Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells in the Nine Township Area ­ 2009 September 2009 Prepared by Delaware Basin Drilling from EPA to DOE dated 7/16/2009) 1 Solution Mining Practices 1 Recent Well Failures 2 The Mechanism

2

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

3

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

4

Cerro Prieto cold water injection: effects on nearby production wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reservoir wells close to injection well E-6 along with theMeeting. Most of the injection wells are open to the Alphaand completing new injection wells is lower than in the East

Truesdell, A.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

6

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

7

GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

John K. Godwin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Boise geothermal injection well: Final environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Boise, Idaho, an Idaho Municipal Corporation, is proposing to construct a well with which to inject spent geothermal water from its hot water heating system back into the geothermal aquifer. Because of a cooperative agreement between the City and the US Department of Energy to design and construct the proposed well, compliance to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is required. Therefore, this Environmental Assessment (EA) represents the analysis of the proposed project required under NEPA. The intent of this EA is to: (1) briefly describe historical uses of the Boise Geothermal Aquifer; (2) discuss the underlying reason for the proposed action; (3) describe alternatives considered, including the No Action Alternative and the Preferred Alternative; and (4) present potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and the analysis of those impacts as they apply to the respective alternatives.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 Production...

10

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year... 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production...

11

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 Production (million...

12

Non-isothermal CO2 flow through an injection well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-isothermal CO2 flow through an injection well Orlando SilvaOrlando Silva #12; The Problem CO2 or gas injection well Questions Injection of scCO2 vs. gaseous CO2. Other relevant examples: - gas and therefore the CO2 injection rate. caprock reservoir geothermal gradient hydrostatic gradient well CO2 bubble

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

13

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

14

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

15

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

16

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

17

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

18

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

19

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

20

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

22

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

23

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

24

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

25

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

26

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

27

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

28

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

29

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

30

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

31

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

32

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

33

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

34

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

35

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

36

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

37

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

38

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

39

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

40

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

42

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................

43

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 241,776 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 From Oil Wells.................................................. 60,444 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 Total................................................................... 302,220 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 Wet After Lease Separation................................

44

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

45

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 98,551 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6,574 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 Total................................................................... 105,125 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 105,125 100,107 103,158

46

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

47

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

48

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

49

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

50

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

51

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

52

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

53

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

54

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

55

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

56

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

57

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

58

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

59

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

60

Completion report: Raft River Geothermal Injection Well Six (RRGI-6)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Raft River Geothermal Injection Well Six (RRGI-6) is an intermediate-depth injection well designed to accept injection water in the 600 to 1000 m (2000 to 3500 ft) depth range. It has one barefoot leg, and it was drilled so that additional legs can be added later; if there are problems with intermediate-depth injection, one or more additional legs could be directionally drilled from the current well bore. Included are the reports of daily drilling records of drill bits, casings, and loggings, and descriptions of cementing, coring, and containment.

Miller, L.G.; Prestwich, S.M.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modeling Single Well Injection-Withdrawal (SWIW) Tests for Characterization of Complex Fracture-Matrix Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not just near the injection well. Note that because thisConcentrations at the injection well increase during thethe fractures away from the injection well is fast, solutes

Cotte, F.P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

63

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

64

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

65

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

66

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

67

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

68

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

69

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

70

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

71

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

72

Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for monitoring and controlling the injection rate of fluid by an injection well of an in-situ remediation system for treating a contaminated groundwater plume. The well is fitted with a gated insert, substantially coaxial with the injection well. A plurality of openings, some or all of which are equipped with fluid flow sensors and gates, are spaced along the insert. The gates and sensors are connected to a surface controller. The insert may extend throughout part of, or substantially the entire length of the injection well. Alternatively, the insert may comprise one or more movable modules which can be positioned wherever desired along the well. The gates are opened part-way at the start of treatment. The sensors monitor and display the flow rate of fluid passing through each opening on a controller. As treatment continues, the gates are opened to increase flow in regions of lesser flow, and closed to decrease flow in regions of greater flow, thereby approximately equalizing the amount of fluid reaching each part of the plume.

Corey, John C. (212 Lakeside Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for monitoring and controlling the injection rate of fluid by an injection well of an in-situ remediation system for treating a contaminated groundwater plume. The well is fitted with a gated insert, substantially coaxial with the injection well. A plurality of openings, some or all of which are equipped with fluid flow sensors and gates, are spaced along the insert. The gates and sensors are connected to a surface controller. The insert may extend throughout part of, or substantially the entire length of the injection well. Alternatively, the insert may comprise one or more movable modules which can be positioned wherever desired along the well. The gates are opened part-way at the start of treatment. The sensors monitor and display the flow rate of fluid passing through each opening on a controller. As treatment continues, the gates are opened to increase flow in regions of lesser flow, and closed to decrease flow in regions of greater flow, thereby approximately equalizing the amount of fluid reaching each part of the plume.

Corey, J.C.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

74

Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a system for monitoring and controlling the rate of fluid flow from an injection well used for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Corey, J.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Cerro Prieto cold water injection: effects on nearby production wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The liquid-dominated Cerro Prieto geothermal field of northern Baja California, Mexico has been under commercial exploitation since 1973. During the early years of operation, all waste brines were sent to an evaporation pond built west of the production area. In 1989, cooled pond brines began to be successfully injected into the reservoir along the western boundary of the geothermal system. The injection rate varied over the years, and is at present about 20% of the total fluid extracted. As expected under the continental desert conditions prevailing in the area, the temperature and salinity of the pond brines change with the seasons, being higher during the summer and lower during the winter. The chemistry of pond brines is also affected by precipitation of silica, oxidation of H{sub 2}S and reaction with airborne clays. Several production wells in the western part of the field (CP-I area) showed beneficial effects from injection. The chemical (chloride, isotopic) and physical (enthalpy, flow rate) changes observed in producers close to the injectors are reviewed. Some wells showed steam flow increases, in others steam flow decline rates flattened. Because of their higher density, injected brines migrated downward in the reservoir and showed up in deep wells.

Truesdell, A.H.; Lippmann, M.J.; De Leon, J.; Rodriguez, M.H.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

77

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

78

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

79

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

80

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

82

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

83

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

84

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

85

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

86

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

87

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

88

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

89

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

90

Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production  

SciTech Connect

Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

91

The feasibility of deep well injection for brine disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A generalized methodology for evaluating the technical feasibility of projects involving the disposal of waste brine by injection into deep saline aquifers is developed, primarily from the hydrology and petroleum engineering literature. Data collection, groundwater modeling, and fluid compatibility are discussed in detail. Injection system design, economics, and regulatory considerations are more related to economic than technical feasibility, and are discussed only as they relate to technical feasibility. The methodology is utilized to make a preliminary evaluation of a proposed brine injection project in the Dove Creek area of King and Stonewall Counties, North Central Texas. Four known deep aquifers are modeled, using the SWIFT/486 software, to determine their ability to receive two cfs of brine for a project life of one hundred years. Two aquifers, the Strawn and EUenburger Formations, are predicted to be acceptable for disposal. Each aquifer would require only one disposal well which is favorable for the economics of the project. Additional data, particularly hydraulic conductivity and net aquifer thickness data, are required to make a more definitive technical feasibility determination for this project.

Spongberg, Martin Edward

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Analysis of thermally induced permeability enhancement in geothermal injection wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reinjection of spent geothermal brine is a common means of disposing of geothermal effluents and maintaining reservoir pressures. Contrary to the predictions of two-fluid models (two-viscosity) of nonisothermal injection, an increase of injectivity, with continued injection, is often observed. Injectivity enhancement and thermally-affected pressure transients are particularly apparent in short-term injection tests at the Los Azufres Geothermal Field, Mexico. During an injection test, it is not uncommon to observe that after an initial pressure increase, the pressure decreases with time. As this typically occurs far below the pressure at which hydraulic fracturing is expected, some other mechanism for increasing the near-bore permeability must explain the observed behavior. This paper focuses on calculating the magnitude of the nearbore permeability changes observed in several nonisothermal injection tests conducted at the Los Azufres Geothermal Field.

Benson, S.M.; Daggett, J.S.; Iglesias, E.; Arellano, V.; Ortiz-Ramirez, J.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Collection and analyses of physical data for deep injection wells in Florida.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Deep injection wells (DIW) in Florida are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the state of Florida through the Underground Injection Control (more)

Gao, Jie.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Single Well Injection Withdrawl Tracer Tests for Proppant ...  

A large question preventing optimal natural gas production from "hydrofracked" shales is how far proppants, injected to keep shale fractures open, ...

95

Study Reveals Fuel Injection Timing Impact on Particle Number...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In an ongoing quest to meet ever-more-rigorous fuel economy and emissions requirements, vehicle manufacturers are increasingly turning to gasoline direct injection (GDI) coupled...

96

A Simulator for Design & Management of Injection Well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or Hydraulically Fractured Wells Waterflooding and Surface Facilities Design · Performance Prediction of Vertical

Texas at Austin, University of

97

Current injection efficiency of InGaAsN quantum-well lasers Nelson Tansua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current injection efficiency of InGaAsN quantum-well lasers Nelson Tansua Department of Electrical-threshold current injection efficiency of quantum well QW lasers is clarified. The analysis presented here is applied to the current injection efficiency of 1200 nm emitting InGaAs and 1300 nm emitting InGaAsN QW

Gilchrist, James F.

98

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems Experiment Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology...

99

Electron Injection at High Mach Number Quasi-Perpendicular Shocks : Surfing and Drift Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electron injection process at high Mach number collisionless quasi-perpendicular shock waves is investigated by means of one-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations. We find that energetic electrons are generated through the following two steps: (1) electrons are accelerated nearly perpendicular to the local magnetic field by shock surfing acceleration at the leading edge of the shock transition region. (2) the preaccelerated electrons are further accelerated by shock drift acceleration. As a result, energetic electrons are preferentially reflected back to the upstream. Shock surfing acceleration provides sufficient energy required for the reflection. Therefore, it is important not only for the energization process by itself, but also for triggering the secondary acceleration process. We also present a theoretical model of the two-step acceleration mechanism based on the simulation results, which can predict the injection efficiency for subsequent diffusive shock acceleration process. We show that the injection efficiency obtained by the present model agrees well with the value obtained by Chandra X-ray observations of SN 1006. At typical supernova remnant shocks, energetic electrons injected by the present mechanism can self-generate upstream Alfven waves, which scatter the energetic electrons themselves.

T. Amano; M. Hoshino

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

100

A study on chemical interactions between waste fluid, formation water, and host rock during deep well injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the vicinity of an injection well that had been in operationaway from the injection well. This modeling work iswithin 200 m of an injection well that had been in operation

Spycher, Nicolas; Larkin, Randy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin February 17, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon sequestration technologies nationwide, has begun drilling the injection well for their large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute

102

Numerical simulation study of silica and calcite dissolution around a geothermal well by injecting high pH solutions with chelating agent.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transport modeling of injection well scaling and acidizingto a field geothermal injection well system, to investigateespecially near the injection well. CALCITE DISSOLUTION

Xu, Tianfu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

104

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

105

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

106

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

107

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems Experiment Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems Experiment Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field is a large, high temperature system located in California on the western edge of the Basin and Range province. Well 46A-19RD, located in the southwestern portion of this field is currently the focus of a DOE-funded Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) project. Petrologic and petrographic investigations of the well show that quartz diorite and granodiorite are dominant lithologies. Dikes of granophyre, containing phenocrysts of plagioclase, potassium feldspar, and

108

A study of the spray injection Reynolds number effects on gasoline yields of an FCC riser reactor  

SciTech Connect

A computational analysis of the combined effects of feed oil injection parameters in a commercial-scale fluidized catalytic cracking riser reactor was performed using a three-phase, multiple species kinetic cracking computer code. The analysis showed that the injection operating parameters (droplet diameter and injection velocity) had strong impacts on the gasoline yields of the FCC unit. A spray injection Reynolds number combining the two parameters was defined. A correlation between the spray injection Reynolds number and the gasoline product yields for various feed injection conditions was developed. A range of spray injection Reynolds number for the maximum gasoline yield was identified.

Bowman, B. J.; Zhou, C. Q.; Chang, S. L.; Lottes, S. A.

2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

109

NETL: News Release - Frio Formation Test Well Injected With Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19, 2004 19, 2004 Frio Formation Test Well Injected With Carbon Dioxide Researchers Perform Small Scale, Short Term Carbon Sequestration Field Test HOUSTON, TX - In the first U.S. field test to investigate the ability of brine formations to store greenhouse gasses, researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy are closely monitoring 1,600 tons of carbon dioxide that were injected into a mile-deep well in Texas in October. The test is providing unique data to help investigators understand the viability of geologic sequestration as a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The Frio Brine Pilot experimental site is 30 miles northeast of Houston, in the South Liberty oilfield. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology drilled a 5,753 foot injection well earlier this year, and developed a nearby observation well to study the ability of the high-porosity Frio sandstone formation to store carbon dioxide.

110

Optical injection and coherent control of a ballistic charge current in GaAsAlGaAs quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical injection and coherent control of a ballistic charge current in GaAs?AlGaAs quantum wells of Hache´ et al.,2,3 but in this article we report injection into the plane of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells specific to quantum wells. Although we expect the underlying physics of injection and control of currents

Sipe,J. E.

111

Evaluation of injection well risk management potential in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

The UIC regulations promulgated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) provide the EPA, or an EPA approved state agency, with authority to regulate subsurface injection of fluids to protect USDWs. Oil and gas producing industry interests are concerned primarily with Class 2 wells whose uses as defined by UIC regulations are: disposal of fluids brought to the surface and liquids generated in connection with oil and gas production (SWD); injection of fluids for enhanced oil recovery (EOR); and storage of liquid hydrocarbons. The Williston Basin was chosen for the pilot study of the feasibility of using the risk approach in managing Class 2 injection operations for the following reasons: it is one of the nine geologic basins which was classified as having a significant potential for external casing corrosion, which permitted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the injection well corrosion control measures used by industry; there are 731 active, 22 shut in and 203 temporarily abandoned SWD and water injection wells in the basin; and the basin covers three states. The broad objective of the Williston Basin study is to define requirements and to investigate the feasibility of incorporating risk management into administration of the UIC program. The study does not address the reporting aspects of UIC regulatory and compliance activities but the data base does contain essentially all the information required to develop the reports needed to monitor those activities. 16 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas...

113

Underground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies & Practicality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environments and are very salty, like the Marcellus shale and other oil and gas formations underlying the areaUnderground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies), Region 3. Marcellus Shale Educational Webinar, February 18, 2010 (Answers provide below by Karen Johnson

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

114

Current injection efficiency induced efficiency-droop in InGaN quantum well light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current injection efficiency induced efficiency-droop in InGaN quantum well light-emitting diodes]. The detail of the model for current injection model for quantum well heterostructure is described in Ref. [18 Keywords: III-Nitride InGaN QWs Light-emitting diodes Efficiency-droop a b s t r a c t Current injection

Gilchrist, James F.

115

Study Reveals Fuel Injection Timing Impact on Particle Number Emissions (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Start of injection can improve environmental performance of fuel-efficient gasoline direct injection engines.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 ...

117

File:05HIADrillingAndModificationOfWellsForInjectionUsePermit (1).pdf |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIADrillingAndModificationOfWellsForInjectionUsePermit (1).pdf HIADrillingAndModificationOfWellsForInjectionUsePermit (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:05HIADrillingAndModificationOfWellsForInjectionUsePermit (1).pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 33 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 13:55, 12 July 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:55, 12 July 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (33 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 13:12, 24 July 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 13:12, 24 July 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (26 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

118

Effects of Gasoline Direct Injection Engine Operating Parameters on Particle Number Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A single-cylinder, wall-guided, spark ignition direct injection engine was used to study the impact of engine operating parameters on engine-out particle number (PN) emissions. Experiments were conducted with certification gasoline and a splash blend of 20% fuel grade ethanol in gasoline (E20), at four steady-state engine operating conditions. Independent engine control parameter sweeps were conducted including start of injection, injection pressure, spark timing, exhaust cam phasing, intake cam phasing, and air-fuel ratio. The results show that fuel injection timing is the dominant factor impacting PN emissions from this wall-guided gasoline direct injection engine. The major factor causing high PN emissions is fuel liquid impingement on the piston bowl. By avoiding fuel impingement, more than an order of magnitude reduction in PN emission was observed. Increasing fuel injection pressure reduces PN emissions because of smaller fuel droplet size and faster fuel-air mixing. PN emissions are insensitive to cam phasing and spark timing, especially at high engine load. Cold engine conditions produce higher PN emissions than hot engine conditions due to slower fuel vaporization and thus less fuel-air homogeneity during the combustion process. E20 produces lower PN emissions at low and medium loads if fuel liquid impingement on piston bowl is avoided. At high load or if there is fuel liquid impingement on piston bowl and/or cylinder wall, E20 tends to produce higher PN emissions. This is probably a function of the higher heat of vaporization of ethanol, which slows the vaporization of other fuel components from surfaces and may create local fuel-rich combustion or even pool-fires.

He, X.; Ratcliff, M. A.; Zigler, B. T.

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

119

Method for cutting steam heat losses during cyclic steam injection of wells. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Heavy Oil is abundant in California. It is a very viscous fluid, which must be thinned in order to flow from wells at economical rates. The best method of oil viscosity reduction is by cyclic steam injection into the oil-containing rock formations. Making steam in conventional generators fueled with Natural Gas is, however, a costly process. The main objective of this Project is to reduce the cost of the required steam, per Barrel of Oil produced. This is made possible by a combination of Patented new technologies with several known methods. The best known method for increasing the production rate from oil wells is to use horizontal drainholes, which provide a much greater flow area from the oil zone into the well. A recent statistic based on 344 horizontal wells in 21 Canadian Oil fields containing Heavy Oil shows that these are, on the average six times more prolific than vertical wells. The cost of horizontal wells, however, is generally two to three times that of a vertical well, in the same field, so our second goal is to reduce the net cost of horizontal wells by connecting two of them to the same vertical casing, well head and pumping system. With such a well configuration, it is possible to get two horizontal wells for the price of about one and a half times the price of a single vertical well.

Gondouin, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Grant Title: WELLS FARGO GRANT PROGRAM Funding Opportunity Number: N/A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grant Title: WELLS FARGO GRANT PROGRAM Funding Opportunity Number: N/A Agency/Department: Wells: Organizations with tax-exempt status under Section 501(c)(3) of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code, as well as qualified tribal and governmental agencies, including public school systems. Summary: Wells Fargo makes

Farritor, Shane

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Matched boundary extrapolation solutions for CO2 well injection into a saline aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interfacesolutionforcarbondioxideinjection intoInterface Solutionfor Carbon Dioxide Injection intoIPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and

Houseworth, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Service Identification in TCP/IP: Well-Known versus Random Port Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sixteen-bit well-known port number is often overlooked as a network identifier in Internet communications. Its purpose at the most fundamental level is only to demultiplex flows of traffic. Several unintended uses of ...

Masiello, Elizabeth

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

123

U.S. Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov ... Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and ...

124

Summary report: Assessment of deep injection well associated surface soils at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes sampling activities and analytical results of the chemical and radiological content of surface soils from storm water retention basins and drainage ditches associated with eight deep injection wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The results of the sampling effort were intended to support permitting of the injection wells by the State of Idaho Department of Water Resources. In August 1992, the surface soils associated with eight storm water retention basins and ditches were sampled. All samples were collected and analyzed in accordance with a written sampling and analysis plan. The samples were analyzed by an off-Site contract laboratory, and the results were compared to local and regional soil analytical data to determine the presence of contaminants. The results indicated that the surface soils from the storm water retention basins and ditches did not have concentrations of metals or radionuclides greater than the range of concentrations found in local and regional soils. Volatile organic compounds were below detection limits.

Pole, S.B.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Method for cutting steam heat losses during cyclic steam injection of wells. Second quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

The Midway-Sunset Field (CA) is the largest Heavy Oil field in California and steam injection methods have been successfully used for more than 30 years to produce the Heavy Oil from many of its unconsolidated sand reservoirs. In partnership with another DOE/ERIP grantee, our Company has acquired an 80 ac. lease in the SE part of this field, in order to demonstrate our respective technologies in the Monarch sand, of Miocene Age, which is one of the reservoirs targeted by the DOE Class 3 Oil Program. This reservoir contains a 13 API oil, which has a much higher market value, as a Refinery Feedstock, than the 5 to 8 API Vaca Tar, used only as road paving material. This makes it easier to justify the required investment in a vertical well equipped with two horizontal drainholes. The economic viability of such a project is likely to be enhanced if Congress approves the export to Japan of a portion of the 27 API (1% Sulfur) AK North Slope oil, which currently is landed in California in preference to lighter and sweeter Far East imported crudes. This is a major cause of the depressed prices for California Heavy Oil in local refineries, which have reduced the economic viability of all EOR methods, including steam injection, in California. Two proposals, for a Near-Term (3 y.) and for a Mid-Term (6 y.) project respectively, were jointly submitted to the DOE for Field Demonstration of the Partners` new technologies under the DOE Class 3 Oil Program. The previous design of a special casing joint for the Oxnard field well was reviewed and adapted to the use of existing Downhole Hardware components from three suppliers, instead of one. The cost of drilling and completion of a well equipped with two horizontal drainholes was re-evaluated for the conditions prevailing in the Midway Sunset field, which are more favorable than in the Oxnard field, leading to considerable reductions in drilling rig time and cost.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Characterization of injection wells in a fractured reservoir using PTS logs, Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada, about 15 km south of Reno, is a shallow (150m to 825m) moderate temperature (155 C to 168 C) liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir situated in highly-fractured granodiorite. Three injection wells were drilled and completed in granodiorite to dispose of spent geothermal fluids from the Steamboat II and III power plants (a 30 MW air-cooled binary-type facility). Injection wells were targeted to depths below 300m to inject spent fluids below producing fractures. First, quasi-static downhole pressure-temperature-spinner (PTS) logs were obtained. Then, the three wells were injection-tested using fluids between 80 C and 106 C at rates from 70 kg/s to 200 kg/s. PTS logs were run both up and down the wells during these injection tests. These PTS surveys have delineated the subsurface fracture zones which will accept fluid. The relative injectivity of the wells was also established. Shut-in interzonal flow within the wells was identified and characterized.

Goranson, Colin; Combs, Jim

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

127

Predicting the rate by which suspended solids plug geothermal injection wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Standard membrane filtration tests were used to evaluate injection at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Southern California. Results indicate that direct injection into reservoir zones with primary porosity is not feasible unless 1 ..mu..m or larger particulates formed during or after the energy conversion process are removed. (JGB)

Owens, L.B.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Netherton, R.; Thorson, L.

1978-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

128

Modeling Single Well Injection-Withdrawal (SWIW) Tests for Characterization of Complex Fracture-Matrix Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to reliably predict flow and transport in fractured porous rock is an essential condition for performance evaluation of geologic (underground) nuclear waste repositories. In this report, a suite of programs (TRIPOLY code) for calculating and analyzing flow and transport in two-dimensional fracture-matrix systems is used to model single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests. The SWIW test, a tracer test using one well, is proposed as a useful means of collecting data for site characterization, as well as estimating parameters relevant to tracer diffusion and sorption. After some specific code adaptations, we numerically generated a complex fracture-matrix system for computation of steady-state flow and tracer advection and dispersion in the fracture network, along with solute exchange processes between the fractures and the porous matrix. We then conducted simulations for a hypothetical but workable SWIW test design and completed parameter sensitivity studies on three physical parameters of the rock matrix - namely porosity, diffusion coefficient, and retardation coefficient - in order to investigate their impact on the fracture-matrix solute exchange process. Hydraulic fracturing, or hydrofracking, is also modeled in this study, in two different ways: (1) by increasing the hydraulic aperture for flow in existing fractures and (2) by adding a new set of fractures to the field. The results of all these different tests are analyzed by studying the population of matrix blocks, the tracer spatial distribution, and the breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained, while performing mass-balance checks and being careful to avoid some numerical mistakes that could occur. This study clearly demonstrates the importance of matrix effects in the solute transport process, with the sensitivity studies illustrating the increased importance of the matrix in providing a retardation mechanism for radionuclides as matrix porosity, diffusion coefficient, or retardation coefficient increase. Interestingly, model results before and after hydrofracking are insensitive to adding more fractures, while slightly more sensitive to aperture increase, making SWIW tests a possible means of discriminating between these two potential hydrofracking effects. Finally, we investigate the possibility of inferring relevant information regarding the fracture-matrix system physical parameters from the BTCs obtained during SWIW testing.

Cotte, F.P.; Doughty, C.; Birkholzer, J.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Estimation of CO2 injection well requirements into saline aquifers for pre-feasibility CCS economics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sub-surface saline aquifers are candidates as CO2 injection sites because they could have significant storage potential. One of the long-standing issues in assessing such storage (more)

Bukhteeva, Olga

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A study of production/injection data from slim holes and production wells at the Oguni Geothermal Field, Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production and injection data from slim holes and large-diameter wells at the Oguni Geothermal Field, Japan, were examined in an effort to establish relationships (1) between productivity of large-diameter wells and slim holes, (2) between injectivity and productivity indices and (3) between productivity index and borehole diameter. The production data from Oguni boreholes imply that the mass production from large-diameter wells may be estimated based on data from slim holes. Test data from both large- and small-diameter boreholes indicate that to first order the productivity and the injectivity indices are equal. Somewhat surprisingly, the productivity index was found to be a strong function of borehole diameter; the cause for this phenomenon is not understood at this time.

Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Abe, M.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

All-optical injection and control of spin and electrical currents in quantum wells Ali Najmaie, R. D. R. Bhat, and J. E. Sipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All-optical injection and control of spin and electrical currents in quantum wells Ali Najmaie, R of the injected carriers. This degeneracy is lifted in a quantum well semiconductor structure due to confinement injection of electrical and spin currents in the plane of a GaAs quantum well and its control through

Sipe,J. E.

132

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

SciTech Connect

Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report documents the activities undertaken to close Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 was closed in accordance with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the injection well to^ production wells along high conductivity fractures. A powerful method for investigat- ing fields typically choose a configuration for injection wells after a number of development wells have of cooler injected fluids at producing wells. The goal of the current #12;- 10 - work is to provide

Stanford University

135

Temperature histories in geothermal wells: survey of rock thermomechanical properties and drilling, production, and injection case studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal and mechanical properties for geothermal formations are tabulated for a range of temperatures and stress conditions. Data was obtained from the technical literature and direct contacts with industry. Thermal properties include heat capacity, conductivity, and diffusivity. Undisturbed geothermal profiles are also presented. Mechanical properties include Youngs modulus and Poisson ratio. GEOTEMP thermal simulations of drilling, production and injection are reported for two geothermal regions, the hot dry rock area near Los Alamos and the East Mesa field in the Imperial Valley. Actual drilling, production, and injection histories are simulated. Results are documented in the form of printed GEOTEMP output and plots of temperatures versus depth, radius, and time. Discussion and interpretation of the results are presented for drilling and well completion design to determine: wellbore temperatures during drilling as a function of depth; bit temperatures over the drilling history; cement temperatures from setting to the end of drilling; and casing and formation temperatures during drilling, production, and injection.

Goodman, M.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Measuring resistivity changes from within a first cased well to monitor fluids injected into oil bearing geological formations from a second cased well while passing electrical current between the two cased wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A.C. current is conducted through geological formations separating two cased wells in an oil field undergoing enhanced oil recovery operations such as water flooding operations. Methods and apparatus are disclosed to measure the current leakage conducted into a geological formation from within a first cased well that is responsive to fluids injected into formation from a second cased well during the enhanced oil production activities. The current leakage and apparent resistivity measured within the first cased well are responsive to fluids injected into formation from the second cased well provided the distance of separation between the two cased wells is less than, or on the order of, a Characteristic Length appropriate for the problem.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Measuring resistivity changes from within a first cased well to monitor fluids injected into oil bearing geological formations from a second cased well while passing electrical current between the two cased wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A.C. current is conducted through geological formations separating two cased wells in an oil field undergoing enhanced oil recovery operations such as water flooding operations. Methods and apparatus are disclosed to measure the current leakage conducted into a geological formation from within a first cased well that is responsive to fluids injected into formation from a second cased well during the enhanced oil production activities. The current leakage and apparent resistivity measured within the first cased well are responsive to fluids injected into formation from the second cased well provided the distance of separation between the two cased wells is less than, or on the order of, a Characteristic Length appropriate for the problem.

Vail, W.B. III.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

138

Protocol for laboratory research on degradation, interaction, and fate of wastes disposed by deep-well injection: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research investigation was to develop a laboratory protocol for use in determining degradation, interaction, and fate of organic wastes disposed in deep subsurface reservoirs via disposal wells. Knowledge of the ultimate fate of deep-well disposed wastes is important because provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) require that by August 1988, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must show that the disposal of specified wastes by deep-well injection is safe to human health and the environment, or the practice must be stopped. The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) developed this protocol primarily by transferring some of its expertise and knowledge of laboratory protocol relevant to improved recovery of petroleum. Phenol, because it is injected into deep, subsurface reservoirs for disposal, was selected for study by the EPA. Phenol is one waste product that has been injected into the Frio formation; therefore, a decision was made to use phenol and sedimentary rock from the Frio formation for a series of laboratory experiments to demonstrate the protocol. This study investigates the adsorption properties of a specific reservoir rock which is representative of porous sedimentary geologic formations used as repositories for hazardous organic wastes. The developed protocol can be used to evaluate mobility, adsorption, and degradation of an organic hazardous waste under simulated subsurface reservoir conditions. 22 refs., 13 figs., 16 tabs.

Collins, A.G.; Crocker, M.E.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Bachaquero-01 reservoir, Venezuela-increasing oil production by switching from cyclic steam injection to steamflooding using horizontal wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bachaquero-01 reservoir of the Lagunillas field is located in the eastern part of the Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela. The field is operated by the national oil company of Venezuela, PDVSA (Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A.). The Bachaquero-01 heavy oil reservoir lies at about 3,000 ft. ss. and contains 7.037 BSTB of 1 1.7 degrees API gravity oil with an in-situ viscosity of 635 cp. Cold production began in 1960, but since 1971 the reservoir was produced under a massive cyclic steam injection system. To-date some 370 cyclic-steam injection welts have produced from the reservoir, yielding a cumulative oil recovery of only about 5.6% of initial oil-in-place. The reservoir pressure has dropped from an initial 1,370 psia to its present value of about 700 psia. Maximum oil production peaked at 45.0 MSTB/D in 1991, and has since continued to decline. To arrest production decline, three horizontal cyclic-steam injection wells were drilled and completed in the reservoir in 1995-1997. The horizontal sections were from 1,280 to 1,560 ft long and were drilled in locations with existing vertical cyclic steam injection welts. Three-dimensional thermal-compositional simulation studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of the three horizontal welts under cyclic steam injection and steamflooding. The Cartesian model dimensions of the three horizontal welts were 11x22x4, 11x27x5, and 12x20x5. In the steamflooding scheme investigated, the existing horizontal welts were used as injectors while existing (and new) vertical welts surrounding the horizontal welts were used as producers. Simulation results indicate oil recovery under cyclic steam injection to be about 15% of initial oil-in-place, compared to about 25% under steamflooding with no new producers, and about 50% under steamflooding with additional producers. The main advantages of steamflooding over cyclic steam injection were in the re-pressurization and improved thermal efficiency for the Bachaquero-01 reservoir. Higher oil recovery with additional wells resulted from improved areal sweep efficiency. Further study is planned to investigate steamflooding for the rest of the reservoir.

Rodriguez, Manuel Gregorio

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the fifth quarter of this project, progress was made concerning four of the stated objectives of the project. First, extensive sensitivity studies, based on reservoir simulation, have been performed on a field example to assess the effects of wellbore friction, inflow, skin, length, and diameter of the well, etc. on the productivity of a horizontal well. Secondly, the authors have launched a new phase of the project on developing models for scale-up and coarse grid pseudo functions for horizontal wells in heterogeneous reservoirs. The available methods have been applied to an example problem and their performance and limitations have been analyzed. Thirdly, the authors are in the process of developing a new analytical solution for the coning and cresting critical rates for horizontal wells. Finally, experimental data bases will be used to test the authors` newly developed general mechanistic model for two-phase flow.

Fayers, F.J.; Aziz, K.; Hewett, T.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Downward two-phase flow effects in heat-loss and pressure-drop modeling of steam injection wells  

SciTech Connect

Modelling of the pressure drop and heat loss in steam injection wells has undergone a gradual evolution since the heavy interest in enhanced oil recovery by steam injection in the mid-60's. After briefly reviewing the evolution of steam models this paper presents a model which advances the state-of-the-art of steam modelling. The main advance presented in this paper is modelling the effects of the various flow regimens that occur during steam injection. The paper describes the formulation of a two-phase downward vertical flow pressure drop model which is not limited by the ''no-slip'' homogeneous flow assumptions in most previously published models. By using different correlations for mist, bubble, and slug flow, improved pressure drop calculations result, which in turn improve temperature predictions. The paper describes how the model handles temperature predictions differently in the single and two-phase steam flow situations. The paper also describes special features in the model to account for layered soil properties, soil dry out, cyclic injection, coupling heat losses, and reflux boiling in wet annuli. Two examples problems are presented which illustrate some of these features.

Galate, J.W.; Mitchell, R.F.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). However, there is one modification to the selected alternative. Due to the large area that would require fencing, it is proposed that instead of fencing, an appropriate number of warning signs attached to tee posts be used to delineate the use restriction area. CAU 335 is located in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 335 is located in the Area 6 Well 3 Yard approximately 39 km (24 mi) north of Mercury, on the Mercury Highway and several hundred feet (ft) west along Road 6-06. CAU 335 consists of the following three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-20-01, Drums, Oil Waste, Spill; CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole; CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit. The site history for CAU 335 is provided in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (DOE/NV, 2000). Briefly, CAS 06-20-01, was used for storing material that was pumped out of CAS 06-20-02 and placed into four 208-liter (L) (55-gall [gal]) drums. The drums were taken to the NTS Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in 1991. CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action required. Any spills associated with CAS 06-20-01 are addressed and considered part of CAS 06-20-02. CAS 06-20-02 was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris for an undetermined amount of time. In 1991, the casing was emptied of its contents, excavated, and backfilled. CAS 06-23-03 was used as a depository for effluent waste from truck-washing activities from 1960-1991.

K. B. Campbell

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Carrier heating in quantum wells under optical and current injection of electron-hole pairs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carrier heating in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells (QWs) under optical interband pumping in the spontaneous-emission mode has been studied. The electron temperature was determined as a function of the pumping intensity. The effect of the electric field on the photoluminescence spectrum was examined. The change in the carrier concentration with the drive current in the spontaneous- and stimulated-emission modes in InGaAsSb/InAlGaAsSb QWs was determined from electroluminescence spectra. The rise in the temperature of hot carriers, which results in the increase in the carrier concentration with the drive current, was roughly estimated.

Vorobjev, L. E., E-mail: LVor@rphf.spbstu.ru; Vinnichenko, M. Ya.; Firsov, D. A.; Zerova, V. L.; Panevin, V. Yu.; Sofronov, A. N.; Thumrongsilapa, P. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University (Russian Federation); Ustinov, V. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University, Research and Education Center for Nanotechnology (Russian Federation); Vasiljev, A. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Shterengas, L.; Kipshidze, G.; Hosoda, T.; Belenky, G. [State University of New York at Stony Brook, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Coal gas openhole completion well effectiveness in the Piceance Basin, Colorado: Preliminary results, South Shale Ridge [number sign]11-15 well  

SciTech Connect

Since 1983, the Deep Coal Seam Project (DCSP) and the Western Cretaceous Coal Seam Project (WCCSP) of the Gas Research institute has funded research efforts in the Piceance and San Juan basins of Colorado and New Mexico to further the knowledge of all facets of commercial coalbed natural gas reservoir development. Because of WCCSP research into openhole completion well effectiveness in the Fruitland play, and the need to complete a successful Cameo coal openhole well, the South Shale Ridge [number sign]11-15 well was deemed to be an excellent chance for technology transfer and evaluation. Because of implementation of carefully designed air mist drilling and controlled openhole completion techniques, along with a sufficient magnitude of cleat permeability, it appears that the [number sign]11-15 well is commercial. The cavity was installed without major problems. The initial gas production test rate of roughly 280 MCFGPD is one of the best in South Shale Ridge. The [number sign]11-15 well case study is quite important in that it may serve to emphasize the point that the conservative attitude towards commercialization of previously untapped petroleum resources is often not correct. It is now an open question as to whether the conventional wisdom that most of the Cameo coal gas play is too tight to enable commercial production is indeed true, or if by analogy with Fruitland openhole wells, Cameo coal wells that have been hydraulic fracture stimulated are commonly very poorly connected to the cleat permeability of the reservoir. There is no significant reason to believe that the South Shale Ridge area is geologically unique, and thus there is a distinct possibility that more widespread Cameo coal production than has been previously recorded can be achieved.

Close, J.C. (Resource Enterprises, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Dowden, D. (Conquest Oil Co., Greeley, CO (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Use of data obtained from core tests in the design and operation of spent brine injection wells in geopressured or geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of formation characteristics on injection well performance are reviewed. Use of data acquired from cores taken from injection horizons to predict injectivity is described. And methods for utilizing data from bench scale testing of brine and core samples to optimize injection well design are presented. Currently available methods and equipment provide data which enable the optimum design of injection wells through analysis of cores taken from injection zones. These methods also provide a means of identifying and correcting well injection problems. Methods described in this report are: bulk density measurement; porosity measurement; pore size distribution analysis; permeability measurement; formation grain size distribution analysis; core description (lithology) and composition; amount, type and distribution of clays and shales; connate water analysis; consolidatability of friable reservoir rocks; grain and pore characterization by scanning electron microscopy; grain and pore characterization by thin section analysis; permeability damage and enhancement tests; distribution of water-borne particles in porous media; and reservoir matrix acidizing effectiveness. The precise methods of obtaining this information are described, and their use in the engineering of injection wells is illustrated by examples, where applicable. (MHR)

Jorda, R.M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Number  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' , /v-i 2 -i 3 -A, This dow'at consists ~f--~-_,_~~~p.~,::, Number -------of.-&--copies, 1 Series.,-a-,-. ! 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 1; r-.' L INTRAMURALCORRESPONDENCE i"ks' 3 2.. September 25, 1947 Memo.tor Dr. A. H, Dovdy . From: Dr. H. E, Stokinger Be: Trip Report - Mayvood Chemical Works A trip vas made Nednesday, August 24th vith Messrs. Robert W ilson and George Sprague to the Mayvood Chemical F!orks, Mayvood, New Jersey one of 2 plants in the U.S.A. engaged in the production of thorium compounds. The purpose of the trip vas to: l 1. Learn the type of chemical processes employed in the thorium industry (thorium nitrate). 2. Survey conditions of eeosure of personnel associated vith these chemical processes. 3. Obtain samples of atmospheric contaminants in the plant, as

147

Underground Injection Control Permit Applications for FutureGen 2.0 Morgan County Class VI UIC Wells 1, 2, 3, and 4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FG-RPT-017 FG-RPT-017 Revision 1 Underground Injection Control Permit Applications for FutureGen 2.0 Morgan County Class VI UIC Wells 1, 2, 3, and 4 SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION March 2013 (Revised May 2013 in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Completeness Review) Acknowledgment: This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FE0001882. Disclaimer: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

148

Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high density of steam injection wells for thermal recovery.kilometres 20 miles Steam-injection wells per km 2 (mi 2 )average number of steam injection well blowouts and blowouts

Benson, Sally M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A study of production/injection data from slim holes and large-diameter wells at the Takigami Geothermal Field, Kyushu, Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production and injection data from nine slim holes and sixteen large-diameter wells at the Takigami Geothermal Field, Kyushu, Japan were analyzed in order to establish relationships (1) between injectivity and productivity indices, (2) between productivity/injectivity index and borehole diameter, and (3) between discharge capacity of slim holes and large-diameter wells. Results are compared with those from the Oguni and Sumikawa fields. A numerical simulator (WELBOR) was used to model the available discharge rate from Takigami boreholes. The results of numerical modeling indicate that the flow rate of large-diameter geothermal production wells with liquid feedzones can be predicted using data from slim holes. These results also indicate the importance of proper well design.

Garg, S.K. [Maxwell Federal Div., Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)] [Maxwell Federal Div., Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Combs, J. [Geo-Hills Associates, Los Altos Hills, CA (United States)] [Geo-Hills Associates, Los Altos Hills, CA (United States); Azawa, Fumio [Idemitsu Kosan Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [Idemitsu Kosan Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Gotoh, Hiroki [Idemitsu Oita Geothermal Co. Ltd., Oita (Japan)] [Idemitsu Oita Geothermal Co. Ltd., Oita (Japan)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Numerical simulation study of silica and calcite dissolution around a geothermal well by injecting high pH solutions with chelating agent.  

SciTech Connect

Dissolution of silica, silicate, and calcite minerals in the presence of a chelating agent (NTA) at a high pH has been successfully performed in the laboratory using a high-temperature flow reactor. The mineral dissolution and porosity enhancement in the laboratory experiment has been reproduced by reactive transport simulation using TOUGHREACT. The chemical stimulation method has been applied by numerical modeling to a field geothermal injection well system, to investigate its effectiveness. Parameters from the quartz monzodiorite unit at the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) site at Desert Peak (Nevada) were used. Results indicate that the injection of a high pH chelating solution results in dissolution of both calcite and plagioclase minerals, and avoids precipitation of calcite at high temperature conditions. Consequently reservoir porosity and permeability can be enhanced especially near the injection well.

Xu, Tianfu; Rose, Peter; Fayer, Scott; Pruess, Karsten

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A CO2 FLOOD UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL INJECTION WELLS IN A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE APPROACHING WATERFLOOD DEPLETION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO{sub 2} horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields. The Unit was a mature waterflood with water cut exceeding 95%. Oil must be mobilized through the use of a miscible or near-miscible fluid to recover significant additional reserves. Also, because the unit was relatively small, it did not have the benefit of economies of scale inherent in normal larger scale projects. Thus, new and innovative methods were required to reduce investment and operating costs. Two primary methods used to accomplish improved economics were use of reservoir characterization to restrict the flood to the higher quality rock in the unit and use of horizontal injection wells to cut investment and operating costs. The project consisted of two budget phases. Budget Phase I started in June 1994 and ended late June 1996. In this phase Reservoir Analysis, Characterization Tasks and Advanced Technology Definition Tasks were completed. Completion enabled the project to be designed, evaluated, and an Authority for Expenditure (AFE) for project implementation submitted to working interest owners for approval. Budget Phase II consisted of the implementation and execution of the project in the field. Phase II was completed in July 2001. Performance monitoring, during Phase II, by mid 1998 identified the majority of producing wells which under performed their anticipated withdrawal rates. Newly drilled and re-activated wells had lower offtake rates than originally forecasted. As a result of poor offtake, higher reservoir pressure was a concern for the project as it limited CO{sub 2} injectivity. To reduce voidage balance, and reservoir pressure, a disposal well was therefore drilled. Several injection surveys indicated the CO{sub 2} injection wells had severe conformance issues. After close monitoring of the project to the end of 1999, it was evident the project would not recover the anticipated tertiary reserves. The main reasons for under-performance were poor in zone CO{sub 2} injection into the upper San Andres layers, poorer offtake rates from newly drilled replacement wells and a higher than required reservoir pressure. After discussion internally within Phillips, externally with the Department of Energy (DOE) and SCU partners, a redevelopment of South Cowden was agreed upon to commence in year 2000. The redevelopment essentially abandoned the original development for Budget Phase II in favor of a revised approach. This involved conformance techniques to resolve out of zone CO{sub 2} injection and use of horizontal wells to improve in zone injectivity and productivity. A phased approach was used to ensure short radius lateral drilling could be implemented effectively at South Cowden. This involved monitoring drilling operations and then production response to determine if larger investments during the second phase were justified. Redevelopment Phase 1 was completed in May 2000. It was deemed a success in regard to finding suitable/cost-effective technology for drilling horizontal laterals and finding a technique that could sustain long-term productivity from the upper layers of the San Andres reservoir. Four existing vertical producing wells were isolated from their existing completions and sidetracked with horizontal laterals into the upper layers of the San Andres. Overall average offtake rates for the four wells increased by a factor of 12 during the first four months after completion of Phase 1. Phase 2 of the redevelopment focused on current CO{sub 2} vertical injection wells. Techniques were applied to resolve near well conformance concerns and then either single or dual laterals were dril

K.J. Harpole; Ed G. Durrett; Susan Snow; J.S. Bles; Carlon Robertson; C.D. Caldwell; D.J. Harms; R.L. King; B.A. Baldwin; D. Wegener; M. Navarrette

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A study on chemical interactions between waste fluid, formation water, and host rock during deep well injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the area. While drilling NDW-1, fluid samples were collectedorigin of the fluid collected while drilling the new well

Spycher, Nicolas; Larkin, Randy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO2) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO2 horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields.

Wier, Don R. Chimanhusky, John S.; Czirr, Kirk L.; Hallenbeck, Larry; Gerard, Matthew G.; Dollens, Kim B.; Owen, Rex; Gaddis, Maurice; Moshell, M.K.

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

154

Property:NbrInjWells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name NbrInjWells Property Type Number Description Number of Injection Wells (total). Pages using the property "NbrInjWells" Showing 5 pages using this property. B...

155

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and depths in the area associated with the Mud Plant. (4) CAS 03-20-05 contains TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination within the injection well casing soil and TPH-DRO contamination at the depth coincidental with the bottom of the injection well sump. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the corrective action investigation, review of future and current operations in Areas 1 and 3 of the Nevada Test Site, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the following corrective actions are recommended for the Corrective Action Unit 322 CASs. Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred corrective action for the following CASs: (1) CAS 01-25-01, removal of TPH-DRO contamination would pose a significant safety hazard due to the site location. (2) CAS 03-25-03 No contamination remains at Area A (AST Berm); and thus, no further action is the preferred alternative at this part of the CAS. However at Area B, TPH-DRO contamination is varied in concentration and location and the footprint of the CAS is large, removal of contaminated ''pockets'' would be laborious and cost prohibitive. The plutonium-239 surface contamination identified at CAS 03-25-03 Area B has been removed and drummed as a best management practice. (3) CAS 03-20-05, TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination are present in the injection well casing soils. Recommend corrective action includes removal of the liquid in the injection well sump (approximately 3 feet (ft) of liquid at 60 ft below ground surface), grouting the sump, and the area within the injection well casing.

Robert Boehlecke

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 219 is located in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

David A. Strand

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and depths in the area associated with the Mud Plant. (4) CAS 03-20-05 contains TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination within the injection well casing soil and TPH-DRO contamination at the depth coincidental with the bottom of the injection well sump. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the corrective action investigation, review of future and current operations in Areas 1 and 3 of the Nevada Test Site, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the following corrective actions are recommended for the Corrective Action Unit 322 CASs. Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred corrective action for the following CASs: (1) CAS 01-25-01, removal of TPH-DRO contamination would pose a significant safety hazard due to the site location. (2) CAS 03-25-03 No contamination remains at Area A (AST Berm); and thus, no further action is the preferred alternative at this part of the CAS. However at Area B, TPH-DRO contamination is varied in concentration and location and the footprint of the CAS is large, removal of contaminated ''pockets'' would be laborious and cost prohibitive. The plutonium-239 surface contamination identified at CAS 03-25-03 Area B has been removed and drummed as a best management practice. (3) CAS 03-20-05, TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination are present in the injection well casing soils. Recommend corrective action includes removal of the liquid in the injection well sump (approximately 3 feet (ft) of liquid at 60 ft below ground surface), grouting the sump, and the area within the injection well casing. The plutonium-239 surface contamination identified at CAS 03-20-05 has been removed and drummed as a best management practice and will be disposed of as low-level radioactive waste. It is recommended that the liquids be removed from the holding tank wells and the sumps of the two outer holding tanks within the BOP Shop, and the sumps be grouted, and the holding tanks filled in to the BOP Shop floor surface. The preferred corrective action alternatives were ev

Boehlecke, Robert

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Interaction, compatibilities and long-term environmental fate of deep-well-injected EOR fluids and/or waste fluids with reservoir fluids and rocks - state-of-the-art. [206 references  

SciTech Connect

The state-of-the-art of environmental research of injected enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and/or waste fluids is presented with respect to (1) interactions and compatibilities with reservoir fluids and rocks, and (2) their long-term environmental fate. Major environmental impacts associated with EOR are: (1) possible contamination of surface and groundwater, and (2) possible contamination of land. Although the report focuses on EOR fluids, many other liquid wastes also are considered. When EOR chemicals and/or waste fluids are injected into deep wells for oil recovery or disposal, they may pose environmental problems unless the injection process, oil recovery process, or waste disposal process is carefully planned and executed. This report discusses injection waters, water compatibilities, formation rocks with emphasis on clay minerals, corrosion, bacterial problems, EOR operations, waste fluid injection operations, injection well design, radioactive wastes, transport and fate processes, and mathematical models. 206 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Collins, G.; Kayser, M.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 546, Injection Well and Surface Releases, at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is comprised of two corrective action sites (CASs): 06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area 09-20-01, Injection Well The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 546. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from May 5 through May 28, 2008, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2008). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: Determine whether a contaminant of concern is present at a given CAS. Determine whether sufficient information is available to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives at each CAS. The CAU 546 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Because DQO data needs were met, and corrective actions have been implemented, it has been determined that no further corrective action (based on risk to human receptors) is necessary for the CAU 546 CASs. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: No further corrective actions are needed for CAU 546 CASs. No Corrective Action Plan is required. A Notice of Completion to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 546. Corrective Action Unit 546 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels established in this document. No analytes were detected at concentrations exceeding final action levels. However, contaminants of concern were presumed to be present in the subsurface soil at CAS 09-20-01. Therefore, the corrective action of close in place was selected as the preferred alternative for this CAS. Potential source material was removed from CAS 06-23-02; therefore, the corrective action of clean closure was selected as the preferred alternative at this CAS.

Alfred Wickline

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Numerical simulation study of silica and calcite dissolution around a geothermal well by injecting high pH solutions with chelating agent.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thirty-Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO 2geology of the Desert Peak Geothermal Field: A case history,

Xu, Tianfu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Evolution of the deformation state and composition as a result of changes in the number of quantum wells in multilayered InGaN/GaN structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The methods of high-resolution X-ray diffraction have been used to study the multilayered structures in an In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN system grown by the method of metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition. A correlation between the strain state (relaxation) of the system, the indium content within quantum wells, the ratio of the barrier/well thicknesses, and the number of quantum wells in the active superlattice is established. It is shown that partial relaxation is observed even in a structure with one quantum well. The results we obtained indicate that the relaxation processes are bound to appreciably affect the optical characteristics of devices.

Kladko, V. P., E-mail: kladko@isp.kiev.ua; Kuchuk, A. V.; Safriuk, N. V.; Machulin, V. F.; Belyaev, A. E.; Konakova, R. V. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine); Yavich, B. S. [ZAO Svetlana-Optoelectronics (Russian Federation); Ber, B. Ya.; Kazantsev, D. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Preliminary test results and geology of the DOE/Superior Hulin. number sign. 1 geopressured-geothermal well, Vermillion Parish, Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE/Superior Hulin {number sign}1 well is the most recent of the current three geopressured-geothermal prospects being tested by the Department of Energy (DOE) under its geopressured-geothermal program initiated in 1975. The other prospects under evaluation are Gladys McCall {number sign}1 (Cameron Parish, LA) and Pleasant Bayou {number sign}2 (Brazoria County, TX). The main objective of this research program is to evaluate the commercial viability of energy production from high temperature (275{degrees}+F.), geopressured, natural-gas-saturated brine sandstone aquifers occur-ring in the Gulf Coast area. The DOE/Superior Hulin {number sign}1 well is located 7.5 mi (12 km) south of the town of Erath, Louisiana. It was originally drilled and later sidetracked as an exploration well by Superior Oil Company to a depth of 21,549 ft (6,568 m) and completed in 1979. The well produced 0.3 bcf gas in 19 months from the interval between 21,059 and 21,094 ft (6,419-6,429 m). Later, owing to production problems caused by tubing/casing failure, Superior abandoned production and transferred the well to DOE for testing under the geopressured-geothermal program. The well has recently been cleaned and recompleted by Eaton Operating Company, Houston, Texas, and plugged back to 20,725 ft (6,317 m). This well penetrates the deepest known Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal reservoir and has a maximum recorded temperature of 338{degrees}F with a 560 ft (171 m) thick sandstone. Regional geologic work indicates that the Hulin sandstone represents either a submarine canyon or an unstable shelf delta type of environment. The well is presently perforated at the bottom of the sandstone from 20,610 to 20,690 ft (6282-6306 m) for preliminary short-term testing now in progress. Initial testing indicates the gas-brine ratio to be 31 SCF/STB.

John, C.J.; Stevenson, D.A.; Groat, C.G. (Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 219 with no further corrective action beyond the application of a use restriction at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 20 through October 12, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 219 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. A best management practice was implemented at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03, and corrective action was performed at CAS 23-20-01 between January and April 2006. In addition, a use restriction will be applied to CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03 to provide additional protection to Nevada Test Site personnel. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 219 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A Tier 2 evaluation was conducted, and a FAL of 185,000 micrograms per kilogram was calculated for chlordane at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03 based on an occasional use area exposure scenario. This evaluation of chlordane based on the Tier 2 FAL determined that no FALs were exceeded. Therefore, the DQO data needs were met, and it was determined that no corrective action (based on risk to human receptors) is necessary for the site. The following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: (1) The surface soil surrounding the main concrete pad at CAS 23-20-01 contained Aroclor-1254, Aroclor-1260, and chlordane above the FALs. This soil, along with the COCs, was subsequently removed at CAS 23-20-01. (2) The sludge in the concrete box of the catch basin at the large concrete pad at CAS 23-20-01 contained lead and benzo(a)pyrene above the FALs. This contamination was limited to the sludge in the concrete box of the catch basin and did not migrate to the subsurface features beneath it. The contaminated and the concrete box of the catch basin were subsequently recovered at CAS 23-20-01.

David Strand

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Underground Wells (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Class I, III, IV and V injection wells require a permit issued by the Executive Director of the Department of Environmental Quality; Class V injection wells utilized in the remediation of...

165

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 & 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the June 2006, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 & 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: CAS 01-25-01, AST Release CAS 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revison 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the June 2003, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Optimization of Injection Scheduling in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- of wells,and (2) allocating a total speci6cd injection rate among chosen injectors. The alloca- tion is defined as the fieldwide break- through lindex, B. Injection is optimized by choosing injection wells questions: (1) Which wells should be made injectors? (2) How should the total nquired injection rate

Stanford University

168

Yet Another Fault Injection Technique : by Forward Body Biasing Injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expensive fault injection tech- niques, like clock or voltage glitches, are well taken into accountYet Another Fault Injection Technique : by Forward Body Biasing Injection K. TOBICH1,2, P. MAURINE1 Injection, Electromag- netic Attacks, RSA, Chinese Remainder Theorem 1 Introduction Fault injection

169

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil-Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1980. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, a summary of microseismic activity before and during 1980, and a description of the monitoring of a liquid tiltmeter at the test well site are included.

Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Application of Vacancy Injection Gettering to Improve Efficiency of Solar Cells Produced by Millinet Solar: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-417  

SciTech Connect

NREL will apply vacancy injection gettering (VIG) to Millinet solar cells and evaluate the performance improvement produced by this process step. The VIG will be done in conjunction with the formation of a back, Al-alloyed, contact. Millinet Solar will provide NREL with cells having AR coating on the front side and screen-printed Al on the backside, which will be processed in the NREL's optical furnace to perform simultaneous VIG and back contact alloying with deep BSF. These cells will be sent back to Millinet solar for a screen-printed front/side contact mask, followed by a second firing at NREL. Detailed analyses will be performed to determine improvements due to BSF and VIG.

Sopori, B.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Underground Injection Control Rule (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule regulates injection wells, including wells used by generators of hazardous or radioactive wastes, disposal wells within an underground source of drinking water, recovery of geothermal...

172

The consequences of high injected carrier densities on carrier localisation and efficiency droop in InGaN/GaN quantum well structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the concentration of the randomly distributed In atoms on the optical properties of InGaN/GaN quantum wells. On the basis of this comparison of theory with experiment we attribute the reduction in the S- shape temperature dependence to the saturation... , the buffer layer was grown in a Thomas Swan 6x2 metalorganic vapour-phase epitaxy reactor using trimethyl gallium (TMG), silane (SiH4) and ammonia (NH3) as precursors, with hydrogen as the carrier gas. The GaN buffer layer was deposited at 1020 C on a...

Hammersley, S; Watson-Parris, D; Dawson, P; Godfrey, M; Badcock, T; Kappers, M; McAleese, C; Oliver, R; Humphreys, C

2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

173

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1979. Annual report, Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to monitor baseline air and water quality, subsidence, microseismic activity, and noise in the vicinity of Brazoria County geopressured geothermal test wells, Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2, has been underway since March 1978. The initial report on environmental baseline monitoring at the test well contained descriptions of baseline air and water quality, a noise survey, an inventory of microseismic activity, and a discussion of the installation of a liquid tilt meter (Gustavson, 1979). The following report continues the description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, includes an inventory of microseismic activity during 1979 with interpretations of the origin of the events, and discusses the installation and monitoring of a liquid tilt meter at the test well site. In addition, a brief description of flooding at the test site is presented.

Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

-OGP 04 (1) -Predicting Injectivity Decline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- OGP 04 (1) - Predicting Injectivity Decline in Water Injection Wells by Upscaling On-Site Core, resulting in injectivity decline of injection wells. Particles such as biomass, corrosion products, silt on permeability. These data were then processed, upscaled to model injection wells and, finally, history matched

Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

175

EVALUATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES OF URANIUM, THORIUM, AND RADIUM ASSOCIATED WITH PRODUCED FLUIDS, PRECIPITATES, AND SLUDGES FROM OIL, GAS, AND OILFIELD BRINE INJECTION WELLS IN MISSISSIPPI  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are known to be produced as a byproduct of hydrocarbon production in Mississippi. The presence of NORM has resulted in financial losses to the industry and continues to be a liability as the NORM-enriched scales and scale encrusted equipment is typically stored rather than disposed of. Although the NORM problem is well known, there is little publically available data characterizing the hazard. This investigation has produced base line data to fill this informational gap. A total of 329 NORM-related samples were collected with 275 of these samples consisting of brine samples. The samples were derived from 37 oil and gas reservoirs from all major producing areas of the state. The analyses of these data indicate that two isotopes of radium ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) are the ultimate source of the radiation. The radium contained in these co-produced brines is low and so the radiation hazard posed by the brines is also low. Existing regulations dictate the manner in which these salt-enriched brines may be disposed of and proper implementation of the rules will also protect the environment from the brine radiation hazard. Geostatistical analyses of the brine components suggest relationships between the concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra, between the Cl concentration and {sup 226}Ra content, and relationships exist between total dissolved solids, BaSO{sub 4} saturation and concentration of the Cl ion. Principal component analysis points to geological controls on brine chemistry, but the nature of the geologic controls could not be determined. The NORM-enriched barite (BaSO{sub 4}) scales are significantly more radioactive than the brines. Leaching studies suggest that the barite scales, which were thought to be nearly insoluble in the natural environment, can be acted on by soil microorganisms and the enclosed radium can become bioavailable. This result suggests that the landspreading means of scale disposal should be reviewed. This investigation also suggests 23 specific components of best practice which are designed to provide a guide to safe handling of NORM in the hydrocarbon industry. The components of best practice include both worker safety and suggestions to maintain waste isolation from the environment.

Charles Swann; John Matthews; Rick Ericksen; Joel Kuszmaul

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Goethermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equiptment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum production systems, stripping towers for mineral production processes, nuclear waste storage, CO2 sequestration strategies, global warming). Although funding decreases cut short completion of several research activities, we made significant progress on these abbreviated projects.

Nancy Moller Weare

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

177

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 322 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 01-25-01, AST Release (Area 1); 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release (Area 3); 03-20-05, Injection Wells (Area 3). Corrective Action Unit 322 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. The investigation of three CASs in CAU 322 will determine if hazardous and/or radioactive constituents are present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

178

Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of total oil produced incrementally. The abandoned-welltotal number of producing and steam- injection wells California Oiltotal number of P&A wells reported by California Division of Oil,

Jordan, Preston D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Injectivity Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test Injectivity Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Injectivity Test Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Permeability of the well Thermal: Dictionary.png Injectivity Test: A well testing technique conducted upon completion of a well. Water is pumped into the well at a constant rate until a stable pressure is reached then the pump is turned off and the rate at which pressure decreases is measured. The pressure measurements are graphed and well permeability can

180

Design considerations for pump-and-treat remediation based on characterization of industrial injection wells: Lessons learned from the groundwater interim action at the test area north of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a 2,305 km{sup 2} (890 mi{sup 2}) Federal Facility operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The Test Area North (TAN) complex is located approximately 80 km (50 mi) northwest of Idaho Falls in the northern portion of the HSTEL and extends over an area of approximately 30 km{sup 2} (12 mi{sup 2}). The Technical Support Facility (TSF) is centrally located within TAN and consists of several experimental and support facilities for conducting research and development activities on nuclear reactor performance. Operations at TAN were initiated in the early 1950s to support the U.S. Air Force aircraft nuclear propulsion project and have continued over the years with various experimental and testing facilities. The TSF-05 Injection well was used from 1953 to 1972 to dispose of TAN liquid wastes in the fractured basalt of the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was first identified as a groundwater contaminant in 1987 when it was found in the TAN drinking water above acceptable levels. The TAN Groundwater Interim Action at the INEL was intended to provide both interim containment and clean-up of contaminated groundwater resulting from the 40-year old injection well, TSF-05. The primary decontamination objective of the Groundwater Treatment Facility (GWTF) is to remove volatile organic compounds, primarily TCE. A pump-and-treat technology using air stripping, carbon adsorption, and resin ion exchange for strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) was selected in the Operable Unit 1-07A Groundwater Interim Action Record of Decision. Operations started on February 16, 1994 and activities were suspended on January 23, 1995 due to the inability to meet Remedial Action Objectives (RAOs).

Cotten, G.B.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Annual Report, July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The work reported herein covers select tasks remaining in Budget Phase I and many of the tasks of Budget Phase II. The principal Tasks in Budget Phase I included in this report are Reservoir Analysis and Characterization; Advanced Technical Studies; and Technology Transfer, Reporting and Project Management Activities for Budget Phase I. The principle Task in Budget Phase II included in this report is Field Demonstration. Completion of these tasks has enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed, economically evaluated, and implemented in the field. Field implementation of the project commenced during late 1995, with actual CO{sub 2} injection scheduled for start-up in mid-July, 1996. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative CO{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take-or-pay provisions, CO{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price) and gas recycle agreements (expensing costs as opposed to a large upfront capital investment for compression) were negotiated to further improve the project economics. The Grayburg-San Andres section had previously been divided into multiple zones based on the core study and gamma ray markers that correlate wells within the Unit. Each zone was mapped as continuous across the field. Previous core studies concluded that the reservoir quality in the South Cowden Unit (SCU) is controlled primarily by the distribution of a bioturbated and diagenetically-altered rock type with a distinctive {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} texture. The {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} modifier is derived from the visual effect of pervasive, small-scale intermixing of tan oil-stained reservoir rock with tight gray non-reservoir rock.

Chimahusky, J.S.; Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Dollens, K.B.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Injecting Carbon Dioxide into Unconventional Storage Reservoirs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will also be investigated with a targeted CO 2 injection test into a depleted shale gas well. Different reservoir models will be used before, during, and after injection...

183

The Impact of Injection on Seismicity at The Geyses, California Geothermal Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thermoelastic stress on injection well fracturing. SPE38N) LBNL NCSN POWER PLANTS INJECTION WELLS EVENTS LBNLNCSN POWER PLANTS INJECTION WELLS EVENTS Aidlin 11 - LBNL

Majer, Ernest L.; Peterson, John E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

An analytical solution for transient gas flow in a multi-well system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with extraction and injection wells. The transient solutionthe extraction (or injection) well as a line sink (orwill be applied at the injection well. Although (11) and (

Shan, Chao

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Optimization of injection scheduling in geothermal fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study discusses the application of algorithms developed in Operations Research to the optimization of brine reinjection in geothermal fields. The injection optimization problem is broken into two sub-problems: (1) choosing a configuration of injectors from an existing set of wells, and (2) allocating a total specified injection rate among chosen injectors. The allocation problem is solved first. The reservoir is idealized as a network of channels or arcs directly connecting each pair of wells in the field. Each arc in the network is considered to have some potential for thermal breakthrough. This potential is quantified by an arc-specific break-through index, b/sub ij/, based on user-specified parameters from tracer tests, field geometry, and operating considerations. The sum of b/sub ij/-values for all arcs is defined as the fieldwide breakthrough index, B. Injection is optimized by choosing injection wells and rates so as to minimize B subject to constraints on the number of injectors and the total amount of fluid to be produced and reinjected. The study presents four computer programs which employ linear or quadratic programming to solve the allocation problem. In addition, a program is presented which solves the injector configuration problem by a combination of enumeration and quadratic programming. The use of the various programs is demonstrated with reference both to hypothetical data and an actual data set from the Wairakei Geothermal Field in New Zealand.

Lovekin, J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Optimization of Injection Scheduling in Geothermal Fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study discusses the application of algorithms developed in Operations Research to the optimization of brine reinjection in geothermal fields. The injection optimization problem is broken into two sub-problems: (1) choosing a configuration of injectors from an existing set of wells, and (2) allocating a total specified injection rate among chosen injectors. The allocation problem is solved first. The reservoir is idealized as a network of channels or arcs directly connecting each pair of wells in the field. Each arc in the network is considered to have some potential for thermal breakthrough. This potential is quantified by an arc-specific breakthrough index, b{sub ij}, based on user-specified parameters from tracer tests, field geometry, and operating considerations. The sum of b{sub ij}-values for all arcs is defined as the fieldwide breakthrough index, B. Injection is optimized by choosing injection wells and rates so as to minimize B subject to constraints on the number of injectors and the total amount of fluid to be produced and reinjected. The use of the various methods is demonstrated with reference both to hypothetical data and an actual data set from the Wairakei Geothermal Field in New Zealand.

Lovekin, James; Horne, Roland N.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

187

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Injection into a fractured geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed study is made on the movement of the thermal fronts in the fracture and in the porous medium when 100{sup 0}C water is injected into a 300{sup 0}C geothermal reservoir with equally spaced horizontal fractures. Numerical modeling calculations were made for a number of thermal conductivity values, as well as different values of the ratio of fracture and rock medium permeabilities. One important result is an indication that although initially, the thermal front in the fracture moves very fast relative to the front in the porous medium as commonly expected, its speed rapidly decreases. At some distance from the injection well the thermal fronts in the fracture and the porous medium coincide, and from that point they advance together. The implication of this result on the effects of fractures on reinjection into geothermal reservoirs is discussed.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Tsang, C.F.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Epidemiology of HIV Among Injecting and Non-injecting Drug Users: Current Trends and Implications for Interventions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

might inject drugs worldwide [1]. China, the United States,China, the United States, and Russia, the three leading countries for injecting drugChina Russia USA Fig. 1 Number and proportion of HIV infection among injecting drug

Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Stockman, Jamila K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Energy recovery by water injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several analytical and numerical studies that address injection and thermal breakthrough in fractured geothermal reservoirs are described. The results show that excellent thermal sweeps can be achieved in fractured reservoirs, and that premature cold water breakthrough can be avoided if the injection wells are appropriately located.

Witherspoon, P.A.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Tsang, C.F.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Energy-efficient control in injection molding.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??xviii, 209 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis CENG 2008 Yao As an energy-intensive process, in injection molding, energy cost is (more)

Yao, Ke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Wellness Program WELLNESS POINTS BANK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Program WELLNESS POINTS BANK Renew your commitment to health. Start again October 1, 2012 to your family and friends, too. Your health and well-being are also important to the University of Minnesota. As your employer, the University recognizes the value of investing in a comprehensive Wellness

Thomas, David D.

193

Continuous active-source seismic monitoring of CO2 injection in a brine aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source deployed in the injection well. We first present thehas two wells, an injection well and a dedicated monitoringa sonic log of the injection well. We assumed the volume

Daley, Thomas M.; Solbau, Ray D.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Benson, Sally M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Hanford wells  

SciTech Connect

The Site Characterization and Assessment Section of the Geosciences Department at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has compiled a list of wells located on or near the Hanford Site. Information has been updated on wells existing from the days before construction of the Hanford Works to the present. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The list of wells will be used by DOE contractors who need condensed, tabular information on well location, construction, and completion dates. This report does not include data on lithologic logs and ground-water contamination. Moreover, the completeness of this list is limited because of new well construction and existing well modifications, which are continually under way. Despite these limitations, this list represents the most complete description possible of data pertaining to wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

McGhan, V.L.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Theorem Proving with the Real Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis discusses the use of the real numbers in theorem proving. Typically, theorem provers only support a few `discrete' datatypes such as the natural numbers. However the availability of the real numbers opens up many interesting and important application areas, such as the verification of floating point hardware and hybrid systems. It also allows the formalization of many more branches of classical mathematics, which is particularly relevant for attempts to inject more rigour into computer algebra systems. Our work is conducted in a version of the HOL theorem prover. We describe the rigorous definitional construction of the real numbers, using a new version of Cantor's method, and the formalization of a significant portion of real analysis. We also describe an advanced derived decision procedure for the `Tarski subset' of real algebra as well as some more modest but practically useful tools for automating explicit calculations and routine linear arithmetic reasoning. Finally,...

John Robert Harrison

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Model study of historical injection in the Southeast Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three component model study of the historical injection of two wells in the Unit 13 area demonstrates that the recovery of injection derived steam is influenced by the geologic structure of the bottom of the reservoir and the relative location of injection wells. the migration of injectate from the first injection well, located up structure from the second, quenched the area around the second injector before it started operation. while both wells had similar cumulative mass injected, nearly five times more injection derived steam is recovered from the first injector than the second. Sensitivity runs were made to three cases of increasing matrix capillary pressure. The recovery of injection derived steam increases with higher values of capillarity. The interaction of structure at the bottom of the reservoir, injection well locations, and matrix capillarity all influence the recovery efficiency of injectate as steam. The model developed in this study will be used to evaluate injection strategies at The Geysers.

Faulder, D.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Model study of historical injection in the southeast Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three component model study of the historical injection of two wells in the Unit 13 area demonstrates that the recovery of injection derived steam is influenced by the geologic structure of the bottom of the reservoir and the relative location of injection wells. The migration of injectate from the first injection well, located up structure from the second, quenched the area around the second injector before it started operation. While both wells had similar cumulative mass injected, nearly five times more injection derived steam is recovered from the first injector than the-second. Sensitivity runs were made to three cases of increasing matrix capillary pressure. The recovery of injection derived steam increases with higher values of capillarity. The interaction of structure at the bottom of the reservoir, injection well locations, and matrix capillarity all influence the recovery efficiency of injected as steam. The model developed in this study will be used to evaluate injection strategies at The Geysers.

Faulder, D.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Model study of historical injection in the southeast Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three component model study of the historical injection of two wells in the Unit 13 area demonstrates that the recovery of injection derived steam is influenced by the geologic structure of the bottom of the reservoir and the relative location of injection wells. The migration of injectate from the first injection well, located up structure from the second, quenched the area around the second injector before it started operation. While both wells had similar cumulative mass injected, nearly five times more injection derived steam is recovered from the first injector than the-second. Sensitivity runs were made to three cases of increasing matrix capillary pressure. The recovery of injection derived steam increases with higher values of capillarity. The interaction of structure at the bottom of the reservoir, injection well locations, and matrix capillarity all influence the recovery efficiency of injected as steam. The model developed in this study will be used to evaluate injection strategies at The Geysers.

Faulder, D.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hanford wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Injectivity Testing for Vapour Dominated Feed Zones  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wells with vapor dominated feed zones yield abnormal pressure data. This is caused by the condensation of vapor during water injection. A revised injectivity test procedure currently applied by PNOC at the Leyte Geothermal Power Project has improved the injectivity test results.

Clotworthy, A.W.; Hingoyon, C.S.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Common Rail Injection System Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The collaborative research program between the Department of energy and Electro-Motive Diesels, Inc. on the development of common rail fuel injection system for locomotive diesel engines that can meet US EPA Tier 2 exhaust emissions has been completed. This final report summarizes the objectives of the program, work scope, key accomplishments and research findings. The major objectives of this project encompassed identification of appropriate injection strategies by using advanced analytical tools, development of required prototype hardware/controls, investigations of fuel spray characteristics including cavitation phenomena, and validation of hareware using a single-cylinder research locomotive diesel engine. Major milestones included: (1) a detailed modeling study using advanced mathematical models - several various injection profiles that show simultaneous reduction of NOx and particulates on a four stroke-cycle locomotive diesel engine were identified; (2) development of new common rail fuel injection hardware capable of providing these injection profiles while meeting EMD engine and injection performance specifications. This hardware was developed together with EMD's current fuel injection component supplier. (3) Analysis of fuel spray characteristics. Fuel spray numerical studies and high speed photographic imaging analyses were performed. (4) Validation of new hardware and fuel injection profiles. EMD's single-cylinder research diesel engine located at Argonne National Laboratory was used to confirm emissions and performacne predictions. These analytical ane experimental investigations resulted in optimized fuel injection profiles and engine operating conditions that yield reductions in NOx emissions from 7.8 g/bhp-hr to 5.0 g/bhp-hr at full (rated) load. Additionally, hydrocarbon and particulate emissions were reduced considerably when compared to baseline Tier I levels. The most significant finding from the injection optimization process was a 2% to 3% improvement in fuel economy over EMD's traditional Tier I engine hardware configuration. the common rail fuel injection system enabled this added benefit by virtue of an inherent capability to provide multiple injections per power stroke at high fuel rail pressures. On the basis of the findings in this study, EMD concludes that the new electronically-controlled high-pressure common rail injection system has the potential to meet locomotive Tier 2 NOx and particulates emission standards without sacrificing the fuel economy. A number of areas to further improve the injection hardware and engine operating characteristics to further exploit the benefits of common rail injection system have also been identified.

Electro-Motive,

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

203

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

205

Pressure buildup during supercritical carbon dioxide injection from a partially penetrating borehole into gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the vicinity of the injection well. While a large injectionby pumping it down into an injection well. While the actuala small part of the injection well (typically, a few meters

Mukhopadhyay, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Coupled reservoir-geomechanical analysis of CO2 injection and ground deformations at In Salah, Algeria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is centered on one CO 2 injection well and consists of about1.5 km) horizontal injection wells. In an ongoing researchabove active CO 2 injection wells and the uplift pattern

Rutqvist, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Doublets and other allied well patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whenever a liquid is injected into an infinite reservoir containing liquid with the same flow properties, the equations of flow are well known. The pressures in such a system vary over time and distance (radius) in ways that depend on the formation and liquid flow properties. Such equations are well known--they form the basis for the voluminous well-testing literature in petroleum engineering and ground water hydrology. Suppose there are two wells--one an injector and one a producer--with identical rates. The behavior of this system can be calculated using superposition; which merely means that the results can be added independently of each other. When this is done, the remarkable result is that after a period of time there is a region that approaches steady state flow. Thereafter, the pressures and flow velocities in this region stay constant. The size of this region increases with time. This ``steady state`` characteristic can be used to solve a number of interesting and useful problems, both in heat transfer and in fluid flow. The heat transfer problems can be addressed because the equations are identical in form. A number of such problems are solved herein for doublet systems. In addition, concepts are presented to help solve other cases that flow logically from the problems solved herein. It is not necessary that only two wells be involved. It turns out that any time the total injection and production are equal, the system approaches steady state. This idea is also addressed in these notes. A number of useful multiwell cases are addressed to present the flavor of such solutions.

Brigham, W.E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

OPTIMIZATION OF INJECTION INTO VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. ................................... 19 FIGURE 3.13: ONE-DIMENSIONAL MODEL WITH A PAIR OF INJECTION AND PRODUCTION WELLS. ................... 20 FIGURE 3.14: TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODEL WITH PRODUCTION AND INJECTION WELLS AT THE CENTER.......... 20 and an injection well was placed in the corner diagonally opposite. The maximum production rate of the well

Stanford University

209

GRR/Section 5-HI-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-HI-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-HI-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-HI-a - Drilling and Well Development 05HIADrillingAndModificationOfWellsForInjectionUsePermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Engineering Division Regulations & Policies Hawaii Administrative Code §13-183-65 Draft Rules Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05HIADrillingAndModificationOfWellsForInjectionUsePermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

210

Operational experience during the LHC injection tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the LHC injection tests of 2008. two injection tests took place in October and November 2009 as preparation for the LHC restart on November 20, 2009. During these injection tests beam was injected through the TI 2 transfer line into sector 23 of ring 1 and through TI 8 into the sectors 78, 67 and 56 of ring 2. The beam time was dedicated to injection steering, optics measurements and debugging of all the systems involved. Because many potential problems were sorted out in advance, these tests contributed to the rapid progress after the restart. This paper describes the experiences and issues encountered during these tests as well as related measurement results.

Fuchsberger, K; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Bailey, R; Bruning, O; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Lamont, M; MacPherson, A; Meddahi, M; Papotti, G; Pojer, M; Ponce, L; Redaelli, S; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Wenninger, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Staged direct injection diesel engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diesel engine having staged injection for using lower cetane number fuels than No. 2 diesel fuel. The engine includes a main fuel injector and a pilot fuel injector. Pilot and main fuel may be the same fuel. The pilot injector injects from five to fifteen percent of the total fuel at timings from 20.degree. to 180.degree. BTDC depending upon the quantity of pilot fuel injected, the fuel cetane number and speed and load. The pilot fuel injector is directed toward the centerline of the diesel cylinder and at an angle toward the top of the piston, avoiding the walls of the cylinder. Stratification of the early injected pilot fuel is needed to reduce the fuel-air mixing rate, prevent loss of pilot fuel to quench zones, and keep the fuel-air mixture from becoming too fuel lean to become effective. In one embodiment, the pilot fuel injector includes a single hole for injection of the fuel and is directed at approximately 48.degree. below the head of the cylinder.

Baker, Quentin A. (San Antonio, TX)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 1 - a geopressured-geothermal test well, 1978. Volume III. Appendix II. Air quality monitoring, Radian Corporation, Austin, Texas. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The air monitoring program, instrument types, and bag sampling program are described in each of five quarterly reports. The operating statistics for each of the major subsystems contained in the monitoring station are presented. National ambient air quality standards are presented for criteria pollutants and the monthly statistics for the monitoring station for the month are displayed. Daily averages, maximum daily five-minute averages retained in the data base as well as the times of occurrence, the five largest averages, and the diurnal variation of various recording times are tabulated. (MHR)

Gustavson, T.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Fuel Distributor Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Chapter 27 of the Texas Water Code (the Injection Well Act) defines an "injection well" as "an artificial excavation or opening in the ground made by digging, boring, drilling, jetting, driving, or some other

214

JOB NUMBER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . .: LEAVE BLANK (NARA use only) JOB NUMBER N/-&*W- 9d - 3 DATE RECEIVED " -1s - 9 J - NOTIFICATION TOAGENCY , In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C. 3303a the disposition request. including amendments, is ap roved except , . l for items that may be marke,, ,"dis osition not approved" or "withdrawn in c o i m n 10. 4. NAME OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER 5 TELEPHONE Jannie Kindred (202) 5&-333 5 - 2 -96 6 AGENCYCERTIFICATION -. ~ - I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposition of its records and that the records roposed for disposal are not now needed for the business of this agency or wiRnot be needed after t G t r & s s d ; and that written concurrence from

215

KPA Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Mapping of the DOE Information Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM-SW) level 3. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Number KPA Activity SEM Section SEM Work Product SQSE Web site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse ORGANIZATION PROCESS FOCUS OPF-1 The software process is assessed periodically, and action plans are developed to address the assessment findings. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement Action Plan * Methodologies ! DOE Methodologies ! SEM OPF-2 The organization develops and maintains a plan for its software process development and improvement activities. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement

216

Case Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Name of Petitioner: Name of Petitioner: Date of Filing: Case Number: Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 JUL 2 2 2009 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Appeal Dean P. Dennis March 2, 2009 TBA-0072 Dean D. Dennis filed a complaint of retaliation under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dennis alleged that he engaged in protected activity and that his employer, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec ), subsequently terminated him. An Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Hearing Officer denied relief in Dean P. Dennis, Case No. TBH-0072, 1 and Mr. Dennis filed the instant appeal. As discussed below, the appeal is denied. I. Background The DOE established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to "safeguard public

217

Slit injection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser cavity electron beam injection device provided with a single elongated slit window for passing a suitably shaped electron beam and means for varying the current density of the injected electron beam.

Alger, Terry W. (Livermore, CA); Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA); Bradley, Laird P. (Livermore, CA)

1976-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Rich catalytic injection  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

Veninger, Albert (Coventry, CT)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

A Comparative Review of Hydrologic Issues Involved in Geologic Storage of CO2 and Injection Disposal of Liquid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loss in class I waste injection wells, in: Apps J.A. andR.F. , An overview of injection well history in the Unitedmeasures for Class I injection wells, in Apps J.A. and Tsang

Tsang, C.-F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Beam injection into RHIC  

SciTech Connect

During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geothermal injection monitoring project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is provided on the geothermal brine injection problem and each of the project tasks is outlined in detail. These tasks are: evaluation of methods of monitoring the movement of injected fluid, preparation for an eventual field experiment, and a review of groundwater regulations and injection programs. (MHR)

Younker, L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

U.S. Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Number ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

456: 307: 363: 325: 340: 2001: 374: 326: 316: 377: 428: 419: 413: 448: 378: 429: 361: 329: 2002: 314: 266: 283: 300: 308: 308: 317: 366: 329: 351: 291: 321: 2003: 306 ...

223

U.S. Dry Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

421 359 397 405 385 1974 377 310 403 423 458 391 507 444 484 527 454 505 1975 515 408 456 482 500 542 526 599 649 685 599 556 1976 637 522 574 591 563 588 549 554 580 645 592...

224

U.S. Dry Exploratory Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 7,228 1950's 8,292 9,539 10,090 10,633 10,389 11,832 13,118 11,904 10,632 10,577 1960's 9,515...

225

U.S. Dry Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 5,369 1950's 6,507 7,487 7,669 7,816 8,541 8,620 8,993 8,252 7,530 8,012 1960's 8,697 8,309...

226

U.S. Dry Exploratory Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 538 411 431 367 454 477 530 601 502 551 501 589 1974 490 486 492 532 570 556 608 617 590 622 644 626 1975 624 453 572 551...

227

Illinois oil field statistics, 1995 Pool, Number of wells Character  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S 30 AM Bridgeport, Pen 1070 6 0 0 S 12 AM Jordan 1490 30 0 1 S 10 AM Buchanan, Pen 1290 0 0 0 S 15 AM,ABD 1985 *Energy, Williamson, 9S, 2E 1968 17.3 346.6 23 1 1 20 Mis 2694 Aux Vases, Mis 2354 1968 23 1

228

Illinois oil field statistics, 1994 Pool, Number of wells Character  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 2 387 AM Ord 5143 Bridgeport, Pen 1070 6 0 0 S 12 AM Jordan 1490 30 0 0 S 10 AM Buchanan, Pen 1290 2738 1964 14 0 0 37 OL 17 ABD 1958,REV 1964,ABD 1985 *Energy, Williamson, 9S, 2E 1968 9.9 401.2 23 0 0

229

Illinois oil field statistics, 1992 Pool, Number of wells Character  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 3 382 AM Ord 5143 Bridgeport, Pen 1070 6 0 0 S 12 AM Jordan 1490 30 0 0 S 10 AM Buchanan, Pen 1290 2738 1964 14 0 0 37 OL 17 ABD 1958,REV 1964,ABD 1985 *Energy, Williamson, 9S, 2E 1968 3.9 391.3 23 0 0

230

Illinois oil field statistics, 2001 Pool, Number of wells Character  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1070 4 0 0 S 12 AM Jordan 1490 30 0 0 S 10 AM Buchanan, Pen 1290 0 0 0 S 15 AM Biehl, Pen 1450 765 2 3 2 0 0 L 3 McClosky, Mis 2738 1964 14 0 0 37 OL 17 ABD 1958,REV 1964,ABD 1985 *Energy, Williamson, 9S

231

Illinois oil field statistics, 1999 Pool, Number of wells Character  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S 30 AM Bridgeport, Pen 1070 6 2 0 S 12 AM Jordan 1490 30 0 0 S 10 AM Buchanan, Pen 1290 0 0 0 S 15 AM *Energy, Williamson, 9S, 2E Aux Vases, Mis 2354 1968 24.1 299.5 20 2 0 18 S 16 Mis 2694 *Enfield, White, 5

232

Illinois oil field statistics, 1996 Pool, Number of wells Character  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1070 4 0 0 S 12 AM Jordan 1490 30 0 0 S 10 AM Buchanan, Pen 1290 0 0 0 S 15 AM Biehl, Pen 1450 766 1 0 *Energy, Williamson, 9S, 2E Aux Vases, Mis 2354 1968 25.6 275.4 18 3 0 16 S 16 Mis 2694 *Enfield, White, 5

233

Illinois oil field statistics, 2002 Pool, Number of wells Character  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.0 1336 0 6 375 AM Ord 5143 Bridgeport, Pen 1070 6 0 0 S 12 AM Jordan 1490 30 0 0 S 10 AM Buchanan, Pen 17 ABD 1958,REV 1964,ABD 1985 *Energy, Williamson, 9S, 2E 1968 1.8 380.6 23 0 0 20 Dev 4414 Aux Vases

234

Illinois oil field statistics, 1997 Pool, Number of wells Character  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S 30 AM Bridgeport, Pen 1070 6 0 0 S 12 AM Jordan 1490 30 0 0 S 10 AM Buchanan, Pen 1290 0 0 0 S 15 AM 2666 1964 2 0 0 L 3 McClosky, Mis 2738 1964 14 0 0 37 OL 17 ABD 1958,REV 1964,ABD 1985 *Energy

235

Illinois oil field statistics, 2003 Pool, Number of wells Character  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 1 375 AM Ord 5143 Bridgeport, Pen 1070 6 0 1 S 12 AM Jordan 1490 30 0 0 S 10 AM Buchanan, Pen 1290 17 ABD 1958,REV 1964,ABD 1985 *Energy, Williamson, 9S, 2E 1968 1.9 382.5 23 0 0 20 Dev 4414 Aux Vases

236

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 241: 1990's: 356: 373: 382: 385: 390: 372: 370: 372: 185: 300: 2000's: 280: 300 ...

237

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

930: 847: 1,152: 2000's: 1,169: 1,244: 1,232: 1,249: 1,272: 1,356: 1,451: 1,540: 1,645: 1,643: 2010's: 1,580: 1,308-= No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not ...

238

T-705: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation 05: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates Packet Injection Attacks T-705: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates Packet Injection Attacks August 30, 2011 - 3:46am Addthis PROBLEM: A remote user can conduct packet injection attacks. PLATFORM: Linux Kernel ABSTRACT: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates Packet Injection Attacks. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025977 CVE-2011-3188 (under review) The Linux Kernel Archives IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in the Linux Kernel. A remote user can conduct packet injection attacks. The kernel's sequence number generation function uses partial MD4 with 24-bits unguessable. A remote user may be able to brute-force guess a valid sequence number to inject a packet into a

239

Studies of injection into naturally fractured reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A semi-analytical model for studies of cold water injection into naturally fractured reservoirs has been developed. The model can be used to design the flow rates and location of injection wells in such systems. The results obtained using the model show that initially the cold water will move very rapidly through the fracture system away from the well. Later on, conductive heat transfer from the rock matrix blocks will retard the advancement of the cold water front, and eventually uniform energy sweep conditions will prevail. Where uniform energy sweep conditions are reached the cold waer movement away from the injection well will be identical to that in a porous medium; consequently maximum energy recovery from the rock matrix will be attained. The time of uniform energy sweep and the radial distance from the injection well where it occurs are greatly dependent upon the fracture spacing, but independent of the fracture aperture.

Boedvarsson, G.S.; Lai, C.H.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Geysers injection modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our research is concerned with mathematical modeling techniques for engineering design and optimization of water injection in vapor-dominated systems. The emphasis in the project has been on the understanding of physical processes and mechanisms during injection, applications to field problems, and on transfer of numerical simulation capabilities to the geothermal community. This overview summarizes recent work on modeling injection interference in the Southeast Geysers, and on improving the description of two-phase flow processes in heterogeneous media.

Pruess, K.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Underground Injection Control (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Injection and Mining Division (IMD) has the responsibility of implementing two major federal environmental programs which were statutorily charged to the Office of Conservation: the Underground...

242

Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wells, and for steam-injection wells, in thermal ?elds255/mi. 2 ) for steam-injection wells on a per-thermal-?eld331 ft) for steam-injection wells. Demographics and land use

Jordan, Preston D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

CarbFix CO2 Injection Pilot Project, J. M. Matter, M. Stute & W. Broecker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fix Injection Site #12;A Conceptual Carbonation Model Injec8on well: CO2 fully dissolvedCarbFix CO2 Injection Pilot Project, Iceland J. M. Matter, M. Stute & W. Broecker Lamont Pétursson #12;CarbFix Injection Site #12;CarbFix CO2 Injection Site #12;CarbFix Injection Site 2

244

Glossary Term - Atomic Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Previous Term (Alpha Particle) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Avogadro's Number) Avogadro's Number Atomic Number Silver's atomic number is 47 The atomic number is equal to...

245

Application of Gaseous Sphere Injection Method for Modeling Under-expanded H2 Injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology for modeling gaseous injection has been refined and applied to recent experimental data from the literature. This approach uses a discrete phase analogy to handle gaseous injection, allowing for addition of gaseous injection to a CFD grid without needing to resolve the injector nozzle. This paper focuses on model testing to provide the basis for simulation of hydrogen direct injected internal combustion engines. The model has been updated to be more applicable to full engine simulations, and shows good agreement with experiments for jet penetration and time-dependent axial mass fraction, while available radial mass fraction data is less well predicted.

Whitesides, R; Hessel, R P; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

246

Victor J. Daniel Jr. CO2 Injection Test Site Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississippi Test Site JAF02664.PPT 1 1.1 SITE BACKGROUND 1.2 GENERAL IDENTIFICATION DATA 1.3 REGULATORY CLASSIFICATION 1.4 WELL DATA - INJECTION WELL NO. 1 1.5 WELL DATA -...

247

Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search Properties of type "Number" Showing 200 properties using this type. (previous 200) (next 200) A Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property:AvgTempGeoFluidIntoPlant Property:AvgWellDepth B Property:Building/FloorAreaChurchesChapels Property:Building/FloorAreaGroceryShops Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters

248

Injection Phenomena in the PS Converter - The Teachings of J ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

blockage and punching); the concept of high pressure or sonic injection including a review of the ... to the representatives of the technology suppliers as well as.

249

Injection of Alternative Carbon Containing Materials in the BF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By injection of the materials preparation methods in terms e.g. drying and/or ... Efficiency in recovery of valuable compounds as well as the behaviour of...

250

THE RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.  

SciTech Connect

The RHIC injection system has to transport beam from the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line onto the closed orbits of the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings. This task can be divided into three problems. First, the beam has to be injected into either ring. Second, once injected the beam needs to be transported around the ring for one turn. Third, the orbit must be closed and coherent beam oscillations around the closed orbit should be minimized. We describe our solutions for these problems and report on system tests conducted during the RHIC Sextant test performed in 1997. The system will be fully commissioned in 1999.

FISCHER,W.; GLENN,J.W.; MACKAY,W.W.; PTITSIN,V.; ROBINSON,T.G.; TSOUPAS,N.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

251

Geologic controls influencing CO2 loss from a leaking well.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injection of CO2 into formations containing brine is proposed as a long-term sequestration solution. A significant obstacle to sequestration performance is the presence of existing wells providing a transport pathway out of the sequestration formation. To understand how heterogeneity impacts the leakage rate, we employ two dimensional models of the CO2 injection process into a sandstone aquifer with shale inclusions to examine the parameters controlling release through an existing well. This scenario is modeled as a constant-rate injection of super-critical CO2 into the existing formation where buoyancy effects, relative permeabilities, and capillary pressures are employed. Three geologic controls are considered: stratigraphic dip angle, shale inclusion size and shale fraction. In this study, we examine the impact of heterogeneity on the amount and timing of CO2 released through a leaky well. Sensitivity analysis is performed to classify how various geologic controls influence CO2 loss. A 'Design of Experiments' approach is used to identify the most important parameters and combinations of parameters to control CO2 migration while making efficient use of a limited number of computations. Results are used to construct a low-dimensional description of the transport scenario. The goal of this exploration is to develop a small set of parametric descriptors that can be generalized to similar scenarios. Results of this work will allow for estimation of the amount of CO2 that will be lost for a given scenario prior to commencing injection. Additionally, two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are compared to quantify the influence that surrounding geologic media has on the CO2 leakage rate.

Hopkins, Polly L.; Martinez, Mario J.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Klise, Katherine A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor pills'' directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)) [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Influence of Thermalisation on Electron Injection in Supernova Remnant Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within a test-particle description of the acceleration process in parallel nonrelativistic shocks, we present an analytic treatment of the electron injection. We estimate the velocity distribution of the injected electrons as the product of the post-shock thermal distribution of electrons times the probability for electrons with a given velocity to be accelerated; the injection efficiency is then evaluated as the integral of this velocity distribution. We estimate the probability of a particle to be injected as that of going back to the upstream region at least once. This is the product of the probability of returning to the shock from downstream times that of recrossing the shock from downstream to upstream. The latter probability is expected to be sensitive to details of the process of electron thermalisation within the (collisionless) shock, a process that is poorly known. In order to include this effect, for our treatment we use results of a numerical, fully kinetic study, by Bykov & Uvarov (1999). According to them, the probability of recrossing depends on physics of thermalisation through a single free parameter (Gamma), which can be expressed as a function of the Mach number of the shock, of the level of electron-ion equilibration, as well as of the spectrum of turbulence. It becomes apparent, from our analysis, that the injection efficiency is related to the post-shock electron temperature, and that it results from the balance between two competing effects: the higher the electron temperature, the higher the fraction of downstream electrons with enough velocity to return to the shock and thus to be ready to cross the shock from downstream to upstream; at the same time, however, the higher the turbulence, which would hinder the crossing.

O. Petruk; R. Bandiera

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

254

Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In low-permeability gas reservoirs, horizontal wells have been used to increase the reservoir contact area, and hydraulic fracturing has been further extending the contact between wellbores and reservoirs. This thesis presents an approach to evaluate horizontal well performance for fractured or unfractured gas wells and a sensitivity study of gas well performance in a low permeability formation. A newly developed Distributed Volumetric Sources (DVS) method was used to calculate dimensionless productivity index for a defined source in a box-shaped domain. The unique features of the DVS method are that it can be applied to transient flow and pseudo-steady state flow with a smooth transition between the boundary conditions. In this study, I conducted well performance studies by applying the DVS method to typical tight sandstone gas wells in the US basins. The objective is to determine the best practice to produce horizontal gas wells. For fractured wells, well performance of a single fracture and multiple fractures are compared, and the effect of the number of fractures on productivity of the well is presented based on the well productivity. The results from this study show that every basin has a unique ideal set of fracture number and fracture length. Permeability plays an important role on dictating the location and the dimension of the fractures. This study indicated that in order to achieve optimum production, the lower the permeability of the formation, the higher the number of fractures.

Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Definition: Injectivity Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Injectivity Test Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Injectivity Test A well testing technique conducted upon completion of a well. Water is pumped into the well at a constant rate until a stable pressure is reached then the pump is turned off and the rate at which pressure decreases is measured. The pressure measurements are graphed and well permeability can be calculated.[1] References ↑ https://pangea.stanford.edu/ERE/pdf/IGAstandard/ISS/2008Croatia/Hole03.pdf Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You and one other like this.One person likes this. Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Injectivity_Test&oldid=688681"

256

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Glossary Term - Avogadro's Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic Number Previous Term (Atomic Number) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Beta Decay) Beta Decay Avogadro's Number Avogadro's number is the number of particles in one mole of a...

258

Calculating the probability of injected carbon dioxide plumes encountering faults  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main concerns of storage in saline aquifers is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available for these aquifers. This necessitates a method using available fault data to estimate the probability of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault. The probability of encounter can be calculated from areal fault density statistics from available data, and carbon dioxide plume dimensions from numerical simulation. Given a number of assumptions, the dimension of the plume perpendicular to a fault times the areal density of faults with offsets greater than some threshold of interest provides probability of the plume encountering such a fault. Application of this result to a previously planned large-scale pilot injection in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin yielded a 3% and 7% chance of the plume encountering a fully and half seal offsetting fault, respectively. Subsequently available data indicated a half seal-offsetting fault at a distance from the injection well that implied a 20% probability of encounter for a plume sufficiently large to reach it.

Jordan, P.D.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Numerical simulation of water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs is a means of condensate disposal, as well as a reservoir management tool for enhancing energy recovery and reservoir life. We review different approaches to modeling the complex fluid and heat flow processes during injection into vapor-dominated systems. Vapor pressure lowering, grid orientation effects, and physical dispersion of injection plumes from reservoir heterogeneity are important considerations for a realistic modeling of injection effects. An example of detailed three-dimensional modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers is given.

Pruess, K.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Injection in basin and range-type reservoirs: the Raft River experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Injection testing at the Raft River KGRA has yielded some interesting results which can be useful in planning injection systems in Basin and Range type reservoirs. Because of inhomogeneities and possible fracturing in basin fill sediment, rapid pressure response to injection has been observed in one shallow monitor well, but not others. In some monitor wells in the injection field, pressure drops are observed during injection suggesting plastic deformation of the sediments. Seismicity, however, has not accompanied these observed water level changes.

Petty, S.; Spencer, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TEMPERATURE EFFECTS DURING THE INJECTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE INTO BRINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

project (cf. Sec. 3). The CO2 is assumed to move away from the injection well in a radially sym- metric illustrating saturations. Also two observation wells 50 m and 100 m away from the injection point are shown. The temperatures at the first observation well (50 m distance from the injection point, right underneath

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

262

Decontaminating Flooded Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains how to decontaminate and disinfect a well, test the well water and check for well damage after a flood.

Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Geothermal energy well casing seal  

SciTech Connect

A geothermal energy transfer and utilization system makes use of thermal energy stored in hot solute-bearing well water to generate super-heated steam from an injected flow of clean water. The super-heated steam is then used for operating a turbine-driven pump at the well bottom for pumping the hot solute-bearing water at high pressure and in liquid state to the earth's surface, where it is used by transfer of its heat to a closed-loop steam generator-turbine-alternator combination for the beneficial generation of electrical or other power. Residual concentrated solute-bearing water is pumped back into the earth. The clean cooled water regenerated at the surface-located system is returned to the deep well pumping system also for lubrication of a fluid bearing arrangement supporting the turbine-driven pump system. The deep well pump system is supported within the well casing pipe from the earth's surface by the turbine exhaust steam conduit. In view of differential expansion effects on the relative lengths of the casing pipe and the exhaust steam conduit, a novel flexible seal is provided between the suspended turbine-pump system and the well pipe casing. 9 claims, 2 drawing figures.

Matthews, H.B.

1976-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

264

Wellness Planning Session Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Planning Session Report September 12, 2008 #12;Wellness Planning Session Report Printed.............................................................................1 Explored what wellness program should look like at NMSU .......................2 Considered for the Wellness committee..................................2 Identified the next meeting date and meeting agenda

Castillo, Steven P.

265

Numerical modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data from injection experiments in the southeast Geysers are presented that show strong interference (both negative and positive) with a neighboring production well. Conceptual and numerical models are developed that explain the negative interference (decline of production rate) in terms of heat transfer limitations and water-vapor relative permeability effects. Recovery and over-recovery following injection shut-in are attributed to boiling of injected fluid, with heat of vaporization provided by the reservoir rocks.

Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Enedy, S. [Northern California Power Agency, Middletown, CA (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Injection and energy recovery in fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical studies of the effects of injection on the behavior of production wells completed in fractured two-phase geothermal reservoirs are presented. In these studies the multiple-interacting-continua (MINC) method is employed for the modeling of idealized fractured reservoirs. Simulations are carried out for a five-spot well pattern with various well spacings, fracture spacings, and injection fractions. The production rates from the wells are calculated using a deliverability model. The results of the studies show that injection into two-phase fractured reservoirs increases flow rates and decreases enthalpies of producing wells. These two effects offset each other so that injection tends to have small effects on the usable energy output of production wells in the short term. However, if a sufficiently large fraction of the produced fluids is injected, the fracture system may become liquid-filled and an increased steam rate is obtained. Our studies show that injection greatly increases the long-term energy output from wells, as it helps extract heat from the resrvoir rocks. If a high fraction of the produced fluids is injected, the ultimate energy recovery will increase manyfold.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; O'Sullivan, M.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Neutral beam injection in 2XIIB  

SciTech Connect

Integrated into the operation of the 2XIIB controlled fusion experiment is a 600-A, 20-keV neutral injection system: the highest neutral-beam current capacity of any existing fusion machine. This paper outlines the requirements of the injection system and the design features to which they led. Both mechanical and electrical aspects are discussed. Also included is a brief description of some operational aspects of the system and some of the things we have learned along the way, as well as a short history of the most significant developments. (auth)

Hibbs, S.M.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Experimental investigation of caustic steam injection for heavy oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study has been conducted to compare the effect of steam injection and caustic steam injection in improving the recovery of San Ardo and Duri heavy oils. A 67 cm long x 7.4 cm O.D (outer diameter), steel injection cell is used in the study. Six thermocouples are placed at specific distances in the injection cell to record temperature profiles and thus the steam front velocity. The injection cell is filled with a mixture of oil, water and sand. Steam is injected at superheated conditions of 238oC with the cell outlet pressure set at 200 psig, the cell pressure similar to that found in San Ardo field. The pressure in the separators is kept at 50 psig. The separator liquid is sampled at regular intervals. The liquid is centrifuged to determine the oil and water volumes, and oil viscosity, density and recovery. Acid number measurements are made by the titration method using a pH meter and measuring the EMF values. The interfacial tensions of the oil for different concentrations of NaOH are also measured using a tensionometer. Experimental results show that for Duri oil, the addition of caustic results in an increase in recovery of oil from 52% (steam injection) to 59 % (caustic steam injection). However, caustic has little effect on San Ardo oil where oil recovery is 75% (steam injection) and 76 % (caustic steam injection). Oil production acceleration is seen with steam-caustic injection. With steam caustic injection there is also a decrease in the produced oil viscosity and density for both oils. Sodium hydroxide concentration of 1 wt % is observed to give the lowest oil-caustic interfacial tension. The acid numbers for San Ardo and Duri oil are measured as 6.2 and 3.57 respectively.

Madhavan, Rajiv

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Method for gravel packing wells  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for gravel packing a well that penetrates an unconsolidated or poorly consolidated subterranean oil or gas reservoir. It comprises: providing a borehole casing through the reservoir; perforating the casing at preselected intervals therealong to form at least one set of longitudinal, perforation tunnels adjacent a substantial portion of the reservoir; locating a sand screen inside the casing and in juxtaposition with the perforation tunnels, an annulus being formed between the sand screen and the casing; positioning a conduit in juxtaposition with the sand screen extending substantially the length of the sand screen and having its upper extremity open to fluids; injecting a fluid slurry containing gravel down through the annulus and conduit whereby the fluid portion of the slurry is forced out of the annulus through the perforation tunnels into the reservoir and the gravel portion of the slurry deposited in the annulus and forced into the perforation tunnels into the formation; sizing the cross-sectional area of the conduit and the annulus so that if gravel forms a bridge in a portion of the annulus thereby blocking the flow of fluid slurry through the the annulus, fluid slurry containing gravel will continue to flow through the conduit and into the annulus around the gravel bridge; and terminating the injection of the slurry.

Jones, L.G.

1990-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

270

Gaseous Fuel Injection Modeling using a Gaseous Sphere Injection Methodology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growing interest in gaseous fuels (hydrogen and natural gas) for internal combustion engines calls for the development of computer models for simulation of gaseous fuel injection, air entrainment and the ensuing combustion. This paper introduces a new method for modeling the injection and air entrainment processes for gaseous fuels. The model uses a gaseous sphere injection methodology, similar to liquid droplet in injection techniques used for liquid fuel injection. In this paper, the model concept is introduced and model results are compared with correctly- and under-expanded experimental data.

Hessel, R P; Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

271

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

272

Completion report: Raft River Geothermal Production Well Four (RRGP-4)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fourth Raft River well was originally drilled to 866 m (2840 ft), for use as a test injection well. This well allowed the injection of geothermal fluids into the intermediate zone--above the geothermal production zone and below the shallow groundwater aquifers. After this testing, the well was deepened and cased for use as a production well. The well's designation was changed from RRGI-4 to RRGP-4. This report describes the drilling and completion of both drilling projects. Results of well tests are also included.

Miller, L.G.; Prestwich, S.M.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

274

Fluid injection profiles: modern analysis of wellbore temperature survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exact and approximate solutions for heat flow in a fluid injection well are presented. By using the approximate results, temperature surveys can be quickly analyzed in the field, and the well depths where fluids leave and the departing flow rates at these depths can be precisely determined. Although this method eliminates the need for indigenous and post injection shut-in temperatures, several surveys must be taken just before and during the injection period which can be as short as several hours. In the application described the method was used to locate the depths where hydraulic fractures were initiated in a hot dry rock geothermal well.

Murphy, H.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Rigs Drilling Gas Wells Are At  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The increasing number of resulting gas well completions have been expanding production in major producing States, such as Texas. For the year 2000, ...

276

Energy Injection in GRB Afterglow Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend the standard fireball model, widely used to interpret gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow light curves, to include energy injections, and apply the model to the afterglow light curves of GRB 990510, GRB 000301C and GRB 010222. We show that discrete energy injections can cause temporal variations in the optical light curves and present fits to the light curves of GRB 000301C as an example. A continuous injection may be required to interpret other bursts such as GRB 010222. The extended model accounts reasonably well for the observations in all bands ranging from X-rays to radio wavelengths. In some cases, the radio light curves indicate that additional model ingredients may be needed.

Gudlaugur Johannesson; Gunnlaugur Bjornsson; Einar H. Gudmundsson

2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

277

Gaussian random number generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid generation of high quality Gaussian random numbers is a key capability for simulations across a wide range of disciplines. Advances in computing have brought the power to conduct simulations with very large numbers of random numbers and with it, ... Keywords: Gaussian, Random numbers, normal, simulation

David B. Thomas; Wayne Luk; Philip H.W. Leong; John D. Villasenor

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Well Flix Program Details  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Well Flix's in the Well-U library. These DVD's have been made available so employees may learn about a variety of fitness for a one-week basis at no cost. Contact Well U at well-u-info@rochester.edu for DVD rental. Click the link

Portman, Douglas

279

Injectivity Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Injectivity Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Quantification of the pressure response prior to 600 minutes is not always possible. Short-duration (< 24-hour) injection or pump tests are conducted with the drilling rig equipment, and long-duration (21-day) injection and pump tests are then conducted with the permanent pumping facilities. References Allman, D. W.; Goldman, D.; Niemi, W. L. (1 January 1979) Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft

280

INJECTION SYSTEM DESIGN FOR THE BSNS/RCS.  

SciTech Connect

The BSNS injection system is designed to take one uninterrupted long drift in one of the four dispersion-free straight sections to host all the injection devices. Painting bumper magnets are used for both horizontal and vertical phase space painting. Closed-orbit bumper magnets are used for facilitating the installation of the injection septa and decreasing proton traversal in the stripping foil. Even with large beam emittance of about 300 {pi}mm.mrad used, BSNS/RCS still approaches the space charge limit during the injection/trapping phase for the accumulated particles of 1.9*10{sup 13} and at the low injection energy of 80 MeV. Uniform-like beam distribution by well-designed painting scheme is then obtained to decrease the tune shift/spread. ORBIT code is used for the 3D simulations. Upgrading to higher injection energy has also been considered.

WEI, J.; TANG, J.Y.; CHEN, Y.; CHI, Y.L.; JIANG, Y.L.; KANG, W.; PANG, J.B.; QIN, Q.; QIU, J.; SHEN, L.; WANG, W.

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Well R-14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well R-14 is located in Ten Site Canyon and was completed at a depth of 1316 ft below ground surface (bgs) in August 2002 within unassigned pumiceous deposits located below the Puye Formation (fanglomerate). The well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Individual static depths measured for each isolated screen after the Westbay{trademark} transducer monitoring system was installed in mid-December 2002 were nearly identical at 1177 ft bgs, suggesting only horizontal subsurface flow at this time, location, and depth. Screen 1 straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous deposits. Screen 2 is located about 50 ft deeper than screen 1 and is only within the unassigned pumiceous deposits. Constant-rate, straddle-packer, injection tests were conducted at screen 2, including two short tests and one long test. The short tests were 1 minute each but at different injection rates. These short tests were used to select an appropriate injection rate for the long test. We analyzed both injection and recovery data from the long test using the Theis, Theis recovery, Theis residual-recovery, and specific capacity techniques. The Theis injection, Theis recovery, and specific capacity methods correct for partial screen penetration; however, the Theis residual-recovery method does not. The long test at screen 2 involved injection at a rate of 10.1 gallons per minute (gpm) for 68 minutes and recovery for the next 85 minutes. The Theis analysis for screen 2 gave the best fit to residual recovery data. These results suggest that the 158-ft thick deposits opposite screen 2 have a transmissivity (T) equal to or greater than 143 ft{sup 2}/day, and correspond to a horizontal hydraulic conductivity (K) of at least 0.9 ft/day. The specific capacity method yielded a T value equal to or greater than 177 ft{sup 2}/day, and a horizontal K of at least 1.1 ft/day. Results from the injection and recovery phases of the test at screen 2 were similar to those from the residual-recovery portion of the test, but were lower by a factor of about two. The response to injection was typical for a partially penetrating well screen in a very thick aquifer.

S. McLin; W. Stone

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Well completion process for formations with unconsolidated sands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for consolidating sand around a well, involving injecting hot water or steam through well casing perforations in to create a cement-like area around the perforation of sufficient rigidity to prevent sand from flowing into and obstructing the well. The cement area has several wormholes that provide fluid passageways between the well and the formation, while still inhibiting sand inflow.

Davies, David K. (Kingwood, TX); Mondragon, III, Julius J. (Redondo Beach, CA); Hara, Philip Scott (Monterey Park, CA)

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

283

Drilling and operating geothermal wells in California  

SciTech Connect

The following procedural points for geothermal well drilling and operation are presented: geothermal operators, definitions, geothermal unit, agent, notice of intention, fees, report on proposed operations, bonds, well name and number, well and property sale on transfer, well records, and other agencies. (MHR)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Well-centered meshing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A well-centered simplex is a simplex whose circumcenter lies in its interior, and a well-centered mesh is a simplicial mesh in which every simplex is (more)

Vanderzee, Evan B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Particle beam injection system  

SciTech Connect

This invention provides a poloidal divertor for stacking counterstreaming ion beams to provide high intensity colliding beams. To this end, method and apparatus are provided that inject high energy, high velocity, ordered, atomic deuterium and tritium beams into a lower energy, toroidal, thermal equilibrium, neutral, target plasma column that is magnetically confined along an endless magnetic axis in a strong restoring force magnetic field having helical field lines to produce counterstreaming deuteron and triton beams that are received bent, stacked and transported along the endless axis, while a poloidal divertor removes thermal ions and electrons all along the axis to increase the density of the counterstreaming ion beams and the reaction products resulting therefrom. By balancing the stacking and removal, colliding, strong focused particle beams, reaction products and reactions are produced that convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ); Kulsrud, Russell M. (Princeton, NJ)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Geothermal well stimulation treatments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of proppants in geothermal environments and two field experiments in well stimulation are discussed. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Underground Injection Control Program Rules and Regulations (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to preserve the quality of the groundwater of the State and thereby protect groundwater contamination from contamination by discharge from injection wells and...

288

Quantum Random Number Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... trusted beacon of random numbers. You could conduct secure auctions, or certify randomized audits of data. One of the most ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services Dr. Marcelle Holmes Assistant Vice Chancellor CARE Career Student Health Center #12;The mission of the Wellness, Health & Counseling Services cluster is to support · Dedicated to promoting principles of wellness, prevention and healthy life-style choices for students

Stanford, Kyle

290

Property:NbrProdWells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name NbrProdWells Property Type Number Description Number of production wells serving this plant Pages using the property "NbrProdWells" Showing 6 pages...

291

GRR/Section 4-OR-d - Exploration Injection Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-OR-d - Exploration Injection Permit 4-OR-d - Exploration Injection Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-OR-d - Exploration Injection Permit 04ORDExplorationInjectionPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies OAR 340-044-0012: Authorization of Underground Injection Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04ORDExplorationInjectionPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 4-OR-d.1 - Is this New Injection Activity or a Renewal? The developer must follow one of two different procedures if the developer

292

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

293

72 Los Alamos Science Number 24 1996 Russian Federation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inspection by signing the Nu- clear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT). However, a number of states, as well

294

Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, we present a compilation of reported cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. The compiled database contains cetane values for 299 pure compounds, including 156 hydrocarbons and 143 oxygenates. Cetane number is a relative ranking of fuels based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition. The cetane number is typically measured either in a combustion bomb or in a single-cylinder research engine. This report includes cetane values from several different measurement techniques - each of which has associated uncertainties. Additionally, many of the reported values are determined by measuring blending cetane numbers, which introduces significant error. In many cases, the measurement technique is not reported nor is there any discussion about the purity of the compounds. Nonetheless, the data in this report represent the best pure compound cetane number values available from the literature as of August 2004.

Murphy, M. J.; Taylor, J. D.; McCormick, R. L.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Underground Injection Control Regulations (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article prohibits injection of hazardous or radioactive wastes into or above an underground source of drinking water, establishes permit conditions and states regulations for design,...

296

well | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142280543 Varnish cache server well Dataset Summary Description The California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources contains oil, gas, and geothermal data for the state of California. Source California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Date Released February 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords California data gas geothermal oil well Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 1 wells (xls, 10.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 2 wells (xls, 4 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 3 wells (xls, 3.8 MiB) application/zip icon California district 4 wells (zip, 11.2 MiB)

297

Geothermal Well Technology Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. An overview of the program is presented. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies encountered when current rotary drilling techniques are used for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

injected oil, gas and water, produced/injected produced/injected oil, gas and water, produced oil, gas (at welland cyclically produced oil/water/steam (at well head) Steam

Jordan, Preston D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Combustion oscillation control by cyclic fuel injection  

SciTech Connect

A number of recent articles have demonstrated the use of active control to mitigate the effects of combustion instability in afterburner and dump combustor applications. In these applications, cyclic injection of small quantities of control fuel has been proposed to counteract the periodic heat release that contributes to undesired pressure oscillations. This same technique may also be useful to mitigate oscillations in gas turbine combustors, especially in test rig combustors characterized by acoustic modes that do not exist in the final engine configuration. To address this issue, the present paper reports on active control of a subscale, atmospheric pressure nozzle/combustor arrangement. The fuel is natural gas. Cyclic injection of 14% control fuel in a premix fuel nozzle is shown to reduce oscillating pressure amplitude by a factor of 0.30 (i.e., {approximately}10 dB) at 300 Hz. Measurement of the oscillating heat release is also reported.

Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Robey, E. [EG& G Technical Services of West Virginia, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Cowell, L.; Rawlins, D. [Solar Turbines, Inc., San Diedgo, CA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geothermal well stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Ultrafast shift and injection currents observed in wurtzite semiconductors via emitted terahertz radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and injection currents have been generated in bulk GaAs and strained GaAs quantum wells QWs , respectivelyUltrafast shift and injection currents observed in wurtzite semiconductors via emitted terahertz; published online 18 November 2005 Shift and injection currents are generated in the wurtzite semiconductors

Van Driel, Henry M.

303

Shock Chlorination of Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock chlorination is a method of disinfecting a water well. This publication gives complete instructions for chlorinating with bleach or with dry chlorine. It is also available in Spanish as publication L-5441S

McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

304

Underground Injection Control (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Injection Control (West Virginia) Injection Control (West Virginia) Underground Injection Control (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This rule set forth criteria and standards for the requirements which apply to the State Underground Injection Control Program (U.I.C.). The UIC permit program regulates underground injections by 5 classes of wells. All owners

305

Isobaric groundwater well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring a parameter in a well, under isobaric conditions, including such parameters as hydraulic gradient, pressure, water level, soil moisture content and/or aquifer properties the method as presented comprising providing a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends, the casing supporting a transducer having a reference port; placing the casing lengthwise into the well, second end first, with the reference port vented above the water table in the well; and sealing the first end. A system is presented for measuring a parameter in a well, the system comprising a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends and being configured to be placed lengthwise into a well second end first; a transducer, the transducer having a reference port, the reference port being vented in the well above the water table, the casing being screened across and above the water table; and a sealing member sealing the first end. In one embodiment, the transducer is a tensiometer transducer and in other described embodiments, another type transducer is used in addition to a tensiometer.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A Case History of Injection Through 1991 at Dixie Valley, Nevada | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Case History of Injection Through 1991 at Dixie Valley, Nevada Case History of Injection Through 1991 at Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Case History of Injection Through 1991 at Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract The Dixie Valley injection system has been operational for 3 1/4 years and disperses injectate into the reservoir through three distinct geological environments. Short term step-rate injection tests underestimated the long term injectivity of some of the injectors requiring additional injectors to be drilled. Liberal use of surface discharge over three years allowed orderly development of an eight-well injection system that provides pressure support for nine production wells but has not yet resulted in any cooling problems. Tracer testing identified a single flow path while long

307

DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected VOC soil gas concentrations during ASVE. Five (5) SVE wells that were located closest to the air injection wells were used as monitoring points during the air sparging tests. The air sparging tests lasted 48 hours. Soil gas sample results indicate that sparging did not affect VOC concentrations in four of the five sparging wells, while results from one test did show an increase in soil gas concentrations.

Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

308

Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

309

Injection, injectivity and injectability in geothermal operations: problems and possible solutions. Phase I. Definition of the problems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: thermodynamic instability of brine, injectivity loss during regular production and injection operations, injectivity loss caused by measures other than regular operations, heat mining and associated reservoir problems in reinjection, pressure maintenance through imported make-up water, suggested solutions to injection problems, and suggested solutions to injection problems: remedial and stimulation measures. (MHR)

Vetter, O.J.; Crichlow, H.B.

1979-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

310

GRR/Section 14-HI-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-HI-c - Underground Injection Control Permit GRR/Section 14-HI-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-HI-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14HIC - UndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch Regulations & Policies Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 11, Chapter 23 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14HIC - UndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf 14HIC - UndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The developer must receive an Underground Injection Control Permit from the

311

Monitor well responses at the Raft River, Idaho, Geothermal Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effects of geothermal fluid production and injection on overlying ground-water aquifers have been studied at the Raft River Geothermal Site in southcentral Idaho. Data collected from 13 monitor wells indicate a complex fractured and porous media controlled ground-water flow system affected by natural recharge and discharge, irrigation withdrawal, and geothermal withdrawal and injection. The monitor wells are completed in aquifers and aquitards overlying the principal geothermal aquifers. Potentiometric heads and water quality are significantly affected by natural upward geothermal leakage via faults and matrix seepage. No significant change in water quality data has been observed, but potentiometric head changes resulted due to geothermal resource testing and utilization. Long-term hydrographs for the wells exhibit three distinct patterns, with superimposed responses due to geothermal pumping and injection. Well hydrographs typical of the Shallow aquifer exhibit effects of natural recharge and irrigation withdrawals. For selected wells, pressure declines due to injection and pressure buildup associated with pumping are observed. The latter effect is presumably due to the elastic deformation of geologic material overlying the stressed aquifers. A second distinct pattern occurs in two wells believed to be hydraulically connected to the underlying Intermediate aquifer via faults. These wells exhibit marked buildup effects due to injection as well as responses typical of the Shallow aquifer. The third pattern is demonstrated by three monitor wells near the principal production wells. This group of wells exhibits no seasonal potentiometric head fluctuations. Fluctuations which do occur are due to injection and pumpage. The three distinct hydrograph patterns are composites of the potentiometric head responses occurring in the various aquifers underlying the Raft River Site.

Skiba, P.A.; Allman, D.W.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION  

SciTech Connect

The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in their physics and their technology, or in any case they are considered to be adequately covered by these other authors.

Kunkel, W.B.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Analysis of injection tests in liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective was to develop procedures for analyzing nonisothermal injection test data during the early phases of injection. In particular, methods for determining the permeability-thickness of the formation, skin factor of the well and tracking the movement of the thermal front have been developed. The techniques developed for interpreting injection pressure transients are closely akin to conventional groundwater and petroleum techniques for evaluating these parameters. The approach taken was to numerically simulate injection with a variety of temperatures, reservoir parameters and flowrates, in order to determine the characteristic responses due to nonisothermal injection. Two characteristic responses were identified: moving front dominated behavior and composite reservoir behavior. Analysis procedures for calculating the permeability-thickness of the formation and the skin factor of the well have been developed for each of these cases. In order to interpret the composite reservior behavior, a new concept has been developed; that of a ''fluid skin factor'', which accounts for the steady-state pressure buildup due to the region inside the thermal front. Based on this same concept, a procedure for tracking the movement of the thermal front has been established. The results also identify the dangers of not accounting the nonisothermal effects when analyzing injection test data. Both the permeability-thickness and skin factor of the well can be grossly miscalculated if the effects of the cold-region around the well are not taken into consideration. 47 refs., 30 figs., 14 tabs.

Benson, S.M.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Number | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number More Documents & Publications Analysis of Open Office of Inspector General Recommendations, OAS-L-08-07 Policy and International Affairs (WFP) Open Government Plan 2.0...

315

Expected Frobenius numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that for large instances the order of magnitude of the expected Frobenius number is (up to a constant depending only on the dimension) given by its lower bound.

Aliev, Iskander; Hinrichs, Aicke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Geochemical Determination of the Fate and Transport of Injected Fresh Wastewater to a Deep Saline Aquifer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Deep well injection into non-potable saline aquifers of treated domestic wastewater has been used in Florida for decades as a safe and effective alternative (more)

Walsh, Virginia M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Geothermal Well Stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stimulation of geothermal wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 300-600 F range can be expected. The behavior of stimulation fluids, frac proppants, and equipment at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated before performance expectations can be determined. In order to avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, high temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the stimulation materials must be verified. Perhaps most significant of all, in geothermal wells the required techniques must be capable of bringing about the production of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional petroleum well stimulation and demands the creation of very high near-wellbore permeability and/or fractures with very high flow conductivity.

Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Sorbent Injection for Small  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas URS Group and their test team will evaluate sorbent injection for mercury control on sites with low-SCA ESPs, burning low sulfur Eastern bituminous coals. Full-scale tests will be performed at Plant Yates Units 1 and 2 to evaluate sorbent injection performance across a cold-side ESP/wet FGD and a cold-side ESP with a dual NH3/SO3 flue gas conditioning system, respectively. Short-term parametric tests on Units 1 and 2 will provide data on the effect of sorbent injection rate on mercury removal and ash/FGD byproduct composition. Tests on Unit 2 will also evaluate the effect of dual-flue gas conditioning on sorbent injection performance. Results from a one-month injection test on Unit 1 will provide insight to the long-term performance and variability of this process as well as any effects on plant operations. The goals of the long-term testing are to obtain sufficient operational data on removal efficiency over time, effects on the ESP and balance of plant equipment, and on injection equipment operation to prove process viability.

319

TRACER STABILITY AND CHEMICAL CHANGES IN AN INJECTED GEOTHERMAL FLUID DURING INJECTION-BACKFLOW TESTING AT THE EAST MESA GEOTHERMAL FIELD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stabilities of several tracers were tested under geothermal conditions while injection-backflow tests were conducted at East Mesa. The tracers I and Br were injected continuously while SCN (thiocyanate), B, and disodium fluorescein were each injected as a point source (slug). The tracers were shown to be stable, except where the high concentrations used during slug injection induced adsorption of the slug tracers. However, adsorption of the slug tracers appeared to ''armor'' the formation against adsorption during subsequent tests. Precipitation behavior of calcite and silica as well as Na/K shifts during injection are also discussed.

Adams, M.C.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

320

Thermal indicator for wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Injection nozzle for a turbomachine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbomachine includes a compressor, a combustor operatively connected to the compressor, an end cover mounted to the combustor, and an injection nozzle assembly operatively connected to the combustor. The injection nozzle assembly includes a first end portion that extends to a second end portion, and a plurality of tube elements provided at the second end portion. Each of the plurality of tube elements defining a fluid passage includes a body having a first end section that extends to a second end section. The second end section projects beyond the second end portion of the injection nozzle assembly.

Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

322

PEP-II injection timing and controls  

SciTech Connect

Hardware has been built and software written and incorporated in the existing SLC accelerator control system to control injection of beam pulses from the accelerator into the PEP-II storage rings currently under construction. Hardware includes a CAMAC module to delay the machine timing fiducial in order that a beam pulse extracted from a damping ring will be injected into a selected group of four 476 MHz buckets in a PEP-II ring. Further timing control is accomplished by shifting the phase of the bunches stored in the damping rings before extraction while leaving the phase of the PEP-II stored beam unchanged. The software which drives timing devices on a pulse-to-pulse basis relies on a dedicated communication link on which one scheduling microprocessor broadcasts a 128-bit message to all distributed control microprocessors at 360 Hz. PEP-II injection will be driven by the scheduling microprocessor according to lists specifying bucket numbers in arbitrary order, and according to scheduling constraints maximizing the useful beam delivered to the SLC collider currently in operation. These lists will be generated by a microprocessor monitoring the current stored per bucket in each of the PEP-II rings.

Bharadwaj, V.; Browne, M.; Crane, M.; Gromme, T.; Himel, T.; Ross, M.; Stanek, M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ronan, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Intersubband Absorption at 1.55 ?M In Aln/Gan Multi Quantum Wells ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intersubband Absorption at 1.55 ?M In Aln/Gan Multi Quantum Wells Grown at 770 C by Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy using Pulse Injection Method.

324

Spin Injection Across a Heterojunction: A Ballistic Picture  

SciTech Connect

Spin injection across heterojunctions plays a decisive role in the new field of spintronics. Within the ballistic transport regime, we state a general expression for the spin-injection rate in a heterojunction made of two ballistic electrodes. Both the spin-orbit interaction and interface scattering effect are taken into account. Our model is consistent with the well-documented results of ferromagnetic-metal junctions. It explains the recent experimental results of a dilute-magnetic-semiconductor/semiconductor junction and predicts solutions to enhance the spin-injection rate across a ferromagnetic-semiconductor junction.

Hu, C.-M.; Matsuyama, T.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

325

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

326

Geothermal wells: a forecast of drilling activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numbers and problems for geothermal wells expected to be drilled in the United States between 1981 and 2000 AD are forecasted. The 3800 wells forecasted for major electric power projects (totaling 6 GWe of capacity) are categorized by type (production, etc.), and by location (The Geysers, etc.). 6000 wells are forecasted for direct heat projects (totaling 0.02 Quads per year). Equations are developed for forecasting the number of wells, and data is presented. Drilling and completion problems in The Geysers, The Imperial Valley, Roosevelt Hot Springs, the Valles Caldera, northern Nevada, Klamath Falls, Reno, Alaska, and Pagosa Springs are discussed. Likely areas for near term direct heat projects are identified.

Brown, G.L.; Mansure, A.J.; Miewald, J.N.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Apparatus and method for downhole injection of radioactive tracer  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure relates to downhole injection of radioactive .sup.82 Br and monitoring its progress through fractured structure to determine the nature thereof. An ampule containing granular .sup.82 Br is remotely crushed and water is repeatedly flushed through it to cleanse the instrument as well as inject the .sup.82 Br into surrounding fractured strata. A sensor in a remote borehole reads progress of the radioactive material through fractured structure.

Potter, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Archuleta, Jacobo R. (Espanola, NM); Fink, Conrad F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Report number codes  

SciTech Connect

This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Using Fractional Numbers of . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the design parameters in closed queueing networks is Np, the number of customers of class p. It has been assumed that Np must be an integer. However, integer choices will usually not achieve the target throughput for each class simultaneously. We use Mean Value Analysis with the Schweitzer-Bard approximation and nonlinear programming to determine the value of Np needed to achieve the production targets exactly, although the values of Np may be fractional. We interpret these values to represent the average number of customers of each class in the network. We implement a control rule to achieve these averages and verify our approach through simulation.

Rajan Suri; Rahul Shinde; Mary Vernon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Hydrothermal Injection Research Program. Annual progress report, FY 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test program was initiated at the Raft River Geothermal Field in southern Idaho in September of 1982. A series of eight short-term injection and backflow tests followed by a long-term injection test were conducted on one well in the field. Tracers were added during injection and monitored during backflow of the well. The test program was successful, resulting in a unique data set which shows promise as a means to improve understanding of the reservoir characteristics. In December of 1982 an RFP was issued to obtain an industrial partner to obtain follow-on data on the injection/backflow technique in a second field and to study any alternate advanced concepts for injection testing which the industrial community might recommend. Republic Geothermal, Inc. and the East Mesa Geothermal Field were selected for the second test series. Two wells were utilized for testing, and a series of ten tests were conducted in July and August of 1983 aimed principally at further evaluation of the injection/backflow technique. This test program was also successfully completed. This report describes in detail the analysis conducted on the Raft River data, the supporting work at EG and G Idaho and at ESL/UURI, and gives an overview of the objectives and test program at East Mesa.

Blackett, R.E.; Kolesar, P.T.; Capuano, R.G.; Sill, W.R.; Allman, D.W.; Hull, L.C.; Large, R.M.; Miller, J.D.; Skiba, P.A.; Downs, W.F.; Koslow, K.N.; McAtee, R.E.; Russell, B.F.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Adaptive engine injection for emissions reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

NOx and soot emissions from internal combustion engines, and in particular compression ignition (diesel) engines, are reduced by varying fuel injection timing, fuel injection pressure, and injected fuel volume between low and greater engine loads. At low loads, fuel is injected during one or more low-pressure injections occurring at low injection pressures between the start of the intake stroke and approximately 40 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke. At higher loads, similar injections are used early in each combustion cycle, in addition to later injections which preferably occur between about 90 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke, and about 90 degrees after top dead center during the expansion stroke (and which most preferably begin at or closely adjacent the end of the compression stroke). These later injections have higher injection pressure, and also lower injected fuel volume, than the earlier injections.

Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI): Sun, Yong (Madison, WI)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

332

Reservoir response to injection in the Southeast Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 20 megawatt (MW) increase in steam flow potential resulted within five months of the start-up of new injection wells in the Southeast Geysers. Flow rate increases were observed in 25 wells offset to the injectors, C-11 and 956A-1. This increased flowrate was sustained during nine months of continuous injection with no measurable decrease in offset well temperature until C-11 was shut-in due to wellbore bridging. The responding steam wells are located in an area of reduced reservoir steam pressure known as the Low Pressure Area (LPA). The cause of the flowrate increases was twofold (1) an increase in static reservoir pressure and (2) a decrease in interwell communication. Thermodynamic and microseismic evidence suggests that most of the water is boiling near the injector and migrating to offset wells located ''down'' the static pressure gradient. However, wells showing the largest increase in steam flowrate are not located at the heart of the pressure sink. This indicates that localized fracture distribution controls the preferred path of fluid migration from the injection well. A decrease in non-condensible gas concentrations was also observed in certain wells producing injection derived steam within the LPA. The LPA project has proven that steam suppliers can work together and benefit economically from joint efforts with the goal of optimizing the use of heat from The Geysers reservoir. The sharing of costs and information led directly to the success of the project and introduces a new era of increased cooperation at The Geysers.

Enedy, Steve; Enedy, Kathy; Maney, John

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Monitoring well systems in geothermal areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ability to monitor the injection of spent geothermal fluids at reasonable cost might be greatly improved by use of multiple-completion techniques. Several such techniques, identified through contact with a broad range of experts from the groundwater and petroleum industries, are evaluated relative to application in the typical geologic and hydrologic conditions of the Basin and Range Province of the Western United States. Three basic monitor well designs are suggested for collection of pressure and temperature data: Single standpipe, multiple standpipe, and closed-system piezometers. A fourth design, monitor well/injection well dual completions, is determined to be inadvisable. Also, while it is recognized that water quality data is equally important, designs to allow water sampling greatly increase costs of construction, and so such designs are not included in this review. The single standpipe piezometer is recommended for use at depths less than 152 m (500 ft); several can be clustered in one area to provide information on vertical flow conditions. At depths greater than 152 m (500 ft), the multiple-completion standpipe and closed-system piezometers are likely to be more cost effective. Unique conditions at each monitor well site may necessitate consideration of the single standpipe piezometer even for deeper completions.

Lofgren, B.E.; O'Rourke, J.; Sterrett, R.; Thackston, J.; Fain, D.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A number of organizations,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buying power to purchase green power. The city of Chicago has formed an alliance with 47 other local installed solar electric systems on a number of the city's buildings, including the Chicago Center for Green to competition, the city of Chicago and 47 other local government agencies formed the Local Government Power

335

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

Bolch, Tobias

336

Disjunctive Rado numbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If L1 and L2 are linear equations, then the disjunctive Rado number of the set {L1, L2} is the least integer n, provided that it exists, such that for every 2-coloring of ... Keywords: Rado, Ramsey, Schur, disjunctive

Brenda Johnson; Daniel Schaal

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Grid orientation effects in the simulation of cold water injection into depleted vapor zones  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A considerable body of field experience with injection has been accumulated at Larderello, Italy and The Geysers, California; the results have been mixed. There are well documented cases where injection has increased flow rates of nearby wells. Return of injected fluid as steam from production wells has been observed directly through chemical and isotopic changes of produced fluids (Giovannoni et al., 1981; Nuti et al., 1981). In other cases injection has caused thermal interference and has degraded the temperature and pressure of production wells. Water injection into depleted vapor zones gives rise to complex two-phase fluid flow and heat transfer processes with phase change. These are further complicated by the fractured-porous nature of the reservoir rocks. An optimization of injection design and operating practice is desirable; this requires realistic and robust mathematical modeling capabilities.

Pruess, K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

BOOSTER GOLD BEAM INJECTION EFFICIENCY AND BEAM LOSS  

SciTech Connect

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the BNL requires the AGS to provide Gold beam with the intensity of 10{sup 9} ions per bunch. Over the years, the Tandem Van de Graaff has provided steadily increasing intensity of gold ion beams to the AGS Booster. However, the gold beam injection efficiency at the Booster has been found to decrease with the rising intensity of injected beams. As the result, for Tandem beams of the highest intensity, the Booster late intensity is lower than with slightly lower intensity Tandem beam. In this article, the authors present two experiments associated with the Booster injection efficiency and beam intensity. One experiment looks at the Booster injection efficiency by adjusting the Tandem beam intensity, and another looks at the beam life time while scraping the beam in the Booster. The studies suggest that the gold beam injection efficiency at the AGS Booster is related to the beam loss in the ring, rather than the intensity of injected beam or circulating beam. A close look at the effect of the lost gold ion at the Booster injection leads to the prediction that the lost gold ion creates large number of positive ions, and even larger number of electrons. The lost gold beam is also expected to create large numbers of neutral particles. In 1998 heavy ion run, the production of positive ions and electrons due to the lost gold beam has been observed. Also the high vacuum pressure due to the beam loss, presumably because of the neutral particles it created, has been measured. These results will be reported elsewhere.

ZHANG,S.Y.; AHRENS,L.A.

1998-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

339

European Lean Gasoline Direct Injection Vehicle Benchmark  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lean Gasoline Direct Injection (LGDI) combustion is a promising technical path for achieving significant improvements in fuel efficiency while meeting future emissions requirements. Though Stoichiometric Gasoline Direct Injection (SGDI) technology is commercially available in a few vehicles on the American market, LGDI vehicles are not, but can be found in Europe. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) obtained a European BMW 1-series fitted with a 2.0l LGDI engine. The vehicle was instrumented and commissioned on a chassis dynamometer. The engine and after-treatment performance and emissions were characterized over US drive cycles (Federal Test Procedure (FTP), the Highway Fuel Economy Test (HFET), and US06 Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (US06)) and steady state mappings. The vehicle micro hybrid features (engine stop-start and intelligent alternator) were benchmarked as well during the course of that study. The data was analyzed to quantify the benefits and drawbacks of the lean gasoline direct injection and micro hybrid technologies from a fuel economy and emissions perspectives with respect to the US market. Additionally that data will be formatted to develop, substantiate, and exercise vehicle simulations with conventional and advanced powertrains.

Chambon, Paul H [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Norman, Kevin M [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Thomas, John F [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cementing horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

Since the introduction of horizontal drilling, most completions have been open hole. Open-hole or slotted-liner completions may be satisfactory in straight, thick formations, if stimulation is not required. But if the wellbore wanders out of the reservoir, whether due to loss of directional control or spotty knowledge of formation dimensions, casing becomes a necessity. In addition, a wellbore that stays in the formation but comes uncomfortably close to the water-oil contact or gas cap requires casing to prevent coning. Further, if stimulation is anticipated, or may become a necessity, it is essential that the hole be cased and cemented. Otherwise, there is no control of the stimulation treatment. Even if the horizontal wellbore itself does not require casing, intermediate casing in the high-angle hole is needed. This is especially critical in open-hole completions below a gas cap, for example. The keys to effective horizontal cementing are fundamentally the same as for cementing vertical wells: proper centralization of casing in the bore-hole to ensure efficient mud removal and well-designed cement slurries.

Baret, F.; Griffin, T.J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

342

Single well tracer method to evaluate enhanced recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Data useful to evaluate the effectiveness of or to design an enhanced recovery process (the recovery process involving mobilizing and moving hydrocarbons through a hydrocarbon-bearing subterranean formation from an injection well to a production well by injecting a mobilizing fluid into the injection well) are obtained by a process which comprises sequentially: determining hydrocarbon saturation in the formation in a volume in the formation near a well bore penetrating the formation, injecting sufficient of the mobilizing fluid to mobilize and move hydrocarbons from a volume in the formation near the well bore penetrating the formation, and determining by the single well tracer method a hydrocarbon saturation profile in a volume from which hydrocarbons are moved. The single well tracer method employed is disclosed by U.S. Pat. No. 3,623,842. The process is useful to evaluate surfactant floods, water floods, polymer floods, CO.sub.2 floods, caustic floods, micellar floods, and the like in the reservoir in much less time at greatly reduced costs, compared to conventional multi-well pilot test.

Sheely, Jr., Clyde Q. (Ponca City, OK); Baldwin, Jr., David E. (Ponca City, OK)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers...

344

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential...

345

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers...

346

Projective Space Codes for the Injection Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of error control in random linear network coding, it is useful to construct codes that comprise well-separated collections of subspaces of a vector space over a finite field. In this paper, the metric used is the so-called "injection distance", introduced by Silva and Kschischang. A Gilbert-Varshamov bound for such codes is derived. Using the code-construction framework of Etzion and Silberstein, new non-constant-dimension codes are constructed; these codes contain more codewords than comparable codes designed for the subspace metric.

Khaleghi, Azadeh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Mechanical well jar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a mechanical well jar having inner and outer tubular members movable longitudinally relative to each other a limited distance. Means for connecting one of the members to a pipe string extends above the jar. Means connect the other member to the pipe string below the jar. Annular shoulders on the members engage to limit the relative longitudinal movement of the members. The improvement comprises: laterally spaced, arcuate cam plates each attached to the inner surface of the outer member by threaded members that extend through the wall of the outer member and that can be removed from outside the outer member to allow the cam plates to be removed and repaired or replaced.

Burton, C.A.

1987-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

Preventive Action Number:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-017 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 11_0414 Added problem statement to first block. F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 3 of 3 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Corrective Action Number: Source: Details/Problem Statement: Raised By: Raised Date: Target Date:

349

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT Board of Directors Reply to: Ronald Rayner C. W. Adams James D. Downing, P.E. Chairman Billy Hickman 66768 Hwy 60 Brian Turner Marvin John P.O. Box 99 Vice-Chairman Jason Pierce Salome, AZ 85348 Denton Ross Jerry Rovey Secretary James N. Warkomski ED8@HARCUVARCO.COM John Utz Gary Wood PHONE:(928) 859-3647 Treasurer FAX: (928) 859-3145 Sent via e-mail Mr. Darrick Moe, Regional Manager Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region P. O. Box 6457 Phoenix, AZ 85005-6457 moe@wapa.gov; dswpwrmrk@wapa.gov Re: ED5-Palo Verde Hub Project Dear Mr. Moe, In response to the request for comments issued at the October 6 Parker-Davis Project customer th meeting, and in conjunction with comments previously submitted by the Southwest Public Power

350

Preventive Action Number:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-018 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-018 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 09_0924 Worksheet modified to reflect External Audit recommendation for identification of "Cause for Potential Nonconformance". Minor editing changes. 11_0414 Added Preventive Action Number block to match Q-Pulse

351

Electron bunch injection at an angle into a laser wakefield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

External injection of electron bunches longer than the plasma wavelength in a laser wakefield accelerator can lead to the generation of femtosecond ultrarelativistic bunches with a couple of percent energy spread. Extensive study has been done on external electron bunch (e.g. one generated by a photo-cathode rf linac) injection in a laser wakefield for different configurations. In this paper we investigate a new way of external injection where the electron bunch is injected at a small angle into the wakefield. This way one can avoid the ponderomotive scattering as well as the vacuum-plasma transition region, which tend to destroy the injected bunch. In our simulations, the effect of the laser pulse dynamics is also taken into account. It is shown that injection at an angle can provide compressed and accelerated electron bunches with less than 2% energy spread. Another advantage of this scheme is that it has less stringent requirements in terms of the size of the injected bunch and there is the potential to tr...

Luttikhof, M J H; Van Goor, F A; Boller, K -J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Wellness Peer Program Volunteer Job Description Wellness Peer Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Peer Program Volunteer Job Description Wellness Peer Programs: Leave The Pack Behind & Wellness Centre, UTSC Mental Wellness ­ mental health awareness program focusing on mental health, coping on healthy relationships, sexually transmitted infections and birth control Health & Wellness Centre

Kronzucker, Herbert J.

353

Subsurface steam sampling in Geysers wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new downhole sampling tool has been built for use in steam wells at The Geysers geothermal reservoir. The tool condenses specimens into an initially evacuated vessel that is opened down hole at the direction of an on-board computer. The tool makes a temperature log of the well as it is deployed, and the pressure and temperature of collected specimens are monitored for diagnostic purposes. Initial tests were encouraging, and the Department of Energy has funded an expanded effort that includes data gathering needed to develop a three-dimensional model of The Geysers geochemical environment. Collected data will be useful for understanding the origins of hydrogen chloride and non-condensable gases in the steam, as well as tracking the effect of injection on the composition of produced steam. Interested parties are invited to observe the work and to join the program.

Lysne, P. [Lysne (Peter), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, B. [Unocal Geothermal and Power Operations Group, Santa Rose, CA (United States); Hirtz, P. [Thermochem, Inc., Santa Rosa, CA (United States); Normann, R.; Henfling, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Impact of injection on reservoir performance in the NCPA steam field at The Geysers  

SciTech Connect

A managed injection program implemented by the NCPA in The Southeast Geysers reservoir continues to positively impact reservoir performance. Injection effects are determined by the application of geochemical and geophysical techniques to track the movement of injectate. This information, when integrated with reservoir pressure, flowrate, and thermodynamic data, is used to quantify the overall performance and efficiency of the injection program. Data analysis indicates that injected water is boiling near the injection wells, without deeper migration, and is recovered as superheated steam from nearby production wells. Injection derived steam (IDS) currently accounts for 25 to 35 percent of total production in the NCPA steamfield. Most importantly, 80 to 100% of the injectate is flashing and being recovered as steam. The amount of IDS has increased since 1988 due to both a change in injection strategy and a drying out of the reservoir. However, significant areas of the reservoir still remain relatively unaffected by injection because of the limited amount of injectate presently available. That the reservoir has been positively impacted in the injection areas is evidenced by a decrease in the rate of pressure decline from 1989 through 1992. Correspondingly, there has been a reduction in the rate of steam flow decline in the areas' production wells. Conversely, little evidence of reservoir cooling or thermal breakthrough is shown even in areas where IDS accounts for 80 percent or more of production. Finally, since injection water is a relatively low-gas source of steam, noncondensible gas concentrations have been reduced in some steam wells located within the injection dominated areas.

Enedy, S.L.; Smith, J.L.; Yarter, R.E.; Jones, S.M.; Cavote, P.E.

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

355

GRR/Section 14-TX-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TX-c - Underground Injection Control Permit TX-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-TX-c - Underground Injection Control Permit Pages from 14TXCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (4).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Railroad Commission of Texas Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Tex. Water Code § 27 16 TAC 3.9 46 TAC 3.46 16 TAC 3.30 - MOU between the RRC and the TCEQ Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Pages from 14TXCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (4).pdf Pages from 14TXCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (4).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

356

Oil well jar  

SciTech Connect

A jar for use in imparting jarring blows to an object lodged in the bore of a well. The jar includes a mandrel member and outer telescopically related tubular member, the mandrel member and said tubular member being telescopically movable between an extended and a collapsed position of the jar. One of the members is connected to a drill string while the other of the members is connected to the object to be jarred. Telescopically overlapping portions of the members provide an annular chamber for confining an operating fluid. A sleeve and a cylinder extend into the chamber and into an essentially fluid tight fit with each other for a selected portion of the telescopic travel between the extended and collapsed positions. An operating fluid bypass is provided in the first one of the members, the bypass being in fluid communication with the operating fluid above and below the sleeve, the bypass including a channel. An orifice is disposed in the channel. A filter, distinct from said orifice, is provided by controlling the clearences between the sleeve and the first one of the members.

Sutliff, W. N.

1985-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

357

Finite Neutrosophic Complex Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this book for the first time the authors introduce the notion of real neutrosophic complex numbers. Further the new notion of finite complex modulo integers is defined. For every $C(Z_n)$ the complex modulo integer $i_F$ is such that $2F_i = n - 1$. Several algebraic structures on $C(Z_n)$ are introduced and studied. Further the notion of complex neutrosophic modulo integers is introduced. Vector spaces and linear algebras are constructed using these neutrosophic complex modulo integers.

W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Injection of Zero Valent Iron into an Unconfined Aquifer Using Shear-Thinning Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 190 kg of two micron-diameter zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles were injected into a test zone in the top two meters of an unconfined aquifer within a trichloroethene (TCE) source area. A shear-thinning fluid was used to enhance ZVI delivery in the subsurface to a radial distance of up to four meters from a single injection well. The ZVI particles were mixed in-line with the injection water, shear-thinning fluid, and a low concentration of surfactant. ZVI was observed at each of the seven monitoring wells within the targeted radius of influence during injection. Additionally, all wells within the targeted zone showed low TCE concentrations and primarily dechlorination products present 44 days after injection. These results suggest that ZVI can be directly injected into an aquifer with shear-thinning fluids and extends the applicability of ZVI to situations where other emplacement methods may not be viable.

Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Macbeth, Tamzen

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

359

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells...

360

GRR/Section 14-OR-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-OR-c - Underground Injection Control Permit GRR/Section 14-OR-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-OR-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14ORCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies 40 CFR 144.26: Federal UIC Regulations 40 CFR 144.83: Notification OAR 340-044: State UIC Regulations Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14ORCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

GRR/Section 14-NV-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-NV-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 4-NV-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-NV-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14NVCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Nevada Division of Minerals Nevada Division of Water Resources Bureau of Land Management Regulations & Policies Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS) Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14NVCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

362

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.A. Hsieh 1e$ Pressure Buildup Monitoring of the Krafla Geothermal Field, . . . . . . . . 1'1 Xceland - 0 Initial Chemical and Reservoir Conditions at Lo6 Azufres Wellhead Power Plant Startup - P. Kruger, LSGP-TR-92 - Injection Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal

Stanford University

363

Construction Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Execution - (2009 - 2011) North Execution - (2009 - 2011) Construction Project Number 2009 2010 2011 Project Description ANMLPL 0001C 76,675.32 - - Animas-Laplata circuit breaker and power rights CRGRFL 0001C - - 7,177.09 Craig Rifle Bay and transfer bay upgrade to 2000 amps; / Convert CRG RFL to 345 kV out of Bears Ear Sub FGE 0019C - - 39,207.86 Replace 69/25kV transformer KX2A at Flaming Gorge FGE 0020C - - 52,097.12 Flaming Gorge: Replace failed KW2A transformer HDN 0069C 16,638.52 208,893.46 3,704,578.33 Replace failed transformer with KZ1A 250 MVA 230/138kv

364

KPA Activity Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

supports CMM-SW Level 2 supports CMM-SW Level 2 Mapping of the DOE Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM- SW) level 2. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Activity Number KPA Activity SEM Section SME Work Product SQSE Web Site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse REQUIREMENTS MANAGEMENT RM-1 The software engineering group reviews the allocated requirements before they are incorporated in the software project. Chapter 3.0 * Develop High-Level Project Requirements Chapter 4.0 * Establish Functional Baseline * Project Plan * Requirements Specification Document * Requirements Management awareness * Defining Project Requirements RM-2 The software engineering group uses the allocated requirements as the basis for

365

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal stimulation of an east-flank injection well, the first step in the creation of a heat exchanger at depth. Well datasets from the east flank of the Coso Geothermal Field...

366

Oil-Well Fire Fighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oil Well Fire Fighting. NIST fire Research NIST Fire Research 2 Oil Well Fire Fighting RoboCrane Model Oil Well Fire Fighting Working Model.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

367

Steam-injection profile control using limited-entry perforations  

SciTech Connect

A completion technique for steam-injection wells that ensures improved profile distribution of steam into several independent sands is being used at the South Belridge field in California. Previously, steam profiles were poor for many of the conventionally perforated (two 3/8-in. (9.5-mm) -diameter holes per foot) injection wells. This standard completion does not guarantee that the thicker, higher-permeability sands will not act as thief zones with respect to the thinner, tighter sands open in the same wellbore. Limited-entry perforating (typically one hole per 15 to 20 ft (4.6 to 6.1m) of gross interval with at least one in each major sand member) provides the best assurance of achieving a uniform injection profile in single-wellbore multisand completions.

Small, G.P.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Steam-injection profile control using limited-entry perforations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A completion technique for steam injection wells that assures improved profile distribution of steam into several independent sands is being used at the South Belridge Field, California. Previously, steam profiles were poor for many of the conventionally perforated (two-3/8'' diameter holes per foot) injection wells. This standard completion does not guarantee that the thicker, higher permeability sands will not act as thief zones with respect to the thinner, tighter sands open in the same wellbore. Limited entry perforating (typically one hole per 15-20' of gross interval with at least one in each major sand member) provides the best assurance of achieving a uniform injection profile in single wellbore multi-sand completions.

Small, G.P.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements)...

370

Well-logging activities in Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report is a brief survey of the current state of well-logging service in Russia (number and types of crews, structure of well-logging jobs, types of techniques used, well-logging equipment, auxiliary downhole jobs, etc.). Types and peculiarities of well data acquisition and processing hardware and software are discussed (petrophysics included). New well-logging technologies used in Russia (new methods of electric logging data processing, electromagnetic logging, pulse neutron logging, nuclear magnetic resonance logging, acoustic tomography, logging-testing-logging technique, etc.) are surveyed. Comparison of the Tengiz field (Kazakhstan) well data obtained by Schlumberger and Neftegazgeofizika Association crews is given. Several problems and drawbacks in equipment and technology used by well-logging crews in Russia are discussed.

Savostyanov, N.A. (Neftegazgeofizika, Moscow (Russian Federation))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Geothermal injection treatment: process chemistry, field experiences, and design options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful development of geothermal reservoirs to generate electric power will require the injection disposal of approximately 700,000 gal/h (2.6 x 10/sup 6/ 1/h) of heat-depleted brine for every 50,000 kW of generating capacity. To maintain injectability, the spent brine must be compatible with the receiving formation. The factors that influence this brine/formation compatibility and tests to quantify them are discussed in this report. Some form of treatment will be necessary prior to injection for most situations; the process chemistry involved to avoid and/or accelerate the formation of precipitate particles is also discussed. The treatment processes, either avoidance or controlled precipitation approaches, are described in terms of their principles and demonstrated applications in the geothermal field and, when such experience is limited, in other industrial use. Monitoring techniques for tracking particulate growth, the effect of process parameters on corrosion and well injectability are presented. Examples of brine injection, preinjection treatment, and recovery from injectivity loss are examined and related to the aspects listed above.

Kindle, C.H.; Mercer, B.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Blair, S.C.; Myers, D.A.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

GRR/Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit GRR/Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14UTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Utah Administrative Code R317-7 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Potential Roadblocks If the permit application does not adequately demonstrate that geothermal re-injection wells will be constructed and operated to be protective of any USDWs the issuance of a permit may be denied or delayed. 14UTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf 14UTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf

373

GRR/Elements/14-CA-c.3 - Application For Proposed Underground Injection  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CA-c.3 - Application For Proposed Underground Injection CA-c.3 - Application For Proposed Underground Injection Project < GRR‎ | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections 14-CA-c.3 - Application For Proposed Underground Injection Project Under the Memorandum of Agreement Between State Water Resources Control Board and DOGGR geothermal operators must file an application for underground geothermal wastewater injection with the appropriate DOGGR district office. The application must include: A chemical analysis to characterize the proposed injection fluid; A chemical analysis from the proposed zone of injection considering the characteristics of the zone; and The depth, location, and injection formation of the proposed well. Logic Chain

374

The energy injection and losses in the Monte Carlo simulations of a diffusive shock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) could be simulated by some well-established models, the assumption of the injection rate from the thermal particles to the superthermal population is still a contentious problem. But in the self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations, because of the prescribed scattering law instead of the assumption of the injected function, hence particle injection rate is intrinsically defined by the prescribed scattering law. We expect to examine the correlation of the energy injection with the prescribed multiple scattering angular distributions. According to the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions, the energy injection and the losses in the simulation system can directly decide the shock energy spectrum slope. By the simulations performed with multiple scattering law in the dynamical Monte Carlo model, the energy injection and energy loss functions are obtained. As results, the case applying anisotropic scattering law produce a small energy injection and large energy losses leading to a s...

Wang, Xin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Current drive, anticurrent drive, and balanced injection  

SciTech Connect

In lower hybrid (LH) discharges, the number of suprathermal electrons is limited by the upper bound on the current density from the q = 1 condition, which is caused by the onset of the m = 1 MHD instability. The stored energy of suprathermal electrons, measured in terms of a poloidal beta, scales with plasma current as I/sub p//sup -1/. Potentially, these bounds represent very restrictive conditions for heating in larger machines. Consequently, it seems necessary to perform experiments where the electrons are driven in both directions, parallel and antiparallel to the magnetic field, i.e., bidirectional scenarios like anticurrent drive or balanced injection. Data from PLT relevant to these ideas are discussed. 6 refs., 4 figs.

von Goeler, S.; Stevens, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Cavallo, A.; Chu, T.K.; Fishman, H.; Hill, K.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Utah Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

377

Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

378

Utah Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

379

California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

380

California Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

382

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

383

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

384

Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

385

Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

386

Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

387

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

388

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

389

Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

390

Idaho Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

391

Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

392

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

393

Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

394

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

395

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

396

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

397

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

398

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

399

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

400

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

402

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

403

Maine Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Maine Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

404

Florida Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Florida Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

405

Iowa Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

406

Georgia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Georgia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

407

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

408

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

409

Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

410

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

411

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

412

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

413

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

414

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

415

Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

416

Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

417

Delaware Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Delaware Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

418

Vermont Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

419

Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

420

Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

422

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

423

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

424

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

425

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

426

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

427

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

428

Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

429

Texas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

430

Non-darcy flow behavior mean high-flux injection wells in porous and fractured formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phase and Multiphase Non-Darcy Flow in Porous and FracturedFormulation A multiphase system in a porous or fracturedand multiphase non-Darcy flow in multidimensional porous and

Wu, Yu-Shu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Illinois. The injection well is being drilled into a test area...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

option for CO 2 storage. This is the first drilling into the Mount Simon Sandstone since oil and gas exploratory drilling was conducted some 15 to 40 years ago. Drilling...

432

Radiological Dose Assessment of NORM Disposal in Class II Injection Wells*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The Sandia-Waste Isolation and Transport Model for Fractured Media, Release 4.84, NUREG/CR- 3328, SAND83

Argonne National Laboratory

433

ICPP injection well alternative project, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) portion of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been obtaining water needed for its operations from the Snake River aquifer, which occupies the entire region underlying the site. Most of this water has been used for cooling operating equipment, while a small portion has found various process uses. After passing through the ICPP process area, these waters are then returned to the aquifer. A small portion (about 1%) of the returned stream contains measurable amounts of radioactivity derived from the miscellaneous process users. This report and the recommendations contained herein are based upon stream flows projected for 1985 as supplied by DOE for the ICPP. 26 different alternatives for handling cooling water, chemical, and low level radioactive water disposal are examined. These cases are considered from technical, environmental, safety, and economic points of view. The level of detail is sufficient to eliminate non-viable cases, and to identify those which offer improvements over present practice. The Environmental/Safety Risk Factors were evaluated on a qualitative comparison basis only. Before a recommended improvement is incorporated into the waste disposal system, a conceptual design study should be made which would evaluate all those secondary effects and environmental factors that, by the very nature of the screening process, this study has not provided. Certain synergistic combinations have been noted and are discussed. This report does note whether the operations considered are in regulatory compliance, or are likely to be capable of providing lasting improvement to the waste water system. Qualitative comparisons were made between the various alternatives to confirm their relationship with applicable standards.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Helicopter Surveys for Locating Wells and Leaking Oilfield Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Prior to the injection of CO2 into geological formations, either for enhanced oil recovery or for CO2 sequestration, it is necessary to locate wells that perforate the target formation and are within the radius of influence for planned injection wells. Locating and plugging wells is necessary because improperly plugged well bores provide the most rapid route for CO2 escape to the surface. This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of helicopter and ground-based well detection strategies at a 100+ year old oilfield in Wyoming where a CO2 flood is planned. This project was jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory and Fugro Airborne Surveys

Hammack, R.W.; Veloski, G.A.; Hodges, G. (Fugro Airborne Surveys)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Wellness counseling appointments: To schedule an appointment with a wellness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness counseling appointments: To schedule an appointment with a wellness counselor you may call, email, or simply stop by the Center for Student Wellness to leave a note for a wellness counselor-304-5564 (p) 212-304-5560 (p) 212-544-1967 (f) Email: studentwellness@columbia.edu Wellness information

Grishok, Alla

436

carbon sequestration via direct injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION Howard J. Herzog, Ken Caldeira, and Eric Adams INTRODUCTION The build-up of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and other greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere has caused concern about possible global climate change. As a result, international negotiations have produced the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), completed during the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. The treaty, which the United States has ratified, calls for the "stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system." The primary greenhouse gas is CO 2 , which is estimated to contribute to over two-thirds of any climate change. The primary source of CO

437

Miniaturized flow injection analysis system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Miniaturized flow injection analysis system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis is described, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38{times}25{times}3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction. 9 figs.

Folta, J.A.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Response Tracking Number: 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The significance of vadose-zone biodegradation on the vapor intrusion of petroleum compounds is well recognized, but considered to a limited extent in the guidance document. Although exceptions can occur, the likelihood that dissolved hydrocarbons in groundwater will cause impacts to indoor air is remote. It is more reasonable to focus screening efforts on hydrocarbon release sites with i) shallow NAPL present below the building, ii) direct contact of dissolved hydrocarbons on the building, or iii) migration of petroleum vapors through preferential pathways in contact with contamination. Studies have demonstrated that vadose-zone aerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons is common and significant (Roggemans et al., 2001). The USEPA vapor intrusion database and industry experience both indicate that dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater do not cause vapor intrusion impacts. Provided no preferential pathways are present, the potential for biodegradation is increased at sites with low hydrocarbon concentration, large depth to source, relatively permeable soils, and no capping effect (e.g., low permeability surface soil or cover that would limit transport of O2 into the subsurface) (Health Canada, 2004). Hence, Health Canada is currently considering a provision to allow for a 10x adjustment in the attenuation factor to account for biodegradation at sites with no surface cap and large depths to source. Modeling and site investigation studies demonstrate that biodegradation can result in many orders of magnitude reduction in vapor intrusion risk estimates (Abreu and Johnson, 2005b; Ettinger

Commenter Organization

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Radial lean direct injection burner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Method for improving the steam splits in a multiple steam injection process  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for enhancing the uniformity of steam distribution in a multiple steam injection system comprising a steam generator, a steam header, a primary steam line connecting the generator to the header, and secondary steam lines connecting the header to steam injection wells. It comprises: injecting a surfactant into the primary steam line, and mixing the surfactant and steam sufficiently so that the surfactant and the steam enter the header as a foam.

Stowe, G.R. III.

1990-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

442

Regulation and Permitting of Carbon Dioxide Geologic Sequestration Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update of the United States regulations and project experiences associated with permitting injection wells used for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). This report is an update of a previous Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) study on this subject published in December 2008 when the draft regulations governing geologic sequestration were first published.BackgroundSeparating ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

443

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Application of horizontal wells in steeply dipping reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A three-dimensional reservoir simulation study is performed to evaluate the impact of horizontal well applications on oil recovery from steeply dipping reservoirs. The Provincia field, located in Colombia, provided the basic reservoir information for the study. Reservoir simulation results indicate that for reservoir dip angles greater than about 40', this parameter has little or no effect on the primary recovery performance for homogeneous high-permeability reservoirs, The initial gascap size and the anisotropy of permeability (kv/kh ratio) are the dominant parameters affecting the oil recovery. For thin reservoirs, the location of the horizontal injector will not significantly affect the oil recovery. Simultaneous gas and water injection through horizontal wells can increase the oil recovery factor from almost 35% under primary production to 40%. A significant incremental oil recovery could be expected by employing horizontal wells for simultaneous gas and water injection. A comparison of the production performance of horizontal and vertical producers shows that a horizontal well can produce oil up to 2.5 times the oil rate of a vertical well, without a high rate of gas production. Also, the use of horizontal producers significantly accelerates the oil recovery. For the case of a homogeneous reservoir under simultaneous gas and water injection, the horizontal well system does not give a significant increment in the oil recovery compared to the vertical well system.

Lopez Navarro, Jose David

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

An environmental analysis of injection molding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates injection molding from an environmental standpoint, yielding a system-level environmental analysis of the process. There are three main objectives: analyze the energy consumption trends in injection ...

Thiriez, Alexandre

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Charge - dependent increase in coherence of synchrotron oscillation at injection  

SciTech Connect

Because of coupled bunch instability and/or because of some unidentified mechanism, bunches from the 8 GeV Booster accelerator at Fermilab arrive in the Main Injector synchrotron with a complicated centroid distribution in phase and energy. The currently installed broad band kicker provides a maximum of 2 kV, insufficient to remove injection errors before the oscillations would de-cohere, ignoring the influence of bunch charge. Perhaps surprisingly, for sufficient but generally modest charge, the effect of potential well distortion is to maintain bunch integrity. This talk illustrates the phenomenon for injection into the Fermilab Main Injector and offers an explanation sufficiently general to apply elsewhere.

MacLachlan, J.A.; /Fermilab

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Modeling discharge requirements for deep geothermal wells at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, MX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the mid-l980's, Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) drilled a number of deep wells (M-200 series) at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Baja California, Mexico to investigate the continuation of the geothermal reservoir to the east of the Cerro Prieto-II and III production areas. The wells encountered permeability at depths ranging from 2,800 to 4,400 m but due to the reservoir depth and the relatively cold temperatures encountered in the upper 1,000 to 2,000 m of the wells, it was not possible to discharge some of the wells. The wells at Cerro Prieto are generally discharged by injecting compressed air below the water level using 2-3/8-inch tubing installed with either a crane or workover rig. The objective of this technique is to lift sufficient water out of the well to stimulate flow from the reservoir into the wellbore. However, in the case of the M-200 series wells, the temperatures in the upper 1,000 to 2,000 m are generally below 50 C and the heat loss to the formation is therefore significant. The impact of heat loss on the stimulation process was evaluated using both a numerical model of the reservoir/wellbore system and steady-state wellbore modeling. The results from the study indicate that if a flow rate of at least 300 liters/minute can be sustained, the well can probably be successfully stimulated. This is consistent with the flow rates obtained during the successful stimulations of wells M-202 and M-203. If the flow rate is closer to 60 liters/minute, the heat loss is significant and it is unlikely that the well can be successfully discharged. These results are consistent with the unsuccessful discharge attempts in wells M-201 and M-205.

Menzies, Anthony J.; Granados, Eduardo E.; Puente, Hector Gutierrez; Pierres, Luis Ortega

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

448

Experience with Zinc Injection in European PWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc injection is an effective technique for lowering shutdown dose rates in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This report compiles information about zinc injection experience at Siemens PWRs and compares the results with the use of zinc injection at U.S. PWRs. The plant data confirm that even low concentrations of zinc in the reactor water can indeed lower shutdown dose rates, but plants should make a concerted effort to inject zinc on a continuous basis to achieve the best results.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Wellness Offerings September 17, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Offerings September 17, 2009 Vendor Health Risk Assessment Online Content and Decision (Wellness Partners: American Specialty Health) !" !" !" !" !" !" !" !" Blue Shield of CA !" !" !" !" !" !" !" !" CIGNA (Wellness and DM Partner: Healthways) !" !" !" ! HealthNet !" !" !" ! Kaiser

Kay, Mark A.

450

RMOTC - Testing - Openhole Logging Well  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Openhole Logging Well RMOTC Openhole Logging Well RMOTC has drilled a vertical well that is specifically designated for openhole logging tests. It was drilled to 5,450 feet and has...

451

Well Permits (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Well permits are required for the installation of wells in private and public space. Wells are defined as any trest hole, shaft, or soil excavation created by any means including, but not limited...

452

U.S. Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1940's: 19,946: 1950's: 22,229: 21,416: 21,514: 23,342: 26,156: 28,196: 28,261: 25,419 ...

453

U.S. Crude Oil Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Number ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1940's: 21,352: 1950's: 23,812: 23,179: 23,290: 25,323: 28,141: 30,432: 30,528: 27,364 ...

454

Table 7 Illinois oil field statistics, 1990 Pool, Number of wells Character  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 0 377 AM Ord 5143 Bridgeport, Pen 1070 6 0 0 S 12 AM Jordan 1490 30 0 0 S 10 AM Buchanan, Pen 1290 *Energy, Williamson, 9S, 2E 1968 2.0 384.5 23 0 0 20 Dev 4414 Aux Vases, Mis 2354 1968 23 0 0 39 S 16

455

Table 7 Illinois oil field statistics, 1989 Pool, Number of wells Character  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S 30 AM Bridgeport, Pen 1070 6 0 0 S 12 AM Jordan 1490 30 0 0 S 10 AM Buchanan, Pen 1290 0 0 0 S 15 AM *Energy, Williamson, 9S, 2E 1968 9.2 370.4 23 0 0 20 Dev 4414 Aux Vases, Mis 2354 1968 23 0 0 S 16 Ohara

456

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary) - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... sector. Monthly preliminary (from January 2012 to present) state-level data for the production series, except marketed production, ...

457

Number: 305 Most Dangerous Vehicles ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... top> Number: 314 Marine Vegetation Description: Commercial harvesting of marine vegetation such as algae, seaweed and ...

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

458

Productivity index of multilateral wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the history of petroleum science there are a vast variety of productivity solutions for different well types, well configurations and flow regimes. The main (more)

Nunsavathu, Upender Naik.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Connecticut Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Connecticut Wells Jump to: navigation, search Name Connecticut Wells Place Bethlehem, Connecticut Zip 6751 Sector Geothermal energy Product A Connecticut-based geothermal heat pump...

460

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Injections of Natural Gas into Storage (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

462

Applications of geochemistry to problems in geothermal injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional reservoir engineering studies have, in the past, dealt mainly with interpretation of pressure transient effects in a reservoir. Present-day techniques can be used in many reservoirs to forecast with some reliability the probability, magnitude and timing of pressure interference among wells. However, forecasting fluid breakthrough from an injection well to a production well in geologically complex geothermal reservoirs is not presently possible with any reliability, and forecasting thermal breakthrough is even more difficult. In addition, the chemical effects of injection are poorly understood at present, and it is not possible to predict beforehand the full range of scaling and aquifer plugging problems that may be encountered. This report discusses development of chemical tracers specifically designed for geothermal applications so that breakthrough of injectate can be detected early, and field and laboratory studies on the chemical interactions among reservoir fluids, reservoir rocks and injected fluids so that these interactions can be quantified and models developed for predicting any degradation (or enhancement) of permeability.

Wright, P.M.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

To be more explicit on number 4) below, she wants to try to get...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

only the number of units necessary to meet PJM's directive and optimizing its use of Trona injection to minimize SO 2 emissions. In a June 2, 2006, letter order to Mirant, DOE...

464

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary

465

Well completion and operations for MHF of Fenton Hill HDR Well EE-2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous attempts to connect Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Site Wells EE-2 and EE-3 by pumping 150 thousand to 1.3 million gallons of water had not achieved a detectable hydraulic fracture connection. Therefore, preparations were made to conduct, in December 1983, a 4 to 6 million gallon, 50 BPM water injection in EE-2. The objective was to enlarge the previously created reservoir in EE-2 using massive hydraulic facturing (MHF). The planning, preparations, operations and results of the MHF are presented here. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Dreesen, D.S.; Nicholson, R.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Rigs Drilling Gas Wells Are At - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The increasing number of resulting gas well completions have been expanding production in major producing States, such as Texas. For the year 2000, ...

467

Fuel injection device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injection system and method provide for shaping a combustion plume within a combustion chamber to effectively recirculate hot combustion gases for stable combustion conditions while providing symmetrical combustion conditions. Char and molten slag are passed to the outer boundary layer to complete combustion of char while permitting initial substoichiometric combustion in a reductive atmosphere for reducing discharge of nitrogen oxides. Shaping of the plume is accomplished by an axially adjustable pintle which permits apportionment of driving pressure between elements which contribute tangential and those which contribute radial directional components to oxidant flow entering the combustion chamber.

Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Fuel injection device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injection system and method provide for shaping a combustion plume within a combustion chamber to effectively recirculate hot combustion gases for stable combustion conditions while providing symmetrical combustion conditions. Char and molten slag are passed to the outer boundary layer to complete combustion of char while permitting initial substoichiometric combustion in a reductive atmosphere for reducing discharge of nitrogen oxides. Shaping of the plume is accomplished by an axially adjustable pintle which permits apportionment of driving pressure between elements which contribute tangential and those which contribute radial directional components to oxidant flow entering the combustion chamber.

Carlson, L.W.

1983-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

469

INJECTIVE COGENERATORS AMONG OPERATOR BIMODULES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Given C ?-algebras A and B acting cyclically on Hilbert spaces H and K, respectively, we characterize completely isometric A, B-bimodule maps from B(K, H) into operator A, B-bimodules. We determine cogenerators in some classes of operator bimodules. For an injective cogenerator X in a suitable category of operator A, B-bimodules we show: if A, regarded as a C ?-subalgebra of A?(X) (adjointable left multipliers on X), is equal to its relative double commutant in A?(X), then A must be a W ?-algebra. 1.

Bojan Magajna

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominatedgeothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Water injection has been recognized as a powerful techniquefor enhancing energy recovery from vapor-dominated geothermal systemssuch as The Geysers. In addition to increasing reservoir pressures,production well flow rates, and long-term sustainability of steamproduction, injection has also been shown to reduce concentrations ofnon-condensible gases (NCGs) in produced steam. The latter effectimproves energy conversion efficiency and reduces corrosion problems inwellbores and surface lines.This report reviews thermodynamic andhydrogeologic conditions and mechanisms that play an important role inreservoir response to water injection. An existing general-purposereservoir simulator has been enhanced to allow modeling of injectioneffects in heterogeneous fractured reservoirs in three dimensions,including effects of non-condensible gases of different solubility.Illustrative applications demonstrate fluid flow and heat transfermechanisms that are considered crucial for developing approaches to insitu abatement of NCGs.

Pruess, Karsten

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

471

Horizontal well improves oil recovery from polymer flood--  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal drilling associated with an injection scheme appears to be highly promising for obtaining additional oil recovery. Horizontal well CR 163H, in the Chateaurenard field is discussed. It demonstrated that a thin unconsolidated sand can be successfully drilled and cased. The productivity index (PI) of the well was much greater than vertical wells, and an unproduced oil bank was successfully intersected. On the negative side, it was necessary to pump low in a very deviated part of the well, and the drilling cost was high compared to an onshore vertical well. CR 163H was the fifth and probably most difficult horizontal well drilled by Elf Aquitaine. Located within a polymer-flood project, the target was a 7-m thick sand reservoir at a vertical depth of 590:0080 m. In this inverted seven-spot configuration with one injector in the center and six producers at a distance of 400 m, a polymer solution was injected from 1977 to 1983, followed by water injection.

Bruckert, L. (Elf Aquitaine, Boussens, (FR))

1989-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

472

GRR/Section 14-CO-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 14-CO-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CO-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14COCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Colorado Division of Water Resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14COCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not delegated

473

WELLNESS LIFESTYLE AGREEMENT COMMITMENT FORM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WELLNESS LIFESTYLE AGREEMENT COMMITMENT FORM The Wellness Lifestyle Program is located in Reynolds will actively participate in the wellness program to make Reynolds Hall a healthy and supportive place or more consequences: conduct referral; administrative removal from the Wellness Program and

Weston, Ken

474

Single well seismic imaging of a gas-filled hydrofracture  

SciTech Connect

A single well seismic survey was conducted at the Lost Hills, Ca oil field in a monitoring well as part of a CO2 injection test. The source was a piezoelectric seismic source and the sensors were a string of hydrophones hanging below the source. The survey was processed using standard CMP reflection seismology techniques. A potential reflection event was observed and interpreted as being caused by a near vertical hydrofracture. The radial distance between the survey well and the hydrofracture is estimated from Kirchoff migration using a velocity model derived from cross well seismic tomography. The hydrofracture location imaged after migration agrees with the location of an existing hydrofracture.

Daley, Thomas M.; Gritto, Roland; Majer, Ernest L.

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

475

Human Collagen Injections to Reduce Rectal Dose During Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives: The continuing search for interventions, which address the incidence and grade of rectal toxicities associated with radiation treatment of prostate cancer, is a major concern. We are reporting an investigational trial using human collagen to increase the distance between the prostate and anterior rectal wall, thereby decreasing the radiation dose to the rectum. Methods: This is a pilot study evaluating the use of human collagen as a displacing agent for the rectal wall injected before starting a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Using a transperineal approach, 20 mL of human collagen was injected into the perirectal space in an outpatient setting. Computerized IMRT plans were performed pre- and postcollagen injection, and after a patient completed their radiotherapy, to determine radiation dose reduction to the rectum associated with the collagen injection. Computed tomography scans were performed 6 months and 12 months after completing their radiotherapy to evaluate absorption rate of the collagen. All patients were treated with IMRT to a dose of 75.6 Gy to the prostate. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled into the study. The injection of human collagen in the outpatient setting was well tolerated. The mean separation between the prostate and anterior rectum was 12.7 mm. The mean reduction in dose to the anterior rectal wall was 50%. All men denied any rectal symptoms during the study. Conclusions: The transperineal injection of human collagen for the purpose of tissue displacement is well tolerated in the outpatient setting. The increased separation between the prostate and rectum resulted in a significant decrease in radiation dose to the rectum while receiving IMRT and was associated with no rectal toxicities.

Noyes, William R., E-mail: noyes@cancercenternd.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Hosford, Charles C. [Department of Medical Statistics, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Schultz, Steven E. [Department of Urology, RiverView Health, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

CHANGE OF NAME TIAA Annuity Number CREF Annuity Number TIAA Policy Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHANGE OF NAME TIAA Annuity Number CREF Annuity Number TIAA Policy Number Social Security Number and only use black or dark blue ink. Return this form to: TIAA-CREF P.O. Box 1264 Charlotte, NC 28201 NOTE City State Zip Code For TIAA-CREF USE ONLY Accepted -- Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association

Snider, Barry B.

477

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

478

Particle injection into a chain: decoherence versus relaxation for Hermitian and non-Hermitian dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate a model system for the injection of fermionic particles from filled source sites into an empty chain. We study the ensuing dynamics for Hermitian as well as for non-Hermitian time evolution where the particles cannot return to the bath sites (quantum ratchet). A non-homogeneous hybridization between bath and chain sites permits transient currents in the chain. Non-interacting particles show decoherence in the thermodynamic limit: the average particle number and the average current density in the chain become stationary for long times, whereas the single-particle density matrix displays large fluctuations around its mean value. Using the numerical time-dependent density-matrix renormalization group ($t$-DMRG) method we demonstrate, on the other hand, that sizable density-density interactions between the particles introduce relaxation which is by orders of magnitudes faster than the decoherence processes.

F. Gebhard; K. zu Muenster; J. Ren; N. Sedlmayr; J. Sirker; B. Ziebarth

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

479

Allergy Injection Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Allergy Injection Policy Allergy Injection Policy Allergy Injection Policy Millions of Americans suffer from perennial and seasonal allergic rhinitis. Allergy immunotherapy is an effective way to reduce or eliminate the symptoms of allergic rhinitis by desensitizing the patient to the allergen(s) by giving escalating doses of an extract via regular injections. Receiving weekly injections at a private physician's office is time consuming, reduces productivity, and can quickly deplete an employee's earned leave. FOH offers the convenience of receiving allergy injections at the OHC as a physician-prescribed service, reducing time away from work for many federal employees. Allergy Injection Policy.pdf More Documents & Publications Physician Treatment Order Handicapped Parking Guidance

480

Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection wells number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Injection-backflow tracer testing on a single well is not a commonly used procedure for geothermal reservoir evaluation, and, consequently, there is little published information on the character or interpretation of tracer recovery curves. Two field experiments were conducted to develop chemical tracer procedures for use with injection-backflow testing, one on the fracture-permeability Raft River reservoir and the other on the matrix-permeability East Mesa reservoir. Results from tests conducted with incremental increases in the injection

482

Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY STATUS REPORT on Implementation of NEP Recommendations January, 2005 1 NEP RECOMMENDATIONS: STATUS OF IMPLEMENTATION Chapter 1 1. That the President issue an Executive Order to direct all federal agencies to include in any regulatory action that could significantly and adversely affect energy supplies, distribution, or use, a detailed statement of energy effects and alternatives in submissions to the Office of Management and Budget of proposed regulations covered and all notices of proposed regulations published in the Federal Register. STATUS: IMPLEMENTED. In May 2001, President Bush issued Executive Order 13211 requiring federal agencies to include, in any regulatory action that could significantly and

483

A three-dimensional laboratory steam injection model allowing in situ saturation measurements. [Comparing steam injection and steam foam injection with nitrogen and without nitrogen  

SciTech Connect

The CT imaging technique together with temperature and pressure measurements were used to follow the steam propagation during steam and steam foam injection experiments in a three dimensional laboratory steam injection model. The advantages and disadvantages of different geometries were examined to find out which could best represent radial and gravity override flows and also fit the dimensions of the scanning field of the CT scanner. During experiments, steam was injected continuously at a constant rate into the water saturated model and CT scans were taken at six different cross sections of the model. Pressure and temperature data were collected with time at three different levels in the model. During steam injection experiments, the saturations obtained by CT matched well with the temperature data. That is, the steam override as observed by temperature data was also clearly seen on the CT pictures. During the runs where foam was present, the saturation distributions obtained from CT pictures showed a piston like displacement. However, the temperature distributions were different depending on the type of steam foam process used. The results clearly show that the pressure/temperature data alone are not sufficient to study steam foam in the presence of non-condensible gas.

Demiral, B.M.R.; Pettit, P.A.; Castanier, L.M.; Brigham, W.E.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well Exploratory Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploratory Well Details Activities (8) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Can provide core or cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify stratigraphy and structural features within a well Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole -Information about the heat source Dictionary.png Exploratory Well: An exploratory well is drilled for the purpose of identifying the

485

Modification of turbulent structure in channel flows by microbubble injection close to the wall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation of turbulent structure modification of a boundary layer for a fully developed channel flow by microbubble injection close to the upper wall was carried out using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Two-dimensional velocity components in an x-y plane at Reynolds number of 5128 based on the half height of the channel and bulk velocity were measured. Microbubbles, with an average diameter of 30 ??m were produced by electrolysis and injected in the buffer layer. Different values of the void fraction were attained and used to evaluate the effects of the presence of microbubbles and their concentration within the boundary layer. A reduction in drag was observed due to the injection of microbubbles. Drag reduction augments as the value of the void fraction increases. Furthermore, increases in both the non-dimensional values of streamwise and normal turbulent intensities, normalized by the friction velocity were observed with the void fraction growth. A gradual decrease in the Reynolds shear stresses was achieved as the void fraction increases. This effect is due to a ??decorrelation?? or ??decoupling?? between the streamwise and normal fluctuating velocities. Modifications in the length and time scales due to the presence of microbubbles were detected by calculating two-point correlation coefficients in one and two dimensions and the autocorrelation coefficient at various locations within the measurement zone. Streamline length and time scales were increased. On the contrary, the normal length and time scales were decreased. The vorticity and strain rate values decreased with the injection of microbubbles. Turbulent energy production was also decreased within the boundary layer. Quadrant analysis was used to find out the contribution of the u?? and v?? fluctuating velocity components to the Reynolds stress. The presence of microbubbles reduces the contribution to the Reynolds stresses by Q4 events (sweeps), which are responsible for the production of skin friction. Vortical structure detection in the measurement area was pursued. The structure with and without the microbubble injection is compared. In this study the presence of microbubbles within the boundary layer has produced several modifications in the flow structure as well as reduction in the drag.

Gutierrez Torres, Claudia del Carmen

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Single well surfactant test to evaluate surfactant floods using multi tracer method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Data useful for evaluating the effectiveness of or designing an enhanced recovery process said process involving mobilizing and moving hydrocarbons through a hydrocarbon bearing subterranean formation from an injection well to a production well by injecting a mobilizing fluid into the injection well, comprising (a) determining hydrocarbon saturation in a volume in the formation near a well bore penetrating formation, (b) injecting sufficient mobilizing fluid to mobilize and move hydrocarbons from a volume in the formation near the well bore, and (c) determining the hydrocarbon saturation in a volume including at least a part of the volume of (b) by an improved single well surfactant method comprising injecting 2 or more slugs of water containing the primary tracer separated by water slugs containing no primary tracer. Alternatively, the plurality of ester tracers can be injected in a single slug said tracers penetrating varying distances into the formation wherein the esters have different partition coefficients and essentially equal reaction times. The single well tracer method employed is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,623,842. This method designated the single well surfactant test (SWST) is useful for evaluating the effect of surfactant floods, polymer floods, carbon dioxide floods, micellar floods, caustic floods and the like in subterranean formations in much less time and at much reduced cost compared to conventional multiwell pilot tests.

Sheely, Clyde Q. (Ponca City, OK)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

The Distribution of Ramsey Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the number of integers in the interval [0,x] that are non-trivial Ramsey numbers r(k,n) (3 order of magnitude (x ln x)**(1/2).

Clark, Lane

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Production Trends of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To obtain better well performance and improved production from shale gas reservoirs, it is important to understand the behavior of shale gas wells and to identify different flow regions in them over a period of time. It is also important to understand best fracture and stimulation practice to increase productivity of wells. These objectives require that accurate production analysis be performed. For accurate production analysis, it is important to analyze the production behavior of wells, and field production data should be interpreted in such a way that it will identify well parameters. This can be done by performing a detailed analysis on a number of wells over whole reservoirs. This study is an approach that will lead to identifying different flow regions in shale gas wells that include linear and bilinear flow. Important field parameters can be calculated from those observations to help improve future performance. The detailed plots of several wells in this study show some good numbers for linear and bilinear flow, and some unique observations were made. The purpose of this work is to also manage the large amount of data in such a way that they can be used with ease for future studies. A program was developed to automate the analysis and generation of different plots. The program can also be used to perform the simple calculations to calculate different parameters. The goal was to develop a friendly user interface that would facilitate reservoir analysis. Examples were shown for each flow period, i.e. linear and bilinear flow. Different plots were generated (e.g; Bob Plot (square root of time plot) and Fourth Root of Time Plot, that will help in measuring slopes and thus reservoir parameters such as fracture permeability and drainage area. Different unique cases were also observed that show a different behavior of well in one type of plot from another.

Khan, Waqar A.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Number: 1394 Description: In what ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Number: 1752 Description: When was the Oklahoma City bombing? ... name of the plane that dropped the Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima? ...