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1

Underground Injection Control Program Rules and Regulations (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to preserve the quality of the groundwater of the State and thereby protect groundwater contamination from contamination by discharge from injection wells and...

2

Underground Injection Control (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Injection and Mining Division (IMD) has the responsibility of implementing two major federal environmental programs which were statutorily charged to the Office of Conservation: the Underground...

3

Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Fuel Distributor Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Chapter 27 of the Texas Water Code (the Injection Well Act) defines an "injection well" as "an artificial excavation or opening in the ground made by digging, boring, drilling, jetting, driving, or some other

4

DOE/NETL's phase II mercury control technology field testing program: preliminary economic analysis of activated carbon injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on results of field testing conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), this article provides preliminary costs for mercury control via conventional activated carbon injection (ACI), brominated ACI, and conventional ACI coupled with the application of a sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) to coal prior to combustion. The economic analyses are reported on a plant-specific basis in terms of the cost required to achieve low (50%), mid (70%), and high (90%) levels of mercury removal 'above and beyond' the baseline mercury removal achieved by existing emission control equipment. In other words, the levels of mercury control are directly attributable to ACI. Mercury control costs via ACI have been amortized on a current dollar basis. Using a 20-year book life, levelized costs for the incremental increase in cost of electricity (COE), expressed in mills per kilowatt-hour (mills/kWh), and the incremental cost of mercury control, expressed in dollars per pound of mercury removed ($/lb Hg removed), have been calculated for each level of ACI mercury control. For this analysis, the increase in COE varied from 0.14 mills/kWh to 3.92 mills/kWh. Meanwhile, the incremental cost of mercury control ranged from $3810/lb Hg removed to $166 000/lb Hg removed. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Andrew P. Jones; Jeffrey W. Hoffmann; Dennis N. Smith; Thomas J. Feeley III; James T. Murphy [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (UIC code) is adopted pursuant to the provisions of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-5-11). It is the purpose of this UIC Code to adopt underground injection control (UIC) regulations necessary to qualify the State of Arkansas to retain authorization for its Underground Injection Control Program pursuant to the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974, as amended; 42 USC 300f et seq. In order

6

Underground Injection Control (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Injection Control (West Virginia) Injection Control (West Virginia) Underground Injection Control (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This rule set forth criteria and standards for the requirements which apply to the State Underground Injection Control Program (U.I.C.). The UIC permit program regulates underground injections by 5 classes of wells. All owners

7

Development of an injection augmentation program at the Dixie Valley,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

an injection augmentation program at the Dixie Valley, an injection augmentation program at the Dixie Valley, Nevada geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Development of an injection augmentation program at the Dixie Valley, Nevada geothermal field Abstract Evaporative cooling at geothermal power plants generally reduces reservoir pressures even if all available geothermal liquids are reinjected. Controlled programs of injecting non geothermal waters directly into reservoirs have been tested or implemented at only four fields, three of them being vapor dominated. At the liquid-dominated Dixie Valley geothermal field an unsuccessful search for a large volume source of warm,chemically desirable fluid for augmentation was conducted.After determining water

8

Underground Injection Control Regulations (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article prohibits injection of hazardous or radioactive wastes into or above an underground source of drinking water, establishes permit conditions and states regulations for design,...

9

Underground Injection Control Rule (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule regulates injection wells, including wells used by generators of hazardous or radioactive wastes, disposal wells within an underground source of drinking water, recovery of geothermal...

10

Stanford Geothermal Program, reservoir and injection technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report of the Stanford Geothermal Program presents major projects in reservoir and injection technology. The four include: (1) an application of the boundary element method to front tracking and pressure transient testing; (2) determination of fracture aperture, a multi-tracer approach; (3) an analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection; and, (4) pressure transient modeling of a non-uniformly fractured reservoir. (BN)

Horne, R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Underground Injection Control Fee Schedule (West Virginia) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Injection Control Fee Schedule (West Virginia) Injection Control Fee Schedule (West Virginia) Underground Injection Control Fee Schedule (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Fees Provider Department of Environmental Protection This rule establishes schedules of permit fees for state under-ground injection control permits issued by the Chief of the Office of Water Resources. This rule applies to any person who is required to apply for and

12

Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting new regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. These regulations are directed at the existing fleet of nearly 1,100 boilers. These plants are relatively old with an average age of over 40 years. Although most of these units are capable of operating for many additional years, there is a desire to minimize large capital expenditures because of the reduced (and unknown) remaining life of the plant to amortize the project. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. This is the final site report for tests conducted at Laramie River Station Unit 3, one of five sites evaluated in this DOE/NETL program. The overall objective of the test program is to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at five plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, and AEP's Conesville Station Unit 6. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The goals for the program established by DOE/NETL are to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the benchmark established by DOE of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The goals of the program were exceeded at Laramie River Station by achieving over 90% mercury removal at a sorbent cost of $3,980/lb ($660/oz) mercury removed for a coal mercury content of 7.9 lb/TBtu.

Sharon Sjostrom

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect

The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting new regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. These regulations are directed at the existing fleet of nearly 1,100 boilers. These plants are relatively old with an average age of over 40 years. Although most of these units are capable of operating for many additional years, there is a desire to minimize large capital expenditures because of the reduced (and unknown) remaining life of the plant to amortize the project. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. This is the final site report for tests conducted at DTE Energy's Monroe Power Plant, one of five sites evaluated in this DOE/NETL program. The overall objective of the test program was to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at five plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, and AEP's Conesville Station Unit 6. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The goals for the program established by DOE/NETL were to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the target established by DOE of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The results from Monroe indicate that using DARCO{reg_sign} Hg would result in higher mercury removal (80%) at a sorbent cost of $18,000/lb mercury, or 70% lower than the benchmark. These results demonstrate that the goals established by DOE/NETL were exceeded during this test program. The increase in mercury removal over baseline conditions is defined for this program as a comparison in the outlet emissions measured using the Ontario Hydro method during the baseline and long-term test periods. The change in outlet emissions from baseline to long-term testing was 81%.

Sharon Sjostrom

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL, EPRI, and industry partners, studied mercury control options at six coal-fired power plants. The overall objective of the this test program was to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at six plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, American Electric Power's Conesville Station Unit 6, and Labadie Power Plant Unit 2. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The financial goals for the program established by DOE/NETL were to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the target established by DOE of $60,000 per pound of mercury removed. Results from testing at Holcomb, Laramie, Meramec, Labadie, and Monroe indicate the DOE goal was successfully achieved. However, further improvements for plants with conditions similar to Conesville are recommended that would improve both mercury removal performance and economics.

Sharon Sjostrom

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

Interphase power controller with voltage injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a new family of Interphase Power Controllers (IPC) based on the principle of voltage injection commonly used in phase-shifting transformers (PST). The voltage injection IPC exhibits power (active and reactive) control characteristics similar to previously defined IPC's and retains their inherent qualities: passive control, short circuit limitation and voltage decoupling. It also provides more flexibility for the adjustment of the operating points. Two promising topologies are described in more detail. One of them offers the potential of retrofitting existing phase-shifting transformers into full-fledged IPC's.

Beauregard, F.; Brochu, J.; Morin, G.; Pelletier, P. (Centre d'Innovation sur le Transport d'Energie du Quebec, Varennes, Quebec (Canada))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Combustion oscillation control by cyclic fuel injection  

SciTech Connect

A number of recent articles have demonstrated the use of active control to mitigate the effects of combustion instability in afterburner and dump combustor applications. In these applications, cyclic injection of small quantities of control fuel has been proposed to counteract the periodic heat release that contributes to undesired pressure oscillations. This same technique may also be useful to mitigate oscillations in gas turbine combustors, especially in test rig combustors characterized by acoustic modes that do not exist in the final engine configuration. To address this issue, the present paper reports on active control of a subscale, atmospheric pressure nozzle/combustor arrangement. The fuel is natural gas. Cyclic injection of 14% control fuel in a premix fuel nozzle is shown to reduce oscillating pressure amplitude by a factor of 0.30 (i.e., {approximately}10 dB) at 300 Hz. Measurement of the oscillating heat release is also reported.

Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Robey, E. [EG& G Technical Services of West Virginia, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Cowell, L.; Rawlins, D. [Solar Turbines, Inc., San Diedgo, CA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting new regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. These regulations are directed at the existing fleet of nearly 1,100 boilers. These plants are relatively old with an average age of over 40 years. Although most of these units are capable of operating for many additional years, there is a desire to minimize large capital expenditures because of the reduced (and unknown) remaining life of the plant to amortize the project. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. The overall objective of the test program described in this quarterly report is to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at five plants with configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. This technology was successfully evaluated in NETL's Phase I tests at scales up to 150 MW, on plants burning subbituminous and bituminous coals and with ESPs and fabric filters. The tests also identified issues that still need to be addressed, such as evaluating performance on other configurations, optimizing sorbent usage (costs), and gathering longer-term operating data to address concerns about the impact of activated carbon on plant equipment and operations. The four sites identified for testing are Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station, AmerenUE's Meramec Station, AEP's Conesville Station, and Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant. In addition to tests identified for the four main sites, parametric testing at Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3 has been scheduled and made possible through additional costshare participation targeted by team members specifically for tests at Holcomb or a similar plant. This is the fifth quarterly report for this project. Long-term testing was completed at Meramec during this reporting period. Preliminary results from parametric, baseline and long-term testing at Meramec are included in this report. Planning information for the other three sites is also included. In general, quarterly reports will be used to provide project overviews, project status, and technology transfer information. Topical reports will be prepared to present detailed technical information.

Sharon Sjostrom

2005-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

18

PEP-II injection timing and controls  

SciTech Connect

Hardware has been built and software written and incorporated in the existing SLC accelerator control system to control injection of beam pulses from the accelerator into the PEP-II storage rings currently under construction. Hardware includes a CAMAC module to delay the machine timing fiducial in order that a beam pulse extracted from a damping ring will be injected into a selected group of four 476 MHz buckets in a PEP-II ring. Further timing control is accomplished by shifting the phase of the bunches stored in the damping rings before extraction while leaving the phase of the PEP-II stored beam unchanged. The software which drives timing devices on a pulse-to-pulse basis relies on a dedicated communication link on which one scheduling microprocessor broadcasts a 128-bit message to all distributed control microprocessors at 360 Hz. PEP-II injection will be driven by the scheduling microprocessor according to lists specifying bucket numbers in arbitrary order, and according to scheduling constraints maximizing the useful beam delivered to the SLC collider currently in operation. These lists will be generated by a microprocessor monitoring the current stored per bucket in each of the PEP-II rings.

Bharadwaj, V.; Browne, M.; Crane, M.; Gromme, T.; Himel, T.; Ross, M.; Stanek, M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ronan, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Hydrothermal Injection Research Program. Annual progress report, FY 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test program was initiated at the Raft River Geothermal Field in southern Idaho in September of 1982. A series of eight short-term injection and backflow tests followed by a long-term injection test were conducted on one well in the field. Tracers were added during injection and monitored during backflow of the well. The test program was successful, resulting in a unique data set which shows promise as a means to improve understanding of the reservoir characteristics. In December of 1982 an RFP was issued to obtain an industrial partner to obtain follow-on data on the injection/backflow technique in a second field and to study any alternate advanced concepts for injection testing which the industrial community might recommend. Republic Geothermal, Inc. and the East Mesa Geothermal Field were selected for the second test series. Two wells were utilized for testing, and a series of ten tests were conducted in July and August of 1983 aimed principally at further evaluation of the injection/backflow technique. This test program was also successfully completed. This report describes in detail the analysis conducted on the Raft River data, the supporting work at EG and G Idaho and at ESL/UURI, and gives an overview of the objectives and test program at East Mesa.

Blackett, R.E.; Kolesar, P.T.; Capuano, R.G.; Sill, W.R.; Allman, D.W.; Hull, L.C.; Large, R.M.; Miller, J.D.; Skiba, P.A.; Downs, W.F.; Koslow, K.N.; McAtee, R.E.; Russell, B.F.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Geothermal Injection Technology Program: Annual progress report, Fiscal Year 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Geothermal Injection Technology Program major activities in fiscal year 1986. The Idaho Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI) have been conducting injection research and testing for this program, which was initiated in 1983. Activities at the INEL, representative element nodeling of fracture systems based on stochastic analysis, dual permeability modeling of flow in a fractured geothermal reservoir, and dual permeability model - laboratory and FRACSL-validation studies, are presented first, followed by the University of Utah Research Institute tracer development - experimental studies, which includes a brief description of activities planned for FY-1987.

Not Available

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy-efficient control in injection molding.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??xviii, 209 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis CENG 2008 Yao As an energy-intensive process, in injection molding, energy cost is (more)

Yao, Ke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Dry sorbent injection may serve as a key pollution control ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Dry sorbent injection (DSI) is a pollution control technology that may play a role in the United States' electric power sector's compliance with the Mercury and Air ...

23

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Stanford Geothermal Program, reservoir and injection technology. Fourth annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report of the Stanford Geothermal Program presents major projects in reservoir and injection technology. The four include: (1) an application of the boundary element method to front tracking and pressure transient testing; (2) determination of fracture aperture, a multi-tracer approach; (3) an analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection; and, (4) pressure transient modeling of a non-uniformly fractured reservoir. (BN)

Horne, R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Method for controlling corrosion in thermal vapor injection gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in the method for producing high pressure thermal vapor streams from combustion gases for injection into subterranean oil producing formations to stimulate the production of viscous minerals is described. The improvement involves controlling corrosion in such thermal vapor gases by injecting water near the flame in the combustion zone and injecting ammonia into a vapor producing vessel to contact the combustion gases exiting the combustion chamber.

Sperry, John S. (Houston, TX); Krajicek, Richard W. (Houston, TX)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Sorbent Injection for Small  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas URS Group and their test team will evaluate sorbent injection for mercury control on sites with low-SCA ESPs, burning low sulfur Eastern bituminous coals. Full-scale tests will be performed at Plant Yates Units 1 and 2 to evaluate sorbent injection performance across a cold-side ESP/wet FGD and a cold-side ESP with a dual NH3/SO3 flue gas conditioning system, respectively. Short-term parametric tests on Units 1 and 2 will provide data on the effect of sorbent injection rate on mercury removal and ash/FGD byproduct composition. Tests on Unit 2 will also evaluate the effect of dual-flue gas conditioning on sorbent injection performance. Results from a one-month injection test on Unit 1 will provide insight to the long-term performance and variability of this process as well as any effects on plant operations. The goals of the long-term testing are to obtain sufficient operational data on removal efficiency over time, effects on the ESP and balance of plant equipment, and on injection equipment operation to prove process viability.

28

Direct Injection Compressed Ignition Diesel Automotive Technology Education GATE Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The underlying goal of this project was to provide multi-disciplinary engineering training for graduate students in the area of internal combustion engines, specifically in direct injection compression ignition engines. The program was designed to educate highly qualified engineers and scientists that will seek to overcome technological barriers preventing the development and production of cost-effective high-efficiency vehicles for the US. market. Further, these highly qualified engineers and scientists will foster an educational process to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals who are knowledgeable about and have experience in developing and commercializing critical advanced automotive technologies. Eight objectives were defined to accomplish this goal: (1) Develop an interdisciplinary internal combustion engine curriculum emphasizing direct injected combustion ignited diesel engines. (2) Encourage and promote interdisciplinary interaction of the faculty. (3) Offer a Ph.D. degree in internal combustion engines based upon an interdisciplinary curriculum. (4) Promote strong interaction with industry, develop a sense of responsibility with industry and pursue a self sustaining program. (5) Establish collaborative arrangements and network universities active in internal combustion engine study. (6) Further Enhance a First Class educational facility. (7) Establish ''off-campus'' M.S. and Ph.D. engine programs of study at various industrial sites. (8) Extend and Enhance the Graduate Experience.

Carl L. Anderson

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Control network programs and their execution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control Network Programming (CNP) as a new programming paradigm has been presented elsewhere, and the CNP approach has been illustrated through solving representative typical applications, many of which belong to the AI area. This report aims at more ... Keywords: AI programming, CNP, Spider, control network programming, control networks, non-procedural programming, nondeterministic programming, programming languages, programming paradigms, recursive networks

Kostadin Kratchanov; Emilia Golemanova; Tzanko Golemanov

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

NOx Sensor for Direct Injection Emission Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Electricore/Delphi team continues to leverage the electrochemical planar sensor technology that has produced stoichiometric planar and wide range oxygen sensors as the basis for development of a NOx sensor. Zirconia cell technology with an integrated heater will provide the foundation for the sensor structure. Proven materials and packaging technology will help to ensure a cost-effective approach to the manufacture of this sensor. The electronics technique and interface is considered to be an area where new strategies need to be employed to produce higher S/N ratios of the NOx signal with emphasis on signal stability over time for robustness and durability Both continuous mode and pulse mode control techniques are being evaluated. Packaging the electronics requires careful design and circuit partitioning so that only the necessary signal conditioning electronics are coupled directly in the wiring harness, while the remainder is situated within the ECM for durability and costs reasons. This task continues to be on hold due to the limitation that the definition of the interface electronics was unavailable until very late in the project. The sense element is based on the amperometric method utilizing integrated alumina and zirconia ceramics. Precious metal electrodes are used to form the integrated heater, the cell electrodes and leads. Inside the actual sense cell structure, it is first necessary to separate NOx from the remaining oxygen constituents of the exhaust, without reducing the NOx. Once separated, the NOx will be measured using a measurement cell. Development or test coupons have been used to facilitate material selection and refinement, cell, diffusion barrier, and chamber development. The sense element currently requires elaborate interconnections. To facilitate a robust durable connection, mechanical and metallurgical connections are under investigation. Materials and process refinements continue to play an important role in the development of the sensor.

Betteridge, William J

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

31

Numerical study of boundary layer injection as a scale control method  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A boundary layer injection method of controlling scale-buildup in geothermal two-phase flow nozzles is studied. The object of this study is to set an upper limit on the ratio of the injected mass flow rate to the free stream mass flow rate that is necessary to isolate the scale carrying free stream flow from the nozzle wall. In order to develop a numerical model of the boundary layer flow, assumptions are made which reduce the results to order of magnitude approximations. Two configurations of nozzles with various injection flow rates are tried. It is found by numerical experiment that a nozzle with injection through a 1 mm thick ring near the inlet, is more efficient at isolating the free stream than a porous nozzle. A mass flow rate ratio of 0.173% was necessary to achieve this effect. It may be concluded that an upper limit on the mass flow rate ratio is about 2.0% with injection through a ring near the inlet, and that boundary layer injection is a reasonable method of controlling scale-buildup. A glossary of variables, program documentation and listings are presented for programs GMD15SR8, TRACK11, and TRACK12.

Feiereisen, W.

1975-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

32

Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a system for monitoring and controlling the rate of fluid flow from an injection well used for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Corey, J.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Geothermal injection technology program. Annual progress report, FY-85  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes injection research conducted during FY-1985. The objective was to develop a better understanding of the migration and impact of fluids injected in geothermal reservoirs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual project summaries. (ACR)

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for monitoring and controlling the injection rate of fluid by an injection well of an in-situ remediation system for treating a contaminated groundwater plume. The well is fitted with a gated insert, substantially coaxial with the injection well. A plurality of openings, some or all of which are equipped with fluid flow sensors and gates, are spaced along the insert. The gates and sensors are connected to a surface controller. The insert may extend throughout part of, or substantially the entire length of the injection well. Alternatively, the insert may comprise one or more movable modules which can be positioned wherever desired along the well. The gates are opened part-way at the start of treatment. The sensors monitor and display the flow rate of fluid passing through each opening on a controller. As treatment continues, the gates are opened to increase flow in regions of lesser flow, and closed to decrease flow in regions of greater flow, thereby approximately equalizing the amount of fluid reaching each part of the plume.

Corey, John C. (212 Lakeside Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for monitoring and controlling the injection rate of fluid by an injection well of an in-situ remediation system for treating a contaminated groundwater plume. The well is fitted with a gated insert, substantially coaxial with the injection well. A plurality of openings, some or all of which are equipped with fluid flow sensors and gates, are spaced along the insert. The gates and sensors are connected to a surface controller. The insert may extend throughout part of, or substantially the entire length of the injection well. Alternatively, the insert may comprise one or more movable modules which can be positioned wherever desired along the well. The gates are opened part-way at the start of treatment. The sensors monitor and display the flow rate of fluid passing through each opening on a controller. As treatment continues, the gates are opened to increase flow in regions of lesser flow, and closed to decrease flow in regions of greater flow, thereby approximately equalizing the amount of fluid reaching each part of the plume.

Corey, J.C.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM TECHNICAL REPORT A-S3-1 AERIAL SURVEY TECHNIQUES TO MAP NUMBER rGOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. Technical Report A-83-l 4. TI T L E (""d Subtitle) 5. AERIAL SURVEY···..,." -.d Identity by block numb,,,) Aerial surveys Computer applications Aquatic plant control Mapping

US Army Corps of Engineers

37

Injection engine as a control object. II. Problems of automatic control of the engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Specific features of injection engine as a control object are discussed, strict formulations of problems of engine automatic control and principles of their solution are presented. Examples of solution of the problem of stabilization of air-fuel ratio ...

D. N. Gerasimov; H. Javaherian; D. V. Efimov; V. O. Nikiforov

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Long-Term Carbon Injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for > 90% Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for > 90% Mercury Removal for a PRB Unit with a Spray Drier and Fabric Filter The intent of DOE's Phase I and II field tests was to work with industry to evaluate the most promising mercury control technologies at full-scale in a variety of configurations. Although longer-term tests were conducted, the test period was not sufficient to answer many fundamental questions about long-term consistency of mercury removal and reliability of the system when integrated with plant processes. As the technologies move towards commercial implementation, it is critical to accurately define the mercury removal performance and costs so that power companies and policy makers can make informed decisions. Therefore, the overall objective of this Phase III project is to determine the mercury removal performance, long-term emissions variability, and associated O&M costs of activated carbon injection for >90% mercury control over a 10 to 12 month period on a unit that represents the combination of coal and emission control equipment that will be used for many new and existing power plants.

39

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2003 through September, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the eighth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the semi-annual Technical Progress Report for the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. Additional balance of plant impact information for the two tests was reported in the Technical Progress Report for the time period October 1, 2001 through March 30, 2002. Additional information became available about the effects of byproduct magnesium hydroxide injection on SCR catalyst coupons during the long-term test at BMP, and those results were reported in the report for the time period April 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. During the current period, process economic estimates were developed, comparing the costs of the furnace magnesium hydroxide slurry injection process tested as part of this project to a number of other candidate SO{sub 3}/sulfuric acid control technologies for coal-fired power plants. The results of this economic evaluation are included in this progress report.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Apparatus and method for controlling the secondary injection of fuel  

SciTech Connect

A combustor (28) for a gas turbine engine is provided comprising a primary combustion chamber (30) for combusting a first fuel to form a combustion flow stream (50) and a transition piece (32) located downstream from the primary combustion chamber (30). The transition piece (32) comprises a plurality of injectors (66) located around a circumference of the transition piece (32) for injecting a second fuel into the combustion flow stream (50). The injectors (66) are effective to create a radial temperature profile (74) at an exit (58) of the transition piece (32) having a reduced coefficient of variation relative to a radial temperature profile (64) at an inlet (54) of the transition piece (32). Methods for controlling the temperature profile of a secondary injection are also provided.

Martin, Scott M.; Cai, Weidong; Harris, Jr., Arthur J.

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Control Lighting Control Types to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories Product Designation Process Low Standby Power Energy & Cost Savings Calculators Model Acquisitions Language Working Group Resources Technology Deployment Renewable Energy

42

Development of an injection augmentation program at the Dixie...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water rights, rehabilitating an irrigation well, and constructing a polyethylene pipeline to a dedicated injector.During the first two years of this program four different...

43

Guidelines for Control Center Application Program Interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applying the interoperability concept to the utility control center requires application program interfaces (API) for energy management systems (EMS). This report contains guidelines for achieving plug compatibility of application programs in the control center EMS.

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

44

GRR/Section 14-HI-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-HI-c - Underground Injection Control Permit GRR/Section 14-HI-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-HI-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14HIC - UndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch Regulations & Policies Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 11, Chapter 23 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14HIC - UndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf 14HIC - UndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The developer must receive an Underground Injection Control Permit from the

45

Omega Mine Injection Program: Monongalia County, West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the largest project of its kind, coal combustion products (CCPs) were injected into West Virginia's Omega Mine to prevent mine subsidence and decrease acid mine drainage. This report documents the use of an alkaline grout consisting of 49 percent fluidized-bed combustion ash, 49 percent pulverized coal fly ash, plus 2 percent cement to fill the 10.4-hectare (26-acre) north lobe of a 68-hectare (170-acre) mine. The general requirements for such a grouting material were that it possess 1) sufficient flu...

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

46

Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the time that enhanced AC was injected, the average mercury removal for the month long test was approximately 74% across the test baghouse module. ACI was interrupted frequently during the month long test because the test baghouse module was bypassed frequently to relieve differential pressure. The high air-to-cloth ratio of operations at this unit results in significant differential pressure, and thus there was little operating margin before encountering differential pressure limits, especially at high loads. This limited the use of sorbent injection as the added material contributes to the overall differential pressure. This finding limits sustainable injection of AC without appropriate modifications to the plant or its operations. Handling and storage issues were observed for the TOXECON ash-AC mixture. Malfunctioning equipment led to baghouse dust hopper plugging, and storage of the stagnant material at flue gas temperatures resulted in self-heating and ignition of the AC in the ash. In the hoppers that worked properly, no such problems were reported. Economics of mercury control at Big Brown were estimated for as-tested scenarios and scenarios incorporating changes to allow sustainable operation. This project was funded under the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory project entitled 'Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program--Phase II'.

John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

47

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

M. J. Holmes

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

48

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

A. P. Evans

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

49

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W?s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

A. P. Evans

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

50

Advanced Emission Control Development Program.  

SciTech Connect

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

Evans, A.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

GRR/Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit GRR/Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14UTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Utah Administrative Code R317-7 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Potential Roadblocks If the permit application does not adequately demonstrate that geothermal re-injection wells will be constructed and operated to be protective of any USDWs the issuance of a permit may be denied or delayed. 14UTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf 14UTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf

52

Duct injection for SO{sub 2} control, Design Handbook, Volume 1, Process design and engineering guidelines  

SciTech Connect

PETC developed a comprehensive program of coal-related, acid-rain research and development with a major activity area centering on flue gas cleanup and control of SO{sub 2} emissions. Particular emphasis was placed on the retrofit measures for older coal-fired power plants which predate the 1971 New Source Performance Standards. Candidate emission control technologies fall into three categories, depending upon their point of application along the fuel path (i.e., pre, during, or post combustion). The post-combustion, in-duct injection of a calcium-based chemical reagent seemed promising. Preliminary studies showed that reagent injection between the existing air heater and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) could remove between 50-60% of the SO{sub 2} and produce an environmentally safe, dry, solid waste that is easily disposed. Although SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies were less, the estimated capital costs for duct injection technology were low making the economics of duct injection systems seem favorable when compared to conventional wet slurry scrubbers under certain circumstances. With the promulgation of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 came more incentive for the development of low capital cost flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. A number of technical problems had to be resolved, however, before duct injection technology could be brought to a state of commercial readiness. The Duct Injection Technology Development Program was launched as a comprehensive, four-year research effort undertaken by PETC to develop this new technology. Completed in 1992, this Duct Injection Design Handbook and the three-dimensional predictive mathematical model constitute two primary end products from this development program. The aim of this design handbook and the accompanying math model is to provide utility personnel with sufficient information to evaluate duct injection technology against competing SO{sub 2} emissions reduction strategies for an existing plant.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

This project Final Report is submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41987, 'Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas.' Sorbent injection technology is targeted as the primary mercury control process on plants burning low/medium sulfur bituminous coals equipped with ESP and ESP/FGD systems. About 70% of the ESPs used in the utility industry have SCAs less than 300 ft2/1000 acfm. Prior to this test program, previous sorbent injection tests had focused on large-SCA ESPs. This DOE-NETL program was designed to generate data to evaluate the performance and economic feasibility of sorbent injection for mercury control at power plants that fire bituminous coal and are configured with small-sized electrostatic precipitators and/or an ESP-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) configuration. EPRI and Southern Company were co-funders for the test program. Southern Company and Reliant Energy provided host sites for testing and technical input to the project. URS Group was the prime contractor to NETL. ADA-ES and Apogee Scientific Inc. were sub-contractors to URS and was responsible for all aspects of the sorbent injection systems design, installation and operation at the different host sites. Full-scale sorbent injection for mercury control was evaluated at three sites: Georgia Power's Plant Yates Units 1 and 2 [Georgia Power is a subsidiary of the Southern Company] and Reliant Energy's Shawville Unit 3. Georgia Power's Plant Yates Unit 1 has an existing small-SCA cold-side ESP followed by a Chiyoda CT-121 wet scrubber. Yates Unit 2 is also equipped with a small-SCA ESP and a dual flue gas conditioning system. Unit 2 has no SO2 control system. Shawville Unit 3 is equipped with two small-SCA cold-side ESPs operated in series. All ESP systems tested in this program had SCAs less than 250 ft2/1000 acfm. Short-term parametric tests were conducted on Yates Units 1 and 2 to evaluate the performance of low-cost activated carbon sorbents for removing mercury. In addition, the effects of the dual flue gas conditioning system on mercury removal performance were evaluated as part of short-term parametric tests on Unit 2. Based on the parametric test results, a single sorbent (e.g., RWE Super HOK) was selected for a 30-day continuous injection test on Unit 1 to observe long-term performance of the sorbent as well as its effects on ESP and FGD system operations as well as combustion byproduct properties. A series of parametric tests were also performed on Shawville Unit 3 over a three-week period in which several activated carbon sorbents were injected into the flue gas duct just upstream of either of the two Unit 3 ESP units. Three different sorbents were evaluated in the parametric test program for the combined ESP 1/ESP 2 system in which sorbents were injected upstream of ESP 1: RWE Super HOK, Norit's DARCO Hg, and a 62:38 wt% hydrated lime/DARCO Hg premixed reagent. Five different sorbents were evaluated for the ESP 2 system in which activated carbons were injected upstream of ESP 2: RWE Super HOK and coarse-ground HOK, Norit's DARCO Hg and DARCO Hg-LH, and DARCO Hg with lime injection upstream of ESP 1. The hydrated lime tests were conducted to reduce SO3 levels in an attempt to enhance the mercury removal performance of the activated carbon sorbents. The Plant Yates and Shawville studies provided data required for assessing carbon performance and long-term operational impacts for flue gas mercury control across small-sized ESPs, as well as for estimating the costs of full-scale sorbent injection processes.

Carl Richardson; Katherine Dombrowski; Douglas Orr

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

GRR/Section 14-TX-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TX-c - Underground Injection Control Permit TX-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-TX-c - Underground Injection Control Permit Pages from 14TXCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (4).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Railroad Commission of Texas Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Tex. Water Code § 27 16 TAC 3.9 46 TAC 3.46 16 TAC 3.30 - MOU between the RRC and the TCEQ Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Pages from 14TXCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (4).pdf Pages from 14TXCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (4).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

55

Headquarters Facilities Work Planning and Control Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Headquarters Facilities Work Planning and Control Program Headquarters Facilities Work Planning and Control Program Headquarters Facilities Work Planning and Control Program...

56

Water injection into a Low-Permeability Rock - 2: Control Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part 1, we have demonstrated the inevitable growth of the fluid injection hydrofractures in low-permeability rocks. Thus, a smart controller that manages fluid injection in the presence of hydrofracture extension is highly desirable. Such a controller will be an essential part of automated waterflood project surveillance and control. Here we design an optimal injection controller using methods of optimal control theory. The controller inputs are the history of the injection pressure and the cumulative injection, along with the fracture size. The output parameter is the injection pressure and the control objective is the injection rate. We demonstrate that the optimal injection pressure depends not only on the instantaneous measurements, but it is determined by the whole history of the injection and of the fracture area growth. We show the controller robustness when the inputs are delayed and noisy and when the fracture undergoes abrupt extensions. Finally, we propose a procedure that allows estimation of the hydrofracture size at no additional cost.

Silin, Dmitriy B.; Patzek, Tad W.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Controlled air injection for a fuel cell system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for injecting oxygen into a fuel cell reformate stream to reduce the level of carbon monoxide while preserving the level of hydrogen in a fuel cell system.

Fronk, Matthew H. (Honeove Falls, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Cost Estimate of Activated Carbon Injection for Controlling Mercury...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mercury reductions of between 60% and 70% at injection rates around 10-15 lbsmillion acf (see Figure 1). Although regression analysis of full-scale ACIESP data shows that it...

59

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbent InjectIon for Small eSP Sorbent InjectIon for Small eSP mercury control In low Sulfur eaStern bItumInouS coal flue GaS Background Full-scale field testing has demonstrated the effectiveness of activated carbon injection (ACI) as a mercury-specific control technology for certain coal-fired power plants, depending on the plant's coal feedstock and existing air pollution control device configuration. In a typical configuration, powdered activated carbon (PAC) is injected downstream of the plant's air heater and upstream of the existing particulate control device - either an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) or a fabric filter (FF). The PAC adsorbs the mercury from the combustion flue gas and is subsequently captured along with the fly ash in the ESP or FF. ACI can have some negative side

60

Stored program digital process controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital process control function generator wherein a timing clock, in conjunction with programmable read only memories controls variables in a process with respect to time.

Stephenson, Dwight L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1977-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Steam-injection profile control using limited-entry perforations  

SciTech Connect

A completion technique for steam-injection wells that ensures improved profile distribution of steam into several independent sands is being used at the South Belridge field in California. Previously, steam profiles were poor for many of the conventionally perforated (two 3/8-in. (9.5-mm) -diameter holes per foot) injection wells. This standard completion does not guarantee that the thicker, higher-permeability sands will not act as thief zones with respect to the thinner, tighter sands open in the same wellbore. Limited-entry perforating (typically one hole per 15 to 20 ft (4.6 to 6.1m) of gross interval with at least one in each major sand member) provides the best assurance of achieving a uniform injection profile in single-wellbore multisand completions.

Small, G.P.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Steam-injection profile control using limited-entry perforations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A completion technique for steam injection wells that assures improved profile distribution of steam into several independent sands is being used at the South Belridge Field, California. Previously, steam profiles were poor for many of the conventionally perforated (two-3/8'' diameter holes per foot) injection wells. This standard completion does not guarantee that the thicker, higher permeability sands will not act as thief zones with respect to the thinner, tighter sands open in the same wellbore. Limited entry perforating (typically one hole per 15-20' of gross interval with at least one in each major sand member) provides the best assurance of achieving a uniform injection profile in single wellbore multi-sand completions.

Small, G.P.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

GRR/Section 14-ID-c - Underground Injection Control | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-ID-c - Underground Injection Control 4-ID-c - Underground Injection Control < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-ID-c - Underground Injection Control 14IDCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Water Resources Regulations & Policies IDAPA 37.03.04 IDAPA 37.03.03 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Potential Roadblocks Extensive public comments can stretch the timeline since IDWR must respond to all comments, potentially hold a Fact Finding Hearing, and thoroughly review the input received in these processes prior to making a decision to issue or deny the permit. 14IDCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf

64

GRR/Section 14-CA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

14-CA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14-CA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14CACUndergroundInjectionControl.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Regulations & Policies Division 3, Chapter 4 of the California Public Resources Code Title 14, Division 2, Chapter 4 of the California Code of Regulations Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 144 Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 146 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14CACUndergroundInjectionControl.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

65

GRR/Section 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit GRR/Section 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Chapter 173-218 WAC Non-endangerment Standard Triggers None specified The Safe Drinking Water Act requires Washington to implement technical criteria and standards to protect underground sources of drinking water from contamination. Under Chapter 173-218 WAC, the Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) regulates and permits underground injection control (UIC) wells in Washington. The Environmental Protection Agency

66

GRR/Section 14-OR-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-OR-c - Underground Injection Control Permit GRR/Section 14-OR-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-OR-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14ORCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies 40 CFR 144.26: Federal UIC Regulations 40 CFR 144.83: Notification OAR 340-044: State UIC Regulations Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14ORCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

67

GRR/Section 14-NV-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-NV-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 4-NV-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-NV-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14NVCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Nevada Division of Minerals Nevada Division of Water Resources Bureau of Land Management Regulations & Policies Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS) Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14NVCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

68

Environmental Restoration Program Management Control Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Management Control Plan has been prepared to define the Energy Systems approach to managing its participation in the US DOE's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program in a manner consistent with DOE/ORO 931: Management Plan for the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge, Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; and the Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Contract Management Plan (CMP). This plan discusses the systems, procedures, methodology, and controls to be used by the program management team to attain these objectives.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

FY2001 Progress Report for the Spark Ignition Direct Injection R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPARK IGNITION, SPARK IGNITION, DIRECT INJECTION ENGINE R&D 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory and Computer Systems Management, Inc., for their artistic and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transportation Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2001 Progress Report for the Spark Ignition Direct Injection R&D Program

70

Flue gas injection control of silica in cooling towers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injection of CO{sub 2}-laden flue gas can decrease the potential for silica and calcite scale formation in cooling tower blowdown by lowering solution pH to decrease equilibrium calcite solubility and kinetic rates of silica polymerization. Flue gas injection might best inhibit scale formation in power plant cooling towers that use impaired makeup waters - for example, groundwaters that contain relatively high levels of calcium, alkalinity, and silica. Groundwaters brought to the surface for cooling will degas CO{sub 2} and increase their pH by 1-2 units, possibly precipitating calcite in the process. Recarbonation with flue gas can lower the pHs of these fluids back to roughly their initial pH. Flue gas carbonation probably cannot lower pHs to much below pH 6 because the pHs of impaired waters, once outgassed at the surface, are likely to be relatively alkaline. Silica polymerization to form scale occurs most rapidly at pH {approx} 8.3 at 25 C; polymerization is slower at higher and lower pH. pH 7 fluids containing {approx}220 ppm SiO{sub 2} require > 180 hours equilibration to begin forming scale whereas at pH 8.3 scale formation is complete within 36 hours. Flue gas injection that lowers pHs to {approx} 7 should allow substantially higher concentration factors. Periodic cycling to lower recoveries - hence lower silica concentrations - might be required though. Higher concentration factors enabled by flue gas injection should decrease concentrate volumes and disposal costs by roughly half.

Brady, Patrick Vane; Anderson, Howard L., Jr.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

International Nonproliferation Export Control Program (INECP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation and Nonproliferation and National Security Program > TNPS > Strategic Trade Control > International Programs > INECP Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr

72

GRR/Section 14-CO-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 14-CO-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CO-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14COCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Colorado Division of Water Resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14COCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not delegated

73

GRR/Section 14-MT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 14-MT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14MTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

74

Neural Predictive Controller Based Diesel Injection Management System for Emission Minimisation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid growth in production of automobiles has increased emissions. Automotive control engineers use innovative control techniques to meet the upcoming emission standards. This paper proposes a novel method of employing artificial neural network ANN based ... Keywords: Artificial Neural Network ANN, Common Rail System CRS, Control System Simulation, Emission Minimisation, Fuel Injection System, Green System Design, Green Technology

C. N. Arunaa; S. Babu Devasenapati; K. I. Ramachandran; K. Vishnuprasad; C. Surendra

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Southeast Geyers Cooperative Tracer Evaluation and Testing Program for the Purpose of Estimating The Efficiency of Injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Southeast Geysers Cooperative Tracer Evaluation Program has been a joint project located in the SE part of the Geysers geothermal field, in Lake and Sonoma Counties, California. A new generation of environmentally benign vapor-phase tracers has been used to estimate the varying degrees to which injectate is being recovered following the significant increase of injected volumes within the Southeast Geysers.

J.L. (Bill) Smith

2001-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

76

Optical injection and coherent control of a ballistic charge current in GaAsAlGaAs quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical injection and coherent control of a ballistic charge current in GaAs?AlGaAs quantum wells of Hache´ et al.,2,3 but in this article we report injection into the plane of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells specific to quantum wells. Although we expect the underlying physics of injection and control of currents

Sipe,J. E.

77

Internal Technical Report, Hydrothermal Injection Program - East Mesa 1983-84 Test Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a test data index and a data plots for a series of 12 drawdown and tracer injection-withdrawal tests in porous-media aquifers at the East Mesa Geothermal Field located in the Imperial Valley near El Centro, California. Test and instrumentation summaries are also provided. The first 10 of these tests were completed during July and August 1983. The remaining 2 tests were completed in February 1984, after a 6-month quiescent period, in which tracers were left in the reservoir. The test wells used were 56-30 and 56-19, with 38-30 supplying water for the injection phase and 52-29 used as a disposal well during the backflowing of the test wells. Six other wells in the surrounding area were measured periodically for possible hydrologic effects during testing. It is not the intent of this report to supply analyzed data, but to list the uninterpreted computer stored data available for analysis. The data have been examined only to the extent to ensure that they are reasonable and internally consistent. This data is stored on permanent files at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cyber Computer Complex. The main processors for this complex are located at the Computer Science Center (CSC) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Hydrothermal Injection Test program, funded by the Department of Energy, was a joint effort between EG and G Idaho, Inc., the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI) and Republic Geothermal, Inc. (RGI) of Santa Fe Springs, California.

Freiburger, R.M.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Optimization of Trona/Limestone Injection for SO2 Control in Coal-Fired Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Mobotec USA develops and markets air pollution control systems for utility boilers and other combustion systems. They have a particular interest in technologies that can reduce NOx, SOx, and mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers, and have been investigating the injection of sorbents such as limestone and trona into a boiler to reduce SOx and Hg emissions. WRI proposed to use the Combustion Test Facility (CTF) to enable Mobotec to conduct a thorough evaluation of limestone and trona injection for SO{sub 2} control. The overall goal of the project was to characterize the SO{sub 2} reductions resulting from the injection of limestone and trona into the CTF when fired with a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal used in one of Mobotec's Midwest installations. Results revealed that when limestone was injected at Ca:S molar ratios of 1.5 to 3.0, the resulting SO{sub 2} reductions were 35-55%. It is believed that further reductions can be attained with improved mixing of the sorbent with the combustion gases. When limestone was added to the coal, at Ca:S molar ratios of 0.5 to 1.5, the SO{sub 2} reductions were 13-21%. The lower reductions were attributed to dead-burning of the sorbent in the high temperature flame zone. In cases where limestone was both injected into the furnace and added to the coal, the total SO{sub 2} reductions for a given Ca:S molar ratio were similar to the reductions for furnace injection only. The injection of trona into the mid-furnace zone, for Na:S molar ratios of 1.4 to 2.4, resulted in SO{sub 2} reductions of 29-43%. Limestone injection did not produce any slag deposits on an ash deposition probe while trona injection resulted in noticeable slag deposition.

None

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Pollution Control Air Pollution Control Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Air Pollution Control Program The Air Pollution Control Program assists state, local, and tribal agencies in planning, developing, establishing, improving, and maintaining adequate

80

MODELING POWDERED SORBENT INJECTION IN COMBINATION WITHE FABRIC FILTER FOR THE CONTROL OF MERCURY EMISSIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWDERED SORBENT INJECTION IN POWDERED SORBENT INJECTION IN COMBINATION WITH FABRIC FILTER FOR THE CONTROL OF MERCURY EMISSIONS Joseph R. V. Flora Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 Richard A. Hargis, William J. O'Dowd, Henry W. Pennline National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box, 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 Radisav D. Vidic * Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 ABSTRACT A two-stage mathematical model for mercury removal using powdered activated carbon injection upstream of a baghouse filter was developed, with the first stage accounting for removal in the ductwork and the second stage accounting for additional removal due to the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Application for Underground Injection Control Permit for the PUNA Geothermal Venture Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) plans to construct and operate the 25 MW Puna Geothermal Venture Project in the Puna District of the Island of Hawaii. The project will drill geothermal wells within a dedicated 500-acre project area, use the produced geothermal fluid to generate electricity for sale to the Hawaii Electric Light Company for use on the Island of Hawaii, and inject all the produced geothermal fluids back into the geothermal reservoir. Since the project will use injection wells, it will require an Underground Injection Control (UIC) permit from the Drinking Water Section of the State of Hawaii Department of Health. The PGV Project is consistent with the State and County of Hawaii's stated objectives of providing energy self-sufficiency and diversifying Hawaii's economic base. The project will develop a new alternate energy source as well as provide additional information about the nature of the geothermal resource.

None

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Application for Underground Injection Control Permit for the PUNA Geothermal Venture Project  

SciTech Connect

Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) plans to construct and operate the 25 MW Puna Geothermal Venture Project in the Puna District of the Island of Hawaii. The project will drill geothermal wells within a dedicated 500-acre project area, use the produced geothermal fluid to generate electricity for sale to the Hawaii Electric Light Company for use on the Island of Hawaii, and inject all the produced geothermal fluids back into the geothermal reservoir. Since the project will use injection wells, it will require an Underground Injection Control (UIC) permit from the Drinking Water Section of the State of Hawaii Department of Health. The PGV Project is consistent with the State and County of Hawaii's stated objectives of providing energy self-sufficiency and diversifying Hawaii's economic base. The project will develop a new alternate energy source as well as provide additional information about the nature of the geothermal resource.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Pilot-scale HCl control by dry alkaline injection for emissions from refuse incinerators. Technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One method of removing the HCl in an exhaust-gas stream is to directly inject finely divided sorbent particles into the gas stream upstream from particulate collection equipment, allowing enough time for the HCl to react with the sorbent in the duct. The study proposed to provide data on HCl removal from a simulated incinerator exhaust stream as a function of the in-duct reaction/residence time, the reaction temperature, and the sorbent-to-gas ratio. A 500-acfm pilot-scale HCl control system utilizing dry powdered sorbent was tested at the University of Washington. Powdered alkaline reagents including sodium bicarbonate and calcium hydroxide were injected into boiler flue gas spiked with hydrogen chloride gas. The acid gas reacts with the injected sorbent in a 20-inch diameter by 26-foot high vertical, down-flow vessel. HCl removal efficiency was measured as a function of sorbent stoichiometry, gas residence time in reactor, and reaction temperature.

Moore, D.; Pilat, M.

1988-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

84

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

84-2004 84-2004 SEPTEMBER 2004 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 Date June 2006 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS U.S. Department of Energy AREA OCSH Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Table of Changes Page Change 67 (near bottom) In row 1, column 2 of the table titled "dosimetric properties" 6 mrem was changed to 6 x 10 -2 mrem Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1184-2004 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have undertaken a wide variety

85

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Focus Area: Propane Topics: Socio-Economic Website: theicct.orgsitesdefaultfilespublications...

86

Injection engine as a control object. I. Schematic diagram of the engine and synthesis of a mathematical model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper is devoted to the analysis of injection engine as an object of automatic control by a built-in microprocessor system. The schematic diagram of the engine is presented; controlled, measured, and input variables are indicated; a mathematical ...

D. N. Gerasimov; H. Javaherian; D. V. Efimov; V. O. Nikiforov

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Surface acoustic wave controlled carrier injection into self-assembled quantum dots and quantum posts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on recent progress in the acousto-electrical control of self-assembled quantum dot and quantum post using radio frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs). We show that the occupancy state of these optically active nanostructures can be controlled via the SAW-induced dissociation of photogenerated excitons and the resulting sequential bipolar carrier injection which strongly favors the formation of neutral excitons for quantum posts in contrast to conventional quantum dots. We demonstrate high fidelity preparation of the neutral biexciton which makes this approach suitable for deterministic entangled photon pair generation. The SAW driven acoustic charge conveyance is found to be highly efficient within the wide quantum well surrounding the quantum posts. Finally we present the direct observation of acoustically triggered carrier injection into remotely positioned, individual quantum posts which is required for a low-jitter SAW-triggered single photon source.

Hubert J. Krenner; Stefan Vlk; Florian J. R. Schlein; Florian Knall; Achim Wixforth; Dirk Reuter; Andreas D. Wieck; Hyochul Kim; Tuan A. Truong; Pierre M. Petroff

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

88

Impacts of Low-NOX Combustion and Activated Carbon Injection on Particulate Control Device Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model study of the re-entrainment of carbon from the hoppers of a typical utility electrostatic precipitator (ESP). During earlier phases of this study, hopper re-entrainment was identified as the principle mechanism responsible for the low collection efficiency of carbon by ESPs. This statement was found to be true for both unburned carbon from the boiler and activated carbon injected for mercury control. The results indicate tha...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources South Dakota's Air Pollution Control Program is intended to maintain air quality standards through monitoring the ambient air quality throughout the

90

Seismic monitoring of the June, 1988 Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program flow/injection test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface. We deployed our recording stations so that we could detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous seismic noise energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. This event has provided the opportunity to compare the detection and location capabilities of small networks and arrays in a geothermal environment. At present, we are carefully scanning all of the data that we collected during the flow test for evidence of anomalous seismic noise sources and for impulsive events smaller than the network detection threshold (magnitude 0.0). 8 refs., 4 figs.

Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Hutchings, L.J.; Hauk, T.F.

1988-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

91

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F 1325.8 F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: May 11, 2006 REPLY TO EH-52:JRabovsky:3-2 135 ATTN OF: APPROVAL OF CHANGE NOTICE 1 TO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) SUBJECT. HANDBOOK 1184-2004, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS TO: Dennis Kubicki, EH-24 Technical Standards Manager This memorandum forwards the subject Change Notice 1 to DOE Handbook, DOE- HDBK- 1184-2004, which has approved for publication and distribution. The change to this handbook consists of a correction to the rule of thumb, listed in Appendix A, for converting the uptake of tritium oxide into radiation dose. A factor of 1/100 was inadvertently omitted from this rule of thumb when this DOE Handbook was originally published. This change does not affect the references, is not of a technical nature, and

92

Active Control of an Axial Flow Compressor via Pulsed Air Injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the use of pulsed air injection to control the onset of rotating stall in a low-speed, axial flow compressor. By measuring the unsteady pressures near the rotor face, a control algorithm determines the magnitude and phase of the first mode of rotating stall and controls the injection of air in the front of the rotor face. Experimental results show that this technique slightly extends the stall point of the compressor and eliminates the hysteresis loop normally associated with rotating stall. A parametric study is used to determine the optimal control parameters for suppression of stall. Analytic results---using a low-dimensional model developed by Moore and Greitzer combined with an unsteady shift in the compressor characteristic to model the injectors---give further insights into the operation of the controller. Based on this model, we show that the behavior of the experiment can be explained as a change in the bifurcation behavior of the system under non...

Raffaello D' Andrea; Robert L. Behnken; Richard M. Murray; Asme J. Turbomachinery

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field TesTing oF AcTivATed cArbon Field TesTing oF AcTivATed cArbon injecTion opTions For Mercury conTrol AT TXu's big brown sTATion Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. Lignite coal is unique because of its highly variable ash content (rich in alkali and alkaline-earth elements), high moisture levels, low chlorine content, and high calcium content. Unique to Texas lignite coals are relatively high iron and selenium concentrations. When combusting Texas lignite coals, up to 80 percent of the mercury in the flue gas is present as elemental mercury, which is not readily captured by downstream pollution control devices. To better understand the factors that influence mercury control at units firing

94

Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Control Types Characteristics of the most common lighting controls for offices and other public buildings are outlined below. Typical Lighting Control Applications...

95

Reducing cold start hydrocarbon emissions from port fuel injected spark ignition engines with improved management of hardware & controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to investigate strategies for reducing cold start hydrocarbon (HC) emissions from port fuel injected (PFI) spark ignition (SI) engines with better use of existing hardware and control ...

Lang, Kevin R., 1980-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Alabama Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider ADEM This rule states standards for emission inventory reporting requirements, ambient air quality standards, sampling and testing methods and guidelines for maintenance of equipment. It also states guidelines for air pollution

97

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the most...

98

Visualization & Controls Program Peer Review | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Visualization & Controls Program Peer Review Visualization & Controls Program Peer Review Visualization & Controls Program Peer Review With mounting evidence suggesting an increased probability that malicious attacks may be launched against energy control systems, there is a critical need to understand specific cyber vulnerabilities and corresponding mitigation strategies. This need is being addressed by SCADA/ Energy Management System (EMS) Cyber Security Assessments conducted at the National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) facility at INL and at on-site field installations of control systems. Visualization & Controls Program Peer Review More Documents & Publications DOE/OE National SCADA Test Bed Fiscal Year 2009 Work Plan DOE National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan Vulnerability Analysis of Energy Delivery Control Systems - 2011

99

State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for underground injection control. Summary annual report, April 1992--April 1993  

SciTech Connect

ICF Resources` project, entitled {open_quotes}State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for Underground Injection Control{close_quotes} includes two primary tasks (development of state and national systems respectively) and a technology transfer element. The state system was designed to assist states with data management related to underground injection control (UIC). However, during the current period, external changes (primarily pending regulatory changes at the federal level) have made the risk assessment protocol aspect of the state system of increased importance relative to data management. This protocol would assess the relative risk of groundwater contamination due to UIC activities in various areas of the state. The risk assessment system could be used to assist states in allocating scarce resources and potentially could form the analytical basis of a state variance program to respond to pending federal regulatory changes. Consequently, a substantial portion of the effort to date has been focused on this aspect of the project, The national energy and environmental risk analysis system (EERAS) is designed to enhance DOE`s analytical capabilities. This concept will be demonstrated using UIC data. The initial system design for EERAS has been completed but may be revised based on input from DOE and on the pending UIC regulatory changes. Data have been collected and organized and can be input once the file structure is finalized. The further development options for EERAS defined as part of this project will allow for the full development of the system beyond the current prototype phase which will enhance DOE`s analytical capabilities for responding to regulatory initiatives and for evaluating the benefits of risk-based regulatory approaches.

Haas, M.R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

EL Program: Smart Manufacturing and Construction Control ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... modeling and simulation into an automated optimization architecture, the program ... staff will work closely with ITL, ISA, and the Smart Grid Office for ...

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EL Program: Smart Manufacturing and Construction Control ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... modeling and simulation into an automated optimization architecture, the program ... staff will work closely with ITL, ISA, and the Smart Grid Office for ...

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

DOE/NETL's Mercury Control Technology R&D Program Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE/NETL's Mercury Control Technology R&D Program Review DOE/NETL's Mercury Control Technology R&D Program Review July 14-15, 2004 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Program Review Overview Sorbent Injection Research Panel Discussion: Sorbent Injection for Hg Control Mercury Control Technology R&D I Poster Session Mercury Control Technology R&D II By-Product Characterization Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

103

Data Collection Computers Instrument Control Program (ICP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... once whenever a controller is connected to the instrument. ... used at the polarized beam instruments each have ... do not operate the controls by hand. ...

104

Radiation Control Program and Radiation Control Act (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute authorizes the state to implement a regulatory program for sources of radiation, and contains rules for the Department, licensing and registration, and taxation of radioactive materials.

105

Division of Environmental Control Technology program, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Environmental engineering programs are reviewed for the following technologies; coal; petroleum and gas; oil shale; solar; geothermal and energy conservation; nuclear energy; and decontamination and decommissioning. Separate abstracts were prepared for each technology. (MHR)

None

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

FUEL FORMULATION EFFECTS ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION, COMBUSTION, EMISSIONS AND EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes work under a U.S. DOE sponsored Ultra Clean Fuels project entitled ''Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas,'' Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41098. In this study we have examined the incremental benefits of moving from low sulfur diesel fuel and ultra low sulfur diesel fuel to an ultra clean fuel, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel produced from natural gas. Blending with biodiesel, B100, was also considered. The impact of fuel formulation on fuel injection timing, bulk modulus of compressibility, in-cylinder combustion processes, gaseous and particulate emissions, DPF regeneration temperature and urea-SCR NOx control has been examined. The primary test engine is a 5.9L Cummins ISB, which has been instrumented for in-cylinder combustion analysis and in-cylinder visualization with an engine videoscope. A single-cylinder engine has also been used to examine in detail the impacts of fuel formulation on injection timing in a pump-line-nozzle fueling system, to assist in the interpretation of results from the ISB engine.

Boehman, A; Alam, M; Song, J; Acharya, R; Szybist, J; Zello, V; Miller, K

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

107

Coal-water slurry spray characteristics of an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments have been complete to characterize coal-water slurry sprays from a electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system of diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies, fuel pressures and needle lifts were obtained as a function of time, orifice diameter, coal loading, gas density in the chamber, and accumulator fuel pressure. For the base conditions 50% (by mass) coal loading, 0.4 mm diameter nozzle hole, coal-water slurry pressure of 82 MPa (12,000 psi), and a chamber density of 25 kg/m{sup 3}, the break-up time was 0. 30 ms. An empirical correlation for both spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity was developed. For the conditions of this study, the spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity were 15% greater for coal-water slurry than for diesel fuel or water. Cone angles of the sprays were dependent on the operating conditions and fluid, as well as the time and locations of the measurement. The time-averaged cone angle for the base case conditions was 13.6{degree}. Results of this study and the correlation are specific to the tested coal-water slurry and are not general for other coal-water slurry fuels.

Caton, J.A.; Payne, S.E.; Terracina, D.P.; Kihm, K.D. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Performance and Economics of Catalytic Glow Plugs and Shields in Direct Injection Natural Gas Engines for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details work done by TIAX and Westport to test and perform cost analysis for catalytic glow plugs and shields for direct-injection natural gas engines for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program.

Mello, J. P.; Bezaire, D.; Sriramulu, S.; Weber, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Program on Technology Innovation: Future Control Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project reviews the functions and architectures of control centers: their past, present, and likely future. The evolving changes in power system operational needs require a distributed control center that is decentralized, integrated, flexible, and open. Present-day control centers are moving in that direction with varying degrees of success. Technologies employed in today's control centers enabling them to be distributed are briefly reviewed. With the rise of the Internet age, the trend in informat...

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Controllable needle-free injection : development and verification of a novel device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current needle-free injection technology is based on actuation via compressed springs or gas. These devices are not easy to modify for different depths of injections. This thesis describes the design and verification of a ...

Wendell, Dawn M. (Dawn Marie), 1983-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Late - Cycle Injection of Air/Oxygen - Enriched Air for Diesel Exhaust Emissions Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reduce the ''Engine Out'' particulates using the ''In Cylinder'' technique of late cycle auxiliary gas injection (AGI). Reduce the ''Engine Out'' NOx by combining AGI with optimization of fuel injection parameters. Maintain or Improve the Fuel Efficiency.

Mather, Daniel

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

112

All-optical injection and control of spin and electrical currents in quantum wells Ali Najmaie, R. D. R. Bhat, and J. E. Sipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All-optical injection and control of spin and electrical currents in quantum wells Ali Najmaie, R of the injected carriers. This degeneracy is lifted in a quantum well semiconductor structure due to confinement injection of electrical and spin currents in the plane of a GaAs quantum well and its control through

Sipe,J. E.

113

Determination of Zinc-Based Additives in Lubricating Oils by Flow-Injection Analysis with Flame-AAS Detection Exploiting Injection with a Computer-Controlled Syringe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A flow-injection system is proposed for the determination of metal-based additives in lubricating oils. The system, operating under computer control uses a motorised syringe for measuring and injecting the oil sample (200 L) in a kerosene stream, where it is dispersed by means of a packed mixing reactor and carried to an atomic absorption spectrometer which is used as detector. Zinc was used as model analyte. Two different systems were evaluated, one for low concentrations (range 010 ppm) and the second capable of providing higher dilution rates for high concentrations (range 0.02%0.2 % w/w). The sampling frequency was about 30 samples/h. Calibration curves fitted a second-degree regression model (r 2 = 0.996). Commercial samples with high and low zinc levels were analysed by the proposed method and the results were compared with those obtained with the standard ASTM method. The t test for mean values showed no significant differences at the 95 % confidence level. Precision (RSD%) was better than 5 % (2 % typical) for the high concentrations system. The carryover between successive injections was found to be negligible. 1.

Gustavo Pignalosa; Moiss Knochen; Noel Cabrera

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Frequency modulation on single sideband using controlled dynamics of an optically injected semiconductor laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

locked semicon- ductor lasers with delayed optoelectronicgeneration using semiconductor laser dynamics, IEEE J. Sel.in optically-injected laser diodes, Opt. Commun. , vol.

Chan, Sze-Chun; Liu, Jia-Ming

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Control strategy for hydrocarbon emissions in turbocharged direct injection spark ignition engines during cold-start  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasoline consumption and pollutant emissions from transportation are costly and have serious, demonstrated environmental and health impacts. Downsized, turbocharged direct-injection spark ignition (DISI) gasoline engines ...

Cedrone, Kevin David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

TOUGHREACT-A simulation program for non-isothermal multiphase reactive geochemical transport in variably saturated geologic media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO2 geological sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase ... Keywords: CO2 geologic sequestration, Clay swelling, Geochemical transport, Hydrothermal systems, Injectivity enhancement, Mineral scaling, Mineral trapping, Reactive fluid flow, Saline aquifer, TOUGHREACT

Tianfu Xu; Eric Sonnenthal; Nicolas Spycher; Karsten Pruess

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Advanced in-duct sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} control. Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project was to develop a second generation duct sorbent injection technology as a cost-effective compliance option for the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Research and development work was focused on the Advanced Coolside process, which showed the potential for exceeding the original performance targets of 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% sorbent utilization. Process development was conducted in a 1000 acfm pilot plant. The pilot plant testing showed that the Advanced Coolside process can achieve 90% SO{sub 2} removal at sorbent utilizations up to 75%. The testing also showed that the process has the potential to achieve very high removal efficiency (90 to >99%). By conducting conceptual process design and economic evaluations periodically during the project, development work was focused on process design improvements which substantially lowered process capital and operating costs, A final process economic study projects capital costs less than one half of those for limestone forced oxidation wet FGD. Projected total SO{sub 2} control cost is about 25% lower than wet FGD for a 260 MWe plant burning a 2.5% sulfur coal. A waste management study showed the acceptability of landfill disposal; it also identified a potential avenue for by-product utilization which should be further investigated. Based on the pilot plant performance and on the above economic projections, future work to scale up the Advanced Coolside process is recommended.

Stouffer, M.R.; Withium, J.A.; Rosenhoover, W.A.; Maskew, J.T.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Intelligent emissions controller for substance injection in the post-primary combustion zone of fossil-fired boilers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The control of emissions from fossil-fired boilers wherein an injection of substances above the primary combustion zone employs multi-layer feedforward artificial neural networks for modeling static nonlinear relationships between the distribution of injected substances into the upper region of the furnace and the emissions exiting the furnace. Multivariable nonlinear constrained optimization algorithms use the mathematical expressions from the artificial neural networks to provide the optimal substance distribution that minimizes emission levels for a given total substance injection rate. Based upon the optimal operating conditions from the optimization algorithms, the incremental substance cost per unit of emissions reduction, and the open-market price per unit of emissions reduction, the intelligent emissions controller allows for the determination of whether it is more cost-effective to achieve additional increments in emission reduction through the injection of additional substance or through the purchase of emission credits on the open market. This is of particular interest to fossil-fired electrical power plant operators. The intelligent emission controller is particularly adapted for determining the economical control of such pollutants as oxides of nitrogen (NO.sub.x) and carbon monoxide (CO) emitted by fossil-fired boilers by the selective introduction of multiple inputs of substances (such as natural gas, ammonia, oil, water-oil emulsion, coal-water slurry and/or urea, and combinations of these substances) above the primary combustion zone of fossil-fired boilers.

Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL); Feldman, Earl E. (Willowbrook, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL); Glickert, Roger W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) Speaker(s): Bernie Kotlier Date: March 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote CALCTP is a broad based partnership that is dedicated to advancing the California State policy of energy conservation as the first priority for serving the state's future energy needs. CALCTP is supported, operated and directed by representatives of the California Lighting Technology Center, the California Energy Commission, the California Community College system, investor owned utilities, municipal utilities, electrical contractors, electrical workers, and manufacturers of advanced, high efficiency lighting and lighting control systems. The mission of the California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) is to make

120

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its ability to capture vapor phase Hg, however activated carbon performed relatively well. At the normal operating temperatures of 298-306 F, mercury emissions from the ESP were so low that both particulate and elemental mercury were ''not detected'' at the detection limits of the Ontario Hydro method for both baseline and injection tests. The oxidized mercury however, was 95% lower at a sorbent injection concentration of 10 lbs/MMacf compared with baseline emissions. When the flue gas temperatures were increased to a range of 343-347 F, mercury removal efficiencies were limited to fly ash LOI, operation of the SNCR system, and flue gas temperature on the native mercury capture without sorbent injection. Listed below are the main conclusions from this program: (1) SNCR on/off test showed no beneficial effect on mercury removal caused by the SNCR system. (2) At standard operating temperatures ({approx} 300 F), reducing LOI from 30-35% to 15-20% had minimal impact on Hg removal. (3) Increasing flue gas temperatures reduced Hg removal regardless of LOI concentrations at Salem Harbor (minimum LOI was 15%). Native mercury removal started to fall off at temperatures above 320 F. ACI effectiveness for mercury removal fell off at temperatures above 340 F. (4) Test method detection limits play an important role at Salem Harbor due to the low residual emissions. Examining the proposed MA rule, both the removal efficiency and the emission concentrations will be difficult to demonstrate on an ongoing basis. (5) Under tested conditions the baseline emissions met the proposed removal efficiency for 2006, but not the proposed emission concentration. ACI can meet the more-stringent 2012 emission limits, as long as measurement detection limits are lower than the Ontario Hydro method. SCEM testing was able to verify the low emissions. For ACI to perform at this level, process conditions need to match those obtained during testing.

Michael D. Durham

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Characterizing the Effects of Air Injection on Compressor Performance for Use in Active Control of Rotating Stall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous work has developed an air injection controller for rotating stall based on the idea of a shifting compressor characteristic and the Moore--Greitzer three state compressor model. In order to demonstrate this form of control experimentally, a series of open loop tests were performed to measure the performance characteristics of a low speed axial flow compression system when air is injected upstream of the rotor face. The position of the air injection port relative to the hub and the rotor face and the angle relative to the mean axial flow were varied. The tests show that the injection of air has drastic effects on the stalling mass flow rate and on the size of the hysteresis loop associated with rotating stall. The stalling mass flow rate was decreased by 10% and the hysteresis loop was completely eliminated under some conditions. The results of the open loop parametric study were then used to implement a closed loop control strategy based on a shifting characteristic. 1 Introdu...

Robert Behnken; Mina Leung; Richard M. Murray

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Common Rail Injection System Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The collaborative research program between the Department of energy and Electro-Motive Diesels, Inc. on the development of common rail fuel injection system for locomotive diesel engines that can meet US EPA Tier 2 exhaust emissions has been completed. This final report summarizes the objectives of the program, work scope, key accomplishments and research findings. The major objectives of this project encompassed identification of appropriate injection strategies by using advanced analytical tools, development of required prototype hardware/controls, investigations of fuel spray characteristics including cavitation phenomena, and validation of hareware using a single-cylinder research locomotive diesel engine. Major milestones included: (1) a detailed modeling study using advanced mathematical models - several various injection profiles that show simultaneous reduction of NOx and particulates on a four stroke-cycle locomotive diesel engine were identified; (2) development of new common rail fuel injection hardware capable of providing these injection profiles while meeting EMD engine and injection performance specifications. This hardware was developed together with EMD's current fuel injection component supplier. (3) Analysis of fuel spray characteristics. Fuel spray numerical studies and high speed photographic imaging analyses were performed. (4) Validation of new hardware and fuel injection profiles. EMD's single-cylinder research diesel engine located at Argonne National Laboratory was used to confirm emissions and performacne predictions. These analytical ane experimental investigations resulted in optimized fuel injection profiles and engine operating conditions that yield reductions in NOx emissions from 7.8 g/bhp-hr to 5.0 g/bhp-hr at full (rated) load. Additionally, hydrocarbon and particulate emissions were reduced considerably when compared to baseline Tier I levels. The most significant finding from the injection optimization process was a 2% to 3% improvement in fuel economy over EMD's traditional Tier I engine hardware configuration. the common rail fuel injection system enabled this added benefit by virtue of an inherent capability to provide multiple injections per power stroke at high fuel rail pressures. On the basis of the findings in this study, EMD concludes that the new electronically-controlled high-pressure common rail injection system has the potential to meet locomotive Tier 2 NOx and particulates emission standards without sacrificing the fuel economy. A number of areas to further improve the injection hardware and engine operating characteristics to further exploit the benefits of common rail injection system have also been identified.

Electro-Motive,

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Prototype demonstration of dual sorbent injection for acid gas control on municipal solid waste combustion units  

SciTech Connect

This report gathered and evaluated emissions and operations data associated with furnace injection of dry hydrated lime and duct injection of dry sodium bicarbonate at a commercial, 1500 ton per day, waste-to-energy facility. The information compiled during the project sheds light on these sorbents to affect acid gas emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. The information assesses the capability of these systems to meet the 1990 Clean Air Act and 1991 EPA Emission Guidelines.

None

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - Nox Budget Trading 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations establish a budget trading program for nitrogen oxide emissions, setting NOx budget units for generators and an NOx Allowance Tracking System to account for emissions. These regulations apply to units that serve generators with a nameplate capacity greater than 15 MWe and sell any amount of electricity, as well as to units that have a maximum

125

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Brayton Point Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of the impacts of future mercury regulations to Brayton Point Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has variable (29-75%) native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables and activated carbon on mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included: (1) Plant and PG&E National Energy Group corporate personnel; (2) Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); (3) United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL); (4) ADA-ES, Inc.; (5) NORIT Americas, Inc.; (6) Apogee Scientific, Inc.; (7) TRC Environmental Corporation; (8) URS Corporation; (9) Quinapoxet Solutions; (10) Energy and Environmental Strategies (EES); and (11) Reaction Engineering International (REI). The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall, the objectives of this field test program were to determine the impact of activated carbon injection on mercury control and balance-of-plant processes on Brayton Point Unit 1. Brayton Point Unit 1 is a 250-MW unit that fires a low-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. Particulate control is achieved by two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in series. The full-scale tests were conducted on one-half of the flue gas stream (nominally 125 MW). Mercury control sorbents were injected in between the two ESPs. The residence time from the injection grid to the second ESP was approximately 0.5 seconds. In preparation for the full-scale tests, 12 different sorbents were evaluated in a slipstream of flue gas via a packed-bed field test apparatus for mercury adsorption. Results from these tests were used to determine the five carbon-based sorbents that were tested at full-scale. Conditions of interest that were varied included SO{sub 3} conditioning on/off, injection concentrations, and distribution spray patterns. The original test plan called for parametric testing of NORIT FGD carbon at 1, 3, and 10 lbs/MMacf. These injection concentrations were estimated based on results from the Pleasant Prairie tests that showed no additional mercury removal when injection concentrations were increased above 10 lbs/MMacf. The Brayton Point parametric test data indicated that higher injection concentrations would achieve higher removal efficiencies and should be tested. The test plan was altered to include testing at 20 lbs/MMacf. The first test at this higher rate showed very high removal across the second ESP (>80%). Unlike the ''ceiling'' phenomenon witnessed at Pleasant Prairie, increasing sorbent injection concentration resulted in further capture of vapor-phase mercury. The final phase of field-testing was a 10-day period of continuous injection of NORIT FGD carbon. During the first five days, the injection concentration was held at 10 lbs/MMacf, followed by nominally five days of testing at an injection concentration of 20 lbs/MMacf. The mercury removal, as measured by the semi-continuous emission monitors (S-CEM), varied between 78% and 95% during the 10 lbs/MMacf period and increased to >97% when the injection concentration was increased to 20 lbs/MMacf. During the long-term testing period, mercury measurements following EPA's draft Ontario Hydro method were conducted by TRC Environmental Corporation at both 10 and 20 lbs/MMacf test conditions. The Ontario Hydro data showed that the particulate mercury removal was similar between the two conditions of 10 or 20 lbs/MMacf and removal efficiencies were greater than 99%. Elemental mercury was not detected in any samples, so no conclusions as to its removal can be drawn. Removal of oxidized mercury, on the other hand, increased from 68% to 93% with the higher injection concentration. These removal rates agreed well with the S-CEM results.

Michael D. Durham

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

126

Controlling combustion characteristics using a slit nozzle in a direct-injection methanol engine  

SciTech Connect

A new type of fuel injection nozzle, called a `slit nozzle,` has been developed to improve poor ignitability and to stabilize combustion under low load conditions in direct-injection methanol diesel engines manufactured for medium-duty trucks. This nozzle has a single oblong vent like a slit. Engine test results indicate that the slit nozzle can improve combustion and thermal efficiency, especially at low loads and no load. This can be explained by the fact that the slit nozzle forms a more highly concentrated methanol spray around the glow-plug than do multi-hole nozzles. As a result, this nozzle improves flame propagation. 3 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

Kusaka, Jin; Daisho, Yasuhiro; Saito, Takeshi; Kihara, Ryoji

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Direct observation of dynamic surface acoustic wave controlled carrier injection into single quantum posts using phase-resolved optical spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A versatile stroboscopic technique based on active phase-locking of a surface acoustic wave to picosecond laser pulses is used to monitor dynamic acoustoelectric effects. Time-integrated multi-channel detection is applied to probe the modulation of the emission of a quantum well for different frequencies of the surface acoustic wave. For quantum posts we resolve dynamically controlled generation of neutral and charged excitons and preferential injection of holes into localized states within the nanostructure.

Vlk, S; Schlein, F J R; Truong, T A; Kim, H; Petroff, P M; Wixforth, A; Krenner, H J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Direct observation of dynamic surface acoustic wave controlled carrier injection into single quantum posts using phase-resolved optical spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A versatile stroboscopic technique based on active phase-locking of a surface acoustic wave to picosecond laser pulses is used to monitor dynamic acoustoelectric effects. Time-integrated multi-channel detection is applied to probe the modulation of the emission of a quantum well for different frequencies of the surface acoustic wave. For quantum posts we resolve dynamically controlled generation of neutral and charged excitons and preferential injection of holes into localized states within the nanostructure.

S. Vlk; F. Knall; F. J. R. Schlein; T. A. Truong; H. Kim; P. M. Petroff; A. Wixforth; H. J. Krenner

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

129

Coordination Between the HEU Transparency Program and the Material Protection, Control and Accountability Program  

SciTech Connect

DOE sponsored programs such as Material Protection Control and Accountability (MPC&A) and implementation of the Highly-Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program send US personnel into Russian nuclear facilities and receive Russian representatives from these programs. While there is overlap in the Russian nuclear facilities visited by these two programs, there had not been any formal mechanism to share information between them. Recently, an MPC&A/HEU Working Group was developed to facilitate the sharing of appropriate information and to address concerns expressed by Minatom and Russian facility personnel such as US visit scheduling conflicts. This paper discusses the goals of the Working Group and ways it has helped to allow the programs to work more efficiently with the Russian facilities.

Glaser, J.; Hernandez, J.; Dougherty, D.; Bieniawski, A.; Cahalane, P.; Mastal, E.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Control Systems Security Test Center - FY 2004 Program Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 2004, the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) was established at Idaho National Laboratory to execute assessment activities to reduce the vulnerability of the nations critical infrastructure control systems to terrorist attack. The CSSC implements a program to accomplish the five goals presented in the US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security. This report summarizes the first year funding of startup activities and program achievements that took place in FY 2004 and early FY 2005. This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center of the National Cyber Security Division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs federal departments to identify and prioritize the critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the National Cyber Security Division to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems.

Robert E. Polk; Alen M. Snyder

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Synchronized droplet size measurements for coal-water-slurry (CWS) diesel sprays of an electronically-controlled fuel injection system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were completed to study intermittent coal-water slurry (CWS) fuel sprays injected from an electronically-controlled accumulator injector system. A laser diffraction particle analyzing (LDPA) technique was used to measure the spray diameters (Sauter mean diameter, SMD) assuming the Rosin-Rammler two parameter model. In order to ensure an accurate synchronization of the measurement with the intermittent sprays, a new synchronization technique was developed using the light extinction signal as a triggering source for the data taking initiation. This technique allowed measurement of SMDs near the spray tip where the light extinction was low and the data were free from the multiscattering bias. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading in mass containing 5 {mu}m mass median diameter coal particulates was considered. Injection pressures ranging from 28 to 110 MPa, two different nozzle orifice diameters, 0.2 ad 0.4 mm, and four axial measurement locations from 60 to 120 mm from the nozzle orifice were studied. Measurements were made for pressurized (2.0 MPa in gauge) and for ambient chamber conditions. The spray SMD showed an increase with the distance of the axial measurement location and with the ambient gas density, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure. A correlation of the Sauter mean diameter with the injection conditions was determined. The results were also compared with previous SMD correlations that were available only for diesel fuel sprays.

Kihm, K.D.; Terracina, D.P.; Payne, S.E.; Caton, J.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Beam injection into RHIC  

SciTech Connect

During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Geothermal injection monitoring project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is provided on the geothermal brine injection problem and each of the project tasks is outlined in detail. These tasks are: evaluation of methods of monitoring the movement of injected fluid, preparation for an eventual field experiment, and a review of groundwater regulations and injection programs. (MHR)

Younker, L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Rich Reagent Injection Technology for NOx Control in Cyclone-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes multiple demonstration projects that have led to commercial development of the Rich Reagent Injection (RRI) technology. RRI was developed by Reaction Engineering International (REI) with funding from EPRI and U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL). Prior to RRI, most NOx reduction efforts that focused on modifying combustion to reduce NOx formation in fossil-fuel-fired boilers and furnaces involved air or fuel staging. Even with significant levels of furnace stag...

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

135

Cyber Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These trainings vary from web-based cyber security trainings for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/ Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors.

Daniel Noyes

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Structural Synthesis Of Programs From Refined User Requirements (Programming boiler control in NUT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using a declarative language as a tool for automated implementation of requirements written in a semiformal manner. The technique of structural synthesis of programs based on automatic proof search in intuitionistic propositional calculus implemented in the NUT system is used for solving the steam-boiler problem. The goal of the experiment is to bridge a gap between the language of requirements and an implementation. An appropriate set of concepts is developed for representing the problem, i.e. writing the requirements in a form understandable by the program synthesis tools. A complete implementation, including simulator of the actual steam-boiler and control panel, is written in NUT. 1.0 Introduction This paper concerns automatic application of formal methods in implementation of industrial control systems. The idea is to use an extensible very high level language, extending it with a set of concepts sufficient for writing req...

M. Addibpour; E. Tyugu; M. Addibpour E. Tyugu [mattin

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Near-surface groundwater responses to injection of geothermal wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiences with injecting geothermal fluids have identified technical problems associated with geothermal waste disposal. This report assesses the feasibility of injection as an alternative for geothermal wastewater disposal and analyzes hydrologic controls governing the upward migration of injected fluids. Injection experiences at several geothermal developments are presented, including: Raft River, Salton Sea, East Mesa, Otake and Hatchobaru in Japan, and Ahuachapan in El Salvador. Hydrogeologic and design/operational factors affecting the success of an injection program are identified. Hydrogeologic factors include subsidence, near-surface effects of injected fluids, and seismicity. Design/operational factors include hydrodynamic breakthrough, condition of the injection system and reservoir maintenance. Existing and potential effects of production/injection on these factors are assessed.

Arnold, S.C.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

A Survey of Load Control Programs for Price and System Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Load control and demand side load management programs have been implemented in a large number of competitive power markets. These programs can provide enhanced system security and many benefits to participants. This paper reviews and compares existing economically driven programs.

Jazayeri, P.; Schellenberg, A.; Rosehart, W. D.; Doudna, J.; Widergren, Steven E.; Lawrence, D.; Mickey, J.; Jones, S.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its ability to capture vapor phase Hg, however activated carbon performed relatively well. At the normal operating temperatures of 298-306 F, mercury emissions from the ESP were so low that both particulate and elemental mercury were ''not detected'' at the detection limits of the Ontario Hydro method for both baseline and injection tests. The oxidized mercury however, was 95% lower at a sorbent injection concentration of 10 lbs/MMacf compared with baseline emissions. When the flue gas temperatures were increased to a range of 343-347 F, mercury removal efficiencies were limited to <25%, even at the same sorbent injection concentration. Other tests examined the impacts of fly ash LOI, operation of the SNCR system, and flue gas temperature on the native mercury capture without sorbent injection. Listed below are the main conclusions from this program: (1) SNCR on/off test showed no beneficial effect on mercury removal caused by the SNCR system. (2) At standard operating temperatures ({approx} 300 F), reducing LOI from 30-35% to 15-20% had minimal impact on Hg removal. (3) Increasing flue gas temperatures reduced Hg removal regardless of LOI concentrations at Salem Harbor (minimum LOI was 15%). Native mercury removal started to fall off at temperatures above 320 F. ACI effectiveness for mercury removal fell off at temperatures above 340 F. (4) Test method detection limits play an important role at Salem Harbor due to the low residual emissions. Examining the proposed MA rule, both the removal efficiency and the emission concentrations will be difficult to demonstrate on an ongoing basis. (5) Under tested conditions the baseline emissions met the proposed removal efficiency for 2006, but not the proposed emission concentration. ACI can meet the more-stringent 2012 emission limits, as long as measurement detection limits are lower than the Ontario Hydro method. SCEM testing was able to verify the low emissions. For ACI to perform at this level, process conditions need to match those obtained during testing.

Michael D. Durham

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Warm Standby in Hierarchically Structured Process-Control Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We classify standby redundancy design space in process-control programs into the following three categories: cold standby, warm standby, and hot standby. Design parameters of warm standby are identified and the reliability of a system using warm standby is evaluated and compared with that of hot standby. Our analysis indicates that the warm standby scheme is particularly suitable for longlived unmaintainable systems, especially those operating in harsh environments where burst hardware failures are possible. The feasibility of warm standby is demonstrated with a simulated chemical batch reactor system.

Ing-Ray Chen And; Ing-ray Chen; Farokh B. Bastani

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CR mammography: Design and implementation of a quality control program  

SciTech Connect

Despite the recent acquisition of significant quantities of computed radiography CR equipment for mammography, Mexican regulations do not specify the performance requirements for digital systems such as those of CR type. The design of a quality control program QCP specific for CR mammography systems was thus considered relevant. International protocols were taken as reference to define tests, procedures and acceptance criteria. The designed QCP was applied in three CR mammography facilities. Important deficiencies in spatial resolution, noise, image receptor homogeneity, artifacts and breast thickness compensation were detected.

Moreno-Ramirez, A.; Brandan, M. E.; Villasenor-Navarro, Y.; Galvan, H. A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico); Departamento de Radiodiagnostico, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, DF 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Michigan Profile: A review of Michigan's tobacco prevention and control program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and thanks to the Michigan tobacco control partners whoCenter for Tobacco Policy Research. The Michigan Profile: Areview of Michigans tobacco prevention & control program.

Herbers, Stephanie; Hepp, Lisa; Mueller, Nancy MPH; Krauss, Melissa; Luke, Douglas PhD

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Alkali injection system with controlled CO.sub.2 /O.sub.2 ratios for combustion of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature combustion process for an organic fuel containing sulfur n which the nitrogen of air is replaced by carbon dioxide for combination with oxygen with the ratio of CO.sub.2 /O.sub.2 being controlled to generate combustion temperatures above 2000 K. for a gas-gas reaction with SO.sub.2 and an alkali metal compound to produce a sulfate and in which a portion of the carbon-dioxide rich gas is recycled for mixing with oxygen and/or for injection as a cooling gas upstream from heating exchangers to limit fouling of the exchangers, with the remaining carbon-dioxide rich gas being available as a source of CO.sub.2 for oil recovery and other purposes.

Berry, Gregory F. (Naperville, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Alkali injection system with controlled CO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ ratios for combustion of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature combustion process for an organic fuel containing sulfur in which the nitrogen of air is replaced by carbon dioxide for combination with oxygen with the ratio of CO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ being controlled to generate combustion temperatures above 2000/sup 0/K for a gas-gas reaction with SO/sub 2/ and an alkali metal compound to produce a sulfate and in which a portion of the carbon-dioxide rich gas is recycled for mixing with oxygen and/or for injection as a cooling gas upstream from heating exchangers to limit fouling of the exchangers, with the remaining carbon-dioxide rich gas being available as a source of CO/sub 2/ for oil recovery and other purposes. Several advantages are associated with the invention. First, by using a low CO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ ratio, higher flame temperatures can be achieved, thereby substantially promoting the gas-gas reaction between alkali atoms and sulfur gases. Second, by providing a means for injecting additional CO/sub 2/ at various locations removed from the combustion zone, the heat transfer rate and cooling of the alkali sulfates can be tightly controlled without suffering either the loss in efficiency inherent in conventional gas recycle techniques or the added cost associated with the larger mass throughput rate and heat transfer surface area. Third, there is the ability to use the concept in retrofit applications by tailoring the CO/sub 2/ quantity recycled to match the heat utilization performance previously achieved using air as the oxidizing medium. Fourth, a natural reduction in nitrous oxides is achieved by eliminating the reaction of oxygen with the nitrogen in the oxidizer.

Berry, G.F.

1986-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Effects of Ketorolac Injected via Patient Controlled Analgesia Postoperatively on Spinal Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lumbar spinal fusions have been performed for spinal stability, pain relief and improved function in spinal stenosis, scoliosis, spinal fractures, infectious conditions and other lumbar spinal problems. The success of lumbar spinal fusion depends on multifactors, such as types of bone graft materials, levels and numbers of fusion, spinal instrumentation, electrical stimulation, smoking and some drugs such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). From January 2000 to December 2001, 88 consecutive patients, who were diagnosed with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis, were retrospectively enrolled in this study. One surgeon performed all 88 posterolateral spinal fusions with instrumentation and autoiliac bone graft. The patients were divided into two groups. The first group (n=30) was infused with ketorolac and fentanyl intravenously via patient controlled analgesia (PCA) postoperatively

Si-young Park; Seong-hwan Moon; Moon-soo Park; Kyung-soo Oh; Hwan-mo Lee

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

CT-Guided Thrombin Injection to Control Rapid Expansion of Ascending Aortic False Aneurysm 15 Months After Bentall-Bono Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a case of 57-year-old man treated emergently with CT-guided local thrombin injection as the first, life-saving step for control rapid expansion of the aortic pseudoaneurysm. Fifteen months earlier, he was operated on for ascending aortic true aneurysm and coronary artery disease. Upon admission, he had an anterior thoracic wall pulsatile tumor. Due to critical status, definite surgery was postponed and thrombin was injected close to the origin of pseudoaneurysm. It controlled successfully, bleeding from the ascending aorta and enabled the patient to survive the acute phase.

Perek, Bartlomiej, E-mail: bperek@yahoo.com; Urbanowicz, Tomasz [Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Poland); Zabicki, Bartosz [Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology (Poland); Puslecki, Mateusz [Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Poland); Juszkat, Robert, E-mail: radiologiamim@wp.pl [Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology (Poland); Jemielity, Marek [Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Poland)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Software requirements specification for the program analysis and control system risk management module  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TWR Program Analysis and Control System Risk Module is used to facilitate specific data processes surrounding the Risk Management program of the Tank Waste Retrieval environment. This document contains the Risk Management system requirements of the database system.

SCHAEFER, J.C.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

Status of Heavy Vehicle Diesel Emission Control Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Test Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DECSE test program is well under way to providing data on effects of sulfur levels in diesel fuel on performance of emission control technologies.

George Sverdrup

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

Sensors and Controls Program and Project Review: May 21-22, 2013 ...  

... Energy Innovation Portal on Facebook; Tweet about Sensors and Controls Program and Project Review: May 21-22, 2013 - Energy Innovation Portal on Twitter ...

150

The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows...

151

Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Alabama Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.adem.state.al.usalEnviroRegLaws...

152

Quality Assurance Program Plan for FFTF effluent controls. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Program Plan is specific to environmental related activities within the FFTF Property Protected Area. The activities include effluent monitoring and Low Level Waste Certification.

Seamans, J.A.

1995-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

153

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Focus Area: Propane Topics: Socio-Economic Website: theicct.org/sites/default/files/publications/Retrosp_final_bilingual.p Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/overview-china's-vehicle-emission-con Language: "English,Chinese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; 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Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

154

Laboratory Characterization of Advanced SO2 Control By-Products: Dry Sodium and Calcium In-Duct Injection Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive laboratory investigation indicates that the physical and chemical characterization and engineering properties of dry sodium and calcium in-duct injection wastes differ, as do the refuse and by-product management options associated with them. Utilities can use this report on the chemical, physical, engineering, and leachate properties of dry sodium and calcium in-duct injection wastes to better plan for and manage future waste disposal and/or use.

1990-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

155

Dynamic programming for constrained optimal control of discrete-time linear hybrid systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we study the solution to optimal control problems for constrained discrete-time linear hybrid systems based on quadratic or linear performance criteria. The aim of the paper is twofold. First, we give basic theoretical results on the structure ... Keywords: Dynamic programming, Hybrid systems, Multiparametric programming, Optimal control, Piecewise affine systems

Francesco Borrelli; Mato Baoti?; Alberto Bemporad; Manfred Morari

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

A Quality Control Program for Surface Mesometeorological Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A program is described which has been used to verify the quality of surface mesonet data collected during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE). The CCOPE mesonet consisted of 123 automated stations from two mesonet systems ...

Charles G. Wade

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Controlled Unclassified STI | Scientific and Technical Information Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Controlled Unclassified STI Controlled Unclassified STI Print page Print page Email page Email page Certain types of information have restricted access whose publication or distribution is restricted by various laws, federal codes, executive orders, international agreements, etc. This information is known as controlled unclassified information and can be broadly categorized as Official Use Only*, Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and unclassified Naval Nuclear Propulsion Information. Other types of information have restrictions on their handling such as certain copyrighted material. However, regardless of the control marking, all STI is to be submitted to OSTI through appropriate applications. The Energy Link (E-Link) has built in encryption that will protect the submission of

158

Material Protection, Control and Accounting program (MPC&A) | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection, Control and Accounting program (MPC&A) | National Protection, Control and Accounting program (MPC&A) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Material Protection, Control and Accounting program (MPC&A) Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > International Materials Protection and Cooperation > Material Protection, Control and Accounting

159

APPLICATION OF MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING MODELS TO COAL QUALITY CONTROL.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The problem of utilizing blending techniques to control coal quality at the production-consumption phase is considered. Three blending models were developed to provide coal of (more)

BAAFI, ERNEST YAW.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Program on Technology Innovation: Next Generation Monitoring, Assessment, and Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power system operation technologies such as computerized one-line diagram visualization, state estimation, contingency analysis, and distance relay were developed upwards of 50 years ago, However, technological advances in communication, computing, and algorithms have made it possible to reexamine methods for performing real-time monitoring, assessment, and control. This report describes the vision, infrastructure, and technology roadmap for future smart control centers.

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Controlling mercury spills in laboratories with a thermometer exchange program  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a case for replacing mercury thermometers with their organic-liquid-filled counterparts. A review of liquid-in glass-thermometers is given. In addition, a brief summary of mercury's health effects and exposure limits is presented. Spill cleanup methods and some lessons learned from our experience are offered as well. Finally, an overview of the mercury thermometer exchange program developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is presented.

McLouth, Lawrence D.

2002-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

162

Diesel Emissions Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program Status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determine the impact of fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems that could be implemented to lower emissions of NO{sub x} and PM from on-highway trucks in the 2002-2004 time frame.

None

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

163

Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

Bruce Hallbert

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Synchronized droplet size measurements of intermittent coal-water slurry diesel sprays from an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments have been completed to characterize atomization of intermittent coal-water slurry sprays from an electronically controlled accumulator fuel injection system of a diesel fuel engine. A synchronized laser diffraction particle analyzer technique was used to measure the spray tip Sauter mean diameters (SMD). The Rosin-Rammler two parameter model was assumed for the droplet distribution. The measurements were made at the spray tip where laser obscuration was low and the chance of multiscattering bias was minimal. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading by mass containing 5gm volume mean diameter coal particles was used. Injection pressures were ranged from 28 to II 0 MPa. Three different nozzle orifice diameters, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 mm, four axial measurement locations from 60 to 120 mm downstream of the nozzle tip were studied. Measurements were made for both pressurized (2.07 MPa, 300 psig) and unpressurized (ambient, 0 gage) chamber conditions. The spray tip SMD showed an increase with chamber gas density, and with axial measurement location, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure. The effect of nozzle orifice diameter on spray tip SMDs of completely developed sprays for such high pressure injections was found to be negligible. A regression equation for CWS-50 spray tip SMDs was determined as SMD = 0.279-P(inj).?702 r(amb) 2?85 x .521 where Pinj is the injection pressure in Mpa, r(amb) is the ambient density in kg/m3, and x is the axial measurement location downstream of the nozzle tip in mm. The equation shows very good agreement with the measured SMD data by having a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.97. The results were also compared with previous SMD regression equations that were originally obtained for diesel fuel sprays.

Terracina, Dwayne Paul

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Michigan Profile: A review of Michigan's tobacco prevention and control program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To obtain a complete version of The Michigan Profile: Areview of Michigans tobacco prevention and control program,The Michigan Profile A review of Michigans tobacco

Herbers, Stephanie BA; Hepp, Lisa BS; Mueller, Nancy MPH; Krauss, Melissa MPH; Luke, Douglas PhD

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Audit of the Savannah River Site's Quality Control Program for Groundwater Sampling, IG-0405  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 1997 0, 1997 MEMORANDUM FOR: THE SECRETARY FROM: John C. Layton Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Audit of the Savannah River Site's Quality Control Program for Groundwater Sampling" BACKGROUND The Savannah River Site's groundwater remediation program was managed by the Department of Energy's (Department) management and operating contractor for the site, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse). One component of the remediation

167

Keywords MINLP, MIOCP, MILP, optimal control, integer programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(2) with pk,i ? {0,1}. We want to minimize a Mayer term .... ? with ? = 0.5 ?t. Note that for the more general case in which the integer control functions enter in a nonlinear ..... 1st solution found is optimal since best-first search is used. */ if a.d = nt...

168

Control of coal combustion SO[sub 2]and NO[sub x] emissions by in- boiler injection of CMA  

SciTech Connect

The principal objectives of the proposed research are two-fold: (A) To understand the mechanism and assess the effectiveness of sulfur capture by the chemical calcium magnesium acetate (CMA); and (B) To evaluate the NO[sub x], reduction capabilities of CMA by burning the organic constituents of the chemical (the acetate) and reducing NO to stable N[sub 2]. The optimum conditions and the location of CMA introduction in the furnace will be identified. To achieve these goals water solutions of CMA or dry powders of CMA will be injected into hot air or gases simulating the furnace exhaust (containing CO[sub 2], SO[sub x],NO[sub x], H[sub 2]O, O[sub 2] etc.) and the composition of gaseous and solid products of the reaction will be monitored. The processes of burning the organic acetate as well as the calcination, sintering and sulfation of the remaining solid will be studied in detail. The possibility of introducing two different sorbents sequentially will also be examined. For instance, such a scheme may employ injection of the rather inexpensive calcium carbonate initially, followed by the more costly CMA. The effectiveness of a homemade'' CMA using woody biomass as a low-cost source of acetate will be explored if such a product becomes available during the course of this work. Finally, CMA will be introduced in the matrix of the coal by an ion exchange or a precipitation technique. Upon subsequent combustion, the composition and physical structure of the remaining ash will be examined, as well as the gas phase SO[sub x], concentration. Both techniques (CMA pretreatment and CMA injection) may also be implemented simultaneously to assess their combined effect on sulfur capture.

Levendis, Y.A.; Wise, D.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

LASL: controlled thermonuclear research program. Progress report, January--December 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is included for each of the following sections: (1) reversed-field pinch program, (2) Scyllac feedback stabilization experiments, (3) Scylla IV-P linear theta pinch experiments, (4) staged theta pinch, (5) field-reversal experiment, (6) implosion heating experiment, (7) fast liner experiment, (8) gun injection experiment, (9) experimental plasma physics, (10) high-density z-pinch, (11) plasma diagnostics, (12) theory, (13) computers, (14) magnetic energy transfer and storage, (15) systems studies, (16) engineering, and (17) tritium systems test assembly. (MOW)

Thomas, K.S.; Sawyer, G.A.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Research on water level optimal control of boiler drum based on dual heuristic dynamic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler drum system is an important component of a thermal power plant or industrial production, and the water level is a critical parameter of boiler drum control system. Because of non-linear, strong coupling and large disturbance, it is difficult to ... Keywords: BP neural network, boiler drum level, dual heuristic dynamic programming, optimal control

Qingbao Huang; Shaojian Song; Xiaofeng Lin; Kui Peng

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Pre-processing Optimisation Applied to the Classical Integer Programming Model for Statistical Disclosure Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pre-processing optimisation is proposed that can be applied to the integer and mixed integer linear programming models that are used to solve the cell suppression problem in statistical disclosure control. In this paper we report our initial findings ... Keywords: Cell Suppression Problem, Classical Model, External Attacker, Pre-processing Optimisation, Statistical Disclosure Control

Martin Serpell; Alistair Clark; Jim Smith; Andrea Staggemeier

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

OVERVIEW OF ADVANCED PETROLEUM-BASED FUELS-DIESEL EMISSIONS CONTROL PROGRAM (APBF-DEC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels-Diesel Emissions Control Program (APBF-DEC) began in February 2000 and is supported by government agencies and industry. The purpose of the APBF-DEC program is to identify and evaluate the optimal combinations of fuels, lubricants, diesel engines, and emission control systems to meet the projected emission standards for the 2000 to 2010 time period. APBF-DEC is an outgrowth of the earlier Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects Program (DECSE), whose objective is to determine the impact of the sulfur levels in fuel on emission control systems that could lower the emissions of NOx and particulate matter (PM) from diesel powered vehicles in the 2002 to 2004 period. Results from the DECSE studies of two emission control technologies-diesel particle filter (DPF) and NOx adsorber-will be used in the APBF-DEC program. These data are expected to provide initial information on emission control technology options and the effects of fuel properties (including additives) on the performance of emission control systems.

Sverdrup, George M.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

173

Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U. S. Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U. S. Department of Energy Performance Analysis Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance U. S. Department of Energy OVERSIGHT Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................................. 1 1.0 PURPOSE AND EVALUATION APPROACH ........................4 2.0 DOE REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAMS..........................4 3.0 PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS .................................................7 3.1 Groundwater Monitoring and Protection...........................7 3.2 Environmental Radiological Program Management ........ 11 3.3 Environmental Radiological Monitoring and Surveillance ...............................................................15 3.4 Radiological Air Emissions

174

Geothermal and geopressure blowout control. Phase I. Study of existing technology. Phase II. Program plan for geothermal and geopressure blowout control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four papers on existing technology and program planning for blowout control in geothermal and geopressured systems are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for each. (MHR)

Rehm, W.A.; Goins, W.C. Jr.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

SciTech Connect

This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 3 contains reports from 6 government contractors on LPG, anhydrous ammonia, and hydrogen energy systems. Report subjects include: simultaneous boiling and spreading of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water; LPG safety research; state-of-the-art of release prevention and control technology in the LPG industry; ammonia: an introductory assessment of safety and environmental control information; ammonia as a fuel, and hydrogen safety and environmental control assessment.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

DOE/NETL's Mercury Emissions Control Technology R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Emissions Control Mercury Emissions Control Technology R&D Program LRC and Lignite Industry Meeting August 27-28, 2002 Bismarck, ND Thomas J. Feeley, III, Product Manager Innovations for Existing Plants LigniteResearch_TJF,082702 Presentation Outline * About NETL * IEP Program * Hg Background * Hg and lignite coals * Hg Control R&D LigniteResearch_TJF,082702 About NETL LigniteResearch_TJF,082702 * One of DOE's 17 national labs * Government owned / operated * Sites in: - Pennsylvania - West Virginia - Oklahoma - Alaska * More than 1,100 federal and support contractor employees National Energy Technology Laboratory LigniteResearch_TJF,082702 Electric Power Using Coal Clean Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Production Environmental Control V21 Next Generation Carbon Sequestration Exploration & Production Refining &

177

Control Center Application Program Interface (CCAPI) Project: API Standard Proposal Requirements for Generic Interface Definition (GID)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Control Center Application Program Interface (CCAPI) Task Force is charged with producing design criteria for international energy management system (EMS) standards. Their aim is to integrate independently developed EMS applications. The resulting standards will provide utilities with competitive choices in the design of their control systems, while offering less expensive applications to meet the needs of the rapidly changing electric power industry. The initial Task Force deliverable was the Common...

2001-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

On-Off Minimum-Time Control With Limited Fuel Usage: Global Optima Via Linear Programming  

SciTech Connect

A method for finding a global optimum to the on-off minimum-time control problem with limited fuel usage is presented. Each control can take on only three possible values: maximum, zero, or minimum. The simplex method for linear systems naturally yields such a solution for the re-formulation presented herein because it always produces an extreme point solution to the linear program. Numerical examples for the benchmark linear flexible system are presented.

DRIESSEN,BRIAN

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Southern California Edison's (SCE) Research Program for Industrial Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCE has developed and implemented a research program for customer retention through VOC emission control. Following characterization of problematic emission sources, SCE has identified and evaluated a number of alternative solutions and is currently implementing four demonstrations for promising technologies. The SCE program focuses on three major strategies: (1) reformulation, (2) application improvements, and (3) add-on controls. Vendors were identified, contacted, and evaluated for system performance. Industrial targets were selected based on need for assistance, magnitude of emissions, and number of facilities affected. Many facility operators were approached, interviewed, and analyzed. Three technologies were selected for installation at four host sites, with continuous monitoring of inlet and outlet VOC quantities. SCE intends to continue this demonstration project and to develop an effective technology transfer program to our industrial and commercial customers.

Sung, R. D.; Cascone, R.; Reese, J.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Liquefied gaseous fuels safety and environmental control assessment program: third status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Status Report contains contributions from all contractors currently participating in the DOE Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LG) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program and is presented in two principal sections. Section I is an Executive Summary of work done by all program participants. Section II is a presentation of fourteen individual reports (A through N) on specific LGF Program activities. The emphasis of Section II is on research conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Reports A through M). Report N, an annotated bibliography of literature related to LNG safety and environmental control, was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of its LGF Safety Studies Project. Other organizations who contributed to this Status Report are Aerojet Energy Conversion Company; Applied Technology Corporation; Arthur D. Little, Incorporated; C/sub v/ International, Incorporated; Institute of Gas Technology; and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for Reports A through N for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Compressed air energy storage (CAES) environmental control concerns and program plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report assesses the required environmental research and recommends a program plan to assist DOD's Environmental Control Technology Division (ECT) in performing its mission of ensuring that the procedures, processes, systems, and strategies necessary to minimize any adverse environmental impacts of compressed air energy storage (CAES) are developed in a timely manner so as not to delay implementation of the technology. To do so, CAES technology and the expected major environmental concerns of the technology are described. Second, ongoing or planned research in related programs and the applicability of results from these programs to CAES environmental research are discussed. Third, the additional research and development required to provide the necessary environmental data base and resolve concerns in CAES are outlined. Finally, a program plan to carry out this research and development effort is presented.

Beckwith, M.A.; Boehm, D.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

The California Tobacco Control Program: A decade of progress, Results from the California Tobacco Survey, 1990-1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cigarette consumption in California: tobacco taxes vs. anviews of the State of California. Suggested Citation: GilpinWhite MM, Pierce JP. The California Tobacco Control Program:

Cancer Prevention and Control Program; University of California, San Diego

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The California Tobacco Control Program: A Decade of Progress, Results from the California Tobacco Survey, 1990-1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cigarette consumption in California: tobacco taxes vs. anviews of the State of California. Suggested Citation: GilpinWhite MM, Pierce JP. The California Tobacco Control Program:

Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of California, San Diego

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Underground Injection Control Permit Applications for FutureGen 2.0 Morgan County Class VI UIC Wells 1, 2, 3, and 4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FG-RPT-017 FG-RPT-017 Revision 1 Underground Injection Control Permit Applications for FutureGen 2.0 Morgan County Class VI UIC Wells 1, 2, 3, and 4 SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION March 2013 (Revised May 2013 in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Completeness Review) Acknowledgment: This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FE0001882. Disclaimer: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

185

Explicit/multi-parametric model predictive control (MPC) of linear discrete-time systems by dynamic and multi-parametric programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents a new algorithm for solving the explicit/multi-parametric model predictive control (or mp-MPC) problem for linear, time-invariant discrete-time systems, based on dynamic programming and multi-parametric programming techniques. The ... Keywords: Dynamic programming, Explicit Model Predictive Control, Model Predictive Control, Multi-parametric control, Multi-parametric programming

K. I. Kouramas; N. P. Fasca; C. Panos; E. N. Pistikopoulos

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Program or Field Office: Office of Legacy Management Project Title and I.D. No.: Bioremediation Injection and Related Activities at the Pinellas Site, Largo, Florida,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bioremediation Injection and Related Activities at the Pinellas Site, Largo, Florida, Bioremediation Injection and Related Activities at the Pinellas Site, Largo, Florida, LM 13-13 Location: Largo, Florida Proposed Action or Project Description: DOE proposes to use a Geoprobe to inject emulsified edible soybean oil (EEO) and anaerobic microbial solution into the surficial aquifer at the 4.5 Acre Site adjacent to the DOE Young - Rainey STAR Center (Pinellas Site) in Largo, Florida. The proposed action would enhance naturally occurring anaerobic biodegradation, thereby reducing vinyl chloride contamination along the southwest boundary of the 4.5 Acre Site. Dehalococcoides ethenogenes (DHE) is a type of microbe that occurs naturally in the aquifer. Bioaugmentation with a commercially available DHE culture used in conjunction with the EEO would maximize the efficiency of contaminant biodegradation. No genetically engineered or

187

Two-stage Ignition as an Indicator of Low Temperature Combustion in a Late Injection Pre-mixed Compression Ignition Control Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Internal combustion engines have dealt with increasingly restricted emissions requirements. After-treatment devices are successful in bringing emissions into compliance, but in-cylinder combustion control can reduce their burden by reducing engine out emissions. For example, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) are diesel combustion exhaust species that are notoriously difficult to remove by after-treatment. In-cylinder conditions can be controlled for low levels of NOx, but this produces high levels of soot potentially leading to increased particulate matter (PM). The simultaneous reduction of NOx and PM can be realized through a combustion process known as low temperature combustion (LTC). In this study, the typical definition of LTC as the defeat of the inverse relationship between soot and NOx is not applicable as a return to the soot-NOx tradeoff is observed with increasing exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). It is postulated that this effect is the result of an increase in the hot ignition equivalence ratio, moving the combustion event into a slightly higher soot formation region. This is important because a simple emissions based definition of LTC is no longer helpful. In this study, the manifestation of LTC in the calculated heat release profile is investigated. The conditions classified as LTC undergo a two-stage ignition process. Two-stage ignition is characterized by an initial cool-flame reaction followed by typical hot ignition. In traditional combustion conditions, the ignition is fast enough that a cool-flame is not observed. By controlling initial conditions (pressure, temperature, and composition), the creation and duration of the cool-flame event is predictable. Further, the effect that injection timing and the exhaust gas recirculation level have on the controlling factors of the cool-flame reaction is well correlated to the duration of the cool-flame event. These two results allow the postulation that the presence of a sufficiently long cool-flame reaction indicates a combustion event that can be classified as low temperature combustion. A potential method for identifying low temperature combustion events using only the rate of heat release profile is theorized. This study employed high levels of EGR and late injection timing to realize the LTC mode of ordinary petroleum diesel fuel. Under these conditions, and based on a 90 percent reduction in nitric oxide and no increase in smoke output relative to the chosen baseline condition, a two part criteria is developed that identifies the LTC classified conditions. The criteria are as follow: the combustion event of conventional petroleum diesel fuel must show a two-stage ignition process; the first stage (cool-flame reaction) must consume at least 2 percent of the normalized fuel energy before the hot ignition commences.

Bittle, Joshua

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Two Controlled Experiments Assessing the Usefulness of Design Pattern Documentation in Program Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using design patterns is claimed to improve programmer productivity and software quality. Such improvements may manifest both at construction time (in faster and better program design) and at maintenance time (in faster and more accurate program comprehension). This paper focuses on the maintenance context and reports on experimental tests of the following question: Does it help the maintainer if the design patterns in the program code are documented explicitly (using source code comments), compared to a well-commented pro- gram without explicit reference to design patterns? Subjects performed maintenance tasks on two programs ranging from 360 to 560 LOC including comments. Both programs contained design patterns. The controlled variable was whether the use of de- sign patterns was documented explicitly or not. The experiments thus tested whether pattern com- ment lines (PCL) help during maintenance if pat- terns are relevant and sufficient program comments are already present. It turns out that this question is a challenge for the experimental methodology: a setup leading to relevant results is quite difficult to find. We discuss these issues in detail and suggest a general approach to such situations.

Lutz Prechelt; Barbara Unger; Michael Philippsen; Walter Tichy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Radiation Control Program - Partners in Site Restoration  

SciTech Connect

In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the Management and Integration (M&I) contract for all five of the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) facilities to Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a world renowned national laboratory and research and development facility, the BJC mission involves executing the DOE Environmental Management (EM) program. In addition to BJC's M&I contract, UT-Battelle, LLC, a not-for-profit company, is the Management and Operating (M&O) contractor for DOE on the ORNL site. As part of ORNL's EM program, legacy inactive facilities (i.e., reactors, nuclear material research facilities, burial grounds, and underground storage tanks) are transferred to BJC and are designated as remediation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), or long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M) facilities. Facilities operated by both UT-Battelle and BJC are interspersed throughout the site and are usually in close proximity. Both UT-Battelle and BJC have DOE-approved Radiation Protection Programs established in accordance with 10 CFR 835. The BJC Radiological Control (RADCON) Program adapts to the M&I framework and is comprised of a combination of subcontracted program responsibilities with BJC oversight. This paper focuses on the successes and challenges of executing the BJC RADCON Program for BJC's ORNL Project through a joint M&I contractor relationship, while maintaining a positive working relationship and partnership with UT-Battelle's Radiation Protection organization.

Jones, S. L.; Stafford, M. W.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

190

Simulation and Economic Screening of Improved Oil Recovery Methods with Emphasis on Injection Profile Control Including Waterflooding, Polymer Flooding and a Thermally Activated Deep Diverting Gel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The large volume of water produced during the extraction of oil presents a significant problem due to the high cost of disposal in an environmentally friendly manner. On average, an estimated seven barrels of water is produced per barrel of oil in the US alone and the associated treatment and disposal cost is an estimated $5-10 billion. Besides making oil-water separation more complex, produced water also causes problems such as corrosion in the wellbore, decline in production rate and ultimate recovery of hydrocarbons and premature well or field abandonment. Water production can be more problematic during waterflooding in a highly heterogeneous reservoir with vertical communication between layers leading to unevenness in the flood front, cross-flow between high and low permeability layers and early water breakthrough from high permeability layers. Some of the different technologies that can be used to counteract this involve reducing the mobility of water or using a permeability block in the higher permeability, swept zones. This research was initiated to evaluate the potential effectiveness of the latter method, known as deep diverting gels (DDG) to plug thief zones deep within the reservoir and far from the injection well. To evaluate the performance of DDG, its injection was modeled, sensitivities run for a range of reservoir characteristics and conditions and an economic analysis was also performed. The performance of the DDG was then compared to other recovery methods, specifically waterflooding and polymer flooding from a technical and economic perspective. A literature review was performed on the background of injection profile control methods, their respective designs and technical capabilities. For the methods selected, Schlumberger's Eclipse software was used to simulate their behavior in a reservoir using realistic and simplified assumptions of reservoir characteristics and fluid properties. The simulation results obtained were then used to carry out economic analyses upon which conclusions and recommendations are based. These results show that the factor with the largest impact on the economic success of this method versus a polymer flood was the amount of incremental oil produced. By comparing net present values of the different methods, it was found that the polymer flood was the most successful with the highest NPV for each configuration followed by DDG.

Okeke, Tobenna

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant Sustainability Program of Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting System Upgrades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UEIP has been working on a comprehensive sustainability program that includes establishing a site sustainability working group, information gathering, planning, organizing, developing schedule and estimated costs, trhough joint UEIP-US DOE/NNSA National Laboratory sustainability contracts. Considerable efforts have been necessary in the sustainability planning, monitoring, and control of the scope of work using tools such as Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Project and SAP R/3. While information interchanges within the sustainability program provides adequate US assurances that US funds are well spent through its quarterly reporting methodology, proper information security and protection measures are taken throughout the process. Decommissioning of outdated equipment has also become part of determining sustainability requirements and processes. The sites sustainability program has facilitated the development of a transition plan toward eventual full Russian funding of sustaining nuclear security upgrades.

Vakhonin, Alexander; Yuldashev, Rashid; Dabbs, Richard D.; Carroll, Michael F.; Garrett, Albert G.; Patrick, Scott W.; Ku, Eshter M.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Efficient IRM enforcement of history-based access control policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inlined Reference Monitor (IRM) is an established enforcement mechanism for history-based access control policies. IRM enforcement injects monitoring code into the binary of an untrusted program in order to track its execution history. The injected code ... Keywords: distributed optimization protocol, history-based access control policies, inlined reference monitors, language-based security, security automata

Fei Yan; Philip W. L. Fong

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 6 of 6: Temperature Measurement of Galvanneal Steel  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the successful completion of the development of an accurate in-process measurement instrument for galvanneal steel surface temperatures. This achievement results from a joint research effort that is a part of the American Iron and Steel Institute's (AISI) Advanced Process Control Program, a collaboration between the U.S> Department of Energy and fifteen North American Steelmakers. This three-year project entitled ''Temperature Measurement of Galvanneal Steel'' uses phosphor thermography, and outgrowth of Uranium enrichment research at Oak Ridge facilities. Temperature is the controlling factor regarding the distribution of iron and zinc in the galvanneal strip coating, which in turn determines the desired product properties

S.W. Allison; D.L. Beshears; W.W. Manges

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Programming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programming for Exascale Computers William Gropp and Marc Snir April 15, 2013 Abstract Exascale systems will present programmers with many challenges. We review the...

195

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for Environment has responsibility for identifying, characterizing, and ameliorating the environmental, health, and safety issues and public concerns associated with commercial operation of specific energy systems. The need for developing a safety and environmental control assessment for liquefied gaseous fuels was identified by the Environmental and Safety Engineering Division as a result of discussions with various governmental, industry, and academic persons having expertise with respect to the particular materials involved: liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, hydrogen, and anhydrous ammonia. This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in Fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 1 (Executive Summary) describes the background, purpose and organization of the LGF Program and contains summaries of the 25 reports presented in Volumes 2 and 3. Annotated bibliographies on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety and Environmental Control Research and on Fire Safety and Hazards of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) are included in Volume 1.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Implementation of an Enhanced Measurement Control Program for handling nuclear safety samples at WSRC  

SciTech Connect

In the separation and purification of nuclear material, nuclear criticality safety (NCS) is of primary concern. The primary nuclear criticality safety controls utilized by the Savannah River Site (SRS) Separations Facilities involve administrative and process equipment controls. Additional assurance of NCS is obtained by identifying key process hold points where sampling is used to independently verify the effectiveness of production control. Nuclear safety measurements of samples from these key process locations provide a high degree of assurance that processing conditions are within administrative and procedural nuclear safety controls. An enhanced procedure management system aimed at making improvements in the quality, safety, and conduct of operation was implemented for Nuclear Safety Sample (NSS) receipt, analysis, and reporting. All procedures with nuclear safety implications were reviewed for accuracy and adequate detail to perform the analytical measurements safely, efficiently, and with the utmost quality. Laboratory personnel worked in a ``Deliberate Operating`` mode (a systematic process requiring continuous expert oversight during all phases of training, testing, and implementation) to initiate the upgrades. Thus, the effort to revise and review nuclear safety sample procedures involved a team comprised of a supervisor, chemist, and two technicians for each procedure. Each NSS procedure was upgraded to a ``Use Every Time`` (UET) procedure with sign-off steps to ensure compliance with each step for every nuclear safety sample analyzed. The upgrade program met and exceeded both the long and short term customer needs by improving measurement reliability, providing objective evidence of rigid adherence to program principles and requirements, and enhancing the system for independent verification of representative sampling from designated NCS points.

Boler-Melton, C.; Holland, M.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Implementation of an Enhanced Measurement Control Program for handling nuclear safety samples at WSRC  

SciTech Connect

In the separation and purification of nuclear material, nuclear criticality safety (NCS) is of primary concern. The primary nuclear criticality safety controls utilized by the Savannah River Site (SRS) Separations Facilities involve administrative and process equipment controls. Additional assurance of NCS is obtained by identifying key process hold points where sampling is used to independently verify the effectiveness of production control. Nuclear safety measurements of samples from these key process locations provide a high degree of assurance that processing conditions are within administrative and procedural nuclear safety controls. An enhanced procedure management system aimed at making improvements in the quality, safety, and conduct of operation was implemented for Nuclear Safety Sample (NSS) receipt, analysis, and reporting. All procedures with nuclear safety implications were reviewed for accuracy and adequate detail to perform the analytical measurements safely, efficiently, and with the utmost quality. Laboratory personnel worked in a Deliberate Operating'' mode (a systematic process requiring continuous expert oversight during all phases of training, testing, and implementation) to initiate the upgrades. Thus, the effort to revise and review nuclear safety sample procedures involved a team comprised of a supervisor, chemist, and two technicians for each procedure. Each NSS procedure was upgraded to a Use Every Time'' (UET) procedure with sign-off steps to ensure compliance with each step for every nuclear safety sample analyzed. The upgrade program met and exceeded both the long and short term customer needs by improving measurement reliability, providing objective evidence of rigid adherence to program principles and requirements, and enhancing the system for independent verification of representative sampling from designated NCS points.

Boler-Melton, C.; Holland, M.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Improving Area Control Error Diversity Interchange (ADI) Program by Incorporating Congestion Constraints  

SciTech Connect

The area control error (ACE) determines how much a balancing authority (BA) needs to move its regulating units to meet mandatory control performance standard requirements. Regulation is an expensive resource that could cost several hundred million dollars a year for a BA. The amount of regulation needed in a system is increasing with more intermittent generation resources added to the system. The ACE diversity interchange (ADI) program provides a tool for reducing the regulation requirement by combining ACEs from several participating BAs followed by sharing the total ACE among all participating balancing areas. The effect is achieved as a result of the low statistical correlation between the original ACEs of participating BAs. A rule-based ADI approach has already been put into practice in the US Western Interconnection. The degree of actual ACE sharing is artificially limited because of the unknown redistribution of power flows and possible system congestion (these factors are not monitored in the existing ADI). This paper proposes a two-step linear programming (LP) ADI approach that incorporates congestion constraints. In the first step of the proposed LP ADI, the line transmission limits are enforced by setting up corresponding constraints. In the second step, the business fairness is pursued. Simulation is performed to compare the properties of the proposed LP ADI and the existing rule-based ADI. Favorable features, such as avoiding line limit violations and increasing the degree of possible ACE sharing, are observed for the proposed LP ADI.

Zhou, Ning; Etingov, Pavel V.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guttromson, Ross T.; McManus, Bart

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Environmental Control Technologies - Combined SO2 / NOx Control Technologies Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection - Project Brief [PDF-328KB] Energy and Environmental Research Inc., Springfield/Hennepin, IL PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection Volume 1: Program Overview, Part A-Final Public Design Report, Part B-Project Performance and Economics [PDF-17MB] (Feb 1997) Volume 2: Gas Reburning-Sorbent injection at Hennepin Unit 1 [PDF-12MB] (Mar 1996) Volume 3: Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection at Edwards Unit 1 [PDF-3.8MB] (Mar 1996) Volume 4: Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection at Lakeside Unit 7 [PDF-21.9MB] (Mar1996) Volume 5: Guideline Manual [PDF-6.9MB] (Sept 1998)

200

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

Michael D. Durham

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effects of sorbent injection for sulfur dioxide removal on particulate control systems for coal-fired boilers. Final report, October 1984-October 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes studies undertaken to quantify the effects of dry SO2 sorbent injection on electrostatic precipitator (ESP) operation with a coal-burning utility boiler. The specific operation of interest was EPA's limestone injection, multistage burners (LIMB) process. The combination of spent sorbent and fly ash has a higher resistivity, a higher mass concentration, and a finer particle-size distribution than the ash alone; all of these factors diminish the effectiveness of ESP. Also investigated was chemical conditioning to reduce the resistivity problem, the only one of three concerns stemming from sorbent injection that can be readily mitigated. Other topics studied were: the recycle, disposal, and utilization of waste-ash/sorbent mixtures; the selection and modification of sorbents to improve SO2 capture in the furnace; and the reactivation of spent sorbent by humidification to achieve supplemental post-furnace capture of SO2.

Gooch, J.P.; DuBard, J.L.; Faulkner, M.G.; Marchant, G.H.; Dahlin, R.S.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Proof of concept testing of an integrated dry injection system for SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} control. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The integrated Dry Injection Process (IDIP) consists of combustion modification using low NO{sub x} burners to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, dry injection of hydrated line at economizer temperatures for primary capture of SO{sub 2}, dry injection of a commercial grade sodium bicarbonate at the air heater exit for additional SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal, and humidification for precipitator conditioning. IDIP offers the potential for simultaneously achieving 90% SO{sub 2} removal, and 65% NO{sub x} removal from a high sulfur flue gas. The process is well suited for new or retrofit applications since it can be incorporated within existing economizer and downstream ductwork. Subscale tests were performed in order to identify the best calcium and sodium sorbents. These tests involved the injection of calcium hydroxide and sodium sorbents at various points of the flue gas system downstream of a 0.25 MM BTU/hr. coal fired combustor, and the gas residence times, cooling rates and temperatures were comparable to those found for full-scale utility boilers. These tests verified that a high surface area hydrated lime provides maximum sorbent utilization and identified an alcohol-water hydrated lime as yielding the highest surface area and the best SO{sub 2} removal capability. The tests also identified sodium bicarbonate to be somewhat more effective than sodium sesquicarbonate for SO{sub 2} removal. The proof of concept demonstration was conducted on the large combustor at the Riley Stoker Research Facility in Worcester, MA. When economically compared to conventional limestone slurry scrubbing on a 300 MW plant, the dry injection process shows lower capital cost but higher operating cost. Hydrated lime injection can be less costly than limestone scrubbing when two or more of the following conditions exist: plant is small (less than 100MW); yearly operating hours are small (less than 3000); and the remaining plant lifetime is small (less than 10 years).

Helfritch, D.J.; Bortz, S.J. [Research-Cottrell, Inc., Somerville, NJ (United States); Beittel, R. [Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Results of the Excreta Bioassay Quality Control Program for April 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010  

SciTech Connect

A total of 58 urine samples and 10 fecal samples were submitted during the report period (April 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010) to General Engineering Laboratories, South Carolina by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP) to check the accuracy, precision, and detection levels of their analyses. Urine analyses for Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am 235U, 238U, elemental uranium and fecal analyses for 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu were tested this year as well as four tissue samples for 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am and 241Pu. The number of QC urine samples submitted during the report period represented 1.3% of the total samples submitted. In addition to the samples provided by IDP, GEL was also required to conduct their own QC program, and submit the results of analyses to IDP. About 33% of the analyses processed by GEL during the third year of this contract were quality control samples. GEL tested the performance of 21 radioisotopes, all of which met or exceeded the specifications in the Statement of Work within statistical uncertainty (Table 4).

Antonio, Cheryl L.

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

204

Results of The Excreta Bioassay Quality Control Program For April 1, 2010 Through March 31, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of 76 urine samples and 10 spiked fecal samples were submitted during the report period (April 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011) to GEL Laboratories, LLC in South Carolina by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP) to check the accuracy, precision, and detection levels of their analyses. Urine analyses for 14C, Sr, for 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am, 235U, 238U, 238U-mass and fecal analyses for 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu were tested this year. The number of QC urine samples submitted during the report period represented 1.1% of the total samples submitted. In addition to the samples provided by IDP, GEL was also required to conduct their own QC program, and submit the results of analyses to IDP. About 31% of the analyses processed by GEL during the first year of contract 112512 were quality control samples. GEL tested the performance of 23 radioisotopes, all of which met or exceeded the specifications in the Statement of Work within statistical uncertainty except the slightly elevated relative bias for 243,244Cm (Table 4).

Antonio, Cheryl L.

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

205

State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for underground injection control. Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--July 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This task involves developing a preliminary national energy and environmental risk analysis system (EERAS). An analytical methodology for nationwise estimation of potential for USDW contamination from underground injection and the current and future resource potential associated with these areas of concern will be developed.

Not Available

1994-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Attempts to undermine tobacco control: tobacco industry "youth smoking prevention" programs to undermine meaningful tobacco control in Latin America.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

April 20, 2006. 56. Venezuela No-Smoking Program for Youth.Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela) had ratified the World Healthespecially Puerto Rico, Venezuela and Uruguay, are pressing

Sebri, Ernesto M; Glantz, Stanton A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Geothermal induced seismicity program plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plan for a National Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program has been prepared in consultation with a panel of experts from industry, academia, and government. The program calls for baseline seismic monitoring in regions of known future geothermal development, continued seismic monitoring and characterization of earthquakes in zones of geothermal fluid production and injection, modeling of the earthquake-inducing mechanism, and in situ measurement of stresses in the geothermal development. The Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program (GISP) will have as its objectives the evaluation of the seismic hazard, if any, associated with geothermal resource exploitation and the devising of a technology which, when properly utilized, will control or mitigate such hazards.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

FEASIBILITY OF PARTIAL CHEMICAL CONTROL FOR THE SM-2. SM-2 (FORMERLY APPR- 1B) DESIGN PROGRAM, TASK 12-CHEMICAL CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

Chemical control of the SM-2 was evaluated both as a partial substitute for burnable poison in the fuel element meat and as a means of improving plant performance. Based on a review of existing information, boric acid was chosen as the reference soluble poison. It was shown that 60% of the burnable B/sup 10/ in the fuel element matrix could be replaced by soluble B/sup 10/ in the coolant without impairing plant stability during load transients. The feasibility of improving power distribution and reducing the number of control rods by supplementing the burnable poison with chemical control was also demonstrated. A preliminary design of an injection and removal system was prepared for the SM-2. (auth)

1959-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Extremophiles 2004 Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles SEPTEMBER 19 -23, 2004 CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles © 2004, American Society for Microbiology 1752 N Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20036-2904 Phone: 202-737-3600 World Wide Web: www.asm.org All Rights Reserved Printed in the United States of America ISBN: 1-55581 324-0 TABLE OF CONTENTS General Information Scientific Program Abstracts for Oral Sessions Abstracts for Poster Sessions Index 4 10 18 42 144 4 ASM Conferences EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Frank Robb, Chair University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute Michael W. Adams University of Georgia Koki Horikoshi Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology Robert M. Kelly North Carolina State University Jennifer Littlechild

210

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 4: Diesel Particulate Filters -- Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This is the fourth and final report for the DPF test program and covers the effect of diesel sulfur level on: a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF), and a continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CR-DPF).

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 2: NO{sub x} Adsorber Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report discusses the results of the DECSE test program that demonstrates the potential of NOx adsorber catalyst technology across the range of diesel engine operation with a fuel economy penalty less than 4%.

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

DOE/DHS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY PROGRAMS: A MODEL FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY  

SciTech Connect

Many critical infrastructure sectors have been investigating cyber security issues for several years especially with the help of two primary government programs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program have both implemented activities aimed at securing the industrial control systems that operate the North American electric grid along with several other critical infrastructure sectors (ICS). These programs have spent the last seven years working with industry including asset owners, educational institutions, standards and regulating bodies, and control system vendors. The programs common mission is to provide outreach, identification of cyber vulnerabilities to ICS and mitigation strategies to enhance security postures. The success of these programs indicates that a similar approach can be successfully translated into other sectors including nuclear operations, safeguards, and security. The industry regulating bodies have included cyber security requirements and in some cases, have incorporated sets of standards with penalties for non-compliance such as the North American Electric Reliability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection standards. These DOE and DHS programs that address security improvements by both suppliers and end users provide an excellent model for nuclear facility personnel concerned with safeguards and security cyber vulnerabilities and countermeasures. It is not a stretch to imagine complete surreptitious collapse of protection against the removal of nuclear material or even initiation of a criticality event as witnessed at Three Mile Island or Chernobyl in a nuclear ICS inadequately protected against the cyber threat.

Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Slit injection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser cavity electron beam injection device provided with a single elongated slit window for passing a suitably shaped electron beam and means for varying the current density of the injected electron beam.

Alger, Terry W. (Livermore, CA); Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA); Bradley, Laird P. (Livermore, CA)

1976-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Rich catalytic injection  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

Veninger, Albert (Coventry, CT)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

UP-GRADED RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of the RHIC injection systems anticipated the possibility of filling and operating the rings with a 120 bunch pattern, corresponding to 110 bunches after allowing for the abort gap. Beam measurements during the 2002 run confirmed the possibility, although at the expense of severe transverse emittance growth and thus not on an operational basis. An improvement program was initiated with the goal of reducing the kicker rise time from 110 to {approx}95 ns and of minimizing pulse timing jitter and drift. The major components of the injection system are 4 kicker magnets and Blmlein pulsers using thyratron switches. The kicker terminating resistor and operating voltage was increased to reduce the rise time. Timing has been stabilized by using commercial trigger units and extremely stable dc supplies for the thyratron reservoir. A fiber optical connection between control room and the thyratron trigger unit has been provided, thereby allowing the operator to adjust timing individually for each kicker unit. The changes were successfully implemented for use in the RHIC operation.

HAHN,H.FISCHER,W.SEMERTZIDIS,Y.K.WARBURTON,D.S.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

216

WindoWorks: A flexible program for computerized testing of accelerator control system electronic circuit boards  

SciTech Connect

Since most accelerator control system circuit boards reside in a commercial bus architecture, such as CAMAC or VMEbus, a computerized test station is needed for exercising the boards. This test station is needed for the development of newly designed prototypes, for commissioning newly manufactured boards, for diagnosing boards which have failed in service, and for long term testing of boards with intermittent failure problems. WindoWorks was created to address these needs. It is a flexible program which runs on a PC compatible computer and uses a PC to bus crate interface. WindoWorks was designed to give the user a flexible way to test circuit boards. Each test is incapsulated into a window. By bringing up several different windows the user can run several different tests simultaneously. The windows are sizable, and moveable. They have data entry boxes so that the test can be customized to the users preference. The windows can be used in conjunction with each other in order to create supertests. There are several windows which are generic. They can be used to test basic functions on any VME (or CAMAC) board. There are other windows which have been created to test specific boards. New windows for testing specific boards can be easily created by a Pascal programmer using the WindoWorks framework.

Utterback, J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE's Duct Injection Test Facility at Ohio Power Company's Muskingum River Plant was modified to enable performance of a comprehensive test program concerning duct injection of sorbents for SO[sub 2] control. Injection of slaked lime slurries and injection of dry calcium hydroxide powder with humidification were carried out under a variety of process conditions. Slaked lime slurry injection as found to be superior in both operational reliability and S0[sub 2] removal capability compared with dry hydrated lime injection with humidification. Calcium utilization of 50% was achieved with 50% S0[sub 2] removal at the ESP outlet with recycle of unreacted sorbent collected in the precipitatorhoppers. Electrostatic precipitator collection performance was found to be highly variable with sorbent injection, especially with close approach to saturation temperatures and high inlet mass loadings. Small-scale tests with a fabric filter in parallel with the precipitator indicated 5 to 10% more S0[sub 2] removal could be obtained across the fabric filter than the ESP for all test conditions. Over 95% S0[sub 2] removal was achieved with the fabric filter using a two stage cooling process in which the filter was cooled below the operating temperature ofthe duct spray dryer.

Felix, L.G.; Gooch, J.P.; Merritt, R.L. (Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States)); Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G.; Hunt, J.E. (Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States))

1992-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

Deviation to the Test Program and Procedures for the 710 Critical Experiment Reactor Control Drum Mockup Experiment  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a deviation from the "Test Program and Procedures for the 710 Critical Experiment Reactor Control Drum Mockup Experiment," TM-64-3-706, which was made in accordance with ITS Standard Practice J80-81 on September 14, 1964. The deviation did not involve a significant change in the safety of the operation.

Sims, F.L.

1964-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

219

"Investigating the way national grid controllers visualize the electricity transmission grid using a neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) approach"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly skilled South African experts are responsible for controlling the voltage levels of the electrical transmission grid. This paper reports on the research methodology, which was used to identify the mental structure of their expertise. The research ... Keywords: human factors, mental models, naturalistic decision making, neuro-linguistic programming (NLP), visualization

P. Lazanas

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Plant Support Engineering: Aging Management Program Development Guidance for Instrument and Control Cable Systems for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides guidance for developing and implementing a cable aging management program for low-voltage instrument and control cable circuits in nuclear power plants. Guidance is provided for identifying cables located in adverse localized environments and determining if those environments have caused significant cable circuit degradation.

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Collection and analyses of physical data for deep injection wells in Florida.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Deep injection wells (DIW) in Florida are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the state of Florida through the Underground Injection Control (more)

Gao, Jie.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Intradermal needle-free powdered drug injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a new method for needle-free powdered drug injection. The design, construction, and testing of a bench-top helium-powered device capable of delivering powder to controllable depths within the dermis ...

Liu, John (John Hsiao-Yung)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Development of a Systemwide Predator Control Program, Section I : Northern Squawfish Management Program Implementation, 1994 annual report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors report the results from the forth year of a basinwide program to harvest northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in an effort to reduce mortality due to northern squawfish predation on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern squawfish on juvenile salmonids may account for most of the 10--20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated it is not necessary to eradicate northern squawfish to substantially reduce predation-caused mortality of juvenile salmonids. Instead, if northern squawfish were exploited at a 10--20% rate, reductions in numbers of larger, older fish resulting in restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50% or more. Consequently, the authors designed and tested a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day pool in 1990. They also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, they implemented three test fisheries on a multi-pool, or systemwide, scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery.

Willis, Charles F. (S.P. Cramer and Associates, Inc., Gresham, OR); Young, Franklin R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Evaluation of Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Control Strategies to Effectively Meet 70 - 90% Evaluation of Control Strategies to Effectively Meet 70 - 90% Mercury Reduction on an Eastern Bituminous Coal Cyclone Boiler with SCR The overall objective of this project is to assess the potential for significant mercury control, between 50 and 90% above baseline, by sorbent injection for the challenging technical process configuration at Public Service of New Hampshire Company Merrimack Station Unit No. 2. The primary emphasis of this project is to evaluate the performance of mercury sorbent injection, but the effect of co-benefits from SO3 mitigation on mercury control will also be explored. Also in this program the performance capabilities of mercury measurement techniques in challenging flue-gas environment will be assessed and the impact of activated carbon injection on fly ash disposal options will be investigated.

225

LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM Project 3.3 Classroom Photocell and Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a prototype of an advanced daylighting control system for classrooms. This system integrated dimming control of an advanced daylighting control system for classrooms. This system integrated dimming control with On the concept of an advanced daylighting control system. #12;Deliverable 3.3.15 Final Report TWS

226

Control of coal combustion SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] emissions by in-boiler injection of CMA  

SciTech Connect

The principal objectives of the proposed research are two-fold: (A) To understand the mechanism and assess the effectiveness of sulfur capture by the chemical calcium magnesium acetate (CMA). And (B) To evaluate the NO[sub x] reduction capabilities of CMA by burning the organic constituents of the chemical (the acetate) and reducing NO to stable N[sub 2] The optimum conditions and the location of CMA introduction in the furnace will be identified. To achieve these goals water solutions of CMA or dry powders of CMA will be injected into hot air or gases simulating the furnace exhaust (containing CO[sub 2], SO[sub x] NO[sub x], H[sub 2]O, O[sub 2] etc.) and the composition of gaseous and solid products of the reaction will be monitored. The processes of burning the organic acetate as well as the calcination, sintering and sulfation of the remaining solid will be studied in detail.

Levendis, Y.A.; Wise, D.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Geysers injection modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our research is concerned with mathematical modeling techniques for engineering design and optimization of water injection in vapor-dominated systems. The emphasis in the project has been on the understanding of physical processes and mechanisms during injection, applications to field problems, and on transfer of numerical simulation capabilities to the geothermal community. This overview summarizes recent work on modeling injection interference in the Southeast Geysers, and on improving the description of two-phase flow processes in heterogeneous media.

Pruess, K.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Optimization of injection scheduling in geothermal fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study discusses the application of algorithms developed in Operations Research to the optimization of brine reinjection in geothermal fields. The injection optimization problem is broken into two sub-problems: (1) choosing a configuration of injectors from an existing set of wells, and (2) allocating a total specified injection rate among chosen injectors. The allocation problem is solved first. The reservoir is idealized as a network of channels or arcs directly connecting each pair of wells in the field. Each arc in the network is considered to have some potential for thermal breakthrough. This potential is quantified by an arc-specific break-through index, b/sub ij/, based on user-specified parameters from tracer tests, field geometry, and operating considerations. The sum of b/sub ij/-values for all arcs is defined as the fieldwide breakthrough index, B. Injection is optimized by choosing injection wells and rates so as to minimize B subject to constraints on the number of injectors and the total amount of fluid to be produced and reinjected. The study presents four computer programs which employ linear or quadratic programming to solve the allocation problem. In addition, a program is presented which solves the injector configuration problem by a combination of enumeration and quadratic programming. The use of the various programs is demonstrated with reference both to hypothetical data and an actual data set from the Wairakei Geothermal Field in New Zealand.

Lovekin, J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Please cite this article in press as: Preisig, M., Prvost, J.H., Coupled multi-phase thermo-poromechanical effects. Case study: CO2 injection at In Salah, Algeria. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2010.12.006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-poromechanical effects. Case study: CO2 injection at In Salah, Algeria. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10 of Greenhouse Gas Control xxx (2011) xxx­xxx Contents lists available at ScienceDirect International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/ijggc Coupled multi-phase thermo

Prevost, Jean-Herve

230

RESULTS OF THE EXCRETA BIOASSAY QUALITY CONTROL PROGRAM FOR APRIL 1, 2011 THROUGH MARCH 31, 2012  

SciTech Connect

The performance statistics for the Hanford excreta radiobioassay program are presented and discussed. The performance period covers the second contract year of Contract 112512 - April 2011 to March 2012.

Antonio, Cheryl L.; MacLellan, Jay A.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Quality Control of Meteorological Data for the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program Meteorological Support Project ensures the accuracy and reliability of data acquired by meteorological monitoring stations located at seven U.S. Army chemical weapons depots where storage and ...

James C. Liljegren; Stephen Tschopp; Kevin Rogers; Fred Wasmer; Lucia Liljegren; Michael Myirski

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Deemed Savings Estimates for Legacy Air Conditioning and WaterHeating Direct Load Control Programs in PJM Region  

SciTech Connect

During 2005 and 2006, the PJM Interconnection (PJM) Load Analysis Subcommittee (LAS) examined ways to reduce the costs and improve the effectiveness of its existing measurement and verification (M&V) protocols for Direct Load Control (DLC) programs. The current M&V protocol requires that a PURPA-compliant Load Research study be conducted every five years for each Load-Serving Entity (LSE). The current M&V protocol is expensive to implement and administer particularly for mature load control programs, some of which are marginally cost-effective. There was growing evidence that some LSEs were mothballing or dropping their DLC programs in lieu of incurring the expense associated with the M&V. This project had several objectives: (1) examine the potential for developing deemed savings estimates acceptable to PJM for legacy air conditioning and water heating DLC programs, and (2) explore the development of a collaborative, regional, consensus-based approach for conducting monitoring and verification of load reductions for emerging load management technologies for customers that do not have interval metering capability.

Goldman, Charles

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Intelligent predictive control of a power plant with evolutionary programming optimizer and neuro-fuzzy identifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intelligent predictive controller is implemented to control a fossil fuel power unit. This controller is a non-model based system that uses a self-organized neuro-fuzzy identifier to predict the response of the plant in a future time interval. The ...

H. Ghezelayagh; K. Y. Lee

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Injection of Electrons and Holes into Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection of Electrons and Holes into Nanostructures Injection of Electrons and Holes into Nanostructures This program targets fundamental understanding of nanoscale charge transfer processes. The proposed work draws on the strengths of the Brookhaven Chemistry Department in the areas of electron transfer experiment and theory, and extends the area of inquiry to nanoscale processes. Electron/hole injection into a wire, a nanocrystal, a nanotube or other nanostructure in solution may be brought about by light absorption, by an electron pulse (pulse radiolysis, LEAF), by a chemical reagent, or through an electrode. These processes are being studied by transient methods by following conductivity, current, but most generally, spectroscopic changes in the solutions to determine the dynamics of charge injection. The observed transient spectra can also provide values for electron-transfer coupling elements and energetics. Theoretical/computational studies can help in materials design and in the interpretation of the experimental results. The experimental systems being examined include molecular wires and metal nanoclusters.

235

Yet Another Fault Injection Technique : by Forward Body Biasing Injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expensive fault injection tech- niques, like clock or voltage glitches, are well taken into accountYet Another Fault Injection Technique : by Forward Body Biasing Injection K. TOBICH1,2, P. MAURINE1 Injection, Electromag- netic Attacks, RSA, Chinese Remainder Theorem 1 Introduction Fault injection

236

THE RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.  

SciTech Connect

The RHIC injection system has to transport beam from the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line onto the closed orbits of the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings. This task can be divided into three problems. First, the beam has to be injected into either ring. Second, once injected the beam needs to be transported around the ring for one turn. Third, the orbit must be closed and coherent beam oscillations around the closed orbit should be minimized. We describe our solutions for these problems and report on system tests conducted during the RHIC Sextant test performed in 1997. The system will be fully commissioned in 1999.

FISCHER,W.; GLENN,J.W.; MACKAY,W.W.; PTITSIN,V.; ROBINSON,T.G.; TSOUPAS,N.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

237

Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet. 18 figures.

Hadley, G.R.; Hohimer, J.P.; Owyoung, A.

1991-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet.

Hadley, G. Ronald (Albuquerque, NM); Hohimer, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); Owyoung, Adelbert (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Smart Materials for Fuel Injection Actuation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The demands of stringent emissions and a robust engine dynamic torque response characteristic require innovative, accurate and repeatable control of the fuel injection event. Recent advances in piezo-material actuators have warranted the pursuit of its application to advanced heavy-duty truck fuel injection systems. This presentation will report on design and testing of an advanced electronic unit injector for the Detroit Diesel Series 60 truck engine.

Hakim, Nabil

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

Independent Oversight Inspection of Classification and Information Control Programs at the Richland Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 2.2 Authorities ............................................................................... 2 2.3 Guidance ................................................................................. 3 2.4 Training ................................................................................... 3 2.5 Document Reviews ................................................................. 4 2.6 Program Evaluation ................................................................. 4 3.0 CONCLUSIONS ................................................................................ 5 4.0 RATINGS ............................................................................................ 5 5.0 OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVEMENT ..................................... 6 APPENDIX A: SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A computer program for monitoring and controlling ultrasonic anemometers for aerodynamic measurements in animal buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultrasonic anemometers (USAs) are widely implemented in animal housing to measure the air velocity in different measuring points throughout the whole barn, which ultimately leads to determine the velocity fields and the air flow patterns drawing a clear ... Keywords: Aerodynamics, Air profile, Airflow, Computer program, Precision livestock farming, Ultrasonic anemometer

M. Samer; C. Loebsin; K. von Bobrutzki; M. Fiedler; C. Ammon; W. Berg; P. Sanftleben; R. Brunsch

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

GAO-04-988R Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Enhancements Needed to Strengthen Controls Over the Purchase Card Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8R PNNL Purchase Card Controls 8R PNNL Purchase Card Controls United States Government Accountability Office Washington, DC 20548 August 6, 2004 Congressional Requesters Subject: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Enhancements Needed to Strengthen Controls Over the Purchase Card Program The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) located in Richland, Washington, is a government-owned, contractor-operated Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory. The Battelle Memorial Institute manages the lab under a cost- reimbursable contract with DOE. Battelle is paid a management fee to operate the lab and is reimbursed for all allowable costs charged to the contract. During the fall of 2002, the Federal Bureau of Investigation began investigating two Los Alamos National Laboratory employees for alleged misuse of lab credit cards.

243

GAO-04-986R Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Further Improvements Needed to Strengthen Controls Over the Purchase Card Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6R LLNL Purchase Card Controls 6R LLNL Purchase Card Controls United States Government Accountability Office Washington, DC 20548 August 6, 2004 Congressional Requesters Subject: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Further Improvements Needed to Strengthen Controls Over the Purchase Card Program The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) located in Livermore, California is a government-owned, contractor-operated national laboratory of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). 1 The University of California manages the lab under a cost-reimbursable contract with NNSA. The university is paid a management fee to operate the lab and is reimbursed for all allowable costs charged to the contract. During the fall of 2002, the Federal Bureau of Investigation began investigating two

244

West Valley transfer cart control system design description. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detail design of the control system for the West Valley Nuclear Services Vitrification Facility transfer cart has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report documents the requirements and describes the detail design of that equipment and control software. Copies of significant design documents including analysis and testing reports and design drawings are included in the Appendixes.

Bradley, E.C.; Crutcher, R.I.; Halliwell, J.W.; Hileman, M.S.; Moore, M.R.; Nodine, R.N.; Ruppel, F.R.; Vandermolen, R.I.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Program on Technology Innovation: Controlled Recycling of Contaminated Materials for Nuclear Industry Uses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses opportunities to recycle materials in radioactive waste by decontamination and fabrication into new components for use in the nuclear industry. In particular, a novel approach called "controlled recycling" involves a procedure that controls the material during decontamination, metal processing and remanufacture into components for reuse in the nuclear industry.

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Work Control Process Module in Support of a Living Maintenance Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical report shows how to manage the risks associated with work control issues that effect the safety, reliability, and O&M costs of a nuclear plant. It also addresses how to increase communications and improve group dynamics between operations, maintenance, and planning/scheduling personnel to assist in the practical use of the Work Control Process.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology. Final report, Task 4.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE`s Duct Injection Test Facility at Ohio Power Company`s Muskingum River Plant was modified to enable performance of a comprehensive test program concerning duct injection of sorbents for SO{sub 2} control. Injection of slaked lime slurries and injection of dry calcium hydroxide powder with humidification were carried out under a variety of process conditions. Slaked lime slurry injection as found to be superior in both operational reliability and S0{sub 2} removal capability compared with dry hydrated lime injection with humidification. Calcium utilization of 50% was achieved with 50% S0{sub 2} removal at the ESP outlet with recycle of unreacted sorbent collected in the precipitatorhoppers. Electrostatic precipitator collection performance was found to be highly variable with sorbent injection, especially with close approach to saturation temperatures and high inlet mass loadings. Small-scale tests with a fabric filter in parallel with the precipitator indicated 5 to 10% more S0{sub 2} removal could be obtained across the fabric filter than the ESP for all test conditions. Over 95% S0{sub 2} removal was achieved with the fabric filter using a two stage cooling process in which the filter was cooled below the operating temperature ofthe duct spray dryer.

Felix, L.G.; Gooch, J.P.; Merritt, R.L. [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States); Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G.; Hunt, J.E. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1992-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Addressing Control of Hazardous Energy (COHE) Requirements in a Laser Safety Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OSHA regulation 29CFR1910.147 specifies control of hazardous energy requirements for 'the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the machines or equipment, or release of stored energy could cause injury to employees.' Class 3B and Class 4 laser beams must be considered hazardous energy sources because of the potential for serious eye injury; careful consideration is therefore needed to safely de-energize these lasers. This paper discusses and evaluates control of hazardous energy principles in this OSHA regulation, in ANSI Z136.1 ''Safe Use of Lasers,'' and in ANSI Z244.1 ''Control of Hazardous Energy, Lockout/Tagout and Alternative Methods.'' Recommendations are made for updating and improving CoHE (control of hazardous energy) requirements in these standards for their applicability to safe laser operations.

Woods, Michael; /SLAC

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Compilation and evaluation of atomic and molecular data relevant to controlled thermonuclear research needs: USA programs  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. role in the compilation and evaluation of atomic data for controlled thermonuclear research is discussed in the following three areas: (1) atomic structure data, (2) atomic collision data, and (3) surface data. (MOW)

Barnett, C.F.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Comparing, optimizing, and benchmarking quantum-control algorithms in a unifying programming framework  

SciTech Connect

For paving the way to novel applications in quantum simulation, computation, and technology, increasingly large quantum systems have to be steered with high precision. It is a typical task amenable to numerical optimal control to turn the time course of pulses, i.e., piecewise constant control amplitudes, iteratively into an optimized shape. Here, we present a comparative study of optimal-control algorithms for a wide range of finite-dimensional applications. We focus on the most commonly used algorithms: GRAPE methods which update all controls concurrently, and Krotov-type methods which do so sequentially. Guidelines for their use are given and open research questions are pointed out. Moreover, we introduce a unifying algorithmic framework, DYNAMO (dynamic optimization platform), designed to provide the quantum-technology community with a convenient matlab-based tool set for optimal control. In addition, it gives researchers in optimal-control techniques a framework for benchmarking and comparing newly proposed algorithms with the state of the art. It allows a mix-and-match approach with various types of gradients, update and step-size methods as well as subspace choices. Open-source code including examples is made available at http://qlib.info.

Machnes, S. [Quantum Group, Department of Physics, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Sander, U.; Glaser, S. J.; Schulte-Herbrueggen, T. [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Munich (TUM), D-85747 Garching (Germany); Fouquieres, P. de; Gruslys, A.; Schirmer, S. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Joint Environmental Assessment of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Tope Virus Control Program for the Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JOINT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT JOINT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 2002-2006 OF THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE CURLY TOP VIRUS CONTROL PROGRAM FOR BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT AND DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/EA-# 1363 April, 2002 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. I. INTRODUCTION 9 A. Purpose and Need......................................................... 10 B. Background................................................................... 10-11 II. PROPOSED ACTIONS AND ALTERNATIVES Alternative 1 - Proposed Action........................................... 12 General Program.................................................... 12-15 Program Specifics.................................................. 15-18 Public Health and Environmental Considerations:

252

Energy Conservation Program of the Division of Substation and Control Engineering : An Interim Report.  

SciTech Connect

Energy conservation projects undertaken by BPA that could benefit residential and commercial users and development of prototype equipment are described. Progress reports are presented and directions that the projects will take are indicated. The first projects presented are those being done at BPA's Midway Residential Community: studies on air infiltration and weatherization, and evaluation of such energy conservation measures as heat pump and solar water heaters. The next section involves an energy audit and retrofit program undertaken to reduce energy consumption in BPA's own buildings. The third section, also concerned with BPA's efforts to reduce internal energy consumption, presents the application of passive solar techniques to the design of new BPA buildings. The fourth section reports on a system developed to utilize waste thermal energy from transformers and solar energy for space heating and cooling. The fifth section also involves the development of a prototype system, one to monitor energy usage of industrial equipment. The final sections report on projects involving solar and wind energy, the Photovoltaic Applications Program, and the Mod-2 Wind Generator project at Goodnoe Hills. (MCW)

,

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Training Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Program EHS 680 Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures Training & Underground Storage Tank (UST) Facility Employee Training Course Syllabus Subject Category:...

254

Mixed Mode Fuel Injector And Injection System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set that are controlled respectively by first and second three way needle control valves. Each fuel injector includes first and second concentric needle valve members. One of the needle valve members moves to an open position for a homogenous charge injection event, while the other needle valve member moves to an open position for a conventional injection event. The fuel injector has the ability to operate in a homogenous charge mode with a homogenous charge spray pattern, a conventional mode with a conventional spray pattern or a mixed mode.

Stewart, Chris Lee (Normal, IL); Tian, Ye (Bloomington, IL); Wang, Lifeng (Normal, IL); Shafer, Scott F. (Morton, IL)

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

255

Reactive power control of grid-connected wind farm based on adaptive dynamic programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of wind farm with doubly fed induction generators (DFIG). Specifically, we investigate the on-cage induction generator, permanent magnet synchronous generator and doubly fed induction generator (DFIG). DFIG of DFIG are high efficiency, flexible control and low investment. The stator of DFIG is directly connected

He, Haibo

256

The reduction of supersonic jet noise using pulsed microjet injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is concerned with the active control of supersonic jet noise using pulsed microjet injection at the nozzle exit. Experimental investigations were carried out using this control method on an ideally expanded ...

Ragaller, Paul Aaron

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION  

SciTech Connect

The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in their physics and their technology, or in any case they are considered to be adequately covered by these other authors.

Kunkel, W.B.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Evaluation of injection well risk management potential in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

The UIC regulations promulgated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) provide the EPA, or an EPA approved state agency, with authority to regulate subsurface injection of fluids to protect USDWs. Oil and gas producing industry interests are concerned primarily with Class 2 wells whose uses as defined by UIC regulations are: disposal of fluids brought to the surface and liquids generated in connection with oil and gas production (SWD); injection of fluids for enhanced oil recovery (EOR); and storage of liquid hydrocarbons. The Williston Basin was chosen for the pilot study of the feasibility of using the risk approach in managing Class 2 injection operations for the following reasons: it is one of the nine geologic basins which was classified as having a significant potential for external casing corrosion, which permitted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the injection well corrosion control measures used by industry; there are 731 active, 22 shut in and 203 temporarily abandoned SWD and water injection wells in the basin; and the basin covers three states. The broad objective of the Williston Basin study is to define requirements and to investigate the feasibility of incorporating risk management into administration of the UIC program. The study does not address the reporting aspects of UIC regulatory and compliance activities but the data base does contain essentially all the information required to develop the reports needed to monitor those activities. 16 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Optimization of Injection Scheduling in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- of wells,and (2) allocating a total speci6cd injection rate among chosen injectors. The alloca- tion is defined as the fieldwide break- through lindex, B. Injection is optimized by choosing injection wells questions: (1) Which wells should be made injectors? (2) How should the total nquired injection rate

Stanford University

260

Experimental Program to Elucidate and Control Stimulated Brillouin and Raman Backscattering in Long-Scale Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Laser-plasma instability is a serious concern for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where laser beams illuminate the interior of a cavity (called a hohlraum) to produce X-rays to drive the implosion of a fusion capsule. Stimulated Raman and Brillouin backscattering (SRS and SBS) could result in unacceptably high laser reflectivities. Unfortunately, it is impossible at present to fully simulate these processes realistically. The authors experimental program aims to understand these instabilities by pursuing a dual strategy. (1) They use a gas-filled hohlraum design, which best approaches ignition-hohlraum conditions, on the Nova laser to identify important non linear trends. (2) They are shifting towards more fundamental experiments with a nearly diffraction-limited interaction laser beam illuminating extremely well characterized plasmas on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos to probe the relevant fundamental processes.

Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Montgomery, D.S.; Wilke, M.D.

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Potential of Energy Management and Control Systems for Real-Time Electricity Pricing Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In implementing an integrated electric utility network, direct communication between the utility and customers is an important component. The rapid penetration of computer building control technology in larger commercial and industrial customers provides an opportunity for the utility to implement this network by linking directly with equipment already in place: customer-owned energy management and control systems (EMCS). This paper assesses the potential use of EMCSs in utility real-time pricing (RTP) efforts by discussing the procedures and technical requirements for transferring prices to the EMCS. The perspectives and objectives of the customer and the utility will also be discussed. We will discuss how price information can be used by the customer and the EMCS to implement demand-limiting strategies, both in currently available demand-management algorithms, and in potential price-responsive cost-management algorithms.

Akbari, H.; Heinemeier, K. E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Program on Technology Innovation: Network Management Technology Applied to Power Plant Instrumentation, Control, and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generic solutions developed for the information technology and telecommunications (IT-Telco) fields can benefit power plants willing to modernize instrumentation and control (I&C) equipment and maintenance tasks to take advantage of the expanded functionality of new technologies. This report investigates the applicability of generic network management products to help streamline power plant I&C and maintenance practices. Because of the competitive pressures of a large and expanding marketplace, such gene...

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

263

Multiple sample characterization of coals and other substances by controlled-atmosphere programmed temperature oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A furnace with two hot zones holds multiple analysis tubes. Each tube has a separable sample-packing section positioned in the first hot zone and a catalyst-packing section positioned in the second hot zone. A mass flow controller is connected to an inlet of each sample tube, and gas is supplied to the mass flow controller. Oxygen is supplied through a mass flow controller to each tube to either or both of an inlet of the first tube and an intermediate portion between the tube sections to intermingle with and oxidize the entrained gases evolved from the sample. Oxidation of those gases is completed in the catalyst in each second tube section. A thermocouple within a sample reduces furnace temperature when an exothermic condition is sensed within the sample. Oxidized gases flow from outlets of the tubes to individual gas cells. The cells are sequentially aligned with an infrared detector, which senses the composition and quantities of the gas components. Each elongated cell is tapered inward toward the center from cell windows at the ends. Volume is reduced from a conventional cell, while permitting maximum interaction of gas with the light beam. Reduced volume and angulation of the cell inlets provide rapid purgings of the cell, providing shorter cycles between detections. For coal and other high molecular weight samples, from 50% to 100% oxygen is introduced to the tubes.

LaCount, Robert B. (403 Arbor Ct., Waynesburg, PA 15370)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Duct injection technology prototype development: Evaluation of engineering data  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Duct Injection Technology Prototype Development Project is to develop a sound design basis for applying duct injection technology as a post-combustion SO{sub 2}emissions control method to existing coal-fired power plants. The necessary engineering design and scale-up criteria will be developed for the commercialization of duct injection technology for the control of SO{sub 2} emissions from coal-fired boilers in the utility industry. The primary focus of the analyses summarized in this Topical Report is the review of the known technical and economic information associated with duct injection technology. (VC)

Not Available

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Audit Report on "Management Controls over the Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Louisiana State Energy Program"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) provides grants to states, territories and the District of Columbia (states) to support their energy priorities through the State Energy Program (SEP). Federal funding is based on a grant formula that considers the population and energy consumption in each state, and amounted to $25 million for Fiscal Year (FY) 2009. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) expanded the SEP by authorizing an additional $3.1 billion to states using the existing grant formula. EERE made grant awards to states after reviewing plans that summarize the activities states will undertake to achieve SEP Recovery Act objectives, including preserving and creating jobs; saving energy; increasing renewable energy sources; and, reducing greenhouse gas emissions. EERE program guidance emphasizes that states are responsible for administering SEP within each state, and requires each state to implement internal controls over the use of Recovery Act funds. The State of Louisiana received $71.6 million in SEP Recovery Act funds; a 164-fold increase over its FY 2009 SEP grant of $437,000. As part of the Office of Inspector General's strategy for reviewing the Department's implementation of the Recovery Act, we initiated this review to determine whether the Louisiana State Energy Office had internal controls in place to efficiently and effectively administer Recovery Act funds provided for its SEP program. Louisiana developed a strategy for SEP Recovery Act funding that focused on improving energy efficiency in state buildings, housing and small businesses; increasing Energy Star appliance rebates; and, expanding the use of alternative fuels and renewable energy. Due to a statewide hiring freeze, Louisiana outsourced management of the majority of its projects ($63.3 million) to one general contractor. Louisiana plans to internally manage one project, Education and Outreach ($2.6 million). The remaining funds are allocated to program specific management expenses, including the contractor's fee, a monitoring contract, and Louisiana's payroll expenses ($5.7 million). Louisiana formally approved the general contractor in February 2010. State officials plan to initiate a separate consulting contract for monitoring, verifying and auditing expenditures, energy savings and other metrics as required by EERE for Recovery Act funding.

None

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Advanced emissions control development program. Quarterly technical progress report {number_sign}4, July 1--September 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls will likely arise as the US Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B and W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF will provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) measure and understand the production and partitioning of air toxics species for a variety of steam coals, (2) optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems (ESPs, baghouses, scrubbers), (3) develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts, (4) develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques, and (5) establish a comprehensive, self-consistent air toxics data library. Development work is currently concentrated on the capture of mercury, fine particulate, and a variety of inorganic species such as the acid gases (hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, etc.).

Farthing, G.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Supported-sorbent injection. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new retrofitable, wastefree acid-rain control concept was pilot-tested at Ohio Edison`s high-sulfur coal-fired R.E. Burger generating station at the 2-MWe level. During the project, moistened {open_quotes}supported{close_quotes} sorbents, made from a combination of lime and vermiculite or perlite, were injected into a humidified 6,500-acfm flue-gas slipstream. After the sorbents reacted with the sulfur dioxide in the flue gas, they were removed from ductwork with a cyclone and baghouse. The $1.0 million project was co-funded by Sorbent Technologies Corporation, the Ohio Edison Company, and the Ohio Coal Development Office. The project included a preliminary bench-scale testing phase, construction of the pilot plant, parametric studies, numerous series of recycle tests, and a long-term run. The project proceeded as anticipated and achieved its expected results. This duct injection technology successfully demonstrated SO{sub 2}-removal rates of 80 to 90% using reasonable stoichiometric injection ratios (2:1 Ca:S) and approach temperatures (20-25F). Under similar conditions, dry injection of hydrated lime alone typically only achieves 40 to 50% SO{sub 2} removal. During the testing, no difficulties were encountered with deposits in the ductwork or with particulate control, which have been problems in tests of other duct-injection schemes.

Nelson, S. Jr.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Diesel Emission Control-- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program-- Phase II Summary Report: NOx Adsorber Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The investigations performed in this project demonstrated the ability to develop a NO{sub x} regeneration strategy including both an improved lean/rich modulation cycle and rich engine calibration, which resulted in a high NO{sub x} conversion efficiency over a range of operating temperatures. A high-temperature cycle was developed to desulfurize the NO{sub x} absorber catalyst. The effectiveness of the desulfurization process was demonstrated on catalysts aged using two different sulfur level fuels. The major findings of this project are as follows: (1) The improved lean/rich engine calibration achieved as a part of this test project resulted in NO{sub x} conversion efficiencies exceeding 90% over a catalyst inlet operating temperature window of 300 C-450 C. This performance level was achieved while staying within the 4% fuel economy penalty target defined for the regeneration calibration. (2) The desulfurization procedure developed showed that six catalysts, which had been exposed to fuel sulfur levels of 3-, 16-, and 30-ppm for as long as 250 hours, could be recovered to greater than 85% NO{sub x} conversion efficiency over a catalyst inlet operating temperature window of 300 C-450 C, after a single desulfurization event. This performance level was achieved while staying within the 4% fuel economy penalty target defined for the regeneration calibration. (3) The desulfurization procedure developed has the potential to meet in-service engine operating conditions and provide acceptable driveability conditions. (4) Although aging with 78-ppm sulfur fuel reduced NO{sub x} conversion efficiency more than aging with 3-ppm sulfur fuel as a result of sulfur contamination, the desulfurization events restored the conversion efficiency to nearly the same level of performance. However, repeatedly exposing the catalyst to the desulfurization procedure developed in this program caused a continued decline in the catalyst's desulfurized performance. Additional work will be necessary to identify the cause of this performance decline. (5) The rate of sulfur contamination during aging with 78-ppm sulfur fuel increased with repeated aging/desulfurization cycles (from 10% per ten hours to 18% per ten hours). This was not observed with the 3-ppm fuel, where the rate of decline during aging was fairly constant at approximately 2% per ten hours.

None

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Compliance of SLAC_s Laser Safety Program with OSHA Requirements for the Control of Hazardous Energy  

SciTech Connect

SLAC's COHE program requires compliance with OSHA Regulation 29CFR1910.147, 'The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)'. This regulation specifies lockout/tagout requirements during service and maintenance of equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the equipment, or release of stored energy, could cause injury to workers. Class 3B and Class 4 laser radiation must be considered as hazardous energy (as well as electrical energy in associated equipment, and other non-beam energy hazards) in laser facilities, and therefore requires careful COHE consideration. This paper describes how COHE is achieved at SLAC to protect workers against unexpected Class 3B or Class 4 laser radiation, independent of whether the mode of operation is normal, service, or maintenance.

Woods, Michael; /SLAC

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Hybrid Electric Power Train and Control Strategies Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) offer societal benefits through their ability to displace the use of petroleum fuels. Petroleum fuels represent a polluting and politically destabilizing energy carrier. PHEV technologies can move transportation away from petroleum fuel sources by enabling domestically generated electricity and liquids bio-fuels to serve as a carrier for transportation energy. Additionally, the All-Electric-Range (AER) offered by PHEVs can significantly reduce demand for expensive and polluting liquid fuels. The GATE funding received during the 1998 through 2004 funding cycle by the UC Davis Hybrid Electric Vehicle Center (HEVC) was used to advance and train researchers in PHEV technologies. GATE funding was used to construct a rigorous PHEV curriculum, provide financial support for HEVC researchers, and provide material support for research efforts. A rigorous curriculum was developed through the UC Davis Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering Department to train HEVC researchers. Students' research benefited from this course work by advancing the graduate student researchers' understanding of key PHEV design considerations. GATE support assisted HEVC researchers in authoring technical articles and producing patents. By supporting HEVC researchers multiple Master's theses were written as well as journal articles and publications. The topics from these publications include Continuously Variable Transmission control strategies and PHEV cross platform controls software development. The GATE funding has been well used to advance PHEV systems. The UC Davis Hybrid Electric Vehicle Center is greatly appreciative for the opportunities GATE funding provided. The goals and objectives for the HEVC GATE funding were to nourish engineering research in PHEV technologies. The funding supplied equipment needed to allow researchers to investigate PHEV design sensitivities and to further optimize system components. Over a dozen PHEV researchers benefited from the GATE funding and produced journal articles and intellectual property as a result. The remainder of this document outlines the productivity resulting from GATE funds. The topics include the following: GATE Hybrid Vehicle Systems Related Courses; Students Supported; Publications; and Patents. A discussion regarding the HEVC accomplishments with respect to the GATE funding goals is provided in the conclusion.

Andrew Frank

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

PLT neutral injection ignitron accelerating supply  

SciTech Connect

A phase-controlled rectifier was designed for the accelerating supply on the PLT Neutral Beam Injection system at PPPL. The rectifier must furnish 70 amperes at up to 50 KV for 300 milliseconds, with a duty cycle of up to 10 percent. Protection of the injectors requires the supply to withstand repeated crowbarring. The rectifying element selected to satisfy these requirements was a commercially-available ignitron, installed in a supporting frame and using firing circuits and controls designed by PPPL. (auth)

Ashcroft, D.L.; Murray, J.G.; Newman, R.A.; Peterson, F.L.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A preliminary study of the controls on melting during in situ vitrification. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ vitrification (ISV), developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and patented for the US Department of Energy, is one method used to stabilize contaminated soils in place. ISV involves inserting four electrodes in a square array into contaminated soil and applying an electrical potential to the electrodes. The soil is heated to above its melting point, and the molten zone expands with time to encompass the contaminated zone. After cooling, the resulting solid material is usually a mixture of glass and crystalline material that has a significantly higher resistance to leaching than did the original soils. Nonvolatile elements (most radionuclides and metals) are dissolved into the melt or encapsulated in glass if their solubility in the melt is low. Organic compounds tends to be pyrolyzed, with the decomposition products diffusing to the surface and combusting on exiting the molten zone. A hood is placed over the vitrification zone to collect off-gas particulates and volatiles into a processing trailer that scrubs contaminants from the off-gas. The current study identified key parameters and processes in the ISV melt cycle and developed an improved understanding of ISV. Analytical approximations for several properties of molten soil were determined from available data. Using a simplified geometrical approximation for melt geometry, an analytical approximation for the rate of melting (depth) vs time was derived that is consistent with data from field experiments. At small times, the depth of melting increases linearly with time. After approximately 10 h in large-scale tests, however, the depth increases as the square root of time. Existing data is also consistent with a relationship that shows the volumetric growth rate of the melt to be directly proportional to time. These conclusions suggest that heat transfer processes controlling the ISV process may be at the transition between weak convection and conduction.

Solomon, A.D.; Nyquist, J.E.; Alexiades, V.; Jacobs, G.K.; Lenhart, S.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology  

SciTech Connect

Gilbert Commonwealth, Southern Research Institute and the American Electric Power Service Corporation have embarked on a program to convert DOE's Duct Injection Test Facility located at the Muskingum River Power Plant of Ohio Power Company to test alternate duct injection technologies. The technologies to be tested include slurry sorbent injection of hydrated lime using dual fluid nozzles, or a rotary atomizer and pneumatic injection of hydrated lime, with flue gas humidification before or after sorbent injection. The literature review and analysis contained in this report is a part of the preparatory effort for the test program.

Gooch, J.P.; Dismukes, E.B.; Dahlin, R.S.; Faulkner, M.G. (Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States)); Klett, M.G.; Buchanan, T.L.; Hunt, J.E. (Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Neutral beam injection in 2XIIB  

SciTech Connect

Integrated into the operation of the 2XIIB controlled fusion experiment is a 600-A, 20-keV neutral injection system: the highest neutral-beam current capacity of any existing fusion machine. This paper outlines the requirements of the injection system and the design features to which they led. Both mechanical and electrical aspects are discussed. Also included is a brief description of some operational aspects of the system and some of the things we have learned along the way, as well as a short history of the most significant developments. (auth)

Hibbs, S.M.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

NSLS Work Planning & Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Work Planning & Controls NSLS Work Planning and Control Procedure Lead Working Guidelines Information on Working in Areas Subject to Radiation from VUV Injection Procedure for...

276

Gaseous Fuel Injection Modeling using a Gaseous Sphere Injection Methodology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growing interest in gaseous fuels (hydrogen and natural gas) for internal combustion engines calls for the development of computer models for simulation of gaseous fuel injection, air entrainment and the ensuing combustion. This paper introduces a new method for modeling the injection and air entrainment processes for gaseous fuels. The model uses a gaseous sphere injection methodology, similar to liquid droplet in injection techniques used for liquid fuel injection. In this paper, the model concept is introduced and model results are compared with correctly- and under-expanded experimental data.

Hessel, R P; Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

277

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the injection well to^ production wells along high conductivity fractures. A powerful method for investigat- ing fields typically choose a configuration for injection wells after a number of development wells have of cooler injected fluids at producing wells. The goal of the current #12;- 10 - work is to provide

Stanford University

278

An immiscible WAG injection project in the Kuparuk River Unit  

SciTech Connect

Immiscible water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection has been successfully used in the Kuparuk River Unit as a means of controlling excess gas production. Additionally, simulation results have indicated that WAG injection can increase economic oil recovery by improving waterflood conformance. WAG recovery mechanisms, simulation results, field performance, and field surveillance are discussed.

Champion, J.H.; Sheldon, J.B.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Program update 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program) is a $7.14 billion cost-shared industry/government technology development effort. The program is to demonstrate a new generation of advanced coal-based technologies, with the most promising technologies being moved into the domestic and international marketplace. Clean coal technologies being demonstrated under the CCT program are creating the technology base that allows the nation to meet its energy and environmental goals efficiently and reliably. The fact that most of the demonstrations are being conducted at commercial scale, in actual user environments, and under conditions typical of commercial operations allows the potential of the technologies to be evaluated in their intended commercial applications. The technologies are categorized into four market sectors: advanced electric power generation systems; environmental control devices; coal processing equipment for clean fuels; and industrial technologies. Sections of this report describe the following: Role of the Program; Program implementation; Funding and costs; The road to commercial realization; Results from completed projects; Results and accomplishments from ongoing projects; and Project fact sheets. Projects include fluidized-bed combustion, integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants, advanced combustion and heat engines, nitrogen oxide control technologies, sulfur dioxide control technologies, combined SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} technologies, coal preparation techniques, mild gasification, and indirect liquefaction. Industrial applications include injection systems for blast furnaces, coke oven gas cleaning systems, power generation from coal/ore reduction, a cyclone combustor with S, N, and ash control, cement kiln flue gas scrubber, and pulse combustion for steam coal gasification.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

one mile underground into a deep saline formation. The injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mile underground into a deep saline formation. The injection, mile underground into a deep saline formation. The injection, which will occur over a three-year period and is slated to start in early 2010, will compress up to 1 million metric tonnes of CO 2 from the ADM ethanol facility into a liquid-like, dense phase. The targeted rock formation, the Mt. Simon Sandstone, is the thickest and most widespread saline reservoir in the Illinois Basin, with an estimated CO 2 storage capacity of 27 to 109 billion metric tonnes. A comprehensive monitoring program, which will be evaluated yearly, will be implemented after the injection to ensure the injected CO 2 is stored safely and permanently. The RCSP Program was launched by the Office of Fossil Energy (FE)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

DOE-NETLs Mercury R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE's DOE's Phase II Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program American Coal Council's 2005 Mercury & Multi- Emissions Conference March 22-24, 2005 St. Louis, MO Thomas J. Feeley, III thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov National Energy Technology Laboratory MEC2_Ottawa_May 25 2005 Power Plant Mercury Control Baghouse or ESP FGD Boiler Stack Cleaning SCR Hg 75 ton/yr Hg in coal Current Emissions 48 ton/yr out stack Hg Hg Hg Hg 27 ton/yr Sorbent Injection Oxidizing Systems Hg Specific Control Co-Benefit Control ACS Monthly Meeting November 4 2004 DOE Mercury Control RD&D Portfolio Polishing Technology * MerCAP(tm) Sorbent Injection * Activated carbon * Amended silicates * Halogenated AC * Ca-based sorbents * Chemically treated sorbents * COHPAC/Toxecon(tm) * Thief sorbents Boiler * Combustion modification

282

LBNL Controlled Substance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazardous Waste Req Hazardous Waste Schedule ISM ISM-related Documents ISM - Safety at LBNL IT Systems (EHS) Job Hazards Analysis (JHA) Laser Mgmt. System Laser Safety Lessons...

283

The use of energy management and control systems for retrofit performance monitoring in the LoanSTAR program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring of building energy consumption, operation, and weather variables are important parts of retrofit evaluation projects. However, effective monitoring can be quite expensive. In this report, we investigate the feasibility of using a building`s existing energy management and control system (EMCS) for gathering some or all of this required data, rather than installing dedicated data-logging equipment. Three case studies in the Texas LoanSTAR retrofit monitoring program were used to explore the current applicability of existing EMCSs for monitoring, and to identify areas requiring additional development It was found that data could be retrieved in each case; without installing any additional hardware or software in two of the three sites, and with the addition of only a few sensors and a minor software modification in the third. However, the process of using the EMCS for monitoring was inconvenient in several respects. It was determined that the process could be greatly simplified if EMCS manufacturers ensured that their software averaged data over an hourly interval and reliably reported them at the end of each hour, used concise and consistent formats for requesting and reporting the data, and provided a simple means of displaying or transmitting the data.

Heinemeier, K.E.; Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Claridge, D.; Haberl, J.; Poynor, B.; Belur, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Energy Systems Lab.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The use of energy management and control systems for retrofit performance monitoring in the LoanSTAR program  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring of building energy consumption, operation, and weather variables are important parts of retrofit evaluation projects. However, effective monitoring can be quite expensive. In this report, we investigate the feasibility of using a building's existing energy management and control system (EMCS) for gathering some or all of this required data, rather than installing dedicated data-logging equipment. Three case studies in the Texas LoanSTAR retrofit monitoring program were used to explore the current applicability of existing EMCSs for monitoring, and to identify areas requiring additional development It was found that data could be retrieved in each case; without installing any additional hardware or software in two of the three sites, and with the addition of only a few sensors and a minor software modification in the third. However, the process of using the EMCS for monitoring was inconvenient in several respects. It was determined that the process could be greatly simplified if EMCS manufacturers ensured that their software averaged data over an hourly interval and reliably reported them at the end of each hour, used concise and consistent formats for requesting and reporting the data, and provided a simple means of displaying or transmitting the data.

Heinemeier, K.E.; Akbari, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Claridge, D.; Haberl, J.; Poynor, B.; Belur, R. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Energy Systems Lab.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Particle beam injection system  

SciTech Connect

This invention provides a poloidal divertor for stacking counterstreaming ion beams to provide high intensity colliding beams. To this end, method and apparatus are provided that inject high energy, high velocity, ordered, atomic deuterium and tritium beams into a lower energy, toroidal, thermal equilibrium, neutral, target plasma column that is magnetically confined along an endless magnetic axis in a strong restoring force magnetic field having helical field lines to produce counterstreaming deuteron and triton beams that are received bent, stacked and transported along the endless axis, while a poloidal divertor removes thermal ions and electrons all along the axis to increase the density of the counterstreaming ion beams and the reaction products resulting therefrom. By balancing the stacking and removal, colliding, strong focused particle beams, reaction products and reactions are produced that convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ); Kulsrud, Russell M. (Princeton, NJ)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Injectivity Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test Injectivity Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Injectivity Test Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Permeability of the well Thermal: Dictionary.png Injectivity Test: A well testing technique conducted upon completion of a well. Water is pumped into the well at a constant rate until a stable pressure is reached then the pump is turned off and the rate at which pressure decreases is measured. The pressure measurements are graphed and well permeability can

287

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Date Report No. 3: Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on Particulate Matter Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report covers the effects of diesel fuel sulfur level on particulate matter emissions for four technologies.

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Joint environmental assessment 1997--2001 of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Top Virus Control Program for Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE, Naval Petroleum reserves in California (NPRC), proposes to sign an Amendment to the Cooperative Agreement and Supplement with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) to extend the term of the Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) in California. This program involves Malathion spraying on NPRC lands to control the beet leafhopper, over a five year period from 1997 through 2001. It is expected that approximately 330 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1 (NPR-1) and approximately 9,603 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 2 (NPR-2) will be treated with Malathion annually by CDFA during the course of this program. The actual acreage subject to treatment can vary from year to year. Pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended, the potential impacts of the proposed action were analyzed in a Joint Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1011) with the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) acting as lead agency, in consultation with the CDFA, and the DOE acting as a cooperating agency. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the conduct of the Curly Top Virus Control Program in California is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is consequently issuing a FONSI.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Geothermal program overview: Fiscal years 1993--1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Geothermal Energy Program is involved in three main areas of research: finding and tapping the resource; power generation; and direct use of geothermal energy. This publication summarizes research accomplishments for FY 1993 and 1994 for the following: geophysical and geochemical technologies; slimhole drilling for exploration; resource assessment; lost circulation control; rock penetration mechanics; instrumentation; Geothermal Drilling Organization; reservoir analysis; brine injection; hot dry rock; The Geysers; Geothermal Technology Organization; heat cycle research; advanced heat rejection; materials development; and advanced brine chemistry.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Preliminary Audit Report on "Management Controls over the Commonwealth of Virginia's Efforts to Implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Weatherization Assistance Program"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (Department) Weatherization Assistance Program received $5 billion under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) to improve the energy efficiency of homes, multi-family rental units and mobile homes owned or occupied by low-income persons. Subsequently, the Department awarded a three-year Weatherization Assistance Program grant for $94 million to the Commonwealth of Virginia (Virginia). This grant provided more than a ten-fold increase in funds available to Virginia for weatherization over that authorized in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009. Corresponding to the increase in funding, the Recovery Act increased the limit on the average amount spent to weatherize a home (unit) from $2,500 to $6,500. Virginia's Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) administers the Recovery Act grant through 22 local community action agencies. These agencies (sub-grantees) are responsible for determining applicant eligibility, weatherizing homes, and conducting home assessments and inspections. Typical weatherization services include installing insulation; sealing ducts; tuning and repairing furnaces; and, mitigating heat loss through windows, doors and other infiltration points. Virginia plans to use its Recovery Act Weatherization funding to weatherize about 9,193 units over the life of the grant - a significant increase over the 1,475 housing units that were planned to be completed in FY 2009. Given the significant increase in funding and the demands associated with weatherizing thousands of homes, we initiated this audit to determine if Virginia had adequate safeguards in place to ensure that the Weatherization Program was managed efficiently and effectively. The State of Virginia's DHCD had not implemented financial and reporting controls needed to ensure Weatherization Program funds are spent effectively and efficiently. Specifically, DHCD had not: (1) Performed on-site financial monitoring of any of its sub-grantees under the Recovery Act; (2) Reviewed documentation supporting sub-grantee requests for reimbursements to verify the accuracy of amounts charged; (3) Periodically reconciled amounts paid to sub-grantees to the actual cost to weatherize units; (4) Maintained vehicle and equipment inventories as required by Federal regulations and state and Federal program directives; and (5) Accurately reported Weatherization Program results to the Department. Exacerbating weaknesses in DHCD's financial controls, the Department's most recent program monitoring visit to Virginia, made in 2008 before passage of the Recovery Act, did not include a required financial review. Hence, the financial control weaknesses discussed above were not detected and had not been addressed. As described in this report, these control and reporting weaknesses increase the risk that Recovery Act objectives may not be achieved and that fraud, waste or abuse can occur and not be detected in this critically important program.

None

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trap nets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Report C of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed in Report C. Program cooperators include the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal Damage Unit as a contractor to test Dam Angling. The PSMFC was responsible for coordination and administration of the program; PSMFC subcontracted various tasks and activities to ODFW and WDFW based on the expertise each brought to the tasks involved in implementing the program and dam angling to the USDA.

Porter, Russell [Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission].

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

292

Energy recovery by water injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several analytical and numerical studies that address injection and thermal breakthrough in fractured geothermal reservoirs are described. The results show that excellent thermal sweeps can be achieved in fractured reservoirs, and that premature cold water breakthrough can be avoided if the injection wells are appropriately located.

Witherspoon, P.A.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Tsang, C.F.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Nanomanufacturing Programs and Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for the nanoscale stress distributions and surface defects that control device more. Next-Generation Robotics and Automation Program Last ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

294

Injection, injectivity and injectability in geothermal operations: problems and possible solutions. Phase I. Definition of the problems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: thermodynamic instability of brine, injectivity loss during regular production and injection operations, injectivity loss caused by measures other than regular operations, heat mining and associated reservoir problems in reinjection, pressure maintenance through imported make-up water, suggested solutions to injection problems, and suggested solutions to injection problems: remedial and stimulation measures. (MHR)

Vetter, O.J.; Crichlow, H.B.

1979-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

295

118 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / MAY/JUNE 2000 LINEAR PROGRAMMING FOR FLOOD CONTROL IN THE IOWA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

118 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / MAY/JUNE 2000 LINEAR PROGRAMMING a popular area of research for >30 years. Yeh (1985) and Wurbs (1993) pre- sented in-depth reviews

Lund, Jay R.

296

Installation Restoration Program. Site inspection report. Volume 3. 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site Inspection Report, 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island, Volume III of III. This is the third volume of a three volume site inspection report. Three areas of concern (AOCs) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A passive soil gas survey was conducted of the entire station. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. Low level contamination of fuel-related compounds were detected below state action levels. No further action was recommended.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Installation Restoration Program. Site inspection report. Volume 2. 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Site Inspection Report, 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island, Volume II of III. This is the second volume of a three volume site inspection report. Three areas of concern (AOCs) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A passive soil gas survey was conducted of the entire station. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. Low level contamination of fuel-related compounds were detected below state action levels. No further action was recommended.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Installation Restoration Program. Site inspection report. Volume 1. 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site Inspection Report, 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island, Volume I of III. This is the first volume of a three volume site inspection report. Three areas of concern (AOCs) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A passive soil gas survey was conducted of the entire station. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. Low level contamination of fuel-related compounds were detected below state action levels. No further action was recommended.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Materials Reliability Program: An Assessment of the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) Alloy 600 Reactor Vessel Head Penetration PWS CC Remedial Techniques (MRP-61)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Service experience over the past decade with control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) penetrations in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) worldwide confirmed primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in alloy 600 base metal at several plants. This report summarizes the evaluations and results of an autoclave-accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) test program designed to assess the effectiveness of selected surface remedial techniques to mitigate alloy 600 PWSCC in PWR vessel head penetration base and...

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

300

Injection nozzle for a turbomachine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbomachine includes a compressor, a combustor operatively connected to the compressor, an end cover mounted to the combustor, and an injection nozzle assembly operatively connected to the combustor. The injection nozzle assembly includes a first end portion that extends to a second end portion, and a plurality of tube elements provided at the second end portion. Each of the plurality of tube elements defining a fluid passage includes a body having a first end section that extends to a second end section. The second end section projects beyond the second end portion of the injection nozzle assembly.

Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology. Topical report No. 1, Literature review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gilbert Commonwealth, Southern Research Institute and the American Electric Power Service Corporation have embarked on a program to convert DOE`s Duct Injection Test Facility located at the Muskingum River Power Plant of Ohio Power Company to test alternate duct injection technologies. The technologies to be tested include slurry sorbent injection of hydrated lime using dual fluid nozzles, or a rotary atomizer and pneumatic injection of hydrated lime, with flue gas humidification before or after sorbent injection. The literature review and analysis contained in this report is a part of the preparatory effort for the test program.

Gooch, J.P.; Dismukes, E.B.; Dahlin, R.S.; Faulkner, M.G. [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States); Klett, M.G.; Buchanan, T.L.; Hunt, J.E. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

-OGP 04 (1) -Predicting Injectivity Decline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- OGP 04 (1) - Predicting Injectivity Decline in Water Injection Wells by Upscaling On-Site Core, resulting in injectivity decline of injection wells. Particles such as biomass, corrosion products, silt on permeability. These data were then processed, upscaled to model injection wells and, finally, history matched

Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

303

An experimental study of fuel injection strategies in CAI gasoline engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion of gasoline in a direct injection controlled auto-ignition (CAI) single-cylinder research engine was studied. CAI operation was achieved with the use of the negative valve overlap (NVO) technique and internal exhaust gas re-circulation (EGR). Experiments were performed at single injection and split injection, where some amount of fuel was injected close to top dead centre (TDC) during NVO interval, and the second injection was applied with variable timing. Additionally, combustion at variable fuel-rail pressure was examined. Investigation showed that at fuel injection into recompressed exhaust fuel reforming took place. This process was identified via an analysis of the exhaust-fuel mixture composition after NVO interval. It was found that at single fuel injection in NVO phase, its advance determined the heat release rate and auto-ignition timing, and had a strong influence on NO{sub X} emission. However, a delay of single injection to intake stroke resulted in deterioration of cycle-to-cycle variability. Application of split injection showed benefits of this strategy versus single injection. Examinations of different fuel mass split ratios and variable second injection timing resulted in further optimisation of mixture formation. At equal share of the fuel mass injected in the first injection during NVO and in the second injection at the beginning of compression, the lowest emission level and cyclic variability improvement were observed. (author)

Hunicz, J.; Kordos, P. [Department of Combustion Engines and Transport, Lublin University of Technology, Nadbystrzycka 36, 20-618 Lublin (Poland)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection Volume 5 - Guideline Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (S02). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved d,emonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit #1, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOX. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOX to diatomic nitrogen (N,). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (S1) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot flue gas to achieve S02 capture. `At each site where the technologies were to be demonstrated, performance goals were set to achieve air emission reductions of 60 percent for NOX and 50 percent for S02. These performance goals were exceeded during long term demonstration testing. For the tangentially fired unit, NO, emissions were reduced by 67.2?40 and SOZ emissions by 52.6Y0. For the cyclone-fired unit, NO, emissions were reduced by 62.9% and SOZ emissions by 57.9Y0.

None

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Enahancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection Volume 5 - Guideline Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (S02). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved demonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit W, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOX. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOX to diatomic nitrogen (N,). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (S1) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot flue gas to achieve S02 capture. At each site where the techno!o@es were to be demonstrated, petiormance goals were set to achieve air emission reductions of 60 percent for NO. and 50 percent for SO2. These performance goals were exceeded during long term demonstration testing. For the tangentially fired unit, NOX emissions were reduced by 67.2% and S02 emissions by 52.6%. For the cyclone-fired unit, NOX emissions were reduced by 62.9% and SOZ emissions by 57.9%.

None

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Joint Environmental Assessment of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Tope Virus Control Program for the Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy, Finding of No Significant Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Curly Top Virus Control Program in California Curly Top Virus Control Program in California AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY The DOE, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC), proposes to sign an Amendment to the Cooperative Agreement and Supplement with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) to extend the term of the Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) in California. This program involves Malathion spraying on NPRC lands to control the beet leafhopper, over a 5-year period from 2002 through 2006. It is expected that approximately 2,000 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2) will be treated with Malathion annually by CDFA during the course of this program. The actual acreage subject to treatment can vary from year to year.

307

Adaptive engine injection for emissions reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

NOx and soot emissions from internal combustion engines, and in particular compression ignition (diesel) engines, are reduced by varying fuel injection timing, fuel injection pressure, and injected fuel volume between low and greater engine loads. At low loads, fuel is injected during one or more low-pressure injections occurring at low injection pressures between the start of the intake stroke and approximately 40 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke. At higher loads, similar injections are used early in each combustion cycle, in addition to later injections which preferably occur between about 90 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke, and about 90 degrees after top dead center during the expansion stroke (and which most preferably begin at or closely adjacent the end of the compression stroke). These later injections have higher injection pressure, and also lower injected fuel volume, than the earlier injections.

Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI): Sun, Yong (Madison, WI)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

Control of coal combustion SO{sub 2}and NO{sub x} emissions by in- boiler injection of CMA. Second quarterly project status report, 1 January 1993--31 March 1993  

SciTech Connect

The principal objectives of the proposed research are two-fold: (A) To understand the mechanism and assess the effectiveness of sulfur capture by the chemical calcium magnesium acetate (CMA); and (B) To evaluate the NO{sub x}, reduction capabilities of CMA by burning the organic constituents of the chemical (the acetate) and reducing NO to stable N{sub 2}. The optimum conditions and the location of CMA introduction in the furnace will be identified. To achieve these goals water solutions of CMA or dry powders of CMA will be injected into hot air or gases simulating the furnace exhaust (containing CO{sub 2}, SO{sub x},NO{sub x}, H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2} etc.) and the composition of gaseous and solid products of the reaction will be monitored. The processes of burning the organic acetate as well as the calcination, sintering and sulfation of the remaining solid will be studied in detail. The possibility of introducing two different sorbents sequentially will also be examined. For instance, such a scheme may employ injection of the rather inexpensive calcium carbonate initially, followed by the more costly CMA. The effectiveness of a ``homemade`` CMA using woody biomass as a low-cost source of acetate will be explored if such a product becomes available during the course of this work. Finally, CMA will be introduced in the matrix of the coal by an ion exchange or a precipitation technique. Upon subsequent combustion, the composition and physical structure of the remaining ash will be examined, as well as the gas phase SO{sub x}, concentration. Both techniques (CMA pretreatment and CMA injection) may also be implemented simultaneously to assess their combined effect on sulfur capture.

Levendis, Y.A.; Wise, D.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Control of coal combustion SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions by in-boiler injection of CMA. Final project report, July 1, 1992--December 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of carboxylic calcium and magnesium salts (e.g., calcium magnesium acetate or CMA, CaMg{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}COOH){sub 6}) for the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in oxygen-lean atmospheres. Experiments were performed in a high-temperature furnace that simulated the post-flame environment of a coal-fired boiler by providing similar temperatures and partial pressures of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. When injected into a hot environment, the salts calcined and formed highly porous {open_quotes}popcorn{close_quotes}-like cenospheres. Residual MgO and/or CaCO{sub 3} and CaO reacted heterogeneously with SO{sub 2} to form MgSO{sub 4} and/or CaCO{sub 4}. The organic components - which can be manufactured from wastes such as sewage sludge - gasified and reduced NO{sub x }to N{sub 2} efficiently if the atmosphere was moderately fuel-rich. Dry-injected CMA particles at a Ca/S ratio of 2, residence time of 1 second and bulk equivalence ratio of 1.3 removed over 90% of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} at gas temperatures {>=} 950{degrees}C. When the furnace isothermal zone was {acid salts as dual SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} reduction agents. For example, wet injection of the salts could be combined with less expensive hydrocarbons such as lignite or even polymers such as poly(ethylene) that could be extracted from the municipal waste stream.

Levendis, Y.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Optimizing injected solvent fraction in stratified reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waterflooding has become standard practice for extending the productive life of many solution gas drive reservoirs, but has the disadvantage of leaving a substantial residual oil volume in the reservoir. Solvent flooding has been offered as a method whereby oil may be completely displaced from the reservoir, leaving no residual volume. Field results have demonstrated that solvent floods suffer from early solvent breakthrough and considerable oil by-passing owing to high solvent mobility. The injection of both water and solvent has been demonstrated to offer advantages. Water partially mitigates both the adverse mobility and high cost of solvent floods, while solvent mobilizes oil which would be left in the reservoir by water alone. The process is equally applicable to reservoirs currently at residual oil saturation (tertiary floods) and to reservoirs at maximum oil saturation (secondary floods). In stratified reservoirs high permeability layers may be preferentially swept by solvent floods, while low permeability layers may be scarcely swept at all. Presence or absence of transverse communication between layers can modify overall sweep efficiency. This work is a study of water-solvent injection in stratified reservoirs based on computer simulation results. Fractional oil recovery as a function of injected solvent fraction, permeability contrast between layers, initial oil saturation, and presence or absence of transverse communication between strata has been determined. Results are presented as a series of optimization curves. Permeability contrast between layers is shown to be the dominant control on fractional oil recovery. Transverse communicating reservoirs are shown to require a higher solvent-water ratio in order to attain recoveries comparable to transverse noncommunicating reservoirs. In actual field projects, water and solvent are injected alternately as discrete slugs. This process is known as "WAG" for "water-alternating-gas". In the simulations used in this study, continuous water-solvent injection at a fixed fraction rather than true WAG was employed. It is demonstrated that the two methods give equivalent results. In summary, this work is the first comprehensive study of the behavior of stratified reservoirs undergoing water-solvent injection.

Moon, Gary Michael

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Methodology for adapting rigorous simulation programs to supervisory control of building HVAC&R systems: simulation, calibration and optimization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, general and systematic methodologies were developed for simulating, calibrating and optimal control of building energy system. Based on investigation of two popular (more)

Sun, Jian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Economics of dry FGD by sorbent injection  

SciTech Connect

Increasingly stringent pollution control requirements for new power plants have nearly doubled the cost of producing electricity. The capital, operating and maintenance costs of wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems are major, and considerable interest is currently being given to less expensive dry systems. One attractive alternative to wet scrubbing for FGD is to inject a dry, powdered reagent into the duct work between a coal-fired boiler and a FF (baghouse). The reagent (and fly ash) are collected on the fabric surface where the SO/sub 2//reagent contact occurs. The technical aspects of SO/sub 2/ removal using nahcolite and trona as sorbents have been investigated at laboratory-scale, demonstrated at full-scale, and are reported on briefly. These results indicate that injection of sodium based reagents is technically an attractive alternative to the many steps and processes involved in wet scrubbing. This paper summarizes a project to examine the economics of nahcolite/trona and furnace limestone injection FGD and compare them to those of the more advanced spray dryer FGD systems. Uncertainties in material handling, pulverization, and waste disposal were investigated and designs were produced as a basis for cost estimating.

Naulty, D.J.; Hooper, R.; Keeth, R.J.; McDowell, D.A.; Muzio, L.J.; Scheck, R.W.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Public Health ServiceINJECTION DRUG USE AND THE TRANSMISSION OF HIV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preventing drug use and providing substance abuse treatment for persons who inject illicit drugs are crucial to preventing many blood-borne infections, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, many drug users are not currently in substance abuse treatment programs because of multiple factors including the limited availability of these programs and the lack of readiness or willingness of some drug users to enter substance abuse treatment. Consequently, substantial numbers of drug users continue to inject drugs. This bulletin summarizes new information on preventing transmission of HIV and other blood-borne infections among persons who inject drugs and updates prevention recommendations published in April 1993. *1 The findings of a 1995 workshop on the use of sterile syringes by persons who inject drugs and several recent publications 2,3,4,5,6 indicate that persons who inject drugs should use sterile syringes * * to prevent the transmission of HIV and other blood-borne infectious diseases. These conclusions should be considered by clinicians providing health care to persons who use or inject drugs and by public health professionals planning and carrying out HIV prevention programs for injection drug users (IDUs). Health professionals should inform IDUs that using sterile syringes is safer than reusing syringes, including syringes that have been disinfected with bleach. The information in this bulletin has been prepared for health professionals involved in programs serving persons who inject drugs. Separate educational materials will be prepared to inform drug injectors of these findings.

unknown authors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Injecting Carbon Dioxide into Unconventional Storage Reservoirs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will also be investigated with a targeted CO 2 injection test into a depleted shale gas well. Different reservoir models will be used before, during, and after injection...

315

Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

316

Two-Pulse Ionization Injection into Quasi-Linear Laser Wakefields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a scheme for controlling electron injection into the quasi-linear wakefield driven by a guided drive pulse via ionization of a dopant species by a collinear injection laser pulse with a short Rayleigh range. The scheme is analyzed by particle in cell simulations which show controlled injection and acceleration of electrons to an energy of 370 MeV, a relative energy spread of 2%, and a normalized transverse emittance of 3.0 {\\mu}m.

Bourgeois, Nicolas; Hooker, Simon M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Impact of injection on reservoir performance in the NCPA steam field at The Geysers  

SciTech Connect

A managed injection program implemented by the NCPA in The Southeast Geysers reservoir continues to positively impact reservoir performance. Injection effects are determined by the application of geochemical and geophysical techniques to track the movement of injectate. This information, when integrated with reservoir pressure, flowrate, and thermodynamic data, is used to quantify the overall performance and efficiency of the injection program. Data analysis indicates that injected water is boiling near the injection wells, without deeper migration, and is recovered as superheated steam from nearby production wells. Injection derived steam (IDS) currently accounts for 25 to 35 percent of total production in the NCPA steamfield. Most importantly, 80 to 100% of the injectate is flashing and being recovered as steam. The amount of IDS has increased since 1988 due to both a change in injection strategy and a drying out of the reservoir. However, significant areas of the reservoir still remain relatively unaffected by injection because of the limited amount of injectate presently available. That the reservoir has been positively impacted in the injection areas is evidenced by a decrease in the rate of pressure decline from 1989 through 1992. Correspondingly, there has been a reduction in the rate of steam flow decline in the areas' production wells. Conversely, little evidence of reservoir cooling or thermal breakthrough is shown even in areas where IDS accounts for 80 percent or more of production. Finally, since injection water is a relatively low-gas source of steam, noncondensible gas concentrations have been reduced in some steam wells located within the injection dominated areas.

Enedy, S.L.; Smith, J.L.; Yarter, R.E.; Jones, S.M.; Cavote, P.E.

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

318

Projective Space Codes for the Injection Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of error control in random linear network coding, it is useful to construct codes that comprise well-separated collections of subspaces of a vector space over a finite field. In this paper, the metric used is the so-called "injection distance", introduced by Silva and Kschischang. A Gilbert-Varshamov bound for such codes is derived. Using the code-construction framework of Etzion and Silberstein, new non-constant-dimension codes are constructed; these codes contain more codewords than comparable codes designed for the subspace metric.

Khaleghi, Azadeh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

DOE-NETL's Mercury Control Technology R&D Program for Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Emissions from Coal Mercury Emissions from Coal 1 st International Experts' Workshop May 12-13, 2004 Glasgow, Scotland Thomas J. Feeley, III thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov National Energy Technology Laboratory TJ Feeley _Scotland_ 2004 Presentation Outline * Who is NETL * Why mercury control? * NETL mercury control R&D * NETL coal utilization by-products R&D TJ Feeley _Glasgow_May 2004 * One of DOE's 17 national labs * Government owned / operated * Sites in: - Pennsylvania - West Virginia - Oklahoma - Alaska * More than 1,100 federal and support contractor employees National Energy Technology Laboratory TJ Feeley Feb. 2004 * R&D Activities - Mercury control - NO x control - Particulate matter control - Air quality research - Coal utilization by-products - Water management Innovations for Existing Plants

320

Staged direct injection diesel engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diesel engine having staged injection for using lower cetane number fuels than No. 2 diesel fuel. The engine includes a main fuel injector and a pilot fuel injector. Pilot and main fuel may be the same fuel. The pilot injector injects from five to fifteen percent of the total fuel at timings from 20.degree. to 180.degree. BTDC depending upon the quantity of pilot fuel injected, the fuel cetane number and speed and load. The pilot fuel injector is directed toward the centerline of the diesel cylinder and at an angle toward the top of the piston, avoiding the walls of the cylinder. Stratification of the early injected pilot fuel is needed to reduce the fuel-air mixing rate, prevent loss of pilot fuel to quench zones, and keep the fuel-air mixture from becoming too fuel lean to become effective. In one embodiment, the pilot fuel injector includes a single hole for injection of the fuel and is directed at approximately 48.degree. below the head of the cylinder.

Baker, Quentin A. (San Antonio, TX)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Injection-locked composite lasers for mm-wave modulation : LDRD 117819 final report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a 3-year LDRD program at Sandia National Laboratories exploring mutual injection locking of composite-cavity lasers for enhanced modulation responses. The program focused on developing a fundamental understanding of the frequency enhancement previously demonstrated for optically injection locked lasers. This was then applied to the development of a theoretical description of strongly coupled laser microsystems. This understanding was validated experimentally with a novel 'photonic lab bench on a chip'.

Wendt, Joel Robert; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Raring, James; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Alford, Charles Fred (Sandia Staffing Alliance, LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Skogen, Erik J.; Chow, Weng Wah; Cajas, Florante G. (LMATA Government Services, LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Overberg, Mark E.; Torres, David L. (LMATA Government Services, LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Peake, Gregory Merwin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Advanced Application Development Program Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary of the Tranmission Reliability program's Advanced Applications Research and Development activity area. This program develops and demonstrates tools to monitor and control the grid with...

323

Control of coal combustion SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions by in-boiler injection of CMA. Final project report, July 1, 1992--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of carboxylic calcium and magnesium salts (e.g., calcium magnesium acetate or CMA, CaMg{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}COOH){sub 6}) for the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in oxygen-lean atmospheres. Experiments were performed in a high-temperature furnace that simulated the post-flame environment of a coal-fired boiler by providing similar temperatures and partial pressures of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. When injected into a hot environment, the salts calcined and formed highly porous {open_quotes}popcorn{close_quotes}-like cenospheres. Residual MgO and/or CaCO{sub 3} and CaO reacted heterogeneously with SO{sub 2} to form MgSO{sub 4} and/or CaCO{sub 4}. The organic components - which can be manufactured from wastes such as sewage sludge - gasified and reduced NO{sub x }to N{sub 2} efficiently if the atmosphere was moderately fuel-rich. Dry-injected CMA particles at a Ca/S ratio of 2, residence time of 1 second and bulk equivalence ratio of 1.3 removed over 90% of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} at gas temperatures {>=} 950{degrees}C. When the furnace isothermal zone was {<=} 950{degrees}C, Ca was essentially inert in the furnace quenching zone, while Mg continued to sorb SO{sub 2} as the gas temperature cooled at a rate of -130{degrees}C/sec. Hence, the removal of SO{sub 2} by CMA could continue for nearly the entire residence time of emissions in the exhaust stream of a power plant. Additional research is needed to improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of the relatively expensive carboxylic acid salts as dual SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} reduction agents. For example, wet injection of the salts could be combined with less expensive hydrocarbons such as lignite or even polymers such as poly(ethylene) that could be extracted from the municipal waste stream.

Levendis, Y.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Computer program development specification for the air traffic control subsystem of the Man-Vehicle Systems Research Facility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Functional summary: The Air Traffic Control (ATC) Subsystem of the Man-Vehicle System Research Facility (MVSRF) is a hardware/software complex which provides the MVSRF with the capability of simulating the multi-aircraft, ...

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Flight Transportation Laboratory

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Instrumentation and Controls Division annual progress report for period ending September 1, 1974. Non-LMFBR program  

SciTech Connect

Research projects are summarized under the following categories: (1) basic electronics development; (2) engineering support for research facilities; (3) pulse counting and analysis; (4) radiation detection and monitoring; (5) instrument development; (6) automatic control and data acquisition; (7) process systems and instrumentation development; (8) reactor instrumentation and controls; (9) fuel reprocessing and shipping; (10) standards laboratory; (11) instrumentation for reactor division experiments and test loops; (12) maintenance and service; (13) ecological science studies; and (14) administration and training. (WHK)

Sadowski, G.S. (comp.)

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Control of coal combustion SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions by in-boiler injection of CMA. First quarterly project status report, 1 October 1992--31 December 1992  

SciTech Connect

The principal objectives of the proposed research are two-fold: (A) To understand the mechanism and assess the effectiveness of sulfur capture by the chemical calcium magnesium acetate (CMA). And (B) To evaluate the NO{sub x} reduction capabilities of CMA by burning the organic constituents of the chemical (the acetate) and reducing NO to stable N{sub 2} The optimum conditions and the location of CMA introduction in the furnace will be identified. To achieve these goals water solutions of CMA or dry powders of CMA will be injected into hot air or gases simulating the furnace exhaust (containing CO{sub 2}, SO{sub x} NO{sub x}, H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2} etc.) and the composition of gaseous and solid products of the reaction will be monitored. The processes of burning the organic acetate as well as the calcination, sintering and sulfation of the remaining solid will be studied in detail.

Levendis, Y.A.; Wise, D.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Advanced emissions control development program. Quarterly technical progress report {number_sign}8, July 1--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop practical strategies and systems for the simultaneous control of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulate matter, and air toxics emissions from coal-fired boilers in such a way as to keep coal economically and environmentally competitive as a utility boiler fuel. Of particular interest is the control of air toxics emissions through the cost-effective use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP`s), fabric filters (baghouses), and SO{sub 2} removal systems such as wet scrubbers and various clean coal technologies. This objective will be achieved through extensive development testing in Babcock and Wilcox`s state-of-the-art, 10 MW{sub e} equivalent, Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF). The project has extended the capabilities of the CEDF to facilitate air toxics emissions control development work on backend flue gas cleanup equipment. Specifically, an ESP, a baghouse, and a wet scrubber for SO{sub 2} (and air toxics) control were added--all designed to yield air toxics emissions data under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: measure and understand production and partitioning of air toxics species in coal-fired power plant systems; optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems; quantify the impacts of coal cleaning on air toxics emissions; identify and/or develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts; develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques; and establish an air toxics data library to facilitate studies of the impacts of coal selection, coal cleaning, and emissions control strategies on the emissions of coal-fired power plants.

Evans, A.P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results for year eleven in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible.

Porter, Russell G.; Winther, Eric C.; Fox, Lyle G.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Apparatus and method to inject a reductant into an exhaust gas feedstream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust aftertreatment system for an internal combustion engine is provided including an apparatus and method to inject a reductant into the exhaust gas feedstream. Included is a fuel metering device adapted to inject reductant into the exhaust gas feedstream and a controllable pressure regulating device. A control module is operatively connected to the reductant metering device and the controllable pressure regulating device, and, adapted to effect flow of reductant into the exhaust gas feedstream over a controllable flow range.

Viola, Michael B. (Macomb Township, MI)

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

330

CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Begins in Illinois Begins in Illinois CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois November 17, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon storage technologies nationwide, has begun injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) for their large-scale CO2 injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute to global climate change. "Establishing long-term, environmentally safe and secure underground CO2 storage is a critical component in achieving successful commercial

331

Evaluation of Humidity Control Options in Hot-Humid Climate Homes (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Humidity Control Options in Hot-Humid Climate Homes As the Building America program researches construction of homes that achieve greater source energy savings over typical mid-1990s construction, proper modeling of whole-house latent loads and operation of humidity control equipment has become a high priority. Long-term high relative humidity can cause health and durability problems in homes, particularly in a hot-humid climate. In this study, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) used the latest EnergyPlus tool equipped with the moisture capacitance model to analyze the indoor relative humidity in three home types: a Building America high-performance home; a mid- 1990s reference home; and a 2006 International Energy Conservation

332

Integration of Nevada Test Site (NTS) Work Control Programs and Incorporating Integrated Safety Management (ISM) into Activity Level Work Planning and Control  

SciTech Connect

This session will examine a method developed by Federal and Contractor personnel at the Nevada Site Office (NSO) to improve the planning and execution of work activities utilizing an Activity Level Work Control process in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2004-1, Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations. The process was initially developed during Fiscal Year (FY) 2007, and implementation is commencing during the fourth quarter of FY 2008. This process will significantly enhance the flexibility and the appropriate rigor in the performance of work activities.

Mike Kinney and Kevin Breen

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.A. Hsieh 1e$ Pressure Buildup Monitoring of the Krafla Geothermal Field, . . . . . . . . 1'1 Xceland - 0 Initial Chemical and Reservoir Conditions at Lo6 Azufres Wellhead Power Plant Startup - P. Kruger, LSGP-TR-92 - Injection Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal

Stanford University

334

Wellness Peer Program Volunteer Job Description Wellness Peer Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Peer Program Volunteer Job Description Wellness Peer Programs: Leave The Pack Behind & Wellness Centre, UTSC Mental Wellness ­ mental health awareness program focusing on mental health, coping on healthy relationships, sexually transmitted infections and birth control Health & Wellness Centre

Kronzucker, Herbert J.

335

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Applications Blast Furnace Granular-Coal Injection System Demonstration Project - Project Brief PDF-314KB Bethlehem Steel Corp., Burns Harbor, IN PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS...

336

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results for year twelve in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and damangling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale.

Porter, Russell G.; Winther, Eric C.; Fox, Lyle G.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

GRR/Elements/14-CA-c.3 - Application For Proposed Underground Injection  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CA-c.3 - Application For Proposed Underground Injection CA-c.3 - Application For Proposed Underground Injection Project < GRR‎ | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections 14-CA-c.3 - Application For Proposed Underground Injection Project Under the Memorandum of Agreement Between State Water Resources Control Board and DOGGR geothermal operators must file an application for underground geothermal wastewater injection with the appropriate DOGGR district office. The application must include: A chemical analysis to characterize the proposed injection fluid; A chemical analysis from the proposed zone of injection considering the characteristics of the zone; and The depth, location, and injection formation of the proposed well. Logic Chain

338

Geothermal injection treatment: process chemistry, field experiences, and design options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful development of geothermal reservoirs to generate electric power will require the injection disposal of approximately 700,000 gal/h (2.6 x 10/sup 6/ 1/h) of heat-depleted brine for every 50,000 kW of generating capacity. To maintain injectability, the spent brine must be compatible with the receiving formation. The factors that influence this brine/formation compatibility and tests to quantify them are discussed in this report. Some form of treatment will be necessary prior to injection for most situations; the process chemistry involved to avoid and/or accelerate the formation of precipitate particles is also discussed. The treatment processes, either avoidance or controlled precipitation approaches, are described in terms of their principles and demonstrated applications in the geothermal field and, when such experience is limited, in other industrial use. Monitoring techniques for tracking particulate growth, the effect of process parameters on corrosion and well injectability are presented. Examples of brine injection, preinjection treatment, and recovery from injectivity loss are examined and related to the aspects listed above.

Kindle, C.H.; Mercer, B.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Blair, S.C.; Myers, D.A.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Analysis of PWR RCS Injection Strategy During Severe Accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactor coolant system (RCS) injection is an important strategy for severe accident management of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system. Maanshan is a typical Westinghouse PWR nuclear power plant (NPP) with large, dry containment. The severe accident management guideline (SAMG) of Maanshan NPP is developed based on the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) SAMG.The purpose of this work is to analyze the RCS injection strategy of PWR system in an overheated core condition. Power is assumed recovered as the vessel water level drops to the bottom of active fuel. The Modular Accident Analysis Program version 4.0.4 (MAAP4) code is chosen as a tool for analysis. A postulated station blackout sequence for Maanshan NPP is cited as a reference case for this analysis. The hot leg creep rupture occurs during the mitigation action with immediate injection after power recovery according to WOG SAMG, which is not desired. This phenomenon is not considered while developing the WOG SAMG. Two other RCS injection methods are analyzed by using MAAP4. The RCS injection strategy is modified in the Maanshan SAMG. These results can be applied for typical PWR NPPs.

Wang, S.-J. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China); Chiang, K.-S. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China); Chiang, S.-C. [Taiwan Power Company, Taiwan (China)

2004-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

RCx Program and UESC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program & UESC Program & UESC FUPWG - Fall 2010 Rapid City, SD Chris Gillis Pacific Gas and Electric Company October 20, 2010 Regional Summits 2 Agenda  What is RCx?  PG&E's RCx Program  RCx and UESC 3 What is RCx? A systematic process for optimizing performance of a facility's existing equipment, lighting controls, processes, and control systems A building tune-up using a facility's existing equipment: * Lighting Controls * HVAC Controls & Processes * Control Systems Regional Summits 4 Common RCx Measures Scheduled Loads * Equipment Scheduling: Time of Day * Equipment Scheduling: Optimum Start-Stop * Equipment Scheduling: Lighting Controls Economizer/Outside Air Loads * Economizer Operation: Inadequate Free

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341

Steam Generator Management Program: Effects of Different pH Control Agents on Pressurized Water Reactor Plant Systems and Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion of materials in the condensate, feedwater, and drain systems of PWRs generates a significant amount of corrosion products in the secondary cycle. These corrosion products are generally transported into the steam generators and deposit on tubing surfaces, tubesheets, and tube support plates. Increased corrosion results in elevated levels of undesired corrosion products being deposited into the steam generators. To minimize corrosion of the secondary system components, control of pH in the second...

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

342

The Impact of Injection on Seismicity at The Geyses, CaliforniaGeothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water injection into geothermal systems has often become arequired strategy to extended and sustain production of geothermalresources. To reduce a trend of declining pressures and increasingnon-condensable gas concentrations in steam produced from The Geysers,operators have been injecting steam condensate, local rain and streamwaters, and most recently treated wastewater piped to the field fromneighboring communities. If geothermal energy is to provide a significantincrease in energy in the United States (US Department of Energy (DOE)goal is 40,000 megawatts by 2040), injection must play a larger role inthe overall strategy, i.e., enhanced geothermal systems, (EGS). Presentedin this paper are the results of monitoring microseismicity during anincrease in injection at The Geysers field in California using data froma high-density digital microearthquake array. Although seismicity hasincreased due to increased injection it has been found to be somewhatpredicable, thus implying that intelligent injection control may be ableto control large increases in seismicity.

Majer, Ernest L.; Peterson, John E.

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

343

EMC 2006: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Program Overview. Electronic materials relate to, are produced, or are operated by the controlled flow of electrons through a semiconductor, a gas,...

344

Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL's NETL's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Program Advances of Multi-pollutant and CO 2 Control Technologies Chicago, IL April 30, 2007 Timothy Fout Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory T. Fout, Apr. 2007 Outline for Presentation * NETL Overview * The Issue * The Solutions * What is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) * DOE's Sequestration Program Structure * CO 2 Capture Research Projects T. Fout, Apr. 2007 National Energy Technology Laboratory * Only DOE national lab dedicated to fossil energy - Fossil fuels provide 85% of U.S. energy supply * One lab, five locations, one management structure * 1,100 Federal and support-contractor employees * Research spans fundamental science to technology demonstrations West Virginia

345

Injection/withdrawal scheduling for natural gas storage facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control decisions for gas storage facilities are made in the face of extreme uncertainty over future natural gas prices on world markets. We examine the problem faced by owners of storage contracts of how to manage the injection/withdrawal schedule of ... Keywords: natural gas storage, optimization, scheduling

Alan Holland

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and are both equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

C. Jean Bustard

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

With the nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous systems of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of projected DOE/EPA early cost estimates. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000-2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that was tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology injects a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. PG&E National Energy Group provided two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company provided a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company hosted a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the fifteenth reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: (1) Test Sites--Final Reports for the two remaining plants are being written (Salem Harbor and Brayton Point). (2) Technology Transfer--Technical information about the project was presented to a number of organizations during the quarter including members of congress, coal companies, architect/engineering firms, National Mining Association, the North Carolina Department of Air Quality, the National Coal Council and EPA.

Jean Bustard; Richard Schlager

2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

348

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 3, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SGSYS (Substation Grounding SYStem Analysis Program). This program analyzes the substation ground field given the total electric current injected into the ground field and the design of the grounding system. Standard outputs of the program are (1) total ground resistance, (2) step voltage, (3) touch voltage, (4) voltages on a grid of points, (5) voltage profile along straight lines, (6) transfer voltages, (7) ground potential rise, (8) body currents, (9) step voltage profile along straight lines, and (10) touch voltage profile along straight lines. This program can be utilized in an interactive or batch mode. In the interactive mode, the user defines the grounding system geometry, soil parameters, and output requests interactively, with the use of a user friendly conversational program. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. An appendix provides forms which facilitate data collection procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program SGSYS and provides a test case for validation purposes.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

carbon sequestration via direct injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION Howard J. Herzog, Ken Caldeira, and Eric Adams INTRODUCTION The build-up of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and other greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere has caused concern about possible global climate change. As a result, international negotiations have produced the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), completed during the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. The treaty, which the United States has ratified, calls for the "stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system." The primary greenhouse gas is CO 2 , which is estimated to contribute to over two-thirds of any climate change. The primary source of CO

350

Miniaturized flow injection analysis system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Miniaturized flow injection analysis system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis is described, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38{times}25{times}3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction. 9 figs.

Folta, J.A.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Radial lean direct injection burner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program. Quarterly Technical Progress Report {number_sign}6 for the period: January 1 to March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Babcock {ampersand} Wilcox (B{ampersand}W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls will likely arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B{ampersand}W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF will provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) measure and understand the production and partitioning of air toxics species for a variety of steam coals, (2) optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems (ESPs, baghouses, scrubbers), (3) develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts, (4) develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques, and (5) establish a comprehensive, self- consistent air toxics data library. Development work is currently concentrated on the capture of mercury, fine particulate, and a variety of inorganic species such as the acid gases (hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, etc.).

Farthing, George A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Water Injection into a Low-Permeability Rock - 1: Hydrofracture Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we model water injection through a growing vertical hydrofracture penetrating a low-permeability reservoir. The results are useful in oilfield waterflood applications and in liquid waste disposal through reinjection. Using Duhamel's principle, we extend the Gordeyev and Entov (1997) self-similar 2D solution of pressure diffusion from a growing fracture to the case of variable injection pressure. The flow of water injected into a low-permeability rock is almost perpendicular to the fracture for a time sufficiently long to be of practical interest. We revisit Carter's model of 1D fluid injection (Howard and Fast, 1957) and extend it to the case of variable injection pressure. We express the cumulative injection through the injection pressure and effective fracture area. Maintaining fluid injection above a reasonable minimal value leads inevitably to fracture growth regardless of the injector design and the injection policy. The average rate of fracture growth can be predicted from early injection. A smart injection controller that can prevent rapid fracture growth is needed.

Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitriy B.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

355

An environmental analysis of injection molding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates injection molding from an environmental standpoint, yielding a system-level environmental analysis of the process. There are three main objectives: analyze the energy consumption trends in injection ...

Thiriez, Alexandre

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Waste heat steams ahead with injection technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owners of Commercial-Industrial-Institutional buildings whose thermal usage is too variable to implement cogeneration are looking to a gasturbine steam-injection technology, called the Cheng Cycle, to reduce their energy costs. The Cheng Cycle uses industrial components-a gas-turbine generating set, a waste-heat recovery steam generator and system controls-in a thermodynamically optimized mode. In the process, steam produced from waste heat can be used for space or process heating or to increase the electrical output of a gas turbine. The process was patented in 1974 by Dr. Dah Yu Cheng, of the University of Santa Clara, Santa Clara, Calif. When a plant's thermal needs fall because of production or temperature changes, unused steam is directed back to the turbine to increase electrical output. As thermal requirements rise, the process is reversed and needed steam is channeled to plant uses.

Shepherd, S.; Koloseus, C.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Radiation Safety Work Control Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Safety Work Control Form (see instructions on pg-2) Rev July-2012 Area: Form : Date: Preliminary Applicability Screen: (a) Will closing the beam line injection stoppers...

358

Experience with Zinc Injection in European PWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc injection is an effective technique for lowering shutdown dose rates in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This report compiles information about zinc injection experience at Siemens PWRs and compares the results with the use of zinc injection at U.S. PWRs. The plant data confirm that even low concentrations of zinc in the reactor water can indeed lower shutdown dose rates, but plants should make a concerted effort to inject zinc on a continuous basis to achieve the best results.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Injectivity Testing for Vapour Dominated Feed Zones  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wells with vapor dominated feed zones yield abnormal pressure data. This is caused by the condensation of vapor during water injection. A revised injectivity test procedure currently applied by PNOC at the Leyte Geothermal Power Project has improved the injectivity test results.

Clotworthy, A.W.; Hingoyon, C.S.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Engine with hydraulic fuel injection and ABS circuit using a single high pressure pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An engine system comprises a hydraulically actuated fuel injection system and an ABS circuit connected via a fluid flow passage that provides hydraulic fluid to both the fuel injection system and to the ABS circuit. The hydraulically actuated system includes a high pressure pump. The fluid control passage is in fluid communication with an outlet from the high pressure pump.

Bartley, Bradley E. (Manito, IL); Blass, James R. (Bloomington, IL); Gibson, Dennis H. (Chillicothe, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor fueling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three separate papers are included which report research progress during this period: (1) A new railgun configuration with perforated sidewalls, (2) development of a fuseless small-bore railgun for injection of high-speed hydrogen pellets into magnetically confined plasmas, and (3) controls and diagnostics on a fuseless railgun for solid hydrogen pellet injection.

Kim, K.; Zhang, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Engines - Spark Ignition Engines - Direct Injection - Omnivorous Engine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Injection, Spark-Ignited Engines Direct Injection, Spark-Ignited Engines Omnivorous Engine Omnivorous Engine Setup Omnivorous Engine Setup New engine technology has made possible engines that will operate on a wide variety of fuel inputs, from gasoline to naptha to ethanol to methanol, without driver intervention. Although flexible fuel vehicles have been produced in the millions, their engines have always been optimized for gasoline operation while accepting significant performance and efficiency degradations when using the alternative fuel. This project seeks to combine in-cylinder measurement technology, and advanced controls to optimize spark timing, the quantity and timing of injected fuel, to produce an "omnivorous engine"--one that will be able to run on any liquid spark ignition fuel with optimal efficiency and low

363

Fuel injection device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injection system and method provide for shaping a combustion plume within a combustion chamber to effectively recirculate hot combustion gases for stable combustion conditions while providing symmetrical combustion conditions. Char and molten slag are passed to the outer boundary layer to complete combustion of char while permitting initial substoichiometric combustion in a reductive atmosphere for reducing discharge of nitrogen oxides. Shaping of the plume is accomplished by an axially adjustable pintle which permits apportionment of driving pressure between elements which contribute tangential and those which contribute radial directional components to oxidant flow entering the combustion chamber.

Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fuel injection device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injection system and method provide for shaping a combustion plume within a combustion chamber to effectively recirculate hot combustion gases for stable combustion conditions while providing symmetrical combustion conditions. Char and molten slag are passed to the outer boundary layer to complete combustion of char while permitting initial substoichiometric combustion in a reductive atmosphere for reducing discharge of nitrogen oxides. Shaping of the plume is accomplished by an axially adjustable pintle which permits apportionment of driving pressure between elements which contribute tangential and those which contribute radial directional components to oxidant flow entering the combustion chamber.

Carlson, L.W.

1983-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

365

INJECTIVE COGENERATORS AMONG OPERATOR BIMODULES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Given C ?-algebras A and B acting cyclically on Hilbert spaces H and K, respectively, we characterize completely isometric A, B-bimodule maps from B(K, H) into operator A, B-bimodules. We determine cogenerators in some classes of operator bimodules. For an injective cogenerator X in a suitable category of operator A, B-bimodules we show: if A, regarded as a C ?-subalgebra of A?(X) (adjointable left multipliers on X), is equal to its relative double commutant in A?(X), then A must be a W ?-algebra. 1.

Bojan Magajna

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Injection with seawater: problems in the operation of a seawater treatment plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reservoir pressure elevation by means of water injection in the production formation is a technique that improves production efficiency. In offshore activities, seawater is available for injection, but it has a high level of solids in suspension and also ions and dissolved gases that may cause problems in the water injection system. Therefore, a seawater treatment plant is necessary for preparation of the injection water. The treatment system has the following components for physical treatment: colander, which prevents the intake of large objects to the system; filters, which include flocculation for coagulation means for the removal of microscopic particles that can pass through the colander; deaerator; and system controls.

Garbis, S.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Operational experience during the LHC injection tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the LHC injection tests of 2008. two injection tests took place in October and November 2009 as preparation for the LHC restart on November 20, 2009. During these injection tests beam was injected through the TI 2 transfer line into sector 23 of ring 1 and through TI 8 into the sectors 78, 67 and 56 of ring 2. The beam time was dedicated to injection steering, optics measurements and debugging of all the systems involved. Because many potential problems were sorted out in advance, these tests contributed to the rapid progress after the restart. This paper describes the experiences and issues encountered during these tests as well as related measurement results.

Fuchsberger, K; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Bailey, R; Bruning, O; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Lamont, M; MacPherson, A; Meddahi, M; Papotti, G; Pojer, M; Ponce, L; Redaelli, S; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Wenninger, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NETL: News Release - DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 27, 2009 February 27, 2009 DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of Carbon Dioxide in Michigan Basin Project Expected to Advance National Carbon Sequestration Program, Create Jobs Washington, DC-Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. MORE INFO Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program DOE's Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, began injecting the CO2 this week in the

369

The Discussion of a New Exhausting Smoke Solution in Natural Draft Cooling Tower with Flue Gas Injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First, the three-dimensional model of NDCT with flue gas injection and the boundary conditions was established by GAMBIT2.3 on the basis of structural parameter. On theFLUENT6.3 technology platform with self-designed program, it was found that: The new ... Keywords: NDCT with flue gas injection, jet mechanics numerical simulation, natural draft cooling towers

Yang Shuo; Qing-Jie Qi; Xin-Le Yang; Shi Lei; Chun-Yang Li

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Allergy Injection Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Allergy Injection Policy Allergy Injection Policy Allergy Injection Policy Millions of Americans suffer from perennial and seasonal allergic rhinitis. Allergy immunotherapy is an effective way to reduce or eliminate the symptoms of allergic rhinitis by desensitizing the patient to the allergen(s) by giving escalating doses of an extract via regular injections. Receiving weekly injections at a private physician's office is time consuming, reduces productivity, and can quickly deplete an employee's earned leave. FOH offers the convenience of receiving allergy injections at the OHC as a physician-prescribed service, reducing time away from work for many federal employees. Allergy Injection Policy.pdf More Documents & Publications Physician Treatment Order Handicapped Parking Guidance

371

Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin February 17, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon sequestration technologies nationwide, has begun drilling the injection well for their large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute

372

Energy program annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents on overview of research from Lawrence Livermore laboratories on the following topics: fossil energy; petroleum geochemistry: origin of oil and gas; methane-conversion enzymes; oil shale project; flow of granular solids; mild coal gasification; and injection-front imaging in enhanced oil recovery. Conservation and renewable energy: geothermal program and combustion technology. Nuclear waste: high-level nuclear waste disposal. hazardous waste research development.

Borg, I.Y. (ed.)

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

DOE Light Truck Clean Diesel (LTCD) Program Final Caterpillar Public Report Light Truck Clean Diesel Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy and Caterpillar entered a Cooperative Agreement to develop compression ignition engine technology suitable for the light truck/SUV market. Caterpillar, in collaboration with a suitable commercialization partner, developed a new Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) engine technology to dramatically improve the emissions and performance of light truck engines. The overall program objective was to demonstrate engine prototypes by 2004, with an order of magnitude emission reduction while meeting challenging fuel consumption goals. Program emphasis was placed on developing and incorporating cutting edge technologies that could remove the current impediments to commercialization of CIDI power sources in light truck applications. The major obstacle to commercialization is emissions regulations with secondary concerns of driveability and NVH (noise, vibration and harshness). The target emissions levels were 0.05 g/mile NOx and 0.01 g/mile PM to be compliant with the EPA Tier 2 fleet average requirements of 0.07 g/mile and the CARB LEV 2 of 0.05 g/mile for NOx, both have a PM requirement of 0.01 g/mile. The program team developed a combustion process that fundamentally shifted the classic NOx vs. PM behavior of CIDI engines. The NOx vs. PM shift was accomplished with a form of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI). The HCCI concept centers on appropriate mixing of air and fuel in the compression process and controlling the inception and rate of combustion through various means such as variable valve timing, inlet charge temperature and pressure control. Caterpillar has adapted an existing Caterpillar design of a single injector that: (1) creates the appropriate fuel and air mixture for HCCI, (2) is capable of a more conventional injection to overcome the low power density problems of current HCCI implementations, (3) provides a mixed mode where both the HCCI and conventional combustion are functioning in the same combustion cycle. Figure 1 illustrates the mixed mode injection system. Under the LTCD program Caterpillar developed a mixed mode injector for a multi-cylinder engine system. The mixed mode injection system represents a critical enabling technology for the implementation of HCCI. In addition, Caterpillar implemented variable valve system technology and air system technology on the multi-cylinder engine platform. The valve and air system technology were critical to system control. Caterpillar developed the combustion system to achieve a 93% reduction in NOx emissions. The resulting NOx emissions were 0.12 gm/mile NOx. The demonstrated emissions level meets the stringent Tier 2 Bin 8 requirement without NOx aftertreatment! However, combustion development alone was not adequate to meet the program goal of 0.05gm/mile NOx. To meet the program goals, an additional 60% NOx reduction technology will be required. Caterpillar evaluated a number of NOx reduction technologies to quantify and understand the NOx reduction potential and system performance implications. The NOx adsorber was the most attractive NOx aftertreatment option based on fuel consumption and NOx reduction potential. In spite of the breakthrough technology development conducted under the LTCD program there remains many significant challenges associated with the technology configuration. For HCCI, additional effort is needed to develop a robust control strategy, reduce the hydrocarbon emissions at light load condition, and develop a more production viable fuel system. Furthermore, the NOx adsorber suffers from cost, packaging, and durability challenges that must be addressed.

Eric Fluga

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Bibliography: injection technology applicable to geothermal utilization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bibliography cites 500 documents that may be helpful in planning, analysis, research, and development of the various aspects of injection technology in geothermal applications. These documents include results from government research; development, demonstration, and commercialization programs; selected references from the literature; symposia; references from various technical societies and installations; reference books; reviews; and other selected material. The cited references are from (1) subject searching, using indexing, storage, and retrieval information data base of the Department of Energy's Technical Information Center's on-line retrieval system, RECON; (2) searches of references from the RECON data base, of work by authors known to be active in the field of geothermal energy research and development; (3) subject and author searches by the computerized data storage and retrieval system of Chemical Abstracts, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC; and (4) selected references from texts and reviews on this subject. Each citation includes title, author, author affiliation, date of publication, and source. The citations are listed in chronological order (most recent first) in each of the subject categories for which this search was made. The RECON accession number is also given.

Darnell, A.J.; Eichelberger, R.L.

1982-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

375

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program : Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index Predator Control Fisheries and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin, 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The papers in this document report the results of studies to develop a Columbia River basin-wide program to control northern squawfish predation on juvenile salmonids. Our studies focus on (1) determining where in the basin northern squawfish predation is a problem, (2) conducting various fisheries for northern squawfish, and (3) testing a plan to evaluate how well fisheries are controlling northern squawfish populations. These studies were initiated as part of a basin-wide effort to reduce mortality of juvenile salmonids on their journey from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River basin suggested predation by northern squawfish on juvenile salmonids may account for most of the 10 to 20 percent mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia and Snake river reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982--1988 indicated it is not necessary to eradicate northern squawfish to substantially reduce predation-caused mortality of juvenile salmonids. Instead, if northern squawfish were exploited at a 20 percent rate, reductions in their numbers and restructuring of their populations could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50 percent. We tested three fisheries in 1990, a tribal long-line fishery, a recreational-reward fishery, and a dam hook-and-line fishery.

Nigro, Anthony A.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3MS Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs AN L-934 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M...

377

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs AN L-9213 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report...

378

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

r Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs ANL-949 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report...

379

Semiannual progress report for the Idaho Geothermal Program, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the Idaho Geothermal program between October 1, 1979 and March 31, 1980. Progress on the 5-MW Pilot Power Plant at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site is summarized including construction, steady-state and transient analyses by computer modeling, the geothermal water treatment program, and additional experimental and theoretical work on direct contact heat exchangers. Asbestos-cement pipe failures in the geothermal fluid supply and injection system are also summarized. The successful automatic control-mode testing of the Prototype Power Plant is reported. A continuing direct applications experiment in aquaculture is outlined, and a proposal to study various ramifications of irrigating agricultural and range lands with spent geothermal fluid is described briefly. Also outlined is the second experimental hydraulic fracture treatment of a geothermal well at Raft River as part of the National Well Stimulation Program. The improvements to the Raft River site facilities are described, and progress in providing technical information and assistance in the Outreach, or User Assistance program presented. Also presented is a new DOE program, the User Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program, which is intended to reduce the financial risk of hydrothermal reservoir exploration by the private sector. Progress reports are also included on DOE's Program Opportunity Notice (PON) Program demonstration projects and Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) Program study projects.

Ihrig, R.R. (ed.)

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

States. Since East Africa forms part of the natural distribution of hydrilla, a search for potential;Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION C' [HIS PAGE(Wh., D.t.£nle,ed) 20. ABSTRACT (Continued). distribution, despite an intensive search, only a single population, probably of exotic origin, was found. The range

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the flue gas in a separate activation reactor, which increases SO 2 removal. An electrostatic precipitator downstream from the point of injection captures the reaction...

382

Blast Furnace Granulated Coal Injection System Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Blast Furnace Granulated Coal Injection System Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment June 2000 U. S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880,...

383

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Injection through fractures  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Injection through fractures Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot...

384

NSLS-II INJECTION STRAIGHT DIAGNOSTICS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ultra-bright light source being developed by the NSLS-II project will utilize top-up injection and fine tuning of the injection process is mandatory. In this paper we present the diagnostics installed in the injection straight. Its use for commissioning and tuning of the injection cycle is also described. The NSLS-II storage ring will utilize a 9.3 meter long injection straight section shown in Fig. 1. Injection will be preformed with two septa (one pulsed, one DC) and four kickers. The stored beam will be shifted towards the pulsed septum up to IS mm and the nominal distance between centers of the injected and the bumped beam is 9.5mm. The NSLS-II beam position monitors will have turn-by-turn and first-turn capabilities and will be used for the commissioning and tuning the injection process. However, there are three additional BPMs and two beam intercepting OTR screens (flags) installed in the injection straight.

Pinayev, I.; Blednykh, A.; Ferreira, M.; Fliller, R.; Kosciuk, B.; Shaftan, T.V.; Wang, G.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Powder Injection Molding - Available Technologies - PNNL  

Summary. Presented here is a novel and innovative means of powder injection molding (PIM) of reactive refractory metals, such as titanium and its ...

386

Dry Sorbent Injection Workshop Summary: Workshop Held November 11, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A day-long dry sorbent injection (DSI) workshop was held in Charlotte, North Carolina, on November 20, 2011. The workshop was attended by representatives of over 20 electric power companies. Introductory remarks were made by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) staff, followed by presentations by 10 electric power companies describing their efforts and results from testing DSI technology for control of acid gases from flue gas. These testing efforts considered sulfur trioxide (SO3)/sulfuric acid, hyd...

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

387

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology: Topical report No. 7, Task 4. 1: Testing of first generation mathematical model predictions; Topical report No. 8, Task 4. 2: Testing of second generation mathematical model predictions, Duct Injection Test Facility, Muskingum River Power Plant, Beverly, OH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gilbert/Commonwealth (G/C) and Southern Research Institute have completed a project under DOE sponsorship entitled Scaleup Tests and Supporting Research for the Development of Duct Injection Technology''. The project included extensive modifications to DOE's Duct Injection Test Facility (DITF) located at the Muskingum River Plant of Ohio Power Company. A comprehensive test program was performed at the facility to evaluate So[sub 2] removal and overall process operability with duct injection of slaked lime slurries and dry injection of calcium hydroxide powder with humidification. Detailed results from the project are presented in the following reports: Topical Report No. 1 -- Literature Review; Topical Report No. 2 -- Evaluation of System Performance; Topical Report No. 3 -- Scale-Up Testing; Advanced Configurations Process Controls; Failure Modes; and Waste characterization. Project Final Report. The purposes of this report are: (1) to satisfy a contractual requirement for a separate topical report concerning the subject of mathematical model validation, and (2) to briefly describe the status of the model development and validation effort.

Felix, L.G.; Gooch, J.P. (Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States)); Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G. (Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology: Topical report No. 7, Task 4.1: Testing of first generation mathematical model predictions; Topical report No. 8, Task 4.2: Testing of second generation mathematical model predictions, Duct Injection Test Facility, Muskingum River Power Plant, Beverly, OH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gilbert/Commonwealth (G/C) and Southern Research Institute have completed a project under DOE sponsorship entitled ``Scaleup Tests and Supporting Research for the Development of Duct Injection Technology``. The project included extensive modifications to DOE`s Duct Injection Test Facility (DITF) located at the Muskingum River Plant of Ohio Power Company. A comprehensive test program was performed at the facility to evaluate So{sub 2} removal and overall process operability with duct injection of slaked lime slurries and dry injection of calcium hydroxide powder with humidification. Detailed results from the project are presented in the following reports: Topical Report No. 1 -- Literature Review; Topical Report No. 2 -- Evaluation of System Performance; Topical Report No. 3 -- Scale-Up Testing; Advanced Configurations Process Controls; Failure Modes; and Waste characterization. Project Final Report. The purposes of this report are: (1) to satisfy a contractual requirement for a separate topical report concerning the subject of mathematical model validation, and (2) to briefly describe the status of the model development and validation effort.

Felix, L.G.; Gooch, J.P. [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States); Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Energy Management and Control Systems and their Use for Performance Monitoring in the LoanSTAR Program, Technical Report prepared for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Energy and Environment Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis program, pre- and post-retrofit energy consumption for each building is monitored using conventional field data acquisition systems. This report summarizes continuing investigations into the usefulness of existing Energy Management and Control Systems to perform this same data collection task.

Heinemeier, K. E.; Akbari, H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

artmouth has long been a leader in implementing policies and programs to control our use of energy. We do this not only to protect our environment by conserving the use of natural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

artmouth has long been a leader in implementing policies and programs to control our use of energy our efforts to reduce our energy usage. Although the weather can be a primary influence on energy space at 68 degrees in the winter, in accordance with the College's policy. Exceptions

Myers, Lawrence C.

391

A Lorentz-force actuated controllable needle-free drug delivery system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advantages of delivering injections via needle-free methods are numerous. However, conventional methods for needle-free injection lack sufficient control over depth of penetration and shape of injection. Thus, a ...

Hemond, Brian D. (Brian David Thomson)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainability Workshops Highlights of our Programs Named Postdoctoral Fellowship Program Spring Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Faculty opportunities Learning Lab...

393

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Second Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Second Generation Advanced Reburning Second Generation Advanced Reburning General Electric - Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE-EER) is carrying out a two Phase research program to develop novel Advanced Reburning (AR) concepts for high efficiency and low cost NOx control from coal-fired utility boilers. AR technologies are based on combination of basic reburning and N-agent/promoter injections. Phase I of the project was successfully completed and EER was selected to continue to develop AR technology during Phase II. Phase I demonstrated that AR technologies are able to provide effective NOx control for coal-fired combustors. Three technologies were originally envisioned for development: AR-Lean, AR-Rich, and Multiple Injection AR (MIAR). Along with these, three additional technologies were identified during the project: reburning plus promoted SNCR; AR-Lean plus promoted SNCR; and AR-Rich plus promoted SNCR. The promoters are sodium salts, in particular sodium carbonate. These AR technologies have different optimum reburn heat input levels and furnace temperature requirements. For full scale application, an optimum technology can be selected on a boiler-specific basis depending on furnace temperature profile and regions of injector access.

394

Wind Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Program Wind Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT DEPLOYMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE » Wind Program » About Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Budget Contacts Plans, Implementation, and Results Here you'll find an overview of the Wind Program and links to its program planning, implementation, and results documents. This list summarizes the program's wind power research, development, and demonstration activities. Read more about: Overview Learn more about this EERE Office. Plans Discover the plans, budgets, and analyses that set the direction of office priorities and activities. Implementation Find out how the office controls, implements, and adjusts its plans and manages its activities. Results Learn about the technological, commercial, and other outputs and outcomes

395

Reservoir response to injection in the Southeast Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 20 megawatt (MW) increase in steam flow potential resulted within five months of the start-up of new injection wells in the Southeast Geysers. Flow rate increases were observed in 25 wells offset to the injectors, C-11 and 956A-1. This increased flowrate was sustained during nine months of continuous injection with no measurable decrease in offset well temperature until C-11 was shut-in due to wellbore bridging. The responding steam wells are located in an area of reduced reservoir steam pressure known as the Low Pressure Area (LPA). The cause of the flowrate increases was twofold (1) an increase in static reservoir pressure and (2) a decrease in interwell communication. Thermodynamic and microseismic evidence suggests that most of the water is boiling near the injector and migrating to offset wells located ''down'' the static pressure gradient. However, wells showing the largest increase in steam flowrate are not located at the heart of the pressure sink. This indicates that localized fracture distribution controls the preferred path of fluid migration from the injection well. A decrease in non-condensible gas concentrations was also observed in certain wells producing injection derived steam within the LPA. The LPA project has proven that steam suppliers can work together and benefit economically from joint efforts with the goal of optimizing the use of heat from The Geysers reservoir. The sharing of costs and information led directly to the success of the project and introduces a new era of increased cooperation at The Geysers.

Enedy, Steve; Enedy, Kathy; Maney, John

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

U.S. Department Of Energy Advanced Small Modular Reactor R&D Program: Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) Pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interfaces (ICHMI) are essential enabling technologies that strongly influence nuclear power plant performance and operational costs. The nuclear power industry is currently engaged in a transition from traditional analog-based instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface systems to implementations employing digital technologies. This transition has primarily occurred in an ad hoc fashion through individual system upgrades at existing plants and has been constrained by licenseability concerns. Although the recent progress in constructing new plants has spurred design of more fully digital plant-wide ICHMI systems, the experience base in the nuclear power application domain is limited. Additionally, development of advanced reactor concepts, such as Generation IV designs and small modular reactors, introduces different plant conditions (e.g., higher temperatures, different coolants, etc.) and unique plant configurations (e.g., multiunit plants with shared systems, balance of plant architectures with reconfigurable co-generation options) that increase the need for enhanced ICHMI capabilities to fully achieve industry goals related to economic competitiveness, safety and reliability, sustainability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection. As a result, significant challenges remain to be addressed to enable the nuclear power industry to complete the transition to safe and comprehensive use of modern ICHMI technology. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized that ICHMI research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) is needed to resolve the technical challenges that may compromise the effective and efficient utilization of modern ICHMI technology and consequently inhibit realization of the benefits offered by expanded utilization of nuclear power. Consequently, several DOE programs have substantial ICHMI RD&D elements within their respective research portfolios. This paper describes current ICHMI research in support of advanced small modular reactors. The objectives that can be achieved through execution of the defined RD&D are to provide optimal technical solutions to critical ICHMI issues, resolve technology gaps arising from the unique measurement and control characteristics of advanced reactor concepts, provide demonstration of needed technologies and methodologies in the nuclear power application domain, mature emerging technologies to facilitate commercialization, and establish necessary technical evidence and application experience to enable timely and predictable licensing. 1 Introduction Instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interfaces are essential enabling technologies that strongly influence nuclear power plant performance and operational costs. The nuclear power industry is currently engaged in a transition from traditional analog-based instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) systems to implementations employing digital technologies. This transition has primarily occurred in an ad hoc fashion through individual system upgrades at existing plants and has been constrained by licenseability concerns. Although the recent progress in constructing new plants has spurred design of more fully digital plant-wide ICHMI systems, the experience base in the nuclear power application domain is limited. Additionally, development of advanced reactor concepts, such as Generation IV designs and small modular reactors, introduces different plant conditions (e.g., higher temperatures, different coolants, etc.) and unique plant configurations (e.g., multiunit plants with shared systems, balance of plant architectures with reconfigurable co-generation options) that increase the need for enhanced ICHMI capabilities to fully achieve industry goals related to economic competitiveness, safety and reliability, sustainability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection. As a result, significant challenges remain to be addressed to enable the nuclear power industry to complete the transition to safe and comprehensive use of m

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Injection Molding of Plastics from Agricultural Materials  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to conduct a systematic study to relate injection molding parameters to properties of blends of starch and synthetic polymer. From this study, we wished to develop a thorough understanding of the injection molding process and gain significant insight into designing molds and aiding in developing products cheaply and efficiently.

Bhattacharya, M.; Ruan, R.

2001-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

398

Status of Environmental Controls for Geothermal Energy Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the initial findings and recommendations of the Environmental Controls Panel to the Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council (IGCC). The Panel has been charged to assess the adequacy of existing environmental controls for geothermal energy systems, to review ongoing programs to develop environmental controls, and to identify controls-related research areas where redirection of federal efforts are appropriate to assure the availability of controls on a timely basis. In its deliberations, the Panel placed greatest emphasis on the use of geothermal resources for electricity generation, the application of geothermal energy receiving greatest attention today. The Panel discussed major known environmental concerns and their potential impact on the commercialization of geothermal resources, control options, regulatory considerations, and ongoing and planned research programs. The environmental concerns reviewed in this report include: air emissions, liquid discharges, solid wastes, noise, subsidence, seismicity, and hydrological alterations. For each of these concerns a brief description of the concern, associated legislation and regulations, control approaches, federal funding trend, and the Panel's recommendations and priorities are presented. In short, the Panel recommends that controls-related research efforts be rebalanced and enhanced, with the greatest emphasis placed on controls for hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and non-H{sub 2}S gaseous emissions, injection monitoring methods, systems to treat and use nongeothermal waters for environmental control purposes, solid waste characterization and management methods evaluation, and subsidence controls.

Caskey, John F.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Oakland, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Dry sorbent injection may serve as a key pollution control ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... Home; Browse by Tag; Most Popular Tags. ... are the technologies that will allow plants to meet the MATS for HCl and other acid ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NETL: Control Technology: Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Technology Laboratory, under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corp., the Tennessee Valley...

402

T-528: Mozilla Firefox/Thunderbird/SeaMonkey Multiple HTML Injection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Mozilla Firefox/Thunderbird/SeaMonkey Multiple HTML 8: Mozilla Firefox/Thunderbird/SeaMonkey Multiple HTML Injection Vulnerabilities T-528: Mozilla Firefox/Thunderbird/SeaMonkey Multiple HTML Injection Vulnerabilities January 5, 2011 - 2:28pm Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox/Thunderbird/SeaMonkey Multiple HTML Injection Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Mozilla Firefox 3.5.11 - 3.6.10, Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0 - 2.0.9 Vulnerable Platforms Details ABSTRACT: Mozilla Firefox/Thunderbird/SeaMonkey Multiple HTML Injection Vulnerabilities. Mozilla Firefox, SeaMonkey, and Thunderbird are prone to multiple HTML-injection vulnerabilities. Successful exploits will allow attacker-supplied HTML and script code to run in the context of the affected browser, potentially allowing the attacker to steal cookie-based authentication credentials or to control how the site is rendered to the

403

WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 24, NO. 8, PAGES 1345-1359, AUGUST 1988 Gradient Dynamic Programming for StochasticOptimal Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water quality maintenance in rivers [e.g., Dracupand Fogarty, 1974; Changand Yeh, 1973], to mention only programming ap- plicationsin water resourcescan be found in the works by Yakowitz [1982] and Yeh [1985WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 24, NO. 8, PAGES 1345-1359, AUGUST 1988 Gradient Dynamic Programming

Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

404

Selection and development of air-injected frit slurry blasting for decontamination of DWPF canisters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canisters of waste glass produced in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Plant will be decontaminated by air-injected frit slurry blasting. The byproduct of this operation, contaminated frit slurry, will be used as part of the feed stock for the glass-making process. Therefore, no secondary waste will be created. Scouting tests of four different frit blasting techniques were conducted by the Savannah River Laboratory. The techniques investigated were dry blasting, direct pump slurry blasting, air-aspirated slurry blasting, and air-injected slurry blasting. The air-injected slurry blasting technique was chosen for development, based on results of these scouting tests. A detailed development program was undertaken to optimize the air-injected frit slurry blasting process. 3 references, 28 figures.

Ward, C.R.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone October 21, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), one of seven partnerships in the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has successfully injected 1,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the Mount Simon Sandstone, a deep saline formation that is widespread across much of the Midwest. Preliminary results indicate that the formation has good CO2 storage potential and could possibly serve as a repository for CO2 emissions captured from stationary sources in the region. Carbon capture and storage

406

DOE Regional Partnership Initiates CO2 Injection in Lignite Coal Seam |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initiates CO2 Injection in Lignite Coal Initiates CO2 Injection in Lignite Coal Seam DOE Regional Partnership Initiates CO2 Injection in Lignite Coal Seam March 10, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- A U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) team of regional partners has begun injecting CO2 into a deep lignite coal seam in Burke County, North Dakota, to demonstrate the economic and environmental viability of geologic CO2 storage in the U.S. Great Plains region. Ultimately, geologic carbon sequestration is expected to play an important role in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and combating climate change. The Lignite Field Validation Test is being conducted by the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, one of seven regional partnerships under DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program. The seven

407

Development of an engine fuel and spark controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to develop an engine control unit (ECU) for a four cylinder engine to be used in a Formula SAE racers. The ECU must provide effective fuel injection and spark ignition control and provide for easy adjustment by the user for engine tuning purposes. The controller was designed to operate using a speed-throttle fuel map, with acceleration enrich, meet and other fuel compensating factors. A paired double-tiring strategy was adapted to avoid the complications associated with sequential fuel injection. The ECU utilized a Motorola 68HC16 development board, as well as special injector and ignition driver circuits. The software was designed to be primarily interrupt driven, with a task manager to arbitrate among other tasks. A user interface program, which runs on a PC, allows the user to instantly alter operating parameters in the ECU during engine tuning and development. The controller was tested on a Yamaha YZF 600 motorcycle engine with a custom intake manifold and fuel injection system. The fuel and spark maps and other parameters were configured for this engine by using the user interface. Dynamometer testing verities that engine performance with this ECU meets design specifications.

Suter, William Gregory

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Applications of high-speed dust injection to magnetic fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is now an established fact that a significant amount of dust is produced in magnetic fusion devices due to plasma-wall interactions. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular for the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and degrade performance. Safety concerns are due to tritium retention, dust radioactivity, toxicity, and flammability. Performance concerns include high-Z impurities carried by dust to the fusion core that can reduce plasma temperature and may even induce sudden termination of the plasma. We have recognized that dust transport, dust-plasma interactions in magnetic fusion devices can be effectively studied experimentally by injection of dust with known properties into fusion plasmas. Other applications of injected dust include diagnosis of fusion plasmas and edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. In diagnostic applications, dust can be regarded as a source of transient neutrals before complete ionization. ELM's pacing is a promising scheme to prevent disruptions and type I ELM's that can cause catastrophic damage to fusion machines. Different implementation schemes are available depending on applications of dust injection. One of the simplest dust injection schemes is through gravitational acceleration of dust in vacuum. Experiments at Los Alamos and Princeton will be described, both of which use piezoelectric shakers to deliver dust to plasma. In Princeton experiments, spherical particles (40 micron) have been dropped in a systematic and reproducible manner using a computer-controlled piezoelectric bending actuator operating at an acoustic (0,2) resonance. The circular actuator was constructed with a 2.5 mm diameter central hole. At resonance ({approx} 2 kHz) an applied sinusoidal voltage has been used to control the flux of particles exiting the hole. A simple screw throttle located {approx}1mm above the hole has been used to set the magnitude of the flux achieved for a given voltage. Particle fluxes ranging from a few tens of particle per second up to thousands of particles per second have been achieved using this simple device. To achieve higher dust injection speed, another key consideration is how to accelerate dust at controlled amount. In addition to gravity, other possible acceleration mechanisms include electrostatic, electromagnetic, gas-dragged, plasma-dragged, and laser-ablation-based acceleration. Features and limitations of the different acceleration methods will be discussed. We will also describe laboratory experiments on dust acceleration.

Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Yangfang [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Germany

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

409

Optimally Controlled Flexible Fuel Powertrain System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to develop a true Flex Fuel Vehicle capable of running on any blend of ethanol from 0 to 85% with reduced penalty in usable vehicle range. A research and development program, targeting 10% improvement in fuel economy using a direct injection (DI) turbocharged spark ignition engine was conducted. In this project a gasoline-optimized high-technology engine was considered and the hardware and configuration modifications were defined for the engine, fueling system, and air path. Combined with a novel engine control strategy, control software, and calibration this resulted in a highly efficient and clean FFV concept. It was also intended to develop robust detection schemes of the ethanol content in the fuel integrated with adaptive control algorithms for optimized turbocharged direct injection engine combustion. The approach relies heavily on software-based adaptation and optimization striving for minimal modifications to the gasoline-optimized engine hardware system. Our ultimate objective was to develop a compact control methodology that takes advantage of any ethanol-based fuel mixture and not compromise the engine performance under gasoline operation.

Hakan Yilmaz; Mark Christie; Anna Stefanopoulou

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Simulating Injectate/Rock Chemical Interaction In Fractured Desert Peak Quartz Monzonite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Simulations of the interactions of injected fluids with minerals within an engineered fracture in a sample of Desert Peak quartz monzonite were compared with experimental observations of fluid chemistry and fracture permeability. The observed decrease in permeability and effective hydraulic aperture was much more rapid ({approx}1.0 {micro}m/day) for a core injected with a mixed salt solution containing dissolved silica (near-saturation injectate), compared to cores injected with NaCl (far-from-saturation injectate) ({approx}0.1 {micro}m/day). Simulations were in qualitative agreement with these observations. Near-saturation injectate is predicted to result in net precipitation of secondary phases in the fracture ({approx}0.12 {micro}m/day), compared to a net dissolution of the rock for the far-from-saturation injectate ({approx}0.3 {micro}m/day). Permeability loss for the near-saturation-injectate is ascribed to precipitation in the fracture as well as potential dissolution of primary mineral asperities. Permeability loss for the far-from-saturation fluid is ascribed to dissolution of asperities and smoothing of the fracture. Post-test analysis of the fracture surface will be necessary to verify the processes occurring. The simplified geochemical models used do not account for mineral heterogeneity or for distributions of fluid residence times which could be important controls on permeability evolution. Further analysis is planned to explicitly account for these phenomena.

Viani, B; Roberts, J; Detwiler, R; Roberts, S; Carlson, S

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

411

An Innovative Injection and Mixing System for Diesel Fuel Reforming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project focused on fuel stream preparation improvements prior to injection into a solid oxide fuel cell reformer. Each milestone and the results from each milestone are discussed in detail in this report. The first two milestones were the creation of a coking formation test rig and various testing performed on this rig. Initial tests indicated that three anti-carbon coatings showed improvement over an uncoated (bare metal) baseline. However, in follow-up 70 hour tests of the down selected coatings, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis revealed that no carbon was generated on the test specimens. These follow-up tests were intended to enable a down selection to a single best anti-carbon coating. Without the formation of carbon it was impossible to draw conclusions as to which anti-carbon coating showed the best performance. The final 70 hour tests did show that AMCX AMC26 demonstrated the lowest discoloration of the metal out of the three down selected anti-carbon coatings. This discoloration did not relate to carbon but could be a useful result when carbon growth rate is not the only concern. Unplanned variations in the series of tests must be considered and may have altered the results. Reliable conclusions could only be drawn from consistent, repeatable testing beyond the allotted time and funding for this project. Milestones 3 and 4 focused on the creation of a preheating pressure atomizer and mixing chamber. A design of experiment test helped identify a configuration of the preheating injector, Build 1, which showed a very uniform fuel spray flow field. This injector was improved upon by the creation of a Build 2 injector. Build 2 of the preheating injector demonstrated promising SMD results with only 22psi fuel pressure and 0.7 in H2O of Air. It was apparent from testing and CFD that this Build 2 has flow field recirculation zones. These recirculation zones may suggest that this Build 2 atomizer and mixer would require steam injection to reduce the auto ignition potential. It is also important to note that to achieve uniform mixing within a short distance, some recirculation is necessary. Milestone 5 generated CFD and FEA results that could be used to optimize the preheating injector. CFD results confirmed the recirculation zones seen in test data and confirmed that the flow field would not change when attached to a reformer. The FEA predicted fuel wetted wall temperatures which led to several suggested improvements that could possibly improve nozzle efficiency. Milestone 6 (originally an optional task) took a different approach than the preheating pressure atomizer. It focused on creation and optimization of a piezoelectric injector which could perform at extremely low fuel pressures. The piezoelectric atomizer showed acceptable SMD results with fuel pressure less than 1.0 psig and air pressure less than 1.0 in H2O. These SMD values were enhanced when a few components were changed, and it is expected would improve further still at elevated air temperatures. It was demonstrated that the piezoelectric injector could accomplish the desired task. The addition of phase tracking and a burst mode to the frequency controller increased the usability of the piezoelectric injector. This injector is ready to move on to the next phase of development. Engine Components has met the required program milestones of this project. Some of the Milestones were adjusted to allow Milestone 6 to be completed in parallel with the other Milestones. Because of this, Task 3.10 and 3.13 were made optional instead of Milestone 6. Engine Components was extremely grateful for the support that was provided by NETL in support of this work.

Spencer Pack

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Pulser injection with subsequent removal for gamma-ray spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved system for gamma-ray spectroscopy characterized by an interface module that controls the injection of electronic pulses as well as separation logic that enables storage of pulser events in a region of the spectrum of a multichannel analyzer distinct from the region reserved for storage of gamma-ray events. The module accomplishes this by tagging pulser events (high or low) injected into the amplification circuitry, adding an offset to the events so identified at the time the events are at the output of the analog to digital converter, and storing such events in the upper portion of the spectrum stored in the multichannel analyzer. The module can be adapted for use with existing gamma-ray spectroscopy equipment to provide for automatic analyses of radioisotopes. 7 figs.

Hartwell, J.K.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.; Killian, E.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slurry Injection Slurry Injection Fact Sheet - Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes Underground Injection of Drilling Wastes Several different approaches are used for injecting drilling wastes into underground formations for permanent disposal. Salt caverns are described in a separate fact sheet. This fact sheet focuses on slurry injection technology, which involves grinding or processing solids into small particles, mixing them with water or some other liquid to make a slurry, and injecting the slurry into an underground formation at pressures high enough to fracture the rock. The process referred to here as slurry injection has been given other designations by different authors, including slurry fracture injection (this descriptive term is copyrighted by a company that provides slurry injection services), fracture slurry injection, drilled cuttings injection, cuttings reinjection, and grind and inject.

414

Duct injection technology prototype development: Scale-up methodology and engineering design criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Duct Injection Technology Prototype Development project is to develop a sound design basis for applying duct injection technology as a post-combustion SO{sub 2} emissions control method to existing, pre-NSPS, coal-fired power plants. This report is divided into five major topics: (1) design criteria; (2) engineering drawings; (3) equipment sizing and design; (4) plant and equipment arrangement considerations; and (5) equipment bid specification guidelines.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project has been to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corporation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Carmeuse North America. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increased interest for coal-fired power generating units for a number of reasons. In particular, sulfuric acid can cause plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOX control, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different magnesium-based or dolomitic alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry byproduct from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercially available magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners. The other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm sorbent effectiveness over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP Unit 3, and the second was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant test provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. A final task in the project was to compare projected costs for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries to estimated costs for other potential sulfuric acid control technologies. Estimates were developed for reagent and utility costs, and capital costs, for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries and seven other sulfuric acid control technologies. The estimates were based on retrofit application to a model coal-fired plant.

Gary M. Blythe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Program Accomplishments  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Progress and accomplishments in hydrogen and fuel cells. A Fuel Cell Technologies Program fact sheet that outlines current progress in key program goals.

417

Banquet Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Annual Banquet Program 5:30 pm Social Hour (Cash Bar) 6:30 pm Dinner 7:15 pm Program Remarks & Introduction of Current Officers John ...

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program . If you need assistance with the DOE application, please e-mail SC.WDTS@science.doe.gov. For the Argonne Student Research Participation Program, apply only...

419

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program. If you need assistance with the DOE application, please e-mail SC.WDTS@science.doe.gov. For the Argonne Student Research Participation Program, apply only...

420

Studies of injection into naturally fractured reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A semi-analytical model for studies of cold water injection into naturally fractured reservoirs has been developed. The model can be used to design the flow rates and location of injection wells in such systems. The results obtained using the model show that initially the cold water will move very rapidly through the fracture system away from the well. Later on, conductive heat transfer from the rock matrix blocks will retard the advancement of the cold water front, and eventually uniform energy sweep conditions will prevail. Where uniform energy sweep conditions are reached the cold waer movement away from the injection well will be identical to that in a porous medium; consequently maximum energy recovery from the rock matrix will be attained. The time of uniform energy sweep and the radial distance from the injection well where it occurs are greatly dependent upon the fracture spacing, but independent of the fracture aperture.

Boedvarsson, G.S.; Lai, C.H.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "injection control program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Efficient Spin Injection using Tunnel Injectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semiconductor spintronics aims to develop novel sensor, memory and logic devices by manipulating the spin states of carriers in semiconducting materials. This talk will focus on electrical spin injection into semiconductors, which is a prerequisite for ...

Xin Jiang

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

SRS - Programs - Nonproliferation Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 SEARCH GO spacer SRS Home Nonproliferation Programs In the crucial field of nuclear nonproliferation, SRS employee contributions helped to advance all three of the planned plutonium disposition facilities at the Savannah River Site: the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF); Waste Solidification Building (WSB); and the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. A $345 million project, the WSB will process liquid waste from the MOX facility. After material is processed at the WSB, transuranic waste will be packaged and sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico, and low-level waste will be packaged and sent to onsite or commercial off-site low-level waste disposal facilities. The mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility will be a major component in the United States' program to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium.

423

Robust State Estimation Under False Data Injection in Distributed Sensor Networks Shanshan Zheng, Tao Jiang, John S. Baras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robust State Estimation Under False Data Injection in Distributed Sensor Networks Shanshan Zheng algorithms against false data injection. They are built upon an existing distributed Kalman filtering infrastructure assets, such as power grids, automated railroad control, water and gas distribution, etc

Baras, John S.

424

Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program. Tenth quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. A fuel control system is being developed to allow program evaluation of a very promising low emissions, single stage, fixed geometry proprietary burner. Ceramic regenerators are under test in the free-rotor vehicle, and some have completed 30 hours of performance evaluation. Three-dimensional ceramic regenerator transient thermal and structural analysis programs are operational. Initial friction and wear test fixture results show that zirconium oxide fully stabilized by yttrium oxide is an effective substitute for nickel oxide in a plasma sprayed seal. A preprototype control system was adapted for variable inlet guide vane control in a vehicle installation. An evaluation of the free-rotor accessory drive concept in a vehicle showed no serious mechanical integrity problems. Simplifications are being made to the water injection system; significant metallurgical analysis of observed erosion/corrosion problems was accomplished. Variable inlet guide vane aerodynamic loss characteristics were determined. Generally satisfactory results with linerless insulation are resulting in extended use and application. Pattern work for the upgraded engine housing and the power turbine wheel castings are in process. A computer design analysis of the regenerator drive gears was made, and an analysis was completed of a three peripheral roller regenerator support and drive proposal for the upgraded engine.

Schmidt, F.W.; Wagner, C.E.

1975-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Fluidized bed injection assembly for coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coaxial feed system for fluidized bed coal gasification processes including an inner tube for injecting particulate combustibles into a transport gas, an inner annulus about the inner tube for injecting an oxidizing gas, and an outer annulus about the inner annulus for transporting a fluidizing and cooling gas. The combustibles and oxidizing gas are discharged vertically upward directly into the combustion jet, and the fluidizing and cooling gas is discharged in a downward radial direction into the bed below the combustion jet.

Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA); Salvador, Louis A. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Direct liquid injection of liquid petroleum gas  

SciTech Connect

A fuel injector and injection system for injecting liquified petroleum gas (LPG) into at least one air/fuel mixing chamber from a storage means that stores pressurized LPG in its liquid state. The fuel injector (including a body), adapted to receive pressurized LPG from the storage means and for selectively delivering the LPG to the air/fuel mixing chamber in its liquified state. The system including means for correcting the injector activation signal for pressure and density variations in the fuel.

Lewis, D.J.; Phipps, J.R.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

427

Program 050  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental and Water Environmental and Water Resources MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH PROGRAM Background Mercury exists in trace amounts in fossil fuels (e.g., natural gas, coal), vegetation, crustal material, and waste products. Through combustion or natural processes, mercury vapor can be released to the atmosphere, where it can drift for a year or more, spreading with air currents over vast regions of the globe. Current estimates approximate that 5000 tons of mercury is released annually into the atmosphere from anthropogenic (man-made) and natural sources combined. Anthropogenic sources in the United States account for about 3 percent of the total annual global mercury releases, with U.S. power plants contributing about 1 percent of the world total. Mercury emissions have fallen in

428

MS&T '05 Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Program Organizers: B. Lynn Ferguson, Deformation Control. Technology, Inc. .... Session Chairs: Julie Schoenung, University of California, Davis;. Jean-Daniel...

429

US Fedeal Cyber Security Research Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Automation Protocol (SCAP) ? Access Control Policy Machine [NIST] ? Military Networking Protocol (MNP) program [DARPA] ? High-Level ...

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

430

Engineering and management aspects of the ORMAK program  

SciTech Connect

A review of the ORMAK program is given. The review briefly covers the engineering development of the ORMAK program in terms of injection research, high- field ORMAK, ORMAK F/Bx, magnet development, and liner surface development. Management requirements of the ORMAK program are also discussed. (MOW)

Roberts, M.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was purchased used and all of the equipment has nearly reached the end of its useful service.

Ronald Landreth