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1

Activated Carbon Injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

None

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

2

Activated Carbon Injection  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

None

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

3

Activated carbon injection - a mercury control success story  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Almost 100 full-scale activated carbon injection (ACI) systems have been ordered by US electric utilities. These systems have the potential to remove over 90% of the mercury in flue, at a cost below $10,000 per pound of mercury removal. Field trials of ACI systems arm outlined. 1 fig.

NONE

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the time that enhanced AC was injected, the average mercury removal for the month long test was approximately 74% across the test baghouse module. ACI was interrupted frequently during the month long test because the test baghouse module was bypassed frequently to relieve differential pressure. The high air-to-cloth ratio of operations at this unit results in significant differential pressure, and thus there was little operating margin before encountering differential pressure limits, especially at high loads. This limited the use of sorbent injection as the added material contributes to the overall differential pressure. This finding limits sustainable injection of AC without appropriate modifications to the plant or its operations. Handling and storage issues were observed for the TOXECON ash-AC mixture. Malfunctioning equipment led to baghouse dust hopper plugging, and storage of the stagnant material at flue gas temperatures resulted in self-heating and ignition of the AC in the ash. In the hoppers that worked properly, no such problems were reported. Economics of mercury control at Big Brown were estimated for as-tested scenarios and scenarios incorporating changes to allow sustainable operation. This project was funded under the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory project entitled 'Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program--Phase II'.

John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

5

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon injection Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Edinburgh Collection: Fossil Fuels 7 First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington, DC, May 14-17, 2001 Summary: carbon sequestration...

6

Modeling Carbon Nanotubes in Injection Molding | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling Carbon Nanotubes in Injection Molding Feb 03 2015 11:00 AM - 11:30 AM Lukas Bystricky, Florida State University Computer Science and Mathematics Division Computational and...

7

Activated carbon aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activated carbon aerogels were obtained from the CO{sub 2} activation of the carbon aerogels. The adsorption isotherms of nitrogen on activated carbon aerogels at 77 K were measured and analyzed by the high-resolution {alpha}{sub s} plot to evaluate their porosities. The {alpha}{sub s} plot showed an upward deviation from linearity below {alpha}{sub s} = 0.5, suggesting that the presence of micropores becomes more predominant with the extent of the activation. Activation increased noticeably the pore volume and the surface area (the maximum value: 2600 m{sup 2}.g{sup -1}) without change of the basic network structure of primary particles. Activated carbon aerogels had a bimodal pore size distribution of uniform micropores and mesopores. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Hanzawa, Y.; Kaneko, K. [Chiba Univ. (Japan)] [Chiba Univ. (Japan); Pekala, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Dresselhaus, M.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1996-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

8

Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public Service Company of Colorado and ADA Technologies, Inc. have performed a study of the injection of activated carbon for the removal of vapor-phase mercury from coal-fired flue gas streams. The project was completed under contract to the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, with contributions from EPRI and Public Service Company. The prime contractor for the project was Public Service Company, with ADA Technologies as the major subcontractor providing technical support to all aspects of the project. The research and development effort was conducted in two phases. In Phase I a pilot facility was fabricated and tests were performed using dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control on a coal-fired flue gas slipstream extracted from an operating power plant. Phase II was designed to move carbon injection technology towards commercial application on coal-fired power plants by addressing key reliability and operability concerns. Phase II field work included further development work with the Phase I pilot and mercury measurements on several of PSCo's coal-fired generating units. In addition, tests were run on collected sorbent plus fly ash to evaluate the impact of the activated carbon sorbent on the disposal of fly ash. An economic analysis was performed where pilot plant test data was used to develop a model to predict estimated costs of mercury removal from plants burning western coals. Testing in the pilot plant was undertaken to quantify the effects of plant configuration, flue gas temperature, and activated carbon injection rate on mercury removal. All three variables were found to significantly impact the mercury removal efficiency in the pilot. The trends were clear: mercury removal rates increased with decreasing flue gas temperature and with increasing carbon injection rates. Mercury removal was much more efficient with reverse-gas and pulse-jet baghouse configurations than with an ESP as the particulate control device. The native fly ash of the host unit provided significant mercury removal capacity, so that the activated carbon sorbent served as an incremental mercury removal mechanism. Tests run to characterize the waste product, a combination of fly ash and activated carbon on which mercury was present, showed that mercury and other RCRA metals of interest were all below Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) regulatory limits in the leachate. The presence of activated carbon in the fly ash was shown to have an effect on the use of fly ash as an additive in the manufacture of concrete, which could limit the salability of fly ash from a plant where activated carbon was used for mercury control.

Jim Butz; Terry Hunt

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Calculating the probability of injected carbon dioxide plumes encountering faults  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main concerns of storage in saline aquifers is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available for these aquifers. This necessitates a method using available fault data to estimate the probability of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault. The probability of encounter can be calculated from areal fault density statistics from available data, and carbon dioxide plume dimensions from numerical simulation. Given a number of assumptions, the dimension of the plume perpendicular to a fault times the areal density of faults with offsets greater than some threshold of interest provides probability of the plume encountering such a fault. Application of this result to a previously planned large-scale pilot injection in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin yielded a 3% and 7% chance of the plume encountering a fully and half seal offsetting fault, respectively. Subsequently available data indicated a half seal-offsetting fault at a distance from the injection well that implied a 20% probability of encounter for a plume sufficiently large to reach it.

Jordan, P.D.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Effects of carbon dioxide injection on the displacement of methane and carbonate dissolution in sandstone cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs appears to be a feasible way to dispose of industrial quantities of carbon dioxide generated by fossil fired power plants. Depleted gas reservoirs amongst others (oil reservoirs, saline aquifers) is a very... from the Sleipner Vest field is separated from the produced natural gas and is injected each year into the underlying Utsira aquifer. 1, 7, 8 A combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) scheme and CO2 sequestration project has been undertaken in which CO2...

Maduakor, Ekene Obioma

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Activated Boron Nitride Derived from Activated Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combination of chemical, thermal, and electrical properties. The utility of activated carbon suggests is characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and surface area analysis. The activated BN microstructure is similar

Zettl, Alex

12

NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TEMPERATURE EFFECTS DURING THE INJECTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE INTO BRINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TEMPERATURE EFFECTS DURING THE INJECTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE INTO BRINE for the simulation of carbon dioxide injection into geological formations is currently an intensive field of research for the balance of thermal energy, we can investigate numerically the effects of temperature variations during

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

13

CARBON SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION Howard J. Herzog, Ken Caldeira, and Eric Adams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARBON SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION Howard J. Herzog, Ken Caldeira, and Eric Adams and sequestration. Carbon sequestration is often associated with the planting of trees. As they mature, the trees INTRODUCTION The build-up of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere has

14

Activated carbon to the rescue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the response to pipeline spill of ethylene dichloride (EDC) on the property of an oil company. Activated carbon cleanup proceedure was used. During delivery, changeout, transport, storage, thermal reactivation, and return delivery to the site, the carbon never came into direct contact with operating personnel or the atmosphere. More than 10,000 tones of dredge soil and 50 million gallons of surface water were processed during the emergency response.

Sen, S. [Calgon Carbon Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Evaluation of the environmental viability of direct injection schemes for ocean carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis evaluates the expected impact of several promising schemes for ocean carbon sequestration by direct injection of CO2, and serves as an update to the assessment by Auerbach et al. (1997) and Caulfield et al. ...

Israelsson, Peter H. (Peter Hampus), 1973-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mathematical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Injection in the Subsurface for Improved Hydrocarbon Recovery and Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Injection in the Subsurface for Improved Hydrocarbon Recovery and Sequestration Philip C. Myint, Laurence Rongy, Kjetil B. Haugen, Abbas Firoozabadi Department. Combustion of fossil fuels contributes to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels that have been

Firoozabadi, Abbas

17

INVESTIGATION AND DEMONSTRATION OF DRY CARBON-BASED SORBENT INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report describes the activities that have taken place during the first full quarter of the Phase II project ''Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control''. Modifications were completed and sampling began at the 600 acfm pilot-scale particulate control module (PCM) located at the Comanche Station in Pueblo, CO. The PCM was configured as an electrostatic precipitator for these tests. A Perkin-Elmer flue gas mercury analyzer was installed on-site and operated. Initial test results using both manual sampling methodology and the mercury analyzer are presented herein. Preparations were made during this period for full-scale mercury testing of several PSCo units. A site visit was made to Arapahoe and Cherokee Generating Stations to determine sample locations and to develop a test plan.

Terry Hunt; Mark Fox; Lillian Stan; Sheila Haythornthwaite; Justin Smith; Jason Ruhl

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Activated, coal-based carbon foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

19

JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest iodine number was superior to commercial DARCO FGD for mercury capture. The results of the activated carbon market assessment indicate an existing market for water treatment and an emerging application for mercury control. That market will involve both existing and new coal-fired plants. It is expected that 20% of the existing coal-fired plants will implement activated carbon injection by 2015, representing about 200,000 tons of annual demand. The potential annual demand by new plants is even greater. In the mercury control market, two characteristics are going to dominate the customer's buying habit-performance and price. As continued demonstration testing of activated carbon injection at the various coal-fired power plants progresses, the importance of fuel type and plant configuration on the type of activated carbon best suited is being identified.

Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

Oldenburg, Curtis M. (LBNL Earth Sciences Division) [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

Oldenburg, Curtis M [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

22

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

July 21, 2009 Berkeley Lab summer lecture: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

Oldenburg

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC Why it Matters: Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas is considered to be...

24

activated carbon fibers: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbon fiberscarbon aerogels composites by gelation and supercritical drying Materials Science Websites Summary: Fabrication of activated carbon fiberscarbon aerogels...

25

activated carbon fiber: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbon fiberscarbon aerogels composites by gelation and supercritical drying Materials Science Websites Summary: Fabrication of activated carbon fiberscarbon aerogels...

26

The transport properties of activated carbon fibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

di Vittorio, S.L. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. (Shinshu Univ., Nagano (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing...

28

active carbon adsorption: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Blackhawk Road, APG, MD USA 21010 ABSTRACT The impregnated active carbon in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS Giurgiutiu, Victor...

29

activated carbon products: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Blackhawk Road, APG, MD USA 21010 ABSTRACT The impregnated active carbon in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS Giurgiutiu, Victor...

30

activities carbonic anhydrase: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Blackhawk Road, APG, MD USA 21010 ABSTRACT The impregnated active carbon in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS Giurgiutiu, Victor...

31

activated carbon adsorption: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Blackhawk Road, APG, MD USA 21010 ABSTRACT The impregnated active carbon in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS Giurgiutiu, Victor...

32

activated carbon production: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Blackhawk Road, APG, MD USA 21010 ABSTRACT The impregnated active carbon in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS Giurgiutiu, Victor...

33

A parametric study of factors affecting oil recovery efficiency from carbon dioxide injection using a compositional reservoir model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors Affecting Oil Recovery Estimating Oil Recovery From Carbon Dioxide Flooding 15 33 CHAPTER III ? FIELD CASE ANALYSIS 38 3. 1 3. 2 3. 3 3. 4 Background Laboratory Analysis Reservoir Analysis Estimates of Injection Recovery and Project... to estimate the recovery of oil from continuous injection of carbon dioxide. Finally, the results of the sensitivity analysis were compared to published laboratory and theoretical models and documented field results to test the correlation model. CHAPTER...

Barnes, Gregory Allen.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Sensitivity of injection costs to input petrophysical parameters in numerical geologic carbon sequestration models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are widely used in feasibility studies for geologic carbon sequestration. Accurate estimates of petrophysical parameters are needed as inputs for these simulations. However, relatively few experimental values are available for CO2-brine systems. Hence, a sensitivity analysis was performed using the STOMP numerical code for supercritical CO2 injected into a model confined deep saline aquifer. The intrinsic permeability, porosity, pore compressibility, and capillary pressure-saturation/relative permeability parameters (residual liquid saturation, residual gas saturation, and van Genuchten alpha and m values) were varied independently. Their influence on CO2 injection rates and costs were determined and the parameters were ranked based on normalized coefficients of variation. The simulations resulted in differences of up to tens of millions of dollars over the life of the project (i.e., the time taken to inject 10.8 million metric tons of CO2). The two most influential parameters were the intrinsic permeability and the van Genuchten m value. Two other parameters, the residual gas saturation and the residual liquid saturation, ranked above the porosity. These results highlight the need for accurate estimates of capillary pressure-saturation/relative permeability parameters for geologic carbon sequestration simulations in addition to measurements of porosity and intrinsic permeability.

Cheng, C. L.; Gragg, M. J.; Perfect, E.; White, Mark D.; Lemiszki, P. J.; McKay, L. D.

2013-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

35

Injection repair of carbon fiber/bismaleimide composite panels with bisphenol E cyanate ester resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resin injection of bisphenol E cyanate ester, a low viscosity resin that cures into a high temperature thermoset polymer, is investigated as a reliable repair method to restore strength and stiffness in delaminated carbon fiber/bismaleimide composites used in aircraft panels. The influence of temperature on the viscosity of the uncured resin was measured to optimize the injection conditions for high resin infiltration into the delaminations. The repair efficiency of the resin was evaluated by varying the panel thickness and the method by which the delamination damage was created in the composite specimens. Ultrasonic scanning (C-scan), flash thermography images, and cross-section analysis of repaired panels revealed excellent resin infiltration into the damaged region. Evaluation of mechanical repair efficiency using both bending stiffness and in-plain compressive strength of the composite panels as the repair metrics showed values exceeding 100%.

Thunga, Mahendra [Ames Laboratory; Bauer, Amy [Iowa State University; Obusek, Kristine [Fleet Readiness Center East; Meilunas, Ray [Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division; Akinc, Mufit [Ames Laboratory; Kessler, Michael R [Ames Laboratory

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Active carbon filter health condition detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active carbon filter health condition detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors Jingjing Chemical Biological Center, 5183 Blackhawk Road, APG, MD USA 21010 ABSTRACT The impregnated active carbon in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS

Giurgiutiu, Victor

37

Coupled Flow and Deformation Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Migration in the Presence of a Caprock Fracture during Injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the transport of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) during long-term CO{sub 2} injection into a typical geologic reservoir, such as a saline aquifer, could be complicated because of changes in geochemical, hydrogeological, and hydromechanical behavior. While the caprock layer overlying the target aquifer is intended to provide a tight, impermeable seal in securing injected CO{sub 2}, the presence of geologic uncertainties, such as a caprock fracture or fault, may provide a channel for CO{sub 2} leakage. There could also be a possibility of the activation of a new or existing dormant fault or fracture, which could act as a leakage pathway. Such a leakage event during CO{sub 2} injection may lead to a different pressure and ground response over a period of time. In the present study, multiphase fluid flow simulations in porous media coupled with geomechanics were used to investigate the overburden geologic response and plume behavior during CO{sub 2} injection in the presence of a hypothetical permeable fractured zone in a caprock, existing or activated. Both single-phase and multiphase fluid flow simulations were performed. The CO{sub 2} migration through an existing fractured zone leads to changes in the fluid pressure in the overburden geologic layers and could have a significant impact on ground deformation behavior. Results of the study show that pressure signatures and displacement patterns are significantly different in the presence of a fractured zone in the caprock layer. The variation in pressure and displacement signatures because of the presence of a fractured zone in the caprock at different locations may be useful in identifying the presence of a fault/fractured zone in the caprock. The pressure signatures can also serve as a mechanism to identify the activation of leakage pathways through the caprock during CO{sub 2} injection. Pressure response and ground deformation behavior from sequestration modeling could be useful in the development of smart technologies to monitor safe CO{sub 2} storage and understand CO{sub 2} transport, with limited field instrumentation.

Siriwardane, Hema J.; Gondle, Raj K.; Bromhal, Grant S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Uncertainty quantification for the impact of injection rate fluctuation on the geomechanical response of geological carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an analysis of the geomechanical effects of injection rate fluctuations for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Initially, we present analytical solutions for the effects of injection rate fluctuations on CO2 fluid pressure spatial distribution and temporal evolution for a typical injection scenario. Numerical calculations are performed using a finite element method to investigate the effects of injection rate fluctuations on geomechanical deformation, stresses, and potential failure of the aquifer and caprock layers. The numerical method was first validated by the fluid pressure distribution’s good agreement with the analytical solution. It was shown that for any Gaussian fluctuations of injection rate Q with given mean Q ? and variance ?_Q, the coefficients of variance for fluid pressure (?_p=?_p?p ? ), deformation (?_u=?_u?u ? ), and stresses (?_?=?_??? ? ) increase linearly with the coefficient of variance for injection rate (?_Q=?_Q?Q ? ). The proportional constants are identified, and the fluctuations have the most pronounced effect on the geomechanical stresses, and, therefore, on the potential failure of the aquifer and caprock layers. Instead of expensive computational simulation, this study provides an efficient tool to estimate the geomechanical response variance to injection rate fluctuation. A failure analysis was presented based on the numerical results, where probability of failure was estimated for fluctuating injection rates with different mean and variance during the entire injection period. It was found that with increasing injection rate fluctuation, the failure probability increases significantly. Therefore, the risk associated with injection rate fluctuations should be carefully evaluated.?

Bao, Jie; Chu, Yanjun; Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Fang, Yilin

2014-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

39

A novel activated carbon for supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel activated carbon was prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon has large surface area with microporous, and high heteroatom content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heteroatom-containing functional groups can improve the pseudo-capacitance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical properties lead to the good electrochemical properties. -- Abstract: A novel activated carbon has been prepared by simple carbonization and activation of phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin which is synthesized by the condensation polymerization method. The morphology, thermal stability, surface area, elemental composition and surface chemical composition of samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurement, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Electrochemical properties have been studied by cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in 6 mol L{sup -1} potassium hydroxide. The activated carbon shows good capacitive behavior and the specific capacitance is up to 210 F g{sup -1}, which indicates that it may be a promising candidate for supercapacitors.

Shen, Haijie [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Liu, Enhui, E-mail: liuenhui99@sina.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Xiang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Zhengzheng; Tian, Yingying; Wu, Yuhu; Wu, Zhilian; Xie, Hui [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Fabrication of activated carbon fibers/carbon aerogels composites by gelation and supercritical drying  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fabrication of activated carbon fibers/carbon aerogels composites by gelation and supercritical August 2003) Activated carbon fiber/carbon aerogel (ACF/CA) composites were fabricated by gelling. The ACFs can reinforce the related carbon aerogels when they originally have low mass density and are weak

Liu, Jie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Supporting Information Unexpected Role of Activated Carbon in Promoting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supporting Information Unexpected Role of Activated Carbon in Promoting Transformation of Secondary. (City of Industry, CA), Siemens Aquacarb carbon (AqC) from Siemens Water Technologies (Warrendale, PA

Huang, Ching-Hua

42

4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project was to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in the hopes of observing changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE No.DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data. Attribute analysis was a very useful tool in enhancing changes in seismic character present, but difficult to interpret on time amplitude slices. Lessons learned from and tools/techniques developed during this project will allow high-resolution seismic imaging to be routinely applied to many CO{sub 2} injection programs in a large percentage of shallow carbonate oil fields in the midcontinent.

Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nano Structured Activated Carbon for Hydrogen Storge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of a nanostructured synthetic carbons materials that have been synthesized by thermal-decomposition of aromatic rich polyether such as poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is reported. These polymers based nanostructured carbons efficacious for gas adsorption and storage and have Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of more than 3000 m2/g, and with average pore diameter of < 2nm. Surface-area, pore characteristics, and other critical variables for selecting porous materials of high gas adsorption capacities are presented. Analysis of the fragments evolved under various carbonization temperatures, and the correlation between the activation and carbonization temperatures provides a mechanistic perspective of the pore evolution during activation. Correlations between gas (N2 and H2) adsorption capacity and porous texture of the materials have been established. The materials possess excellent hydrogen storage properties, with hydrogen storage capacity up to 7.4 wt% (gravimetric) and ~ 45 g H2 L-1 (volumetric) at -196oC and 6.0 MPa.

Israel Cabasso; Youxin Yuan

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

44

Application of thermal analysis techniques in activated carbon production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several current research programs at the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) relate to the development of activated carbons from Illinois coal, fly ash, and scrap tires. Preparation of activated carbons involves thermal processing steps that include preoxidation, pyrolysis and activation. Reaction time, temperature and gas composition during these processing steps ultimately determine the nature of the activated carbon produced. Thermal analysis plays a significant role in developing carbons by providing fundamental and engineering data that are useful in carbon production and characterization for process development.

Donnals, G.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Brady, T.A. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon surface Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxide-Carbon Supercapacitors Summary: on synthesizing various activated carbons, aerogels, activated carbon fibers, and cloths with large surface areas... . In our case, the...

46

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon cloth Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxide-Carbon Supercapacitors Summary: on synthesizing various activated carbons, aerogels, activated carbon fibers, and cloths with large surface areas... are also the same.10...

47

DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be inferred from their physical and chemical properties. The developed porosity of the activated carbon was a function of the oxygen content, porosity and H/C ratio of the parent unburned carbon feedstock. It was observed that extended activation times and high activation temperatures increased the porosity of the produced activated carbon at the expense of the solid yield. The development of activated carbon from unburned carbon in fly ash has been proven to be a success by this study in terms of the higher surface areas of the resultant activated carbons, which are comparable with commercial activated carbons. However, unburned carbon samples obtained from coal-fired power plants as by-product have high ash content, which is unwanted for the production of activated carbons. Therefore, the separation of unburned carbon from the fly ash is expected to be beneficial for the utilization of unburned carbon to produce activated carbons with low ash content.

Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

Baker, Frederick S [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

activated carbon chemically: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A: Chemical 118 (1997) 215-222 Chemical activities of graphitic carbon spheres Materials Science Websites Summary: the MVOCC process 8. Transition-metal oxides andor rare...

50

activated carbon filters: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

composites by gelation and supercritical August 2003) Activated carbon fibercarbon aerogel (ACFCA) composites were fabricated by gelling. The textures and pore structures...

51

activated carbon filter: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

composites by gelation and supercritical August 2003) Activated carbon fibercarbon aerogel (ACFCA) composites were fabricated by gelling. The textures and pore structures...

52

Experimental and Simulation Studies to Evaluate the Improvement of Oil Recovery by Different Modes of CO2 Injection in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental and numerical simulation studies were conducted to investigate the improvement of light oil recovery in carbonate cores during CO2 injection. The main steps in the study are as follows. First, the minimum miscibility pressure of 31º...

Aleidan, Ahmed Abdulaziz S.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

Sensitivity of stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon to aerosol size and altitude of injection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensitivity of stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon to aerosol size and altitude geoengineering with black carbon (BC) aerosols using a general circulation model with fixed sea surface involving sulfate aerosols, black carbon geoengineering likely carries too many risks to make it a viable

54

Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Modeling Coal Matrix Shrinkage and Differential Swelling with CO2 Injection for Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery and Carbon Sequestration Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Matrix shrinkage and swelling can cause profound changes in porosity and permeability of coalbed methane reservoirs during depletion or when under CO{sub 2} injection processes, with significant implication for primary or enhanced methane recovery. Two models that are used to describe these effects are discussed. The first was developed by Advanced Resources International (ARI) and published in 1990 by Sawyer, et al. The second model was published by Palmer and Mansoori in 1996. This paper shows that the two provide equivalent results for most applications. However, their differences in formulation cause each to have relative advantages and disadvantages under certain circumstances. Specifically, the former appears superior for undersaturated coalbed methane reservoirs while the latter would be better if a case is found where matrix swelling is strongly disproportional to gas concentration. Since its presentation in 1996, the Palmer and Mansoori model has justifiably received much critical praise. However, the model developed by ARI for the COMET reservoir simulation program has been in use since 1990, and has significant advantages in certain settings. A review of data published by Levine in 1996 reveals that carbon dioxide causes a greater degree of coal matrix swelling compared to methane, even when measured on a unit of concentration basis. This effect is described in this report as differential swelling. Differential swelling may have important consequences for enhanced coalbed methane and carbon sequestration projects. To handle the effects of differential swelling, an extension to the matrix shrinkage and swelling model used by the COMET simulator is presented and shown to replicate the data of Levine. Preliminary field results from a carbon dioxide injection project are also presented in support of the extended model. The field evidence supports that considerable changes to coal permeability occur with CO{sub 2} injection, with significant implication for the design, implementation and performance of enhanced coalbed methane recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration projects.

L. J. Pekot; S. R. Reeves

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Selecting activated carbon for water and wastewater treatability studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of follow-up investigations were performed to produce data for improving the four-indicator carbon selection method that we developed to identify high-potential activated carbons effective for removing specific organic water pollutants. The carbon's pore structure and surface chemistry are dependent on the raw material and the activation process. Coconut carbons have relatively more small pores than large pores; coal and apricot nutshell/walnut shell fruit carbons have the desirable pore structures for removing adsorbates of all sizes. Chemical activation, excessive activation, and/or thermal reactivation enlarge small pores, resulting in reduced phenol number and higher tannic acid number. Activated carbon's phenol, iodine, methylene blue, and tannic acid numbers are convenient indicators of its surface area and pore volume of pore diameters < 10, 10-15, 15-28, and > 28 angstrom, respectively. The phenol number of a carbon is also a good indicator of its surface acidity of oxygen-containing organic functional groups that affect the adsorptive capacity for aromatic and other small polar organics. The tannic acid number is an indicator of carbon's capacity for large, high-molecular-weight natural organic precursors of disinfection by-products in water treatment. The experimental results for removing nitrobenzene, methyl-tert-butyl ether, 4,4-bisphenol, humic acid, and the organic constituents of a biologically treated coking-plant effluent have demonstrated the effectiveness of this capacity-indicator-based method of carbon selection.

Zhang, W.; Chang, Q.G.; Liu, W.D.; Li, B.J.; Jiang, W.X.; Fu, L.J.; Ying, W.C. [East China University of Chemical Technology, Shanghai (China)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbons production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

United States Department of Summary: as qualifying carbon offset activities in existing markets and regis- tries. Forest carbon projects... are primarily concerned with carbon...

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon-based adsorbents Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

two primary elements, the filter media (activated carbon or lignite coke) to adsorb pollutants... in that Marker's past experience has been that Hg capture with carbon or carbon...

59

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbons derived Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester carbon and is the simplest carbon sequestration activity to account for in forest... reductions achieved by...

60

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon obtained Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester carbon and is the simplest carbon sequestration activity to account for in forest... reductions achieved by...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbons obtained Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester carbon and is the simplest carbon sequestration activity to account for in forest... reductions achieved by...

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbons prepared Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester carbon and is the simplest carbon sequestration activity to account for in forest... reductions achieved by...

63

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon treated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester carbon and is the simplest carbon sequestration activity to account for in forest... reductions achieved by...

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon testing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester carbon and is the simplest carbon sequestration activity to account for in forest... reductions achieved by...

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon comparison Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester carbon and is the simplest carbon sequestration activity to account for in forest... reductions achieved by...

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon fixed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester carbon and is the simplest carbon sequestration activity to account for in forest... reductions achieved by...

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon derived Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester carbon and is the simplest carbon sequestration activity to account for in forest... reductions achieved by...

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - active carbons derived Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester carbon and is the simplest carbon sequestration activity to account for in forest... reductions achieved by...

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon felts Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sible strategy also means actively withdrawing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere2 . Such carbon... sequestration faces multi-faceted chal- lenges: the net withdrawal of carbon...

70

Effect of Oxygen Co-Injected with Carbon Dioxide on Gothic Shale Caprock-CO2-Brine Interaction during Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Co-injection of oxygen, a significant component in CO2 streams produced by the oxyfuel combustion process, can cause a significant alteration of the redox state in deep geologic formations during geologic carbon sequestration. The potential impact of co-injected oxygen on the interaction between synthetic CO2-brine (0.1 M NaCl) and shale caprock (Gothic shale from the Aneth Unit in Utah) and mobilization of trace metals was investigated at ~10 MPa and ~75 °C. A range of relative volume percentages of O2 to CO2 (0, 1, 4 and 8%) were used in these experiments to address the effect of oxygen on shale-CO2-brine interaction under various conditions. Major mineral phases in Gothic shale are quartz, calcite, dolomite, montmorillonite, and pyrite. During Gothic shale-CO2-brine interaction in the presence of oxygen, pyrite oxidation occurred extensively and caused enhanced dissolution of calcite and dolomite. Pyrite oxidation and calcite dissolution subsequently resulted in the precipitation of Fe(III) oxides and gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O). In the presence of oxygen, dissolved Mn and Ni were elevated because of oxidative dissolution of pyrite. The mobility of dissolved Ba was controlled by barite (BaSO4) precipitation in the presence of oxygen. Dissolved U in the experimental brines increased to ~8–14 ?g/L, with concentrations being slightly higher in the absence of oxygen than in the presence of oxygen. Experimental and modeling results indicate the interaction between shale caprock and oxygen co-injected with CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration can exert significant impacts on brine pH, solubility of carbonate minerals, stability of sulfide minerals, and mobility of trace metals. The major impact of oxygen is most likely to occur in the zone near CO2 injection wells where impurity gases can accumulate. Oxygen in CO2-brine migrating away from the injection well will be continually consumed through the reactions with sulfide minerals in deep geologic formations.

Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong; Cantrell, Kirk J.

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

71

Flow injection analysis of phenolic compounds with carbon paste electrodes modified with tyrosinase purchased from different companies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tyrosinase-modified carbon paste electrodes were prepared using lyophilised powder of the enzyme purchased from different companies. The selectivity of these electrodes for nine phenolic compounds, including six substituted catechols, has been studied. The signals obtained for catechol were always higher than those found for other phenolic compounds. Cyclic voltammetry and flow injection measurements indicated that the response of the tyrosinase-modified carbon paste electrodes was limited by the rate of the enzymatic oxidation of catechols. Different approaches of past electrode preparation have been studied and compared. Direct mixing of enzyme into the graphite powder doped with the osmium based mediator, resulted in the highest sensitivity for the studied substrates. However, substrate selectivity was found to be dependent on the source of enzyme used for electrode preparation.

Lindgren, A.; Emneus, J.; Csoeregi, E.; Gorton, L.; Marko-Varga, G. [Univ. of Lund (Sweden); Ruzgas, T. [Inst. of Biochemistry, Vilnius (Lithuania)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

Baker, Frederick S

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

73

Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

Baker, Frederick S.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Oil recovery by carbon dioxide injection into consolidated and unconsolidated sandstone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and field in the past decade. The analysis of these tests indicated that additional oil beyond that obtained by normal water flooding could be recovered with carbon d1oxide. The c1tations on the following pages follow the style of the Journal.... Yon Gonten The use of carbon dioxide as an oil recovery agent in petro- leum reservoirs has been investigated for many years. Both la- boratory and field studies have established that carbon dioxide can be an efficient oil displacing agent...

Lin, Fwu-Jin Frank

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

MathematicalModelingofCarbonDioxide(CO2)Injection intheSubsurfaceforImprovedHydrocarbonRecoveryand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phase compared to the diffusion-only case. References [1] World Energy Outlook, International Energy and Environmental Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA World Energy Demand Global energy demand injection schemes from density effects, Energy and Fuels 26 (2012) 4590­4598. doi:10.1021/ef300502f. [3] K

Firoozabadi, Abbas

76

Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M. [Yuan Ze Inst. of Tech., Taoyuan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will load heavily onto activated carbon and should be removed from groundwater upstream of the activated carbon pre-treatment system. Unless removed upstream, the adsorbed loadings of these organic constituents could exceed the land disposal criteria for carbon.

BYRNES ME

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

78

Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for 90% Mercury Removal for a PRB Unit a Spray Dryer and Fabric Filter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon (PAC) into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. The purpose of this test program was to evaluate the long-term mercury removal capability, long-term mercury emissions variability, and operating and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with sorbent injection on a configuration being considered for many new plants. Testing was conducted by ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA) at Rocky Mountain Power’s (RMP) Hardin Station through funding provided by DOE/NETL, RMP, and other industry partners. The Hardin Station is a new plant rated at 121 MW gross that was first brought online in April of 2006. Hardin fires a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and is configured with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOx control, a spray dryer absorber (SDA) for SO2 control, and a fabric filter (FF) for particulate control. Based upon previous testing at PRB sites with SCRs, very little additional mercury oxidation from the SCR was expected at Hardin. In addition, based upon results from DOE/NETL Phase II Round I testing at Holcomb Station and results from similarly configured sites, low native mercury removal was expected across the SDA and FF. The main goal of this project was met—sorbent injection was used to economically and effectively achieve 90% mercury control as measured from the air heater (AH) outlet to the stack for a period of ten months. This goal was achieved with DARCO® Hg-LH, Calgon FLUEPAC®-MC PLUS and ADA Power PAC PREMIUM brominated activated carbons at nominal loadings of 1.5–2.5 lb/MMacf. An economic analysis determined the twenty-year levelized cost to be 0.87 mills/kW-hr, or $15,000/lb Hg removed. No detrimental effects on other equipment or plant operations were observed. The results of this project also filled a data gap for plants firing PRB coal and configured with an SCR, SDA, and FF, as many new plants are being designed today. Another goal of the project was to evaluate, on a short-term basis, the mercury removal associated with coal additives and coal blending with western bituminous coal. The additive test showed that, at this site, the coal additive known as KNX was affective at increasing mercury removal while decreasing sorbent usage. Coal blending was conducted with two different western bituminous coals, and West Elk coal increased native capture from nominally 10% to 50%. Two additional co-benefits were discovered at this site. First, it was found that native capture increased from nominally 10% at full load to 50% at low load. The effect is believed to be due to an increase in mercury oxidation across the SCR caused by a corresponding decrease in ammonia injection when the plant reduces load. Less ammonia means more active oxidation sites in the SCR for the mercury. The second co-benefit was the finding that high ammonia concentrations can have a negative impact on mercury removal by powdered activated carbon. For a period of time, the plant operated with a high excess of ammonia injection necessitated by the plugging of one-third of the SCR. Under these conditions and at high load, the mercury control system could not maintain 90% removal even at the maximum feed rate of 3.5 lb/MMacf (pounds of mercury per million actual cubic feet). The plant was able to demonstrate that mercury removal was directly related to the ammonia injection rate in a series of tests where the ammonia rate was decreased, causing a corresponding increase in mercury removal. Also, after the SCR was refurbished and ammonia injection levels returned to normal, the mercury removal performance also returned to normal. Another goal of the project was to install a commercial-grade activated carbon injection (ACI) system and integrate it with new-generation continuous emissions monitors for mercury (Hg-CEMs) to allow automatic feedback control on outlet me

Sjostrom, Sharon; Amrhein, Jerry

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

E-Print Network 3.0 - active carbon process Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What Point in This Process Will Payments for Offset Activities Occur? 55... as qualifying carbon offset activities in existing markets and regis- tries. Forest carbon projects......

80

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon process Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What Point in This Process Will Payments for Offset Activities Occur? 55... as qualifying carbon offset activities in existing markets and regis- tries. Forest carbon projects......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

Schwarz, James A. (Fayetteville, NY); Noh, Joong S. (Syracuse, NY); Agarwal, Rajiv K. (Las Vegas, NV)

1990-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

82

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A CO2 FLOOD UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL INJECTION WELLS IN A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE APPROACHING WATERFLOOD DEPLETION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO{sub 2} horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields. The Unit was a mature waterflood with water cut exceeding 95%. Oil must be mobilized through the use of a miscible or near-miscible fluid to recover significant additional reserves. Also, because the unit was relatively small, it did not have the benefit of economies of scale inherent in normal larger scale projects. Thus, new and innovative methods were required to reduce investment and operating costs. Two primary methods used to accomplish improved economics were use of reservoir characterization to restrict the flood to the higher quality rock in the unit and use of horizontal injection wells to cut investment and operating costs. The project consisted of two budget phases. Budget Phase I started in June 1994 and ended late June 1996. In this phase Reservoir Analysis, Characterization Tasks and Advanced Technology Definition Tasks were completed. Completion enabled the project to be designed, evaluated, and an Authority for Expenditure (AFE) for project implementation submitted to working interest owners for approval. Budget Phase II consisted of the implementation and execution of the project in the field. Phase II was completed in July 2001. Performance monitoring, during Phase II, by mid 1998 identified the majority of producing wells which under performed their anticipated withdrawal rates. Newly drilled and re-activated wells had lower offtake rates than originally forecasted. As a result of poor offtake, higher reservoir pressure was a concern for the project as it limited CO{sub 2} injectivity. To reduce voidage balance, and reservoir pressure, a disposal well was therefore drilled. Several injection surveys indicated the CO{sub 2} injection wells had severe conformance issues. After close monitoring of the project to the end of 1999, it was evident the project would not recover the anticipated tertiary reserves. The main reasons for under-performance were poor in zone CO{sub 2} injection into the upper San Andres layers, poorer offtake rates from newly drilled replacement wells and a higher than required reservoir pressure. After discussion internally within Phillips, externally with the Department of Energy (DOE) and SCU partners, a redevelopment of South Cowden was agreed upon to commence in year 2000. The redevelopment essentially abandoned the original development for Budget Phase II in favor of a revised approach. This involved conformance techniques to resolve out of zone CO{sub 2} injection and use of horizontal wells to improve in zone injectivity and productivity. A phased approach was used to ensure short radius lateral drilling could be implemented effectively at South Cowden. This involved monitoring drilling operations and then production response to determine if larger investments during the second phase were justified. Redevelopment Phase 1 was completed in May 2000. It was deemed a success in regard to finding suitable/cost-effective technology for drilling horizontal laterals and finding a technique that could sustain long-term productivity from the upper layers of the San Andres reservoir. Four existing vertical producing wells were isolated from their existing completions and sidetracked with horizontal laterals into the upper layers of the San Andres. Overall average offtake rates for the four wells increased by a factor of 12 during the first four months after completion of Phase 1. Phase 2 of the redevelopment focused on current CO{sub 2} vertical injection wells. Techniques were applied to resolve near well conformance concerns and then either single or dual laterals were dril

K.J. Harpole; Ed G. Durrett; Susan Snow; J.S. Bles; Carlon Robertson; C.D. Caldwell; D.J. Harms; R.L. King; B.A. Baldwin; D. Wegener; M. Navarrette

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Detection of low concentration oxygen containing functional groups on activated carbon fiber surfaces through fluorescent labeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detection of low concentration oxygen containing functional groups on activated carbon fiber of surface functional groups (OH, COOH and CHO) on activated carbon fiber surfaces. The chromophores were rights reserved. Keywords: Carbon fibers; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; Infrared spectroscopy

Borguet, Eric

86

Bioindication Potential of Carbonic Anhydrase Activity in Anemones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bioindication. While oysters and many other bivalves are predisposed to accumulate heavy metal pollutants from polluted vs pristine ®eld sites. CA activity was found to be de- creased with increase in metal. Keywords: carbonic anhydrase; metal pollution; anemo- nes; coral reefs; Panama. The activity of the zinc

Bermingham, Eldredge

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon fabrics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Materials Science 44 Fabrication of activated carbon fiberscarbon aerogels composites by gelation and supercritical drying Summary: Fabrication of activated...

88

Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orA BRIEFAprilBudgetAbout5 CalendarCarbonIllinois |

89

A comparison of the electrochemical behavior of carbon aerogels and activated carbon fiber cloths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrochemical capacitative behavior of carbon aerogels and commercial carbon fiber cloths was studied in 5M KOH, 3M sulfuric acid, and 0.5M tetrethylammonium tetrafluoroborate/propylene carbonate electrolytes. The resorcinol-formaldehyde based carbon aerogels with a range of denisty (0.2-0.85 g/cc) have open-cell structures with ultrafine pore sizes (5-50 nm), high surface area (400-700 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. The commercial fiber cloths in the density range 0.2-04g/cc have high surface areas (1000-2500 m{sup 2}/g). The volumetric capacitances of high-density aerogels are shown to be comparable to or exceeding those from activated carbon fibers. Electrochemical behavior of these materials in various electrolytes is compared and related to their physical properties.

Tran, T.D.; Alviso, C.T.; Hulsey, S.S.; Nielsen, J.K.; Pekala, R.W.

1996-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

90

A General Methodology for Evaluation of Carbon Sequestration Activities and Carbon Credits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general methodology was developed for evaluation of carbon sequestration technologies. In this document, we provide a method that is quantitative, but is structured to give qualitative comparisons despite changes in detailed method parameters, i.e., it does not matter what ''grade'' a sequestration technology gets but a ''better'' technology should receive a better grade. To meet these objectives, we developed and elaborate on the following concepts: (1) All resources used in a sequestration activity should be reviewed by estimating the amount of greenhouse gas emissions for which they historically are responsible. We have done this by introducing a quantifier we term Full-Cycle Carbon Emissions, which is tied to the resource. (2) The future fate of sequestered carbon should be included in technology evaluations. We have addressed this by introducing a variable called Time-adjusted Value of Carbon Sequestration to weigh potential future releases of carbon, escaping the sequestered form. (3) The Figure of Merit of a sequestration technology should address the entire life-cycle of an activity. The figures of merit we have developed relate the investment made (carbon release during the construction phase) to the life-time sequestration capacity of the activity. To account for carbon flows that occur during different times of an activity we incorporate the Time Value of Carbon Flows. The methodology we have developed can be expanded to include financial, social, and long-term environmental aspects of a sequestration technology implementation. It does not rely on global atmospheric modeling efforts but is consistent with these efforts and could be combined with them.

Klasson, KT

2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

Equation calculates activated carbon's capacity for adsorbing pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption on activated carbon is an effective method for removing volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants from gases. A new, simple equation has been developed for calculating activated carbon's adsorption capacity as a function of the VOC concentration in the gas. The correlation shows good agreement with experimental results. Results from the equation are applicable for conditions commonly encountered in air pollution control techniques (25 C, 1 atm). The only input parameters needed are VOC concentrations and a table of correlation coefficients for 292 C[sub 8]-C[sub 14] compounds. The table is suitable for rapid engineering usage with a personal computer or hand calculator.

Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

1995-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon particles Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Activated carbon; Carbon fibers; D. Electrical (electronic) properties Electromagnetic interference (EMI... in the composites is typically that ... Source: Chung, Deborah D.L....

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon effect Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tyne Collection: Materials Science 18 United States Department of Summary: as qualifying carbon offset activities in existing markets and regis- tries. Forest carbon projects......

94

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbons produced Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

United States Department of Summary: as qualifying carbon offset activities in existing markets and regis- tries. Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester...

95

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon addition Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to invest in carbon reducing activities in developing... is the influence carbon markets will have on additional benefits from land-use systems such as rural...

96

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon produced Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

United States Department of Summary: as qualifying carbon offset activities in existing markets and regis- tries. Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester...

97

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon storage Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

capacity with active carbon nanostructure... are the premier laboratory in carbon aerogels and have explored their use for hydrogen storage and gas separation... . Preliminary...

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbons modified Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

losses... through changes in activity outside of the project focus area. For example, carbon sequestration endeavors... SOIL CARBON: POLICY AND ECONOMICS GREGG ... Source:...

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon developed Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Reading Collection: Materials Science 30 Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects Summary: is the time over which project activities are to be...

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon modified Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

losses... through changes in activity outside of the project focus area. For example, carbon sequestration endeavors... SOIL CARBON: POLICY AND ECONOMICS GREGG ... Source:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon sorcion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF ENERGY Summary: to look at the impact of recently observed climate change on soil carbon sequestration activities Results... that 5% of the soil carbon sequestered from...

102

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF ENERGY Summary: to look at the impact of recently observed climate change on soil carbon sequestration activities Results... that 5% of the soil carbon sequestered from...

103

Carbon-based Supercapacitors Produced by Activation of Graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercapacitors, also called ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, store electrical charge on high-surface-area conducting materials. Their widespread use is limited by their low energy storage density and relatively high effective series resistance. Using chemical activation of exfoliated graphite oxide, we synthesized a porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of up to 3100 square meters per gram, a high electrical conductivity, and a low oxygen and hydrogen content. This sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form primarily 0.6- to 5-nanometer-width pores. Two-electrode supercapacitor cells constructed with this carbon yielded high values of gravimetric capacitance and energy density with organic and ionic liquid electrolytes. The processes used to make this carbon are readily scalable to industrial levels.

Y Zhu; S Murali; M Stoller; K Ganesh; W Cai; P Ferreira; A Pirkle; R Wallace; K Cychosz; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Carbon-Based Supercapacitors Produced by Activation of Graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercapacitors, also called ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, store electrical charge on high-surface-area conducting materials. Their widespread use is limited by their low energy storage density and relatively high effective series resistance. Using chemical activation of exfoliated graphite oxide, we synthesized a porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of up to 3100 square meters per gram, a high electrical conductivity, and a low oxygen and hydrogen content. This sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form primarily 0.6- to 5-nanometer-width pores. Two-electrode supercapacitor cells constructed with this carbon yielded high values of gravimetric capacitance and energy density with organic and ionic liquid electrolytes. The processes used to make this carbon are readily scalable to industrial levels.

Zhu, Y.; Su, D.; Murali, S.; Stoller, M.D.; Ganesh, K.J.; Cai, W.; Ferreira, P.J.; Pirkle, A.; Wallace, R.M.; Cychosz, K.A., Thommes, M.; Stach, E.A.; Ruoff, R.S.

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

105

Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 ºC, 27 ºC, and 32 ºC there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Production Scale-Up or Activated Carbons for Ultracapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation use accounts for 67% of the petroleum consumption in the US. Electric and hybrid vehicles are promising technologies for decreasing our dependence on petroleum, and this is the objective of the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Inexpensive and efficient energy storage devices are needed for electric and hybrid vehicle to be economically viable, and ultracapacitors are a leading energy storage technology being investigated by the FreedomCAR program. The most important parameter in determining the power and energy density of a carbon-based ultracapacitor is the amount of surface area accessible to the electrolyte, which is primarily determined by the pore size distribution. The major problems with current carbons are that their pore size distribution is not optimized for liquid electrolytes and the best carbons are very expensive. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) has developed methods to prepare porous carbons with tunable pore size distributions from inexpensive carbohydrate based precursors. The use of low-cost feedstocks and processing steps greatly lowers the production costs. During this project with the assistance of Maxwell Technologies, we found that an impurity was limiting the performance of our carbon and the major impurity found was sulfur. A new carbon with low sulfur content was made and found that the performance of the carbon was greatly improved. We also scaled-up the process to pre-production levels and we are currently able to produce 0.25 tons/year of activated carbon. We could easily double this amount by purchasing a second rotary kiln. More importantly, we are working with MeadWestvaco on a Joint Development Agreement to scale-up the process to produce hundreds of tons of high quality, inexpensive carbon per year based on our processes.

Dr. Steven D. Dietz

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ammonia-Activated Mesoporous Carbon Membranes for Gas Separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porous carbon membranes, which generally show improved chemical and thermal stability compared to polymer membranes, have been used in gas separations for many years. In this work, we show that the post-synthesis ammonia treatment of porous carbon at elevated temperature can improve the permeance and selectivity of these membranes for the separation of carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons from permanent gases. Hierarchically structured porous carbon membranes were exposed to ammonia gas at temperatures ranging from 850 C to 950 C for up to 10 min and the N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} permeances were measured for these different membranes. Higher treatment temperatures and longer exposure times resulted in higher gas permeance values. In addition, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6}/N{sub 2} selectivities increased by a factor of 2 as the treatment temperature and time increased up to a temperature and time of 900 C, 10 min. Higher temperatures showed increased permeance but decreased selectivity indicating excess pore activation. Nitrogen adsorption measurements show that the ammonia treatment increased the porosity of the membrane while elemental analysis revealed the presence of nitrogen-containing surface functionalities in the treated carbon membranes. Thus, ammonia treatment at high temperature provides a controlled method to introduce both added microporosity and surface functionality to enhance gas separations performance of porous carbon membranes.

Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Lee, Jeseung [ORNL; Wang, Xiqing [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The production of activated silica with carbon dioxide gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ional to the per cent of carbon dioxi. de 1n the flue gas for a constant total gas flow rate. REFE REN CES l. Andrews, R. V, , Hanford Works Eocument (1952), 2. Andrews, R. V. & J. A. W. W. A, , ~46 82 (1954). 3. Andrews, R. V, , Personal Communication 4... of the reciuire . ents for the dedree of iliASTER OF SCIENCE Janus', 1956 Major Subject: Chemi. cal Engineering TH PRODUCTION OP ACTIVATED SILICA 7iIITH CARBON DIOXIDE GAS A Thesis William Bell Hayes III Approved as to style and content by: Chairmen...

Hayes, William Bell

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage 5 Cristian I carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) were synthesized by melt-spinning, carbonization and activation of an isotropic pitch carbon precursor premixed with an orga- nometallic Pd compound. The hydrogen uptake at 25 °C

Pennycook, Steve

110

Catalytic activation of carbon monoxide on metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In discussing the important basic aspects of carbon monoxide chemistry, this review covers the adsorption and reaction of CO with H/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/ on reduced metal surfaces. Carbon monoxide adsorption of the Group VIII metals exhibits certain patterns. Typically, as coverages exceed one-half, compression occurs in the monolayer and the molecules lose registry with the surface metal atoms. Particular sites associated with rough surfaces facilitate CO dissociation to the surface carbon; these sites may have a significant effect on selectivity in the CO hydrogenation reaction. The support used and the metal crystallite size both affect the catalyst activity and product selectivity. Indications are strong that a better knowledge of metal-support interactions combined with a more complete understanding of the surface chemistry involved will lead to improved catalyst systems in the future.

Vannice, M.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs.

Grant, T.M.; King, C.J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Waste management activities and carbon emissions in Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes research into waste management activities and carbon emissions from territories in sub-Saharan Africa with the main objective of quantifying emission reductions (ERs) that can be gained through viable improvements to waste management in Africa. It demonstrates that data on waste and carbon emissions is poor and generally inadequate for prediction models. The paper shows that the amount of waste produced and its composition are linked to national Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Waste production per person is around half that in developed countries with a mean around 230 kg/hd/yr. Sub-Saharan territories produce waste with a biogenic carbon content of around 56% (+/-25%), which is approximately 40% greater than developed countries. This waste is disposed in uncontrolled dumps that produce large amounts of methane gas. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste will rise with increasing urbanization and can only be controlled through funding mechanisms from developed countries.

Couth, R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Sorption of uranium from nitric acid solution using TBP-impregnated activated carbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of extraction chromatography has been used to study the sorption of uranium from nitric acid solutions using tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) impregnated activated carbons. Batch equilibrium data and kinetic and breakthrough column behavior of uranium are reported. Wood based activated carbon has shown better capacity and breakthrough characteristics than shell based activated carbon. Sorption rate on impregnated carbons was relatively slow indicating that diffusion is the rate controlling step within the pore structure of the activated carbon. Uranium distribution on impregnated activated carbons is compared with equivalent bulk liquid extraction and a mechanism of uranium sorption is discussed.

Abbasi, W.A. [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, Islamabad (Pakistan). Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology; Streat, M. [Loughborough Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO2) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO2 horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields.

Wier, Don R. Chimanhusky, John S.; Czirr, Kirk L.; Hallenbeck, Larry; Gerard, Matthew G.; Dollens, Kim B.; Owen, Rex; Gaddis, Maurice; Moshell, M.K.

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

115

Sulfur Impregnation on Activated Carbon Fibers through H2S Oxidation for Vapor Phase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sulfur Impregnation on Activated Carbon Fibers through H2S Oxidation for Vapor Phase Mercury: Sulfur was impregnated onto activated carbon fibers ACFs through H2S oxidation catalyzed by the sorbent CE Database subject headings: Activated carbon; Sulfur; Mercury; Hydrogen sulfides; Oxidation

Borguet, Eric

116

Nitrogen in aramid-based activated carbon fibers by TPD, XPS and XANES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Nitrogen in aramid-based activated carbon fibers by TPD, XPS and XANES J.P. Boudou a,* , Ph, 33080 Oviedo, Spain Abstract Activated carbon fibers were prepared from Nomex@ [poly to a great extent in the derived carbonized and activated fibers, it is of interest to gain knowledge about

117

Letters to the Editor STEM imaging of single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Letters to the Editor STEM imaging of single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers considered individual Pd atoms that are highly dispersed throughout the vol- ume of activated carbon fibers by adding transition metals to their microstructure [1]. For instance, activated carbon fibers (ACFs

Pennycook, Steve

118

System and method for coproduction of activated carbon and steam/electricity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for producing activated carbon comprising carbonizing a solid carbonaceous material in a carbonization zone of an activated carbon production apparatus (ACPA) to yield a carbonized product and carbonization product gases, the carbonization zone comprising carbonaceous material inlet, char outlet and carbonization gas outlet; activating the carbonized product via activation with steam in an activation zone of the ACPA to yield activated carbon and activation product gases, the activation zone comprising activated carbon outlet, activation gas outlet, and activation steam inlet; and utilizing process gas comprising at least a portion of the carbonization product gases or a combustion product thereof; at least a portion of the activation product gases or a combustion product thereof; or a combination thereof in a solid fuel boiler system that burns a solid fuel boiler feed with air to produce boiler-produced steam and flue gas, the boiler upstream of an air heater within a steam/electricity generation plant, said boiler comprising a combustion zone, a boiler-produced steam outlet and at least one flue gas outlet.

Srinivasachar, Srivats (Sturbridge, MA); Benson, Steven (Grand Forks, ND); Crocker, Charlene (Newfolden, MN); Mackenzie, Jill (Carmel, IN)

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

119

Investigation of Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Obtained from Pulverized Coal Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addressed the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addressed the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project has determined the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed have also been determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control have been analyzed in an effort to determine the effects of SCR on the ash.

Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely; Zheng Yao

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon composites Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences ; Biology and Medicine 49 Fabrication of activated carbon fiberscarbon aerogels composites by gelation and supercritical drying Summary: Fabrication of activated...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Effect of flue gas impurities on the process of injection and storage of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, corefloods were conducted at 1,500 psig and 70??C, in which flue gas was injected into an Austin chalk core containing initially methane. Two types of flue gases were injected: dehydrated flue gas with 13.574 mole% CO2 (Gas A), and treated flue gas (N2, O2...

Nogueira de Mago, Marjorie Carolina

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Design and Implementation of a CO(2) Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells in Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported herein covers select tasks in Budget Phase 11. The principle Task in Budget Phase 11 included in this report is Field Demonstration. Completion of many of the Field Demonstration tasks during the last report period enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed, economically evaluated, and implemented in the field. Field implementation of the project commenced during late 1995, with actual C0{sub 2} injection commencing in mid-July, 1996. This report summarizes activities incurred following initial project start-up, towards the goal of optimizing project performance. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative C0{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take-or-pay provisions, C0{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price) and gas recycle agreement (expensing costs as opposed to a large upfront capital investment for compression) were negotiated to further improve the project economics. The Grayburg-San Andres section had previously been divided into multiple zones based on the core study and gamma ray markers that correlate wells within the Unit. Each zone was mapped as continuous across the field. Previous core studies concluded that the reservoir quality in the South Cowden Unit (SCU) is controlled primarily by the distribution of a bioturbated and diagenetically-altered rock type with a distinctive chaotic texture. The chaotic modifier is derived from the visual effect of pervasive, small-scale intermixing of tan oil-stained reservoir rock with tight gray non- reservoir rock. The chaotic reservoir rock extends from Zone C (4780`-4800`) to the lower part of Zone F (4640`-4680`). Zones D (4755`-4780`) and E (4680`-4755`) are considered the main floodable zones, though Zone F is also productive and Zone C is productive above the oil- water contact. During Budget Phase 1, the Stratamodel computer program was utilized as the primary tool to integrate the diverse geologic, petrophysical, and seismic data into a coherent three dimensional (3-D) model. The basic porosity model having been constructed, critiqued and modified based on field production and detailed cross-section displays, permeability data was imported into the model, and a 3-D interpolation of the permeability was completed.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

HYDROTHERMAL ACTIVITY AND CARBON-DIOXIDE DISCHARGE AT SHRUB AND UPPER KLAWASI MUD VOLCANOES,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROTHERMAL ACTIVITY AND CARBON-DIOXIDE DISCHARGE AT SHRUB AND UPPER KLAWASI MUD VOLCANOES and July 1973 at Shrub and Upper Klawasi mud volcanoes 8 ii #12;HYDROTHERMAL ACTIVITY AND CARBON. Map of diffuse carbon dioxide flow from soils near the summit of Shrub mud volcano 9 TABLES 1

124

Study of Adsorption of Methanol in an Activated Carbon and Carbon Nanotube Matrix for Use in a Solar Based Refrigeration Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis seeks to investigate the adsorption capabilities of activated carbon and carbon nanotubes. The adsorption of methanol on both of these substances was tested for their application in a solar based refrigeration cycle. Research on carbon...

Sambath, Srivaths

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

Carbonic anhydrase activity in isolated chloroplasts of chlamydomonas reinhardtii  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a new assay of carbonic anhydrase, NaH{sup 14}CO{sub 3} solution at the bottom of a sealed vessel releases {sup 14}CO{sub 3} which diffuses to the top of the vessel to be assimilated by actively photosynthesizing Chlamydomonas cells. The assay is initiated by illuminating cells and stopped by turning the light off and killing the cells with acid. Enzyme activity was estimated from acid stable radioactivity above the uncatalyzed background level. With bovine carbonic anhydrase, 1.5 Wilbur Anderson Unit (WAU) can be consistantly measured at 5-6 fold above background. Sonicated whole cells of air adapted wild type (+)gave 741.1 {plus minus} 12.4 WAU/mg chl. Intact washed cells of mixotrophically grown wall-less mutant CWD(-) and a high CO2 requiring wall-less double mutant CIA-3/CW15 (-) gave 7.1 {plus minus} 1.9 and 2.8 {plus minus} 7.8 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplasts isolated from CWD and CIA-3/CW15 and subsequently disrupted gave 64.0 {plus minus} 14.7 and 2.8 {plus minus} 3.2 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplast sonicate from another wall-less mutant CW15(-) gave activity comparable to CWD. Thus on a chlorophyll basis, enzyme activity in chloroplasts from mixotrophically grown cells is about 1/10th of the level found in air adapted wild type cells. CIA-3 seems to lack this activity.

Katzman, G.; Togasaki, R.K. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA)); Marcus, Y. (Carnegie Institute, Stanford, CA (USA)); Moroney, J.V. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

activated carbon preparation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mesoporous carbon-based composites for confinement of Eue Mesoporous polymer-carbon composite (CMPEICMK-3) materials were successfully prepared. After Eu(III) ions were loaded...

127

activated carbon load: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube composites to shock wave loading Materials Science Websites Summary: Dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube...

128

activated carbon hollow: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Index 1 Interconnected hollow carbon nanospheres for stable lithium metal anodes Materials Science Websites Summary: Interconnected hollow carbon nanospheres for stable...

129

activated carbon prepared: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mesoporous carbon-based composites for confinement of Eue Mesoporous polymer-carbon composite (CMPEICMK-3) materials were successfully prepared. After Eu(III) ions were loaded...

130

activated carbon loaded: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube composites to shock wave loading Materials Science Websites Summary: Dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube...

131

Studies on Supercapacitor Electrode Material from Activated Lignin-Derived Mesoporous Carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We synthesized mesoporous carbon from pre-cross-linked lignin gel impregnated with a surfactant as the pore-forming agent, and then activated the carbon through physical and chemical methods to obtain activated mesoporous carbon. The activated mesoporous carbons exhibited 1.5- to 6-fold increases in porosity with a maximum BET specific surface area of 1148 m2/g and a pore volume of 1.0 cm3/g. Slow physical activation helped retain dominant mesoporosity; however, aggressive chemical activation caused some loss of the mesopore volume fraction. Plots of cyclic voltammetric data with the capacitor electrode made from these carbons showed an almost rectangular curve depicting the behavior of ideal double-layer capacitance. Although the pristine mesoporous carbon exhibited the same range of surface-area-based capacitance as that of other known carbon-based supercapacitors, activation decreased the surface-area-based specific capacitance and increased the gravimetric-specific capacitance of the mesoporous carbons. Surface activation lowered bulk density and electrical conductivity. Warburg impedance as a vertical tail in the lower frequency domain of Nyquist plots supported good supercapacitor behavior for the activated mesoporous carbons. Our work demonstrated that biomass-derived mesoporous carbon materials continue to show potential for use in specific electrochemical applications.

Saha, Dipendu [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Yunchao [ORNL] [ORNL; Bi, Zhonghe [ORNL] [ORNL; Chen, Jihua [ORNL] [ORNL; Keum, Jong Kahk [ORNL] [ORNL; Hensley, Dale K [ORNL] [ORNL; Grappe, Hippolyte A. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)] [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL] [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL] [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters Meera A. Sidheswaran a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters Meera A Keywords: Activated carbon fiberVolatile organic compoundIndoor pollutantEnergy efficient ventilation a b s t r a c t This study explores the potential environmental and energy benefits of using activated

133

Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2014 First Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CRADA between PNNL, Autodesk, Toyota and Magna has been effective since October 28th, 2013. The whole team including CRADA and subcontract partners kicked off the project technically on November 1st, 2013. This report describes work performed during the first quarter of FY 2014. The following technical progresses have been made toward project milestones: 1) The project kickoff meeting was organized at PlastiComp, Inc. in Winona on November 13th, 2013 involving all the project partners. During this meeting the research plan and Gantt chart were discussed and refined. The coordination of the research activities among the partners was also discussed to ensure that the deliverables and timeline will be met. 2) Autodesk delivered a research version of ASMI to PNNL for process modeling using this tool under the project. PNNL installed this research version on a PNNL computer and tested it. Currently, PNNL is using ASMI to prepare the models for PlastiComp plaques. 3) PlastiComp has compounded long carbon-fiber reinforced polypropylene and polyamide 6,6 compounds for rheological and thermal characterization tests by the Autodesk laboratories in Melbourne, Australia. 4) Initial mold flow analysis was carried out by PlastiComp to confirm that the 3D complex part selected by Toyota as a representative automotive part is moldable. 5) Toyota, Magna, PlastiComp and PNNL finalized the planning for molding the Toyota 3D complex part. 6) Purdue University worked with PNNL to update and specify the test matrix for characterization of fiber length/orientation. 7) Purdue University developed tools to automate the data collection and analysis of fiber length and orientation measurements. 8) Purdue University designed and specified equipment to replace the need for equipment using the technology established by the University of Leeds at General Motors.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Sanborn, Scott E.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Mathur, Raj N.; Sangid, Michael D.; Jin, Xiaoshi; Costa, Franco; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven; Tucker III, Charles L.

2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

134

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1992 activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIACs staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. As analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Stoss, F.W. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon impregnated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface, such that the targeted active layer contained 91 g... on cellulose-based carbon aerogel 1 LEPMI, UMR 5631 ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques...

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - active carbon stocks Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

parameters include the mean annual temperature, the initial soil carbon stocks... for bioenergy crops. These activities are still in their early stages, and the accuracy of...

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - active carbon nanotube-supported Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

catalysts for diesel fuel synthesis 38 Value-added products... the probable cost of aerogels produced on an industrial scale. Development of activated-carbon supported......

138

Carbon Nanotubes Inhibit the Hemolytic Activity of the Pore-Forming Toxin Pyolysin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Nanotubes Inhibit the Hemolytic Activity of the Pore-Forming Toxin Pyolysin Apraku David Article Address correspondence to tangxw@uwaterloo.ca ABSTRACT Functionalized carbon nanotubes have oxidized and non-covalently PEGlyated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which were previously

Le Roy, Robert J.

139

Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon – Batch Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 ?g/g for the two Tusaar materials.

Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

140

REMOVAL OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS FROM SUBCRITICAL WATER WITH ACTIVATED CARBON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that controlling the temperature (and to a lesser extent, the pressure) of water can dramatically change its ability to extract organics and inorganics from matrices ranging from soils and sediments to waste sludges and coal. The dielectric constant of water can be changed from about 80 (a very polar solvent) to <5 (similar to a nonpolar organic solvent) by controlling the temperature (from ambient to about 400 C) and pressure (from about 5 to 350 bar). The EERC has shown that hazardous organic pollutants such as pesticides, PACS (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) can be completely removed from soils, sludges, and sediments at temperatures (250 C) and pressures (<50 atm) that are much milder than typically used for supercritical water processes (temperature >374 C, pressure >221 atm). In addition, the process has been demonstrated to be particularly effective for samples containing very high levels of contaminants (e.g., part per thousand). Current projects include demonstrating the subcritical water remediation process at the pilot scale using an 8-liter system constructed under separate funding during 1997. To date, subcritical water has been shown to be an effective extraction fluid for removing a variety of organic pollutants from soils and sludges contaminated with fossil fuel products and waste products, including PACS from soil (e.g., town gas sites), refining catalysts, and petroleum tank bottom sludges; PCBs from soil and sediments; toxic gasoline components (e.g., benzene) from soil and waste sludge; and phenols from petroleum refinery sludges. The obvious need to clean the wastewater from subcritical water processes led to preliminary experiments with activated carbon placed in line after the extractor. Initial experiments were performed before and after cooling the extractant water (e.g., with water at 200 C and with water cooled to 25 C). Surprisingly, the ability of activated carbon to remove organics from the water is better at a high temperature than at room temperature. These initial results are opposite to those expected from chromatographic theory, since the solubility of the organics is about 100,000-fold higher in the hot water than in ambient water. At present, the physicochemical mechanism accounting for these results is unknown; however, it is possible that the lower surface tension and lower viscosity of subcritical water (compared to water at ambient conditions) greatly increases the available area of the carbon by several orders of magnitude. Regardless of the mechanism involved, the optimal use of activated carbon to clean the wastewater generated from subcritical water remediation will depend on obtaining a better understanding of the controlling parameters. While these investigations focused on the cleanup of wastewater generated from subcritical water remediation, the results also apply to cleanup of any wastewater contaminated with nonpolar and moderately polar organics such as wastewaters from coal and petroleum processing.

Steven B. Hawthorne; Arnaud J. Lagadec

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - actively inflamed liver Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diverse Roles of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Liver Injury and Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride Summary: injection of iNKT activator -galactosylceramide ( -GalCer)...

142

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Annual report, July 1, 1996--June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported herein covers select tasks in Budget Phase 2. The principle Task in Budget Phase 2 included in this report is Field Demonstration. Completion of many of the Field Demonstration tasks during the last report period enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed, economically evaluated, and implemented in the field. Field implementation of the project commenced during late 1995, with actual CO{sub 2} injection commencing in mid-July, 1996. This report summarizes activities incurred following initial project start-up, towards the goal of optimizing project performance. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative CO{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take-or-pay provisions, CO{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price) and gas recycle agreement (expensing costs as opposed to a large upfront capital investment for compression) were negotiated to further improve the project economics.

Dollens, K.B.; Harpole, K.J.; Durrett, E.G.; Bles, J.S.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

activated carbon treatment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

electromagnetic shielding is appreciated. behavior of laminated epoxy-carbon fiber composite X, Chung DDL. Submicron diameter nickel filaments1 Chung DDL. Materials for...

144

A dsorption of H2 S or SO2 on an activated carbon cloth modified by ammonia treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent studies have reported that activated carbon fibers, such as PAN-ACF [1] or Nomex-ACF [2], have for the recovery of sulfuric acid compared to granular activated carbon because the diffusion of sulfuric acid rarely been investigated to improve the performance of activated carbon fibers for the removal of SO2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

145

S urface chemistry of a viscose-based activated carbon cloth modified by treatment with ammonia and steam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based activated carbon fibers (ACF) to optimize the oxidative retention of up to 5000 ppmv of SO2 in moist air suitable for the recovery of sulfuric acid at room temperature than granular activated carbon becauseS urface chemistry of a viscose-based activated carbon cloth modified by treatment with ammonia

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

146

activated carbon fibres: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

testing, (more) Li, Xin 2012-01-01 10 High Heat Flux Erosion of Carbon Fibre Composite Materials in the TEXTOR Tokamak* Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: ,. 1. *...

147

activated carbon fibre: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

testing, (more) Li, Xin 2012-01-01 10 High Heat Flux Erosion of Carbon Fibre Composite Materials in the TEXTOR Tokamak* Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: ,. 1. *...

148

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon filtration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface, such that the targeted active layer contained 91 g... on cellulose-based carbon aerogel 1 LEPMI, UMR 5631 CNRSGrenoble-INPUJF, BP75, F-38402 St Martin d......

149

Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2014 Third Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the technical progresses made during the third quarter of FY 2014: 1) Autodesk introduced the options for fiber inlet condition to the 3D solver. These options are already available in the mid-plane/dual domain solver. 2) Autodesk improved the accuracy of 3D fiber orientation calculation around the gate. 3) Autodesk received consultant services from Prof. C.L. Tucker at the University of Illinois on the implementation of the reduced order model for fiber length, and discussed with Prof. Tucker the methods to reduce memory usage. 4) PlastiComp delivered to PNNL center-gated and edge-fan-gated 20-wt% to 30-wt% LCF/PP and LCF/PA66 (7”x7”x1/8”) plaques molded by the in-line direct injection molding (D-LFT) process. 5) PlastiComp molded ASTM tensile, flexural and impact bars under the same D-LFT processing conditions used for plaques for Certification of Assessment and ascertaining the resultant mechanical properties. 6) Purdue developed a new polishing routine, utilizing the automated polishing machine, to reduce fiber damage during surface preparation. 7) Purdue used a marker-based watershed segmentation routine, in conjunction with a hysteresis thresholding technique, for fiber segmentation during fiber orientation measurement. 8) Purdue validated Purdue’s fiber orientation measurement method using the previous fiber orientation data obtained from the Leeds machine and manually measured data by the University of Illinois. 9) PNNL conducted ASMI mid-plane analyses for a 30wt% LCF/PP plaque and compared the predicted fiber orientations with the measured data provided by Purdue University at the selected locations on this plaque. 10) PNNL put together the DOE 2014 Annual Merit Review (AMR) presentation with the team and presented it at the AMR meetings on June 17, 2014. 11) PNNL built ASMI dual domain models for the Toyota complex part and commenced mold filling analyses of the complex part with different wall thicknesses in order to support part molding. 12) Toyota and Magna discussed with PNNL on tool modification for molding the complex part. Toyota sent the CAD files of the complex part to PNNL to build ASMI models of the part for mold filling analysis to provide guidance to tooling and part molding.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Sanborn, Scott E.; Mathur, Raj N.; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael D.; Wang, Jin; Jin, Xiaoshi; Costa, Franco; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven; Tucker III, Charles L.

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Annual Report, July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported herein covers select tasks remaining in Budget Phase I and many of the tasks of Budget Phase II. The principal Tasks in Budget Phase I included in this report are Reservoir Analysis and Characterization; Advanced Technical Studies; and Technology Transfer, Reporting and Project Management Activities for Budget Phase I. The principle Task in Budget Phase II included in this report is Field Demonstration. Completion of these tasks has enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed, economically evaluated, and implemented in the field. Field implementation of the project commenced during late 1995, with actual CO{sub 2} injection scheduled for start-up in mid-July, 1996. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative CO{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take-or-pay provisions, CO{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price) and gas recycle agreements (expensing costs as opposed to a large upfront capital investment for compression) were negotiated to further improve the project economics. The Grayburg-San Andres section had previously been divided into multiple zones based on the core study and gamma ray markers that correlate wells within the Unit. Each zone was mapped as continuous across the field. Previous core studies concluded that the reservoir quality in the South Cowden Unit (SCU) is controlled primarily by the distribution of a bioturbated and diagenetically-altered rock type with a distinctive {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} texture. The {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} modifier is derived from the visual effect of pervasive, small-scale intermixing of tan oil-stained reservoir rock with tight gray non-reservoir rock.

Chimahusky, J.S.; Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Dollens, K.B.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A mathematical model for countercurrent moving-bed activated carbon adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the column. There was insufficient data taken to verify this model. The testing procedure was limited by the approximate uniformity of the influent concentrations in the pilot plant and the effect of the activated carbon concentration and initial solute...A MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR COUNTERCURRENT MOVING-BED ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION A Thesis by DOUGLAS HAROLD ANDERSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

Anderson, Douglas Harold

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Preparation of activated carbon from sorghum pith and its structural and electrochemical properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Sorghum pith as the cost effective raw material for activated carbon preparation. {yields} Physicochemical method/KOH activation for preparation of activated carbon is inexpensive. {yields} Activated carbon having lower surface area surprisingly delivered a higher specific capacitance. {yields} Treated at 500 {sup o}C activated carbon exceeds maximum specific capacitances of 320.6 F/g at 10 mV/s. -- Abstract: The cost effective activated carbon (AC) has been prepared from sorghum pith by NaOH activation at various temperatures, including 300 {sup o}C (AC1), 400 {sup o}C (AC2) and 500 {sup o}C (AC3) for the electrodes in electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) applications. The amorphous nature of the samples has been observed from X-ray diffraction and Raman spectral studies. Subsequently, the surface functional groups, surface morphology, pore diameter and specific surface area have been identified through FT-IR, SEM, histogram and N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherm methods. The electrochemical characterization of AC electrodes has been examined using cyclic voltammetry technique in the potential range of -0.1-1.2 V in 1.0 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte at different scan rates (10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 100 mV/s). The maximum specific capacitances of 320.6 F/g at 10 mV/s and 222.1 F/g at 100 mV/s have been obtained for AC3 electrode when compared with AC1 and AC2 electrodes. Based on the characterization studies, it has been inferred that the activated carbon prepared from sorghum pith may be one of the innovative carbon electrode materials for EDLC applications.

Senthilkumar, S.T.; Senthilkumar, B. [Solid State Ionics and Energy Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India)] [Solid State Ionics and Energy Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Balaji, S. [Materials Laboratory, Thiagarajar Advanced Research Center, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai 625015 (India)] [Materials Laboratory, Thiagarajar Advanced Research Center, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai 625015 (India); Sanjeeviraja, C. [Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630003 (India)] [Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630003 (India); Kalai Selvan, R., E-mail: selvankram@buc.edu.in [Solid State Ionics and Energy Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Effect of silicate modulus and metakaolin incorporation on the carbonation of alkali silicate-activated slags  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerated carbonation is induced in pastes and mortars produced from alkali silicate-activated granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS)-metakaolin (MK) blends, by exposure to CO{sub 2}-rich gas atmospheres. Uncarbonated specimens show compressive strengths of up to 63 MPa after 28 days of curing when GBFS is used as the sole binder, and this decreases by 40-50% upon complete carbonation. The final strength of carbonated samples is largely independent of the extent of metakaolin incorporation up to 20%. Increasing the metakaolin content of the binder leads to a reduction in mechanical strength, more rapid carbonation, and an increase in capillary sorptivity. A higher susceptibility to carbonation is identified when activation is carried out with a lower solution modulus (SiO{sub 2}/Na{sub 2}O ratio) in metakaolin-free samples, but this trend is reversed when metakaolin is added due to the formation of secondary aluminosilicate phases. High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffractometry of uncarbonated paste samples shows that the main reaction products in alkali-activated GBFS/MK blends are C-S-H gels, and aluminosilicates with a zeolitic (gismondine) structure. The main crystalline carbonation products are calcite in all samples and trona only in samples containing no metakaolin, with carbonation taking place in the C-S-H gels of all samples, and involving the free Na{sup +} present in the pore solution of the metakaolin-free samples. Samples containing metakaolin do not appear to have the same availability of Na{sup +} for carbonation, indicating that this is more effectively bound in the presence of a secondary aluminosilicate gel phase. It is clear that claims of exceptional carbonation resistance in alkali-activated binders are not universally true, but by developing a fuller mechanistic understanding of this process, it will certainly be possible to improve performance in this area.

Bernal, Susan A., E-mail: susana.bernal@gmail.co [Materials Engineering Department, Composite Materials Group, CENM, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Mejia de Gutierrez, Ruby [Materials Engineering Department, Composite Materials Group, CENM, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Provis, John L., E-mail: jprovis@unimelb.edu.a [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Rose, Volker [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) project for the south Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. All work this quarter falls within Task V field demonstration. Short progress reports are presented for field demonstration involving: drill horizontal injection wells 6C-25H and 7C-11H; and drill two vertical WAG injectors along South Cowden Unit boundary.

NONE

1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

Equilibrium polymerization of cyclic carbonate oligomers. II. Role of multiple active sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Equilibrium polymerization of cyclic carbonate oligomers. II. Role of multiple active sites P 30 November 2001; accepted 8 February 2002 Ring opening polymerization of bisphenol A polycarbonate 0.36%) of chemically active particles lead to equilibrium polymerization. There is a continuous

156

PERGAMON Carbon 38 (2000) 17571765 High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

directly, as in a traditional H , 23.1% CO, 5.8% CO , 6.6% H O, 0.5% H S, and2 2 2 2 coal-fired power plant types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H S from a simulated coal temperature was examined as a2 function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal

Cal, Mark P.

157

EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct:DirectivesSAND2015-2127 O Dr.andAnnual TrainingEFRC Carbon

158

In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. Abstract: In geologic carbon sequestration, while part of the injected carbon dioxide will dissolve into host...

159

Inorganic Carbon Turnover caused by Digestion of Carbonate Sands and Metabolic Activity of Holothurians  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this study inorganic additional aspects of carbon turnover were determined in laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, H. leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni from One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 6.1 to 6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts as opposed to 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2kg and 80 ± 7kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual dissolution rates of H. atra and S. herrmanni of 6.5±1.9g and 9.6±1.4g, respectively, suggest that 0.05±0.02% and 0.1±0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During the incubations the CaCO3 dissolution was 0.07±0.01%, 0.04±0.01% and 0.21±0.05% of the fecal casts for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state for both aragonite and calcite minerals during laboratory incubations decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monitoring Geological Carbon Sequestration Authors: RongmaoGeological Carbon Sequestration ABSTRACT Injection andmonitoring geological carbon sequestration. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Zhou, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership- Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future anthropogenic carbon storage in this region.

162

Comment on the “Role of SO2 for Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal Combustion Flue Gas by Activated Carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A communication in response to the excellent and timely paper entitled “Role of SO2 for Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal Combustion Flue Gas by Activated Carbon”.

Granite, E.J.; Presto, A.A.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole � including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite � at 1152�2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4�1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6�1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The potential for leakage of injected CO2 at carbon seques-tration sites is a significant concern in the design and deploy-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the design and deploy- ment of long-term carbon sequestration efforts. Effective and reliable monitoring Technology Laboratory (NETL) West Pearl Queen carbon sequestration pilot site in southeastern New Mexico, USA-penetrating radar survey and tracer observations at the West Pearl Queen carbon sequestration pilot site, New Mexico

Wilson, Thomas H.

165

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon materials Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbon dioxide through a natural process known as carbonation reaction that results... in carbon dioxide sequestration in these materials. About 19% of the carbon dioxide produced...

166

An electrochemical double layer capacitor using an activated carbon electrode with gel electrolyte binder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) was prepared with an activated carbon powder electrode with poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) based gel electrolyte. Ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) were used as plasticizer and tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF{sub 4}) was used as the supporting electrolyte. An optimized gel electrolyte of PVdF-HFP/PC/EC/TEABF{sub 4} - 23/31/35/11 mass ratio exhibited high ionic conductivity of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm, high electrode capacitance, and good mechanical strength. An electrode consisting of activated carbon (AC) with the gel electrolyte as the binder (AC/PVdF-HFP based gel, 7/3 mass ratio) showed a higher specific capacitance and a lower ion diffusion resistance within the electrode than a carbon electrode, prepared with PVdF-HFP binder without plasticizer. This suggests that an electrode mixed with the gel electrolyte has a lower ion diffusion resistance inside the electrode. The highest specific capacitance of 123 F/g was achieved with an electrode containing AC with a specific surface area of 2500 m{sup 2}/g. A coin-type EDLC cell with optimized components showed excellent cycleability exceeding 10{sup 4} cycles with ca. 100% coulombic efficiency achieved when charging and discharging was repeated between 1.0 and 2.5 V at 1.66 mA/cm{sup 2}.

Osaka, Tetsuya, Liu, X.; Nojima, Masashi; Momma, Toshiyuki [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan)] [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Gel nanostructure in alkali-activated binders based on slag and fly ash, and effects of accelerated carbonation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Binders formed through alkali-activation of slags and fly ashes, including ‘fly ash geopolymers’, provide appealing properties as binders for low-emissions concrete production. However, the changes in pH and pore solution chemistry induced during accelerated carbonation testing provide unrealistically low predictions of in-service carbonation resistance. The aluminosilicate gel remaining in an alkali-activated slag system after accelerated carbonation is highly polymerised, consistent with a decalcification mechanism, while fly ash-based binders mainly carbonate through precipitation of alkali salts (bicarbonates at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations, or carbonates under natural exposure) from the pore solution, with little change in the binder gel identifiable by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In activated fly ash/slag blends, two distinct gels (C–A–S–H and N–A–S–H) are formed; under accelerated carbonation, the N–A–S–H gel behaves comparably to fly ash-based systems, while the C–A–S–H gel is decalcified similarly to alkali-activated slag. This provides new scope for durability optimisation, and for developing appropriate testing methodologies. -- Highlights: •C-A-S-H gel in alkali-activated slag decalcifies during accelerated carbonation. •Alkali-activated fly ash gel changes much less under CO{sub 2} exposure. •Blended slag-fly ash binder contains two coexisting gel types. •These two gels respond differently to carbonation. •Understanding of carbonation mechanisms is essential in developing test methods.

Bernal, Susan A., E-mail: s.bernal@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Walkley, Brant; San Nicolas, Rackel [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)] [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Gehman, John D. [School of Chemistry and Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)] [School of Chemistry and Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Brice, David G.; Kilcullen, Adam R. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia) [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia); Duxson, Peter [Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia)] [Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia); Deventer, Jannie S.J. van [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Adsorption characteristics of benzene on biosolid adsorbent and commercial activated carbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study selected biosolids from a petrochemical wastewater treatment plant as the raw material. The sludge was immersed in 0.5-5 M of zinc chloride (ZnCl{sub 2}) solutions and pyrolyzed at different temperatures and times. Results indicated that the 1-M ZnCl{sub 2}-immersed biosolids pyrolyzed at 500{sup o}C for 30 min could be reused and were optimal biosolid adsorbents for benzene adsorption. Pore volume distribution analysis indicated that the mesopore contributed more than the macropore and micropore in the biosolid adsorbent. The benzene adsorption capacity of the biosolid adsorbent was 65 and 55% of the G206 (granular-activated carbon) and BPL (coal-based activated carbon; Calgon, Carbon Corp.) activated carbons, respectively. Data from the adsorption and desorption cycles indicated that the benzene adsorption capacity of the biosolid adsorbent was insignificantly reduced compared with the first-run capacity of the adsorbent; therefore, the biosolid adsorbent could be reused as a commercial adsorbent, although its production cost is high. 18 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Hung-Lung Chiang; Kuo-Hsiung Lin; Chih-Yu Chen; Ching-Guan Choa; Ching-Shyung Hwu; Nina Lai [China Medical University, Taichung (Taiwan). Department of Risk Management

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

DEVELOPMENT OF A CO2 SEQUESTRATION MODULE BY INTEGRATING MINERAL ACTIVATION AND AQUEOUS CARBONATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mineral carbonation is a promising concept for permanent CO{sub 2} sequestration due to the vast natural abundance of the raw minerals, the permanent storage of CO{sub 2} in solid form as carbonates, and the overall reaction being exothermic. However, the primary drawback to mineral carbonation is the reaction kinetics. To accelerate the reaction, aqueous carbonation processes are preferred, where the minerals are firstly dissolved in solution. In aqueous carbonation, the key step is the dissolution rate of the mineral, where the mineral dissolution reaction is likely to be surface controlled. In order to accelerate the dissolution process, the serpentine can be ground to very fine particle size (<37 {micro}m), but this is a very energy intensive process. Alternatively, magnesium could be chemically extracted in aqueous solution. Phase I showed that chemical surface activation helps to dissolve the magnesium from the serpentine minerals (particle size {approx}100 {micro}m), and furthermore, the carbonation reaction can be conducted under mild conditions (20 C and 650 psig) compared to previous studies that required >185 C, >1850 psig and <37 {micro}m particle size. Phase I also showed that over 70% of the magnesium can be extracted at ambient temperature leaving amorphous SiO{sub 2} with surface areas {approx} 330m{sup 2}/g. The overall objective of Phase 2 of this research program is to optimize the active carbonation process developed in Phase I in order to design an integrated CO{sub 2} sequestration module. During the current reporting period, Task 1 ''Mineral activation'' was initiated and focused on a parametric study to optimize the operation conditions for the mineral activation, where serpentine and sulfuric acid were reacted, as following the results from Phase 1. Several experimental factors were outlined as having a potential influence on the mineral activation. This study has focused to date on the effects of varying the acid concentration, particle size, and the reaction time. The reaction yields and the characterization of the reaction products by ICP/AES, TGA, and BET analyses were used to describe the influence of each of the experimental variables. The reaction yield was as high as 48% with a 5M acid concentration, with lower values directly corresponding to lower acid concentrations. ICP/AES results are indicative of the selective dissolution of magnesium with reaction yields. Significant improvements in the removal of moisture, as observed from TGA studies, as well as in the dissolution can be realized with the comminution of particles to a D{sub 50} less than 125 {micro}m. A minimum threshold value of 3M concentration of sulfuric acid was determined to exist in terms of the removal of moisture from serpentine. Contrary to expected, the reaction time, within this design of experiments, has been shown to be insignificant. Potentially coupled with this unexpected result are low BET surface areas of the treated serpentine. These results are issues of further consideration to be addressed under the carbonation studies. The remaining results are as expected, including the dissolution of magnesium, which is to be utilized within the carbonation unit. Phase 1 studies have shown that carbonation reactions could be carried out under a milder regime through the implementation of NaOH titration with the magnesium solution. The optimization of acid concentration, particle size, and reaction temperature will ultimately be determined according to the carbonation efficiencies. Therefore and according to the planned project schedule, research efforts are moving into Task 2 ''Aqueous carbonation'' as the redesign of the reactor unit is nearly completed.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; George Alexander

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Tevatron injection timing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yang, Junbing (Westmont, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Naperville, IL)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

172

CO2-Brine Surface Dissolution and Injection: CO2 Storage Enhancement Paul Emeka Eke, SPE, Mark Naylor, Stuart Haszeldine and Andrew Curtis, Scottish Centre for Carbon Storage,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are population increase, per capita GDP (also known as ``affluence level''), the energy intensity of the economy by the gross domestic product, GDP), energy production, E, carbon-based fuels used for energy production, C (E/GDP) and the carbon intensity of the energy system (C/E). The term E/GDP reflects the sectorial

173

Design and Implementation of a C02 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells in a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to utilize reservoir characteristics and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO2) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. Also the project seeks to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field.

None

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle objective of this project is to demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of an innovative reservoir management and carbon dioxide (CO2) flood project development approach for improving CO2 flood project economics in shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs.

Czirr, K.L.; Gaddis, M.P.; Moshell, M.K.

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

175

Recent studies on activated carbons and fly ashes from Turkish resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article deals with adsorptive properties of activated carbons (ACs) and fly ashes from Turkish coal and biomass resources. ACs because of their high surface area, microporous character and the chemical nature of their surface have been considered potential adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastewater. Pyrolysis is an established process method for preparation of activated carbon from biomass. The bio-char is can be used as AC. The adsorption properties of ACs were strictly defined by the physicochemical nature of their surface and their texture, i.e., pore volume, pore size distribution, surface area. It is well known that the pH of the solution-adsorbant mixture is an important variable in the adsorption process. Fly ash has the highest adsorption capacity (198.2 mg/g for Cd(II)). Almond shell AC has the lowest adsorption capacity (2.7 mg/g).

Ayhan Demirbas; Gulsin Arslan; Erol Pehlivan [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Oxidative Degradation of Trichloroethylene Adsorbed on Active Carbons: Use of Microwave Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OXIDATIVE DEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE ADSORBED ON ACTIVE CARBONS: USE OF MICROWAVE ENERGY R. VARMA, S. P. NANDI, D. CLEAVELAND, K. M. MYLES, D. R. VISSERS, AND P. A. NELSON Chemist Chemical Technology Division Argonne National... microwave energy and heatup. The bed temperature was estimated to be from 350 to 400 0 C. The extent of TCE degradation was determined from analysis of the exit gaa as well as the start ing and final bed material. The highest TCE degra dation (NBOl...

Varma, R.; Nandi, S. P.; Cleaveland, D.; Myles, K. M.; Vissers, D. R.; Nelson, P. A.

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon pac Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(GHG) such as carbon dioxide... emissions through carbon offsets or some other means. A carbon offset is created by voluntarily removing Source: Wynne, Randolph H. - Department...

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon columns Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(GHG) such as carbon dioxide... emissions through carbon offsets or some other means. A carbon offset is created by voluntarily removing Source: Wynne, Randolph H. - Department...

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon gac Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(GHG) such as carbon dioxide... emissions through carbon offsets or some other means. A carbon offset is created by voluntarily removing Source: Wynne, Randolph H. - Department...

180

Evaluation of the effects of contaminant injection location and injection method on the determination of overall relative room ventilation efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Calculation of zeroeth moment Calculation of first moment. . 29 30 Diagram of flows in and out of a perfectly mixed room. 30 Floor plan of test room. 31 Carbon dioxide concentration versus time for supply... duct injection point and pulse injection method. 32 Example of use of moments to determine mean age of air. . . . 29 Figure 7. Carbon dioxide concentration versus time for short circuit injection point and pulse injection method. 32 Figure 8...

Pierce, Stephen Dale

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Analysis of condensate banking dynamics in a gas condensate reservoir under different injection schemes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

condensate reservoir under natural depletion, and injection of methane, injection of carbon dioxide, produced gas recycling and water injection. To monitor the condensate banking dynamics near the wellbore area, such as oil saturation and compositional...

Sandoval Rodriguez, Angelica Patricia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated mineral carbon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Heat Engineering Laboratory Summary: FACULTY OF TECHNOLOGY Heat Engineering Laboratory Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral... - Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral...

183

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and gas, have caused a substantial increase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil-caused CO2 emissions and to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. 2.0 What is carbon sequestration? The term "carbon sequestration" is used to describe both natural and deliberate CARBON,INGIGATONSPERYEAR 1.5 Fossil

184

PT AND PT/NI "NEEDLE" ELETROCATALYSTS ON CARBON NANOTUBES WITH HIGH ACTIVITY FOR THE ORR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Platinum and platinum/nickel alloy electrocatalysts supported on graphitized (gCNT) or nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (nCNT) are prepared and characterized. Pt deposition onto carbon nanotubes results in Pt 'needle' formations that are 3.5 nm in diameter and {approx}100 nm in length. Subsequent Ni deposition and heat treatment results in PtNi 'needles' with an increased diameter. All Pt and Pt/Ni materials were tested as electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The Pt and Pt/Ni catalysts showed excellent performance for the ORR, with the heat treated PtNi/gCNT (1.06 mA/cm{sup 2}) and PtNi/nCNT (0.664 mA/cm{sup 2}) showing the highest activity.

Colon-Mercado, H.

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

Carbon monoxide alleviates ethanol-induced oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stress-inducible protein heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) is well-appreciative to counteract oxidative damage and inflammatory stress involving the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). The potential role and signaling pathways of HO-1 metabolite carbon monoxide (CO), however, still remained unclear. To explore the precise mechanisms, ethanol-dosed adult male Balb/c mice (5.0 g/kg.bw.) or ethanol-incubated primary rat hepatocytes (100 mmol/L) were pretreated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimmer (CORM-2, 8 mg/kg for mice or 20 ?mol/L for hepatocytes), as well as other pharmacological reagents. Our data showed that CO released from HO-1 induction by quercetin prevented ethanol-derived oxidative injury, which was abolished by CO scavenger hemoglobin. The protection was mimicked by CORM-2 with the attenuation of GSH depletion, SOD inactivation, MDA overproduction, and the leakage of AST, ALT or LDH in serum and culture medium induced by ethanol. Moreover, CORM-2 injection or incubation stimulated p38 phosphorylation and suppressed abnormal Tnfa and IL-6, accompanying the alleviation of redox imbalance induced by ethanol and aggravated by inflammatory factors. The protective role of CORM-2 was abolished by SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) but not by PD98059 (ERK inhibitor) or SP600125 (JNK inhibitor). Thus, HO-1 released CO prevented ethanol-elicited hepatic oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway, suggesting a potential therapeutic role of gaseous signal molecule on ALD induced by naturally occurring phytochemicals. - Highlights: • CO alleviated ethanol-derived liver oxidative and inflammatory stress in mice. • CO eased ethanol and inflammatory factor-induced oxidative damage in hepatocytes. • The p38 MAPK is a key signaling mechanism for the protective function of CO in ALD.

Li, Yanyan; Gao, Chao; Shi, Yanru; Tang, Yuhan; Liu, Liang; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Ministry of Education Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Xing, Mingyou [Department of Infectious Diseases, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Liu, Liegang [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Ministry of Education Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Yao, Ping, E-mail: yaoping@mails.tjmu.edu.cn [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Ministry of Education Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Photocatalytic oxidation of NO{sub x} using TiO{sub 2}/activated carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes experimental results for a method of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emission control. NO{sub x} was oxidized photocatalytically to nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) using different titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) catalysts. The addition of ferric oxide improved the performance of the TiO{sub 2}. Of four adsorbents tested, activated carbon performed best in suppressing NO{sub 2} concentration. Optimum catalyst compositions were determined. Initial results indicated that photocatalytic oxidation of NO{sub x} offers several advantages over other emission control methods.

Wang, S.; Chen, D.H.; Li, K.Y. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Nanoporous separators for supercapacitor using activated carbon monolith electrode from oil palm empty fruit bunches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activated porous carbon electrode prepared from fibres of oil palm empty fruit bunches was used for preparing the carbon based supercapacitor cells. The symmetrical supercapacitor cells were fabricated using carbon electrodes, stainless steel current collector, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte, and three types of nanoporous separators. Cells A, B and C were fabricated using polypropylene, eggshell membrane, and filter paper, respectively. Electrochemical characterizations data from Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry, and Galvanic Charge Discharge techniques showed that specific capacitance, specific power and specific energy for cell A were 122 F g{sup ?1}, 177 W kg{sup ?1}, 3.42 Wh kg{sup ?1}, cell B; 125 F g{sup ?1}, 179 W kg{sup ?1}, and 3.64 Wh kg{sup ?1}, and cell C; 180 F g{sup ?1}, 178 W kg{sup ?1}, 4.27 Wh kg{sup ?1}. All the micrographs from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope showed that the different in nanoporous structure of the separators lead to a significant different in influencing the values of specific capacitance, power and energy of supercapacitors, which is associated with the mobility of ion into the pore network. These results indicated that the filter paper was superior than the eggshell membrane and polypropylene nanoporous separators. However, we found that in terms of acidic resistance, polypropylene was the best nanoporous separator for acidic medium.

Nor, N. S. M., E-mail: madra@ukm.my; Deraman, M., E-mail: madra@ukm.my; Omar, R., E-mail: madra@ukm.my; Basri, N. H.; Dolah, B. N. M. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Taer, E.; Awitdrus,; Farma, R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Riau, 28293 Pekanbaru, Riau (Indonesia)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity carbon intensity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in their early stages, and the accuracy of soil carbon estimates... Carbon Changes for Bioenergy Crops Prepared by: David Andress ... Source: Argonne National Laboratory - GREET...

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon application Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in their early stages, and the accuracy of soil carbon estimates... Carbon Changes for Bioenergy Crops Prepared by: David Andress David Andress & Associates, Inc. 11008... ......

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon based Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbon credits, it is absolutely essential... not credit any soil carbon changes to the bioenergy crops. A second ... Source: Argonne National Laboratory - GREET Model Project...

191

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon full-scale Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Carbon Dioxide In Deep Summary: full-scale demonstration projects. In closing, carbon sequestration is a promising and necessary... Benson Testimony, November 7, 2007....

192

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon supported Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

claimed to be carbon-neutral. Initiatives based on this approach may be referred... ' for carbon sequestration. However, this interpretation is not supported by the long-term...

193

Effect of active layer thickness on differential quantum efficiency of 1. 3 and 1. 55. mu. m InGaAsP injection lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dependence of differential quantum efficiency (eta/sub d/) on active layer thickness (d) for 1.3 and 1.55 ..mu..m InGaAsP buried crescent (BC) injection lasers has been measured. A comparison of the results shows that eta/sub d/ for 1.55 ..mu..m lasers increases more rapidly with decreasing d than eta/sub d/ for 1.3 ..mu..m lasers. The significantly different dependence of eta/sub d/ on d in BC lasers suggests that the optical absorption in the active region of InGaAsP lasers is strongly wavelength dependent. This gives the important practical conclusion that the eta/sub d/ for 1.55 ..mu..m lasers can be significantly improved by reducing d, whereas the eta/sub d/ for 1.3 ..mu..m lasers can only be slightly improved by reducing d. As a result of eta/sub d/ vs d investigation, we have obtained high performance 1.3 and 1.55 ..mu..m BC lasers which exhibit threshold currents as low as 9 mA at 25 /sup 0/C, high-temperature operation (up to 100 /sup 0/C), and eta/sub d/ over 65% (1.3 ..mu..m) and 45% (1.55 ..mu..m).

Cheng, W.H.; Su, C.B.; Renner, D.

1987-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

194

Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting new regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. These regulations are directed at the existing fleet of nearly 1,100 boilers. These plants are relatively old with an average age of over 40 years. Although most of these units are capable of operating for many additional years, there is a desire to minimize large capital expenditures because of the reduced (and unknown) remaining life of the plant to amortize the project. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. This is the final site report for tests conducted at Laramie River Station Unit 3, one of five sites evaluated in this DOE/NETL program. The overall objective of the test program is to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at five plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, and AEP's Conesville Station Unit 6. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The goals for the program established by DOE/NETL are to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the benchmark established by DOE of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The goals of the program were exceeded at Laramie River Station by achieving over 90% mercury removal at a sorbent cost of $3,980/lb ($660/oz) mercury removed for a coal mercury content of 7.9 lb/TBtu.

Sharon Sjostrom

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

Magnesium oxide nanoparticles on green activated carbon as efficient CO{sub 2} adsorbent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was focused on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) adsorption ability using Magnesium oxide (MgO) nanoparticles and MgO nanoparticles supported activated carbon based bamboo (BAC). The suitability of MgO as a good CO{sub 2} adsorbent was clarified using Thermodynamic considerations (Gibbs-Helmholtz relationship). The ?H and ?G of this reaction were ? 117.5 kJ?mol{sup ?1} and ? 65.4 kJ?mol{sup ?1}, respectively, at standard condition (298 K and 1 atm). The complete characterization of these adsorbent were conducted by using BET, XRD, FTIR, TEM and TPD?CO{sub 2}. The surface areas for MgO nanoparticles and MgO nanoparticles supported BAC were 297.1 m{sup 2}/g and 702.5 m{sup 2}/g, respectively. The MgO nanoparticles supported BAC shown better physical and chemical adsorption ability with 39.8 cm{sup 3}/g and 6.5 mmol/g, respectively. The combination of MgO nanoparticle and BAC which previously prepared by chemical method can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions as well as better CO{sub 2} adsorption behavior. Overall, our results indicate that nanoparticles of MgO on BAC posses unique surface chemistry and their high surface reactivity coupled with high surface area allowed them to approach the goal as an efficient CO{sub 2} adsorbent.

Wan Isahak, Wan Nor Roslam; Ramli, Zatil Amali Che; Mohamed Hisham, Mohamed Wahab; Yarmo, Mohd Ambar [Low Carbon Economy (LCE) Research Group, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

196

Analysis of Power System Dynamics Subject to Stochastic Power Injections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--We propose a framework to study the impact of stochastic active/reactive power injections. In this framework the active/reactive power injections evolve according to a continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) model. The DAE model is linearized around a nominal set of active/reactive power injections

Liberzon, Daniel

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon fluidized-bed Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies 16 PRODUCTION OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES BY MEANS OF FLUIDIZED BED PYROLYSIS OF VIRGIN OR RECYCLED POLYMERS Summary: PRODUCTION OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES BY...

198

DEVELOPMENT OF A CO2 SEQUESTRATION MODULE BY INTEGRATING MINERAL ACTIVATION AND AQUEOUS CARBONATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mineral carbonation provides a potential option for the long-term storage of carbon dioxide. Serpentine has been chosen as the feedstock mineral, due to its abundance and availability. However, the relatively low reactivity of serpentine has warranted research into physical and chemical treatments that have been shown to greatly increase its reactivity. The use of sulfuric acid as an accelerating medium for the removal of magnesium from serpentine has recently been investigated. In addition to the challenges presented by the dissolution of serpentine, another challenge is the subsequent carbonation of the magnesium ions. A stable hydration sphere for the magnesium ion reduces the carbonation kinetics by obstructing the formation of the carbonation products. Accordingly, this research has evaluated the solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solution, the interaction between the dissociation products of carbon dioxide, and the carbonation potential of the magnesium ion.

George Alexander; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Parvana Aksoy; Harold Schobert

2006-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

199

Numerical simulations of the thermal impact of supercritical CO2 injection on chemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical simulations of the thermal impact of supercritical CO2 injection on chemical reactivity, investigates thermal effects during CO2 injection into a deep carbonate formation. Different thermal processes in carbonate aquifers, and the influence of anthropic thermal processes (e.g., injection temperature

Boyer, Edmond

200

Microfluidic sieve using intertwined, free-standing carbon nanotube mesh as active medium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfluidic sieve having a substrate with a microfluidic channel, and a carbon nanotube mesh. The carbon nanotube mesh is formed from a plurality of intertwined free-standing carbon nanotubes which are fixedly attached within the channel for separating, concentrating, and/or filtering molecules flowed through the channel. In one embodiment, the microfluidic sieve is fabricated by providing a substrate having a microfluidic channel, and growing the intertwined free-standing carbon nanotubes from within the channel to produce the carbon nanotube mesh attached within the channel.

Bakajin, Olgica (San Leandro, CA); Noy, Aleksandr (Belmont, CA)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Iron optimization for Fenton-driven oxidation of MTBE-spent granular activated carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fenton-driven chemical oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) was accomplished through the addition of iron (Fe) and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) (15.9 g/L; pH 3). The GAC used was URV, a bituminous-coal based carbon. The Fe concentration in GAC was incrementally varied (1020-25 660 mg/kg) by the addition of increasing concentrations of Fe solution (FeSO4{center_dot}7H{sub 2}O). MTBE degradation in Fe-amended GAC increased by an order of magnitude over Fe-unamended GAC and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reaction was predominantly (99%) attributed to GAC-bound Fe within the porous structure of the GAC. Imaging and microanalysis of GAC particles indicated limited penetration of Fe into GAC. The optimal Fe concentration was 6710 mg/kg (1020 mg/kg background; 5690 mg/kg amended Fe) and resulted in the greatest MTBE removal and maximum Fe loading oxidation efficiency (MTBE oxidized (g)/Fe loaded to GAC(mg/Kg)). At lower Fe concentrations, the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reaction was Fe limited. At higher Fe concentrations, the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reaction was not entirely Fe limited, and reductions in GAC surface area, GAC pore volume, MTBE adsorption, and Fe loading oxidation efficiency were measured. Results are consistent with nonuniform distribution of Fe, pore blockage in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} transport, unavailable Fe, and limitations in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} diffusive transport, and emphasize the importance of optimal Fe loading. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Scott G. Huling; Patrick K. Jones; Tony R. Lee [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ada, OK (United States). Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Iodine Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins and Activated Carbons– Batch Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iodine sorption onto seven resins and six carbon materials was evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36 on the Hanford Site. These materials were tested using a range of solution-to-solid ratios. The test results are as follows: • The efficacy of the resin and granular activated carbon materials was less than predicted based on manufacturers’ performance data. It is hypothesized that this is due to the differences in speciation previously determined for Hanford groundwater. • The sorption of iodine is affected by the iodine species in the source water. Iodine loading on resins using source water ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 189.9 to 227.0 mL/g. The sorption values when the iodine is converted to iodide ranged from 2.75 to 5.90 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 536.3 to 2979.6 mL/g. It is recommended that methods to convert iodine to iodide be investigated in fiscal year (FY) 2015. • The chemicals used to convert iodine to iodate adversely affected the sorption of iodine onto the carbon materials. Using as-received source water, loading and Kd values ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g and 189.8 to 226.3 mL/g respectively. After treatment, loading and Kd values could not be calculated because there was little change between the initial and final iodine concentration. It is recommended the cause of the decrease in iodine sorption be investigated in FY15. • In direct support of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has evaluated samples from within the 200W pump and treat bioreactors. As part of this analysis, pictures taken within the bioreactor reveal a precipitate that, based on physical properties and known aqueous chemistry, is hypothesized to be iron pyrite or chalcopyrite, which could affect iodine adsorption. It is recommended these materials be tested at different solution-to-solid ratios in FY15 to determine their effect on iodine sorption.

Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Field Trip Guide to Serpentinite, Silica-Carbonate Alteration, and Related Hydrothermal Activity in the Clear Lake Region, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide is designed to familiarize scientists with the geology, structure, alteration, and fluids typical of California serpentinites for purposes of carbon dioxide sequestration (Lackner et al., 1995). Goff et al. (1997) and Goff and Lackner (1998) describe the geology and geochemistry of some of the serpentinites from this area. Mechanisms of silica-carbonate alteration were outlined by Barnes et al. (1973). Donnelly-Nolan et al. (1993) most recently reviewed relations between regional hydrothermal alteration and Quarternary volcanic activity. Stanley et al. (1998) summarized geophysical characteristics of the region.

Fraser Goff; George Guthrie

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin, Et Al., 1993) Exploration Activity...

205

C/H{sub 2}O reaction under supercritical conditions and their repercussions in the preparation of activated carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two chars prepared by carbonization of oak wood and anthracite were used to perform a comparative study of the gasification with supercritical water (SCW) and with steam. This work reports the effects of the type of char, the activating agent, temperature, flow rate, and particle size employed on the kinetics, mechanism of reaction, and the characteristics of the activated carbons obtained. The results show that the reactivity of the two chars is much higher with SCW than with steam. Although this increase can be explained in terms of the greater penetration of SCW and diffusional effects in the pore structure of the chars, some aspects suggest a possible change in the mechanism of reaction favored by the formation of clusters in SCW. The evolution of porosity was also found to differ when the char was gasified with SCW and with steam, being governed strongly by the starting material. When the oak char was activated with SCW, the smallest microporosity was broadened from the very first moments due to its very open pore structure, providing carbons with larger micropores and some mesoporosity. In contrast, in the case of the anthracite char, with a narrower pore structure, the evolution of the porosity was slower and less uniform, favoring external gasification of the particle. Accordingly, the carbons had a broader distribution of micropores, and mesoporosity was scarce.

Salvador, F.; Senchez-Montero, M.J.; Izquierdo, C. [University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Total oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane over transition metal-fluorite oxide composite catalysts. I. Catalyst composition and activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel metal oxide composite catalyst for the total oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane was prepared by combining fluorite oxides with active transition metals. The fluorite oxides, such as ceria and zirconia, are oxygen-ion-conducting materials having catalytic properties usually at high temperatures. Active base metal catalysts, such as copper, were used as additives to promote the catalytic properties of these oxides. The contact of the two types of materials gave rise to a high active oxidation catalyst. At a space velocity of about 42,000 h{sup {minus}1}, complete carbon monoxide oxidation in air occurred at room temperature on the Au{sub 0.05}[Ce(La)]{sub 0.95}L{sub x} catalyst and at ca. 100{degrees}C on Cu-Ce-O composite catalysts. At the same space velocity, total oxidation of methane on the Cu-Ce-O catalyst doped with La{sub 2}O{sub 3} or SrO took place at ca. 550{degrees}C. The specific carbon monoxide oxidation activity of the Cu-Ce-O catalyst was several orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional copper-based catalysts and comparable or superior to platinum catalysts. This type of composite catalyst also showed excellent resistance to water vapor poisoning. The enhanced catalyst activity and stability resulted from strong interaction of the transition metal and fluorite oxide materials. 44 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, F. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)] [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon electrodes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

both single and multibarr... the useof carbon fiber electrodes in voltammetry (Armstrong-James and Millar, 1979; Kruk et al., 1980... - tophoretic pipettes. 29 (28%) used...

208

Biodegradation of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) using a granular activated carbon trickling filter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot scale trickling filter was constructed using granular activated carbon (GAC) as the packing medium and inoculated with a microbial culture known to degrade MTBE. The packing dimensions were 0.076 m in diameter and 0.22 m deep. The unit operated with recycling flow for two months before a biofilm was observed on the GAC. After two additional months the biofilm had visibly spread throughout the packing. A few pieces of GAC were placed in a sealed bottle with MTBE-contaminated water and nutrients. Headspace analysis performed over 14 days confirmed that MTBE degradation was occurring. The trickling filter was converted to continuous flow and operated for one month at a nominal flow rate of 0.1 L/min and a hydraulic loading rate of 32 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}-d. Samples were collected for analysis at the spray nozzle and at the bottom of the trickling filter. Fractional removal varied with influent MTBE concentration, temperature and liquid flow rate. Percent MTBE removal was as high as 85%. A mechanical failure resulted in the trickling filter bed drying and percent removal dropping to less than 1 percent. However, the system recovered within five days.

Converse, B.M.; Schroeder, E.D.; Chang, D.P.Y.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

High-capacity electric double-layer capacitor with high-density-activated carbon fiber electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently the authors have presented a method to prepare activated carbon fiber with high bulk density (HD-ACF) without using any binders. The possibility of using the HD-ACF as an electrode for electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) was examined in this paper. The capacitance of the EDLC with the HD-ACF electrode increased with the increase of bulk density of the HD-ACF, indicating that individual fibers are highly packed without losing their capacitance. The capacitance also increased in proportion to the size of the HD-ACF electrode. The initial discharge current of the EDLC showed little dependency on either the bulk density or the size of the HD-ACF electrode. These results clarified that the HD-ACF electrode is suitable for constructing a high-power EDLC. The initial discharge current was directly proportional to the conductivity of aqueous KCI used as the electrolyte, indicating that the resistance of the electrolyte is much higher than that of the HD-ACF electrode. This result showed that the efficiency of the HD-ACF was well above the efficiency of the electrolyte used in this study and that the improvement of the ionic conductivity of electrolyte is also necessary for developing a high-power EDLC.

Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Shudo, Atsushi; Miura, Kouichi

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Perchlorate ion (C104) removal using an electrochemically induced catalytic reaction on modified activated carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Virgin carbon and carbon modified by oxidation with HNO3, NaOH and H2O2 were examined in this study for their ability to remove perchlorate by reduction or adsorption mechanisms. Surface functional groups formed on the modified AC (MAC) were examined...

Langille, Meredith Caitlyn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Rich catalytic injection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

Veninger, Albert (Coventry, CT)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Annual report, June 3, 1994--October 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported here covers Budget Phase I of the project. The principal tasks in Budget Phase I are the Reservoir Analysis and Characterization Task and the Advanced Technology Definition Task. Completion of these tasks have enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed and evaluated from an economic and risk analysis standpoint. Field implementation of the project has been recommended to the working interest owner of the South Cowden Unit (SCU) and approval has been obtained. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative CO{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take or pay requirements, CO{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate crude oil price) and gas recycle agreements (expensing cost as opposed to large capital investments for compression) were negotiated to further improve project economics. A detailed reservoir characterization study was completed by an integrated team of geoscientists and engineers. The study consisted of detailed core description, integration of log response to core descriptions, mapping of the major flow units, evaluation of porosity and permeability relationships, geostatistical analysis of permeability trends, and direct integration of reservoir performance with the geological interpretation. The study methodology fostered iterative bidirectional feedback between the reservoir characterization team and the reservoir engineering/simulation team to allow simultaneous refinement and convergence of the geological interpretation with the reservoir model. The fundamental conclusion from the study is that South Cowden exhibits favorable enhanced oil recovery characteristics, particularly reservoir quality and continuity.

Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Gerard, M.G.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Controlled air injection for a fuel cell system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for injecting oxygen into a fuel cell reformate stream to reduce the level of carbon monoxide while preserving the level of hydrogen in a fuel cell system.

Fronk, Matthew H. (Honeove Falls, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Modeling high-pressure adsorption of gas mixtures on activated carbon and coal using a simplified local-density model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simplified local-density (SLD) theory was investigated regarding its ability to provide accurate representations and predictions of high-pressure supercritical adsorption isotherms encountered in coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration. Attention was focused on the ability of the SLD theory to predict mixed-gas adsorption solely on the basis of information from pure gas isotherms using a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS). An extensive set of high-pressure adsorption measurements was used in this evaluation. These measurements included pure and binary mixture adsorption measurements for several gas compositions up to 14 MPa for Calgon F-400 activated carbon and three water-moistened coals. Also included were ternary measurements for the activated carbon and one coal. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} on dry activated carbon, the SLD-PR can predict the component mixture adsorption within about 2.2 times the experimental uncertainty on average solely on the basis of pure-component adsorption isotherms. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} on two of the three wet coals, the SLD-PR model can predict the component adsorption within the experimental uncertainties on average for all feed fractions (nominally molar compositions of 20/80, 40/60, 60/40, and 80/20) of the three binary gas mixture combinations, although predictions for some specific feed fractions are outside of their experimental uncertainties.

Fitzgerald, J.E.; Robinson, R.L.; Gasem, K.A.M. [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States). School of Chemical Engineering

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

215

9,030,305 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 6, 2015 ...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed...

216

9,959,066 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of March 26, 2015 |...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed...

217

9,932,381 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of March 18, 2015 |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed...

218

9,894,105 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of March 12, 2015 |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed...

219

8,993,963 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of December 17, 2014...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed...

220

Resonantly pumped optical pumping injection cavity lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An optical parametric oscillator is tuned to the resonance wavelength of the etalon in an optical pumping injection cavity (OPIC) laser with a type-II "W" active region, thereby minimizing the threshold pump intensity and ...

Santilli, Michael Robert; McAlpine, T. C.; Greene, K. R.; Olafsen, L. J.; Bewley, W. W.; Felix, C. L.; Vurgaftman, I.; Meyer, J. R.; Lee, H.; Martinelli, R. U.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting new regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. These regulations are directed at the existing fleet of nearly 1,100 boilers. These plants are relatively old with an average age of over 40 years. Although most of these units are capable of operating for many additional years, there is a desire to minimize large capital expenditures because of the reduced (and unknown) remaining life of the plant to amortize the project. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. This is the final site report for tests conducted at DTE Energy's Monroe Power Plant, one of five sites evaluated in this DOE/NETL program. The overall objective of the test program was to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at five plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, and AEP's Conesville Station Unit 6. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The goals for the program established by DOE/NETL were to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the target established by DOE of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The results from Monroe indicate that using DARCO{reg_sign} Hg would result in higher mercury removal (80%) at a sorbent cost of $18,000/lb mercury, or 70% lower than the benchmark. These results demonstrate that the goals established by DOE/NETL were exceeded during this test program. The increase in mercury removal over baseline conditions is defined for this program as a comparison in the outlet emissions measured using the Ontario Hydro method during the baseline and long-term test periods. The change in outlet emissions from baseline to long-term testing was 81%.

Sharon Sjostrom

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

Underground Injection Control (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Injection and Mining Division (IMD) has the responsibility of implementing two major federal environmental programs which were statutorily charged to the Office of Conservation: the Underground...

223

Studies of adsorption characteristics of activated carbons down to 4.5 K for the development of cryosorption pumps for fusion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cryosorption pump is the only possible device to pump helium, hydrogen and its isotopes in fusion environment, such as high magnetic field and high plasma temperatures. Activated carbons are known to be the most suitable adsorbent in the development of cryosorption pumps. For this purpose, the data of adsorption characteristics of activated carbons in the temperature range 4.5 K to 77 K are needed, but are not available in the literature. For obtaining the above data, a commercial micro pore analyzer operating at 77 K has been integrated with a two stage GM cryocooler, which enables the cooling of the sample temperature down to 4.5 K. A heat switch mounted between the second stage cold head and the sample chamber helps to raise the sample chamber temperature to 77 K without affecting the performance of the cryocooler. The detailed description of this system is presented elsewhere. This paper presents the results of experimental studies of adsorption isotherms measured on different types of activated carbons in the form of granules, globules, flake knitted and non-woven types in the temperature range 4.5 K to 10 K using Helium gas as the adsorbate. The above results are analyzed to obtain the pore size distributions and surface areas of the activated carbons. The effect of adhesive used for bonding the activated carbons to the panels is also studied. These results will be useful to arrive at the right choice of activated carbon to be used for the development of cryosorption pumps.

Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, U.; Vivek, G. A. [Centre for Cryogenic Technology, Indian institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Krishnamoorthy, V.; Gangradey, R. [Cryopump Group, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Udgata, S. S.; Tripati, V. S. [I-Design Engineering Solutions Ltd., Ubale Nagar, Wagholi, Pune 412207 (India)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

224

Combustion with reduced carbon in the ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Combustion of coal in which oxygen is injected into the coal as it emerges from burner produces ash having reduced amounts of carbon.

Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool III, Lawrence E.

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

225

Effects of CO{sub 2} activation on electrochemical performance of microporous carbons derived from poly(vinylidene fluoride)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we have prepared microporous carbons (MPCs) derived from poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), and the physical activation of MPCs using CO{sub 2} gas is subsequently carried out with various activation temperatures to investigate the electrochemical performance. PVDF is successfully converted into MPCs with a high specific surface area and well-developed micropores. After CO{sub 2} activation, the specific surface areas of MPCs (CA-MPCs) are enhanced by 12% compared with non-activated MPCs. With increasing activation temperature, the micropore size distributions of A-MPCs also become narrower and shift to larger pore size. It is also confirmed that the CO{sub 2} activation had developed the micropores and introduced the oxygen-containing groups to MPCs? surfaces. From the results, the specific capacitances of the electrodes in electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) based on CA-MPCs are distinctly improved through CO{sub 2} activation. The highest specific capacitance of the A-MPCs activated at 700 °C is about 125 F/g, an enhancement of 74% in comparison with NA-MPCs, at a discharge current of 2 A/g in a 6 M KOH electrolyte solution. We also found that micropore size of 0.67 nm has a specific impact on the capacitance behaviors, besides the specific surface area of the electrode samples. - Graphical abstract: The A-MPC samples with high specific surface area (ranging from 1030 to 1082 m{sup 2}/g), corresponding to micropore sizes of 0.67 and 0.72 nm, and with the amount of oxygen-containing groups ranging from 3.2% to 4.4% have been evaluated as electrodes for EDLC applications. . Display Omitted - Highlights: • Microporous carbons (MPCs) were synthesized without activation process. • Next, we carried out the CO{sub 2} activation of MPCs with activation temperatures. • It had developed the micropores and introduced the O-functional groups to MPCs. • The highest specific capacitance: 125 F/g, an increase of 74% compared to MPCs.

Lee, Seul-Yi; Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.kr

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Pore Size Analysis of Activated Carbons from Argon and Nitrogen Porosimetry Using Density Functional Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Form: December 28, 1999 We present isotherms calculated from density functional theory. A similar set of density functional theory isotherms, previously reported for nitrogen adsorption on carbon Functional Theory Robert J. Dombrowski, Daniel R. Hyduke, and Christian M. Lastoskie* Department of Chemical

Lastoskie, Christian M.

227

SIMULTANEOUS MECHANICAL AND HEAT ACTIVATION: A NEW ROUTE TO ENHANCE SERPENTINE CARBONATION REACTIVITY AND LOWER CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION PROCESS COST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal can support a large fraction of global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other candidate technologies, which propose long-term storage (e.g., ocean and geological sequestration), mineral sequestration permanently disposes of CO{sub 2} as geologically stable mineral carbonates. Only benign, naturally occurring materials are formed, eliminating long-term storage and liability issues. Serpentine carbonation is a leading mineral sequestration process candidate, which offers large scale, permanent sequestration. Deposits exceed those needed to carbonate all the CO{sub 2} that could be generated from global coal reserves, and mining and milling costs are reasonable ({approx}$4 to $5/ton). Carbonation is exothermic, providing exciting low-cost process potential. The remaining goal is to develop an economically viable process. An essential step in this development is increasing the carbonation reaction rate and degree of completion, without substantially impacting other process costs. Recently, the Albany Research Center (ARC) has accelerated serpentine carbonation, which occurs naturally over geological time, to near completion in less than an hour. While reaction rates for natural serpentine have been found to be too slow for practical application, both heat and mechanical (attrition grinding) pretreatment were found to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity. Unfortunately, these processes are too energy intensive to be cost-effective in their present form. In this project we explored the potential that utilizing power plant waste heat (e.g., available up to {approx}200-250 C) during mechanical activation (i.e., thermomechanical activation) offers to enhance serpentine mineral carbonation, while reducing pretreatment energy consumption and process cost. This project was carried out in collaboration with the Albany Research Center (ARC) to maximize the insight into the potential thermomechanical activation offers. Lizardite was selected as the model serpentine material for investigation, due to the relative structural simplicity of its lamellar structure when compared with the corrugated and spiral structures of antigorite and chrysotile, respectively. Hot-ground materials were prepared as a function of grinding temperature, time, and intensity. Carbonation reactivity was explored using the standard ARC serpentine carbonation test (155 C, 150 atm CO{sub 2}, and 1 hr). The product feedstock and carbonation materials were investigated via a battery of techniques, including X-ray powder diffraction, electron microscopy, thermogravimetric and differential thermal, BET, elemental, and infrared analysis. The incorporation of low-level heat with moderate mechanical activation (i.e., thermomechanical activation) was found to be able to substantially enhance serpentine carbonation reactivity in comparison with moderate mechanical activation alone. Increases in the extent of carbonation of over 70% have been observed in this feasibility study, indicating thermomechanical activation offers substantial potential to lower process cost. Investigations of the thermomechanically activated materials that formed indicate adding low-level heat during moderately intense lizardite mechanical activation promotes (1) energy absorption during activation, (2) structural disorder, and (3) dehydroxylation, as well as carbonation reactivity, with the level of energy absorption, structural disorder and dehydroxylation generally increasing with increasing activation temperature. Increasing activation temperatures were also associated with decreasing surface areas and water absorptive capacities for the activated product materials. The above decreases in surface area and water absorption capacity can be directly correlated with enhanced particle sintering during thermomechanical activation, as evidenced by electron microscopy observation. The level of induced structural disorder appears to be a key parameter in enhancing carbonation reactivity. However, p

M.J. McKelvy; J. Diefenbacher; R. Nunez; R.W. Carpenter; A.V.G. Chizmeshya

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL, EPRI, and industry partners, studied mercury control options at six coal-fired power plants. The overall objective of the this test program was to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at six plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, American Electric Power's Conesville Station Unit 6, and Labadie Power Plant Unit 2. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The financial goals for the program established by DOE/NETL were to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the target established by DOE of $60,000 per pound of mercury removed. Results from testing at Holcomb, Laramie, Meramec, Labadie, and Monroe indicate the DOE goal was successfully achieved. However, further improvements for plants with conditions similar to Conesville are recommended that would improve both mercury removal performance and economics.

Sharon Sjostrom

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date 1999 - 1999 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A second...

230

Low Power, Red, Green and Blue Carbon Nanotube Enabled Vertical Organic Light Emitting Transistors for Active Matrix OLED Displays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic semiconductors are potential alternatives to polycrystalline silicon as the semiconductor used in the backplane of active matrix organic light emitting diode displays. Demonstrated here is a light-emitting transistor with an organic channel, operating with low power dissipation at low voltage, and high aperture ratio, in three colors: red, green and blue. The single-wall carbon nanotube network source electrode is responsible for the high level of performance demonstrated. A major benefit enabled by this architecture is the integration of the drive transistor, storage capacitor and light emitter into a single device. Performance comparable to commercialized polycrystalline-silicon TFT driven OLEDs is demonstrated.

McCarthy, M. A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Liu, B. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Donoghue, E. P. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Kim, D. Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville; So, Franky [University of Florida, Gainesville; Rinzler, A. G. [University of Florida, Gainesville

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Remarkable catalytic activity of cobalt tetraphenylporphyrin modified on a titania for the oxidation of carbon monoxide below room temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CoTPP on TiO/sub 2/-120s modified at 250 /sup 0/C under vacuum catalytically oxidized carbon monoxide rapidly with oxygen even at -79/sup 0/C. Its catalytic activity was incomparably higher than that of commercial Hopcalite. Comparison of its catalytic performance with those of the same catalyst or different TiO/sub 2/ supporting catalyst both evacuated at 200 /sup 0/C revealed unique features of the present catalyst in terms of its oxygen adsorption, the poisoning of adsorbed oxygen, and the insolubility of the complex in benzene. Both significant structural modification of the complex and its strong interaction with properly dehydrated TiO/sub 2/-120s brought about by evacuation at 250 /sup 0/C may induce such extraordinary activity. 14 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

Mochida, I.; Iwai, Y.; Kamo, T.; Fujitsu, H.

1985-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

The effect of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of dissolved organic matter and atrazine on granular activated carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of water temperature on the adsorption of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) on activated carbon has not been investigated intensively yet. In this study, batch experiments with granular activated carbon (GAC) F300, from bituminous coal, have been carried out at three temperatures (5, 20, 35{sup o} C) using a humic acid model water and different types of surface water (lake, river, canal). Furthermore, the adsorption of an anthropogenic contaminant, atrazine, was quantified in the absence and presence of DOM. The results indicate a significant influence of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of DOM and atrazine. Contrary to expectations, DOM and atrazine adsorption in surface water tends to be increased with increasing water temperature, whereas the extent of this effect is dependent on the type and concentration of DOM. Furthermore, the temperature effect on atrazine adsorption is controlled by competition of DOM and atrazine on adsorption sites. Some assumptions are proposed and discussed for explaining the temperature effects observed in the batch studies. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Bernd Schreiber; Viktor Schmalz; Thomas Brinkmann; Eckhard Worch [Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany). Institute of Water Chemistry

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Premixed direct injection disk  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPE’s technology “refines” coal by employing a novel catalyst to “crack” the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild “catalytic” gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPE’s catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to “fluidize” the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in near-zero hazardous air or water pollution. This technology would also be conducive to the efficient coproduction of methane and hydrogen while also generating a relatively pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) or sequestration. Specific results of bench-scale testing in the 4- to 38-lb/hr range in the EERC pilot system demonstrated high methane yields approaching 15 mol%, with high hydrogen yields approaching 50%. This was compared to an existing catalytic gasification model developed by GPE for its process. Long-term operation was demonstrated on both Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and on petcoke feedstocks utilizing oxygen injection without creating significant bed agglomeration. Carbon conversion was greater than 80% while operating at temperatures less than 1400°F, even with the shorter-than-desired reactor height. Initial designs for the GPE gasification concept called for a height that could not be accommodated by the EERC pilot facility. More gas-phase residence time should allow the syngas to be converted even more to methane. Another goal of producing significant quantities of highly concentrated catalyzed char for catalyst recovery and material handling studies was also successful. A Pd–Cu membrane was also successfully tested and demonstrated to produce 2.54 lb/day of hydrogen permeate, exceeding the desired hydrogen permeate production rate of 2.0 lb/day while being tested on actual coal-derived syngas that had been cleaned with advanced warm-gas cleanup systems. The membranes did not appear to suffer any performance degradation after exposure to the cleaned, warm syngas over a nominal 100-hour test.

Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions: A matter of time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a difference in carbon intensity of economic activity (often called “the carbon intensity of economic activity. ”and de- crease carbon intensities in developing countries,

Caldeira, K.; Davis, S. J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Transonic Combustion ? - Injection Strategy Development for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transonic Combustion - Injection Strategy Development for Supercritical Gasoline Injection-Ignition in a Light Duty Engine Transonic Combustion - Injection Strategy...

237

Carbon dioxide storage professor Martin Blunt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of CCS storage there are over a hundred sites worldwide where Co2 is injected under- ground as partCarbon dioxide storage professor Martin Blunt executive summary Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS and those for injection and storage in deep geological formations. all the individual elements operate today

238

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: FY 1993 activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provide technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC (including World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases) during the period October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of NDPS, CMPS, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints are provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also presented.

Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment, and Resources Center

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Design and implementation of a CO2 flood utilizing advanced reservoirs characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching water floods depletion: Technical progress report, January 1, 1997--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. All work this quarter falls within the demonstration project.

Chimahusky, J.S., Casteel, J.F.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second object is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. The report include work on the reservoir characterization and project design objective and demonstration project objective.

Chimahusky, J.S.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Optimization of Injection Scheduling in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SGP-TR-I12 Optimization of Injection Scheduling in Geothermal Fields James Lovekin May 1987&injection optimization problem is broke$ into two subpmbkm:(1) choosing a configuration of injectorsfrom an existing set is defined as the fieldwide break- through lindex, B. Injection is optimized by choosing injection wells

Stanford University

242

Automotive hydrogen storage system using cryo-adsorption on activated carbon.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated model of a sorbent-based cryogenic compressed hydrogen system is used to assess the prospect of meeting the near-term targets of 36 kg-H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric and 4.5 wt% gravimetric capacity for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The model includes the thermodynamics of H{sub 2} sorption, heat transfer during adsorption and desorption, sorption dynamics, energetics of cryogenic tank cooling, and containment of H{sub 2} in geodesically wound carbon fiber tanks. The results from the model show that recoverable hydrogen, rather than excess or absolute adsorption, is a determining measure of whether a sorbent is a good candidate material for on-board storage of H{sub 2}. A temperature swing is needed to recover >80% of the sorption capacity of the superactivated carbon sorbent at 100 K and 100 bar as the tank is depressurized to 3-8 bar. The storage pressure at which the system needs to operate in order to approach the system capacity targets has been determined and compared with the breakeven pressure above which the storage tank is more compact if H{sub 2} is stored only as a cryo-compressed gas. The amount of liquid N{sub 2} needed to cool the hydrogen dispensed to the vehicle to 100 K and to remove the heat of adsorption during refueling has been estimated. The electrical energy needed to produce the requisite liquid N{sub 2} by air liquefaction is compared with the electrical energy needed to liquefy the same amount of H{sub 2} at a central plant. The alternate option of adiabatically refueling the sorbent tank with liquid H{sub 2} has been evaluated to determine the relationship between the storage temperature and the sustainable temperature swing. Finally, simulations have been run to estimate the increase in specific surface area and bulk density of medium needed to satisfy the system capacity targets with H{sub 2} storage at 100 bar.

Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J. K.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Continuous process preparation of activated silica with low carbon dioxide content gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iiroduced. Activated silica is the term used to designate a negatively charged colloidal particle formed by the reactien of a dilute sodium silicate solution with a dilute solution of' an acidic material or other activant. Used as a coagulant sid to alum.... paylis (5) at Chicago found that, sodium silicate could. 'be used with paper maker's alum (aluminum sulfate) as an effective c~t aid. in treating Lake l4. chigan water. Since that time several. batch processes have been cleveloyed using various...

Burdett, Joseph Walton

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Industrial-scale processes are available for separating carbon dioxide from the post-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Industrial-scale processes are available for separating carbon dioxide dioxide separation and sequestration because the lower cost of carbon dioxide separation from for injection of carbon dioxide into oil or gas-bearing formations. An advantage of sequestration involving

245

DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, one of seven partnerships in the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has successfully injected 1,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the Mount Simon Sandstone, a deep saline formation that is widespread across much of the Midwest.

246

Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons R.T. Pierrehumbert1 on climate can be characterized by a single statistic, called Cumulative Carbon. This is the aggregate amount of carbon emitted in the form of carbon dioxide by activities such as fossil fuel burning and deforestation

Pierrehumbert, Raymond

247

Environmental Responses to Carbon Mitigation through Geological Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In summary, this DOE EPSCoR project is contributing to the study of carbon mitigation through geological storage. Both deep and shallow subsurface research needs are being addressed through research directed at improved understanding of environmental responses associated with large scale injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic formations. The research plan has two interrelated research objectives. ? Objective 1: Determine the influence of CO{sub 2}-related injection of fluids on pore structure, material properties, and microbial activity in rock cores from potential geological carbon sequestration sites. ? Objective 2: Determine the Effects of CO{sub 2} leakage on shallow subsurface ecosystems (microbial and plant) using field experiments from an outdoor field testing facility.

Cunningham, Alfred; Bromenshenk, Jerry

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

J. Phys. Chem. 1994, 98, 11213-11219 11213 Vibrational Dynamics of Carbon Monoxide at the Active Site of Myoglobin: Picosecond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Phys. Chem. 1994, 98, 11213-11219 11213 Vibrational Dynamics of Carbon Monoxide at the Active Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, Califomia 94305 Received: April 27, 1994: In Final Form at Urbana-Champaign. Deparlment of Chemistry, Sfanford University. Hansen ExperimentaJ Physics Laboratory

Fayer, Michael D.

249

Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Smit, Berend

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

250

Alternations of Structure and Functional Activity of Below Ground Microbial Communities at Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global atmospheric concentration of CO2 has increased by more than 30percent since the industrial revolution. Although the stimulating effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on plant growth and primary productivity have been well studied, its influences on belowground microbial communities are poorly understood and controversial. In this study, we showed a significant change in the structure and functional potential of soil microbial communities at eCO2 in a grassland ecosystem, the BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2 and Nitrogen) experimental site (http://www.biocon.umn.edu/) using a comprehensive functional gene array, GeoChip 3.0, which contains about 28,0000 probes and covers approximately 57,000 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles as well as other functional processes. GeoChip data indicated that the functional structure of microbial communities was markedly different between ambient CO2 (aCO2) and eCO2 by detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all 5001 detected functional gene probes although no significant differences were detected in the overall microbial diversity. A further analysis of 1503 detected functional genes involved in C, N, P, and S cycles showed that a considerable portion (39percent) of them were only detected under either aCO2 (14percent) or eCO2 (25percent), indicating that the functional characteristics of the microbial community were significantly altered by eCO2. Also, for those shared genes (61percent) detected, some significantly (p<0.05) changed their abundance at eCO2. Especially, genes involved in labile C degradation, such as amyA, egl, and ara for starch, cellulose, and hemicelluloses, respectively, C fixation (e.g., rbcL, pcc/acc), N fixation (nifH), and phosphorus utilization (ppx) were significantly increased under eCO2, while those involved in decomposing recalcitrant C, such as glx, lip, and mnp for lignin degradation remained unchanged. This study provides insights into our understanding of belowground microbial communities and their feedbacks to terrestrial ecosystems at eCO2.

He, Zhili; Xu, Meiying; Deng, Ye; Kang, Sanghoon; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Reich, Peter B.; Zhou, Jizhong

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

251

Injection-controlled laser resonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

Chang, J.J.

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

252

Biosensor Based on Self-Assembling Acetylcholinesterase on Carbon...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biosensor Based on Self-Assembling Acetylcholinesterase on Carbon Nanotubes for Flow injectionAmperometric Detection of Biosensor Based on Self-Assembling Acetylcholinesterase on...

253

Alkaline flooding injection strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Underground Injection Control (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule set forth criteria and standards for the requirements which apply to the State Underground Injection Control Program (U.I.C.). The UIC permit program regulates underground injections by...

255

On a mathematical model for hot carrier injection in semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On a mathematical model for hot carrier injection in semiconductors Naoufel Ben Abdallah (1) Pierre of a semiconductor device heavily depends on the injection mechanism of carriers into the active regions through by the relation V bi = U th log N + N \\Gamma ; where U th = kBT=q is the thermal voltage and N + ; N \\Gamma

Schmeiser, Christian

256

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a CO{sub 2} project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. This report includes work on the reservoir characterization and project design objective and the demonstration project objective.

Chimahusky, J.S.

1996-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

257

Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration of Geological Carbon Sequestration Article Type: Manuscript Keywords: Semi-Analytical Modeling; Iterative Methods; Geological Carbon Sequestration; Injection Site Assessment Corresponding Author: Brent Cody

Bau, Domenico A.

258

Effects of temperature and acidic pre-treatment on Fenton-driven oxidation of MTBE-spent granular activated carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of temperature and acidic pretreatment on Fenton-driven chemical oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent granular activated carbon (GAC, derived from bituminous coal) were investigated. Limiting factors in MTBE removal in GAC include the heterogeneous distribution of amended Fe, and slow intraparticle diffusive transport of MTBE and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) into the 'reactive zone'. Acid pretreatment of GAC before Fe amendment altered the surface chemistry of the GAC, lowered the pH point of zero charge, and resulted in greater penetration and more uniform distribution of Fe in GAC. This led to a condition where Fe, MTBE, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} coexisted over a larger volume of the GAC contributing to greater MTBE oxidation and removal. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reaction and MTBE removal in GAC increased with temperature. Modeling H{sub 2}O{sub 2} transport and reaction in GAC indicated that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} penetration was inversely proportional with temperature and tortuosity, and occurred over a larger fraction of the total volume of small GAC particles (0.3 mm diameter) relative to large particles (1.2 mm diameter). Acidic pretreatment of GAC, Fe-amendment, elevated reaction temperature, and use of small GAC particles are operational parameters that improve Fenton-driven oxidation of MTBE in GAC. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Kan, E.; Huling, S.G. [Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center, Ada, OK (United States)

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

ELECTRONIC FUEL INJECTION DIESEL LOCOMOTIVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRONIC FUEL INJECTION FOR DIESEL LOCOMOTIVES 13 August, 2011 Diesel Loco Modernisation Works, Patiala #12;ELECTRONIC FUEL INJECTION FOR DIESEL LOCOMOTIVES A Milestone in Green Initiatives by Indian Diesel Locomotive equipped with "Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI)" was turned out by the Diesel Loco

Jagannatham, Aditya K.

260

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon Composites(T300 & SWB): Crush Resistance, Bend StrengthCARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

Rollins, Andrew M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Global Carbon Emissions in the Coming Decades: The Case of China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from economic activity, carbon intensity, and efficiency of17 4.1. Economic Reform and Carbon Intensity ofCarbon emissions forecasts, carbon intensity, energy policy,

Levine, Mark D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

9,248,559 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 16, 2015  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE’s Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the...

263

9,981,117 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 2, 2015 | Department...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

264

9,449,421 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 12, 2015...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

265

9,805,742 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 27, 2015...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

266

Carbon-particle generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

Hunt, A.J.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

267

Carbon 40 (2002) 445467 Letters to the editor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon 40 (2002) 445­467 Letters to the editor Increasing the electromagnetic interference; Activated carbon; Carbon fibers; D. Electrical (electronic) properties Electromagnetic interference (EMI

Chung, Deborah D.L.

268

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. [Quarterly report], October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a CO{sub 2} project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. This report includes work on the reservoir characterization and project design objective. In addition the initiation of the demonstration project objective includes work done in November and December, 1995.

NONE

1996-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

269

The reduction of supersonic jet noise using pulsed microjet injection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is concerned with the active control of supersonic jet noise using pulsed microjet injection at the nozzle exit. Experimental investigations were carried out using this control method on an ideally expanded ...

Ragaller, Paul Aaron

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.

271

SNS Laser Stripping for H- Injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ORNL spallation neutron source (SNS) user facility requires a reliable, intense beams of protons. The technique of H- charge exchange injection into a storage ring or synchrotron has the potential to provide the needed beam currents, but it will be limited by intrinsic limitations of carbon and diamond stripping foils. A laser in combination with magnetic stripping has been used to demonstrate a new technique for high intensity proton injection, but several problems need to be solved before a practical system can be realized. Technology developed for use in Free Electron Lasers is being used to address the remaining challenges to practical implementation of laser controlled H- charge exchange injection for the SNS. These technical challenges include (1) operation in vacuum, (2) the control of the UV laser beam to synchronize with the H- beam and to shape the proton beam, (3) the control and stabilization of the Fabry-Perot resonator, and (4) protection of the mirrors from radiation.

V.V. Danilov, Y. Liu, K.B. Beard, V.G. Dudnikov, R.P. Johnson, Michelle D. Shinn

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Advanced Particulate Filter Technologies for Direct Injection...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Particulate Filter Technologies for Direct Injection Gasoline Engine Applications Advanced Particulate Filter Technologies for Direct Injection Gasoline Engine Applications...

273

Carbon supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon supercapacitors are represented as distributed RC networks with transmission line equivalent circuits. At low charge/discharge rates and low frequencies these networks approximate a simple series R{sub ESR}C circuit. The energy efficiency of the supercapacitor is limited by the voltage drop across the ESR. The pore structure of the carbon electrode defines the electrochemically active surface area which in turn establishes the volume specific capacitance of the carbon material. To date, the highest volume specific capacitance reported for a supercapacitor electrode is 220F/cm{sup 3} in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (10) and {approximately}60 F/cm{sup 3} in nonaqueous electrolyte (8).

Delnick, F.M.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Premixed direct injection nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An injection nozzle having a main body portion with an outer peripheral wall is disclosed. The nozzle includes a plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes disposed within the main body portion and a fuel flow passage fluidly connected to the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes. Fuel and air are partially premixed inside the plurality of the tubes. A second body portion, having an outer peripheral wall extending between a first end and an opposite second end, is connected to the main body portion. The partially premixed fuel and air mixture from the first body portion gets further mixed inside the second body portion. The second body portion converges from the first end toward said second end. The second body portion also includes cooling passages that extend along all the walls around the second body to provide thermal damage resistance for occasional flame flash back into the second body.

Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC); Johnson, Thomas Edward (Greer, SC); Lacy, Benjamin Paul (Greer, SC); Ziminsky, Willy Steve (Simpsonville, SC)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Underground Injection Control Regulations (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article prohibits injection of hazardous or radioactive wastes into or above an underground source of drinking water, establishes permit conditions and states regulations for design,...

276

Underground Injection Control Rule (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule regulates injection wells, including wells used by generators of hazardous or radioactive wastes, disposal wells within an underground source of drinking water, recovery of geothermal...

277

The importance of landslides and flooding events in harvesting and sequestering macroscopic carbon along active margins : the Eel Basin, Northern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that a significant quantity of biomass carbon is eroded fromdeliver large quantities of sediment and biomass carbon from

McCullough, Justin S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Common Rail Injection System Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The collaborative research program between the Department of energy and Electro-Motive Diesels, Inc. on the development of common rail fuel injection system for locomotive diesel engines that can meet US EPA Tier 2 exhaust emissions has been completed. This final report summarizes the objectives of the program, work scope, key accomplishments and research findings. The major objectives of this project encompassed identification of appropriate injection strategies by using advanced analytical tools, development of required prototype hardware/controls, investigations of fuel spray characteristics including cavitation phenomena, and validation of hareware using a single-cylinder research locomotive diesel engine. Major milestones included: (1) a detailed modeling study using advanced mathematical models - several various injection profiles that show simultaneous reduction of NOx and particulates on a four stroke-cycle locomotive diesel engine were identified; (2) development of new common rail fuel injection hardware capable of providing these injection profiles while meeting EMD engine and injection performance specifications. This hardware was developed together with EMD's current fuel injection component supplier. (3) Analysis of fuel spray characteristics. Fuel spray numerical studies and high speed photographic imaging analyses were performed. (4) Validation of new hardware and fuel injection profiles. EMD's single-cylinder research diesel engine located at Argonne National Laboratory was used to confirm emissions and performacne predictions. These analytical ane experimental investigations resulted in optimized fuel injection profiles and engine operating conditions that yield reductions in NOx emissions from 7.8 g/bhp-hr to 5.0 g/bhp-hr at full (rated) load. Additionally, hydrocarbon and particulate emissions were reduced considerably when compared to baseline Tier I levels. The most significant finding from the injection optimization process was a 2% to 3% improvement in fuel economy over EMD's traditional Tier I engine hardware configuration. the common rail fuel injection system enabled this added benefit by virtue of an inherent capability to provide multiple injections per power stroke at high fuel rail pressures. On the basis of the findings in this study, EMD concludes that the new electronically-controlled high-pressure common rail injection system has the potential to meet locomotive Tier 2 NOx and particulates emission standards without sacrificing the fuel economy. A number of areas to further improve the injection hardware and engine operating characteristics to further exploit the benefits of common rail injection system have also been identified.

Electro-Motive,

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

Development of a particle injection system for impurity transport study in KSTAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solid particle injection system is developed for KSTAR. The system has a compact size, compatibility with a strong magnetic field and high vacuum environment, and the capability to inject a small amount of solid particles with a narrow injection angle. The target flight-distance of 10 cm has been achieved with a particle loss rate of less than 10%. Solid impurity particles such as tungsten and carbon will be injected by this system at the midplane in KSTAR. The impurity transport feature will be studied with a soft X-ray array, a vacuum ultra-violet diagnostic, and Stand Alone Non-Corona code.

Lee, H. Y.; Hong, Joohwan; Lee, Seung Hun; Jang, Siwon; Jang, Juhyeok; Jeon, Taemin; Park, Jae Sun; Choe, Wonho, E-mail: wchoe@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701, Republic of Korea and Fusion Plasma Transport Research Center, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Suk-Ho [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Summary Human activities are increasing the concentra-tions of atmospheric carbon dioxide ([CO2]) and tropospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to forest soils. Because the quality and quantity of labile and recalcitrant carbon (C) com- pounds, soluble phenolics and condensed tannins. Elevated [CO2] significantly increased lit- ter biomass] and tropospheric [O3] that we observed, combined with changes in litter biomass production, could significantly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Laboratory studies of imbibition flooding using carbonated brine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and pressures was a major part of the phase II studies. A high pressure core holder was developed and set inside a temperature regulated in-house constructed oven for this purpose. The core face flushing method was developed for conducting imbibition... and the field for improving oil recovery. The most common techniques used to increase oil recovery include water injection, steam injection, in-situ combustion, carbon dioxide (CO&) injection, chemical flooding and caustic injection. Currently, however, due...

Sharif, Qamar Javaid

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Optoelectronic device with nanoparticle embedded hole injection/transport layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optoelectronic device is disclosed that can function as an emitter of optical radiation, such as a light-emitting diode (LED), or as a photovoltaic (PV) device that can be used to convert optical radiation into electrical current, such as a photovoltaic solar cell. The optoelectronic device comprises an anode, a hole injection/transport layer, an active layer, and a cathode, where the hole injection/transport layer includes transparent conductive nanoparticles in a hole transport material.

Wang, Qingwu (Chelmsford, MA); Li, Wenguang (Andover, MA); Jiang, Hua (Methuen, MA)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

283

Injection nozzle for a turbomachine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbomachine includes a compressor, a combustor operatively connected to the compressor, an end cover mounted to the combustor, and an injection nozzle assembly operatively connected to the combustor. The injection nozzle assembly includes a first end portion that extends to a second end portion, and a plurality of tube elements provided at the second end portion. Each of the plurality of tube elements defining a fluid passage includes a body having a first end section that extends to a second end section. The second end section projects beyond the second end portion of the injection nozzle assembly.

Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

284

A SIGNIFICANTLY LOW CO ABUNDANCE TOWARD THE TW Hya PROTOPLANETARY DISK: A PATH TO ACTIVE CARBON CHEMISTRY?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Letter we report the CO abundance relative to H{sub 2} derived toward the circumstellar disk of the T-Tauri star TW Hya from the HD (1 – 0) and C{sup 18}O (2 – 1) emission lines. The HD (1 – 0) line was observed by the Herschel Space Observatory Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer whereas C{sup 18}O (2 – 1) observations were carried out with the Submillimeter Array at a spatial resolution of 2.''8 × 1.''9 (corresponding to ?151 × 103 AU). In the disk's warm molecular layer (T > 20 K) we measure a disk-averaged gas-phase CO abundance relative to H{sub 2} of ?(CO) = (0.1-3) × 10{sup –5}, substantially lower than the canonical value of ?(CO) = 10{sup –4}. We infer that the best explanation of this low ?(CO) is the chemical destruction of CO followed by rapid formation of carbon chains, or perhaps CO{sub 2}, that can subsequently freeze-out, resulting in the bulk mass of carbon locked up in ice grain mantles and oxygen in water. As a consequence of this likely time-dependent carbon sink mechanism, CO may be an unreliable tracer of H{sub 2} gas mass.

Favre, Cécile; Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Qi, Chunhua [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Blake, Geoffrey A., E-mail: cfavre@umich.edu [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, MS 150-21, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

285

Adaptive engine injection for emissions reduction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

NOx and soot emissions from internal combustion engines, and in particular compression ignition (diesel) engines, are reduced by varying fuel injection timing, fuel injection pressure, and injected fuel volume between low and greater engine loads. At low loads, fuel is injected during one or more low-pressure injections occurring at low injection pressures between the start of the intake stroke and approximately 40 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke. At higher loads, similar injections are used early in each combustion cycle, in addition to later injections which preferably occur between about 90 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke, and about 90 degrees after top dead center during the expansion stroke (and which most preferably begin at or closely adjacent the end of the compression stroke). These later injections have higher injection pressure, and also lower injected fuel volume, than the earlier injections.

Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI): Sun, Yong (Madison, WI)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

286

Direct Electrochemical Regeneration of Enzymatically Active 1,4-NADH Using a Nickel Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Electrochemical Regeneration of Enzymatically Active 1,4- NADH Using a Nickel Modified enzymatically active 1,4- NADH in a batch electrochemical reactor at different electrolysis potentials. 1m was regenerated at -1.5VMSE In comparison with bare GCE, almost the same percentage of enzymatically active 1

Barthelat, Francois

287

CO2 displacement mechanisms: phase equilibria effects and carbon dioxide sequestration studies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Supercritical carbon dioxide is injected into underground formations to enhance oil recovery and for subsurface sequestration to minimize the impact of CO2 emissions due to… (more)

Pasala, Sangeetha M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

U-174: Serendipity Unspecified SQL Injection Vulnerability |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Serendipity Unspecified SQL Injection Vulnerability U-174: Serendipity Unspecified SQL Injection Vulnerability May 22, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Serendipity Unspecified SQL...

289

Influence of Rock Types on Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) techniques such as high pressure CO2 injection may normally be required to recover oil in place in carbonate reservoirs. This study addresses how different rock types can influence the seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates. This research...

Mammadova, Elnara

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

290

EA-1898: Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase III Gordon Creek Project near Price, Utah in Carbon County  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for Phase III field deployment to demonstrate commercial-scale carbon storage technologies.This Phase III large-scale carbon dioxide injection project will combine science and engineering from many disciplines to successfully sequester and monitor carbon storage. [NOTE: This EA has been cancelled].

291

JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING / SEPTEMBER 2000 / 865 CARBON FIBER ADSORPTION USING QUANTITATIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING / SEPTEMBER 2000 / 865 CARBON FIBER ADSORPTION USING carbon fiber (ACF) adsorbents. The DR isotherm parameter, k, depends on the adsorbate as well volatile organic compound adsorbates and activated carbon fiber adsorbents. INTRODUCTION Activated carbon

Cal, Mark P.

292

Research Summary Carbon Additionality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of much/reporting additionality rules. Technological Application of specific technology. Term Abatement arises within a specified

293

Staged direct injection diesel engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A diesel engine having staged injection for using lower cetane number fuels than No. 2 diesel fuel. The engine includes a main fuel injector and a pilot fuel injector. Pilot and main fuel may be the same fuel. The pilot injector injects from five to fifteen percent of the total fuel at timings from 20.degree. to 180.degree. BTDC depending upon the quantity of pilot fuel injected, the fuel cetane number and speed and load. The pilot fuel injector is directed toward the centerline of the diesel cylinder and at an angle toward the top of the piston, avoiding the walls of the cylinder. Stratification of the early injected pilot fuel is needed to reduce the fuel-air mixing rate, prevent loss of pilot fuel to quench zones, and keep the fuel-air mixture from becoming too fuel lean to become effective. In one embodiment, the pilot fuel injector includes a single hole for injection of the fuel and is directed at approximately 48.degree. below the head of the cylinder.

Baker, Quentin A. (San Antonio, TX)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

295

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Injection system for small betatron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to reduce the head loads on the injector electrodes and to raise the efficiency of electron capture during acceleration, small betatrons are provided with an injection system with a controlled three-electrode injector in which injection current pulse with steep leading and trailing edges is formed by the application of a voltage pulse to the control electrode from a separate circuit through a pulse transformer. In a betatron injection system described, elements of the controlled injector of the accelerating chamber are used to correct the shape of the current pulse. The circuit for correcting the current-pulse shape can increase the accelerated charge by the average of 75% per betatron cycle and decrease the heat loads on the electrodes of the injector without the use of a generator of controlling voltage pulses.

Zuorygin, V.P.; Chakhlov, V.L.; Pushin, U.S.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The recovery of oil from carbonate reservoirs by fluid injection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pennsylvanian Pennsylvanian Pennsylvanian Canyon Reef Canyon Reef Pennsylvanian Reef Penney'lvanian Reef Penn'sylvanian Reef Wolfcamp San Andres Silurian OH ? open hole completion P - perforated completion 81 31 40 44 45 39 ll 28 10 127 296...

Coleman, Dwayne Marvin

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Carbon Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Capture Pre-Combustion Post-Combustion CO2 Compression Systems Analysis Regulatory Drivers Program Plan Capture Handbook Carbon capture involves the separation of CO2 from...

299

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigator: Roland N. Home September 1986 Second Annual Report Department of Energy Contract Number through the evaluation of fluid reserves, and the forecastingl of field behavior with time. Injection al series of Proceedings that are a prominent literature source on geothermal energy. The Program

Stanford University

300

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigator: Roland N. Home September 1985 First Annual Report Department of Energy Contract Number, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection I I Tec hnology is a research area receiving special on geothermal energy. The Program publishes technical reports on all of its research projects. Research findings

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geomechanical effects on CO{sub 2} leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of geomechanics—including the potential for faults to reactivate during large scale geologic carbon sequestration operations—has recently become more widely recognized. However, notwithstanding the potential for triggering notable (felt) seismic events, the potential for buoyancy-driven CO{sub 2} to reach potable groundwater and the ground surface is actually more important from public safety and storage-efficiency perspectives. In this context, this work extends the previous studies on the geomechanical modeling of fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on the short-term integrity of the sealing caprock, and hence on the potential for leakage of either brine or CO{sub 2} to reach the shallow groundwater aquifers during active injection. We consider stress/strain-dependent permeability and study the leakage through the fault zone as its permeability changes during a reactivation, also causing seismicity. We analyze several scenarios related to the volume of CO{sub 2} injected (and hence as a function of the overpressure), involving both minor and major faults, and analyze the profile risks of leakage for different stress/strain-permeability coupling functions. We conclude that whereas it is very difficult to predict how much fault permeability could change upon reactivation, this process can have a significant impact on the leakage rate. Moreover, our analysis shows that induced seismicity associated with fault reactivation may not necessarily open up a new flow path for leakage. Results show a poor correlation between magnitude and amount of fluid leakage, meaning that a single event is generally not enough to substantially change the permeability along the entire fault length. Consequently, even if some changes in permeability occur, this does not mean that the CO{sub 2} will migrate up along the entire fault, breaking through the caprock to enter the overlying aquifer.

Rinaldi, A.P.; Rutqvist, J.; Cappa, F.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington, DC, May 14-17, 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington, DC, May 14-17, 2001 Caldeira, K for Research on Ocean Carbon Sequestration (DOCS) *Climate and Carbon Cycle Modeling Group, Lawrence Livermore carbon sequestration strategy. Therefore, we want to understand the effectiveness of oceanic injection

303

Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow CO{sub 2} Injection, Greene County, Missouri  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project titled Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow CO{sub 2} Injection, Greene County, Missouri provided training for three graduate students in areas related to carbon capture and storage. Numerical modeling of CO{sub 2} injection into the St. Francois aquifer at the Southwest Power Plant Site in Greene County, Missouri indicates that up to 4.1 x 10{sup 5} metric tons of CO{sub 2} per year could be injected for 30 years without exceeding a 3 MPa differential injection pressure. The injected CO{sub 2} would remain sequestered below the top of the overlying caprock (St. Francois confining unit) for more than 1000 years. Geochemical modeling indicates that portions of the injected CO{sub 2} will react rapidly with trace minerals in the aquifer to form various solid carbonate mineral phases. These minerals would store significant portions of injected CO{sub 2} over geologic time scales. Finally, a GIS data base on the pore-fluid chemistry of the overlying aquifer system in Missouri, the Ozark aquifer, was compiled from many sources. This data base could become useful in monitoring for leakage from future CO{sub 2} sequestration sites.

Rovey, Charles; Gouzie, Douglas; Biagioni, Richard

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Effect of Organic Capping Layers over Monodisperse Platinum Nanoparticles upon Activity for Ethylene Hydrogenation and Carbon Monoxide Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of oleylamine (OA), trimethyl tetradecyl ammonium bromide (TTAB), and polyvinlypyrrolidone (PVP) capping agents upon the catalytic properties of Pt/silica catalysts was evaluated. Pt nanoparticles that were 1.5 nm in size were synthesized by the same procedure (ethylene glycol reduction under basic conditions) with the various capping agents added afterward for stabilization. Before examining catalytic properties for ethylene hydrogenation and CO oxidation, the Pt NPs were deposited onto mesoporous silica (SBA-15) supports and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), H{sub 2} chemisorption, and elemental analysis (ICP-MS). PVP- and TTAB-capped Pt yielded mass-normalized reaction rates that decreased with increasing pretreatment temperature, and this trend was attributed to the partial coverage of the Pt surface with decomposition products from the organic capping agent. Once normalized to the Pt surface area, similar intrinsic activities were obtained regardless of the pretreatment temperature, which indicated no influence on the nature of the active sites. Consequently, a chemical probe technique using intrinsic activity for ethylene hydrogenation was demonstrated as an acceptable method for estimating the metallic surface areas of Pt. Amine (OA) capping exhibited a detrimental influence on the catalytic properties as severe deactivation and low activity were observed for ethylene hydrogenation and CO oxidation, respectively. These results were consistent with amine groups being strong poisons for Pt surfaces, and revealed the need to consider the effects of capping agents on the catalytic properties.

Kuhn, John N.; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

305

Layer-by-layer carbon nanotube bio-templates for in situ monitoring of the metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To date, one of the most widely adopted biological wastewater treatment techniques is the activated sludge of effective disinfection and wastewater treatment techniques for removing organic and inorganic wastes wastewater treatment, effective and efficient operation of these facilities require information of the p

Lynch, Jerome P.

306

Sequential injection gas guns for accelerating projectiles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Gas guns and methods for accelerating projectiles through such gas guns are described. More particularly, gas guns having a first injection port located proximate a breech end of a barrel and a second injection port located longitudinally between the first injection port and a muzzle end of the barrel are described. Additionally, modular gas guns that include a plurality of modules are described, wherein each module may include a barrel segment having one or more longitudinally spaced injection ports. Also, methods of accelerating a projectile through a gas gun, such as injecting a first pressurized gas into a barrel through a first injection port to accelerate the projectile and propel the projectile down the barrel past a second injection port and injecting a second pressurized gas into the barrel through the second injection port after passage of the projectile and to further accelerate the projectile are described.

Lacy, Jeffrey M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

Jeffrey Long

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

308

Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

Jeffrey Long

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Electroless preparation and characterization of Ni-B nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their catalytic activity towards hydrogenation of styrene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: The MWCNT/Ni-B catalyst has been successfully prepared by an electroless deposition process. The Ni-B nanoparticles on the supporter are amorphous and are well-distributed. The catalytic conversion towards hydrogenation of styrene shows excellent catalytic activity of the obtained materials. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A two-step treatment of MWCNTs enabled the homogeneous growth of Ni-B nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-B nanoparticles were amorphous with an average size of 60 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There were electron transfer between Ni and B. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst had excellent catalytic activity towards hydrogenation of styrene. -- Abstract: Nickel-boron (Ni-B) nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were successfully synthesized through an electroless deposition process using the plating bath with sodium borohydride as a reducing agent. The structural and morphological analyses using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy have shown that the Ni-B nanoparticles deposited on the sidewalls of MWCNTs are fine spheres comprised of amorphous structure with the morphologically unique fine-structure like flowers, and homogenously dispersed with a narrow particle size distribution centered at around 60 nm diameter. The catalytic activity of MWCNT/Ni-B nanoparticles was evaluated with respect to hydrogenation of styrene. The hydrogenation catalyzed by MWCNT-supported Ni-B nanoparticles has been found to make styrene selectively converted into ethylbenzene. The highest conversion reaches 99.8% under proper reaction conditions, which demonstrates the high catalytic activity of MWCNT/Ni-B nanoparticles.

Liu, Zheng; Li, Zhilin [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Institute of Carbon Fibers and Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Feng, E-mail: wangf@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Institute of Carbon Fibers and Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Liu, Jingjun; Ji, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Institute of Carbon Fibers and Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Park, Ki Chul [Institute of Carbon Science and Technology (ICST), Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano-shi, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan)] [Institute of Carbon Science and Technology (ICST), Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano-shi, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); Endo, Morinobu [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano-shi, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan)] [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano-shi, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Experimental High Velocity Acid Jetting in Limestone Carbonates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acid jetting is a well stimulation technique that is used in carbonate reservoirs. It typically involves injecting acid down hole at high flow rates through small orifices which cause high velocities of acid to strike the borehole wall...

Holland, Christopher

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Enhanced Performance Assessment System (EPAS) for carbon sequestration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is an option to mitigate impacts of atmospheric carbon emission. Numerous factors are important in determining the overall effectiveness of long-term geologic storage of carbon, including leakage rates, volume of storage available, and system costs. Recent efforts have been made to apply an existing probabilistic performance assessment (PA) methodology developed for deep nuclear waste geologic repositories to evaluate the effectiveness of subsurface carbon storage (Viswanathan et al., 2008; Stauffer et al., 2009). However, to address the most pressing management, regulatory, and scientific concerns with subsurface carbon storage (CS), the existing PA methodology and tools must be enhanced and upgraded. For example, in the evaluation of a nuclear waste repository, a PA model is essentially a forward model that samples input parameters and runs multiple realizations to estimate future consequences and determine important parameters driving the system performance. In the CS evaluation, however, a PA model must be able to run both forward and inverse calculations to support optimization of CO{sub 2} injection and real-time site monitoring as an integral part of the system design and operation. The monitoring data must be continually fused into the PA model through model inversion and parameter estimation. Model calculations will in turn guide the design of optimal monitoring and carbon-injection strategies (e.g., in terms of monitoring techniques, locations, and time intervals). Under the support of Laboratory-Directed Research & Development (LDRD), a late-start LDRD project was initiated in June of Fiscal Year 2010 to explore the concept of an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS) for carbon sequestration and storage. In spite of the tight time constraints, significant progress has been made on the project: (1) Following the general PA methodology, a preliminary Feature, Event, and Process (FEP) analysis was performed for a hypothetical CS system. Through this FEP analysis, relevant scenarios for CO{sub 2} release were defined. (2) A prototype of EPAS was developed by wrapping an existing multi-phase, multi-component reservoir simulator (TOUGH2) with an uncertainty quantification and optimization code (DAKOTA). (3) For demonstration, a probabilistic PA analysis was successfully performed for a hypothetical CS system based on an existing project in a brine-bearing sandstone. The work lays the foundation for the development of a new generation of PA tools for effective management of CS activities. At a top-level, the work supports energy security and climate change/adaptation by furthering the capability to effectively manage proposed carbon capture and sequestration activities (both research and development as well as operational), and it greatly enhances the technical capability to address this national problem. The next phase of the work will include (1) full capability demonstration of the EPAS, especially for data fusion, carbon storage system optimization, and process optimization of CO{sub 2} injection, and (2) application of the EPAS to actual carbon storage systems.

Wang, Yifeng; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; McNeish, Jerry A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dewers, Thomas A.; Hadgu, Teklu; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from domestic or South

313

Injectivity Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (bot load) ErrorEnergy Information Injectivity Test Jump to:

314

Diffusion injected multi-quantum well light-emitting diode structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The attention towards light-emitting diode (LED) structures based on nanowires, surface plasmon coupled LEDs, and large-area high-power LEDs has been increasing for their potential in increasing the optical output power and efficiency of LEDs. In this work we demonstrate an alternative way to inject charge carriers into the active region of an LED, which is based on completely different current transport mechanism compared to conventional current injection approaches. The demonstrated structure is expected to help overcoming some of the challenges related to current injection with conventional structures. A functioning III-nitride diffusion injected light-emitting diode structure, in which the light-emitting active region is located outside the pn-junction, is realized and characterized. In this device design, the charge carriers are injected into the active region by bipolar diffusion, which could also be utilized to excite otherwise challenging to realize light-emitting structures.

Riuttanen, L., E-mail: lauri.riuttanen@aalto.fi; Nykänen, H.; Svensk, O.; Suihkonen, S.; Sopanen, M. [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Kivisaari, P.; Oksanen, J.; Tulkki, J. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

315

Radial lean direct injection burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

316

An environmental analysis of injection molding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates injection molding from an environmental standpoint, yielding a system-level environmental analysis of the process. There are three main objectives: analyze the energy consumption trends in injection ...

Thiriez, Alexandre

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Chapter 27 of the Texas Water Code (the Injection Well Act) defines an “injection well” as “an artificial excavation or opening in the ground made by digging, boring, drilling, jetting, driving, or...

318

Carbon sequestration monitoring with acoustic double-difference waveform inversion: A case study on SACROC walkaway VSP data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological carbon sequestration involves large-scale injection of carbon dioxide into underground geologic formations and is considered as a potential approach for mitigating global warming. Changes in reservoir properties ...

Yang, Di

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Assessment of Factors Influencing Effective CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity and Injectivity in Eastern Gas Shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building upon advances in technology, production of natural gas from organic-rich shales is rapidly developing as a major hydrocarbon supply option in North America and around the world. The same technology advances that have facilitated this revolution - dense well spacing, horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing - may help to facilitate enhanced gas recovery (EGR) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in these formations. The potential storage of CO {sub 2} in shales is attracting increasing interest, especially in Appalachian Basin states that have extensive shale deposits, but limited CO{sub 2} storage capacity in conventional reservoirs. The goal of this cooperative research project was to build upon previous and on-going work to assess key factors that could influence effective EGR, CO{sub 2} storage capacity, and injectivity in selected Eastern gas shales, including the Devonian Marcellus Shale, the Devonian Ohio Shale, the Ordovician Utica and Point Pleasant shale and equivalent formations, and the late Devonian-age Antrim Shale. The project had the following objectives: (1) Analyze and synthesize geologic information and reservoir data through collaboration with selected State geological surveys, universities, and oil and gas operators; (2) improve reservoir models to perform reservoir simulations to better understand the shale characteristics that impact EGR, storage capacity and CO{sub 2} injectivity in the targeted shales; (3) Analyze results of a targeted, highly monitored, small-scale CO{sub 2} injection test and incorporate into ongoing characterization and simulation work; (4) Test and model a smart particle early warning concept that can potentially be used to inject water with uniquely labeled particles before the start of CO{sub 2} injection; (5) Identify and evaluate potential constraints to economic CO{sub 2} storage in gas shales, and propose development approaches that overcome these constraints; and (6) Complete new basin-level characterizations for the CO{sub 2} storage capacity and injectivity potential of the targeted eastern shales. In total, these Eastern gas shales cover an area of over 116 million acres, may contain an estimated 6,000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas in place, and have a maximum theoretical storage capacity of over 600 million metric tons. Not all of this gas in-place will be recoverable, and economics will further limit how much will be economic to produce using EGR techniques with CO{sub 2} injection. Reservoir models were developed and simulations were conducted to characterize the potential for both CO{sub 2} storage and EGR for the target gas shale formations. Based on that, engineering costing and cash flow analyses were used to estimate economic potential based on future natural gas prices and possible financial incentives. The objective was to assume that EGR and CO{sub 2} storage activities would commence consistent with the historical development practices. Alternative CO{sub 2} injection/EGR scenarios were considered and compared to well production without CO{sub 2} injection. These simulations were conducted for specific, defined model areas in each shale gas play. The resulting outputs were estimated recovery per typical well (per 80 acres), and the estimated CO{sub 2} that would be injected and remain in the reservoir (i.e., not produced), and thus ultimately assumed to be stored. The application of this approach aggregated to the entire area of the four shale gas plays concluded that they contain nearly 1,300 Tcf of both primary production and EGR potential, of which an estimated 460 Tcf could be economic to produce with reasonable gas prices and/or modest incentives. This could facilitate the storage of nearly 50 Gt of CO{sub 2} in the Marcellus, Utica, Antrim, and Devonian Ohio shales.

Godec, Michael

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Wall conditioning experiments on TFTR using impurity pellet injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work describes experiments intended to optimize the limiter conditioning for TFTR supershots. It is shown that deposition of thin layers of lithium on the limiters by impurity pellet injection changes the plasma-wall interaction and improves supershot performance. Series of up to ten Ohmic plasmas each with two lithium pellets were useful in preconditioning the limiter. Generally, plasma performance increased with the amount of lithium deposited up to the maximal amount which could be deposited. Experiments were performed with different materials being deposited (carbon, boron and lithium) and with different methods of deposition.

Strachan, J.D.; Mansfield, D.K.; Bell, M.G. [and others

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By June 30, 2006, 41,566 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,726 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. Oil rates increased from about 3.3 B/D for the period from January through March to about 4.7 B/D for the period from April through June. If the oil rate is sustained, this may be the first indication of the arrival of the oil bank mobilized by carbon dioxide injection. A sustained fluid withdrawal rate of about 200 B/D from CO2 No.12 and CO2 No.13 appears to be necessary to obtain higher oil rates. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has reached either production well. Water injection will continue to displace oil mobilized by carbon dioxide to the production wells and to maintain the pressure in the PPV region at a level that supports continued miscible displacement as the carbon dioxide is displaced by the injected water.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

324

Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

325

ELECTRON INJECTION INTO CYCLIC ACCELERATOR USING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRON INJECTION INTO CYCLIC ACCELERATOR USING LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATION Ya. V. Getmanov, O. A acceleration #12;Storage ring with laser injection CYCLIC ACCELERATOR RF Electron injection The LWFA beam ­ accelerating light, 5 ­ accelerated electrons, 6 ­fast kicker - + accelerating laser pulse evaporatinglaser

326

Numerical Simulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Simulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using Adaptive Multiscale Techniques Wolfgang Dahmen: finite volume method, film cooling, cooling gas injection, multiscale techniques, grid adaptation AMS@igpm.rwth-aachen.de (Thomas Gotzen) #12;Numerical simulation of cooling gas injection using adaptive multiscale techniques

327

Uniform Diffusion of Acetonitrile inside Carbon Nanotubes Favors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials. Nanoporous carbon exhibits excellent charge-discharge properties and a stable cyclic life. Moreover, activated composite carbon films generate high specific capacitance, laying the foundationUniform Diffusion of Acetonitrile inside Carbon Nanotubes Favors Supercapacitor Performance Oleg N

328

Registration of Hanford Site Class V underground injection wells. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plan and Schedule for Disposition and Regulatory Compliance for Miscellaneous Streams (DOE 1994) requires that all existing Class V injection wells be registered under WAC 173--218. (Washington Underground Injection Control Program). The purpose of this document is to fulfill this requirement by registering all active Class V underground injection control wells, on the Hanford Site, under WAC 173--218. This registration will revise the registration previously submitted in 1988 (DOE 1988). In support of this registration, an extensive effort has been made to identify all injection wells on the Hanford Site. New injection wells will not be constructed on the Hanford Site except to receive uncontaminated stormwater or groundwater heatpump return flow. All changes to Miscellaneous Streams will be tracked through the Hanford Site Miscellaneous Streams Inventory Database. Table 5--2 of this injection well registration may be updated annually at the same time as the Miscellaneous Streams Inventory, if necessary.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

(Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The CPA Equation of State and an Activity Coefficient Model for Accurate Molar Enthalpy Calculations of Mixtures with Carbon Dioxide and Water/Brine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamic property calculations of mixtures containing carbon dioxide (CO$_2$) and water, including brines, are essential in theoretical models of many natural and industrial processes. The properties of greatest practical interest are density, solubility, and enthalpy. Many models for density and solubility calculations have been presented in the literature, but there exists only one study, by Spycher and Pruess, that has compared theoretical molar enthalpy predictions with experimental data. In this report, we recommend two different models for enthalpy calculations: the CPA equation of state by Li and Firoozabadi, and the CO$_2$ activity coefficient model by Duan and Sun. We show that the CPA equation of state, which has been demonstrated to provide good agreement with density and solubility data, also accurately calculates molar enthalpies of pure CO$_2$, pure water, and both CO$_2$-rich and aqueous (H$_2$O-rich) mixtures of the two species. It is applicable to a wider range of conditions than the Spycher and Pruess model. In aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) mixtures, we show that Duan and Sun's model yields accurate results for the partial molar enthalpy of CO$_2$. It can be combined with another model for the brine enthalpy to calculate the molar enthalpy of H$_2$O-CO$_2$-NaCl mixtures. We conclude by explaining how the CPA equation of state may be modified to further improve agreement with experiments. This generalized CPA is the basis of our future work on this topic.

P. C. Myint; Y. Hao; A. Firoozabadi

2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

Efficiency and lifetime of carbon foils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Charge-exchange injection by means of carbon foils is a widely used method in accelerators. This paper discusses two critical issues concerning the use of carbon foils: efficiency and lifetime. An energy scaling of stripping efficiency was suggested and compared with measurements. Several factors that determine the foil lifetime--energy deposition, heating, stress and buckling--were studied by using the simulation codes MARS and ANSYS.

Chou, W.; /Fermilab; Kostin, M.; /Michigan State U., NSCL; Tang, Z.; /Fermilab

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Method for preventing bitumen backflow in injection wells when steam injection is interrupted  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for preventing viscous hydrocarbonaceous fluids from backflowing into a well upon interruption of a steamflood. It comprises: detecting a substantial reduction in steam injection pressure in at least one injection well via a pressure sensing device; and causing automatically a pressurized fluid to be injected into the injection well in response to the reduction in pressure which prevents viscous hydrocarbonaceous fluids from backflowing into the injection well.

Freeman, D.C.; Djabbarah, N.F.

1990-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

333

DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected VOC soil gas concentrations during ASVE. Five (5) SVE wells that were located closest to the air injection wells were used as monitoring points during the air sparging tests. The air sparging tests lasted 48 hours. Soil gas sample results indicate that sparging did not affect VOC concentrations in four of the five sparging wells, while results from one test did show an increase in soil gas concentrations.

Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Carbon sequestration monitoring with acoustic double-difference waveform inversion: A case study on SACROC walkaway VSP data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon sequestration monitoring with acoustic double-difference waveform inversion: A case study National Laboratory SUMMARY Geological carbon sequestration involves large-scale injection of carbon is crucial for ensuring safe and reliable carbon storage (Bickle et al., 2007). Conventional analysis of time

Malcolm, Alison

335

Presented at the 2010 Rocky Mountain AAPG Section Meeting in Durango Colorado 1 Pre-and Post-injection Vertical Seismic Profiling over the Southwest Regional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) on Carbon Sequestration's San Juan Basin Fruitland Coal pilot test. The project is funded by the U included a zero offset VSP and three offset VSPs. The zero offset source was located 114 feet from the injection well. Long offset sources were located 1498 feet from the injection well along a 216o azimuth

Wilson, Thomas H.

336

Sample extraction and injection with a microscale preconcentrator.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the development of a microfabricated preconcentrator that functions as a fully integrated chemical extractor-injector for a microscale gas chromatograph (GC). The device enables parts-per-billion detection and quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air with size and power advantages over macro-scale systems. The 44 mm{sup 3} preconcentrator extracts VOCs using highly adsorptive, granular forms of graphitized carbon black and carbon molecular sieves. The micron-sized silicon cavities have integrated heating and temperature sensing allowing low power, yet rapid heating to thermally desorb the collected VOCs (GC injection). The keys to device construction are a new adsorbent-solvent filling technique and solvent-tolerant wafer-level silicon-gold eutectic bonding technology. The product is the first granular adsorbent preconcentrator integrated at the wafer level. Other advantages include exhaustive VOC extraction and injection peak widths an order of magnitude narrower than predecessor prototypes. A mass transfer model, the first for any microscale preconcentrator, is developed to describe both adsorption and desorption behaviors. The physically intuitive model uses implicit and explicit finite differences to numerically solve the required partial differential equations. The model is applied to the adsorption and desorption of decane at various concentrations to extract Langmuir adsorption isotherm parameters from effluent curve measurements where properties are unknown a priori.

Robinson, Alex Lockwood (Advanced Sensor Technologies, Albuquerque, NM); Chan, Helena Kai Lun

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Composites Part B: Engineering, 2011, 42(4): p. 916-925 Analysis of active cooling through nickel coated carbon fibers in the solidification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nickel coated carbon fibers in the solidification processing of aluminum matrix composites Nikhil Gupta1 , Nguyen Q. Nguyen2 , and Pradeep K. Rohatgi2 1 Composite Materials and Mechanics Laboratory, Mechanical In carbon fiber reinforced aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix composites a barrier coating is applied

Gupta, Nikhil

338

The subsurface fluid mechanics of geologic carbon dioxide storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In carbon capture and storage (CCS), CO? is captured at power plants and then injected into deep geologic reservoirs for long-term storage. While CCS may be critical for the continued use of fossil fuels in a carbon-constrained ...

Szulczewski, Michael Lawrence

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By the end of December 2005, 14,115 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,091 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has reached either production well. Continued injection of water is planned to displace oil mobilized by carbon dioxide to the production wells and to maintain the pressure in the PPV region at a level that supports continued miscible displacement as the carbon dioxide is displaced by the injected water.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Coupling geothermal energy capture with carbon dioxide sequestration in naturally permeable, porous geologic formations  – a novel approach for expanding geothermal energy utilization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis research presents a new method to harness geothermal energy by combining it with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. CO2 is injected into deep,… (more)

Randolph, Jimmy Bryan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Method and apparatus for injecting particulate media into the ground  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method and apparatus for injecting particulate media into the ground for constructing underground permeable reactive barriers, which are used for environmental remediation of subsurface contaminated soil and water. A media injector sub-assembly attached to a triple wall drill string pipe sprays a mixture of active particulate media suspended in a carrier fluid radially outwards from the sub-assembly, at the same time that a mixing fluid is sprayed radially outwards. The media spray intersects the mixing spray at a relatively close distance from the point of injection, which entrains the particulate media into the mixing spray and ensures a uniform and deep dispersion of the active media in the surrounding soil. The media injector sub-assembly can optionally include channels for supplying compressed air to an attached down-the-hole hammer drive assembly for use during drilling.

Dwyer, Brian P.; Dwyer, Stephen F.; Vigil, Francine S.; Stewart, Willis E.

2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Hoffman, James S. (Library, PA)

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

344

Flue gas injection control of silica in cooling towers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injection of CO{sub 2}-laden flue gas can decrease the potential for silica and calcite scale formation in cooling tower blowdown by lowering solution pH to decrease equilibrium calcite solubility and kinetic rates of silica polymerization. Flue gas injection might best inhibit scale formation in power plant cooling towers that use impaired makeup waters - for example, groundwaters that contain relatively high levels of calcium, alkalinity, and silica. Groundwaters brought to the surface for cooling will degas CO{sub 2} and increase their pH by 1-2 units, possibly precipitating calcite in the process. Recarbonation with flue gas can lower the pHs of these fluids back to roughly their initial pH. Flue gas carbonation probably cannot lower pHs to much below pH 6 because the pHs of impaired waters, once outgassed at the surface, are likely to be relatively alkaline. Silica polymerization to form scale occurs most rapidly at pH {approx} 8.3 at 25 C; polymerization is slower at higher and lower pH. pH 7 fluids containing {approx}220 ppm SiO{sub 2} require > 180 hours equilibration to begin forming scale whereas at pH 8.3 scale formation is complete within 36 hours. Flue gas injection that lowers pHs to {approx} 7 should allow substantially higher concentration factors. Periodic cycling to lower recoveries - hence lower silica concentrations - might be required though. Higher concentration factors enabled by flue gas injection should decrease concentrate volumes and disposal costs by roughly half.

Brady, Patrick Vane; Anderson, Howard L., Jr.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors. 5 figs.

Schneider, R.P.; Lott, J.A.

1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

346

Geologic Carbon Sequestration and Biosequestration (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Don DePaolo, Director of LBNL's Earth Sciences Division, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

DePaolo, Don [Director, LBNL Earth Sciences Division

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

347

Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons including mobilized hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

348

Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

349

Energy-efficient control in injection molding.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As an energy-intensive process, in injection molding, energy cost is one of the major cost components. The energy expenditure during molding can be divided into… (more)

Yao, Ke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

WPCF Underground Injection Control Disposal Permit Evaluation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Fact Sheet Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: WPCF Underground Injection Control Disposal Permit Evaluation and Fact Sheet Abstract...

351

Advanced Gasoline Turbocharged Direct Injection (GTDI) Engine...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in Gasoline Turbocharged Direct Injection (GTDI) engine technology in the near term as a cost effective, high volume, fuel economy solution, marketed globally as EcoBoost...

352

Chemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

45 48 51 54 57 60 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a) as injected (b) SWIFTed (c) NO 1sChemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer S. Maruyama, M- fullerene and single walled carbon nanotubes are investigated through experimental studies of interaction

Maruyama, Shigeo

353

Evaluating carbon sequestration efficiency in an ocean circulation model by adjoint sensitivity analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating carbon sequestration efficiency in an ocean circulation model by adjoint sensitivity the application of the adjoint method to develop three-dimensional maps of carbon sequestration efficiency. Sequestration efficiency (the percentage of carbon injected at a continuous point source that remains

Follows, Mick

354

January 2, 2008 Numerical modeling of the effect of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

January 2, 2008 Numerical modeling of the effect of carbon dioxide sequestration on the rate souterrain de dioxyde de carbone sur la déformation des calcaires par dissolution sous contrainte: résultats;Abstract When carbon dioxide (CO2) is injected into an aquifer or a depleted geological reservoir, its

Boyer, Edmond

355

Displacement of crude oil by carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Carbon Dioxide (December 1980) Olusegun Omole, B. S. , University of Ibadan, Nigeria Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. J. S. Osoba It has long been recognized that carbon dioxide could be used as an oil recovery agent. Both laboratory and field...- tion. Crude oil from the Foster Field in West Texas, of 7 cp and 34 API, 0 was used as the oil in place. Oil displacements were conducted at pres- sures between 750 psig and 1800 ps1g, and at a temperature of 110 F. 0 Carbon dioxide was injected...

Omole, Olusegun

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Reducing hazardous waste incinerator emissions through blending: A study of 1,1,1-trichloroethane injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate whether blending liquid hazardous wastes with hydrocarbons such as alkanes can improve the destruction efficiency and reduce the combustion byproduct levels in the post-flame region of a laboratory scale combustor. Outlet species concentrations are measured with an FTIR spectrometer for mixtures of 1,1,1-trichloroethane and 25% (by volume) dodecane or heptane injected as a spray of droplets. We also inject sprays of liquid pure 1,1,1-trichloroethane, gaseous pure 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and gaseous 1,1,1-trichloroethane with 25% (by volume) heptane. Once vaporized, the 1,1,1-trichloroethane decomposes to form CO{sub 2} and HCl through the intermediates 1,1-dichloroethylene, phosgene, acetylene, and carbon monoxide. The 1,1,1-trichloroethane/alkane mixtures also form the intermediate ethylene. No significant differences are observed between injecting the compounds as a droplet spray or as a gaseous jet, not as unexpected result as the mixing time of the gas jet is longer than the vaporization time of the droplets. The addition of heptane or dodecane to 1,1,1-trichloroethane produces two principal effects: an increase in ethylene, acetylene and carbon monoxide levels for injection temperatures between 950 to 1040 K, and a decrease in 1,1-dichloroethylene, phosgene, acetylene, and carbon monoxide levels for injection temperatures greater than 1050 K. Reaction of the injected alkane causes the former effect, while the additional heat of combustion of the alkane additives causes the latter. 17 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Thomson, M.; Koshland, C.P.; Sawyer, R.F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Carbon Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical, electrical, thermal andoptical properties. They are harder than diamond yet exible, have betterelectrical conductor than copper, but can also… (more)

Fredriksson, Tore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Overview of Recent Developments in Pellet Injection for ITER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pellet injection is the primary fueling technique planned for core fueling of ITER burning plasmas. Also, the injection of relatively small pellets to purposely trigger rapid small edge localized modes (ELMs) has been proposed as a possible solution to the heat flux damage from larger natural ELMs likely to be an issue on the ITER divertor surfaces. The ITER pellet injection system is designed to inject pellets into the plasma through both inner and outer wall guide tubes. The inner wall guide tubes will provide high throughput pellet fueling while the outerwall guide tubes will be used primarily to trigger ELMs at a high frequency (>15 Hz). The pellet fueling rate ofeach injector is to be up to 120 Pa-m3/s, which will require the formation of solid D-T at a volumetric rate of ~1500 mm3/s. Two injectors are to be provided for ITER at the startup with a provision for up to six injectorsduring the D-T phase. The required throughput of each injector is greater than that of any injector built to date, and a novel twin-screw continuous extrusion system is being developed to meet the challenging design parameters. Status of the development activities will be presented, highlighting recent progress.

Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL; Maruyama, So [ITER Organization, Cadarache, France

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

174-1 Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-174 and Natural Resources Carbon footprinting in the food industry is an activity that determines the greenhouse footprint for their processing facility and products. The importance of establishing a carbon footprint

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

360

Well injectivity during CO2 storage operations in deep saline aquifers6 1: Experimental investigation of drying effects, salt precipitation and7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a technique than can potentially limit the accumulation29-17Jan2014 #12;3 1. Introduction51 52 Geological sequestration of CO2 into deep saline aquifers studied54 much less than mature oil & gas reservoirs. Injection of carbon dioxide into saline aquifers55

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Total Organic Carbon Analyzer | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Organic Carbon Analyzer Total Organic Carbon Analyzer The carbon analyzer is used to analyze total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), total organic carbon (TOC), purgeable...

362

Aluminum-carbon composite electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg. 3 figs.

Farahmandi, C.J.; Dispennette, J.M.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

363

Aluminum-carbon composite electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg.

Farahmandi, C. Joseph (Auburn, AL); Dispennette, John M. (Auburn, AL)

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

364

Carbon and carbon monoxide hydrogenation on nickel: support effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogenation of carbon, deposited on nickel catalysts by CO disproportionation, was investigated by temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) for four oxide supports, alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/), silica (SiO/sub 2/), titanium oxide (TiO/sub 2/), and SiO/sub 2/.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The rate of carbon monoxide hydrogenation was measured by temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) for comparison. The rate of carbon hydrogenation to methane was found to be independent of the support and an average activation energy of 42 kJ/mol was estimated. In contrast, the rate of carbon monoxide hydrogenation was very sensitive to the catalyst support. Nickel (Ni) supported on TiO/sub 2/ exhibited the highest specific activity, and two distinct sites for methanation were observed on Ni/TiO/sub 2/ and Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The lowest specific activities were observed for Ni/SiO/sub 2/ and Ni/SiO/sub 2/.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. For all catalysts, carbon hydrogenation occurred at a lower temperature than carbon monoxide hydrogenation. For both TPR and TPSR, small amounts of ethane were formed and at a lower temperature than methane. The amount of less-active, ..beta..-carbon observed in TPSR experiments was very small on all catalysts. These results indicate that at high coverages, carbon hydrogenation does not depend on the support, and thus it is not rate-determining for CO hydrogenation in excess hydrogen. The support is also shown to change the specific rate of carbon monoxide methanation; activity differences seen in steady-state experiments are not just due to differences in site densities. 5 figures, 5 tables.

Ozdogan, S.Z.; Gochis, P.D.; Falconer, J.L.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Fractionation of stable carbon isotopes by phosphoenopyruvate carboxylase from C4 plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Slack pathway, the active species of carbon dioxide utilized by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was determined. The initial velocity curves obtained when bicarbonate, carbon dioxide, or carbon dioxide and carbonic anhydrase were used to initiate... the reactions, support the conclusion that the bicarbonate ion is the active species of "C02" used. Initial velocities for bicarbonate, carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide with carbonic anhydrase were 696. 2, 69. 6, and 348. 1 umoles malate produced/min mg...

Reibach, Paul Howard

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2004, 6.26 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 250 MCFD. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May. The amount of carbon dioxide produced was small during this period. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.5 B/D in May and June. Operational problems encountered during the initial stages of the flood were identified and resolved.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By December 31, 2006, 79,072 bbls of water were injected into CO2 I-1 and 3,923 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Water injection rates into CO2 I-1, CO2 No.10 and CO2 No.18 were stabilized during this period. Oil production rates increased from 4.7 B/D to 5.5 to 6 B/D confirming the arrival of an oil bank at CO2 No.12. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver No.7, Colliver No.3 and possibly Graham A4 located on an adjacent property. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Our management plan is to continue water injection maintaining oil displacement by displacing the carbon dioxide remaining in the C zone,. If the decline rate of production from the Colliver Lease remains as estimated and the oil rate from the pilot region remains constant, we estimate that the oil production attributed to carbon dioxide injection will be about 12,000 bbl by December 31, 2007. Oil recovery would be equivalent to 12 MCF/bbl, which is consistent with field experience in established West Texas carbon dioxide floods. The project is not economic.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

An Innovative Injection and Mixing System for Diesel Fuel Reforming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project focused on fuel stream preparation improvements prior to injection into a solid oxide fuel cell reformer. Each milestone and the results from each milestone are discussed in detail in this report. The first two milestones were the creation of a coking formation test rig and various testing performed on this rig. Initial tests indicated that three anti-carbon coatings showed improvement over an uncoated (bare metal) baseline. However, in follow-up 70 hour tests of the down selected coatings, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis revealed that no carbon was generated on the test specimens. These follow-up tests were intended to enable a down selection to a single best anti-carbon coating. Without the formation of carbon it was impossible to draw conclusions as to which anti-carbon coating showed the best performance. The final 70 hour tests did show that AMCX AMC26 demonstrated the lowest discoloration of the metal out of the three down selected anti-carbon coatings. This discoloration did not relate to carbon but could be a useful result when carbon growth rate is not the only concern. Unplanned variations in the series of tests must be considered and may have altered the results. Reliable conclusions could only be drawn from consistent, repeatable testing beyond the allotted time and funding for this project. Milestones 3 and 4 focused on the creation of a preheating pressure atomizer and mixing chamber. A design of experiment test helped identify a configuration of the preheating injector, Build 1, which showed a very uniform fuel spray flow field. This injector was improved upon by the creation of a Build 2 injector. Build 2 of the preheating injector demonstrated promising SMD results with only 22psi fuel pressure and 0.7 in H2O of Air. It was apparent from testing and CFD that this Build 2 has flow field recirculation zones. These recirculation zones may suggest that this Build 2 atomizer and mixer would require steam injection to reduce the auto ignition potential. It is also important to note that to achieve uniform mixing within a short distance, some recirculation is necessary. Milestone 5 generated CFD and FEA results that could be used to optimize the preheating injector. CFD results confirmed the recirculation zones seen in test data and confirmed that the flow field would not change when attached to a reformer. The FEA predicted fuel wetted wall temperatures which led to several suggested improvements that could possibly improve nozzle efficiency. Milestone 6 (originally an optional task) took a different approach than the preheating pressure atomizer. It focused on creation and optimization of a piezoelectric injector which could perform at extremely low fuel pressures. The piezoelectric atomizer showed acceptable SMD results with fuel pressure less than 1.0 psig and air pressure less than 1.0 in H2O. These SMD values were enhanced when a few components were changed, and it is expected would improve further still at elevated air temperatures. It was demonstrated that the piezoelectric injector could accomplish the desired task. The addition of phase tracking and a burst mode to the frequency controller increased the usability of the piezoelectric injector. This injector is ready to move on to the next phase of development. Engine Components has met the required program milestones of this project. Some of the Milestones were adjusted to allow Milestone 6 to be completed in parallel with the other Milestones. Because of this, Task 3.10 and 3.13 were made optional instead of Milestone 6. Engine Components was extremely grateful for the support that was provided by NETL in support of this work.

Spencer Pack

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Abstract--Bias temperature instability, hot-carrier injection, and gate-oxide wearout will cause severe lifetime degradation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--Bias temperature instability, hot-carrier injection, and gate-oxide wearout will cause mechanisms are bias temperature instability (BTI) [1] and hot-carrier injection (HCI) [2], both of which can is compounded by thermal feedback, since active devices located at die hot spots operate at an elevated

Lipasti, Mikko H.

370

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Carbon Fiber  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

373

Carbon Fiber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

374

Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon Sequestration- the process of capturing the CO2 released by the burning of fossil fuels and storing it deep withing the Earth, trapped by a non-porous layer of rock.

None

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

375

Influence of stand age on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in Canadian forests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from economic activity, carbon intensity, and ef?ciency ofintensity and stand density. For instance, it has been estimated that the average amount of carbon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Intradermal needle-free powdered drug injection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a new method for needle-free powdered drug injection. The design, construction, and testing of a bench-top helium-powered device capable of delivering powder to controllable depths within the dermis ...

Liu, John (John Hsiao-Yung)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Underground Injection Control Fee Schedule (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule establishes schedules of permit fees for state under?ground injection control permits issued by the Chief of the Office of Water Resources. This rule applies to any person who is...

378

Investigation of Direct Injection Vehicle Particulate Matter...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emissions This study focuses primarily on particulate matter mass analysis of a gasoline direct injection engine in a test cell with a chassis dynamometer. p-10gibbs.pdf...

379

Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (UIC code) is adopted pursuant to the provisions of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-5-11). It is the...

380

Injection Locking Techniques for Spectrum Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wideband spectrum analysis supports future communication systems that reconfigure and adapt to the capacity of the spectral environment. While test equipment manufacturers offer wideband spectrum analyzers with excellent sensitivity and resolution, these spectrum analyzers typically cannot offer acceptable size, weight, and power (SWAP). CMOS integrated circuits offer the potential to fully integrate spectrum analysis capability with analog front-end circuitry and digital signal processing on a single chip. Unfortunately, CMOS lacks high-Q passives and wideband resonator tunability that is necessary for heterodyne implementations of spectrum analyzers. As an alternative to the heterodyne receiver architectures, two nonlinear methods for performing wideband, low-power spectrum analysis are presented. The first method involves injecting the spectrum of interest into an array of injection-locked oscillators. The second method employs the closed loop dynamics of both injection locking and phase locking to independently estimate the injected frequency and power.

Gathma, Timothy D.; Buckwalter, James F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 9209 (United States)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Modeling and Optimization of Matrix Acidizing in Horizontal Wells in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentration, temperature and acid flux in the formation. The work concentrated on the investigation of the acid flux. Analytical equations for injection rate schedule for different wormhole models. In carbonate acidizing, the existence of the optimum...

Tran, Hau

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of December 2004, 11.39 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 242 MCFD. Vent losses were excessive during June as ambient temperatures increased. Installation of smaller plungers in the carbon dioxide injection pump reduced the recycle and vent loss substantially. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May and in the second production well in August. No channeling of carbon dioxide was observed. The GOR has remained within the range of 3000-4000 for most the last six months. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.35 B/D for the six month period between July 1 and December 31. Cumulative oil production was 814 bbls. Neither well has experienced increased oil production rates expected from the arrival of the oil bank generated by carbon dioxide injection.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfn; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Fluidized bed injection assembly for coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coaxial feed system for fluidized bed coal gasification processes including an inner tube for injecting particulate combustibles into a transport gas, an inner annulus about the inner tube for injecting an oxidizing gas, and an outer annulus about the inner annulus for transporting a fluidizing and cooling gas. The combustibles and oxidizing gas are discharged vertically upward directly into the combustion jet, and the fluidizing and cooling gas is discharged in a downward radial direction into the bed below the combustion jet.

Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA); Salvador, Louis A. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Flow Instabilities During Injection of CO2 into SalineAquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous phase by a factor of 15. Because of the lower viscosity, the CO{sub 2} displacement front will have a tendency towards instability so that waves or rounded lobes of saturation may appear and grow into fingers that lead to enhanced dissolution, bypassing, and possibly poor sweep efficiency. This paper presents an analysis, through high-resolution numerical simulations, of the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. We explore the influence of viscosity ratio, relative permeability functions, and capillary pressure on finger growth and spacing. In addition, we address the issues of finger triggering, convergence under grid refinement and boundary condition effects. Simulations were carried out on scalar machines, and on an IBM RS/6000 SP (a distributed-memory parallel computer with 6080 processors) with a parallelized version of TOUGH2.

Garcia, Julio E.; Pruess, Karsten

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

The effects of gas-fluid-rock interactions on CO2 injection and storage: Insights from reactive transport modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Possible means of reducing atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions include injecting CO{sub 2} in petroleum reservoirs for Enhanced Oil Recovery or storing CO{sub 2} in deep saline aquifers. Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} into subsurface reservoirs would induce a complex interplay of multiphase flow, capillary trapping, dissolution, diffusion, convection, and chemical reactions that may have significant impacts on both short-term injection performance and long-term fate of CO{sub 2} storage. Reactive Transport Modeling is a promising approach that can be used to predict the spatial and temporal evolution of injected CO{sub 2} and associated gas-fluid-rock interactions. This presentation will summarize recent advances in reactive transport modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and review key technical issues on (1) the short- and long-term behavior of injected CO{sub 2} in geological formations; (2) the role of reservoir mineral heterogeneity on injection performance and storage security; (3) the effect of gas mixtures (e.g., H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}) on CO{sub 2} storage; and (4) the physical and chemical processes during potential leakage of CO{sub 2} from the primary storage reservoir. Simulation results suggest that CO{sub 2} trapping capacity, rate, and impact on reservoir rocks depend on primary mineral composition and injecting gas mixtures. For example, models predict that the injection of CO{sub 2} alone or co-injection with H{sub 2}S in both sandstone and carbonate reservoirs lead to acidified zones and mineral dissolution adjacent to the injection well, and carbonate precipitation and mineral trapping away from the well. Co-injection of CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and in particular with SO{sub 2} causes greater formation alteration and complex sulfur mineral (alunite, anhydrite, and pyrite) trapping, sometimes at a much faster rate than previously thought. The results from Reactive Transport Modeling provide valuable insights for analyzing and assessing the dynamic behaviors of injected CO{sub 2}, identifying and characterizing potential storage sites, and managing injection performance and reducing costs.

Xiao, Y.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Orthogonal ion injection apparatus and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An orthogonal ion injection apparatus and process are described in which ions are directly injected into an ion guide orthogonal to the ion guide axis through an inlet opening located on a side of the ion guide. The end of the heated capillary is placed inside the ion guide such that the ions are directly injected into DC and RF fields inside the ion guide, which efficiently confines ions inside the ion guide. Liquid droplets created by the ionization source that are carried through the capillary into the ion guide are removed from the ion guide by a strong directional gas flow through an inlet opening on the opposite side of the ion guide. Strong DC and RF fields divert ions into the ion guide. In-guide orthogonal injection yields a noise level that is a factor of 1.5 to 2 lower than conventional inline injection known in the art. Signal intensities for low m/z ions are greater compared to convention inline injection under the same processing conditions.

Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Belov, Mikhail E

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Investigation of the carbon dioxide sorption capacity and structural deformation of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations causing the global energy and environmental crises, geological sequestration of carbon dioxide is now being actively considered as an attractive option to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. One of the important strategies is to use deep unminable coal seams, for those generally contain significant quantities of coal bed methane that can be recovered by CO2 injection through enhanced coal bed natural gas production, as a method to safely store CO2. It has been well known that the adsorbing CO2 molecules introduce structural deformation, such as distortion, shrinkage, or swelling, of the adsorbent of coal organic matrix. The accurate investigations of CO2 sorption capacity as well as of adsorption behavior need to be performed under the conditions that coals deform. The U.S. Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory and Regional University Alliance are conducting carbon dioxide sorption isotherm experiments by using manometric analysis method for estimation of CO2 sorption capacity of various coal samples and are constructing a gravimetric apparatus which has a visual window cell. The gravimetric apparatus improves the accuracy of carbon dioxide sorption capacity and provides feasibility for the observation of structural deformation of coal sample while carbon dioxide molecules interact with coal organic matrix. The CO2 sorption isotherm measurements have been conducted for moist and dried samples of the Central Appalachian Basin (Russell County, VA) coal seam, received from the SECARB partnership, at the temperature of 55 C.

Hur, Tae-Bong; Fazio, James; Romanov, Vyacheslav; Harbert, William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

389

Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Presentation given at DEER 2006,...

390

Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...

391

Fuel Formulation Effects on Diesel Fuel Injection, Combustion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Formulation Effects on Diesel Fuel Injection, Combustion, Emissions and Emission Control Fuel Formulation Effects on Diesel Fuel Injection, Combustion, Emissions and Emission...

392

automated flow injection: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the great majority the feasibility of our attack. The friend injection attack enables a stealth infiltra- tion of social networks Boyer, Edmond 7 Preventing injection attacks...

393

Neutral Beam Injection for Plasma and Magnetic Field Diagnostics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Injection for Plasma and Magnetic Field Diagnostics 1 **diagnostic neutral beam injection system for measuring plasmaplasma v . High proton fraction and small divergence is essential for diagnostic

Vainionpaa, Jaakko Hannes; Leung, Ka Ngo; Kwan, Joe W.; Levinton, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Injection of Zero Valent Iron into an Unconfined Aquifer Using...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Injection of Zero Valent Iron into an Unconfined Aquifer Using Shear-Thinning Fluids. Injection of Zero Valent Iron into an Unconfined Aquifer Using Shear-Thinning Fluids....

395

Advantages of Oxygenates Fuels over Gasoline in Direct Injection...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advantages of Oxygenates Fuels over Gasoline in Direct Injection Spark Ignition Engines Advantages of Oxygenates Fuels over Gasoline in Direct Injection Spark Ignition Engines...

396

3-Cylinder Turbocharged Gasoline Direct Injection: A High Value...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cylinder Turbocharged Gasoline Direct Injection: A High Value Solution for Euro VI Emissions 3-Cylinder Turbocharged Gasoline Direct Injection: A High Value Solution for Euro VI...

397

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel Injection...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics Presentation...

398

Injection risk behavior among women syringe exchangers in San Francisco.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

injection supplies (cotton, cookers, water, and bleach),injection equipment, such as cookers, cottons, and rinsepartners, n=148 Shared cooker, cotton, or rinse water

Lum, Paula J; Sears, Clare; Guydish, Joseph

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Application of Gaseous Sphere Injection Method for Modeling Under-expanded H2 Injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology for modeling gaseous injection has been refined and applied to recent experimental data from the literature. This approach uses a discrete phase analogy to handle gaseous injection, allowing for addition of gaseous injection to a CFD grid without needing to resolve the injector nozzle. This paper focuses on model testing to provide the basis for simulation of hydrogen direct injected internal combustion engines. The model has been updated to be more applicable to full engine simulations, and shows good agreement with experiments for jet penetration and time-dependent axial mass fraction, while available radial mass fraction data is less well predicted.

Whitesides, R; Hessel, R P; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

400

How realistic is the pore size distribution calculated from adsorption isotherms if activated carbon is composed of fullerene-like fragments?w  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon is composed of fullerene-like fragments?w Artur P. Terzyk,*a Sylwester Furmaniak,a Peter J. F. Harris,b Piotr A. Gauden,a Jerzy W$och,c Piotr Kowalczykd and Gerhard Rychlickia Received 11th July 2007 incorporated fullerene-related elements was proposed by Harris et al.18­21 Although this model is quite widely

Harris, Peter J F

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Coal combustion under conditions of blast furnace injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of coal during the blast furnace injection process and to delineate the optimum properties of the feed coal with particular reference to the coals from the Illinois Basin. Although this research is not yet completed the results to date support the following conclusions: (1) based on the results of computer modeling, lower rank bituminous coals, including coal from the Illinois Basin, compare well in their injection properties with a variety of other bituminous coals, although the replacement ratio improves with increasing rank; (2) based on the results of petrographic analysis of material collected from an active blast furnace, it is clear the coal derived char is entering into the raceway of the blast furnace; (3) the results of reactivity experiments on a variety of coal chars at a variety of reaction temperatures show that lower rank bituminous coals, including coal from the Illinois basin, yield chars with significantly higher reactivities in both air and CO{sub 2} than chars from higher rank Appalachian coals and blast furnace coke. These results indicate that the chars from the lower rank coals should have a superior burnout rate in the tuyere and should survive in the raceway environment for a shorter time. These coals, therefore, will have important advantages at high rates of injection that may overcome their slightly lower replacement rates.

Crelling, J.C. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Geology

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Solar Fuels and Carbon Cycle 2.0 (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Paul Alivisatos, LBNL Director speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 4, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Alivisatos, Paul

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

403

Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Oakland, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

System Study: High-Pressure Safety Injection 1998–2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure safety injection system (HPSI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPSI results.

T. E. Wierman

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998-2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

T. E. Wierman

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Opacity reduction using hydrated lime injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this investigation is to study the effects of injecting dry hydrated lime into flue gas to reduce sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) concentrations and consequently stack opacity at the University of Missouri, Columbia power plant. Burning of high sulfur coal (approx. 4% by weight) at the power plant resulted in opacity violations. The opacity problem was due to sulfuric acid mist (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) forming at the stack from high SO{sub 3} concentrations. As a result of light scattering by the mist, a visible plume leaves the stack. Therefore, reducing high concentrations of SO{sub 3} reduces the sulfuric acid mist and consequently the opacity problem. The current hydrated lime injection system has reduced the opacity to acceptable limits. To reduce SO{sub 3} concentrations, dry hydrated lime is injected into the flue gas upstream of a particulate collection device (baghouse) and downstream of the induced draft fan. The lime is periodically injected into the flue via a pneumatic piping system. The hydrated lime is transported down the flue and deposited on the filter bags in the baghouse. As the hydrated lime is deposited on the bags a filter cake is established. The reaction between the SO{sub 3} and the hydrated lime takes place on the filter bags. The hydrated lime injection system has resulted in at least 95% reduction in the SO{sub 3} concentration. Low capital equipment requirements and operating cost coupled with easy installation and maintenance makes the system very attractive to industries with similar problems. This paper documents the hydrated lime injection system and tests the effectiveness of the system on SO{sub 3} removal and subsequent opacity reduction. Measurements Of SO{sub 3} concentrations, flue gas velocities, and temperatures have been performed at the duct work and baghouse. A complete analysis of the hydrated lime injection system is provided.

Wolf, D.E.; Seaba, J.P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. Forenergy and could capture and sequester carbon emissions.

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Neutralizing Carbonic Acid in Deep Carbonate Strata below the North Atlantic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our research is aimed at investigating several technical issues associated with carbon dioxide sequestration in calcium carbonate sediments below the sea floor through laboratory experiments and chemical transport modeling. Our goal is to evaluate the basic feasibility of this approach, including an assessment of optimal depths, sediment types, and other issues related to site selection. The results of our modeling efforts were published this past summer in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. We are expanding on that work through a variety of laboratory and modeling efforts. In the laboratories at Columbia and at Harvard, we are studying the flow of liquid carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide-water mixtures through calcium carbonate sediments to better understand the geomechanical and structural stability of the sediments during and after injection. We are currently preparing the results of these findings for publication. In addition, we are investigating the kinetics of calcium carbonate dissolution in the presence of CO{sub 2}-water fluids, which is a critical feature of the system as it allows for increased permeability during injection. We are also investigating the possibility of carbon dioxide hydrate formation in the pore fluid, which might complicate the injection procedure by reducing sediment permeability but might also provide an upper seal in the sediment-pore fluid system, preventing release of CO{sub 2} into the deep ocean, particularly if depth and temperature at the injection point rule out immediate hydrate formation. This is done by injecting liquid CO{sub 2} into various types of porous media, and then monitoring the changes in permeability. Finally, we are performing an economic analysis to estimate costs of drilling and gas injection, site monitoring as well as the availability of potential disposal sites with particular emphasis on those sites that are within the 200-mile economic zone of the United States. We present some preliminary results from these analyses. A paper discussing the site selection based on data from the Ocean Drilling Program and Deep Sea Drilling Program is currently in preparation.

Daniel P. Schrag

2006-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

409

Carbon microtubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbon microtube comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the microtube has a diameter of from about 10 .mu.m to about 150 .mu.m, and a density of less than 20 mg/cm.sup.3. Also described is a carbon microtube, having a diameter of at least 10 .mu.m and comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the porous wall comprises a plurality of voids, said voids substantially parallel to the length of the microtube, and defined by an inner surface, an outer surface, and a shared surface separating two adjacent voids.

Peng, Huisheng (Shanghai, CN); Zhu, Yuntian Theodore (Cary, NC); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

410

[Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria]. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Interaction between Injection Points during Hydraulic Fracturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a model of the hydraulic fracturing of heterogeneous poroelastic media. The formalism is an effective continuum model that captures the coupled dynamics of the fluid pressure and the fractured rock matrix and models both the tensile and shear failure of the rock. As an application of the formalism, we study the geomechanical stress interaction between two injection points during hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) and how this interaction influences the fracturing process. For injection points that are separated by less than a critical correlation length, we find that the fracturing process around each point is strongly correlated with the position of the neighboring point. The magnitude of the correlation length depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the rock and is on the order of 30-45 m for rocks with low permeabilities. In the strongly correlated regime, we predict a novel effective fracture-force that attracts the fractures toward the neighboring injection point.

Hals, Kjetil M D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Carbon Storage Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership MSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana State University MVA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring,...

413

OPTIMIZATION OF INJECTION INTO VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPTIMIZATION OF INJECTION INTO VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS CONSIDERING ADSORPTION. Because of the costs associated with injection, optimizing an injection program involves not only of the injectate can become available for production and at the same time optimize the present worth of the project

Stanford University

414

Injection of CO2 with H2S and SO2 and Subsequent Mineral Trapping in Sandstone-Shale Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into deep geologic formations can potentially reduce atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases. Sequestering less-pure CO{sub 2} waste streams (containing H{sub 2}S and/or SO{sub 2}) would be less expensive or would require less energy than separating CO{sub 2} from flue gas or a coal gasification process. The long-term interaction of these injected acid gases with shale-confining layers of a sandstone injection zone has not been well investigated. We therefore have developed a conceptual model of injection of CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and/or SO{sub 2} into a sandstone-shale sequence, using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions commonly encountered in Gulf Coast sediments of the United States. We have performed numerical simulations of a 1-D radial well region considering sandstone alone and a 2-D model using a sandstone-shale sequence under acid-gas injection conditions. Results indicate that shale plays a limited role in mineral alteration and sequestration of gases within a sandstone horizon for short time periods (10,000 years in present simulations). The co-injection of SO{sub 2} results in different pH distribution, mineral alteration patterns, and CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration than the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or injection of CO{sub 2} alone. Simulations generate a zonal distribution of mineral alteration and formation of carbon and sulfur trapping minerals that depends on the pH distribution. The co-injection of SO{sub 2} results in a larger and stronger acidified zone close to the well. Precipitation of carbon trapping minerals occurs within the higher pH regions beyond the acidified zones. In contrast, sulfur trapping minerals are stable at low pH ranges (below 5) within the front of the acidified zone. Corrosion and well abandonment due to the co-injection of SO{sub 2} could be important issues. Significant CO{sub 2} is sequestered in ankerite and dawsonite, and some in siderite. The CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capability can reach 80 kg per cubic meter of medium. Most sulfur is trapped through alunite precipitation, although some is trapped by anhydrite precipitation and minor amount of pyrite. The addition of the acid gases and induced mineral alteration result in changes in porosity. The limited information currently available on the mineralogy of natural high-pressure acid-gas reservoirs is generally consistent with our simulations.

Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten; Yamamoto, Hajime

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

415

Evaluation of injection well risk management potential in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UIC regulations promulgated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) provide the EPA, or an EPA approved state agency, with authority to regulate subsurface injection of fluids to protect USDWs. Oil and gas producing industry interests are concerned primarily with Class 2 wells whose uses as defined by UIC regulations are: disposal of fluids brought to the surface and liquids generated in connection with oil and gas production (SWD); injection of fluids for enhanced oil recovery (EOR); and storage of liquid hydrocarbons. The Williston Basin was chosen for the pilot study of the feasibility of using the risk approach in managing Class 2 injection operations for the following reasons: it is one of the nine geologic basins which was classified as having a significant potential for external casing corrosion, which permitted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the injection well corrosion control measures used by industry; there are 731 active, 22 shut in and 203 temporarily abandoned SWD and water injection wells in the basin; and the basin covers three states. The broad objective of the Williston Basin study is to define requirements and to investigate the feasibility of incorporating risk management into administration of the UIC program. The study does not address the reporting aspects of UIC regulatory and compliance activities but the data base does contain essentially all the information required to develop the reports needed to monitor those activities. 16 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

none,

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Injected Beam Dynamics in SPEAR3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the top-off operation it is important to understand the time evolution of charge injected into the storage ring. The large-amplitude horizontal oscillation quickly filaments and decoheres, and in some cases exhibits non-linear x-y coupling before damping to the stored orbit. Similarly, in the longitudinal dimension, any mismatch in beam arrival time, beam energy or phase-space results in damped, non-linear synchrotron oscillations. In this paper we report on measurements of injection beam dynamics in the transverse and longitudinal planes using turn-by-turn BPMs, a fast-gated, image-intensified CCD camera and a Hamamatsu C5680 streak camera.

Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC; Huang, Xiaobiao; /SLAC; Safranek, James; /SLAC; Westerman, Stuart; /SLAC; Cheng, Weixing; /Brookhaven; Mok, Walter; /Unlisted

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

417

Mixed Mode Fuel Injector And Injection System  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set that are controlled respectively by first and second three way needle control valves. Each fuel injector includes first and second concentric needle valve members. One of the needle valve members moves to an open position for a homogenous charge injection event, while the other needle valve member moves to an open position for a conventional injection event. The fuel injector has the ability to operate in a homogenous charge mode with a homogenous charge spray pattern, a conventional mode with a conventional spray pattern or a mixed mode.

Stewart, Chris Lee (Normal, IL); Tian, Ye (Bloomington, IL); Wang, Lifeng (Normal, IL); Shafer, Scott F. (Morton, IL)

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

418

204 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOBIOSCIENCE, VOL. 5, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2006 Using Carbon Nanotubes to Absorb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activated carbon in this regard. Fluorescence intensity of the carbon nanotube with and without immersion204 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOBIOSCIENCE, VOL. 5, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2006 Using Carbon Nanotubes the interaction between hydrogen sulfide and carbon nanotube. The carbon nanotube is chosen because of a known

Zhang, WJ "Chris"

419

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ahead, and identifying the carbon pools and other green house gas emissions sources and savings coveredCarbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 Carbon

420

Diesel engine emissions reduction by multiple injections having increasing pressure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multiple fuel charges are injected into a diesel engine combustion chamber during a combustion cycle, and each charge after the first has successively greater injection pressure (a higher injection rate) than the prior charge. This injection scheme results in reduced emissions, particularly particulate emissions, and can be implemented by modifying existing injection system hardware. Further enhancements in emissions reduction and engine performance can be obtained by using known measures in conjunction with the invention, such as Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR).

Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI); Thiel, Matthew P. (Madison, WI)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fabrication of conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive dionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m.sup.2 /gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon compositives with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to be high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced.

Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Tran, Tri D. (Livermore, CA); Feikert, John H. (Livermore, CA); Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fabrication is described for conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive deionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m{sup 2}/gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon composites with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced. 1 fig.

Kaschmitter, J.L.; Tran, T.D.; Feikert, J.H.; Mayer, S.T.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

Electrolyte reservoir for carbonate fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrode for a carbonate fuel cell and method of making same are described wherein a substantially uniform mixture of an electrode-active powder and porous ceramic particles suitable for a carbonate fuel cell are formed into an electrode with the porous ceramic particles having pores in the range of from about 1 micron to about 3 microns, and a carbonate electrolyte is in the pores of the ceramic particles.

Iacovangelo, C.D.; Shores, D.A.

1984-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

High productivity injection practices at Rouge Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rouge Steel Company, located in Dearborn, Michigan, operates two blast furnaces. The smaller of the pair, ``B`` Furnace, has a hearth diameter of 20 feet and 12 tuyeres. It has averaged 2,290 NTHM (net ton of hot metal) per day of 8.2 NTHM per 100 cubic feet of working volume. ``C`` Furnace has a hearth diameter of 29 feet and 20 tuyeres. Both of these furnaces are single tap hole furnaces. Prior to its reline in 1991, ``C`` Furnace was producing at a rate of 3,300 NTHM/day or about 6.25 NTHM/100 cfwv. In November, 1994 it averaged 5,106 NTHM/day or 9.6 NTHM/100 cfwv. This paper discusses how the current production rates were achieved. Also, the areas that needed to be addressed as production increased will be described. These areas include casthouse arrangement and workload, hot metal ladle capacity, slag pot capacity and charging capability. Coupled with the high blast temperature capability, the furnace was provided with a new natural gas injection system that injected the gas through the blowpipes and a natural gas injection system to enrich the stove gas. Following the furnace reline, natural gas has been used in three ways: tuyere level control; combination injection; and stove gas enrichment. Coke consumption rate has also decreased per NTHM.

Barker, D.H.; Hegler, G.L.; Falls, C.E. [Rouge Steel Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Passive safety injection system using borated water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive safety injection system relies on differences in water density to induce natural circulatory flow patterns which help maintain prescribed concentrations of boric acid in borated water, and prevents boron from accumulating in the reactor vessel and possibly preventing heat transfer.

Conway, Lawrence E. (Allegheny, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Westmoreland, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Enhanced oil recovery using hydrogen peroxide injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NOVATEC received an US Patent on a novel method to recovery viscous oil by hydrogen peroxide injection. The process appears to offer several significant improvements over existing thermal methods of oil recovery. Tejas joined NOVATEC to test the process in the laboratory and to develop oil field applications and procedures.

Moss, J.T. Jr.; Moss, J.T.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Accounting for Remaining Injected Fracturing Fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The technology of multi-stage fracturing of horizontal wells made the development of shale gas reservoirs become greatly successful during the past decades. A large amount of fracturing fluid, usually from 53,000 bbls to 81,400 bbls, is injected...

Zhang, Yannan

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

428

Study Reveals Fuel Injection Timing Impact on Particle Number Emissions (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Start of injection can improve environmental performance of fuel-efficient gasoline direct injection engines.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Method for making carbon films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for treating an organic polymer material, preferably a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer (Saran) to produce a flat sheet of carbon film material having a high surface area ([approx equal]1000 m[sup 2] /g) suitable as an electrode material for super capacitor applications. The method comprises heating a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer film disposed between two spaced apart graphite or ceramic plates to a first temperature of about 160 C for about 14 hours to form a stabilized vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride polymer film, thereafter heating the stabilized film to a second temperature of about 750 C in an inert atmosphere for about one hour to form a carbon film; and finally activating the carbon film to increase the surface area by heating the carbon film in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 750--850 C for between 1--6 hours. 2 figs.

Tan, M.X.

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

430

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting Elisa Belfiori belf0018@umn.edu University of Minnesota Abstract This paper considers the optimal design of policies to carbon emissions in an economy, such as price or quantity controls on the net emissions of carbon, are insufficient to achieve the social

Weiblen, George D

431

Thermal device and method for production of carbon monoxide and hydrogen by thermal dissociation of hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide is produced in a fast quench reactor. The production of carbon monoxide includes injecting carbon dioxide and some air into a reactor chamber having a high temperature at its inlet and a rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Carbon dioxide and other reactants such as methane and other low molecular weight hydrocarbons are injected into the reactor chamber. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream.

Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse, and Zhu, Zhiliang, 2010, Public review draft; A method for assessing carbon stocks, carbon sequestration

433

Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the Management ofThe Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries.Carbon accounting and carbon footprint - more than just

Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Mass Spectroscopy and Reaction Studies of Laser-Vaporized Clusters from Metal-Doped Carbon Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C50 + LaC60 + (40) 30 40 50 60 70 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arb.units) (a) Positive La Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) C43 ­ C44 ­ Mass (amu) LaC32 ­ (a) (b) Fig. 2 Even distribution. 440 460 480 500 36 38 40 42 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a) as injected (b

Maruyama, Shigeo

435

GEO-SEQ Best Practices Manual. Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: Site Evaluation to Implementation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first phase of the GEO-SEQ project was a multidisciplinary effort focused on investigating ways to lower the cost and risk of geologic carbon sequestration. Through our research in the GEO-SEQ project, we have produced results that may be of interest to the wider geologic carbon sequestration community. However, much of the knowledge developed in GEO-SEQ is not easily accessible because it is dispersed in the peer-reviewed literature and conference proceedings in individual papers on specific topics. The purpose of this report is to present key GEO-SEQ findings relevant to the practical implementation of geologic carbon sequestration in the form of a Best Practices Manual. Because our work in GEO-SEQ focused on the characterization and project development aspects, the scope of this report covers practices prior to injection, referred to as the design phase. The design phase encompasses activities such as selecting sites for which enhanced recovery may be possible, evaluating CO{sub 2} capacity and sequestration feasibility, and designing and evaluating monitoring approaches. Through this Best Practices Manual, we have endeavored to place our GEO-SEQ findings in a practical context and format that will be useful to readers interested in project implementation. The overall objective of this Manual is to facilitate putting the findings of the GEO-SEQ project into practice.

Benson, Sally M.; Myer, Larry R.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Doughty, Christine A.; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Hoversten, Mike; Gasperikova, Erica; Daley, Thomas; Majer, Ernie; Lippmann, Marcelo; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Knauss, Kevin; Johnson, James; Foxall, William; Ramirez, Abe; Newmark, Robin; Cole, David; Phelps, Tommy J.; Parker, J.; Palumbo, A.; Horita, J.; Fisher, S.; Moline, Gerry; Orr, Lynn; Kovscek, Tony; Jessen, K.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, J.; Cakici, M.; Hovorka, Susan; Holtz, Mark; Sakurai, Shinichi; Gunter, Bill; Law, David; van der Meer, Bert

2004-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

436

Carbon Diffusion and Clustering in SiGeC Layers Under Thermal Oxidation D. De Salvador1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in order to distinguish the pure thermal effects from those produced by the I injection under oxidationCarbon Diffusion and Clustering in SiGeC Layers Under Thermal Oxidation D. De Salvador1 , E to the formation and growth of C containing precipitates which are promoted by the I injection and act as a sink

437

Terahertz graphene lasers: Injection versus optical pumping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the formation of nonequilibrium states in optically pumped graphene layers and in forward-biased graphene structures with lateral p-i-n junctions and consider the conditions of population inversion and lasing. The model used accounts for intraband and interband relaxation processes as well as deviation of the optical phonon system from equilibrium. As shown, optical pumping suffers from a significant heating of both the electron-hole plasma and the optical phonon system, which can suppress the formation of population inversion. In the graphene structures with p-i-n junction, the injected electrons and holes have relatively low energies, so that the effect of cooling can be rather pronounced, providing a significant advantage of the injection pumping in realization of graphene terahertz lasers.

Ryzhii, Victor; Otsuji, Taiichi [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ryzhii, Maxim [Computational Nanoelectronics Laboratory, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu 965-8580 (Japan); Mitin, Vladimir [Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, SUNY, Buffalo, New York 14260-1920 (United States)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

438

BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

Lazerson, Samuel

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

Waterflooding injectate design systems and methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of designing an injectate to be used in a waterflooding operation is disclosed. One aspect includes specifying data representative of chemical characteristics of a liquid hydrocarbon, a connate, and a reservoir rock, of a subterranean reservoir. Charged species at an interface of the liquid hydrocarbon are determined based on the specified data by evaluating at least one chemical reaction. Charged species at an interface of the reservoir rock are determined based on the specified data by evaluating at least one chemical reaction. An extent of surface complexation between the charged species at the interfaces of the liquid hydrocarbon and the reservoir rock is determined by evaluating at least one surface complexation reaction. The injectate is designed and is operable to decrease the extent of surface complexation between the charged species at interfaces of the liquid hydrocarbon and the reservoir rock. Other methods, apparatus, and systems are disclosed.

Brady, Patrick V.; Krumhansl, James L.

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

440

Global Impacts (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ashok Gadgil, Faculty Senior Scientist and Acting Director, EETD, also Professor of Environmental Engineering, UC Berkeley, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Gadgil, Ashok [EETD and UC Berkeley

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Effect of potassium carbonate on char gasification by carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A differential packed-bed reactor has been employed to study the gasification of 7.5 wt% K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-catalyzed Saran char in carbon dioxide/carbon monoxide mixtures at a total pressure near 1 atm (101.3 kPa) and temperatures between 922 and 1046 K. The rate data were tested with a model which involves two-site adsorption and subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the char surface. The results indicate that this model adequately explains the catalyzed gasification data. Moreover, the activation energy for desorption of carbon-oxygen complex is lower for the catalyzed case than for the uncatalyzed case. Adsorption of CO and CO/sub 2/ on both catalyzed and uncatalyzed chars was also followed with a volumetric adsorption apparatus at pressures between 1 and 100 kPa and temperatures from 273 to 725 K. The catalyzed char adsorbed an order of magnitude more CO/sub 2/ at 560 K than the uncatalyzed char. Subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the carbon surface does not appear to be catalyzed by potassium. Thus, the catalyst's role is to enhance CO/sub 2/ adsorption, thereby creating more oxygen on the surface, and lowering the activation energy for desorption of the resultant carbon-oxygen species.

Koenig, P.C.; Squires, R.G.; Laurendeau, N.M.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Separation of carbon nanotubes in density gradients  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), by chirality and/or diameter, using centrifugation of compositions of SWNTs in and surface active components in density gradient media.

Hersam, Mark C. (Evanston, IL); Stupp, Samuel I. (Chicago, IL); Arnold, Michael S. (Northbrook, IL)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

443

Separation of carbon nanotubes in density gradients  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), by chirality and/or diameter, using centrifugation of compositions of SWNTs in and surface active components in density gradient media.

Hersam, Mark C. (Evanston, IL); Stupp, Samuel I. (Chicago, IL); Arnold, Michael S. (Northbrook, IL)

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

444

Nanoporous carbon catalytic membranes and method for making the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Catalytic membranes comprising highly-dispersed, catalytically-active metals in nanoporous carbon membranes and a novel single-phase process to produce the membranes.

Foley, Henry C. (Hockessin, DE); Strano, Michael (Wilmington, DE); Acharya, Madhav (New Castle, DE); Raich, Brenda A. (Houston, TX)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Carbon nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic self-assembly: a highly active oxygen reduction Carbon nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic...

446

ancestral chloroplastic carbonic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

composites by gelation and supercritical August 2003) Activated carbon fibercarbon aerogel (ACFCA) composites were fabricated by gelling. The textures and pore structures...

447

archean stromatolitic carbonate: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

composites by gelation and supercritical August 2003) Activated carbon fibercarbon aerogel (ACFCA) composites were fabricated by gelling. The textures and pore structures...

448

Carbon Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensor for Assay of Salivary...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensor for Assay of Salivary Cholinesterase Enzyme Activity: An Exposure Biomarker of Carbon Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensor for Assay of...

449

Leaching of As, Cr, and Cu from High-Carbon Fly AshSoil Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of conversion to low-NOX combustion (Hower et al. 1998) and activated carbon ad- dition to control Hg emissions

Aydilek, Ahmet

450

Improved Water Flooding through Injection Brine Modification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of waterflooding, by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Laboratory waterflood tests show that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery. Numerous fields in the Powder River basin have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Although many uncertainties arise in the interpretation and comparison of field production data, injection of low salinity brine appears to give higher recovery compared to brine of moderate salinity (about 7,000 ppm). Laboratory studies of the effect of brine composition on oil recovery cover a wide range of rock types and crude oils. Oil recovery increases using low salinity brine as the injection water ranged from a low of no notable increase to as much as 37.0% depending on the system being studied. Recovery increases using low salinity brine after establishing residual oil saturation (tertiary mode) ranged from no significant increase to 6.0%. Tests with two sets of reservoir cores and crude oil indicated slight improvement in recovery for low salinity brine. Crude oil type and rock type (particularly the presence and distribution of kaolinite) both play a dominant role in the effect that brine composition has on waterflood oil recovery.

Robertson, Eric Partridge; Thomas, Charles Phillip; Morrow, Norman; (U of Wyoming)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

European Lean Gasoline Direct Injection Vehicle Benchmark  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lean Gasoline Direct Injection (LGDI) combustion is a promising technical path for achieving significant improvements in fuel efficiency while meeting future emissions requirements. Though Stoichiometric Gasoline Direct Injection (SGDI) technology is commercially available in a few vehicles on the American market, LGDI vehicles are not, but can be found in Europe. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) obtained a European BMW 1-series fitted with a 2.0l LGDI engine. The vehicle was instrumented and commissioned on a chassis dynamometer. The engine and after-treatment performance and emissions were characterized over US drive cycles (Federal Test Procedure (FTP), the Highway Fuel Economy Test (HFET), and US06 Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (US06)) and steady state mappings. The vehicle micro hybrid features (engine stop-start and intelligent alternator) were benchmarked as well during the course of that study. The data was analyzed to quantify the benefits and drawbacks of the lean gasoline direct injection and micro hybrid technologies from a fuel economy and emissions perspectives with respect to the US market. Additionally that data will be formatted to develop, substantiate, and exercise vehicle simulations with conventional and advanced powertrains.

Chambon, Paul H [ORNL] [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL] [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL] [ORNL; Norman, Kevin M [ORNL] [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL] [ORNL; Thomas, John F [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Activation of Carbon Dioxide 501 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-53882-6.00018-8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the biosphere and the atmosphere as a function of time [4]. Strategies to obtain better carbon inventories have uncertainties remain with regard to accounting for all CO2, all reports on carbon inventories consistently show

Glaser, Rainer

453

Determination of desorption efficiency utilizing direct injection: a dynamic calibration system and phase equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the material pro- ducing the pore structure. The chemical process adds a de- hydrating agent (usually phosphoric acid, zinc chloride or sulphur ic acid) to the heated raw material (200 ? 650 C) . 6, 9 The dehydrating agent is later leached out and concen... for performing desorption eff'iciency studies, there are several methods of loading activated charcoal with a compound. For many organic solvents a sta? 1 tic method, direct injection, is r ecommended. It is gen- erally believed that direct injection does...

Williams, Ronald H

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Influence of frequency scanning on the operation of pulsed lasers with external signal injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis is made of the influence of variation of the detuning of the frequency of a resonator mode from that of an external injected signal on the operation of pulsed gas lasers. It is found when the detuning is varied with time there is an increase in the width of the locking region of a resonator mode in pulsed lasers. The results are given of numerical calculations of the dependences of the locking efficiency on the parameters on the injected signal and of the laser active medium.

Gapotchenko, N.I.; Likhanskii, V.V.; Napartovich, A.P.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Carbon Cycle 2.0: Nitash Balsara: Energy Storage  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

Nitash Balsara

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

High-strength porous carbon and its multifunctional applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High-strength porous carbon and a method of its manufacture are described for multifunctional applications, such as ballistic protection, structural components, ultracapacitor electrodes, gas storage, and radiation shielding. The carbon is produced from a polymer precursor via carbonization, and optionally by surface activation and post-treatment.

Wojtowicz, Marek A; Rubenstein, Eric P; Serio, Michael A; Cosgrove, Joseph E

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

Carbon Cycle 2.0: Jay Keasling: Biofuels  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

Jay Keasling

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Carbon Cycle 2.0: Robert Cheng and Juan Meza  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

Robert Cheng and Juan Meza

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Process for sequestering carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for sequestering carbon dioxide, which includes reacting a silicate based material with an acid to form a suspension, and combining the suspension with carbon dioxide to create active carbonation of the silicate-based material, and thereafter producing a metal salt, silica and regenerating the acid in the liquid phase of the suspension.

Maroto-Valer, M. Mercedes (State College, PA); Zhang, Yinzhi (State College, PA); Kuchta, Matthew E. (State College, PA); Andresen, John M. (State College, PA); Fauth, Dan J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

460

Carbon-enhanced VRLA batteries.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of certain forms of carbon to the negative plate in valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries has been demonstrated to increase the cycle life of such batteries by an order of magnitude or more under high-rate, partial-state-of-charge operation. Such performance will provide a significant impact, and in some cases it will be an enabling feature for applications including hybrid electric vehicles, utility ancillary regulation services, wind farm energy smoothing, and solar photovoltaic energy smoothing. There is a critical need to understnd how the carbon interacts with the negative plate and achieves the aforementioned benefits at a fundamental level. Such an understanding will not only enable the performance of such batteries to be optimzied, but also to explore the feasibility of applying this technology to other battery chemistries. In partnership with the East Penn Manufacturing, Sandia will investigate the electrochemical function of the carbon and possibly identify improvements to its anti-sulfation properties. Shiomi, et al. (1997) discovered that the addition of carbon to the negative active material (NAM) substantially reduced PbSO{sub 4} accumulation in high rate, partial state of charge (HRPSoC) cycling applications. This improved performance with a minimal cost. Cycling applications that were uneconomical for traditional VRLA batteries are viable for the carbon enhanced VRLA. The overall goal of this work is to quantitatively define the role that carbon plays in the electrochemistry of a VRLA battery.

Enos, David George; Hund, Thomas D.; Shane, Rod (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Experimental Target Injection and Tracking System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Targets must be injected into an IFE power plant with an accuracy of and plusmn; 5 mm at a rate of approximately 5 to 10 each second. Targets must be tracked very accurately to allow driver beams to be aligned with defined points on the targets with accuracy {+-}200{mu}m for indirect drive and {+-}20{mu}m for direct drive. An experimental target injection and tracking system has been designed and is being constructed at General Atomics to investigate injection and tracking of both direct drive and indirect drive targets. The design is modular to allow testing of alternate target acceleration and tracking methods. The injector system will be used as a tool for testing the survivability of various target designs and provide feed back to the target designers. This 30 m long system will be the centerpiece of a Facility for developing IFE target fabrication and injection technologies. A high-speed high-flow gas valve (designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory) will provide helium propellant gas to the targets. To avoid target damage from excessive acceleration, an 8 m gun barrel is being built to achieve 400 m/s target speed while not exceeding 10,000 m/s{sup 2} acceleration. Direct-drive targets are protected in the barrel by sabots that are spring loaded to separate into two halves after acceleration. A sabot deflector directs the sabot halves away from the target injection path. Gas expansion chambers and orifices, keep propellant gas out of the target-tracking region. Targets will be optically tracked with laser beams and line scan cameras. High-speed computations will calculate target position in less than 2 ms based on the output from the line-scan cameras. Target position and arrival time to a plane in the reaction chamber center will be predicted in real-time based on early target position measurements. The system design, construction progress, and early testing results will be presented.

Petzoldt, R.W. [General Atomics (United States); Alexander, N.B. [General Atomics (United States); Drake, T.J. [General Atomics (United States); Goodin, D.T. [General Atomics (United States); Stemke, R.W. [General Atomics (United States); Jonestrask, K

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Impact of Extreme Injection Pressure and EGR on the Combustion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Analyse of the Injection System * Simulation * Hydraulic Characterisation * Optical Spray Diagnostics Engine Investigations * Experimental Results * Optical Combustion...

463

A fast model for spreading of neutral particles injected locally into hot plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fast model for calculation of non-stationary 3-D profiles of the density for neutral particles locally released into a hot plasma is elaborated. The approach reduces non-stationary three-dimensional transport equations to a set of one-dimensional ones describing the time evolution of the radial profiles for several parameters characterizing adequately the three-dimensional structure. The method is applied to model the spreading process of carbon atoms released by laser desorption in an experimental device and the local injection of working gas into a fusion reactor. The associated heat loads onto the first wall are assessed.

Tokar, M. Z. [Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Photophysics of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis reviews the recent advances made in optical studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Studying the electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanotubes, we find that carbon nanotubes less than 1 nm in ...

Samsonidze, Georgii G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

CALIFORNIA CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN WASHINGTON. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use in Washington: Costs and Opportunities. California for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock International. #12;ii #12;iii Preface

466

Near-surface groundwater responses to injection of geothermal wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the feasibility of injection as an alternative for geothermal wastewater disposal and analyzes hydrologic controls governing the upward migration of injected fluids. Injection experiences at several geothermal developments are presented including the following: Raft River Valley, Salton Sea, East Mesa, Otake, Hatchobaru, and Ahuachapan geothermal fields.

Arnold, S.C.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Electron Cloud at Injection Region BNL/SNS TECHNICAL NOTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's tangential plane. The stripped electrons from the injection beam cause about 145W thermal damage. They haveElectron Cloud at Injection Region BNL/SNS TECHNICAL NOTE NO. 143 Y.Y. Lee, G. Mahler, W. Meng, D, NEW YORK 11973 #12;1 ELECTRON CLOUD AT INJECTION REGEION Y.Y. Lee, G. Mahler, W. Meng, D. Raparia, L

468

COPPER AND ZINC DEFICIENCIES TREATMENT BY INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTIONS IN SHEEP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPPER AND ZINC DEFICIENCIES TREATMENT BY INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTIONS IN SHEEP M. LAMAND Claudine LAB in the injection site. Copper per os dosing is efficient for treating deficient animals (Lamand et al., 1969 consuming. Therefore we tried to per- fect a copper and zinc deficiency treatment allowing the injection

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

469

Injection and acceleration of H at Earth's bow shock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Injection and acceleration of H and He2 at Earth's bow shock M. Scholer1 , H. Kucharek1 , K the injection and subsequent acceleration of part of the solar wind ions at the Earth's bow shock. The shocks particles does not contribute to ion injection. Acceleration models that permit thermal particles to scatter

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

470

Method for making carbon super capacitor electrode materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making near-net-shape, monolithic carbon electrodes for energy storage devices. The method includes the controlled pyrolysis and activation of a pressed shape of methyl cellulose powder with pyrolysis being carried out in two stages; pre-oxidation, preferably in air at a temperature between 200.degree.-250.degree. C., followed by carbonization under an inert atmosphere. An activation step to adjust the surface area of the carbon shape to a value desirable for the application being considered, including heating the carbon shape in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 300.degree. C., follows carbonization.

Firsich, David W. (Dayton, OH); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM); Delnick, Frank M. (Dexter, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Method for making carbon super capacitor electrode materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for making near-net-shape, monolithic carbon electrodes for energy storage devices. The method includes the controlled pyrolysis and activation of a pressed shape of methyl cellulose powder with pyrolysis being carried out in two stages; pre-oxidation, preferably in air at a temperature between 200--250 C, followed by carbonization under an inert atmosphere. An activation step to adjust the surface area of the carbon shape to a value desirable for the application being considered, including heating the carbon shape in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 300 C, follows carbonization. 1 fig.

Firsich, D.W.; Ingersoll, D.; Delnick, F.M.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

472

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

474

Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon leakage 12 3.4 Project carbon sequestration 12 3.5 Net carbon sequestration 13 4. Environmental quality 14

475

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 1990. These many alternative-fuel initiatives failed tolow-cost, low-carbon alternative fuels would thrive. Theto introduce low-carbon alternative fuels. Former Federal

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Carbon Cycle 2.0: Ashok Gadgil: global impact  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ashok Gadgil speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Ashok Gadgi

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Energy Demand in China (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Lynn Price, LBNL scientist, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Price, Lynn

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

478

Biofuels Science and Facilities (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Jay D. Keasling speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Keasling, Jay D

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

479

Definition, Capabilities, and Components of a Terrestrial Carbon Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research efforts for effectively and consistently monitoring terrestrial carbon are increasing in number. As such, there is a need to define carbon monitoring and how it relates to carbon cycle science and carbon management. There is also a need to identify intended capabilities of a carbon monitoring system and what system components are needed to develop the capabilities. This paper is intended to promote discussion on what capabilities are needed in a carbon monitoring system based on requirements for different areas of carbon-related research and, ultimately, for carbon management. While many methods exist to quantify different components of the carbon cycle, research is needed on how these methods can be coupled or integrated to obtain carbon stock and flux estimates regularly and at a resolution that enables attribution of carbon dynamics to respective sources. As society faces sustainability and climate change conerns, carbon management activities implemented to reduce carbon emissions or increase carbon stocks will become increasingly important. Carbon management requires moderate to high resolution monitoring. Therefore, if monitoring is intended to help inform management decisions, management priorities should be considered prior to development of a monitoring system.

West, Tristram O.; Brown, Mol