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1

Activated Carbon Injection  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

None

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

2

Activated Carbon Injection  

SciTech Connect

History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

None

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

Activated carbon injection - a mercury control success story  

SciTech Connect

Almost 100 full-scale activated carbon injection (ACI) systems have been ordered by US electric utilities. These systems have the potential to remove over 90% of the mercury in flue, at a cost below $10,000 per pound of mercury removal. Field trials of ACI systems arm outlined. 1 fig.

NONE

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Waterjet injection of powdered activated carbon for sediment remediation .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??"In situ sediment remediation through waterjet-activated carbon amendment delivery is an innovative means to mitigate the dangers posed by hydrophobic organic compounds. Ease of use… (more)

Redell, Chris J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field TesTing oF AcTivATed cArbon Field TesTing oF AcTivATed cArbon injecTion opTions For Mercury conTrol AT TXu's big brown sTATion Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. Lignite coal is unique because of its highly variable ash content (rich in alkali and alkaline-earth elements), high moisture levels, low chlorine content, and high calcium content. Unique to Texas lignite coals are relatively high iron and selenium concentrations. When combusting Texas lignite coals, up to 80 percent of the mercury in the flue gas is present as elemental mercury, which is not readily captured by downstream pollution control devices. To better understand the factors that influence mercury control at units firing

6

carbon sequestration via direct injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION Howard J. Herzog, Ken Caldeira, and Eric Adams INTRODUCTION The build-up of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and other greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere has caused concern about possible global climate change. As a result, international negotiations have produced the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), completed during the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. The treaty, which the United States has ratified, calls for the "stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system." The primary greenhouse gas is CO 2 , which is estimated to contribute to over two-thirds of any climate change. The primary source of CO

7

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Long-Term Carbon Injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for > 90% Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for > 90% Mercury Removal for a PRB Unit with a Spray Drier and Fabric Filter The intent of DOE's Phase I and II field tests was to work with industry to evaluate the most promising mercury control technologies at full-scale in a variety of configurations. Although longer-term tests were conducted, the test period was not sufficient to answer many fundamental questions about long-term consistency of mercury removal and reliability of the system when integrated with plant processes. As the technologies move towards commercial implementation, it is critical to accurately define the mercury removal performance and costs so that power companies and policy makers can make informed decisions. Therefore, the overall objective of this Phase III project is to determine the mercury removal performance, long-term emissions variability, and associated O&M costs of activated carbon injection for >90% mercury control over a 10 to 12 month period on a unit that represents the combination of coal and emission control equipment that will be used for many new and existing power plants.

8

Modeling Carbon Nanotubes in Injection Molding | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Carbon Nanotubes in Injection Molding Feb 03 2015 11:00 AM - 11:30 AM Lukas Bystricky, Florida State University Computer Science and Mathematics Division Computational and...

9

Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect

Public Service Company of Colorado and ADA Technologies, Inc. have performed a study of the injection of activated carbon for the removal of vapor-phase mercury from coal-fired flue gas streams. The project was completed under contract to the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, with contributions from EPRI and Public Service Company. The prime contractor for the project was Public Service Company, with ADA Technologies as the major subcontractor providing technical support to all aspects of the project. The research and development effort was conducted in two phases. In Phase I a pilot facility was fabricated and tests were performed using dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control on a coal-fired flue gas slipstream extracted from an operating power plant. Phase II was designed to move carbon injection technology towards commercial application on coal-fired power plants by addressing key reliability and operability concerns. Phase II field work included further development work with the Phase I pilot and mercury measurements on several of PSCo's coal-fired generating units. In addition, tests were run on collected sorbent plus fly ash to evaluate the impact of the activated carbon sorbent on the disposal of fly ash. An economic analysis was performed where pilot plant test data was used to develop a model to predict estimated costs of mercury removal from plants burning western coals. Testing in the pilot plant was undertaken to quantify the effects of plant configuration, flue gas temperature, and activated carbon injection rate on mercury removal. All three variables were found to significantly impact the mercury removal efficiency in the pilot. The trends were clear: mercury removal rates increased with decreasing flue gas temperature and with increasing carbon injection rates. Mercury removal was much more efficient with reverse-gas and pulse-jet baghouse configurations than with an ESP as the particulate control device. The native fly ash of the host unit provided significant mercury removal capacity, so that the activated carbon sorbent served as an incremental mercury removal mechanism. Tests run to characterize the waste product, a combination of fly ash and activated carbon on which mercury was present, showed that mercury and other RCRA metals of interest were all below Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) regulatory limits in the leachate. The presence of activated carbon in the fly ash was shown to have an effect on the use of fly ash as an additive in the manufacture of concrete, which could limit the salability of fly ash from a plant where activated carbon was used for mercury control.

Jim Butz; Terry Hunt

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Calculating the probability of injected carbon dioxide plumes encountering faults  

SciTech Connect

One of the main concerns of storage in saline aquifers is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available for these aquifers. This necessitates a method using available fault data to estimate the probability of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault. The probability of encounter can be calculated from areal fault density statistics from available data, and carbon dioxide plume dimensions from numerical simulation. Given a number of assumptions, the dimension of the plume perpendicular to a fault times the areal density of faults with offsets greater than some threshold of interest provides probability of the plume encountering such a fault. Application of this result to a previously planned large-scale pilot injection in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin yielded a 3% and 7% chance of the plume encountering a fully and half seal offsetting fault, respectively. Subsequently available data indicated a half seal-offsetting fault at a distance from the injection well that implied a 20% probability of encounter for a plume sufficiently large to reach it.

Jordan, P.D.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Effects of carbon dioxide injection on the displacement of methane and carbonate dissolution in sandstone cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous coreflood experiments show that CO2 sequestration in carbonate rocks is a win-win technology. Injecting CO2 into a depleted gas reservoir for storage also produces hitherto unrecoverable gas. This in turn helps to defray the cost of CO2...

Maduakor, Ekene Obioma

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Issues Related to Seismic Activity Induced by the Injection of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISSUES RELATED TO SEISMIC ACTIVITY INDUCED BY THE INJECTION ISSUES RELATED TO SEISMIC ACTIVITY INDUCED BY THE INJECTION OF CO 2 IN DEEP SALINE AQUIFERS Joel Sminchak (sminchak@battelle.org; 614-424-7392) Neeraj Gupta (gupta@battelle.org; 614-424-3820) Battelle Memorial Institute 505 King Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43201 Charles Byrer (a) and Perry Bergman (b) National Energy Technology Laboratory (a) P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV, 26507-0880 (b) P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA, 15236-0940 Abstract Case studies, theory, regulation, and special considerations regarding the disposal of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into deep saline aquifers were investigated to assess the potential for induced seismic activity. Formations capable of accepting large volumes of CO 2 make deep well injection of CO 2 an attractive option. While seismic implications must be considered for injection

13

Preparation of carbon aerogel microspheres by a simple-injection emulsification method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon aerogel microspheres were successfully prepared using a simple-injection emulsification method, employing sol–gel polycondensation of a resorcinol–formaldehyde solution containing sodium carbonate as a catalyst. This process was followed by solvent exchange using acetone, supercritical drying with carbon dioxide and carbonization in a nitrogen atmosphere. The effect of curing time before starting injection, injection rate and agitation rate of continuous phase on the particle size and the porous properties of the carbon aerogel microspheres was investigated. Adsorption of phenol by using the prepared carbon aerogel microspheres was also examined. The diameter of carbon aerogel microspheres was controlled in the range of 20–55 ?m by varying injection rate and agitation rate. The mean diameter of carbon aerogel microspheres decreased with increasing the injection rate and the agitation rate, whereas their mean diameter was independent of the curing time. The BET surface area and total pore volume of carbon aerogel microspheres increased with increasing the curing time. In contrast, their BET surface area and total pore volume decreased with increasing the injection rate and the agitation rate. The BET surface area, total pore volume, mesopore volume and micropore volume of the carbon aerogel microspheres with a mean diameter of 45 ?m were 903 m2/g, 0.60 cm3/g, 0.31 cm3/g and 0.27 cm3/g, respectively. The phenol-adsorption capacity of these carbon aerogel microspheres was 29.3 mg phenol/g adsorbent.

Jintawat Chaichanawong; Koranit Kongcharoen; Surat Areerat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TEMPERATURE EFFECTS DURING THE INJECTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE INTO BRINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TEMPERATURE EFFECTS DURING THE INJECTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE INTO BRINE for the simulation of carbon dioxide injection into geological formations is currently an intensive field of research for the balance of thermal energy, we can investigate numerically the effects of temperature variations during

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

15

Activated carbon to the rescue  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the response to pipeline spill of ethylene dichloride (EDC) on the property of an oil company. Activated carbon cleanup proceedure was used. During delivery, changeout, transport, storage, thermal reactivation, and return delivery to the site, the carbon never came into direct contact with operating personnel or the atmosphere. More than 10,000 tones of dredge soil and 50 million gallons of surface water were processed during the emergency response.

Sen, S. [Calgon Carbon Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Modeling Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Injection in Heterogeneous Porous Media  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the physical processes that occur during the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in liquid-saturated, brine-bearing geologic formations using the numerical simulator TOUGH2. CO2 is injected in a supercritical state that has a much lower density and viscosity than the liquid brine it displaces. In situ, the supercritical CO2 forms a gas-like phase, and also partially dissolves in the aqueous phase, creating a multi-phase, multi-component environment that shares many important features with the vadose zone. The flow and transport simulations employ an equation of state package that treats a two-phase (liquid, gas), three-component (water, salt, CO2) system. Chemical reactions between CO2 and rock minerals that could potentially contribute to mineral trapping of CO2 are not included. The geological setting considered is a fluvial/deltaic formation that is strongly heterogeneous, making preferential flow a significant effect, especially when coupled with the strong buoyancy forces acting on the gas-like CO2 plume. Key model development issues include vertical and lateral grid resolution, grid orientation effects, and the choice of characteristic curves.

Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

17

Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois November 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A project important to demonstrating the commercial viability of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology has completed the first year of injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) from an industrial plant at a large-scale test site in Illinois. Led by the Illinois State Geological Survey, the Illinois Basin-Decatur Project is the first demonstration-scale project in the United States to use CO2 from an industrial source and inject it into a saline reservoir. The CO2 is being captured from an ethanol production facility operated by the Archer Daniels Midland Company in Decatur, Ill., and is being injected

18

Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin February 17, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon sequestration technologies nationwide, has begun drilling the injection well for their large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute

19

CARBON SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION Howard J. Herzog, Ken Caldeira, and Eric Adams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARBON SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION Howard J. Herzog, Ken Caldeira, and Eric Adams and sequestration. Carbon sequestration is often associated with the planting of trees. As they mature, the trees INTRODUCTION The build-up of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere has

20

NETL: News Release - DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 27, 2009 February 27, 2009 DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of Carbon Dioxide in Michigan Basin Project Expected to Advance National Carbon Sequestration Program, Create Jobs Washington, DC-Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. MORE INFO Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program DOE's Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, began injecting the CO2 this week in the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NETL: News Release - Frio Formation Test Well Injected With Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19, 2004 19, 2004 Frio Formation Test Well Injected With Carbon Dioxide Researchers Perform Small Scale, Short Term Carbon Sequestration Field Test HOUSTON, TX - In the first U.S. field test to investigate the ability of brine formations to store greenhouse gasses, researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy are closely monitoring 1,600 tons of carbon dioxide that were injected into a mile-deep well in Texas in October. The test is providing unique data to help investigators understand the viability of geologic sequestration as a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The Frio Brine Pilot experimental site is 30 miles northeast of Houston, in the South Liberty oilfield. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology drilled a 5,753 foot injection well earlier this year, and developed a nearby observation well to study the ability of the high-porosity Frio sandstone formation to store carbon dioxide.

22

INVESTIGATION AND DEMONSTRATION OF DRY CARBON-BASED SORBENT INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report describes the activities that have taken place during the first full quarter of the Phase II project ''Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control''. Modifications were completed and sampling began at the 600 acfm pilot-scale particulate control module (PCM) located at the Comanche Station in Pueblo, CO. The PCM was configured as an electrostatic precipitator for these tests. A Perkin-Elmer flue gas mercury analyzer was installed on-site and operated. Initial test results using both manual sampling methodology and the mercury analyzer are presented herein. Preparations were made during this period for full-scale mercury testing of several PSCo units. A site visit was made to Arapahoe and Cherokee Generating Stations to determine sample locations and to develop a test plan.

Terry Hunt; Mark Fox; Lillian Stan; Sheila Haythornthwaite; Justin Smith; Jason Ruhl

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The recovery of oil from carbonate reservoirs by fluid injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hole 70 Neasured and Calculated Productivities Obtained on Wells Completed Through Perforations 39 Cumulative Oil Recovery Versus Total Water and Oil Throughf low for Stratified Reservoirs- lj. O Cumulative Oil Recovery Versus Total Water and Oil... for Field A 12, Cumulative Oil Recovery Versus Total Water and Oil Throughflow for Field B 13, -20, Permeability Distribution Plots $5-52 The object of this project was to study the extent of the variations of the permeability in carbonate reservoirs...

Coleman, Dwayne Marvin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

Estimation of Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Credits in Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities K. Thomas Klasson and Brian H. Davison Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6226 Presentation First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 Washington, DC "The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes." * Managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 1 Estimation of Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities

25

Carbon Dioxide Capture with Amine-Grafted Activated Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are several possible methods by which amine groups can be grafted on the surface of activated carbon (AC) to improve their capacity for...2 adsorption. Ethylenediamine and diethylenetriamine were selected a...

Amirhossein Houshmand; Wan Mohd Ashri Wan Daud; Min-Gyu Lee…

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

1990-07-00T23:59:59.000Z

27

Comparison of Numerical Simulators for Greenhouse Gas Storage in Coalbeds, Part I: Pure Carbon Dioxide Injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Numerical Simulators for Greenhouse Gas Storage Comparison of Numerical Simulators for Greenhouse Gas Storage in Coalbeds, Part I: Pure Carbon Dioxide Injection David H.-S. Law (law@arc.ab.ca; 780-450-5034) Alberta Research Council (ARC) Inc. 250 Karl Clark Road, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6N 1E4 L.H.G. (Bert) van der Meer (l.vandermeer@nitg.tno.nl; +31-30-256-4635) Netherlands Institute of Applied Geoscience TNO P.O. Box 80015, 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlands W.D. (Bill) Gunter (gunter@arc.ab.ca; 780-450-5467) Alberta Research Council (ARC) Inc. 250 Karl Clark Road, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6N 1E4 Abstract The injection of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in deep, unmineable coalbeds is a very attractive option for geologic CO 2 storage: the CO 2 is stored and at the same time the recovery of

28

EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing...

29

Active carbon filter health condition detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active carbon filter health condition detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors Jingjing Chemical Biological Center, 5183 Blackhawk Road, APG, MD USA 21010 ABSTRACT The impregnated active carbon in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS

Giurgiutiu, Victor

30

Uncertainty quantification for the impact of injection rate fluctuation on the geomechanical response of geological carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

We present an analysis of the geomechanical effects of injection rate fluctuations for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Initially, we present analytical solutions for the effects of injection rate fluctuations on CO2 fluid pressure spatial distribution and temporal evolution for a typical injection scenario. Numerical calculations are performed using a finite element method to investigate the effects of injection rate fluctuations on geomechanical deformation, stresses, and potential failure of the aquifer and caprock layers. The numerical method was first validated by the fluid pressure distribution’s good agreement with the analytical solution. It was shown that for any Gaussian fluctuations of injection rate Q with given mean Q ? and variance ?_Q, the coefficients of variance for fluid pressure (?_p=?_p?p ? ), deformation (?_u=?_u?u ? ), and stresses (?_?=?_??? ? ) increase linearly with the coefficient of variance for injection rate (?_Q=?_Q?Q ? ). The proportional constants are identified, and the fluctuations have the most pronounced effect on the geomechanical stresses, and, therefore, on the potential failure of the aquifer and caprock layers. Instead of expensive computational simulation, this study provides an efficient tool to estimate the geomechanical response variance to injection rate fluctuation. A failure analysis was presented based on the numerical results, where probability of failure was estimated for fluctuating injection rates with different mean and variance during the entire injection period. It was found that with increasing injection rate fluctuation, the failure probability increases significantly. Therefore, the risk associated with injection rate fluctuations should be carefully evaluated.?

Bao, Jie; Chu, Yanjun; Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Fang, Yilin

2014-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

31

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration by Adsorption on Activated Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Activated Carbon (AC) materials was selected as suitable adsorbent for the carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and a numerical analysis was carried out to study the rate of adsorption of the gas on ACs. A one dimensional mathematical model was proposed based on the Dubinin's Theory of Volume Filling of Micropores, and analyzed along with the unsteady heat transfer. A parametric analysis was carried out to study the effect of various crucial parameters like radius of bed, cooling fluid temperature, initial bed temperature and heat transfer coefficient on the adsorption amount. The results show that lower bed radius was ideal for obtaining high amount of CO2 adsorbed assuming constant packing density. Also, a high heat transfer coefficient up to 100 Wm-2K-1 and low cooling fluid temperature of 283 K was necessary for speeding up the process. High initial bed temperature also supports greater adsorption amount under the same conditions.

Reema Saxena; Vinod Kumar Singh; E. Anil Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Nano Structured Activated Carbon for Hydrogen Storge  

SciTech Connect

Development of a nanostructured synthetic carbons materials that have been synthesized by thermal-decomposition of aromatic rich polyether such as poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is reported. These polymers based nanostructured carbons efficacious for gas adsorption and storage and have Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of more than 3000 m2/g, and with average pore diameter of < 2nm. Surface-area, pore characteristics, and other critical variables for selecting porous materials of high gas adsorption capacities are presented. Analysis of the fragments evolved under various carbonization temperatures, and the correlation between the activation and carbonization temperatures provides a mechanistic perspective of the pore evolution during activation. Correlations between gas (N2 and H2) adsorption capacity and porous texture of the materials have been established. The materials possess excellent hydrogen storage properties, with hydrogen storage capacity up to 7.4 wt% (gravimetric) and ~ 45 g H2 L-1 (volumetric) at -196oC and 6.0 MPa.

Israel Cabasso; Youxin Yuan

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

33

A parametric study of factors affecting oil recovery efficiency from carbon dioxide injection using a compositional reservoir model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% OOIP. The reservoir and fluid information for the pilot area is located in Table 2. 1. 5. Injection of a 338 of pore volume slug of carbon 15 dioxide, methane, and n-butane began in January of 1981. The project consisted of one updip injector...A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF FACTORS AFFECTING OIL RECOVERY EFFICIENCY FROM CARBON DIOXIDE INJECTION USING A COMPOSITIONAL RESERVOIR MODEL A THESIS by GREGORY ALLEN BARNES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

Barnes, Gregory Allen.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Effect of palladium loaded activated carbons on hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pd-loaded high surface area activated carbon (BAC-Pd) was produced from bamboo by carbonization and activation using potassium hydroxide with subsequent loading of palladium. The palladium loaded onto BACs appear...

Masaki Ohno; Nami Okamura; Tomohiro Kose; Takashi Asada…

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project was to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in the hopes of observing changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE No.DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data. Attribute analysis was a very useful tool in enhancing changes in seismic character present, but difficult to interpret on time amplitude slices. Lessons learned from and tools/techniques developed during this project will allow high-resolution seismic imaging to be routinely applied to many CO{sub 2} injection programs in a large percentage of shallow carbonate oil fields in the midcontinent.

Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Effect of flue gas impurities on the process of injection and storage of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous experiments - injecting pure CO2 into carbonate cores - showed that the process is a win-win technology, sequestrating CO2 while recovering a significant amount of hitherto unrecoverable natural gas that could help defray the cost of CO2...

Nogueira de Mago, Marjorie Carolina

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Experimental and Simulation Studies to Evaluate the Improvement of Oil Recovery by Different Modes of CO2 Injection in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental and numerical simulation studies were conducted to investigate the improvement of light oil recovery in carbonate cores during CO2 injection. The main steps in the study are as follows. First, the minimum miscibility pressure of 31º...

Aleidan, Ahmed Abdulaziz S.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

38

Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Enhanced Activated Carbon Cathode Performance for Microbial Fuel Cell by Blending Carbon Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhanced Activated Carbon Cathode Performance for Microbial Fuel Cell by Blending Carbon Black-based materials that have good catalytic activity, but the electrical conductivity of the AC is poor compared as a binder, as opposed to Nafion with Pt, which greatly reduces the cost of the cathode materials. AC

40

Pulsed plasma-Used injection sources for remote plasma activated chemical vapor deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulsed plasma- Used injection sources for remote plasma activated chemical vapor deposition Mark J, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (Received 21 October 1992; accepted for publication 12 January 1993) Remote plasma the substrate is immersed in the plasma. This selectivity can be compromised if the deposition gases, which

Kushner, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Selecting activated carbon for water and wastewater treatability studies  

SciTech Connect

A series of follow-up investigations were performed to produce data for improving the four-indicator carbon selection method that we developed to identify high-potential activated carbons effective for removing specific organic water pollutants. The carbon's pore structure and surface chemistry are dependent on the raw material and the activation process. Coconut carbons have relatively more small pores than large pores; coal and apricot nutshell/walnut shell fruit carbons have the desirable pore structures for removing adsorbates of all sizes. Chemical activation, excessive activation, and/or thermal reactivation enlarge small pores, resulting in reduced phenol number and higher tannic acid number. Activated carbon's phenol, iodine, methylene blue, and tannic acid numbers are convenient indicators of its surface area and pore volume of pore diameters < 10, 10-15, 15-28, and > 28 angstrom, respectively. The phenol number of a carbon is also a good indicator of its surface acidity of oxygen-containing organic functional groups that affect the adsorptive capacity for aromatic and other small polar organics. The tannic acid number is an indicator of carbon's capacity for large, high-molecular-weight natural organic precursors of disinfection by-products in water treatment. The experimental results for removing nitrobenzene, methyl-tert-butyl ether, 4,4-bisphenol, humic acid, and the organic constituents of a biologically treated coking-plant effluent have demonstrated the effectiveness of this capacity-indicator-based method of carbon selection.

Zhang, W.; Chang, Q.G.; Liu, W.D.; Li, B.J.; Jiang, W.X.; Fu, L.J.; Ying, W.C. [East China University of Chemical Technology, Shanghai (China)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon pac Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Engineering 55 Letters to the editor Carbon 40 (2002) 445467 447 using continuous carbon-fiber carbon-matrix and polymeruntreated fibers are used. The activation treatment...

43

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon-based adsorbents Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

two primary elements, the filter media (activated carbon or lignite coke) to adsorb pollutants... in that Marker's past experience has been that Hg capture with carbon or carbon...

44

Modeling Coal Matrix Shrinkage and Differential Swelling with CO2 Injection for Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery and Carbon Sequestration Applications  

SciTech Connect

Matrix shrinkage and swelling can cause profound changes in porosity and permeability of coalbed methane reservoirs during depletion or when under CO{sub 2} injection processes, with significant implication for primary or enhanced methane recovery. Two models that are used to describe these effects are discussed. The first was developed by Advanced Resources International (ARI) and published in 1990 by Sawyer, et al. The second model was published by Palmer and Mansoori in 1996. This paper shows that the two provide equivalent results for most applications. However, their differences in formulation cause each to have relative advantages and disadvantages under certain circumstances. Specifically, the former appears superior for undersaturated coalbed methane reservoirs while the latter would be better if a case is found where matrix swelling is strongly disproportional to gas concentration. Since its presentation in 1996, the Palmer and Mansoori model has justifiably received much critical praise. However, the model developed by ARI for the COMET reservoir simulation program has been in use since 1990, and has significant advantages in certain settings. A review of data published by Levine in 1996 reveals that carbon dioxide causes a greater degree of coal matrix swelling compared to methane, even when measured on a unit of concentration basis. This effect is described in this report as differential swelling. Differential swelling may have important consequences for enhanced coalbed methane and carbon sequestration projects. To handle the effects of differential swelling, an extension to the matrix shrinkage and swelling model used by the COMET simulator is presented and shown to replicate the data of Levine. Preliminary field results from a carbon dioxide injection project are also presented in support of the extended model. The field evidence supports that considerable changes to coal permeability occur with CO{sub 2} injection, with significant implication for the design, implementation and performance of enhanced coalbed methane recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration projects.

L. J. Pekot; S. R. Reeves

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

Baker, Frederick S

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

46

Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers  

SciTech Connect

Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M. [Yuan Ze Inst. of Tech., Taoyuan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

Schwarz, James A. (Fayetteville, NY); Noh, Joong S. (Syracuse, NY); Agarwal, Rajiv K. (Las Vegas, NV)

1990-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

48

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5440us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5440us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5440US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" 34349,10956 34380,12444

49

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5440us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5440us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5440US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" 34515,142243 34880,194185 35246,258468

50

Hydrogen storage on activated carbon. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The project studied factors that influence the ability of carbon to store hydrogen and developed techniques to enhance that ability in naturally occurring and factory-produced commercial carbon materials. During testing of enhanced materials, levels of hydrogen storage were achieved that compare well with conventional forms of energy storage, including lead-acid batteries, gasoline, and diesel fuel. Using the best materials, an electric car with a modern fuel cell to convert the hydrogen directly to electricity would have a range of over 1,000 miles. This assumes that the total allowable weight of the fuel cell and carbon/hydrogen storage system is no greater than the present weight of batteries in an existing electric vehicle. By comparison, gasoline cars generally are limited to about a 450-mile range, and battery-electric cars to 40 to 60 miles. The project also developed a new class of carbon materials, based on polymers and other organic compounds, in which the best hydrogen-storing factors discovered earlier were {open_quotes}molecularly engineered{close_quotes} into the new materials. It is believed that these new molecularly engineered materials are likely to exceed the performance of the naturally occurring and manufactured carbons seen earlier with respect to hydrogen storage.

Schwarz, J.A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity  

SciTech Connect

Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for 90% Mercury Removal for a PRB Unit a Spray Dryer and Fabric Filter  

SciTech Connect

The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon (PAC) into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. The purpose of this test program was to evaluate the long-term mercury removal capability, long-term mercury emissions variability, and operating and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with sorbent injection on a configuration being considered for many new plants. Testing was conducted by ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA) at Rocky Mountain Power’s (RMP) Hardin Station through funding provided by DOE/NETL, RMP, and other industry partners. The Hardin Station is a new plant rated at 121 MW gross that was first brought online in April of 2006. Hardin fires a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and is configured with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOx control, a spray dryer absorber (SDA) for SO2 control, and a fabric filter (FF) for particulate control. Based upon previous testing at PRB sites with SCRs, very little additional mercury oxidation from the SCR was expected at Hardin. In addition, based upon results from DOE/NETL Phase II Round I testing at Holcomb Station and results from similarly configured sites, low native mercury removal was expected across the SDA and FF. The main goal of this project was met—sorbent injection was used to economically and effectively achieve 90% mercury control as measured from the air heater (AH) outlet to the stack for a period of ten months. This goal was achieved with DARCO® Hg-LH, Calgon FLUEPAC®-MC PLUS and ADA Power PAC PREMIUM brominated activated carbons at nominal loadings of 1.5–2.5 lb/MMacf. An economic analysis determined the twenty-year levelized cost to be 0.87 mills/kW-hr, or $15,000/lb Hg removed. No detrimental effects on other equipment or plant operations were observed. The results of this project also filled a data gap for plants firing PRB coal and configured with an SCR, SDA, and FF, as many new plants are being designed today. Another goal of the project was to evaluate, on a short-term basis, the mercury removal associated with coal additives and coal blending with western bituminous coal. The additive test showed that, at this site, the coal additive known as KNX was affective at increasing mercury removal while decreasing sorbent usage. Coal blending was conducted with two different western bituminous coals, and West Elk coal increased native capture from nominally 10% to 50%. Two additional co-benefits were discovered at this site. First, it was found that native capture increased from nominally 10% at full load to 50% at low load. The effect is believed to be due to an increase in mercury oxidation across the SCR caused by a corresponding decrease in ammonia injection when the plant reduces load. Less ammonia means more active oxidation sites in the SCR for the mercury. The second co-benefit was the finding that high ammonia concentrations can have a negative impact on mercury removal by powdered activated carbon. For a period of time, the plant operated with a high excess of ammonia injection necessitated by the plugging of one-third of the SCR. Under these conditions and at high load, the mercury control system could not maintain 90% removal even at the maximum feed rate of 3.5 lb/MMacf (pounds of mercury per million actual cubic feet). The plant was able to demonstrate that mercury removal was directly related to the ammonia injection rate in a series of tests where the ammonia rate was decreased, causing a corresponding increase in mercury removal. Also, after the SCR was refurbished and ammonia injection levels returned to normal, the mercury removal performance also returned to normal. Another goal of the project was to install a commercial-grade activated carbon injection (ACI) system and integrate it with new-generation continuous emissions monitors for mercury (Hg-CEMs) to allow automatic feedback control on outlet me

Sjostrom, Sharon; Amrhein, Jerry

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Near-frictionless carbon coatings for spark-ignited direct-injected fuel systems. Final report, January 2002.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an investigation by the Tribology Section of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) into the use of near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coatings for spark-ignited, direct-injected (SIDI) engine fuel systems. Direct injection is being pursued in order to improve fuel efficiency and enhance control over, and flexibility of, spark-ignited engines. SIDI technology is being investigated by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) as one route towards meeting both efficiency goals and more stringent emissions standards. Friction and wear of fuel injector and pump parts were identified as issues impeding adoption of SIDI by the OTT workshop on ''Research Needs Related to CIDI and SIDI Fuel Systems'' and the resulting report, Research Needs Related to Fuel Injection Systems in CIDI and SIDI Engines. The following conclusions were reached: (1) Argonne's NFC coatings consistently reduced friction and wear in existing and reformulated gasolines. (2) Compared to three commercial DLC coatings, NFC provided the best friction reduction and protection from wear in gasoline and alternative fuels. (3) NFC was successfully deposited on production fuel injectors. (4) Customized wear tests were performed to simulate the operating environment of fuel injectors. (5) Industry standard lubricity test results were consistent with customized wear tests in showing the friction and wear reduction of NFC and the lubricity of fuels. (6) Failure of NFC coatings by tensile crack opening or spallation did not occur, and issues with adhesion to steel substrates were eliminated. (7) This work addressed several of the current research needs of the OAAT SIDI program, as defined by the OTT report Research Needs Related to Fuel Injection Systems in CIDI and SIDI Engines.

Hershberger, J.; Ozturk, O.; Ajayi, O. O.; Woodford, J. B.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

56

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A CO2 FLOOD UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL INJECTION WELLS IN A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE APPROACHING WATERFLOOD DEPLETION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO{sub 2} horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields. The Unit was a mature waterflood with water cut exceeding 95%. Oil must be mobilized through the use of a miscible or near-miscible fluid to recover significant additional reserves. Also, because the unit was relatively small, it did not have the benefit of economies of scale inherent in normal larger scale projects. Thus, new and innovative methods were required to reduce investment and operating costs. Two primary methods used to accomplish improved economics were use of reservoir characterization to restrict the flood to the higher quality rock in the unit and use of horizontal injection wells to cut investment and operating costs. The project consisted of two budget phases. Budget Phase I started in June 1994 and ended late June 1996. In this phase Reservoir Analysis, Characterization Tasks and Advanced Technology Definition Tasks were completed. Completion enabled the project to be designed, evaluated, and an Authority for Expenditure (AFE) for project implementation submitted to working interest owners for approval. Budget Phase II consisted of the implementation and execution of the project in the field. Phase II was completed in July 2001. Performance monitoring, during Phase II, by mid 1998 identified the majority of producing wells which under performed their anticipated withdrawal rates. Newly drilled and re-activated wells had lower offtake rates than originally forecasted. As a result of poor offtake, higher reservoir pressure was a concern for the project as it limited CO{sub 2} injectivity. To reduce voidage balance, and reservoir pressure, a disposal well was therefore drilled. Several injection surveys indicated the CO{sub 2} injection wells had severe conformance issues. After close monitoring of the project to the end of 1999, it was evident the project would not recover the anticipated tertiary reserves. The main reasons for under-performance were poor in zone CO{sub 2} injection into the upper San Andres layers, poorer offtake rates from newly drilled replacement wells and a higher than required reservoir pressure. After discussion internally within Phillips, externally with the Department of Energy (DOE) and SCU partners, a redevelopment of South Cowden was agreed upon to commence in year 2000. The redevelopment essentially abandoned the original development for Budget Phase II in favor of a revised approach. This involved conformance techniques to resolve out of zone CO{sub 2} injection and use of horizontal wells to improve in zone injectivity and productivity. A phased approach was used to ensure short radius lateral drilling could be implemented effectively at South Cowden. This involved monitoring drilling operations and then production response to determine if larger investments during the second phase were justified. Redevelopment Phase 1 was completed in May 2000. It was deemed a success in regard to finding suitable/cost-effective technology for drilling horizontal laterals and finding a technique that could sustain long-term productivity from the upper layers of the San Andres reservoir. Four existing vertical producing wells were isolated from their existing completions and sidetracked with horizontal laterals into the upper layers of the San Andres. Overall average offtake rates for the four wells increased by a factor of 12 during the first four months after completion of Phase 1. Phase 2 of the redevelopment focused on current CO{sub 2} vertical injection wells. Techniques were applied to resolve near well conformance concerns and then either single or dual laterals were dril

K.J. Harpole; Ed G. Durrett; Susan Snow; J.S. Bles; Carlon Robertson; C.D. Caldwell; D.J. Harms; R.L. King; B.A. Baldwin; D. Wegener; M. Navarrette

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Detection of low concentration oxygen containing functional groups on activated carbon fiber surfaces through fluorescent labeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detection of low concentration oxygen containing functional groups on activated carbon fiber of surface functional groups (OH, COOH and CHO) on activated carbon fiber surfaces. The chromophores were rights reserved. Keywords: Carbon fibers; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; Infrared spectroscopy

Borguet, Eric

58

Copper nanocrystal modified activated carbon for supercapacitors with enhanced volumetric energy and power density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copper nanocrystal modified activated carbon for supercapacitors with enhanced volumetric energy of copper nanocrystals in AC has little effect on the surface area and porosity of activated carbon. copper nanocrystals improves the electrical conductivity of the carbon network.

Cao, Guozhong

59

Oil recovery by carbon dioxide injection into consolidated and unconsolidated sandstone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide dis- Oiateme t s, that it e tr tts tighter hye ot hoes from the crude oil and this light liquid forms a bank ahead of the free carbon diox1de pushing the . oi-l-, For this reason, a portion of the oil produced was observed to be light oil.... The purpose of this research was to study experimentally the miscibility of carbon dioxide and Nillican crude oil in a consolidated sandstone core and an unconsolidated sand pack. A 15-ft. -long consolidated core was made by joining three indivi- dual 5-ft...

Lin, Fwu-Jin Frank

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Sensitivity of stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon to aerosol size and altitude of injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geoengineering with black carbon (BC) aerosols using a general circulation model with fixed sea surface would enhance the Arctic ozone hole. Using diesel fuel to produce the aerosols is likely prohibitively. Engineered particles, such as resonant scatterers or self-levitating particles, have been proposed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Bioindication Potential of Carbonic Anhydrase Activity in Anemones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bioindication. While oysters and many other bivalves are predisposed to accumulate heavy metal pollutants from polluted vs pristine ®eld sites. CA activity was found to be de- creased with increase in metal. Keywords: carbonic anhydrase; metal pollution; anemo- nes; coral reefs; Panama. The activity of the zinc

Bermingham, Eldredge

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon fiber Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fiber Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activated carbon fiber...

63

EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EFRC Carbon Capture and EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC Why it Matters: Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas is considered to be present in only trace proportions in our atmosphere but it has a leading role in the cast of greenhouse gases, with a thermal radiative effect nearly three times as large as the next biggest contributor. Energy related processes are the biggest sources of atmospheric CO2, especially the burning of fossil fuels and the production of hydrogen from methane. Since both human-caused CO2 concentrations and global average temperatures have been increasing steadily since the mid-20th century it could very well be that our energy future depends on our ability to effectively remove CO2

64

Petroleum contaminated ground-water: Remediation using activated carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ground-water contamination resulting from the leakage of crude oil and refined petroleum products during extraction and processing operations is a serious and a growing environmental problem in Nigeria. Consequently, a study of the use of activated carbon (AC) in the clean up was undertaken with the aim of reducing the water contamination to a more acceptable level. In the experiments described, crude-oil contamination of ground water was simulated under laboratory conditions using ground-water samples collected from existing hand-dug wells at Eagle Island, Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Different masses of the absorbent (i.e., activated carbon) were then added to the samples of ground water. The so treated water samples were left to equilibrate for 7 days, after which the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) contents of the samples were measured. Adsorption isotherms were derived for the two forms of activated carbon used, namely granular activated-carbon (GAC) and powdered activated-carbon (PAC). Results of the TPH analyses showed that activated carbon is an excellent means for the stripping-off of the contaminant: there were decreases in contaminant concentration from an initial concentration of 9304.70 mg/l to average final concentrations of 361.00 and 12.37 mg/l, that is, 96% and 99.9% resulting from the same amounts of GAC and PAC applications respectively. The results of this study revealed that the powdered form of AC would be very effective in the remediation of petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated ground water and its use is therefore recommended.

M.J. Ayotamuno; R.B. Kogbara; S.O.T. Ogaji; S.D. Probert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbons produced Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States Department of Summary: as qualifying carbon offset activities in existing markets and regis- tries. Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester...

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon produced Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States Department of Summary: as qualifying carbon offset activities in existing markets and regis- tries. Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester...

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - active carbon process Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Activated carbon; Carbon fibers; D. Electrical (electronic) properties Electromagnetic interference (EMI... in the composites is typically that ... Source: Chung, Deborah D.L....

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon chemically Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Activated carbon; Carbon fibers; D. Electrical (electronic) properties Electromagnetic interference (EMI... in the composites is typically that ... Source: Chung, Deborah D.L....

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon treatment Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Activated carbon; Carbon fibers; D. Electrical (electronic) properties Electromagnetic interference (EMI... in the composites is typically that ... Source: Chung, Deborah D.L....

70

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon particles Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Activated carbon; Carbon fibers; D. Electrical (electronic) properties Electromagnetic interference (EMI... in the composites is typically that ... Source: Chung, Deborah D.L....

71

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon process Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Activated carbon; Carbon fibers; D. Electrical (electronic) properties Electromagnetic interference (EMI... in the composites is typically that ... Source: Chung, Deborah D.L....

72

Production Scale-Up or Activated Carbons for Ultracapacitors  

SciTech Connect

Transportation use accounts for 67% of the petroleum consumption in the US. Electric and hybrid vehicles are promising technologies for decreasing our dependence on petroleum, and this is the objective of the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Inexpensive and efficient energy storage devices are needed for electric and hybrid vehicle to be economically viable, and ultracapacitors are a leading energy storage technology being investigated by the FreedomCAR program. The most important parameter in determining the power and energy density of a carbon-based ultracapacitor is the amount of surface area accessible to the electrolyte, which is primarily determined by the pore size distribution. The major problems with current carbons are that their pore size distribution is not optimized for liquid electrolytes and the best carbons are very expensive. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) has developed methods to prepare porous carbons with tunable pore size distributions from inexpensive carbohydrate based precursors. The use of low-cost feedstocks and processing steps greatly lowers the production costs. During this project with the assistance of Maxwell Technologies, we found that an impurity was limiting the performance of our carbon and the major impurity found was sulfur. A new carbon with low sulfur content was made and found that the performance of the carbon was greatly improved. We also scaled-up the process to pre-production levels and we are currently able to produce 0.25 tons/year of activated carbon. We could easily double this amount by purchasing a second rotary kiln. More importantly, we are working with MeadWestvaco on a Joint Development Agreement to scale-up the process to produce hundreds of tons of high quality, inexpensive carbon per year based on our processes.

Dr. Steven D. Dietz

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Experimental investigation of factors controlling the calcium carbonate ion activity product of shallow water carbonate-rich sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FACTORS CONTROLLING THE CALCIUM CARBONATE ION ACTIVITY PRODUCT OF SHALLOW WATER CARBONATE-RICH SEDIMENTS A Thesis by LAWRENCE DOUGLAS BERNSTEIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Oceanography EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FACTORS CONTROLLING THE CALCIUM CARBONATE ION ACTIVITY PRODUCT OF SHALLOW WATER CARBONATE...

Bernstein, Lawrence Douglas

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Ammonia-Activated Mesoporous Carbon Membranes for Gas Separations  

SciTech Connect

Porous carbon membranes, which generally show improved chemical and thermal stability compared to polymer membranes, have been used in gas separations for many years. In this work, we show that the post-synthesis ammonia treatment of porous carbon at elevated temperature can improve the permeance and selectivity of these membranes for the separation of carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons from permanent gases. Hierarchically structured porous carbon membranes were exposed to ammonia gas at temperatures ranging from 850 C to 950 C for up to 10 min and the N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} permeances were measured for these different membranes. Higher treatment temperatures and longer exposure times resulted in higher gas permeance values. In addition, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6}/N{sub 2} selectivities increased by a factor of 2 as the treatment temperature and time increased up to a temperature and time of 900 C, 10 min. Higher temperatures showed increased permeance but decreased selectivity indicating excess pore activation. Nitrogen adsorption measurements show that the ammonia treatment increased the porosity of the membrane while elemental analysis revealed the presence of nitrogen-containing surface functionalities in the treated carbon membranes. Thus, ammonia treatment at high temperature provides a controlled method to introduce both added microporosity and surface functionality to enhance gas separations performance of porous carbon membranes.

Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Lee, Jeseung [ORNL; Wang, Xiqing [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Preparation of activated carbon from date pits: Effect of the activation agent and liquid phase oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two series of activated carbons have been prepared from date pits; series C, using carbon dioxide as activating agent, and series S, prepared by activation with steam under the same experimental conditions. The obtained samples were oxidized with nitric acid in order to introduce more oxygen surface groups. The surface area and porosity of the parent and oxidized activated carbons were studied by N2 adsorption at 77 K and CO2 adsorption at 273 K. The oxygen surface complexes were characterized by temperature-programmed decomposition (TPD). The results show that carbon dioxide and steam activations produce microporous carbons with an increasing amount of CO evolving groups when increasing the burn-off. On the other hand, oxidation with nitric acid increases the amount of CO and CO2 evolved by the decomposition of surface oxygen groups, this increase being related to the development of porosity in the carbon with the degree of activation and to the activating agent used (CO2 versus steam).

Meriem Belhachemi; Rachel V.R.A. Rios; Fatima Addoun; Joaquín Silvestre-Albero; Antonio Sepúlveda-Escribano; Francisco Rodríguez-Reinoso

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Catalytic activation of carbon monoxide on metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

In discussing the important basic aspects of carbon monoxide chemistry, this review covers the adsorption and reaction of CO with H/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/ on reduced metal surfaces. Carbon monoxide adsorption of the Group VIII metals exhibits certain patterns. Typically, as coverages exceed one-half, compression occurs in the monolayer and the molecules lose registry with the surface metal atoms. Particular sites associated with rough surfaces facilitate CO dissociation to the surface carbon; these sites may have a significant effect on selectivity in the CO hydrogenation reaction. The support used and the metal crystallite size both affect the catalyst activity and product selectivity. Indications are strong that a better knowledge of metal-support interactions combined with a more complete understanding of the surface chemistry involved will lead to improved catalyst systems in the future.

Vannice, M.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Sorption of uranium from nitric acid solution using TBP-impregnated activated carbons  

SciTech Connect

The concept of extraction chromatography has been used to study the sorption of uranium from nitric acid solutions using tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) impregnated activated carbons. Batch equilibrium data and kinetic and breakthrough column behavior of uranium are reported. Wood based activated carbon has shown better capacity and breakthrough characteristics than shell based activated carbon. Sorption rate on impregnated carbons was relatively slow indicating that diffusion is the rate controlling step within the pore structure of the activated carbon. Uranium distribution on impregnated activated carbons is compared with equivalent bulk liquid extraction and a mechanism of uranium sorption is discussed.

Abbasi, W.A. [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, Islamabad (Pakistan). Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology; Streat, M. [Loughborough Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Sulfur Impregnation on Activated Carbon Fibers through H2S Oxidation for Vapor Phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sulfur Impregnation on Activated Carbon Fibers through H2S Oxidation for Vapor Phase Mercury: Sulfur was impregnated onto activated carbon fibers ACFs through H2S oxidation catalyzed by the sorbent CE Database subject headings: Activated carbon; Sulfur; Mercury; Hydrogen sulfides; Oxidation

Borguet, Eric

79

Nitrogen in aramid-based activated carbon fibers by TPD, XPS and XANES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Nitrogen in aramid-based activated carbon fibers by TPD, XPS and XANES J.P. Boudou a,* , Ph, 33080 Oviedo, Spain Abstract Activated carbon fibers were prepared from Nomex@ [poly to a great extent in the derived carbonized and activated fibers, it is of interest to gain knowledge about

80

System and method for coproduction of activated carbon and steam/electricity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for producing activated carbon comprising carbonizing a solid carbonaceous material in a carbonization zone of an activated carbon production apparatus (ACPA) to yield a carbonized product and carbonization product gases, the carbonization zone comprising carbonaceous material inlet, char outlet and carbonization gas outlet; activating the carbonized product via activation with steam in an activation zone of the ACPA to yield activated carbon and activation product gases, the activation zone comprising activated carbon outlet, activation gas outlet, and activation steam inlet; and utilizing process gas comprising at least a portion of the carbonization product gases or a combustion product thereof; at least a portion of the activation product gases or a combustion product thereof; or a combination thereof in a solid fuel boiler system that burns a solid fuel boiler feed with air to produce boiler-produced steam and flue gas, the boiler upstream of an air heater within a steam/electricity generation plant, said boiler comprising a combustion zone, a boiler-produced steam outlet and at least one flue gas outlet.

Srinivasachar, Srivats (Sturbridge, MA); Benson, Steven (Grand Forks, ND); Crocker, Charlene (Newfolden, MN); Mackenzie, Jill (Carmel, IN)

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

An active carbon catalyst prevents coke formation from asphaltenes during the hydrocracking of vacuum residue  

SciTech Connect

Active carbons were prepared by the steam activation of a brown coal char. The active carbon with mesopores showed greater adsorption selectivity for asphaltenes. The active carbon was effective at suppressing coke formation, even with the high hydrocracking conversion of vacuum residue. The analysis of the change in the composition of saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes in the cracked residue with conversion demonstrated the ability of active carbon to restrict the transformation of asphaltenes to coke. The active carbon that was richer in mesopores was presumably more effective at providing adsorption sites for the hydrocarbon free-radicals generated initially during thermal cracking to prevent them from coupling and polycondensing.

Fukuyama, H.; Terai, S. [Toyo Engineering Corp., Chiba (Japan). Technological Research Center

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO2) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO2 horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields.

Wier, Don R. Chimanhusky, John S.; Czirr, Kirk L.; Hallenbeck, Larry; Gerard, Matthew G.; Dollens, Kim B.; Owen, Rex; Gaddis, Maurice; Moshell, M.K.

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

83

Preparation of activated carbon aerogel and its application to electrode material for electric double layer capacitor in organic electrolyte: Effect of activation temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon aerogel was chemically activated with KOH at various activation temperatures with the aim of improving the electrochemical performance of carbon aerogel for EDLC electrode. Electrochemical performance o...

Soon Hyung Kwon; Eunji Lee; Bum-Soo Kim…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

INVESTIGATION OF FLY ASH AND ACTIVATED CARBON OBTAINED FROM PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addresses the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addresses the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project is determining the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed are also being determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control, are being analyzed to determine the effect of SCR on the ash.

Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

HYDROTHERMAL ACTIVITY AND CARBON-DIOXIDE DISCHARGE AT SHRUB AND UPPER KLAWASI MUD VOLCANOES,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYDROTHERMAL ACTIVITY AND CARBON-DIOXIDE DISCHARGE AT SHRUB AND UPPER KLAWASI MUD VOLCANOES and July 1973 at Shrub and Upper Klawasi mud volcanoes 8 ii #12;HYDROTHERMAL ACTIVITY AND CARBON. Map of diffuse carbon dioxide flow from soils near the summit of Shrub mud volcano 9 TABLES 1

86

Activated carbon aerogel as electrode material for coin-type EDLC cell in organic electrolyte  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon aerogel (CA) was prepared by a carbonization of resorcinol–formaldehyde (RF) polymer gels, and it was chemically activated with KOH to obtain activated carbon aerogel (ACA) for electrode material for EDLC in organic electrolyte. Coin-type EDLC cells with two symmetrical carbon electrode were assembled using the prepared carbon materials. Electrochemical performance of the carbon electrodes was measured by galvanostatic charge/discharge and cyclic voltammetry methods. Activated carbon aerogel (20.9 F/g) showed much higher specific capacitance than carbon aerogel (7.9 F/g) and commercial activated carbon (8.5 F/g) at a scan rate of 100 mV/s. This indicates that chemical activation with KOH served as an efficient method to improve electrochemical performance of carbon aerogel for EDLC electrode in organic electrolyte. The enhanced electrochemical performance of activated carbon aerogel was attributed to the high effective surface area and the well-developed pore structure with appropriate pore size obtained from activation with KOH.

Soon Hyung Kwon; Eunji Lee; Bum-Soo Kim; Sang-Gil Kim; Byung-Jun Lee; Myung-Soo Kim; Ji Chul Jung

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Oxidative Degradation of Trichloroethylene Adsorbed on Active Carbons: Use of Microwave Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OXIDATIVE DEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE ADSORBED ON ACTIVE CARBONS: USE OF MICROWAVE ENERGY R. VARMA, S. P. NANDI, D. CLEAVELAND, K. M. MYLES, D. R. VISSERS, AND P. A. NELSON Chemist Chemical Technology Division Argonne National... Laboratory Argonne, Illinois ABSTRACT Trichloroethylene (TCE) adsorbed on different types of active carbons was exposed to a dry and moist air stream in the presence of 2.45 GHz micro wave radiation. Active carbon beds were used becauae they absorb...

Varma, R.; Nandi, S. P.; Cleaveland, D.; Myles, K. M.; Vissers, D. R.; Nelson, P. A.

88

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1992 activities  

SciTech Connect

During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIACs staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. As analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Stoss, F.W. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Carbon Nanotubes Inhibit the Hemolytic Activity of the Pore-Forming Toxin Pyolysin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Nanotubes Inhibit the Hemolytic Activity of the Pore-Forming Toxin Pyolysin Apraku David Article Address correspondence to tangxw@uwaterloo.ca ABSTRACT Functionalized carbon nanotubes have oxidized and non-covalently PEGlyated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which were previously

Le Roy, Robert J.

90

Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage 5 Cristian I surface area carbon materials for hydrogen storage continues to attract interest because predicted high potential for hydrogen storage on metal-decorated carbon supports, the experimental

Pennycook, Steve

91

REMOVAL OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS FROM SUBCRITICAL WATER WITH ACTIVATED CARBON  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that controlling the temperature (and to a lesser extent, the pressure) of water can dramatically change its ability to extract organics and inorganics from matrices ranging from soils and sediments to waste sludges and coal. The dielectric constant of water can be changed from about 80 (a very polar solvent) to <5 (similar to a nonpolar organic solvent) by controlling the temperature (from ambient to about 400 C) and pressure (from about 5 to 350 bar). The EERC has shown that hazardous organic pollutants such as pesticides, PACS (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) can be completely removed from soils, sludges, and sediments at temperatures (250 C) and pressures (<50 atm) that are much milder than typically used for supercritical water processes (temperature >374 C, pressure >221 atm). In addition, the process has been demonstrated to be particularly effective for samples containing very high levels of contaminants (e.g., part per thousand). Current projects include demonstrating the subcritical water remediation process at the pilot scale using an 8-liter system constructed under separate funding during 1997. To date, subcritical water has been shown to be an effective extraction fluid for removing a variety of organic pollutants from soils and sludges contaminated with fossil fuel products and waste products, including PACS from soil (e.g., town gas sites), refining catalysts, and petroleum tank bottom sludges; PCBs from soil and sediments; toxic gasoline components (e.g., benzene) from soil and waste sludge; and phenols from petroleum refinery sludges. The obvious need to clean the wastewater from subcritical water processes led to preliminary experiments with activated carbon placed in line after the extractor. Initial experiments were performed before and after cooling the extractant water (e.g., with water at 200 C and with water cooled to 25 C). Surprisingly, the ability of activated carbon to remove organics from the water is better at a high temperature than at room temperature. These initial results are opposite to those expected from chromatographic theory, since the solubility of the organics is about 100,000-fold higher in the hot water than in ambient water. At present, the physicochemical mechanism accounting for these results is unknown; however, it is possible that the lower surface tension and lower viscosity of subcritical water (compared to water at ambient conditions) greatly increases the available area of the carbon by several orders of magnitude. Regardless of the mechanism involved, the optimal use of activated carbon to clean the wastewater generated from subcritical water remediation will depend on obtaining a better understanding of the controlling parameters. While these investigations focused on the cleanup of wastewater generated from subcritical water remediation, the results also apply to cleanup of any wastewater contaminated with nonpolar and moderately polar organics such as wastewaters from coal and petroleum processing.

Steven B. Hawthorne; Arnaud J. Lagadec

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Optimal electrochemical performances of CO2 activated carbon aerogels for supercapacitors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Activated carbon aerogels(ACAs) derived from sol-gel polycondensation of resorcinol (R) and formaldehyde (F) were pyrolyzed under Ar flow and activated in CO2 atmosphere. The morphology of ACAs was characterized ...

Lijuan Chang ???; Zhibing Fu; Miao Liu…

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - actively inflamed liver Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diverse Roles of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Liver Injury and Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride Summary: injection of iNKT activator -galactosylceramide ( -GalCer)...

94

Study of Adsorption of Methanol in an Activated Carbon and Carbon Nanotube Matrix for Use in a Solar Based Refrigeration Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy. Various adsorbent/adsorbate pairs have been tested in literature. The present work focuses on carbon nanotubes because theoretically, nanotubes should be able to adsorb better than activated carbon due to their high surface to volume ratios...

Sambath, Srivaths

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

95

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbent InjectIon for Small eSP Sorbent InjectIon for Small eSP mercury control In low Sulfur eaStern bItumInouS coal flue GaS Background Full-scale field testing has demonstrated the effectiveness of activated carbon injection (ACI) as a mercury-specific control technology for certain coal-fired power plants, depending on the plant's coal feedstock and existing air pollution control device configuration. In a typical configuration, powdered activated carbon (PAC) is injected downstream of the plant's air heater and upstream of the existing particulate control device - either an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) or a fabric filter (FF). The PAC adsorbs the mercury from the combustion flue gas and is subsequently captured along with the fly ash in the ESP or FF. ACI can have some negative side

96

Analysis and removal of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) from treated drinking water using a biological activated carbon filter system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study is focused on reducing the concentration of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in treated drinking water. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of AOC removal by biological activated carbon filters (BACF) in a pilot-scale system. The results show that BACF reduces the total concentration of AOC. The concentration of AOC primarily indicates microorganism growth in a water supply network, and the amount of AOC in water is significantly reduced after BACF treatment. The predicted and measured values of AOC in output water treated by the BACF system show linear relationships, and their correlation coefficients are high. An AOC empirical equation was established by determining the relationship between water quality parameters such as total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, UV254, ammonia nitrogen, and total phosphorous. These findings may be relevant to conventional water treatment plants or to water distribution systems to provide treated drinking water with a high level of biological stability.

Jie-Chung Lou; Chih-Yuan Yang; Che-Jung Chang; Wei-Hsiang Chen; Wei-Bin Tseng; Jia-Yun Han

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Amorphous silicon-carbon alloys and amorphous carbon from direct methane and ethylene activation by ECR  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloys are prepared using electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Hydrogen is introduced into the source resonance cavity as an excitation gas. Silane is introduced in the main chamber in the vicinity of the plasma stream, whereas the carbon source gases, methane or ethylene, are introduced either with the silane or with the hydrogen as excitation gases. The effect of the type of carbon-source gas, excitation gas mixture and silane-to-carbon source gas flow ratio on the deposition rate, bandgap, subgap density of states, spin density and hydrogen evolution are studied.

Conde, J.P.; Chu, V.; Giorgis, F.; Pirri, C.F.; Arekat, S.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

A mathematical model for countercurrent moving-bed activated carbon adsorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the carbon column was divided into ten sections and the activated carbon flow rate was such that its detention time was fifty hours. Also, during this fifty hours one thousand gallons of water were treated. Thus the water volume of each section would... be one thou- sand gallons divided by ten sections or 100 gallons. One practical difficulty with the model is that an acti- vated carbon volume must be assumed, tests made, and calculations performed to determine if the effluent quality...

Anderson, Douglas Harold

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

A dsorption of H2 S or SO2 on an activated carbon cloth modified by ammonia treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent studies have reported that activated carbon fibers, such as PAN-ACF [1] or Nomex-ACF [2], have for the recovery of sulfuric acid compared to granular activated carbon because the diffusion of sulfuric acid rarely been investigated to improve the performance of activated carbon fibers for the removal of SO2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

100

S urface chemistry of a viscose-based activated carbon cloth modified by treatment with ammonia and steam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-based activated carbon fibers (ACF) to optimize the oxidative retention of up to 5000 ppmv of SO2 in moist air suitable for the recovery of sulfuric acid at room temperature than granular activated carbon becauseS urface chemistry of a viscose-based activated carbon cloth modified by treatment with ammonia

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Electric Pulse Discharge Activated Carbon Supercapacitors for Transportation Application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon aerogels are good electrical conductors and, hence, can be used in supercapacitors. Capacitance increases as the distance between conductor decreases and the surface area of the conductor increases. Bec...

Subhadarshi Nayak; Jyoti Agrawal

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters Meera A. Sidheswaran a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon fiber (ACF) filters for air cleaning in HVAC systems. The parallel aims for the air cleaningEnergy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters Meera A. Velocities through the ACF media were typical of those in normal particle filter systems (w0.5 m sÃ?1

103

Capture of CO2 from flue gas by vacuum pressure swing adsorption using activated carbon beads  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) for CO2 capture has attracted much research effort with the...2...adsorbent materials. In this work, a new adsorbent, that is, pitch-based activated carbon bead (AC bead), ...

Chunzhi Shen; Jianguo Yu; Ping Li; Carlos A. Grande; Alirio E. Rodrigues

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Degassing Measurement Studies Carried out for Various Forms of Activated Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Activated carbon with its large surface area has extraordinary adsorptive capabilities through physical adsorption. Using this property a project on development of cryoadsorption Cryopump is ongoing at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India. Under the project, to study the desorption characteristics of various sorbents; a DeGassing Measurement System (DGMS) was set up. The DGMS facility works under vacuum environment with additional feature of baking to higher temperatures. DGMS provides accurate and sensitive measurements of weight change, with one microgram sensitivity, for a various samples (Activated carbon granules of different mesh sizes, Activated carbon spheres, Activated carbon pellets and fabrics i.e. Non-woven and Flat Knitted) exposed to controlled environmental conditions over an extended period of time. This paper reports degassing measurement results obtained for various samples studied to show quantitative evolution of the gases during vacuum and heating.

Samiran Mukherjee; Ranjana Gangradey; Sapana Guru; Pratik Nayak; Jyoti Agrawal; V.S. Tripathi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Adsorption capacity of hydrophobic SiO2 aerogel/activated carbon composite materials for TNT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adsorption properties of TNT from wastewater by hydrophobic silica aerogel/activated carbon composite materials were investigated. The effects of adsorption time, pH value, adsorption temperature, and the ...

XiaoFang Zhou; Sheng Cui; Yu Liu; XueYong Liu…

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Optimizing Cr(VI) adsorption on activated carbon produced from heavy oil fly ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to explore the beneficial utilization of heavy oil fly ash (HOFA) generated in the power plants, the present study is intended to optimize the chromium(VI) [Cr(VI)] adsorption on activated carbon prod...

Abdullah Mofarrah; Tahir Husain; Bing Chen

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - activities carbonic anhydrase Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inc. All rights reserved. PII S1095-6433(97)00439-X Summary: .C.; Ruzicka, C.A.; Sly, W.S. Pul-carbonic anhydrase activity. J. Appl. Physiol. 55:75-83; 1983. monary... H: A...

108

Modeling Polychlorinated Biphenyl Mass Transfer after Amendment of Contaminated Sediment with Activated Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sorption kinetics and concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in historically polluted sediment is modeled to assess a remediation strategy based on in situ PCB sequestration by mixing with activated carbon (AC). We extend our evaluation of ...

David Werner; Upal Ghosh; Richard G. Luthy

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

Two-year survey comparing earthquake activity and injection-well locations in the Barnett Shale, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...earthquakes occurred near wells with similar injection...seismically quiescent injection wells. It has been recognized...including the production of geothermal energy (3), secondary...occurred near injection wells disposing of fluid wastes...border to the Gulf of Mexico. In Texas, about 25...

Cliff Frohlich

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2014 Third Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the technical progresses made during the third quarter of FY 2014: 1) Autodesk introduced the options for fiber inlet condition to the 3D solver. These options are already available in the mid-plane/dual domain solver. 2) Autodesk improved the accuracy of 3D fiber orientation calculation around the gate. 3) Autodesk received consultant services from Prof. C.L. Tucker at the University of Illinois on the implementation of the reduced order model for fiber length, and discussed with Prof. Tucker the methods to reduce memory usage. 4) PlastiComp delivered to PNNL center-gated and edge-fan-gated 20-wt% to 30-wt% LCF/PP and LCF/PA66 (7”x7”x1/8”) plaques molded by the in-line direct injection molding (D-LFT) process. 5) PlastiComp molded ASTM tensile, flexural and impact bars under the same D-LFT processing conditions used for plaques for Certification of Assessment and ascertaining the resultant mechanical properties. 6) Purdue developed a new polishing routine, utilizing the automated polishing machine, to reduce fiber damage during surface preparation. 7) Purdue used a marker-based watershed segmentation routine, in conjunction with a hysteresis thresholding technique, for fiber segmentation during fiber orientation measurement. 8) Purdue validated Purdue’s fiber orientation measurement method using the previous fiber orientation data obtained from the Leeds machine and manually measured data by the University of Illinois. 9) PNNL conducted ASMI mid-plane analyses for a 30wt% LCF/PP plaque and compared the predicted fiber orientations with the measured data provided by Purdue University at the selected locations on this plaque. 10) PNNL put together the DOE 2014 Annual Merit Review (AMR) presentation with the team and presented it at the AMR meetings on June 17, 2014. 11) PNNL built ASMI dual domain models for the Toyota complex part and commenced mold filling analyses of the complex part with different wall thicknesses in order to support part molding. 12) Toyota and Magna discussed with PNNL on tool modification for molding the complex part. Toyota sent the CAD files of the complex part to PNNL to build ASMI models of the part for mold filling analysis to provide guidance to tooling and part molding.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Sanborn, Scott E.; Mathur, Raj N.; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael D.; Wang, Jin; Jin, Xiaoshi; Costa, Franco; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven; Tucker III, Charles L.

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Annual Report, July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The work reported herein covers select tasks remaining in Budget Phase I and many of the tasks of Budget Phase II. The principal Tasks in Budget Phase I included in this report are Reservoir Analysis and Characterization; Advanced Technical Studies; and Technology Transfer, Reporting and Project Management Activities for Budget Phase I. The principle Task in Budget Phase II included in this report is Field Demonstration. Completion of these tasks has enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed, economically evaluated, and implemented in the field. Field implementation of the project commenced during late 1995, with actual CO{sub 2} injection scheduled for start-up in mid-July, 1996. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative CO{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take-or-pay provisions, CO{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price) and gas recycle agreements (expensing costs as opposed to a large upfront capital investment for compression) were negotiated to further improve the project economics. The Grayburg-San Andres section had previously been divided into multiple zones based on the core study and gamma ray markers that correlate wells within the Unit. Each zone was mapped as continuous across the field. Previous core studies concluded that the reservoir quality in the South Cowden Unit (SCU) is controlled primarily by the distribution of a bioturbated and diagenetically-altered rock type with a distinctive {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} texture. The {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} modifier is derived from the visual effect of pervasive, small-scale intermixing of tan oil-stained reservoir rock with tight gray non-reservoir rock.

Chimahusky, J.S.; Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Dollens, K.B.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Development and evaluation of carbon and binder loading in low-cost activated carbon cathodes for air-cathode microbial fuel cells{  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development and evaluation of carbon and binder loading in low-cost activated carbon cathodes materials in order to optimize and extend the lifetime of AC cathodes in MFCs. 1. Introduction A microbial, with the cathode typically limiting power production.5,6 Catalysts can be used to reduce the activation energy

113

Program or Field Office: Office of Legacy Management Project Title and I.D. No.: Bioremediation Injection and Related Activities at the Pinellas Site, Largo, Florida,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bioremediation Injection and Related Activities at the Pinellas Site, Largo, Florida, Bioremediation Injection and Related Activities at the Pinellas Site, Largo, Florida, LM 13-13 Location: Largo, Florida Proposed Action or Project Description: DOE proposes to use a Geoprobe to inject emulsified edible soybean oil (EEO) and anaerobic microbial solution into the surficial aquifer at the 4.5 Acre Site adjacent to the DOE Young - Rainey STAR Center (Pinellas Site) in Largo, Florida. The proposed action would enhance naturally occurring anaerobic biodegradation, thereby reducing vinyl chloride contamination along the southwest boundary of the 4.5 Acre Site. Dehalococcoides ethenogenes (DHE) is a type of microbe that occurs naturally in the aquifer. Bioaugmentation with a commercially available DHE culture used in conjunction with the EEO would maximize the efficiency of contaminant biodegradation. No genetically engineered or

114

PERGAMON Carbon 38 (2000) 17571765 High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

directly, as in a traditional H , 23.1% CO, 5.8% CO , 6.6% H O, 0.5% H S, and2 2 2 2 coal-fired power plant types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H S from a simulated coal temperature was examined as a2 function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal

Cal, Mark P.

115

Structural insight into activity enhancement and inhibition of H64A carbonic anhydrase II by imidazoles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human carbonic anhydrases are zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the hydration and dehydration of CO2 and HCO3-, respectively. X-ray crystal structures of a variant of human carbonic anhydrase II in complex with four imidazole derivatives (imidazole, 1-methylimidazole, 2-methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole) have been determined in order to identify the binding sites for such compounds, and a mechanism to explain the effects on catalytic activity is proposed.

Aggarwal, M.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

116

Synthesis, adsorption and regeneration of nanoporous silica aerogel and silica aerogel-activated carbon composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Usage of aerogels as an adsorbent has become more widespread because of its specifications such as high porosity and specific surface. Nanometer silica aerogel and silica aerogel-activated carbon composites were synthesized using a water glass precursor by ambient pressure drying method. Then, the adsorption capacity of synthesized adsorbents was studied in terms of benzene and ethyl benzene adsorption by chromatography method for continuous and batch testing. Results showed that silica aerogel and silica aerogel-activated carbon composites had high tendency for benzene and ethyl benzene adsorption. Silica aerogel showed maximum adsorption capacity of 2.3 g g?1 and 0.7 g g?1 in static adsorption of benzene and ethyl benzene respectively. Also, in dynamic adsorption of benzene and ethyl benzene, silica aerogel had maximum equilibrium adsorption capacity of 0.954 g g?1 and 0.219 g g?1 respectively. Minimum equilibrium adsorption capacity in benzene and ethyl benzene static adsorption was related to activated carbon with 0.7 g g?1 and silica aerogel–2 wt% activated carbon with 0.25 g g?1 respectively. After adsorption process, silica aerogel and silica aerogel–0.5 wt% activated carbon composite were regenerated by solvent extraction–thermal treatment method and, after at least 15 adsorption/desorption cycles, their adsorption capacity became fixed.

Akbar Mohammadi; Jafarsadegh Moghaddas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The production of activated silica with carbon dioxide gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the titratable alkalinity is not reduced. The by-product of the reaction is ammonium hydroxI. de which keeps the alkalinity of the sol the same as that of the starting diluted sodium silicate. The usual method for producing N-Sol A Is to mix dI. lute sodium... safely at about twice the safe storage concen- tration of the Baylis sol. This permits a twofold de- crease in the capaci. ty of the storage tanks (10). Hay also has done a great deal of development wozk 10 in which he has suggested the use of carbon...

Hayes, William Bell

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Role of temperature change in micro seismic activity during fluid injections in faulted and fractured zones. Part 1: Updating the thermal modelling in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Role of temperature change in micro seismic activity during fluid injections in faulted and fractured zones. Part 1: Updating the thermal modelling in a DFN model using a double media approach Ahmed) or at comparisons of tracer and thermal transport in fractured reservoirs (Juliusson et Horne, 2010) to investigate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

119

Chemical and biological systems for regenerating activated carbon contaminated with high explosives  

SciTech Connect

Activated carbon has been used as a substrate for efficiently removing high explosives (HEs) from aqueous and gaseous waste streams. Carbon that is saturated with HEs, however, constitutes a solid waste and is currently being stored because appropriate technologies for its treatment are not available. Because conventional treatment strategies (i.e., incineration, open burning) are not safe or will not be in compliance with future regulations, new and cost-effective methods are required for the elimination of this solid waste. Furthermore, because the purchase of activated carbon and its disposal after loading with HEs will be expensive, an ideal treatment method would result in the regeneration of the carbon thereby permitting its reuse. Coupling chemical and biological treatment systems, such as those described below, will effectively meet these technical requirements. The successful completion of this project will result in the creation of engineered commercial systems that will present safe and efficient methods for reducing the quantities of HE-laden activated carbon wastes that are currently in storage or are generated as a result of demilitarization activities. Biological treatment of hazardous wastes is desirable because the biodegradation process ultimately leads to the mineralization (e.g., conversion to carbon dioxide, nitrogen gas, and water) of parent compounds and has favorable public acceptance. These methods will also be cost- effective because they will not require large expenditures of energy and will permit the reuse of the activated carbon. Accordingly, this technology will have broad applications in the private sector and will be a prime candidate for technology transfer.

Knezovich, J.P.; Daniels, J.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Stenstrom, M.K.; Heilmann, H.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Civil and Engineering Dept.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Inorganic Carbon Turnover caused by Digestion of Carbonate Sands and Metabolic Activity of Holothurians  

SciTech Connect

Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this study inorganic additional aspects of carbon turnover were determined in laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, H. leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni from One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 6.1 to 6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts as opposed to 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2kg and 80 ± 7kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual dissolution rates of H. atra and S. herrmanni of 6.5±1.9g and 9.6±1.4g, respectively, suggest that 0.05±0.02% and 0.1±0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During the incubations the CaCO3 dissolution was 0.07±0.01%, 0.04±0.01% and 0.21±0.05% of the fecal casts for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state for both aragonite and calcite minerals during laboratory incubations decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Preparation and evaluation of hydrotreating catalysts based on activated carbon derived from oil sand petroleum coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel Ni–Mo/activated carbon (AC) hydrotreating catalysts were prepared and evaluated for upgrading heavy vacuum gas oil (HVGO). The AC supports were derived from Alberta oil sand petroleum coke, i.e. fluid coke and/or delayed coke, hereafter referred to as OSP coke, through a chemical process. The BET surface area was as high as 2194 m2/g for the fluid coke derived AC and 2357 m2/g for the delayed coke derived AC. Both \\{ACs\\} contained a large number of micropores with pore volume as high as 1.2 cm3/g. Ni and Mo based active component precursors could be easily loaded on the activated carbon supports by chemical impregnation of nickel nitrate and ammonium molybdate followed by calcination in nitrogen at 773 K without further modification or oxidation treatment to the activated carbons. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation showed highly porous surface structure of the bare activated carbon supports and well dispersed metal (oxide) precursor nanoparticles of 30–50 nm loaded on the AC supports. For comparison, two reference catalysts were also prepared by the same procedure but using commercial activated carbon and porous alumina as supports. After catalyst activation by sulfiding, the hydrotreating performance of the prepared catalysts was evaluated in a magnetically stirred autoclave with a HVGO feedstock to examine their hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) activities. Two commercial hydrotreating catalysts were also tested and compared under similar conditions with the same feed. The results showed that the catalysts based on the activated carbon supports prepared from OSP coke had better hydrotreating performance than the other catalysts. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) characterization of the catalysts after activation showed that small particles of nanostructure (2–5 nm in size) were evenly embedded in the carbon matrix except for some bigger particles that were located on the catalyst surface. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy revealed that these particles were composed of Ni, Mo and S elements. The dispersed nanoparticles formed the active sites and were responsible for the observed high HDS and HDN activity. Elemental analysis and surface characterization of the spent catalysts showed that the formation of coke precursors was favored on the alumina supported catalyst, which resulted in catalyst deactivation.

Yu Shi; Jinwen Chen; Jian Chen; Robb A. Macleod; Marek Malac

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. Abstract: In geologic carbon sequestration, while part of the injected carbon dioxide will dissolve into host...

123

Activated carbon from grass – A green alternative catalyst support for water electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Grass blades (turf grass) have been selected as a cheap biomass source of producing activated carbon for supporting Pt particles for utilizing as electrocatalyst for H2 generation through electrolysis of water. Activation is done using ZnCl2 followed by thermal processing at 250 °C. 1% Pt was supported over the grass derived activated biomass carbon (G-ABC) powder to result in Pt@G-ABC. After physical characterization, Pt@G-ABC sample has been tested for its catalytic activity in 1 M sulfuric acid solution for H2 gas generation through Linear Sweep & Cyclic Voltammetry. Cost factor involved in the production of G-ABC has also been compared with the traditional commercially available carbon support. The studies suggest that grass may be considered not only as a potential alternative source for producing carbon supported catalyst for H2 generation but also highlight the production of low-cost carbon for further applications like electrode materials, adsorbent for color, odor and hazardous pollutants.

Palanichamy Kalyani; Ariharaputhiran Anitha; Andre Darchen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Preparation of Activated Carbon and Silica Particles from Rice Straw  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic biomass, such as agricultural crop residues, forestry byproducts, and municipal waste, is a rich source of renewable energy and materials. ... The LH powders were dried in oven at 60 °C for 12 h, placed in a quartz tube (2 cm inner diameter), and then dried in a furnace (Mini-Mite, Lindberg/Blue) at 10 °C/min to 105 °C and held for 0.5 h. ... TEM samples were prepared by dispersing a small amount of AC and silica particles in water (?0.01 g/L) and sonicated (2510, Branson) for 60 min first, and then a drop of the sonicated suspension was placed onto a carbon grid and dried in air. ...

Sixiao Hu; You-Lo Hsieh

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

125

Adsorption and decomposition of triclosan by activated carbons, manganese oxides, and their composite materials from aqueous solution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research investigates the use of activated carbon (AC) and manganese oxides as adsorbents and oxidizing agents to adsorb and oxidize triclosan, a compound which… (more)

Fang, Sheng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System Background Earth generates and emits an enormous amount of carbon dioxide into the atmos- phere from its deep energy resources, its near-surface processes, and biotic activi- ties. Although anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions increase global warming, global warming is also alleviated by human activities in sequestering carbon into the terrestrial ecosystem and injecting carbon dioxide deep into geological formations,

127

Carbon credits earned from a double slope active solar still under forced circulation mode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human life on land is vitally dependent on fresh water along with food and air. Many areas in the world do not have access to fresh water. Growing demands of freshwater resources are creating an urgent need to develop self sustained system to meet the demand. At present, many distillation methods are available like reverse osmosis, thin film distillation multi-effect fresh evaporation but they are energy intensive or contribute to environmental degradation. Distillation is one technique used for treating available brackish water into fresh water. However, solar energy can be used as an alternative source of energy for water distillation. In this paper, carbon dioxide emission, mitigation and carbon credit earned from a double slope active solar still under forced circulation mode has been carried out. It has been observed that carbon dioxide emission and carbon credit earned over the life time of 15 years are 2.55 tons and ?220 respectively.

A.K. Sethi; Vijay Kumar Dwivedi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

NiFe2O4/activated carbon nanocomposite as magnetic material from petcoke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) was supported on activated carbon (AC) from petroleum coke (petcoke). Potassium hydroxide (KOH) was employed with petcoke to produce activated carbon. NiFe2O4 were synthesized using PEG-Oleic acid assisted hydrothermal method. The structural and magnetic properties were determined using thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA–DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (IR-FT), surface area (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). XRD analysis revealed the cubic spinel structure and ferrite phase with high crystallinity. IR-FT studies showed that chemical modification promoted the formation of surface oxygen functionalities. Morphological investigation by SEM showed conglomerates of spherical nanoparticles with an average particle size of 72 nm and TEM showed the formation of NiFe2O4/carbon nanofibers. Chemical modification and activation temperature of 800 °C prior to activation dramatically increased the BET surface area of the resulting activated carbon to 842.4 m2/g while the sulfur content was reduced from 6 to 1%. Magnetic properties of nanoparticles show strong dependence on the particle size.

Sarah Briceño; W. Brämer-Escamilla; P. Silva; J. García; H. Del Castillo; M. Villarroel; J.P. Rodriguez; M.A. Ramos; R. Morales; Y. Diaz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Oxygen Reduction Activity of PtxNi1-x Alloy Nanoparticles on Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PtxNi1 - x nanoparticles (Pt:Ni; 1:0, 4:1, 3:1 and 0.7:1) of ~5 nm, were synthesized on carboxylic acid-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (PtxNi1 - x NPs/MWNT). The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity measurements ...

Kim, Junhyung

130

Investigations on emission characteristics of the pongamia biodiesel–diesel blend fuelled twin cylinder compression ignition direct injection engine using exhaust gas recirculation methodology and dimethyl carbonate as additive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments were carried out on a twin cylinder direct injection compression ignition engine using pongamia biodiesel–diesel blend as fuel with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) as additive. The experimental results showed that pongamia biodiesel–diesel blend fuelled engine with EGR and DMC can simultaneously reduce smoke and nitric oxide ( NO x ) emission. The NO x emission was reduced by about 17.68% for 10% of EGR introduction and about 13.55% increase in smoke emission. When dimethyl carbonate was added with EGR the engine emits lower smoke with lesser NO x emission and it showed that the smoke reduction rate had a linear relationship with DMC percentage. The carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions also decreased when DMC was added. However the addition of DMC with EGR caused an increase in both BSEC and BTE.

M. Pandian; S. P. Sivapirakasam; M. Udayakumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Chapter Nine - Carbon Capture with Simultaneous Activation and Its Subsequent Transformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon capture and storage/sequestration (CCS) is now being considered as a potential option to mitigate global warming associated with carbon accumulation. The chemical absorption technique employing efficient amino-containing absorbents has been widely developed. Nevertheless, extensive energy consumption in desorption–compression process would be a crucial barrier to realize practical CCS. On the other hand, CO2 is very attractive as a typical renewable feedstock for manufacturing commodity chemicals and fuels. However, the reactions involving CO2 are commonly carried out at high pressure, which may not be economically suitable and also pose safety concerns. Consequently, we have proposed a carbon capture and utilization (CCU) strategy as an alternative approach to addressing energy issue in CCS. This crucial point of CCU could be simultaneous activation of CO2 upon its capture (e.g., formation of carbamate/alkyl carbonate) and thus in situ catalytic transformation into value-added chemicals under mild conditions, avoiding additional desorption step. This chapter is intended to discuss carbon capture and in situ transformation of CO2 to oxazolidinones, carbonates, quinazolines, urea derivatives, isocyanates, and carbamates via the formation of CO and CN bond.

Yu-Nong Li; Liang-Nian He; Zhen-Feng Diao; Zhen-Zhen Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Electroreduction of Oxygen in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells by Activated Carbon Coated Cobalt Nanocrystallites Produced by Electric Arc Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electroreduction of Oxygen in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells by Activated Carbon Coated Cobalt Nanocrystallites Produced by Electric Arc Discharge ... A recent review of the encapsulation of rare earth and iron group metals (Fe, Co, Ni) using electric arc discharge has been published by Saito. ... Nanotubes have been observed after activation of catalytically inactive carbon-coated Co nanocrystallites generated by electric arc discharge. ...

G. Lalande; D. Guay; J. P. Dodelet; S. A. Majetich; M. E. McHenry

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

133

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids  

SciTech Connect

Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole � including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite � at 1152�2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4�1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6�1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Carbon Capture and Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SECARB's SECARB's Mississippi SalineTest Site: A Field Project Update Robert C. Trautz (rtrautz@epri.com) Electric Power Research Institute Senior Project Manager DOE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Annual Review Meeting October 6-8, 2008 Pittsburgh, PA 2 1. Introduction 2. Well Drilling & Completion 3. Reservoir Characterization 4. CO 2 Injection Operations 5. Monitoring and Verification Outline 3 Key Organizations and Acknowledgments SOUTHERN STATES ENERGY BOARD Dr. Gerald (Jerry) R. Hill OTHER FIELD PROJECTS AND SUPPORTING ACTIVITIES * Advanced Resources * Alabama Geological Survey/ SCS * Gulf Coast Carbon Center (TXBEG) * EPRI * Virginia Tech University * Mississippi State University * Others Richard Esposito MISSISSIPPI POWER CO. Rick Berry Richard (Dick) Rhudy Robert (Rob) Trautz

135

How carbon-based sorbents will impact fly ash utilization and disposal  

SciTech Connect

The injection of activated carbon flue gas to control mercury emissions will result in a fly ash and activated carbon mixture. The potential impact of this on coal combustion product disposal and utilization is discussed. The full paper (and references) are available at www.acaa-usa.org. 1 tab., 2 photos.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Hassett, D.J.; Buckley, T.D.; Heebink, L.V.; Pavlish, J.H. [Energy and Environmental Research Center (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

“Carbon sequestration” refers to a portfolio of activities for ... capture, separation and storage or reuse of carbon or CO2. Carbon sequestration technologies encompass both the prevention of CO2 emissions into ...

Robert L. Kane MS; Daniel E. Klein MBA

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yang, Junbing (Westmont, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Naperville, IL)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

138

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

SciTech Connect

The principle objective of this project is to demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of an innovative reservoir management and carbon dioxide (CO2) flood project development approach for improving CO2 flood project economics in shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs.

Czirr, K.L.; Gaddis, M.P.; Moshell, M.K.

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

139

CO2-Brine Surface Dissolution and Injection: CO2 Storage Enhancement Paul Emeka Eke, SPE, Mark Naylor, Stuart Haszeldine and Andrew Curtis, Scottish Centre for Carbon Storage,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are population increase, per capita GDP (also known as ``affluence level''), the energy intensity of the economy by the gross domestic product, GDP), energy production, E, carbon-based fuels used for energy production, C (E/GDP) and the carbon intensity of the energy system (C/E). The term E/GDP reflects the sectorial

140

Raman Spectroscopy—An Innovative and Versatile Tool To Follow the Respirational Activity and Carbonate Biomineralization of Important Cave Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Raman Spectroscopy—An Innovative and Versatile Tool To Follow the Respirational Activity and Carbonate Biomineralization of Important Cave Bacteria ... (11) Bacterial calcium carbonate formation is applied in contaminated soil and groundwater remediation,(12) the protection and repair of concrete and cement structures,(13) and the conservation of building stone and statuary. ...

Robert Keiner; Torsten Frosch; Stefan Hanf; Anna Rusznyak; Denise M. Akob; Kirsten Küsel; Jürgen Popp

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Preparation of Activated Carbon from Oil Sands Coke by Chemical and Physical Activation Techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oil sands coke is a by-product resulting from the upgrading of heavy crude bitumen to light synthetic oil. This research investigates the preparation of activated… (more)

Morshed, Golam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Tevatron injection timing  

SciTech Connect

Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

NETL: Carbon Storage - NETL Carbon Capture and Storage Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS Database CCS Database Carbon Storage NETL's Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage Database - Version 4 Welcome to NETL's Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) Database. The database includes active, proposed, canceled, and terminated CCUS projects worldwide. Information in the database regarding technologies being developed for capture, evaluation of sites for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, estimation of project costs, and anticipated dates of completion is sourced from publically available information. The CCUS Database provides the public with information regarding efforts by various industries, public groups, and governments towards development and eventual deployment of CCUS technology. As of November 2012, the database contained 268 CCUS projects worldwide. The 268 projects include 68 capture, 61 storage, and 139 for capture and storage in more than 30 countries across 6 continents. While most of the projects are still in the planning and development stage, or have recently been proposed, 37 are actively capturing and injecting CO2

144

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and gas, have caused a substantial increase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil-caused CO2 emissions and to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. 2.0 What is carbon sequestration? The term "carbon sequestration" is used to describe both natural and deliberate CARBON,INGIGATONSPERYEAR 1.5 Fossil

145

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion  

SciTech Connect

The first project objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO2) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second project objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. All work during the second quarter falls within the demonstration project.

Czirr, Kirk

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

146

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion  

SciTech Connect

The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing, waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. This report includes work on the reservoir characterization and project design objective and the demonstration project objective.

NONE

1996-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

147

Structure and Oxidation Activity Correlations for Carbon Blacks and Diesel Soot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work focuses on a comprehensive investigation of structure–activity relationships for a diesel engine soot sample (Corning) and 10 commercially available carbon black samples. ... Su and colleagues used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to study the relation between the microstructure and oxidation behavior of soot from exhausts of different heavy-duty diesel engines and discovered the microstructure-controlled oxidation behavior of diesel soot. ... FE-SEM images (see Figure S1 of the Supporting Information) of some carbon blacks (Monarch 1400, Monarch 280, and Printex-U) and diesel soot-1 show the agglomerates, which are composed of their fundamental units called primary particles. ...

Lakshitha Pahalagedara; Hom Sharma; Chung-Hao Kuo; Saminda Dharmarathna; Ameya Joshi; Steven L. Suib; Ashish B. Mhadeshwar

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

148

PT AND PT/NI "NEEDLE" ELETROCATALYSTS ON CARBON NANOTUBES WITH HIGH ACTIVITY FOR THE ORR  

SciTech Connect

Platinum and platinum/nickel alloy electrocatalysts supported on graphitized (gCNT) or nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (nCNT) are prepared and characterized. Pt deposition onto carbon nanotubes results in Pt 'needle' formations that are 3.5 nm in diameter and {approx}100 nm in length. Subsequent Ni deposition and heat treatment results in PtNi 'needles' with an increased diameter. All Pt and Pt/Ni materials were tested as electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The Pt and Pt/Ni catalysts showed excellent performance for the ORR, with the heat treated PtNi/gCNT (1.06 mA/cm{sup 2}) and PtNi/nCNT (0.664 mA/cm{sup 2}) showing the highest activity.

Colon-Mercado, H.

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

149

Injectivity Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test Injectivity Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Injectivity Test Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Permeability of the well Thermal: Dictionary.png Injectivity Test: A well testing technique conducted upon completion of a well. Water is pumped into the well at a constant rate until a stable pressure is reached then the pump is turned off and the rate at which pressure decreases is measured. The pressure measurements are graphed and well permeability can

150

Evaluation of the effects of contaminant injection location and injection method on the determination of overall relative room ventilation efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Calculation of zeroeth moment Calculation of first moment. . 29 30 Diagram of flows in and out of a perfectly mixed room. 30 Floor plan of test room. 31 Carbon dioxide concentration versus time for supply... duct injection point and pulse injection method. 32 Example of use of moments to determine mean age of air. . . . 29 Figure 7. Carbon dioxide concentration versus time for short circuit injection point and pulse injection method. 32 Figure 8...

Pierce, Stephen Dale

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Analysis of condensate banking dynamics in a gas condensate reservoir under different injection schemes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

condensate reservoir under natural depletion, and injection of methane, injection of carbon dioxide, produced gas recycling and water injection. To monitor the condensate banking dynamics near the wellbore area, such as oil saturation and compositional...

Sandoval Rodriguez, Angelica Patricia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Uptake of Reactive Black 5 by pumice and walnut activated carbon: Chemistry and adsorption mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The potential of using pumice and walnut wood activated carbon as low-cost adsorbents for the removal of the diazo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) from aqueous solutions was investigated. The Langmuir isotherm fit to the data specified the presence of two different natures of adsorption sites with different binding energies on the AC-W surface. Kinetic modelling showed that the adsorption behaviour and mechanism of RB5 for both adsorbents is believed to happen via surface adsorption followed by diffusion into the pores of the AC-W and pumice. The main adsorption mechanisms are hydrogen bonding, electrostatic bonding and n–? interactions.

Behzad Heibati; Susana Rodriguez-Couto; Abdeltif Amrane; Mohd. Rafatullah; Alaa Hawari; Mohammad A. Al-Ghouti

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Mineral Carbonation. Abstract: Carbonation of formation minerals converts low viscosity supercritical CO2 injected into deep saline reservoirs for geologic sequestration...

154

Quantification of substitutional carbon loss from Si0.998C0.002 due to silicon self-interstitial injection during oxidation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of crystalline silicon. The Si1 xCx layer was grown at 550 °C and 10 Torr using 50 sccm of a disilane mixture 10% disilane in hydrogen and 20 sccm of methylsilane 1% methylsilane in hydrogen as the silicon and carbon

155

Synthesis and reactivity of sterically congested metallacyclobutenes and metal-mediated carbon-sulfur bond activation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methods for this conversion typically involve the production of byproducts like carbon monoxide and hydrogen

Vélez, Carmen L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Magnesium oxide nanoparticles on green activated carbon as efficient CO{sub 2} adsorbent  

SciTech Connect

This study was focused on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) adsorption ability using Magnesium oxide (MgO) nanoparticles and MgO nanoparticles supported activated carbon based bamboo (BAC). The suitability of MgO as a good CO{sub 2} adsorbent was clarified using Thermodynamic considerations (Gibbs-Helmholtz relationship). The ?H and ?G of this reaction were ? 117.5 kJ?mol{sup ?1} and ? 65.4 kJ?mol{sup ?1}, respectively, at standard condition (298 K and 1 atm). The complete characterization of these adsorbent were conducted by using BET, XRD, FTIR, TEM and TPD?CO{sub 2}. The surface areas for MgO nanoparticles and MgO nanoparticles supported BAC were 297.1 m{sup 2}/g and 702.5 m{sup 2}/g, respectively. The MgO nanoparticles supported BAC shown better physical and chemical adsorption ability with 39.8 cm{sup 3}/g and 6.5 mmol/g, respectively. The combination of MgO nanoparticle and BAC which previously prepared by chemical method can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions as well as better CO{sub 2} adsorption behavior. Overall, our results indicate that nanoparticles of MgO on BAC posses unique surface chemistry and their high surface reactivity coupled with high surface area allowed them to approach the goal as an efficient CO{sub 2} adsorbent.

Wan Isahak, Wan Nor Roslam; Ramli, Zatil Amali Che; Mohamed Hisham, Mohamed Wahab; Yarmo, Mohd Ambar [Low Carbon Economy (LCE) Research Group, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

157

Structural basis of the oxidative activation of the carboxysomal [gamma]-carbonic anhydrase, CcmM  

SciTech Connect

Cyanobacterial RuBisCO is sequestered in large, icosahedral, protein-bounded microcompartments called carboxysomes. Bicarbonate is pumped into the cytosol, diffuses into the carboxysome through small pores in its shell, and is then converted to CO{sub 2} by carbonic anhydrase (CA) prior to fixation. Paradoxically, many {beta}-cyanobacteria, including Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1, lack the conventional carboxysomal {beta}-CA, ccaA. The N-terminal domain of the carboxysomal protein CcmM is homologous to {gamma}-CA from Methanosarcina thermophila (Cam) but recombinant CcmM derived from ccaA-containing cyanobacteria show no CA activity. We demonstrate here that either full length CcmM from T. elongatus, or a construct truncated after 209 residues (CcmM209), is active as a CA - the first catalytically active bacterial {gamma}-CA reported. The 2.0 {angstrom} structure of CcmM209 reveals a trimeric, left-handed {beta}-helix structure that closely resembles Cam, except that residues 198-207 form a third {alpha}-helix stabilized by an essential Cys194-Cys200 disulfide bond. Deleting residues 194-209 (CcmM193) results in an inactive protein whose 1.1 {angstrom} structure shows disordering of the N- and C-termini, and reorganization of the trimeric interface and active site. Under reducing conditions, CcmM209 is similarly partially disordered and inactive as a CA. CcmM protein in fresh E. coli cell extracts is inactive, implying that the cellular reducing machinery can reduce and inactivate CcmM, while diamide, a thiol oxidizing agent, activates the enzyme. Thus, like membrane-bound eukaryotic cellular compartments, the {beta}-carboxysome appears to be able to maintain an oxidizing interior by precluding the entry of thioredoxin and other endogenous reducing agents.

Peña, Kerry L.; Castel, Stephane E.; de Araujo, Charlotte; Espie, George S.; Kimber, Matthew S. (Guelph); (Toronto)

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

158

Intention to change activities that reduce carbon dioxide emissions related to worry about global climate change consequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Introduction Mitigating the global climate change requires actions at different levels including that lay people change their consumption patterns, which cause emissions of greenhouse gases. Recent research suggests that inducing affects such as fear and worry may have positive effects. Objective To investigate whether worry in addition to personalized information about emissions of carbon dioxide would influence lay people's intentions to change consumption-related personal activities causing carbon-dioxide emissions. Method A municipality-provided tool to calculate their annual carbon dioxide emissions was used by 135 university students who after being informed about negative consequences of global climate change stated their intentions to change a number of personal activities to reduce carbon dioxide emissions during the following 12 months. They also rated how worried they were about eight global climate change consequences. Results Intentions to change travel, energy use at home, food consumption, involvement in environmental organizations, and support of environmental policies increased with worry. An interaction was also observed such that high-emitters’ intentions to invest in energy-efficient infrastructure increased more with worry than did low- and medium-emitters’ intentions. Conclusions In line with recent research positing that affect increases preventive actions, the hypothesis was supported that intentions to change personal activities to reduce carbon dioxide emissions increased with participants’ worry about the consequences of global climate change.

E.-L. Sundblad; A. Biel; T. Gärling

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Effect of active layer thickness on differential quantum efficiency of 1. 3 and 1. 55. mu. m InGaAsP injection lasers  

SciTech Connect

The dependence of differential quantum efficiency (eta/sub d/) on active layer thickness (d) for 1.3 and 1.55 ..mu..m InGaAsP buried crescent (BC) injection lasers has been measured. A comparison of the results shows that eta/sub d/ for 1.55 ..mu..m lasers increases more rapidly with decreasing d than eta/sub d/ for 1.3 ..mu..m lasers. The significantly different dependence of eta/sub d/ on d in BC lasers suggests that the optical absorption in the active region of InGaAsP lasers is strongly wavelength dependent. This gives the important practical conclusion that the eta/sub d/ for 1.55 ..mu..m lasers can be significantly improved by reducing d, whereas the eta/sub d/ for 1.3 ..mu..m lasers can only be slightly improved by reducing d. As a result of eta/sub d/ vs d investigation, we have obtained high performance 1.3 and 1.55 ..mu..m BC lasers which exhibit threshold currents as low as 9 mA at 25 /sup 0/C, high-temperature operation (up to 100 /sup 0/C), and eta/sub d/ over 65% (1.3 ..mu..m) and 45% (1.55 ..mu..m).

Cheng, W.H.; Su, C.B.; Renner, D.

1987-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

160

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon fluidized-bed Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies 16 PRODUCTION OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES BY MEANS OF FLUIDIZED BED PYROLYSIS OF VIRGIN OR RECYCLED POLYMERS Summary: PRODUCTION OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES BY...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect

The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting new regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. These regulations are directed at the existing fleet of nearly 1,100 boilers. These plants are relatively old with an average age of over 40 years. Although most of these units are capable of operating for many additional years, there is a desire to minimize large capital expenditures because of the reduced (and unknown) remaining life of the plant to amortize the project. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. This is the final site report for tests conducted at Laramie River Station Unit 3, one of five sites evaluated in this DOE/NETL program. The overall objective of the test program is to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at five plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, and AEP's Conesville Station Unit 6. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The goals for the program established by DOE/NETL are to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the benchmark established by DOE of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The goals of the program were exceeded at Laramie River Station by achieving over 90% mercury removal at a sorbent cost of $3,980/lb ($660/oz) mercury removed for a coal mercury content of 7.9 lb/TBtu.

Sharon Sjostrom

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Kinetics Of Carbon Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kinetics Of Carbon Gasification ... The steam–carbon reaction, which is the essential reaction of the gasification processes of carbon-based feed stocks (e.g., coal and biomass), produces synthesis gas (H2 + CO), a synthetically flexible, environmentally benign energy source. ... Coal Gasification in CO2 and Steam:? Development of a Steam Injection Facility for High-Pressure Wire-Mesh Reactors ...

C. W. Zielke; Everett. Gorin

1957-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Influence of Chemical and Physical Properties of Activated Carbon Powders on Oxygen Reduction and Microbial Fuel Cell Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resource. Cathode materials can account for 47-75% of the MFC capital costs,5 and therefore it is important to choose less expensive materials as the cathode catalyst. Several catalysts have been considered for useInfluence of Chemical and Physical Properties of Activated Carbon Powders on Oxygen Reduction

164

Microfluidic sieve using intertwined, free-standing carbon nanotube mesh as active medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfluidic sieve having a substrate with a microfluidic channel, and a carbon nanotube mesh. The carbon nanotube mesh is formed from a plurality of intertwined free-standing carbon nanotubes which are fixedly attached within the channel for separating, concentrating, and/or filtering molecules flowed through the channel. In one embodiment, the microfluidic sieve is fabricated by providing a substrate having a microfluidic channel, and growing the intertwined free-standing carbon nanotubes from within the channel to produce the carbon nanotube mesh attached within the channel.

Bakajin, Olgica (San Leandro, CA); Noy, Aleksandr (Belmont, CA)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

165

Iodine Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins and Activated Carbons– Batch Testing  

SciTech Connect

Iodine sorption onto seven resins and six carbon materials was evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36 on the Hanford Site. These materials were tested using a range of solution-to-solid ratios. The test results are as follows: • The efficacy of the resin and granular activated carbon materials was less than predicted based on manufacturers’ performance data. It is hypothesized that this is due to the differences in speciation previously determined for Hanford groundwater. • The sorption of iodine is affected by the iodine species in the source water. Iodine loading on resins using source water ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 189.9 to 227.0 mL/g. The sorption values when the iodine is converted to iodide ranged from 2.75 to 5.90 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 536.3 to 2979.6 mL/g. It is recommended that methods to convert iodine to iodide be investigated in fiscal year (FY) 2015. • The chemicals used to convert iodine to iodate adversely affected the sorption of iodine onto the carbon materials. Using as-received source water, loading and Kd values ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g and 189.8 to 226.3 mL/g respectively. After treatment, loading and Kd values could not be calculated because there was little change between the initial and final iodine concentration. It is recommended the cause of the decrease in iodine sorption be investigated in FY15. • In direct support of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has evaluated samples from within the 200W pump and treat bioreactors. As part of this analysis, pictures taken within the bioreactor reveal a precipitate that, based on physical properties and known aqueous chemistry, is hypothesized to be iron pyrite or chalcopyrite, which could affect iodine adsorption. It is recommended these materials be tested at different solution-to-solid ratios in FY15 to determine their effect on iodine sorption.

Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

A Comparison of Oxygen-vacancy Effect on Activity Behaviors of Carbon Dioxide and Steam Reforming of Methane over Supported Nickel Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comparison of the activity behaviors of the mechanistically similar reactions of carbon dioxide reforming and steam reforming of methane was carried out at 400?550 °C ... show that the activity behaviors of car...

Ta-Jen Huang; Han-Jun Lin; Tien-Chun Yu

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Kinetic and equilibrium adsorption of methylene blue and remazol dyes onto steam-activated carbons developed from date pits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Steam-activated carbons DS2 and DS5 were prepared by gasifying 600 °C-date pits carbonization products with steam at 950 °C to burn-off = 20 and 50%, respectively. The textural properties of these carbons were determined from the nitrogen adsorption at ?196 °C. The chemistry of the carbon surface was determined from the surface pH and from neutralization of the surface carbon–oxygen groups of basic and acidic type. The kinetic and equilibrium adsorption of MB and RY on DS2 and DS5 was determined at 27 and 37 °C and at initial sorption solution pH 3–7. DS2 and DS5 have expanded surface area, large total pore volume and contain both micro and mesoporosity. They have on their surface basic and acidic groups of different strength and functionality. This enhanced the sorption of the cationic dye (MB) and of the anionic dye (RY). The adsorption of MB and RY on DS2 and DS5 involves intraparticle diffusion and followed pseudo-second order kinetics. The adsorption isotherms were applicable to the Langmuir isotherm and high monolayer capacities for MB and RY dyes were evaluated indicating the high efficiencies of the carbons for dye adsorption.

Sheikha S. Ashour

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Field Trip Guide to Serpentinite, Silica-Carbonate Alteration, and Related Hydrothermal Activity in the Clear Lake Region, California  

SciTech Connect

This guide is designed to familiarize scientists with the geology, structure, alteration, and fluids typical of California serpentinites for purposes of carbon dioxide sequestration (Lackner et al., 1995). Goff et al. (1997) and Goff and Lackner (1998) describe the geology and geochemistry of some of the serpentinites from this area. Mechanisms of silica-carbonate alteration were outlined by Barnes et al. (1973). Donnelly-Nolan et al. (1993) most recently reviewed relations between regional hydrothermal alteration and Quarternary volcanic activity. Stanley et al. (1998) summarized geophysical characteristics of the region.

Fraser Goff; George Guthrie

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

C/H{sub 2}O reaction under supercritical conditions and their repercussions in the preparation of activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

Two chars prepared by carbonization of oak wood and anthracite were used to perform a comparative study of the gasification with supercritical water (SCW) and with steam. This work reports the effects of the type of char, the activating agent, temperature, flow rate, and particle size employed on the kinetics, mechanism of reaction, and the characteristics of the activated carbons obtained. The results show that the reactivity of the two chars is much higher with SCW than with steam. Although this increase can be explained in terms of the greater penetration of SCW and diffusional effects in the pore structure of the chars, some aspects suggest a possible change in the mechanism of reaction favored by the formation of clusters in SCW. The evolution of porosity was also found to differ when the char was gasified with SCW and with steam, being governed strongly by the starting material. When the oak char was activated with SCW, the smallest microporosity was broadened from the very first moments due to its very open pore structure, providing carbons with larger micropores and some mesoporosity. In contrast, in the case of the anthracite char, with a narrower pore structure, the evolution of the porosity was slower and less uniform, favoring external gasification of the particle. Accordingly, the carbons had a broader distribution of micropores, and mesoporosity was scarce.

Salvador, F.; Senchez-Montero, M.J.; Izquierdo, C. [University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Total oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane over transition metal-fluorite oxide composite catalysts. I. Catalyst composition and activity  

SciTech Connect

A novel metal oxide composite catalyst for the total oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane was prepared by combining fluorite oxides with active transition metals. The fluorite oxides, such as ceria and zirconia, are oxygen-ion-conducting materials having catalytic properties usually at high temperatures. Active base metal catalysts, such as copper, were used as additives to promote the catalytic properties of these oxides. The contact of the two types of materials gave rise to a high active oxidation catalyst. At a space velocity of about 42,000 h{sup {minus}1}, complete carbon monoxide oxidation in air occurred at room temperature on the Au{sub 0.05}[Ce(La)]{sub 0.95}L{sub x} catalyst and at ca. 100{degrees}C on Cu-Ce-O composite catalysts. At the same space velocity, total oxidation of methane on the Cu-Ce-O catalyst doped with La{sub 2}O{sub 3} or SrO took place at ca. 550{degrees}C. The specific carbon monoxide oxidation activity of the Cu-Ce-O catalyst was several orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional copper-based catalysts and comparable or superior to platinum catalysts. This type of composite catalyst also showed excellent resistance to water vapor poisoning. The enhanced catalyst activity and stability resulted from strong interaction of the transition metal and fluorite oxide materials. 44 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, F. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)] [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanism of dense vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition method was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques.

Takashima, A.

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

172

Enhanced photocatalytic activity of nano titanium dioxide coated on ethanol-soluble carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Homogenous and dense spreading of TiO{sub 2} on surface modified CNTs and improved photocatalytic performance of TiO{sub 2} was achieved by coupling TiO{sub 2} with ethanol-soluble CNTs. Display Omitted Highlights: ? Ethanol-soluble CNTs were acquired by surface modification. ? Enhanced photoactivity of TiO{sub 2} coated on modified CNTs was obtained. ? Improved activity of TiO{sub 2} is attributed to the intimate contact between TiO{sub 2} and CNTs. ? Dense heterojunctions through Ti–O–CNTs at the interface is proposed. -- Abstract: Surface functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with ethanol solubility were synthesized and the CNTs–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites were prepared by coupling of TiO{sub 2} with modified CNTs through a sol–gel method. The as-prepared CNTs and composites were characterized and the composite samples were evaluated for their photocatalytic activity toward the degradation of aqueous methyl orange. It is showed that the acid oxidation of CNTs leads to the embedding of oxygenated functional groups, and as a result, the acid-treated CNTs in turn may serve as chemical reactors for subsequent covalent grafting of octadecylamine. Improved photocatalytic performance of CNTs–TiO{sub 2} composites was obtained, which is mainly attributed to the high dispersion of TiO{sub 2} on ethanol-soluble CNTs and the intimate contact between TiO{sub 2} and CNTs resulted from the dense heterojunctions through the Ti-O-C structure at the interface between TiO{sub 2} and CNTs.

Fu, Xiaofei [Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resource Development on Shallow Lakes, Ministry of Education, College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resource Development on Shallow Lakes, Ministry of Education, College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Yang, Hanpei, E-mail: yanghanpei@hhu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resource Development on Shallow Lakes, Ministry of Education, College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resource Development on Shallow Lakes, Ministry of Education, College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); He, Kuanyan; Zhang, Yingchao; Wu, Junming [Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resource Development on Shallow Lakes, Ministry of Education, College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resource Development on Shallow Lakes, Ministry of Education, College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Letters to the editor / Carbon 40 (2002) 445467 447 using continuous carbon-fiber carbon-matrix and polymeruntreated fibers are used. The activation treatment does not  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the electrical additive is added to the electrochemically active species in resistivity of the MnO cathode-matrix and polymer­untreated fibers are used. The activation treatment does not matrix composites. Comp Part B: Eng X, Chung DDL. Submicron diameter nickel filaments[1] Chung DDL. Materials for electromagnetic

Chung, Deborah D.L.

174

Injectivity Test At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Benoit, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Benoit, Et Al., 2000) Exploration Activity Details...

175

Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity...

176

Modeling polychlorinated biphenyl mass transfer after amendment of contaminated sediment with activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

The sorption kinetics and concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in historically polluted sediment is modeled to assess a remediation strategy based on in situ PCB sequestration by mixing with activated carbon (AC). The authors extend their evaluation of a model based on intraparticle diffusion by including a biomimetic semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) and a first-order degradation rate for the aqueous phase. The model predictions are compared with the previously reported experimental PCB concentrations in the bulk water phase and in SPMDs. The simulated scenarios comprise a marine and a freshwater sediment, four PCB congeners, two AC grain sizes, four doses of AC, and comparison with laboratory experiments. The modeling approach distinguishes between two different sediment particles types: a light-density fraction representing carbonaceous particles such as charcoal, coal, coke, cenospheres, or wood, and a heavy-density fraction representing the mineral phase with coatings of organic matter. A third particle type in the numerical model is AC. The model qualitatively reproduces the observed shifts in the PCB distribution during repartitioning after AC amendment but overestimates the overall effect of the treatment in reducing aqueous and SPMD concentrations of PCBs by a factor of 2-6. For the AC application in sediment, competitive sorption of the various solutes apparently requires a reduction by a factor of 16 of the literature values for the AC-water partitioning coefficient measured in pure aqueous systems. With this correction, model results and measurements agree within a factor of 3. After AC amendment is homogeneously mixed into the sediment and then left undisturbed, aqueous PCB concentrations tend toward the same reduction after 5 years. 19 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

David Werner; Upal Ghosh; Richard G. Luthy [University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Modification of Y Zeolite with Alkaline Treatment: Textural Properties and Catalytic Activity for Diethyl Carbonate Synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) Compared to dimethyl carbonate (DMC) and ethanol, DEC has been proposed as a potential fuel oxygenate additive to replace methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) because of its high oxygen content (40.6 wt %) and favorable fuel/water partition coefficient. ... For CuY using untreated zeolite as a support, there were only two H2-comsumption peaks at 473 and 681 K, ascribed to the Cu+ located on sites III? and II. ... Dunn, B. C.; Guenneau, C.; Hilton, S. A.; Pahnke, J.; Eyring, E. M.Production of diethyl carbonate from ethanol and carbon monoxide over a heterogeneous catalyst Energy Fuels 2002, 16, 177– 181 ...

Shouying Huang; Pengzhen Chen; Bing Yan; Shengping Wang; Yongli Shen; Xinbin Ma

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

178

Modeling high-pressure adsorption of gas mixtures on activated carbon and coal using a simplified local-density model  

SciTech Connect

The simplified local-density (SLD) theory was investigated regarding its ability to provide accurate representations and predictions of high-pressure supercritical adsorption isotherms encountered in coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration. Attention was focused on the ability of the SLD theory to predict mixed-gas adsorption solely on the basis of information from pure gas isotherms using a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS). An extensive set of high-pressure adsorption measurements was used in this evaluation. These measurements included pure and binary mixture adsorption measurements for several gas compositions up to 14 MPa for Calgon F-400 activated carbon and three water-moistened coals. Also included were ternary measurements for the activated carbon and one coal. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} on dry activated carbon, the SLD-PR can predict the component mixture adsorption within about 2.2 times the experimental uncertainty on average solely on the basis of pure-component adsorption isotherms. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} on two of the three wet coals, the SLD-PR model can predict the component adsorption within the experimental uncertainties on average for all feed fractions (nominally molar compositions of 20/80, 40/60, 60/40, and 80/20) of the three binary gas mixture combinations, although predictions for some specific feed fractions are outside of their experimental uncertainties.

Fitzgerald, J.E.; Robinson, R.L.; Gasem, K.A.M. [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States). School of Chemical Engineering

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon hollow Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

titania Summary: : A general, one-step and template-free route to rattle-type hollow carbon spheres and their application... . Zhang: A simple template-free approach to TiO2...

180

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Annual report, June 3, 1994--October 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The work reported here covers Budget Phase I of the project. The principal tasks in Budget Phase I are the Reservoir Analysis and Characterization Task and the Advanced Technology Definition Task. Completion of these tasks have enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed and evaluated from an economic and risk analysis standpoint. Field implementation of the project has been recommended to the working interest owner of the South Cowden Unit (SCU) and approval has been obtained. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative CO{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take or pay requirements, CO{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate crude oil price) and gas recycle agreements (expensing cost as opposed to large capital investments for compression) were negotiated to further improve project economics. A detailed reservoir characterization study was completed by an integrated team of geoscientists and engineers. The study consisted of detailed core description, integration of log response to core descriptions, mapping of the major flow units, evaluation of porosity and permeability relationships, geostatistical analysis of permeability trends, and direct integration of reservoir performance with the geological interpretation. The study methodology fostered iterative bidirectional feedback between the reservoir characterization team and the reservoir engineering/simulation team to allow simultaneous refinement and convergence of the geological interpretation with the reservoir model. The fundamental conclusion from the study is that South Cowden exhibits favorable enhanced oil recovery characteristics, particularly reservoir quality and continuity.

Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Gerard, M.G.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

MODELING POWDERED SORBENT INJECTION IN COMBINATION WITHE FABRIC FILTER FOR THE CONTROL OF MERCURY EMISSIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWDERED SORBENT INJECTION IN POWDERED SORBENT INJECTION IN COMBINATION WITH FABRIC FILTER FOR THE CONTROL OF MERCURY EMISSIONS Joseph R. V. Flora Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 Richard A. Hargis, William J. O'Dowd, Henry W. Pennline National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box, 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 Radisav D. Vidic * Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 ABSTRACT A two-stage mathematical model for mercury removal using powdered activated carbon injection upstream of a baghouse filter was developed, with the first stage accounting for removal in the ductwork and the second stage accounting for additional removal due to the

182

ENHANCEMENT OF ADSORPTION CAPACITY BY USE OF PHASE CHANGE MATERIAL (PCM) AS ADDITIVE IN AN ACTIVATED CARBON (AC) FIXED BED ADSORBER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To avoid emission of volatile hydrocarbons from automotive tank systems, canisters filled with activated carbon (AC) are placed as a buffer to the environment. During the loading of the filter the heat of adsorpt...

W. ZIMMERMANN; J.U. KELLER

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Rich catalytic injection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

Veninger, Albert (Coventry, CT)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

The 1994 Sefidabeh (eastern Iran) earthquakes revisited: new evidence from satellite radar interferometry and carbonate dating about the growth of an active fold above a blind thrust fault  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......in those places where active folds do not necessarily...was done using a cold cathode Technosyn instrument...structural development of active fault and fold systems...14C ages for carbonate materials from Lakes Lahontan and...Dinklage W.S., 1998. Active tectonics at Wheeler......

B. Parsons; T. Wright; P. Rowe; J. Andrews; J. Jackson; R. Walker; M. Khatib; M. Talebian; E. Bergman; E. R. Engdahl

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says August 31, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas.

186

Controlled air injection for a fuel cell system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for injecting oxygen into a fuel cell reformate stream to reduce the level of carbon monoxide while preserving the level of hydrogen in a fuel cell system.

Fronk, Matthew H. (Honeove Falls, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ammonium Concentrations in Produced Waters from a Mesothermic Oil Field Subjected to Nitrate Injection Decrease through Formation of Denitrifying Biomass and Anammox Activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sulfate- and nitrate-reducing bacteria from an oil field in Argentina. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 74: 4324-4335. 12 Haveman...injection, p. 370-388. In J. D. Wall et al. (ed.), Bioenergy. ASM Press, Washington, DC. 39 Voordouw, G., A. A...

Sabrina L. Cornish Shartau; Marcy Yurkiw; Shiping Lin; Aleksandr A. Grigoryan; Adewale Lambo; Hyung-Soo Park; Bart P. Lomans; Erwin van der Biezen; Mike S. M. Jetten; Gerrit Voordouw

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

188

8,993,963 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of December 17, 2014...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed...

189

9,030,305 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 6, 2015 ...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed...

190

Fluoride enhances transfection activity of carbonate apatite by increasing cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: {yields} Cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA is enhanced by fluoride incorporation into carbonate apatite carrier. {yields} Fluoridated carbonate apatite promotes a robust increase in transgene expression. {yields} Controlled dissolution of fluoridated carbonate apatite in endosomal acidic environment might buffer the endosomes and prevent degradation of the released DNA. -- Abstract: Intracellular delivery of a functional gene or a nucleic acid sequence to specifically knockdown a harmful gene is a potential approach to precisely treat a critical human disease. The intensive efforts in the last few decades led to the development of a number of viral and non-viral synthetic vectors. However, an ideal delivery tool in terms of the safety and efficacy has yet to be established. Recently, we have developed pH-sensing inorganic nanocrystals of carbonate apatite for efficient and cell-targeted delivery of gene and gene-silencing RNA. Here we show that addition of very low level of fluoride to the particle-forming medium facilitates a robust increase in transgene expression following post-incubation of the particles with HeLa cells. Confocal microscopic observation and Southern blotting prove the cytoplasmic existence of plasmid DNA delivered by likely formed fluoridated carbonate apatite particles while degradation of plasmid DNA presumably by cytoplasmic nucleases was noticed following delivery with apatite particles alone. The beneficial role of fluoride in enhancing carbonate apatite-mediated gene expression might be due to the buffering potential of generated fluoridated apatite in endosomal acidic environment, thereby increasing the half-life of delivered plasmid DNA.

Chowdhury, E.H., E-mail: md.ezharul.hoque@med.monash.edu.my [Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Sunway Campus, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

191

Studies of adsorption characteristics of activated carbons down to 4.5 K for the development of cryosorption pumps for fusion systems  

SciTech Connect

Cryosorption pump is the only possible device to pump helium, hydrogen and its isotopes in fusion environment, such as high magnetic field and high plasma temperatures. Activated carbons are known to be the most suitable adsorbent in the development of cryosorption pumps. For this purpose, the data of adsorption characteristics of activated carbons in the temperature range 4.5 K to 77 K are needed, but are not available in the literature. For obtaining the above data, a commercial micro pore analyzer operating at 77 K has been integrated with a two stage GM cryocooler, which enables the cooling of the sample temperature down to 4.5 K. A heat switch mounted between the second stage cold head and the sample chamber helps to raise the sample chamber temperature to 77 K without affecting the performance of the cryocooler. The detailed description of this system is presented elsewhere. This paper presents the results of experimental studies of adsorption isotherms measured on different types of activated carbons in the form of granules, globules, flake knitted and non-woven types in the temperature range 4.5 K to 10 K using Helium gas as the adsorbate. The above results are analyzed to obtain the pore size distributions and surface areas of the activated carbons. The effect of adhesive used for bonding the activated carbons to the panels is also studied. These results will be useful to arrive at the right choice of activated carbon to be used for the development of cryosorption pumps.

Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, U.; Vivek, G. A. [Centre for Cryogenic Technology, Indian institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Krishnamoorthy, V.; Gangradey, R. [Cryopump Group, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Udgata, S. S.; Tripati, V. S. [I-Design Engineering Solutions Ltd., Ubale Nagar, Wagholi, Pune 412207 (India)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

192

Pore Size Analysis of Activated Carbons from Argon and Nitrogen Porosimetry Using Density Functional Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Form: December 28, 1999 We present isotherms calculated from density functional theory. A similar set of density functional theory isotherms, previously reported for nitrogen adsorption on carbon Functional Theory Robert J. Dombrowski, Daniel R. Hyduke, and Christian M. Lastoskie* Department of Chemical

Lastoskie, Christian M.

193

Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube Arrays with High Electrocatalytic Activity for Oxygen Reduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Institute for the Development and Commercialization...ORR) at the cathode of fuel cells...carbon as an electrocatalyst for the four-electron...led to the development of new ORR electrocatalysts...Nanotechnology: Recent Developments in Chemistry...reduction at the cathode in a direct...poisoning the ORR electrocatalyst by CO-like...

Kuanping Gong; Feng Du; Zhenhai Xia; Michael Durstock; Liming Dai

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

194

Resonantly pumped optical pumping injection cavity lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An optical parametric oscillator is tuned to the resonance wavelength of the etalon in an optical pumping injection cavity (OPIC) laser with a type-II "W" active region, thereby minimizing the threshold pump intensity and ...

Santilli, Michael Robert; McAlpine, T. C.; Greene, K. R.; Olafsen, L. J.; Bewley, W. W.; Felix, C. L.; Vurgaftman, I.; Meyer, J. R.; Lee, H.; Martinelli, R. U.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect

The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting new regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. These regulations are directed at the existing fleet of nearly 1,100 boilers. These plants are relatively old with an average age of over 40 years. Although most of these units are capable of operating for many additional years, there is a desire to minimize large capital expenditures because of the reduced (and unknown) remaining life of the plant to amortize the project. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. This is the final site report for tests conducted at DTE Energy's Monroe Power Plant, one of five sites evaluated in this DOE/NETL program. The overall objective of the test program was to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at five plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, and AEP's Conesville Station Unit 6. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The goals for the program established by DOE/NETL were to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the target established by DOE of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The results from Monroe indicate that using DARCO{reg_sign} Hg would result in higher mercury removal (80%) at a sorbent cost of $18,000/lb mercury, or 70% lower than the benchmark. These results demonstrate that the goals established by DOE/NETL were exceeded during this test program. The increase in mercury removal over baseline conditions is defined for this program as a comparison in the outlet emissions measured using the Ontario Hydro method during the baseline and long-term test periods. The change in outlet emissions from baseline to long-term testing was 81%.

Sharon Sjostrom

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Estimation of point of zero charge for activated carbon treated with atmospheric pressure non-thermal oxygen plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercial activated carbon was treated with a non-thermal oxygen plasma under atmospheric pressure using three types of reactors: a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) parallel-plate reactor; an atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma jet reactor and a DBD coaxial type reactor. The samples treated with the plasma were characterized by the pH value at the point of zero charge. An estimation of the adsorption properties of samples for copper ions in aqueous solution was also carried out in order to explain the effect of pH value on the adsorption results.

Satoshi Kodama; Hidetoshi Sekiguchi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Hydrogen storage in multilayer carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multilayer carbon nanotubes obtained by pyrolysis and mechanical activation of plant-derived amorphous carbon are excellent sorbents for hydrogen.

D. V. Onishchenko; V. P. Reva; V. G. Kuryavyi

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Remarkable catalytic activity of cobalt tetraphenylporphyrin modified on a titania for the oxidation of carbon monoxide below room temperature  

SciTech Connect

CoTPP on TiO/sub 2/-120s modified at 250 /sup 0/C under vacuum catalytically oxidized carbon monoxide rapidly with oxygen even at -79/sup 0/C. Its catalytic activity was incomparably higher than that of commercial Hopcalite. Comparison of its catalytic performance with those of the same catalyst or different TiO/sub 2/ supporting catalyst both evacuated at 200 /sup 0/C revealed unique features of the present catalyst in terms of its oxygen adsorption, the poisoning of adsorbed oxygen, and the insolubility of the complex in benzene. Both significant structural modification of the complex and its strong interaction with properly dehydrated TiO/sub 2/-120s brought about by evacuation at 250 /sup 0/C may induce such extraordinary activity. 14 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

Mochida, I.; Iwai, Y.; Kamo, T.; Fujitsu, H.

1985-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

199

Selective adsorption of tert-butylmercaptan and tetrahydrothiophene on modified activated carbons for fuel processing in fuel cell applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effects of surface oxidation and KOH impregnation on activated carbon for the selective adsorption of tert-butylmercaptan (TBM) and tetrahydrothiophene (THT) present in natural fuel gas were studied. Physicochemical properties of the adsorbents were characterized by N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and surface pH measurements. Oxidation treatments by HNO3 or H2O2 gave rise to considerable increases in both TBM and THT adsorption capacity, about a threefold enhancement from those on pristine activated carbon. Notably, it was found that the oxidative modifications led to an enhancement in THT adsorption selectivity, whereas KOH impregnation led to a marked increase in TBM adsorption selectivity. The properties of the adsorption sites and the adsorption strength of TBM and THT on the sites were characterized. These results agree well with the experimental sulfur adsorption capacities of the samples and can be explained by an adsorption model proposed in this work.

Phuoc Hoang Ho; So-Yun Lee; Doohwan Lee; Hee-Chul Woo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The effect of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of dissolved organic matter and atrazine on granular activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

The influence of water temperature on the adsorption of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) on activated carbon has not been investigated intensively yet. In this study, batch experiments with granular activated carbon (GAC) F300, from bituminous coal, have been carried out at three temperatures (5, 20, 35{sup o} C) using a humic acid model water and different types of surface water (lake, river, canal). Furthermore, the adsorption of an anthropogenic contaminant, atrazine, was quantified in the absence and presence of DOM. The results indicate a significant influence of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of DOM and atrazine. Contrary to expectations, DOM and atrazine adsorption in surface water tends to be increased with increasing water temperature, whereas the extent of this effect is dependent on the type and concentration of DOM. Furthermore, the temperature effect on atrazine adsorption is controlled by competition of DOM and atrazine on adsorption sites. Some assumptions are proposed and discussed for explaining the temperature effects observed in the batch studies. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Bernd Schreiber; Viktor Schmalz; Thomas Brinkmann; Eckhard Worch [Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany). Institute of Water Chemistry

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Underground Injection Control (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Injection and Mining Division (IMD) has the responsibility of implementing two major federal environmental programs which were statutorily charged to the Office of Conservation: the Underground...

202

NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy, coming from an electron source, are injected intodischarges. In an electron bombardment source electrons ofsimply called electron bombardment sources (Kaufman, 1974).

Kunkel, W.B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Recent advances in activity and durability enhancement of Pt/C catalytic cathode in PEMFC: Part I. Physico-chemical and electronic interaction between Pt and carbon support, and activity enhancement of Pt/C catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon-supported platinum or platinum alloys are generally used as the cathodic electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) to enhance the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Main challenges to be addressed in this area are the high electrochemical activity and high stability maintenance for low-Pt-loading catalysts toward the feasibility for fuel cell operation and the reduction of the system cost. The interaction of Pt with carbon support, as well as the interaction of Pt precursor with carbon during the supported catalyst formation, are considered to be beneficial to the improvement of catalytic activity and durability of the electrocatalysts. This paper provides a review of recent advances related to the physico-chemical and electronic interactions at the catalyst–support interface and the catalyst activity enhancement through improved Pt–C interaction, especially focusing on the surface modification of the carbon support to form proper functional groups and chemical links at the Pt/C interface.

Xingwen Yu; Siyu Ye

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect

ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL, EPRI, and industry partners, studied mercury control options at six coal-fired power plants. The overall objective of the this test program was to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at six plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, American Electric Power's Conesville Station Unit 6, and Labadie Power Plant Unit 2. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The financial goals for the program established by DOE/NETL were to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the target established by DOE of $60,000 per pound of mercury removed. Results from testing at Holcomb, Laramie, Meramec, Labadie, and Monroe indicate the DOE goal was successfully achieved. However, further improvements for plants with conditions similar to Conesville are recommended that would improve both mercury removal performance and economics.

Sharon Sjostrom

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin, Et Al., 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Long Valley...

206

Energetics of Homogeneous Intermolecular Vinyl and Allyl Carbon-Hydrogen Bond Activation by the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of alkanes for both industrial and synthetic applications. While the goal of catalytic activation-H bonds,4 few have allowed for quantification of activated products crucial to the assessment of a C-H bond to a coordinatively unsaturated late-metal center (d8 Rh and Ir), generating a relatively

Jones, William D.

207

Carbon nanotubes for organic electronics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigated the use of carbon nanotubes as active components in solution processible organic semiconductor devices. We investigated the use of functionalized carbon nanotubes… (more)

Goh, Roland Ghim Siong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Continuous process preparation of activated silica with low carbon dioxide content gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for storage to prevent gel formation. This sol hns loss tendency to gel and. csn be sai'ely stored and used st approxirately twice the safe storage concentrat1on of the ILsylis sol, Hay (8) bas published. the results of a great deal of de- velopment work... of equipment operation which gave an activated product should. be accurate enough to cause activation in different, but similar equipment. Operating conditions found. 8o /0 /0 Figure ~ /oo /00o /moog C e/ Time, //oorq Gel Time oF Activated Sols Based...

Burdett, Joseph Walton

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Preparation of water soluble carbon nanotubes and assessment of their biological activity in embryonic zebrafish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are currently one of the most important classes of nanomaterials with unique properties sparking off numerous applications in many fields, including electronics, material science and medicine. However, applications of CNTs in medicine and other biological fields are hampered by their insolubility in aqueous media and concerns regarding toxicity. In this study, seven types of CNTs, including two single-walled, one double-walled, and four multi-walled, were evaluated for possible toxicological effects. Soluble CNTs were prepared by treatment with a mixture of acids (D2SO4 and DNO3), washed with Milli-Q water and oven dried. Transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, and other techniques were used to characterise the prepared CNTs. CNT toxicity was assessed using the embryonic zebrafish. Results showed that none of the CNTs studied caused significant adverse developmental effects. These results support the potential safe use of CNTs as components of indwelling medical devices and drug delivery tools.

Adeniyi A. Adenuga; Lisa Truong; Robert L. Tanguay; Vincent T. Remcho

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

andrea Mcnemar andrea Mcnemar National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-2024 andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Gregory J. Elbring Principal Investigator Sandia National Laboratory P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 505-844-4904 gjelbri@sandia.gov GeoloGic SequeStration of carbon DioxiDe in a DepleteD oil reServoir: a comprehenSive moDelinG anD Site monitorinG project Background The use of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to enhance oil recovery (EOR) is a familiar and frequently used technique in the United States. The oil and gas industry has significant experience with well drilling and injecting CO 2 into oil-bearing formations to enhance production. While using similar techniques as in oil production, this sequestration field

211

Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

SciTech Connect

The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPE’s technology “refines” coal by employing a novel catalyst to “crack” the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild “catalytic” gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPE’s catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to “fluidize” the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in near-zero hazardous air or water pollution. This technology would also be conducive to the efficient coproduction of methane and hydrogen while also generating a relatively pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) or sequestration. Specific results of bench-scale testing in the 4- to 38-lb/hr range in the EERC pilot system demonstrated high methane yields approaching 15 mol%, with high hydrogen yields approaching 50%. This was compared to an existing catalytic gasification model developed by GPE for its process. Long-term operation was demonstrated on both Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and on petcoke feedstocks utilizing oxygen injection without creating significant bed agglomeration. Carbon conversion was greater than 80% while operating at temperatures less than 1400°F, even with the shorter-than-desired reactor height. Initial designs for the GPE gasification concept called for a height that could not be accommodated by the EERC pilot facility. More gas-phase residence time should allow the syngas to be converted even more to methane. Another goal of producing significant quantities of highly concentrated catalyzed char for catalyst recovery and material handling studies was also successful. A Pd–Cu membrane was also successfully tested and demonstrated to produce 2.54 lb/day of hydrogen permeate, exceeding the desired hydrogen permeate production rate of 2.0 lb/day while being tested on actual coal-derived syngas that had been cleaned with advanced warm-gas cleanup systems. The membranes did not appear to suffer any performance degradation after exposure to the cleaned, warm syngas over a nominal 100-hour test.

Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Injection-Induced Earthquakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...injected into the reservoir under high pressure...core samples of the reservoir rocks and in situ determination...fracture-dominated porosity of less than 6...Implications for reservoir fracture permeability . AAPG Bull. 93...

William L. Ellsworth

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Premixed direct injection disk  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

214

Injection Laser System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection Laser System For each of NIF's 192 beams: The pulse shape as a function of time must be generated with a high degree of precision The energy delivered to the target must...

215

Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons R.T. Pierrehumbert1 on climate can be characterized by a single statistic, called Cumulative Carbon. This is the aggregate amount of carbon emitted in the form of carbon dioxide by activities such as fossil fuel burning and deforestation

Pierrehumbert, Raymond

216

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Industrial-scale processes are available for separating carbon dioxide from the post-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Industrial-scale processes are available for separating carbon dioxide dioxide separation and sequestration because the lower cost of carbon dioxide separation from for injection of carbon dioxide into oil or gas-bearing formations. An advantage of sequestration involving

217

Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Smit, Berend

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

218

J. Phys. Chem. 1994, 98, 11213-11219 11213 Vibrational Dynamics of Carbon Monoxide at the Active Site of Myoglobin: Picosecond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Phys. Chem. 1994, 98, 11213-11219 11213 Vibrational Dynamics of Carbon Monoxide at the Active Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, Califomia 94305 Received: April 27, 1994: In Final Form at Urbana-Champaign. Deparlment of Chemistry, Sfanford University. Hansen ExperimentaJ Physics Laboratory

Fayer, Michael D.

219

Injectivity Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Injectivity Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Quantification of the pressure response prior to 600 minutes is not always possible. Short-duration (< 24-hour) injection or pump tests are conducted with the drilling rig equipment, and long-duration (21-day) injection and pump tests are then conducted with the permanent pumping facilities. References Allman, D. W.; Goldman, D.; Niemi, W. L. (1 January 1979) Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft

220

Alternations of Structure and Functional Activity of Below Ground Microbial Communities at Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The global atmospheric concentration of CO2 has increased by more than 30percent since the industrial revolution. Although the stimulating effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on plant growth and primary productivity have been well studied, its influences on belowground microbial communities are poorly understood and controversial. In this study, we showed a significant change in the structure and functional potential of soil microbial communities at eCO2 in a grassland ecosystem, the BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2 and Nitrogen) experimental site (http://www.biocon.umn.edu/) using a comprehensive functional gene array, GeoChip 3.0, which contains about 28,0000 probes and covers approximately 57,000 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles as well as other functional processes. GeoChip data indicated that the functional structure of microbial communities was markedly different between ambient CO2 (aCO2) and eCO2 by detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all 5001 detected functional gene probes although no significant differences were detected in the overall microbial diversity. A further analysis of 1503 detected functional genes involved in C, N, P, and S cycles showed that a considerable portion (39percent) of them were only detected under either aCO2 (14percent) or eCO2 (25percent), indicating that the functional characteristics of the microbial community were significantly altered by eCO2. Also, for those shared genes (61percent) detected, some significantly (p<0.05) changed their abundance at eCO2. Especially, genes involved in labile C degradation, such as amyA, egl, and ara for starch, cellulose, and hemicelluloses, respectively, C fixation (e.g., rbcL, pcc/acc), N fixation (nifH), and phosphorus utilization (ppx) were significantly increased under eCO2, while those involved in decomposing recalcitrant C, such as glx, lip, and mnp for lignin degradation remained unchanged. This study provides insights into our understanding of belowground microbial communities and their feedbacks to terrestrial ecosystems at eCO2.

He, Zhili; Xu, Meiying; Deng, Ye; Kang, Sanghoon; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Reich, Peter B.; Zhou, Jizhong

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evaluation of Activated Carbon Adsorbents for CO2 Capture in Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A linear relationship is also observed for the pore volume of the adsorbents (Figure 8b) when Vp and an estimation of the micropore volume (Vp ? Vmeso) of the adsorbents are plotted against the volume of adsorbed CO2 at 4.1 MPa. ... Modified HMS materials demonstrated to be reversibly adsorb substantially more CO2 than previously obsd. ... The anthracite with the highest CO2 adsorption capacity is the sample activated at 800 °C for 2 h, whose surface area was only 540 m2/g, and the adsorbed amt. of CO2 was 65.7 mg-CO2/g-adsorbent. ...

Trevor C. Drage; James M. Blackman; Cova Pevida; Colin E. Snape

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

222

CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Begins in Illinois Begins in Illinois CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois November 17, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon storage technologies nationwide, has begun injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) for their large-scale CO2 injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute to global climate change. "Establishing long-term, environmentally safe and secure underground CO2 storage is a critical component in achieving successful commercial

223

NETL: Carbon Storage - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage Reference Shelf Below are links to Carbon Storage Program documents and reference materials. Each of the 10 categories has a variety of documents posted for easy access to current information - just click on the category link to view all related materials. RSS Icon Subscribe to the Carbon Storage RSS Feed. Carbon Storage Collage 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects Carbon Storage Technology Program Plan Carbon Storage Newsletter Archive Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future CCS Activities Site Screening, Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations

224

Optimization of Injection Scheduling in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SGP-TR-I12 Optimization of Injection Scheduling in Geothermal Fields James Lovekin May 1987&injection optimization problem is broke$ into two subpmbkm:(1) choosing a configuration of injectorsfrom an existing set is defined as the fieldwide break- through lindex, B. Injection is optimized by choosing injection wells

Stanford University

225

Biosensor Based on Self-Assembling Acetylcholinesterase on Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biosensor Based on Self-Assembling Acetylcholinesterase on Carbon Nanotubes for Flow injectionAmperometric Detection of Biosensor Based on Self-Assembling Acetylcholinesterase on...

226

Adsorption behavior of direct red 80 and congo red onto activated carbon/surfactant: Process optimization, kinetics and equilibrium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Adsorptions of congo red and direct red 80 onto activated carbon/surfactant from aqueous solution were optimized. The Box–Behnken design (BBD) has been employed to analyze the effects of concentration of surfactant, temperature, pH, and initial concentration of the dye in the adsorption capacity. Their corresponding experimental data could be evaluated excellently by second order polynomial regression models and the two models were also examined based on the analysis of variance and t test statistics, respectively. The optimum conditions were obtained as follows: Cs = 34.10 ?M, T = 50 °C, pH = 3.5, and CCR = 160 mg/L for the congo red system, and Cs = 34.10 ?M, T = 50 °C, pH = 6.1, and CDR80 = 110 mg/L for the direct red 80 system. And in these conditions, the measured experimental maximum adsorption capacities for the congo red and direct red 80 removals were 769.48 mg/g and 519.90 mg/g, which were consistent with their corresponding predicted values, with small relative errors of ?2.81% and ?0.67%, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics for the two dye adsorptions onto AC/DDAC were also investigated. The experimental data were fitted by four isotherm models, and Langmuir model presented the best fit. The kinetic studies indicated that the kinetic data followed the pseudo-second-order model.

Zhengjun Cheng; Lei Zhang; Xiao Guo; Xiaohui Jiang; Tian Li

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Injection-Induced Earthquakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sounds safe enough. But if the deep aquifer system was originally underpressured...directed toward protection of potable aquifers by requiring injection into formations...much smaller magnitudes. The largest fracking-induced earthquakes (24, 26) have all been below the damage...

William L. Ellsworth

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

228

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says August 31, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas.

229

Carbon dioxide capture and storage: Seven years after the IPCC special report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) entails separating carbon dioxide from coal-, biomass- or gas ... or other large industrial sources, transporting the carbon dioxide by pipeline, injecting it deep undergr...

Haroon Kheshgi; Heleen de Coninck…

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration of Geological Carbon Sequestration Article Type: Manuscript Keywords: Semi-Analytical Modeling; Iterative Methods; Geological Carbon Sequestration; Injection Site Assessment Corresponding Author: Brent Cody

Bau, Domenico A.

231

Carbon 40 (2002) 445467 Letters to the editor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon 40 (2002) 445­467 Letters to the editor Increasing the electromagnetic interference; Activated carbon; Carbon fibers; D. Electrical (electronic) properties Electromagnetic interference (EMI

Chung, Deborah D.L.

232

A study on Raman Injection Laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Raman Injection Laser is a new type of laser which is based on triply resonant stimulated Raman scattering between quantum confined states within the active region of a Quantum Cascade Laser that serves as an internal optical pump. The Raman...

Liu, Debin

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Injection-controlled laser resonator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

Chang, J.J.

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

234

Neutron Scattering Methodology for Absolute Measurement of Room-Temperature Hydrogen Storage Capacity and Evidence for Spillover Effect in a Pt-Doped Activated Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutron Scattering Methodology for Absolute Measurement of Room-Temperature Hydrogen Storage Capacity and Evidence for Spillover Effect in a Pt-Doped Activated Carbon ... A neutron scattering methodology is proposed to simultaneously determine the total hydrogen adsorption, the excess hydrogen adsorption, and hydrogen gas confined in the porous sample. ... It can be combined with an in situ small-angle neutron scattering to study the hydrogen spillover effect in the kinetic adsorption process. ...

Cheng-Si Tsao; Yun Liu; Mingda Li; Yang Zhang; Juscelino B. Leao; Hua-Wen Chang; Ming-Sheng Yu; Sow-Hsin Chen

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

235

POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON FROM NORTH DAKOTA LIGNITE: AN OPTION FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT CONTROL IN WATER TREATMENT PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

New federal drinking water regulations have been promulgated to restrict the levels of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished public water supplies. DBPs are suspected carcinogens and are formed when organic material is partially oxidized by disinfectants commonly used in the water treatment industry. Additional federal mandates are expected in the near future that will further affect public water suppliers with respect to DBPs. Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated DBPs. Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. This project, a cooperative effort between the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Grand Forks Water Treatment Plant, and the University of North Dakota Department of Civil Engineering, consists of several interrelated tasks. The objective of the research was to evaluate a cost-effective PAC produced from North Dakota lignite for removing NOM from water and reducing trihalomethane formation potential. The research approach was to develop a statistically valid testing protocol that can be used to compare dose-response relationships between North Dakota lignite-derived PAC and commercially available PAC products. A statistical analysis was performed to determine whether significant correlations exist between operating conditions, water properties, PAC properties, and dose-response behavior. Pertinent physical and chemical properties were also measured for each of the waters and each of the PACs.

Daniel J. Stepan; Thomas A. Moe; Melanie D. Hetland; Margaret L. Laumb

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

On a mathematical model for hot carrier injection in semiconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On a mathematical model for hot carrier injection in semiconductors Naoufel Ben Abdallah (1) Pierre of a semiconductor device heavily depends on the injection mechanism of carriers into the active regions through by the relation V bi = U th log N + N \\Gamma ; where U th = kBT=q is the thermal voltage and N + ; N \\Gamma

Schmeiser, Christian

237

DOE Regional Partner Initiates CO2 Injection Study in Virginia | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partner Initiates CO2 Injection Study in Virginia Partner Initiates CO2 Injection Study in Virginia DOE Regional Partner Initiates CO2 Injection Study in Virginia February 11, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) into coal seams in the Central Appalachian Basin to determine the feasibility of CO2 storage in unmineable coal seams and the potential for enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The results of the study will be vital in assessing the potential of carbon storage in coal seams as a safe and permanent method to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions while enhancing production of natural gas. DOE's Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) began injecting CO2 at the test site in Russell County, Virginia, in mid January.

238

Synthesis, Activity and Durability of Pt Nanoparticles Supported on Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes for Oxygen Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon nanotube supported metal nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted considerable attention due to their great potential for heterogeneous catalysis. In this paper, surfactant-free and well dispersed platinum (Pt) NPs supported ...

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Chemistry; Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering; Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering; Sheng, Wenchao; Lee, Seung Woo; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Chen, Shuo; Shao-Horn, Yang

239

Investigation into the Mechanism of Interaction of Calcium and Magnesium Silicates with Carbon Dioxide in the Course of Mechanical Activation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A prolonged grinding of diopside, akermanite, sphene, wollastonite, and enstatite is accompanied...2 from the environment (carbonation) along with amorphization and hydration. The IR spectra of ground minerals co...

A. M. Kalinkin; V. V. Boldyrev; A. A. Politov…

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Synthesis and Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity of Atomic and Nanoparticle Gold on Thiol-Functionalized Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrated the self-assembly of atomic Au on thiol-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes through covalent bonding and the formation of Au nanoparticles (NPs) upon a subsequent thermal treatment. Au NPs of 3.4 nm ...

Kim, Junhyung

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone October 21, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), one of seven partnerships in the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has successfully injected 1,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the Mount Simon Sandstone, a deep saline formation that is widespread across much of the Midwest. Preliminary results indicate that the formation has good CO2 storage potential and could possibly serve as a repository for CO2 emissions captured from stationary sources in the region. Carbon capture and storage

242

9,248,559 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 16, 2015  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE’s Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the...

243

9,449,421 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 12, 2015...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

244

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

Rollins, Andrew M.

245

Recent advances in activity and durability enhancement of Pt/C catalytic cathode in PEMFC: Part II: Degradation mechanism and durability enhancement of carbon supported platinum catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology has advanced rapidly in recent years, with one of active area focused on improving the long-term performance of carbon supported catalysts, which has been recognized as one of the most important issues to be addressed for the commercialization of the PEMFCs. The cathode catalyst layer in \\{PEMFCs\\} typically contains platinum group metal/alloy nanoparticles supported on a high-surface-area carbon. Carbon support corrosion and Pt dissolution/aggregation are considered as the major contributors to the degradation of the Pt/C catalysts. If the platinum particles cannot maintain their structure over the lifetime of the fuel cell, change in the morphology of the catalyst layer from the initial state will result in a loss of electrochemical activity. This paper reviews the recent advances in the stability improvement of the Pt/C cathodic catalysts in PEMFC, especially focusing on the durability enhancement through the improved Pt–C interaction. Future promising strategies towards the extension of catalysts operation life are also prospected.

Xingwen Yu; Siyu Ye

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The reduction of supersonic jet noise using pulsed microjet injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is concerned with the active control of supersonic jet noise using pulsed microjet injection at the nozzle exit. Experimental investigations were carried out using this control method on an ideally expanded ...

Ragaller, Paul Aaron

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Carbon Capture and Storage  

SciTech Connect

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several key documents written in the last three years that provide information on the status, economics, technology, and impact of CCS. These are cited throughout this text and identified as key references at the end of this manuscript. When coupled with improvements in energy efficiency, renewable energy supplies, and nuclear power, CCS help dramatically reduce current and future emissions (US CCTP 2005, MIT 2007). If CCS is not available as a carbon management option, it will be much more difficult and much more expensive to stabilize atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions. Recent estimates put the cost of carbon abatement without CCS to be 30-80% higher that if CCS were to be available (Edmonds et al. 2004).

Friedmann, S

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

248

Premixed direct injection nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An injection nozzle having a main body portion with an outer peripheral wall is disclosed. The nozzle includes a plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes disposed within the main body portion and a fuel flow passage fluidly connected to the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes. Fuel and air are partially premixed inside the plurality of the tubes. A second body portion, having an outer peripheral wall extending between a first end and an opposite second end, is connected to the main body portion. The partially premixed fuel and air mixture from the first body portion gets further mixed inside the second body portion. The second body portion converges from the first end toward said second end. The second body portion also includes cooling passages that extend along all the walls around the second body to provide thermal damage resistance for occasional flame flash back into the second body.

Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC); Johnson, Thomas Edward (Greer, SC); Lacy, Benjamin Paul (Greer, SC); Ziminsky, Willy Steve (Simpsonville, SC)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

NETL: News Release - Alabama Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 1, 2010 March 1, 2010 Alabama Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil Recovery, Testing Important Geologic CO2 Storage DOE-Sponsored Citronelle Project Appears Ideal Location for Concurrent CO2 Sequestration and EOR Operations Washington, D.C. - Carbon dioxide (CO2) injection - an important part of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology - is underway as part of a pilot study of CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Citronelle Field of Mobile County, Alabama. A project team led by the University of Alabama at Birmingham is conducting the injection. Study results of the 7,500-ton CO2 injection will provide estimates of oil yields from EOR and CO2 storage capacity in depleted oil reservoirs. In the United States, CO2 injection has already helped recover nearly 1.5 billion barrels of oil from mature oil fields, yet the technology has not been deployed widely. It is estimated that nearly 400 billion barrels of oil still remain trapped in the ground. Funded through the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, the primary goal of the Citronelle Project is to demonstrate that remaining oil can be economically produced using CO2-EOR technology in untested areas of the United States, thereby reducing dependency on oil imports, providing domestic jobs, and preventing the release of CO2 into the atmosphere.

250

Underground Injection Control Rule (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule regulates injection wells, including wells used by generators of hazardous or radioactive wastes, disposal wells within an underground source of drinking water, recovery of geothermal...

251

Underground Injection Control Regulations (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article prohibits injection of hazardous or radioactive wastes into or above an underground source of drinking water, establishes permit conditions and states regulations for design,...

252

Remediation of Contaminated Marine Sediment Using Thin-Layer Capping with Activated Carbon—A Field Experiment in Trondheim Harbor, Norway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation of Contaminated Marine Sediment Using Thin-Layer Capping with Activated Carbon—A Field Experiment in Trondheim Harbor, Norway ... Innovative chemical and biological monitoring methods were deployed to test capping effectiveness. ... (1) Two earlier pilot studies on AC amendment in the field have been established: one at Hunters Point, in San Francisco Bay, CA,(2, 3) and the other at Grasse River, NY.(1) The first field test aimed at remediating polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mud flats in the San Francisco Bay, and the second field study was carried out on a permanently inundated freshwater river bed also contaminated with PCBs. ...

Gerard Cornelissen; Marie Elmquist Kruså; Gijs D. Breedveld; Espen Eek; Amy M.P. Oen; Hans Peter H. Arp; Caroline Raymond; Göran Samuelsson; Jenny E. Hedman; Øystein Stokland; Jonas S. Gunnarsson

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

253

REACTIVE FLOW IN VUGGY CARBONATES: METHODS AND MODELS APPLIED TO MATRIX ACIDIZING OF CARBONATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbonates invariably have small (micron) to large (centimeter) scale heterogeneities in flow properties that may cause the effects of injected acids to differ greatly from what is predicted by a model based on a homogenous formation. To the best...

Izgec, Omer

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

254

Illinois CO2 Injection Project Moves Another Step Forward | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Illinois CO2 Injection Project Moves Another Step Forward Illinois CO2 Injection Project Moves Another Step Forward Illinois CO2 Injection Project Moves Another Step Forward March 15, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The recent completion of a three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey at a large Illinois carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test site is an important step forward for the carbon capture and storage (CCS) project's planned early 2011 startup. The survey - essential to determine the geometry and internal structures of the deep underground saline reservoir where CO2 will be injected - was completed by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance CCS technologies nationwide. CCS is seen by many experts as a

255

Development of a particle injection system for impurity transport study in KSTAR  

SciTech Connect

A solid particle injection system is developed for KSTAR. The system has a compact size, compatibility with a strong magnetic field and high vacuum environment, and the capability to inject a small amount of solid particles with a narrow injection angle. The target flight-distance of 10 cm has been achieved with a particle loss rate of less than 10%. Solid impurity particles such as tungsten and carbon will be injected by this system at the midplane in KSTAR. The impurity transport feature will be studied with a soft X-ray array, a vacuum ultra-violet diagnostic, and Stand Alone Non-Corona code.

Lee, H. Y.; Hong, Joohwan; Lee, Seung Hun; Jang, Siwon; Jang, Juhyeok; Jeon, Taemin; Park, Jae Sun; Choe, Wonho, E-mail: wchoe@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701, Republic of Korea and Fusion Plasma Transport Research Center, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Suk-Ho [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Direct Electrochemical Regeneration of Enzymatically Active 1,4-NADH Using a Nickel Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct Electrochemical Regeneration of Enzymatically Active 1,4- NADH Using a Nickel Modified enzymatically active 1,4- NADH in a batch electrochemical reactor at different electrolysis potentials. 1m was regenerated at -1.5VMSE In comparison with bare GCE, almost the same percentage of enzymatically active 1

Barthelat, Francois

257

Measurements of injected impurity assimilation during massive gas injection experiments in DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

Impurities (H-2, D-2, He, Ne or Ar) injected into steady (non-disrupting) discharges with massive gas injection (MGI) are shown to mix into the plasma core dominantly via magnetohydrodynamic activity during the plasma thermal quench (TQ). Mixing efficiencies of injected impurities into the plasma core are measured to be of order 0.05-0.4. 0D modelling of the experiments is found to reproduce observed TQ and current quench durations reasonably well (typically within +/- 25% or so), although shutdown onset times are underestimated (by around 2 x). Preliminary 0D modelling of ITER based on DIII-D mixing efficiencies suggests that MGI will work well in ITER with regard to disruption heat load and vessel force mitigation, but may not collisionally suppress runaway electrons.

Hollmann, E. M. [University of California, San Diego; Jernigan, T. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Parks, P. B. [General Atomics; Boedo, J.A. [University of California, San Diego; Evans, T. E. [General Atomics, San Diego; Groth, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Humphreys, D A [General Atomics, San Diego; James, A. N. [University of California, San Diego; Lanctot, M J [Columbia University; Nishijima, D. [University of California, San Diego; Rudakov, D.L. [University of California, San Diego; Scott, H A [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Strait, E. J. [General Atomics; Van Zeeland, Michael [General Atomics; Wesley, J. C. [General Atomics; West, J C [General Atomics, San Diego; Wu, W [General Atomics, San Diego; Yu, J.H. [University of California, San Diego

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

259

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

260

CO2 displacement mechanisms: phase equilibria effects and carbon dioxide sequestration studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Supercritical carbon dioxide is injected into underground formations to enhance oil recovery and for subsurface sequestration to minimize the impact of CO2 emissions due to… (more)

Pasala, Sangeetha M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Research Summary Carbon Additionality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of much/reporting additionality rules. Technological Application of specific technology. Term Abatement arises within a specified

262

Carbon formation and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes  

SciTech Connect

The product gases generated by coal gasification systems contain high concentrations of CO and, characteristically, have relatively high carbon activities. Accordingly, carbon deposition and metal dusting can potentially degrade the operation of such gasifier systems. Therefore, the product gas compositions of eight representative gasifier systems were examined with respect to the carbon activity of the gases at temperatures ranging from 480 to 1,090 C. Phase stability calculations indicated that Fe{sub 3}C is stable only under very limited thermodynamic conditions and with certain kinetic assumptions and that FeO and Fe{sub 0.877}S tend to form instead of the carbide. As formation of Fe{sub 3}C is a necessary step in the metal dusting of steels, there are numerous gasifier environments where this type of carbon-related degradation will not occur, particularly under conditions associated with higher oxygen and sulfur activities. These calculations also indicated that the removal of H{sub 2}S by a hot-gas cleanup system may have less effect on the formation of Fe{sub 3}C in air-blown gasifier environments, where the iron oxide phase can exist and is unaffected by the removal of sulfur, than in oxygen-blown systems, where iron sulfide provides the only potential barrier to Fe{sub 3}C formation. Use of carbon- and/or low-alloy steels dictates that the process gas composition be such that Fe{sub 3}C cannot form if the potential for metal dusting is to be eliminated. Alternatively, process modifications could include the reintroduction of hydrogen sulfide, cooling the gas to perhaps as low as 400 C and/or steam injection. If higher-alloy steels are used, a hydrogen sulfide-free gas may be processed without concern about carbon deposition and metal dusting.

DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; Wright, I.G.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

D/sub 2/ - pellet injection system  

SciTech Connect

For density build-up of a target plasma for neutral injection in the stellarator ''Wendelstein W VIIA''and for refuelling of the divertor tokamak ASSDEX, pellet light gas guns have been developed. In a continuous flow cryostat cooled by liquid helium with a comsumption of 2 - 3 liter liquid helium per hour deuterium was condensed and solidified. To prevent the propeller gas entering the torus was used. In one system a 3.6 mm guiding tube following the barrel was applied successfully. By optical diagnostics pellet velocity, pellet size and pellet trajectory is measured. For a pellet centrifuge system investigations of carbon fiber rotors were made up to surface velocities of 1500 m/s.

Buechl, K.; Andelfinger, C.; Kollotzek, H.; Lang, R.; Ulrich, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING / SEPTEMBER 2000 / 865 CARBON FIBER ADSORPTION USING QUANTITATIVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING / SEPTEMBER 2000 / 865 CARBON FIBER ADSORPTION USING carbon fiber (ACF) adsorbents. The DR isotherm parameter, k, depends on the adsorbate as well volatile organic compound adsorbates and activated carbon fiber adsorbents. INTRODUCTION Activated carbon

Cal, Mark P.

265

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

SciTech Connect

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

267

Injection nozzle for a turbomachine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbomachine includes a compressor, a combustor operatively connected to the compressor, an end cover mounted to the combustor, and an injection nozzle assembly operatively connected to the combustor. The injection nozzle assembly includes a first end portion that extends to a second end portion, and a plurality of tube elements provided at the second end portion. Each of the plurality of tube elements defining a fluid passage includes a body having a first end section that extends to a second end section. The second end section projects beyond the second end portion of the injection nozzle assembly.

Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

268

Carbon sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Leaver and Howard Dalton Carbon sequestration Rattan Lal * * ( lal.1...and biotic technologies. Carbon sequestration implies transfer of atmospheric...and biomass burning. 3. Carbon sequestration Emission rates from fossil...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

An Economic Study of Carbon Capture and Storage System Design and Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) and a point of electricity generation is a promising option for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. One issue with respect to CCS is the design of carbon dioxide transport, storage and injection system...

Prasodjo, Darmawan

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

270

Influence of Rock Types on Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) techniques such as high pressure CO2 injection may normally be required to recover oil in place in carbonate reservoirs. This study addresses how different rock types can influence the seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates. This research...

Mammadova, Elnara

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

271

Linear and non-linear mechanistic modeling and simulation of the formation of carbon adsorbents.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon adsorbents, namely, activated carbons and carbon molecular sieves, can be variously applied in the purification and separation of gaseous and liquid mixtures, e.g., in… (more)

Argoti Caicedo, Alvaro Andres

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - anchored carbon fiber Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Activated carbon; Carbon fibers; D. Electrical (electronic) properties Electromagnetic interference (EMI... ) shielding is increas- ... Source: Chung, Deborah D.L. -...

273

NETL: Carbon Dioxide 101 FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are people doing now to manage CO2? What are people doing now to manage CO2? SECARB's injection operations at the Mississippi test site in Escatawpa, Mississippi SECARB's injection operations at the Mississippi test site in Escatawpa, Mississippi. A combined portfolio of carbon management options is being implemented to reduce current emission levels associated with energy production while enhancing energy security and building the technologies and knowledge base for export to other countries faced with reducing emissions. The U.S. portfolio includes: (1) use fuels with reduced carbon intensity - renewables, nuclear, and natural gas; (2) adopt more efficient technologies on both the energy demand and supply sides; and (3) use carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. CCS is a viable emission management option

274

Weyburn Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weyburn Carbon DioxiDe SequeStration Weyburn Carbon DioxiDe SequeStration ProjeCt Background Since September 2000, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) has been transported from the Dakota Gasification Plant in North Dakota through a 320-km pipeline and injected into the Weyburn oilfield in Saskatchewan, Canada. The CO 2 has given the Weyburn field, discovered 50 years ago, a new life: 155 million gross barrels of incremental oil are slated to be recovered by 2035 and the field is projected to be able to store 30 million tonnes of CO 2 over 30 years. CO 2 injection began in October of 2005 at the adjacent Midale oilfield, and an additional 45-60 million barrels of oil are expected to be recovered during 30 years of continued operation. A significant monitoring project associated with the Weyburn and Midale commercial

275

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage wells. The manual builds on lessons learned through NETL research; the experiences of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSPs) carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) field tests; and the acquired knowledge of industries that have been actively drilling wells for more than 100 years. In addition, the BPM provides an overview of the well-

276

High-Activity, Durable Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalyst: Nanoscale Composite of Platinum?Tantalum Oxyphosphate on Vulcan Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

active surface area, and the performance of the cathode catalyst layer were significantly reduced. ... Swider-Lyons, K. E.; Teliska, M. E.; Baker, W. S.; Bouwman, P. J.; Pietron, J. J.Leveraging Metal?Support Interactions to Improve the Activity of PEMFC Cathode Catalysts ECS Trans. ... The goal is to reduce the Pt loading in PEMFC cathodes using catalysts modified by metal support interactions (MSIs), an approach commonly used in heterogeneous catalysis. ...

Yannick Garsany; Albert Epshteyn; Andrew P. Purdy; Karren L. More; Karen E. Swider-Lyons

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

277

Category:Injectivity Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Category:Injectivity Test Jump to: navigation, search Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Injectivity Test page?...

278

NETL: Gasifipedia - Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization: Carbon Sequestration Coal: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization: Carbon Sequestration Carbon sequestration, also termed carbon storage, is the permanent storage of CO2, usually in deep geologic formations. Industrially-generated CO2 -- resulting from fossil fuel combustion, gasification, and other industrial processes -- is injected as a supercritical fluid into geologic reservoirs, where it is held in place by natural traps and seals. Carbon storage is one approach to minimizing atmospheric emissions of man-made CO2. As discussed above, the main purpose of CO2 EOR such as the Weyburn Project is tertiary recovery of crude oil, but in effect substantial CO2 remains sequestered/stored as a result. Current Status of CO2 Storage CO2 storage is currently underway in the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway and the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, have been injecting CO2 into geologic storage formations more than a decade. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, as well. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. In addition, a number of smaller pilot projects are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future long-term CO2 storage. To date, more than 200 small-scale CO2 storage projects have been carried out worldwide. A demonstration project that captures CO2 from a pulverized coal power plant and pipes it to a geologic formation for storage recently came online in Alabama.

279

Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect

In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

Jeffrey Long

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

280

Interpretation of self-potential measurements during injection tests at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

self-potential measurements during injection tests at self-potential measurements during injection tests at Raft River, Idaho. Final report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Interpretation of self-potential measurements during injection tests at Raft River, Idaho. Final report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Self-potential measurements before and during injection tests at Raft River KGRA, Idaho indicate a small negative change. The magnitude of the change (5 to 10 mV) is near the noise level (5 mV) but they extend over a fairly broad area. The presence of a cathodic protection system clouds the issue of the validity of the changes, however the form of the observed changes cannot be explained by any simple change in the current strength of the protection system. Furthermore, similar changes are observed for two

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE Regional Partnership Initiates CO2 Injection in Lignite Coal Seam |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initiates CO2 Injection in Lignite Coal Initiates CO2 Injection in Lignite Coal Seam DOE Regional Partnership Initiates CO2 Injection in Lignite Coal Seam March 10, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- A U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) team of regional partners has begun injecting CO2 into a deep lignite coal seam in Burke County, North Dakota, to demonstrate the economic and environmental viability of geologic CO2 storage in the U.S. Great Plains region. Ultimately, geologic carbon sequestration is expected to play an important role in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and combating climate change. The Lignite Field Validation Test is being conducted by the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, one of seven regional partnerships under DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program. The seven

282

First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington, DC, May 14-17, 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington, DC, May 14-17, 2001 Caldeira, K for Research on Ocean Carbon Sequestration (DOCS) *Climate and Carbon Cycle Modeling Group, Lawrence Livermore carbon sequestration strategy. Therefore, we want to understand the effectiveness of oceanic injection

283

Comparison of the performance of activated carbon-supported noble metal catalysts in the hydrogenolysis of CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

The hydrogenolysis of CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} over 1 wt% palladium, platinum, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and rhenium on activated carbon has been studied in a micro-flow reactor, in a temperature range of 450--540 K, H{sub 2}/CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} feed ratios between 1.5 and 6, a pressure of 0.4 MPa, and a WHSV of 1 g/(g{center_dot}h). The main products of the reaction for all investigated catalysts were CHClF{sub 2}, CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}, and methane. According to their performance, the catalysts could be divided into four groups: rhenium showing no conversion of CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2}, palladium with a high selectivity for CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}, iridium and ruthenium with a high selectivity for CHClF{sub 2}, and platinum and rhodium with moderate selectivity for CHClF{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}. The adsorption of chlorine on the metal surface plays an important role in the selectivity. Strong chlorine adsorption leads to a higher selectivity for CHClF{sub 2}. These results are consistent with a reaction mechanism in which difluorocarbene is the key intermediate. Apparently, the same kinetic network applies to all metals studied. The performance of the catalysts changed as a function of time on stream. Palladium, rhodium, and especially ruthenium deactivated during reaction, whereas the activity of iridium and platinum increased. This can be explained by two opposite effects. On the one hand, the dispersion of all catalysts increased during reaction, which can explain an increase in activity as a function of time on stream. Apparently, CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} hydrogenolysis conditions are suitable for dispersing noble metal catalysts on activated carbon. On the other hand, deactivation takes place by the adsorption of chlorine and deposits of heavy halogenated products.

Wiersma, A.; Sandt, E.J.A.X. van de; Hollander, M.A. den; Bekkum, H. van; Makkee, M.; Moulijn, J.A. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)] [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 November 5, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. As a result, it is helping to both further carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a mitigation strategy for global climate change and move forward G-8 recommendations for launching 20 projects of this type internationally by 2010. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is located at the Cranfield site in Southwestern Mississippi. It is led by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration

285

Staged direct injection diesel engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diesel engine having staged injection for using lower cetane number fuels than No. 2 diesel fuel. The engine includes a main fuel injector and a pilot fuel injector. Pilot and main fuel may be the same fuel. The pilot injector injects from five to fifteen percent of the total fuel at timings from 20.degree. to 180.degree. BTDC depending upon the quantity of pilot fuel injected, the fuel cetane number and speed and load. The pilot fuel injector is directed toward the centerline of the diesel cylinder and at an angle toward the top of the piston, avoiding the walls of the cylinder. Stratification of the early injected pilot fuel is needed to reduce the fuel-air mixing rate, prevent loss of pilot fuel to quench zones, and keep the fuel-air mixture from becoming too fuel lean to become effective. In one embodiment, the pilot fuel injector includes a single hole for injection of the fuel and is directed at approximately 48.degree. below the head of the cylinder.

Baker, Quentin A. (San Antonio, TX)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Spheromak injection into a tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent results from the Caltech spheromak injection experiment [to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett.] are reported. First current drive by spheromak injection into the ENCORE tokamak as a result of the process of magnetic helicity injection is observed. An initial 30% increase in plasma current is observed followed by a drop by a factor of 3 because of sudden plasma cooling. Second spheromak injection results in an increase of tokamak central density by a factor of 6. The high?current/high?density discharge is terminated by a sharp peaking of the density profile followed by an interchange instability. In a second experiment the spheromak is injected into the magnetized toroidal vacuum vessel (with no tokamak plasma) fitted with magnetic probe arrays. An m=1 (nonaxisymmetric) magnetic structure forms in the vessel after the spheromak undergoes a double tilt; once in the cylindrical entrance between gun and tokamak then again in the tokamak vessel. In the absence of net toroidal flux the structure develops a helical pitch (the sense of pitch depends on the helicity sign). Experiments with a number of refractory metal electrode coatings have shown that tungsten and chrome coatings provide some improvement in spheromak parameters. Design details of a larger higher?current spheromak gun with a new accelerator section are also discussed.

M. R. Brown; P. M. Bellan

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Composites Part B: Engineering, 2011, 42(4): p. 916-925 Analysis of active cooling through nickel coated carbon fibers in the solidification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nickel coated carbon fibers in the solidification processing of aluminum matrix composites Nikhil Gupta1 cooling through reinforcing carbon fibers to obtain better control over the solidification microstructure and Ni represent the aluminum melt, carbon fiber, and nickel coating, respectively. 1 INTRODUCTION

Gupta, Nikhil

288

Three-Dimensional Flower-Shaped Activated Porous Carbon/Sulfur Composites as Cathode Materials for Lithium–Sulfur Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After the active sulfur impregnation, both the FESEM images (Figure 1e,f) and TEM images (Figure 2c) of the FA-PC/S composite demonstrate a flower-shaped 3D superstructure similar to the original FA-PC material. ... Early on, carbonaceous materials dominated the anode and hence most of the possible improvements in the cell were anticipated at the cathode terminal; on the other hand, major developments in anode materials made in the last portion of the decade with the introduction of nanocomposite Sn/C/Co alloys and Si-C composites have demanded higher capacity cathodes to be developed. ... The photodecompn. of methyl orange indicates that such ZnO superstructures possess excellent photocatalytic activity. ...

Lan Zhou; Tao Huang; Aishui Yu

2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

289

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

290

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

291

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 5, 2009 November 5, 2009 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 A large-scale carbon dioxide storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. October 21, 2009 DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, one of seven partnerships in the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has successfully injected 1,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the Mount Simon Sandstone, a deep saline formation that is widespread across much of the Midwest. October 13, 2009 Secretary Chu Announces Up To $55 Million in Funding to Develop Advanced

292

Experimental High Velocity Acid Jetting in Limestone Carbonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acid jetting is a well stimulation technique that is used in carbonate reservoirs. It typically involves injecting acid down hole at high flow rates through small orifices which cause high velocities of acid to strike the borehole wall...

Holland, Christopher

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

Asymmetric synthesis of both enantiomers of esters and ?-lactones from optically active 1-chlorovinyl p-tolyl sulfoxides and lithium ester enolates with the formation of a tertiary or a quaternary carbon stereogenic center at the ?-position  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Treatment of optically active 1-chlorovinyl p-tolyl sulfoxides having two different substituents at the 2-position, which were synthesized from aldehydes or unsymmetrical ketones and (R)-(?)-chloromethyl p-tolyl sulfoxide in two or three steps, with the lithium enolate of tert-butyl acetate gave optically active adducts in 99% chiral induction from the sulfur stereogenic center. The adducts were converted to optically active esters, carboxylic acids, and ?-lactones, which have a tertiary or a quaternary carbon stereogenic center at the ?-position. A synthesis of optically active spiro-lactones was realized starting from 2-cyclohexenone by this method.

Shimpei Sugiyama; Tsuyoshi Satoh

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Workshop on Carbon Sequestration Science - Ocean Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Carbon Ocean Carbon Sequestration Howard Herzog MIT Energy Laboratory May 24, 2001 Ocean Carbon Sequestration Options * The direct injection of a relatively pure CO 2 stream that has been generated, for example, at a power plant or from an industrial process * The enhancement of the net oceanic uptake from the atmosphere, for example, through iron fertilization The DOE Center for Research on Ocean Carbon Sequestration (DOCS) * Established July 1999 * Centered at LBNL and LLNL * Participants S Eric Adams MIT S Jim Barry MBARI S Jim Bishop DOCS Scientific Co-director LBNL S Ken Caldeira DOCS Scientific Co-director LLNL S Sallie Chisholm MIT S Kenneth Coale Moss Landing Marine Laboratory S Russ Davis Scripps Institution of Oceanography S Paul Falkowski Rutgers S Howard Herzog MIT S Gerard Nihous Pacific International Center for High Technology Research

295

Geomechanical effects on CO{sub 2} leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection  

SciTech Connect

The importance of geomechanics—including the potential for faults to reactivate during large scale geologic carbon sequestration operations—has recently become more widely recognized. However, notwithstanding the potential for triggering notable (felt) seismic events, the potential for buoyancy-driven CO{sub 2} to reach potable groundwater and the ground surface is actually more important from public safety and storage-efficiency perspectives. In this context, this work extends the previous studies on the geomechanical modeling of fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on the short-term integrity of the sealing caprock, and hence on the potential for leakage of either brine or CO{sub 2} to reach the shallow groundwater aquifers during active injection. We consider stress/strain-dependent permeability and study the leakage through the fault zone as its permeability changes during a reactivation, also causing seismicity. We analyze several scenarios related to the volume of CO{sub 2} injected (and hence as a function of the overpressure), involving both minor and major faults, and analyze the profile risks of leakage for different stress/strain-permeability coupling functions. We conclude that whereas it is very difficult to predict how much fault permeability could change upon reactivation, this process can have a significant impact on the leakage rate. Moreover, our analysis shows that induced seismicity associated with fault reactivation may not necessarily open up a new flow path for leakage. Results show a poor correlation between magnitude and amount of fluid leakage, meaning that a single event is generally not enough to substantially change the permeability along the entire fault length. Consequently, even if some changes in permeability occur, this does not mean that the CO{sub 2} will migrate up along the entire fault, breaking through the caprock to enter the overlying aquifer.

Rinaldi, A.P.; Rutqvist, J.; Cappa, F.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

GRR/Section 4-OR-d - Exploration Injection Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-OR-d - Exploration Injection Permit 4-OR-d - Exploration Injection Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-OR-d - Exploration Injection Permit 04ORDExplorationInjectionPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies OAR 340-044-0012: Authorization of Underground Injection Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04ORDExplorationInjectionPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 4-OR-d.1 - Is this New Injection Activity or a Renewal? The developer must follow one of two different procedures if the developer

297

Effect of steam injection location on syngas obtained from an air–steam gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For a fluidized-bed gasifier, reaction conditions vary along the height of the reactor. Hence, the steam injection location may have a considerable effect on the syngas quality. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of steam injection location and steam-to-biomass ratio (SBR) on the syngas quality generated from an air–steam gasification of switchgrass in a 2–5 kg/h autothermal fluidized-bed gasifier. Steam injection locations of 51, 152, and 254 mm above the distributor plate and \\{SBRs\\} of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 were selected. Results showed that the syngas H2 and CO yields were significantly influenced by the steam injection location (p gasifier efficiencies (cold gas efficiency of 67%, hot gas efficiency of 72%, and carbon conversion efficiency of 96%) were at the steam injection location of 254 mm and SBR of 0.2.

Ashokkumar M. Sharma; Ajay Kumar; Raymond L. Huhnke

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel  

SciTech Connect

A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

299

Carbon Cycle 2.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Cycle 2.0 Carbon Cycle 2.0 Pioneering science for sustainable energy solutions Artificial Photosynthesis Energy Storage Combustion Carbon Capture & Storage Developing World Efficiency Photovoltaics Biofuels Energy Analysis Climate Modeling Carbon Cycle 2.0 is... 1. A vision for * a global energy system integrated with the Earth's natural carbon cycles * an interactive Berkeley Lab environment with a shared sense of purpose 2. A program development plan that will allow us to deepen our capabilities and provide more opportunities to have impact 3. An attempt to integrate our basic research with applications using models of technology deployment constraints 4. Set of internal activities aimed at priming the effort

300

Linked Injectives and Ore Localizations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......injective right (Z?//)-module. By (a), L is ^-divisible and hence ^-divisible. Consider xeE and c e ^ such that xceL. Then xc = yc for some yeL, whence x = y and so xeL. Thus E/L is ^-torsion-free. In view of Lemma 1.1, we investigate......

K. R. Goodearl

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Carbon sequestration monitoring with acoustic double-difference waveform inversion: A case study on SACROC walkaway VSP data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological carbon sequestration involves large-scale injection of carbon dioxide into underground geologic formations and is considered as a potential approach for mitigating global warming. Changes in reservoir properties ...

Yang, Di

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Carbon Conference  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon Conference ... The Fourth Hienninl Conference on Carbon will be held at the University of Buffalo, June 15 to 19. ... The Pittsburgh Section's coal technology group will meet in the conference room at Mellon Institute, Pittsburgh, June ... ...

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Sequential injection gas guns for accelerating projectiles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gas guns and methods for accelerating projectiles through such gas guns are described. More particularly, gas guns having a first injection port located proximate a breech end of a barrel and a second injection port located longitudinally between the first injection port and a muzzle end of the barrel are described. Additionally, modular gas guns that include a plurality of modules are described, wherein each module may include a barrel segment having one or more longitudinally spaced injection ports. Also, methods of accelerating a projectile through a gas gun, such as injecting a first pressurized gas into a barrel through a first injection port to accelerate the projectile and propel the projectile down the barrel past a second injection port and injecting a second pressurized gas into the barrel through the second injection port after passage of the projectile and to further accelerate the projectile are described.

Lacy, Jeffrey M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Carbon nanotube electron sources and applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Review | 0 Biocompatible Materials 0 Macromolecular Substances...Carbon | Biocompatible Materials chemistry Crystallization...Wang et al. 2001), cathode-ray lamps (Saito...al. 2002) are under active consideration. Present...of carbon and related materials'. Phil. Trans. R...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Activities and events provide Residential Network members the opportunity to discuss similar needs and challenges, and to collectively identify effective strategies and useful resources.

306

Numerical simulation of cooling gas injection using adaptive multiscale techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

focus on reducing this effects. Only very recently, active cooling strategies have been developed alsoNumerical simulation of cooling gas injection using adaptive multiscale techniques Wolfgang Dahmen Mathematik, RWTH Aachen, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen Abstract The interaction of a jet of cooling gas

307

Comparison of the activity and selectivity of activated carbon supported group VIII metal catalysts in the hydrogenolysis of CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} into CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic hydrogenolysis of waste and banked CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} (CFC-12) is important for the reduction of ozone depletion caused by CFCs. Especially selective production of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} (HFC-32) is attractive, because this product can be applied as an alternative, ozone friendly, refrigerant. Because of the limited time available for catalyst development, interaction between catalyst and process development is crucial. Several group VIII metal supported catalyst have been tested for the reaction. Activated carbon is selected as support material because of the corrosive reaction conditions. Large differences in both the activity and selectivity are found for the different metals. Palladium has been selected as very suitable for the selective conversion to CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} (85% selectivity at 90% conversion, stable for 1600 hours). Iridium and ruthenium are more selective to CHClF{sub 2} (HCFC-22) (60% and 53% selectivity at 15% and 20% conversion, respectively). In this presentation the different performances of the Group VIII metals will be illustrated with both performance and characterization data.

Wiersma, A.; Hollander, M.A. den; Makkee, M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)] [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Evaluation of autotrophic growth of ammonia-oxidizers associated with granular activated carbon used for drinking water purification by DNA-stable isotope probing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nitrification is an important biological function of granular activated carbon (GAC) used in advanced drinking water purification processes. Newly discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) have challenged the traditional understanding of ammonia oxidation, which considered ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) as the sole ammonia-oxidizers. Previous studies demonstrated the predominance of AOA on GAC, but the contributions of AOA and AOB to ammonia oxidation remain unclear. In the present study, DNA-stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) was used to investigate the autotrophic growth of AOA and AOB associated with GAC at two different ammonium concentrations (0.14 mg N/L and 1.4 mg N/L). GAC samples collected from three full-scale drinking water purification plants in Tokyo, Japan, had different abundance of AOA and AOB. These samples were fed continuously with ammonium and 13C-bicarbonate for 14 days. The DNA-SIP analysis demonstrated that only AOA assimilated 13C-bicarbonate at low ammonium concentration, whereas AOA and AOB exhibited autotrophic growth at high ammonium concentration. This indicates that a lower ammonium concentration is preferable for AOA growth. Since AOA could not grow without ammonium, their autotrophic growth was coupled with ammonia oxidation. Overall, our results point towards an important role of AOA in nitrification in GAC filters treating low concentration of ammonium.

Jia Niu; Ikuro Kasuga; Futoshi Kurisu; Hiroaki Furumai; Takaaki Shigeeda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Performance evaluation of granular activated carbon system at Pantex: Rapid small-scale column tests to simulate removal of high explosives from contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect

A granular activated carbon (GAC) system is now in operation at Pantex to treat groundwater from the perched aquifer that is contaminated with high explosives. The main chemicals of concern are RDX and HMX. The system consists of two GAC columns in series. Each column is charged with 10,000 pounds of Northwestern LB-830 GAC. At the design flow rate of 325 gpm, the hydraulic loading is 6.47 gpm/ft{sup 2}, and the empty bed contact time is 8.2 minutes per column. Currently, the system is operating at less than 10% of its design flow rate, although flow rate increases are expected in the relatively near future. This study had several objectives: Estimate the service life of the GAC now in use at Pantex; Screen several GACs to provide a recommendation on the best GAC for use at Pantex when the current GAC is exhausted and is replaced; Determine the extent to which natural organic matter in the Pantex groundwater fouls GAC adsorption sites, thereby decreasing the adsorption capacity for high explosives; and Determine if computer simulation models could match the experimental results, thereby providing another tool to follow system performance.

Henke, J.L.; Speitel, G.E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Smith P, Powlson DS, Smith JU, Falloon P, and Coleman K. 2000. Meeting Europe's climate change commitments: Quantitative estimates of the potential for carbon mitigation by agriculture. Global Climate Change 6:525-539. Abstract Under the Kyoto Protocol, the European Union is committed to a reduction in CO2 emissions to 92% of baseline (1990) levels during the first commitment period (2008-2012). The Kyoto Protocol allows carbon emissions to be offset by demonstrable removal of carbon from the atmosphere. Thus, land-use / land-management change and forestry activities that are shown to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels can be included in the Kyoto targets. These activities include afforestation, reforestation and deforestation (article

311

Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Including CDIAC Estimates Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass (δ 13C) of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) AmeriFlux - Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values

312

Carbon Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

313

Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR site. References Z. V. Dash, H. D. Murphy, R. L. Aamodt, R. G. Aguilar, D. W. Brown, D. A. Counce, H. N. Fisher, C. O. Grigsby, H. Keppler, A. W. Laughlin, R. M. Potter, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo Jr, G. Zyvoloski (1983) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Injectivity_Test_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Dash,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511316"

314

Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Injectivity_Test_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511318

315

Diffusion injected multi-quantum well light-emitting diode structure  

SciTech Connect

The attention towards light-emitting diode (LED) structures based on nanowires, surface plasmon coupled LEDs, and large-area high-power LEDs has been increasing for their potential in increasing the optical output power and efficiency of LEDs. In this work we demonstrate an alternative way to inject charge carriers into the active region of an LED, which is based on completely different current transport mechanism compared to conventional current injection approaches. The demonstrated structure is expected to help overcoming some of the challenges related to current injection with conventional structures. A functioning III-nitride diffusion injected light-emitting diode structure, in which the light-emitting active region is located outside the pn-junction, is realized and characterized. In this device design, the charge carriers are injected into the active region by bipolar diffusion, which could also be utilized to excite otherwise challenging to realize light-emitting structures.

Riuttanen, L., E-mail: lauri.riuttanen@aalto.fi; Nykänen, H.; Svensk, O.; Suihkonen, S.; Sopanen, M. [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Kivisaari, P.; Oksanen, J.; Tulkki, J. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

316

Fuel Injection Strategy for Soot-Filter Regeneration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fuel injection is optimized to allow both fast soot removal and temperatures below 700-800oC in case of drop-to-idle event. A 1-D mathematical model was used to simulate soot loading and temperature variations as a function of time and axial position in the filter during active regenerations and drop-to-idle events. The fact that the maximum temperature reached in a soot filter is a function of the soot loading when the drop-to-idle event occurs has been taken into account for developing this fuel injection strategy.

317

Injection Technology for Marine Diesel Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The introduction of new emission limits faces modern injection systems with new challenges. Increasing the system pressures puts higher loads on the injection components as regards stability, wear and temperature...

Dr. Rolf Leonhard; Dr.-Ing. Marcus Parche…

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

An environmental analysis of injection molding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates injection molding from an environmental standpoint, yielding a system-level environmental analysis of the process. There are three main objectives: analyze the energy consumption trends in injection ...

Thiriez, Alexandre

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

SQL Injection Attacks and Defense, 2 edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SQL Injection Attacks and Defense, First Edition: Winner of the Best Book Bejtlich Read Award "SQL injection is probably the number one problem for any server-side application, and this book unequaled in its coverage." ¿¿Richard ...

Justin Clarke; Kevvie Fowler; Erlend Oftedal; Rodrigo Marcos Alvarez; Dave Hartley; Alexander Kornbrust; Gary O'Leary-Steele; Alberto Revelli; Sumit Siddharth; Marco Slaviero

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Carbon sequestration monitoring with acoustic double-difference waveform inversion: A case study on SACROC walkaway VSP data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration monitoring with acoustic double-difference waveform inversion: A case study National Laboratory SUMMARY Geological carbon sequestration involves large-scale injection of carbon is crucial for ensuring safe and reliable carbon storage (Bickle et al., 2007). Conventional analysis of time

Malcolm, Alison

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Carbon Sequestered, Carbon Displaced and the Kyoto Context  

SciTech Connect

The integrated system that embraces forest management, forest products, and land-use change impacts the global carbon cycle - and hence the net emission of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide - in four fundamental ways. Carbon is stored in living and dead biomass, carbon is stored in wood products and landfills, forest products substitute in the market place for products made from other materials, and forest harvests can be used wholly or partially to displace fossil fuels in the energy sector. Implementation of the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change would result in the creation of international markets for carbon dioxide emissions credits, but the current Kyoto text does not treat all carbon identically. We have developed a carbon accounting model, GORCAM, to examine a variety of scenarios for land management and the production of forest products. In this paper we explore, for two simple scenarios of forest management, the carbon flows that occur and how these might be accounted for under the Kyoto text. The Kyoto protocol raises questions about what activities can result in emissions credits, which carbon reservoirs will be counted, who will receive the credits, and how much credit will be available? The Kyoto Protocol would sometimes give credits for carbon sequestered, but it would always give credits when fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions are displaced.

Marland, G.; Schlamadinger, B.

1999-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

322

Study examines sulfate-reducing bacteria activity  

SciTech Connect

Low-sulfate seawater injection can reduce the potential of an oil reservoir turning sour because of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) convert sulfate ions in seawater used in waterflooding into sulfide with the concomitant oxidation of a carbon source. A recent study at Capcis investigated the efficiency of SRB under various conditions of sulfate limitation. This study was conducted in a flowing bioreactor at 2,000 psia with different temperature zones (mesophilic 35 C and thermophilic 60--80 C). The study mixed microfloral populations derived from real North Sea-produced fluids, and included an active population of marine methanogenic bacteria present to provide competition for the available carbon sources. In general, results showed that SRB continue to convert sulfate to sulfide in stoichiometric quantities without regard to absolute concentrations. The paper discusses the results and recommends nanofiltration of seawater for ``sweet`` reservoirs.

McElhiney, J.E.; Hardy, J.A. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States); Rizk, T.Y.; Stott, J.F.D.; Eden, R.D. [UMIST, Manchester (United Kingdom)

1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

323

Liquid Propane Injection Applications | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Liquid propane injection technology meets manufacturingassembly guidelines, maintenancerepair strategy, and regulations, with same functionality, horsepower, and torque as...

324

DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin February 27, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. DOE's Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, began injecting the CO2 this week in the Michigan Basin near Gaylord, Mich., in a deep saline formation, the Silurian-age Bass Island dolomite. The MRCSP is one of seven partnerships

325

Disposal of produced waters: Undergrown injection option in the Black Warrior Basin  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of large volumes of water produced simultaneously with coal-bed methane is a costly, environmentally sensitive problem. Underground injection into deeper, naturally fractured, low-porosity formations is feasible provided that the total dissolved solids level of these formation waters comply with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. Greater fracture density in proximity to structures formed by Appalachian and Ouachita tectonism, along with a higher total dissolved solids level in both the production and injection formation waters, occurs in the eastern, southern, and northern margins of the coal-bed methane (CBM) area of the Black Warrior basin in Alabama. Injection permeability is developed where fractures intersect formations with suitable lithologies and thickness. Initial results indicate that the lower Pottsville sands, which thicken to the south, have the highest initial injection potential, although these sands appear dirty and tight on the logs. Normal faulting and matrix porosity, in addition to fracturing, may increase permeability in this formation. In the shallower, northern edge of the CBM area, thin-bedded Mississippian sands with high porosity, such as the Hartzelle, may be present. Injection potential also occurs in the fractured Devonian chert and silecous carbonate lithologies in the Upper Silurian where they thicken to the southwest, and in sandy carbonate lithologies in the undifferentiated Silurian and Ordovician at the eastern margin of the overthrust. The Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Formation has injection potential in a 6-mi wide zone at the eastern margin of the basin, where the upper Knox is dolomitized below the unconformity.

Ortiz, I.; Weller, T.F.; Anthony, R.V. (United Energy Development Consultants, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Dziewulski, D. (BioIndustrial Technologies, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Lorenzen, J. (ResTech, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Frantz, J.H. Jr. (S.A. Holditch Associates, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Adsorption?induced deformation in porous media and application to CO 2 ?injected coal beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An injection of carbon dioxide into a coal bed methane reservoir facilitates the recovery of methane a process known as enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM). Over the injection process carbon dioxide molecules get adsorbed at the surface of the coal pores making the coal swell. This swelling leads to a closure of the coal fracture system and thus to a decrease of the permeability of the reservoir hindering further injection and impairing the economic viability of ECBM. Here we provide a framework in which to calculate adsorption?induced strains in a porous medium. Usual poromechanics equations are extended to take into account surface energies. The calculations performed are valid for a general microstructure and the microstructural features are identified which govern the mechanical response of the porous medium to a change of surface stress. The effect of adsorption on surface stress is also discussed.

M. Vandamme; L. Brochard; O. Coussy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

ELECTRON INJECTION INTO CYCLIC ACCELERATOR USING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELECTRON INJECTION INTO CYCLIC ACCELERATOR USING LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATION Ya. V. Getmanov, O. A acceleration #12;Storage ring with laser injection CYCLIC ACCELERATOR RF Electron injection The LWFA beam ­ accelerating light, 5 ­ accelerated electrons, 6 ­fast kicker - + accelerating laser pulse evaporatinglaser

328

Numerical Simulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Simulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using Adaptive Multiscale Techniques Wolfgang Dahmen: finite volume method, film cooling, cooling gas injection, multiscale techniques, grid adaptation AMS@igpm.rwth-aachen.de (Thomas Gotzen) #12;Numerical simulation of cooling gas injection using adaptive multiscale techniques

329

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Capture and Storage News Carbon Capture and Storage News FE Carbon Capture and Storage News RSS June 9, 2010 Award-Winning DOE Technology Scores Success in Carbon Storage Project The ability to detect and track the movement of carbon dioxide in underground geologic storage reservoirs -- an important component of carbon capture and storage technology -- has been successfully demonstrated at a U.S. Department of Energy New Mexico test site. April 20, 2010 Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting Applications Students and early career professionals can gain hands-on experience in areas related to carbon capture and storage by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration program. March 15, 2010 Illinois CO2 Injection Project Moves Another Step Forward

330

Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Tracer Recovery and Mixing from Two Geothermal Injection-Backflow Studies Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Injection-backflow tracer testing on a single well is not a commonly used procedure for geothermal reservoir evaluation, and, consequently, there is little published information on the character or interpretation of tracer recovery curves. Two field experiments were conducted to develop chemical tracer procedures for use with injection-backflow testing, one on the fracture-permeability Raft River reservoir and the other on the matrix-permeability East Mesa reservoir. Results from tests conducted with incremental increases in the injection

331

Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Hoffman, James S. (Library, PA)

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

temperature measurements conducted by the Gulf Coast Carbon Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature measurements conducted by the Gulf Coast Carbon Center temperature measurements conducted by the Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology, University of Texas at Austin. The effort will examine the instrumentation necessary to ensure safe CO 2 storage by verifying CO 2 retention in the injection zone, quantify storage capacity, and quantify near- and far-field pressure response to injection. SECARB began injecting CO 2 on July 15, 2008, at a depth of 10,300 feet for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) at the Cranfield oilfield near Natchez, Mississippi. The naturally occurring CO 2 is obtained from Jackson Dome and transported by pipeline to the injection site. SECARB plans to inject CO

333

Carbon Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical, electrical, thermal andoptical properties. They are harder than diamond yet exible, have betterelectrical conductor than copper, but can also… (more)

Fredriksson, Tore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Coupling geothermal energy capture with carbon dioxide sequestration in naturally permeable, porous geologic formations  – a novel approach for expanding geothermal energy utilization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis research presents a new method to harness geothermal energy by combining it with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. CO2 is injected into deep,… (more)

Randolph, Jimmy Bryan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Capturing carbon | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capturing carbon Capturing carbon New technology enables molecular-level insight into carbon sequestration Carbon sequestration is a potential solution for reducing greenhouse...

336

Allergy Injection Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Allergy Injection Policy Allergy Injection Policy Allergy Injection Policy Millions of Americans suffer from perennial and seasonal allergic rhinitis. Allergy immunotherapy is an effective way to reduce or eliminate the symptoms of allergic rhinitis by desensitizing the patient to the allergen(s) by giving escalating doses of an extract via regular injections. Receiving weekly injections at a private physician's office is time consuming, reduces productivity, and can quickly deplete an employee's earned leave. FOH offers the convenience of receiving allergy injections at the OHC as a physician-prescribed service, reducing time away from work for many federal employees. Allergy Injection Policy.pdf More Documents & Publications Physician Treatment Order Handicapped Parking Guidance

337

Lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology Michael L) In carbon capture and storage (CCS), CO2 is captured at power plants and then injected underground of fossil fuels in a carbon-constrained world, the deployment of CCS has been hindered by uncertainty in geo

338

Evaluating carbon sequestration efficiency in an ocean circulation model by adjoint sensitivity analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluating carbon sequestration efficiency in an ocean circulation model by adjoint sensitivity the application of the adjoint method to develop three-dimensional maps of carbon sequestration efficiency. Sequestration efficiency (the percentage of carbon injected at a continuous point source that remains

Follows, Mick

339

Chemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

45 48 51 54 57 60 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a) as injected (b) SWIFTed (c) NO 1sChemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer S. Maruyama, M- fullerene and single walled carbon nanotubes are investigated through experimental studies of interaction

Maruyama, Shigeo

340

January 2, 2008 Numerical modeling of the effect of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

January 2, 2008 Numerical modeling of the effect of carbon dioxide sequestration on the rate souterrain de dioxyde de carbone sur la déformation des calcaires par dissolution sous contrainte: résultats;Abstract When carbon dioxide (CO2) is injected into an aquifer or a depleted geological reservoir, its

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Sample extraction and injection with a microscale preconcentrator.  

SciTech Connect

This report details the development of a microfabricated preconcentrator that functions as a fully integrated chemical extractor-injector for a microscale gas chromatograph (GC). The device enables parts-per-billion detection and quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air with size and power advantages over macro-scale systems. The 44 mm{sup 3} preconcentrator extracts VOCs using highly adsorptive, granular forms of graphitized carbon black and carbon molecular sieves. The micron-sized silicon cavities have integrated heating and temperature sensing allowing low power, yet rapid heating to thermally desorb the collected VOCs (GC injection). The keys to device construction are a new adsorbent-solvent filling technique and solvent-tolerant wafer-level silicon-gold eutectic bonding technology. The product is the first granular adsorbent preconcentrator integrated at the wafer level. Other advantages include exhaustive VOC extraction and injection peak widths an order of magnitude narrower than predecessor prototypes. A mass transfer model, the first for any microscale preconcentrator, is developed to describe both adsorption and desorption behaviors. The physically intuitive model uses implicit and explicit finite differences to numerically solve the required partial differential equations. The model is applied to the adsorption and desorption of decane at various concentrations to extract Langmuir adsorption isotherm parameters from effluent curve measurements where properties are unknown a priori.

Robinson, Alex Lockwood (Advanced Sensor Technologies, Albuquerque, NM); Chan, Helena Kai Lun

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

NETL: News Release - Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2009 7, 2009 Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin Large-Scale Test to Inject One Million Metric Tonnes of Carbon Dioxide into Saline Formation Washington, DC-The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon sequestration technologies nationwide, has begun drilling the injection well for their large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute to global climate change.

343

Control of light polarization using optically spin-injected vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers  

SciTech Connect

We fabricated and characterized an optically pumped (100)-oriented InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum well Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VECSEL). The structure is designed to allow the integration of a Metal-Tunnel-Junction ferromagnetic spin-injector for future electrical injection. We report here the control at room temperature of the electromagnetic field polarization using optical spin injection in the active medium of the VECSEL. The switching between two highly circular polarization states had been demonstrated using an M-shaped extended cavity in multi-modes lasing. This result witnesses an efficient spin-injection in the active medium of the LASER.

Frougier, J., E-mail: julien.frougier@thalesgroup.com; Jaffrès, H.; Deranlot, C.; George, J.-M. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS-Thales and Université Paris Sud 11, 1 av. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France)] [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS-Thales and Université Paris Sud 11, 1 av. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Baili, G.; Dolfi, D. [Thales Research and Technology, 1 av. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France)] [Thales Research and Technology, 1 av. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Alouini, M. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, 263 Avenue Général Leclerc, 35042 Rennes (France)] [Institut de Physique de Rennes, 263 Avenue Général Leclerc, 35042 Rennes (France); Sagnes, I. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France)] [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Garnache, A. [Institut d'électronique du Sud CNRS UMR5214, Université Montpellier 2 Place Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier (France)] [Institut d'électronique du Sud CNRS UMR5214, Université Montpellier 2 Place Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier (France)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

344

Carbon and carbon monoxide hydrogenation on nickel: support effects  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogenation of carbon, deposited on nickel catalysts by CO disproportionation, was investigated by temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) for four oxide supports, alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/), silica (SiO/sub 2/), titanium oxide (TiO/sub 2/), and SiO/sub 2/.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The rate of carbon monoxide hydrogenation was measured by temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) for comparison. The rate of carbon hydrogenation to methane was found to be independent of the support and an average activation energy of 42 kJ/mol was estimated. In contrast, the rate of carbon monoxide hydrogenation was very sensitive to the catalyst support. Nickel (Ni) supported on TiO/sub 2/ exhibited the highest specific activity, and two distinct sites for methanation were observed on Ni/TiO/sub 2/ and Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The lowest specific activities were observed for Ni/SiO/sub 2/ and Ni/SiO/sub 2/.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. For all catalysts, carbon hydrogenation occurred at a lower temperature than carbon monoxide hydrogenation. For both TPR and TPSR, small amounts of ethane were formed and at a lower temperature than methane. The amount of less-active, ..beta..-carbon observed in TPSR experiments was very small on all catalysts. These results indicate that at high coverages, carbon hydrogenation does not depend on the support, and thus it is not rate-determining for CO hydrogenation in excess hydrogen. The support is also shown to change the specific rate of carbon monoxide methanation; activity differences seen in steady-state experiments are not just due to differences in site densities. 5 figures, 5 tables.

Ozdogan, S.Z.; Gochis, P.D.; Falconer, J.L.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the InSalah CO2 Storage Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the In Salah CO 2 Storage Project Background Safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs is critical to geologic sequestration. The In Salah Project (joint venture of British Petroleum (BP), Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro) has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 billion cubic feet per year (bcfy) natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian

346

Effect of direct liquid water injection and interdigitated flow field on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

70-108B One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, California 94720 December 2, 1997 Key Words: Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cells, humidification, gas distribution, direct liquid water injection, interdigitated flow fields. * Corresponding... of the catalyst layers were made of waterproof, carbon fiber cloths. Liquid water was injected by two metering pumps into two heated stainless steel coils, where it was preheated to the cell operating temperatures, and then directly into the gas streams...

Wood, D. L.; Yi, Y. S.; Nguyen, Trung Van

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Liquid Propane Injection Technology Conductive to Today's North...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technology Conductive to Today's North American Specification Liquid Propane Injection Technology Conductive to Today's North American Specification Liquid propane injection...

348

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated Carbon dioxide emissions are the main component of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human activity. Carbon dioxide is emitted mostly as a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels for energy, although certain industrial processes (e.g., cement manufacture) also emit carbon dioxide. The estimates of energy-related carbon emissions require both data on the energy use and carbon emissions coefficients relating energy use to the amount of carbon emitted. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the main source of data on U.S. energy use. Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 used annual data provided by energy suppliers. However, to obtain more detail on how different sectors use energy, the emissions estimates in Energy and GHG Analysis rely data from on surveys of energy users, such as manufacturing establishments and commercial buildings.

349

Alteration of permeability by fine particle movement -- A water injectivity problem  

SciTech Connect

Siri field is located off shore of Iran in the Persian Gulf and is producing from the Mishrif Formation, which is common between Iran and United Arab Emirates. Existence of an active aquifer and other appropriate conditions led to the decision of a water injection program. Sea water from the Persian Gulf was found to be compatible with the formation water and was directly injected into the formation after passing through 10 micron filters. Water injectivity was drastically decreased from an initial injection rate of 9,100 bbl/day to 2,200 bbl/day within six years. Because of the severe injectivity loss, the water injection was stopped. An experimental investigation was undertaken to look into the possible causes of the injectivity loss. Two sets of experimental investigations were undertaken with different objectives in mind. In the first part glass bead packs were used to test the experimental set up and to observe the general behavior of fine particle movement in porous media. In the second part a core plug from the field and sea water were used to determine the possible cause of injectivity loss in the field. The experiments were conducted with injection rates of 0.9 cm{sup 3}/s to 3.1 cm{sup 3}/s. Particles of bentonite were suspended in the injected water to simulate fine particles migration in porous media. The particles were injected at concentrations ranged from 20 g/l to 40 g/l. It was observed that the build up in flow resistance was mostly due to the frontal face plugging. Particles of bentonite and alumina were added to the glass beads to study the effect of particles initially present in the glass beads pack medium. Field and laboratory data clearly indicate the importance of the water quality in a waterflood project. Experimental data suggest that a smaller size filter should have been implemented to avoid the injectivity loss.

Asghari, K.; Kharrat, R.; Vossoughi, S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Where is CO2 storage happening today? Where is CO2 storage happening today? Sleipner Project (Norway) Sleipner Project (Norway) Carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is currently happening across the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway, the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, and the In Salah project in Algeria, have been injecting CO2 for many years. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, too. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. Additionally, a multitude of pilot efforts are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future

351

activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Variable in an Experiment Submitted by Anita Brook-Dupree, 1996 TRAC teacher at Fermilab, Teacher, Alternative Middle Years School, Philadelphia, PA. Particle physicists at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois are faced with the problem of detecting the presence of sub-atomic particles they cannot see. During my summer as a TRAC teacher at Fermilab, I tried to think of ways to teach middle school students about things we cannot see. I want to thank my nine-year-old daughter Gia for the idea for the following activity. I was lamenting that I could not come up with ideas of how to relate the work of Fermilab scientists to anything that my students would understand. Then I was reminded by my daughter, that when I brought her to school on the

352

Reducing hazardous waste incinerator emissions through blending: A study of 1,1,1-trichloroethane injection  

SciTech Connect

We investigate whether blending liquid hazardous wastes with hydrocarbons such as alkanes can improve the destruction efficiency and reduce the combustion byproduct levels in the post-flame region of a laboratory scale combustor. Outlet species concentrations are measured with an FTIR spectrometer for mixtures of 1,1,1-trichloroethane and 25% (by volume) dodecane or heptane injected as a spray of droplets. We also inject sprays of liquid pure 1,1,1-trichloroethane, gaseous pure 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and gaseous 1,1,1-trichloroethane with 25% (by volume) heptane. Once vaporized, the 1,1,1-trichloroethane decomposes to form CO{sub 2} and HCl through the intermediates 1,1-dichloroethylene, phosgene, acetylene, and carbon monoxide. The 1,1,1-trichloroethane/alkane mixtures also form the intermediate ethylene. No significant differences are observed between injecting the compounds as a droplet spray or as a gaseous jet, not as unexpected result as the mixing time of the gas jet is longer than the vaporization time of the droplets. The addition of heptane or dodecane to 1,1,1-trichloroethane produces two principal effects: an increase in ethylene, acetylene and carbon monoxide levels for injection temperatures between 950 to 1040 K, and a decrease in 1,1-dichloroethylene, phosgene, acetylene, and carbon monoxide levels for injection temperatures greater than 1050 K. Reaction of the injected alkane causes the former effect, while the additional heat of combustion of the alkane additives causes the latter. 17 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Thomson, M.; Koshland, C.P.; Sawyer, R.F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Fuel Distributor Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Chapter 27 of the Texas Water Code (the Injection Well Act) defines an "injection well" as "an artificial excavation or opening in the ground made by digging, boring, drilling, jetting, driving, or some other

354

Low Temperature Catalyst for Fuel Injection System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A low temperature oxidation catalyst applied to a DOC and DPF combined with a unique fuel injection system remove soot from a diesel exhaust system.

355

NONLINEAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS OF AC HELICITY INJECTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

parameter: the driving fre- quency . The lower the frequency, the greater the classical penetration and the higher the helicity injection rate. On the other hand, the field...

356

Energy-efficient control in injection molding.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As an energy-intensive process, in injection molding, energy cost is one of the major cost components. The energy expenditure during molding can be divided into… (more)

Yao, Ke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Advanced Gasoline Turbocharged Direct Injection (GTDI) Engine...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Gasoline Turbocharged Direct Injection (GTDI) engine technology in the near term as a cost effective, high volume, fuel economy solution, marketed globally as EcoBoost...

358

Hawaii Underground Injection Control Permitting Webpage | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Underground Injection Control Permitting Webpage Author State of Hawaii Department of...

359

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David a. Lang David a. Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov andrew chizmeshya Arizona State University Center for Solid State Science Tempe, AZ 85287-1704 480-965-6072 chizmesh@asu.edu A Novel ApproAch to MiNerAl cArboNAtioN: eNhANciNg cArboNAtioN While AvoidiNg MiNerAl pretreAtMeNt process cost Background Carbonation of the widely occurring minerals of the olivine group, such as forsterite (Mg 2 SiO 4 ), is a potential large-scale sequestration process that converts CO 2 into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO 3 ). Because the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is the key to economic viability. Previous

360

Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A broad review of the structure and properties of carbon nanotubes is presented. Particular emphasis is given to ... dimensional density of states predicted for single-wall nanotubes of small diameter. The eviden...

M. S. Dresselhaus; G. Dresselhaus…

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Carbon Fiber  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

362

Carbon Fiber  

SciTech Connect

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

363

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

364

Prediction of Asphaltene Instability under Gas Injection with the PC-SAFT Equation of State  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of Asphaltene Instability under Gas Injection with the PC-SAFT Equation of State† ... In this work, the applicability of simple and recombined live oil models using the PC-SAFT equation of state to predict the onset of asphaltene precipitation is demonstrated by studying pressure depletion and gas injection (carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen (N2), methane, and ethane) in oil reservoirs. ... The pure component PC-SAFT parameters are fitted to the saturated liquid density and vapor pressure data, and the oil/gas pseudocomponent parameters are estimated from molecular-weight-based correlations. ...

Doris L. Gonzalez; P. David Ting; George J. Hirasaki; Walter G. Chapman

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

Enhanced carbon monoxide utilization in methanation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide - containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. The active carbon is subsequently reacted with steam or hydrogen to form methane. Surprisingly, hydrogen and water vapor present in the feed gas do not adversely affect CO utilization significantly, and such hydrogen actually results in a significant increase in CO utilization.

Elek, Louis F. (Peekskill, NY); Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Resistivity measurements before and after injection Test 5 at Raft River  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

measurements before and after injection Test 5 at Raft River measurements before and after injection Test 5 at Raft River KGRA, Idaho. Final report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Resistivity measurements before and after injection Test 5 at Raft River KGRA, Idaho. Final report Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Resistivity measurements were made prior to, and after an injection test at Raft River KGRA, Idaho. The objectives of the resistivity measurements were to determine if measureable changes could be observed and whether they could be used to infer the direction of fluid flow. Most of the apparent resistivity changes observed after the injection phase of Test 5 are smaller than the estimated standard deviation of the measurements. However, the contour map of the changes suggest an anomalous trend to the

367

U.S.-Norway Conference Focuses on Advancing Carbon Capture and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

There are carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects all over the world. The multinational Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) recognizes more than 40 active and completed...

368

Influence of stand age on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in Canadian forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from economic activity, carbon intensity, and ef?ciency ofintensity and stand density. For instance, it has been estimated that the average amount of carbon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Gasdynamic lasers utilizing carbon gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretical investigation was made of the influence of the processes of carbon gasification by combustion products and oxidants on the chemical composition of the active medium and the energy characteristics of a gasdynamic CO2 laser. Conditions were found under which the stored energy of the active medium was greater than 100 J/g.

A S Biryukov; V M Marchenko; A M Prokhorov

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Supercritical CO2-Corrosion in Heat Treated Steel Pipes during Carbon Capture and Storage CCS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat treatment of steels used for engineering a saline aquifer Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) site may become...2...) into deep geological rock formations. 13% Chromium steel injection pipes heat treated differ...

Anja Pfennig; Phillip Zastrow…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Carbon dioxide capture and storage—liability for non-permanence under the UNFCCC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has recently been...2 may re-enter the atmosphere after injection into geological reservoirs, the question of long-term liability has to be considered if an environmentally sound ...

Sven Bode; Martina Jung

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of December 2004, 11.39 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 242 MCFD. Vent losses were excessive during June as ambient temperatures increased. Installation of smaller plungers in the carbon dioxide injection pump reduced the recycle and vent loss substantially. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May and in the second production well in August. No channeling of carbon dioxide was observed. The GOR has remained within the range of 3000-4000 for most the last six months. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.35 B/D for the six month period between July 1 and December 31. Cumulative oil production was 814 bbls. Neither well has experienced increased oil production rates expected from the arrival of the oil bank generated by carbon dioxide injection.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfn; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

An Innovative Injection and Mixing System for Diesel Fuel Reforming  

SciTech Connect

This project focused on fuel stream preparation improvements prior to injection into a solid oxide fuel cell reformer. Each milestone and the results from each milestone are discussed in detail in this report. The first two milestones were the creation of a coking formation test rig and various testing performed on this rig. Initial tests indicated that three anti-carbon coatings showed improvement over an uncoated (bare metal) baseline. However, in follow-up 70 hour tests of the down selected coatings, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis revealed that no carbon was generated on the test specimens. These follow-up tests were intended to enable a down selection to a single best anti-carbon coating. Without the formation of carbon it was impossible to draw conclusions as to which anti-carbon coating showed the best performance. The final 70 hour tests did show that AMCX AMC26 demonstrated the lowest discoloration of the metal out of the three down selected anti-carbon coatings. This discoloration did not relate to carbon but could be a useful result when carbon growth rate is not the only concern. Unplanned variations in the series of tests must be considered and may have altered the results. Reliable conclusions could only be drawn from consistent, repeatable testing beyond the allotted time and funding for this project. Milestones 3 and 4 focused on the creation of a preheating pressure atomizer and mixing chamber. A design of experiment test helped identify a configuration of the preheating injector, Build 1, which showed a very uniform fuel spray flow field. This injector was improved upon by the creation of a Build 2 injector. Build 2 of the preheating injector demonstrated promising SMD results with only 22psi fuel pressure and 0.7 in H2O of Air. It was apparent from testing and CFD that this Build 2 has flow field recirculation zones. These recirculation zones may suggest that this Build 2 atomizer and mixer would require steam injection to reduce the auto ignition potential. It is also important to note that to achieve uniform mixing within a short distance, some recirculation is necessary. Milestone 5 generated CFD and FEA results that could be used to optimize the preheating injector. CFD results confirmed the recirculation zones seen in test data and confirmed that the flow field would not change when attached to a reformer. The FEA predicted fuel wetted wall temperatures which led to several suggested improvements that could possibly improve nozzle efficiency. Milestone 6 (originally an optional task) took a different approach than the preheating pressure atomizer. It focused on creation and optimization of a piezoelectric injector which could perform at extremely low fuel pressures. The piezoelectric atomizer showed acceptable SMD results with fuel pressure less than 1.0 psig and air pressure less than 1.0 in H2O. These SMD values were enhanced when a few components were changed, and it is expected would improve further still at elevated air temperatures. It was demonstrated that the piezoelectric injector could accomplish the desired task. The addition of phase tracking and a burst mode to the frequency controller increased the usability of the piezoelectric injector. This injector is ready to move on to the next phase of development. Engine Components has met the required program milestones of this project. Some of the Milestones were adjusted to allow Milestone 6 to be completed in parallel with the other Milestones. Because of this, Task 3.10 and 3.13 were made optional instead of Milestone 6. Engine Components was extremely grateful for the support that was provided by NETL in support of this work.

Spencer Pack

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Investigation of the carbon dioxide sorption capacity and structural deformation of coal  

SciTech Connect

Due to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations causing the global energy and environmental crises, geological sequestration of carbon dioxide is now being actively considered as an attractive option to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. One of the important strategies is to use deep unminable coal seams, for those generally contain significant quantities of coal bed methane that can be recovered by CO2 injection through enhanced coal bed natural gas production, as a method to safely store CO2. It has been well known that the adsorbing CO2 molecules introduce structural deformation, such as distortion, shrinkage, or swelling, of the adsorbent of coal organic matrix. The accurate investigations of CO2 sorption capacity as well as of adsorption behavior need to be performed under the conditions that coals deform. The U.S. Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory and Regional University Alliance are conducting carbon dioxide sorption isotherm experiments by using manometric analysis method for estimation of CO2 sorption capacity of various coal samples and are constructing a gravimetric apparatus which has a visual window cell. The gravimetric apparatus improves the accuracy of carbon dioxide sorption capacity and provides feasibility for the observation of structural deformation of coal sample while carbon dioxide molecules interact with coal organic matrix. The CO2 sorption isotherm measurements have been conducted for moist and dried samples of the Central Appalachian Basin (Russell County, VA) coal seam, received from the SECARB partnership, at the temperature of 55 C.

Hur, Tae-Bong; Fazio, James; Romanov, Vyacheslav; Harbert, William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Injectivity Test At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Reese River Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes On March 22, 2007 a brief injectivity test was preformed after the slotted liner had been installed. Water was injected at flow rates of 6.3 l/s, 13 l/s and 19 l/s and the pressure and temperature was recorded down hole at a depth of 926 m. At the higher flow rate, the test was interrupted several times to repair leaks at the surface. From the recorded pressure an approximate injectivity index of 10 l/s/MPa was calculated. References William R. Henkle, Joel Ronne (2008) Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Retrieved from

376

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. Forenergy and could capture and sequester carbon emissions.

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slurry Injection Slurry Injection Fact Sheet - Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes Underground Injection of Drilling Wastes Several different approaches are used for injecting drilling wastes into underground formations for permanent disposal. Salt caverns are described in a separate fact sheet. This fact sheet focuses on slurry injection technology, which involves grinding or processing solids into small particles, mixing them with water or some other liquid to make a slurry, and injecting the slurry into an underground formation at pressures high enough to fracture the rock. The process referred to here as slurry injection has been given other designations by different authors, including slurry fracture injection (this descriptive term is copyrighted by a company that provides slurry injection services), fracture slurry injection, drilled cuttings injection, cuttings reinjection, and grind and inject.

378

How realistic is the pore size distribution calculated from adsorption isotherms if activated carbon is composed of fullerene-like fragments?w  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon is composed of fullerene-like fragments?w Artur P. Terzyk,*a Sylwester Furmaniak,a Peter J. F. Harris,b Piotr A. Gauden,a Jerzy W$och,c Piotr Kowalczykd and Gerhard Rychlickia Received 11th July 2007 incorporated fullerene-related elements was proposed by Harris et al.18­21 Although this model is quite widely

Harris, Peter J F

379

Abstract--Bias temperature instability, hot-carrier injection, and gate-oxide wearout will cause severe lifetime degradation in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract--Bias temperature instability, hot-carrier injection, and gate-oxide wearout will cause mechanisms are bias temperature instability (BTI) [1] and hot-carrier injection (HCI) [2], both of which can is compounded by thermal feedback, since active devices located at die hot spots operate at an elevated

Lipasti, Mikko H.

380

Delayed carbon sequestration and rising carbon prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We set out a dynamic model to investigate optimal time paths of emissions, carbon stocks and carbon sequestration by land conversion, allowing for non-instantaneous carbon sequestration. Previous research in a dy...

Alejandro Caparrós

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet. 18 figures.

Hadley, G.R.; Hohimer, J.P.; Owyoung, A.

1991-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

384

Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet.

Hadley, G. Ronald (Albuquerque, NM); Hohimer, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); Owyoung, Adelbert (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Neutralizing Carbonic Acid in Deep Carbonate Strata below the North Atlantic  

SciTech Connect

Our research is aimed at investigating several technical issues associated with carbon dioxide sequestration in calcium carbonate sediments below the sea floor through laboratory experiments and chemical transport modeling. Our goal is to evaluate the basic feasibility of this approach, including an assessment of optimal depths, sediment types, and other issues related to site selection. The results of our modeling efforts were published this past summer in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. We are expanding on that work through a variety of laboratory and modeling efforts. In the laboratories at Columbia and at Harvard, we are studying the flow of liquid carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide-water mixtures through calcium carbonate sediments to better understand the geomechanical and structural stability of the sediments during and after injection. We are currently preparing the results of these findings for publication. In addition, we are investigating the kinetics of calcium carbonate dissolution in the presence of CO{sub 2}-water fluids, which is a critical feature of the system as it allows for increased permeability during injection. We are also investigating the possibility of carbon dioxide hydrate formation in the pore fluid, which might complicate the injection procedure by reducing sediment permeability but might also provide an upper seal in the sediment-pore fluid system, preventing release of CO{sub 2} into the deep ocean, particularly if depth and temperature at the injection point rule out immediate hydrate formation. This is done by injecting liquid CO{sub 2} into various types of porous media, and then monitoring the changes in permeability. Finally, we are performing an economic analysis to estimate costs of drilling and gas injection, site monitoring as well as the availability of potential disposal sites with particular emphasis on those sites that are within the 200-mile economic zone of the United States. We present some preliminary results from these analyses. A paper discussing the site selection based on data from the Ocean Drilling Program and Deep Sea Drilling Program is currently in preparation.

Daniel P. Schrag

2006-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

386

Comparison of nickel doped Zinc Sulfide and/or palladium nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon as efficient adsorbents for kinetic and equilibrium study of removal of Congo Red dye  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, the efficiency of nickel doped Zinc Sulfide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (Ni-ZnS-NP-AC) and palladium nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (Pd-NP-AC) for the removal of Congo Red (CR) from aqueous solution was investigated. These materials were fully identified and characterized in term of structure, surface area and pore volume with different techniques such XRD, FE-SEM and TEM analysis. The dependency of CR removal percentage to variables such as pH, contact time, amount of adsorbents, CR concentration was examined and optimum values were set as: 0.03 g Ni-ZnS-NP-AC and 0.04 g of Pd-NP-AC at pH of 3 and 2 after mixing for 22 and 26 min for Ni-ZnS-NP-AC and Pd-NP-AC, respectively. Subsequently, it was revealed that isotherm data efficiency can be correlated Langmuir with maximum monolayer adsorption capacities of 286 and 126.6 mg g?1 at room temperature for Ni-ZnS-NP-AC and Pd-NP-AC, respectively. Investigation of correlation between time and rate of adsorption reveal that the CR adsorption onto both adsorbents followed pseudo second order and interparticle diffusion simultaneously.

K. Ahmadi; M. Ghaedi; A. Ansari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

NETL: News Release - CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31, 2011 31, 2011 CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says Near-Miscible Flooding in Arbuckle Formation Would Help Small Producers Tap Additional Domestic Resources Washington, D.C. - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas. Miscibility refers to the pressure at which the CO2 and oil are completely soluble in one another or form a single phase. Below the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) the injected CO2 mixes with and swells the oil to reduce its viscosity, increasing its ability to flow through the reservoir more easily to the production well.

388

Injection of Electrons and Holes into Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection of Electrons and Holes into Nanostructures Injection of Electrons and Holes into Nanostructures This program targets fundamental understanding of nanoscale charge transfer processes. The proposed work draws on the strengths of the Brookhaven Chemistry Department in the areas of electron transfer experiment and theory, and extends the area of inquiry to nanoscale processes. Electron/hole injection into a wire, a nanocrystal, a nanotube or other nanostructure in solution may be brought about by light absorption, by an electron pulse (pulse radiolysis, LEAF), by a chemical reagent, or through an electrode. These processes are being studied by transient methods by following conductivity, current, but most generally, spectroscopic changes in the solutions to determine the dynamics of charge injection. The observed transient spectra can also provide values for electron-transfer coupling elements and energetics. Theoretical/computational studies can help in materials design and in the interpretation of the experimental results. The experimental systems being examined include molecular wires and metal nanoclusters.

389

Injection Locking Techniques for Spectrum Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Wideband spectrum analysis supports future communication systems that reconfigure and adapt to the capacity of the spectral environment. While test equipment manufacturers offer wideband spectrum analyzers with excellent sensitivity and resolution, these spectrum analyzers typically cannot offer acceptable size, weight, and power (SWAP). CMOS integrated circuits offer the potential to fully integrate spectrum analysis capability with analog front-end circuitry and digital signal processing on a single chip. Unfortunately, CMOS lacks high-Q passives and wideband resonator tunability that is necessary for heterodyne implementations of spectrum analyzers. As an alternative to the heterodyne receiver architectures, two nonlinear methods for performing wideband, low-power spectrum analysis are presented. The first method involves injecting the spectrum of interest into an array of injection-locked oscillators. The second method employs the closed loop dynamics of both injection locking and phase locking to independently estimate the injected frequency and power.

Gathma, Timothy D.; Buckwalter, James F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 9209 (United States)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

390

Injection Technologies for Fault Attacks on Microprocessors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fault injection technique we will analyze in detail in Sect. 16.3, is the constant under-powering of a computing device. By running the chip with a depleted power supply, the attacker is able to insert transi...

Alessandro Barenghi; Guido M. Bertoni; Luca Breveglieri…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Investigation of Direct Injection Vehicle Particulate Matter...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emissions This study focuses primarily on particulate matter mass analysis of a gasoline direct injection engine in a test cell with a chassis dynamometer. p-10gibbs.pdf...

392

NETL: News Release - Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2006 2, 2006 DOE Project Injects 700 Tons of Carbon Dioxide Into Texas Sandstone Formation Researchers to Determine the Ability of Brine Formations to Sequester Greenhouse Gas WASHINGTON, DC - When scientists recently pumped 700 metric tons of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) a mile underground as a follow-up to a 2004 effort, they initiated a series of tests to determine the feasibility of storing the CO2 in brine formations, a major step forward in the U.S. Department of Energy's carbon sequestration program. MORE INFO Read the University of Texas at Austin press release 11.19.04 Techline : Frio Formation Test Well Injected with Carbon Dioxide The Frio Brine project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory, is designed to

393

Fluidized bed injection assembly for coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coaxial feed system for fluidized bed coal gasification processes including an inner tube for injecting particulate combustibles into a transport gas, an inner annulus about the inner tube for injecting an oxidizing gas, and an outer annulus about the inner annulus for transporting a fluidizing and cooling gas. The combustibles and oxidizing gas are discharged vertically upward directly into the combustion jet, and the fluidizing and cooling gas is discharged in a downward radial direction into the bed below the combustion jet.

Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA); Salvador, Louis A. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Smart Materials for Fuel Injection Actuation  

SciTech Connect

The demands of stringent emissions and a robust engine dynamic torque response characteristic require innovative, accurate and repeatable control of the fuel injection event. Recent advances in piezo-material actuators have warranted the pursuit of its application to advanced heavy-duty truck fuel injection systems. This presentation will report on design and testing of an advanced electronic unit injector for the Detroit Diesel Series 60 truck engine.

Hakim, Nabil

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

395

Proper Injection Techniques in Dairy Cattle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tissue reaction. Don?t inject more than 10 cc (ml) in one site. If more ? medication must be given, use several injection sites. Use the recommended route of administration. There ? are three main routs of administration. Subcutaneously (SQ... sunlight and in a controlled environment. When finished vaccinating for ? the day, properly dispose of any remaining vaccine. Once a vaccine vial is opened, the expiration date is void. Using sanitary methods Protect needles and medicines ? from dust...

Villarino, Mario A.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

396

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ahead, and identifying the carbon pools and other green house gas emissions sources and savings coveredCarbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 Carbon

397

300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. This report summarizes the work on the polyphosphate injection project, including bench-scale laboratory studies, a field injection test, and the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the results. Previous laboratory tests have demonstrated that when a soluble form of polyphosphate is injected into uranium-bearing saturated porous media, immobilization of uranium occurs due to formation of an insoluble uranyl phosphate, autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2•nH2O]. These tests were conducted at conditions expected for the aquifer and used Hanford soils and groundwater containing very low concentrations of uranium (10-6 M). Because autunite sequesters uranium in the oxidized form U(VI) rather than forcing reduction to U(IV), the possibility of re-oxidation and subsequent re-mobilization is negated. Extensive testing demonstrated the very low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of autunite. In addition to autunite, excess phosphorous may result in apatite mineral formation, which provides a long-term source of treatment capacity. Phosphate arrival response data indicate that, under site conditions, the polyphosphate amendment could be effectively distributed over a relatively large lateral extent, with wells located at a radial distance of 23 m (75 ft) reaching from between 40% and 60% of the injection concentration. Given these phosphate transport characteristics, direct treatment of uranium through the formation of uranyl-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., autunite) could likely be effectively implemented at full field scale. However, formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases using the selected three-phase approach was problematic. Although amendment arrival response data indicate some degree of overlap between the reactive species and thus potential for the formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., apatite formation), the efficiency of this treatment approach was relatively poor. In general, uranium performance monitoring results support the hypothesis that limited long-term treatment capacity (i.e., apatite formation) was established during the injection test. Two separate overarching issues affect the efficacy of apatite remediation for uranium sequestration within the 300 Area: 1) the efficacy of apatite for sequestering uranium under the present geochemical and hydrodynamic conditions, and 2) the formation and emplacement of apatite via polyphosphate technology. In addition, the long-term stability of uranium sequestered via apatite is dependent on the chemical speciation of uranium, surface speciation of apatite, and the mechanism of retention, which is highly susceptible to dynamic geochemical conditions. It was expected that uranium sequestration in the presence of hydroxyapatite would occur by sorption and/or surface complexation until all surface sites have been depleted, but that the high carbonate concentrations in the 300 Area would act to inhibit the transformation of sorbed uranium to chernikovite and/or autunite. Adsorption of uranium by apatite was never considered a viable approach for in situ uranium sequestration in and of itself, because by definition, this is a reversible reaction. The efficacy of uranium sequestration by apatite assumes that the adsorbed uranium would subsequently convert to autunite, or other stable uranium phases. Because this appears to not be the case in the 300 Area aquifer, even in locations near the river, apatite may have limited efficacy for the retention and long-term immobilization of uranium at the 300 Area site..

Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Orthogonal ion injection apparatus and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An orthogonal ion injection apparatus and process are described in which ions are directly injected into an ion guide orthogonal to the ion guide axis through an inlet opening located on a side of the ion guide. The end of the heated capillary is placed inside the ion guide such that the ions are directly injected into DC and RF fields inside the ion guide, which efficiently confines ions inside the ion guide. Liquid droplets created by the ionization source that are carried through the capillary into the ion guide are removed from the ion guide by a strong directional gas flow through an inlet opening on the opposite side of the ion guide. Strong DC and RF fields divert ions into the ion guide. In-guide orthogonal injection yields a noise level that is a factor of 1.5 to 2 lower than conventional inline injection known in the art. Signal intensities for low m/z ions are greater compared to convention inline injection under the same processing conditions.

Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Belov, Mikhail E

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

204 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOBIOSCIENCE, VOL. 5, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2006 Using Carbon Nanotubes to Absorb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

activated carbon in this regard. Fluorescence intensity of the carbon nanotube with and without immersion204 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOBIOSCIENCE, VOL. 5, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2006 Using Carbon Nanotubes the interaction between hydrogen sulfide and carbon nanotube. The carbon nanotube is chosen because of a known

Zhang, WJ "Chris"

400

Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Presentation given at DEER 2006,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Advantages of Oxygenates Fuels over Gasoline in Direct Injection...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advantages of Oxygenates Fuels over Gasoline in Direct Injection Spark Ignition Engines Advantages of Oxygenates Fuels over Gasoline in Direct Injection Spark Ignition Engines...

402

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel Injection...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics Presentation...

403

Injection risk behavior among women syringe exchangers in San Francisco.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

injection supplies (cotton, cookers, water, and bleach),injection equipment, such as cookers, cottons, and rinsepartners, n=148 Shared cooker, cotton, or rinse water

Lum, Paula J; Sears, Clare; Guydish, Joseph

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Alabama Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil Recovery, Testing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil Recovery, Testing Important Geologic CO2 Storage Alabama Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil Recovery, Testing Important...

405

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Latest Estimates Latest Estimates Atmos CO2 Level 397.31 ppm Fossil CO2 Emissions 9,167 MMT Carbon Global Temp Anomaly +0.56°C / +1.01°F Global Sea Level Rise +2.9 ± 0.4 mm/y Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) is the primary climate-change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). CDIAC is located at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and includes the World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases. CDIAC's data holdings include estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and land-use changes; records of atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other radiatively active trace gases; carbon cycle and terrestrial carbon management datasets and analyses; and

406

A CFD Model for High Pressure Liquid Poison Injection for CANDU-6 Shutdown System No. 2  

SciTech Connect

In CANDU reactor one of the two reactor shutdown systems is the liquid poison injection system which injects the highly pressurized liquid neutron poison into the moderator tank via small holes on the nozzle pipes. To ensure the safe shutdown of a reactor it is necessary for the poison curtains generated by jets provide quick, and enough negative reactivity to the reactor during the early stage of the accident. In order to produce the neutron cross section necessary to perform this work, the poison concentration distribution during the transient is necessary. In this study, a set of models for analyzing the transient poison concentration induced by this high pressure poison injection jet activated upon the reactor trip in a CANDU-6 reactor moderator tank has been developed and used to generate the poison concentration distribution of the poison curtains induced by the high pressure jets injected into the vacant region between the pressure tube banks. The poison injection rate through the jet holes drilled on the nozzle pipes is obtained by a 1-D transient hydrodynamic code called, ALITRIG, and this injection rate is used to provide the inlet boundary condition to a 3-D CFD model of the moderator tank based on CFX4.3, a CFD code, to simulate the formation of the poison jet curtain inside the moderator tank. For validation, an attempt was made to validate this model against a poison injection experiment performed at BARC. As conclusion this set of models is judged to be appropriate. (authors)

Bo Wook Rhee; Chang Jun Jeong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150, Dukjin-Dong, Yusong-Gu, Taejon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Hye Jeong Yun; Dong Soon Jang [Choongnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4966 jose.figueroa@netl.doe.gov Kevin o'Brien Principal Investigator SRI International Materials Research Laboratory 333 Ravenswood Avenue Menlo Park, AK 94025 650-859-3528 kevin.obrien@sri.com Fabrication and Scale-Up oF polybenzimidazole - baSed membrane SyStem For pre - combUStion captUre oF carbon dioxide Background In order to effectively sequester carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from a gasification plant, there must be an economically viable method for removing the CO 2 from other gases. While CO 2 separation technologies currently exist, their effectiveness is limited. Amine-based separation technologies work only at low temperatures, while pressure-swing absorption and cryogenic distillation consume significantly

408

Transonic Combustion ?- Injection Strategy Development for Supercritical Gasoline Injection-Ignition in a Light Duty Engine  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Novel fuel injection equipment enables knock-free ignition with low noise and smoke in compression-ignition engines and low-particulates in spark-ignition engines.

409

Injectivity Test At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Newberry Caldera Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes After circulating the mud out of the hole and replacing it with clear water, we attempted two injection tests; one into the open hole section (51 16'- 5360') below the HQ liner, and one into the annulus outside the uncemented part (2748' - -4800') of the liner. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration

410

DOE Partner Begins Carbon Storage Test | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partner Begins Carbon Storage Test Partner Begins Carbon Storage Test DOE Partner Begins Carbon Storage Test June 25, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- A Department of Energy sponsored project in Hopkins County, Kentucky has begun injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) into a mature oil field to assess the region's CO2 storage capacity and feasibility for enhanced oil recovery. The project is part of DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) program and is being conducted by The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC). The project is part of the RCSP's "validation phase," where field tests are being conducted nationwide to assess the most promising sites to deploy carbon capture and storage technologies. This project is expected to create 13 full time jobs which will be

411

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting Elisa Belfiori belf0018@umn.edu University of Minnesota Abstract This paper considers the optimal design of policies to carbon emissions in an economy, such as price or quantity controls on the net emissions of carbon, are insufficient to achieve the social

Weiblen, George D

412

Opacity reduction using hydrated lime injection  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this investigation is to study the effects of injecting dry hydrated lime into flue gas to reduce sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) concentrations and consequently stack opacity at the University of Missouri, Columbia power plant. Burning of high sulfur coal (approx. 4% by weight) at the power plant resulted in opacity violations. The opacity problem was due to sulfuric acid mist (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) forming at the stack from high SO{sub 3} concentrations. As a result of light scattering by the mist, a visible plume leaves the stack. Therefore, reducing high concentrations of SO{sub 3} reduces the sulfuric acid mist and consequently the opacity problem. The current hydrated lime injection system has reduced the opacity to acceptable limits. To reduce SO{sub 3} concentrations, dry hydrated lime is injected into the flue gas upstream of a particulate collection device (baghouse) and downstream of the induced draft fan. The lime is periodically injected into the flue via a pneumatic piping system. The hydrated lime is transported down the flue and deposited on the filter bags in the baghouse. As the hydrated lime is deposited on the bags a filter cake is established. The reaction between the SO{sub 3} and the hydrated lime takes place on the filter bags. The hydrated lime injection system has resulted in at least 95% reduction in the SO{sub 3} concentration. Low capital equipment requirements and operating cost coupled with easy installation and maintenance makes the system very attractive to industries with similar problems. This paper documents the hydrated lime injection system and tests the effectiveness of the system on SO{sub 3} removal and subsequent opacity reduction. Measurements Of SO{sub 3} concentrations, flue gas velocities, and temperatures have been performed at the duct work and baghouse. A complete analysis of the hydrated lime injection system is provided.

Wolf, D.E.; Seaba, J.P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Supported-sorbent injection. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A new retrofitable, wastefree acid-rain control concept was pilot-tested at Ohio Edison`s high-sulfur coal-fired R.E. Burger generating station at the 2-MWe level. During the project, moistened {open_quotes}supported{close_quotes} sorbents, made from a combination of lime and vermiculite or perlite, were injected into a humidified 6,500-acfm flue-gas slipstream. After the sorbents reacted with the sulfur dioxide in the flue gas, they were removed from ductwork with a cyclone and baghouse. The $1.0 million project was co-funded by Sorbent Technologies Corporation, the Ohio Edison Company, and the Ohio Coal Development Office. The project included a preliminary bench-scale testing phase, construction of the pilot plant, parametric studies, numerous series of recycle tests, and a long-term run. The project proceeded as anticipated and achieved its expected results. This duct injection technology successfully demonstrated SO{sub 2}-removal rates of 80 to 90% using reasonable stoichiometric injection ratios (2:1 Ca:S) and approach temperatures (20-25F). Under similar conditions, dry injection of hydrated lime alone typically only achieves 40 to 50% SO{sub 2} removal. During the testing, no difficulties were encountered with deposits in the ductwork or with particulate control, which have been problems in tests of other duct-injection schemes.

Nelson, S. Jr.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

CARBON DIOXIDE AND OUR OCEAN LEGACY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to energy-consuming activities that burn fossil fuels. On a yearly basis, the average Ameri- can produces 22 of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, or nearly half of the fossil fuel carbon emissions over this period sea life that depend on the health and avail- ability of these shelled organisms. At present, ocean

415

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

different options for CO2 storage? different options for CO2 storage? Oil and gas reservoirs, many containing carbon dioxide (CO2), as well as natural deposits of almost pure CO2, can be found in many places in the United States and around the world. These are examples of long-term storage of CO2 by nature, where "long term" means millions of years. Their existence demonstrates that naturally occurring geologic formations and structures of various kinds are capable of securely storing CO2 deep in the subsurface for very long periods of time. Because of the economic importance of oil and gas, scientists and engineers have studied these natural deposits for many decades in order to understand the physical and chemical processes which led to their formation. There are also many decades of engineering experience in subsurface operations similar to those needed for CO2 storage. The most directly applicable experience comes from the oil industry, which, for 40 years, has injected CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs for the recovery of additional product through enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Additional experience comes from natural gas storage operations, which have utilized depleted gas reservoirs, as well as reservoirs containing only water. Scientists and engineers are now combining the knowledge obtained from study of natural deposits with experience from analogous operations as a basis for studying the potential for large-scale storage of CO2 in the deep subsurface.

416

Definition: Injectivity Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Injectivity Test Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Injectivity Test A well testing technique conducted upon completion of a well. Water is pumped into the well at a constant rate until a stable pressure is reached then the pump is turned off and the rate at which pressure decreases is measured. The pressure measurements are graphed and well permeability can be calculated.[1] References ↑ https://pangea.stanford.edu/ERE/pdf/IGAstandard/ISS/2008Croatia/Hole03.pdf Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You and one other like this.One person likes this. Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Injectivity_Test&oldid=688681"

417

Interaction between Injection Points during Hydraulic Fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model of the hydraulic fracturing of heterogeneous poroelastic media. The formalism is an effective continuum model that captures the coupled dynamics of the fluid pressure and the fractured rock matrix and models both the tensile and shear failure of the rock. As an application of the formalism, we study the geomechanical stress interaction between two injection points during hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) and how this interaction influences the fracturing process. For injection points that are separated by less than a critical correlation length, we find that the fracturing process around each point is strongly correlated with the position of the neighboring point. The magnitude of the correlation length depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the rock and is on the order of 30-45 m for rocks with low permeabilities. In the strongly correlated regime, we predict a novel effective fracture-force that attracts the fractures toward the neighboring injection point.

Hals, Kjetil M D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Multistaged stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multistaged Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier for providing a high gain Stokes output signal. The amplifier uses a plurality of optically coupled capillary waveguide amplifiers and one or more regenerative amplifiers to increase Stokes gain to a level sufficient for power amplification. Power amplification is provided by a multifocused Raman gain cell or a large diameter capillary waveguide. An external source of CO.sub.2 laser radiation can be injected into each of the capillary waveguide amplifier stages to increase Raman gain. Devices for injecting external sources of CO.sub.2 radiation include: dichroic mirrors, prisms, gratings and Ge Brewster plates. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 input radiation to the first stage can be coupled and amplified between successive stages.

Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Carbon Fiber Consortium | Partnerships | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Fiber Consortium SHARE Carbon Fiber Consortium Oak Ridge Carbon Fiber Composites Consortium The Oak Ridge Carbon Fiber Composites Consortium was established in 2011 to...

420

Mixed Mode Fuel Injector And Injection System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set that are controlled respectively by first and second three way needle control valves. Each fuel injector includes first and second concentric needle valve members. One of the needle valve members moves to an open position for a homogenous charge injection event, while the other needle valve member moves to an open position for a conventional injection event. The fuel injector has the ability to operate in a homogenous charge mode with a homogenous charge spray pattern, a conventional mode with a conventional spray pattern or a mixed mode.

Stewart, Chris Lee (Normal, IL); Tian, Ye (Bloomington, IL); Wang, Lifeng (Normal, IL); Shafer, Scott F. (Morton, IL)

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 17, 2009 March 17, 2009 DOE Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon Sequestration The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has created a comprehensive new document that examines existing and emerging techniques to monitor, verify, and account for carbon dioxide stored in geologic formations. March 10, 2009 DOE Regional Partnership Initiates CO2 Injection in Lignite Coal Seam A U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory team of regional partners has begun injecting CO2 into a deep lignite coal seam in Burke County, North Dakota, to demonstrate the economic and environmental viability of geologic CO2 storage in the U.S. Great Plains region. February 27, 2009 DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin

422

Effect of potassium carbonate on char gasification by carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

A differential packed-bed reactor has been employed to study the gasification of 7.5 wt% K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-catalyzed Saran char in carbon dioxide/carbon monoxide mixtures at a total pressure near 1 atm (101.3 kPa) and temperatures between 922 and 1046 K. The rate data were tested with a model which involves two-site adsorption and subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the char surface. The results indicate that this model adequately explains the catalyzed gasification data. Moreover, the activation energy for desorption of carbon-oxygen complex is lower for the catalyzed case than for the uncatalyzed case. Adsorption of CO and CO/sub 2/ on both catalyzed and uncatalyzed chars was also followed with a volumetric adsorption apparatus at pressures between 1 and 100 kPa and temperatures from 273 to 725 K. The catalyzed char adsorbed an order of magnitude more CO/sub 2/ at 560 K than the uncatalyzed char. Subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the carbon surface does not appear to be catalyzed by potassium. Thus, the catalyst's role is to enhance CO/sub 2/ adsorption, thereby creating more oxygen on the surface, and lowering the activation energy for desorption of the resultant carbon-oxygen species.

Koenig, P.C.; Squires, R.G.; Laurendeau, N.M.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Global Impacts (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ashok Gadgil, Faculty Senior Scientist and Acting Director, EETD, also Professor of Environmental Engineering, UC Berkeley, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Gadgil, Ashok [EETD and UC Berkeley

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

424

Separation of carbon nanotubes in density gradients  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), by chirality and/or diameter, using centrifugation of compositions of SWNTs in and surface active components in density gradient media.

Hersam, Mark C. (Evanston, IL); Stupp, Samuel I. (Chicago, IL); Arnold, Michael S. (Northbrook, IL)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

Separation of carbon nanotubes in density gradients  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), by chirality and/or diameter, using centrifugation of compositions of SWNTs in and surface active components in density gradient media.

Hersam, Mark C. (Evanston, IL); Stupp, Samuel I. (Chicago, IL); Arnold, Michael S. (Northbrook, IL)

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

426

Mass Spectroscopy and Reaction Studies of Laser-Vaporized Clusters from Metal-Doped Carbon Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C50 + LaC60 + (40) 30 40 50 60 70 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arb.units) (a) Positive La Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) C43 ­ C44 ­ Mass (amu) LaC32 ­ (a) (b) Fig. 2 Even distribution. 440 460 480 500 36 38 40 42 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a) as injected (b

Maruyama, Shigeo

427

Carbon nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic self-assembly: a highly active oxygen reduction Carbon nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic...

428

Enhanced carbon influx into TFTR supershots  

SciTech Connect

Under some conditions, a very large influx of carbon into TFTR occurs during beam injection into low recycling plasmas (the Supershot regime). These carbon blooms'' result in serious degradation of plasma parameters. The sources of this carbon have been identified as hot spots on the TFTR bumper limiter at or near the last closed flux surface. Two separate temperature thresholds have been identified. One, at about 1650{degree}C, is consistent with radiation enhanced sublimation. The other, at about 2300{degree}C, appears to be thermal sublimation of carbon from the limiter. To account for the increased density caused by the blooms, near unity recycling of the carbon at the limiter by physical sputtering is required; this effect is expected from laboratory measurements, and we believe we are seeing it on TFTR. The sources of the carbon blooms are sites which have either loosely attached fragments of limiter material (caused by damage) or surfaces nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. Such surfaces may have local power depositions two orders of magnitude higher than usual. The TFTR team modified the limiter during the opening of Winter 1989--90. The modifications greatly reduced the number and magnitude of the blooms, so that they are no longer a problem.

Ramsey, A.T.; Bush, C.E.; Dylla, H.F.; Owens, D.K.; Pitcher, C.S.; Ulrickson, M.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The Structure of Ions near Carbon Nanotubes: New Insights into Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Structure of Ions near Carbon Nanotubes: New Insights into The Structure of Ions near Carbon Nanotubes: New Insights into Carbon Surface Chemistry and Implications for Water Purification Carbon-based materials have long been used for a variety of water purification operations. Researchers have investigated carbon materials as adsorbents for decades, but only limited information on the precise details of aqueous ion interactions with carbon surfaces has been uncovered. It is empirically known that the affinity of activated carbon for various hydrated ions depends critically on how the material is processed. Processing influences the types of chemical groups and the structure of the carbon surface, which in turn influences the strength of interaction between hydrated ions and the carbon surface. It is also believed that many of the puzzling properties of impurity-free carbon, such as ferromagnetism, are governed by specific modifications of the carbon surface. However, very little is known about the local structure of the carbon surface that is responsible for its aqueous ion affinity.

430

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership U.S Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships: Sharing Knowledge from Two Field Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership Presented to: Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Annual Review Meeting November 15, 2011 Presented by: Gerald R. Hill, Ph.D. Senior Technical Advisor Southern States Energy Board Acknowledgements  This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory.  Cost share and research support provided by SECARB/SSEB Carbon Management Partners.  CO 2 Capture Unit funded separately by Southern Company and partners. 2 Presentation Outline  Overview  Characterization Studies  Early Test - Cranfield, MS  Anthropogenic Test - Citronelle, AL - Capture Unit Status - Pipeline Status - Injection Well Status 3 SECARB Characterization: CO 2 Sources & Saline Reservoirs

431

Process for sequestering carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for sequestering carbon dioxide, which includes reacting a silicate based material with an acid to form a suspension, and combining the suspension with carbon dioxide to create active carbonation of the silicate-based material, and thereafter producing a metal salt, silica and regenerating the acid in the liquid phase of the suspension.

Maroto-Valer, M. Mercedes (State College, PA); Zhang, Yinzhi (State College, PA); Kuchta, Matthew E. (State College, PA); Andresen, John M. (State College, PA); Fauth, Dan J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

432

Carbon Cycle 2.0: Robert Cheng and Juan Meza  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

Robert Cheng and Juan Meza

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The atmospheric signature of carbon capture and storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...here assumed to be a coal-fired power plant equipped for carbon...Fielding2008A perturbation analysis of the climate benefit...Sundquist2008Comparison of two US power-plant carbon dioxide...atmospheric CO2 growth from economic activity, carbon intensity...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Injectivity Test At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Part of the injection testing used downhole packers for isolating various zones and evaluating their permeability. By running the packers into the hole on N-rod ( 2.75"+K610 OD), the annulus was roughly the same cross-sectional area as the inside of the pipe. It was then possible to inject into either the zone above the packer or the one below, and compare the infectivity of those intervals. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration

435

Injectivity Test At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Vale Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analysis of the two injection tests performed at the exploration slimhole site during May, 1995 yielded estimates for the permeability-thickness product (transmissivity) kh of 0.25 and 0.23 Da-fi, based on pressure fall off after injection (see Section IV-a). Using the pressure buildup for the second test, a transmissivity of 0.610 Da-ft was estimated. These estimates are approximately an order of magnitude smaller than the kh values estimated for the nearby A-Alt well which was tested in 1994. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

436

Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Carbon Storage 2011 Carbon Storage Project Portfolio Table of Contents CARBON STORAGE OVERVIEW Carbon Storage Program Contacts [PDF-26KB] Carbon Storage Projects National Map [PDF-169KB] State Projects Summary Table [PDF-39KB] Carbon Storage Program Structure [PDF-181KB] Selected Carbon Sequestration Program Papers and Publications The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Through Beneficial Uses of Carbon Dioxide (2011) [PDF-3.3MB] Greenhouse Gas Science and Technology Carbon Capture and Sequestration: The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Efforts to Characterize Opportunities for Deep Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Offshore Resources (2011) [PDF-445KB]

437

CALIFORNIA CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN WASHINGTON. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use in Washington: Costs and Opportunities. California for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock International. #12;ii #12;iii Preface

438

Edgewood Carbon Holdings LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edgewood Carbon Holdings LLC Edgewood Carbon Holdings LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Edgewood Carbon Holdings LLC Place Cornwall, Vermont Zip 57530 Sector Carbon Product Edgewood Carbon Holdings LLC is active worldwide in the evolving commercialization of carbon recovery. Coordinates 50.443321°, -4.93986° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":50.443321,"lon":-4.93986,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

439

Carbon Diffusion and Clustering in SiGeC Layers Under Thermal Oxidation D. De Salvador1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in order to distinguish the pure thermal effects from those produced by the I injection under oxidationCarbon Diffusion and Clustering in SiGeC Layers Under Thermal Oxidation D. De Salvador1 , E to the formation and growth of C containing precipitates which are promoted by the I injection and act as a sink

440

On the flat length of injective modules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......that I has a projective resolution of length n + m and hence pdRI n + m. Therefore, spli R n + m, as needed. The second inequality...n - 1. Proof. Let I be an injective left R-module. Then pdRI spli R n and hence Corol- lary 2.12 implies that fdRI n......

Ioannis Emmanouil; Olympia Talelli

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Enhanced oil recovery using hydrogen peroxide injection  

SciTech Connect

NOVATEC received an US Patent on a novel method to recovery viscous oil by hydrogen peroxide injection. The process appears to offer several significant improvements over existing thermal methods of oil recovery. Tejas joined NOVATEC to test the process in the laboratory and to develop oil field applications and procedures.

Moss, J.T. Jr.; Moss, J.T.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Accounting for Remaining Injected Fracturing Fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The technology of multi-stage fracturing of horizontal wells made the development of shale gas reservoirs become greatly successful during the past decades. A large amount of fracturing fluid, usually from 53,000 bbls to 81,400 bbls, is injected...

Zhang, Yannan

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

443

Refueling Tokamaks by Injection of Compact Toroids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that transverse injection of a hypervelocity high-density spheromak plasmoid into a tokamak plasma may be a viable fueling scheme. Three important processes occur and are discussed individually: establishment of equilibrium, slowing down, and disassembly of the compact toroid.

P. B. Parks

1988-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

444

Injection of solids to lift coastal areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...used to inject sand into oil or gas reservoirs because the...in sandstone (Western Missouri) at depths ranging from...Delavaud2006Use of vegetable oil and silica powder for scale...seismicity near the Lacq gas field southwestern FranceJ...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Passive safety injection system using borated water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive safety injection system relies on differences in water density to induce natural circulatory flow patterns which help maintain prescribed concentrations of boric acid in borated water, and prevents boron from accumulating in the reactor vessel and possibly preventing heat transfer.

Conway, Lawrence E. (Allegheny, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Westmoreland, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Injection of solids to lift coastal areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...formations, although additional investigations are needed to improve this...Sparks2006An experimental investigation of sill formation and propagation...fracturing soil to improve remedial actions NTIS report PB91-181818Washington...D. Bolton2004Laboratory investigation of multiple injection into...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Study Reveals Fuel Injection Timing Impact on Particle Number Emissions (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Start of injection can improve environmental performance of fuel-efficient gasoline direct injection engines.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Competitiveness of Soil Carbon as an Option: Is it a Bridge to the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on life-cycle comparisons #12;6 GHG activities in FASOMGHG activities in FASOMGHG activities in FASOM Multiple GHG strategy setup Detailed GHG emission accounting Forest carbon Soil carbon N20 CH4 Fuel use carbon emissions National GHG balance GWP weighted sum of all GHG accounts GHG policy implementation #12

McCarl, Bruce A.

449

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Gasoline direct injection: Actual trends and future strategies for injection and combustion systems  

SciTech Connect

Recent developments have raised increased interest on the concept of gasoline direct injection as the most promising future strategy for fuel economy improvement of SI engines. The general requirements for mixture preparation and combustion systems in a GDI engine are presented in view of known and actual systems regarding fuel economy and emission potential. The characteristics of the actually favored injection systems are discussed and guidelines for the development of appropriate combustion systems are derived. The differences between such mixture preparation strategies as air distributed fuel and fuel wall impingement are discussed, leading to the alternative approach to the problem of mixture preparation with the fully air distributing concept of direct mixture injection.

Fraidl, G.K.; Piock, W.F.; Wirth, M.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Steam reforming of n-heptane at low concentration as a means for hydrogen injection into internal combustion engines  

SciTech Connect

Steam reforming of n-heptane at low concentration as a means for hydrogen injection into internal combustion engines, with the aim of running the engine at a lean fuel-air ratio (to reduce emissions and improve fuel economy), was studied in laboratory flow systems with both an integral and gradientless (Berty-type) fixed-bed reactor. The reaction kinetics were determined in the gradientless reactor over a Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst at 632/sup 0/-679/sup 0/K, 1 atm total pressure, and 0.15-1.75 kPa partial pressure of n-heptane, with a recycling ratio of over 20:1. The reaction orders in hydrogen and n-heptane were 0.22 and -0.23, respectively, and the activation energy was 83.6 kj/mole. The reactant concentrations did not satisfy the equilibrium equations for the water-gas shift and methane-steam reactions at low conversions, but the agreement was good at high conversions. A small amount of benzene was produced, which decreased with increasing temperature, probably because of the polymerization, and ultimately, carbon formation.

Sjoestroem, K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon leakage 12 3.4 Project carbon sequestration 12 3.5 Net carbon sequestration 13 4. Environmental quality 14

453

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

454

EA-1835: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

35: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) 35: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project in Chester Township, Michigan EA-1835: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project in Chester Township, Michigan Summary NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide approximately $65.5 million in financial assistance in a cost-sharing arrangement with the project proponent, MRCSP. MRCSP's proposed project would use CO2 captured from an existing natural gas processing plant in Chester Township, pipe it approximately 1 mile to an injection well, and inject it into a deep saline aquifer for geologic sequestration. This project would demonstrate the geologic sequestration of 1,000,000 metric

455

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Background: The U.S. DOE's Sequestration Program began with a small appropriation of $1M in 1997 and has grown to be the largest most comprehensive CCS R&D program in the world. The U.S. DOE's sequestration program has supported a number of projects implementing CO2 injection in the United States and other countries including, Canada, Algeria, Norway, Australia, and Germany. The program has also been supporting a number of complementary R&D projects investigating the science of storage, simulation, risk assessment, and monitoring the fate of the injected CO2 in the subsurface.

456

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 1990. These many alternative-fuel initiatives failed tolow-cost, low-carbon alternative fuels would thrive. Theto introduce low-carbon alternative fuels. Former Federal

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 19, 2012 December 19, 2012 DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource The United States has at least 2,400 billion metric tons of possible carbon dioxide storage resource in saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal seams, according to a new U.S. Department of Energy publication. November 20, 2012 DOE Approves Field Test for Promising Carbon Capture Technology A promising post combustion membrane technology that can separate and capture 90 percent of the carbon dioxide from a pulverized coal plant has been successfully demonstrated and received Department of Energy approval to advance to a larger-scale field test. November 19, 2012 Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in

458

Definition, Capabilities, and Components of a Terrestrial Carbon Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts for effectively and consistently monitoring terrestrial carbon are increasing in number. As such, there is a need to define carbon monitoring and how it relates to carbon cycle science and carbon management. There is also a need to identify intended capabilities of a carbon monitoring system and what system components are needed to develop the capabilities. This paper is intended to promote discussion on what capabilities are needed in a carbon monitoring system based on requirements for different areas of carbon-related research and, ultimately, for carbon management. While many methods exist to quantify different components of the carbon cycle, research is needed on how these methods can be coupled or integrated to obtain carbon stock and flux estimates regularly and at a resolution that enables attribution of carbon dynamics to respective sources. As society faces sustainability and climate change conerns, carbon management activities implemented to reduce carbon emissions or increase carbon stocks will become increasingly important. Carbon management requires moderate to high resolution monitoring. Therefore, if monitoring is intended to help inform management decisions, management priorities should be considered prior to development of a monitoring system.

West, Tristram O.; Brown, Molly E.; Duran, Riley M.; Ogle, Stephen; Moss, Richard H.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

459

Carbon Cycle 2.0: Ashok Gadgil: global impact  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ashok Gadgil speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Ashok Gadgi

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Energy Demand in China (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Lynn Price, LBNL scientist, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Price, Lynn

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inject activated carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Comparison of Neat Biodiesels and ULSD in an Optimized Single-Cylinder Diesel Engine with Electronically-Controlled Fuel Injection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An Experimental Investigation of the Origin of Increased NOx Emissions When Fueling a Heavy-Duty Compression-Ignition Engine with Soy Biodiesel SAE Int. ... The fuels were then burned in a single-cylinder direct-injection diesel engine and evaluated for both fuel consumption and exhaust emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons, and particulate matter. ... Monyem, A.; Van Gerpen, J.; Canakcl, M.The effect of timing and oxidation on emissions from biodiesel–fueled engines Carbon 2001, 44 ( 1) 35– 42 ...

Michael Mangus; Farshid Kiani; Jonathan Mattson; Christopher Depcik; Edward Peltier; Susan Stagg-Williams

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

462

Direct Injection Compression Ignition Diesel Automotive Technology Education GATE Program  

SciTech Connect

The underlying goal of this prqject was to provide multi-disciplinary engineering training for graduate students in the area of internal combustion engines, specifically in direct injection compression ignition engines. The program was designed to educate highly qualified engineers and scientists that will seek to overcome teclmological barriers preventing the development and production of cost-effective high-efficiency vehicles for the U.S. market. Fu1iher, these highly qualified engineers and scientists will foster an educational process to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals who are knowledgeable about and have experience in developing and commercializing critical advanced automotive teclmologies. Eight objectives were defmed to accomplish this goal: 1. Develop an interdisciplinary internal co1nbustion engine curriculum emphasizing direct injected combustion ignited diesel engines. 2. Encourage and promote interdisciplinary interaction of the faculty. 3. Offer a Ph.D. degree in internal combustion engines based upon an interdisciplinary cuniculum. 4. Promote strong interaction with indusuy, develop a sense of responsibility with industry and pursue a self sustaining program. 5. Establish collaborative arrangements and network universities active in internal combustion engine study. 6. Further Enhance a First Class educational facility. 7. Establish 'off-campus' M.S. and Ph.D. engine programs of study at various indusuial sites. 8. Extend and Enhance the Graduate Experience.

Carl L. Anderson

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

463

BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model  

SciTech Connect

With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

Lazerson, Samuel

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

464

Terahertz graphene lasers: Injection versus optical pumping  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the formation of nonequilibrium states in optically pumped graphene layers and in forward-biased graphene structures with lateral p-i-n junctions and consider the conditions of population inversion and lasing. The model used accounts for intraband and interband relaxation processes as well as deviation of the optical phonon system from equilibrium. As shown, optical pumping suffers from a significant heating of both the electron-hole plasma and the optical phonon system, which can suppress the formation of population inversion. In the graphene structures with p-i-n junction, the injected electrons and holes have relatively low energies, so that the effect of cooling can be rather pronounced, providing a significant advantage of the injection pumping in realization of graphene terahertz lasers.

Ryzhii, Victor; Otsuji, Taiichi [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ryzhii, Maxim [Computational Nanoelectronics Laboratory, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu 965-8580 (Japan); Mitin, Vladimir [Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, SUNY, Buffalo, New York 14260-1920 (United States)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

465

Spheromak Formation by Steady Inductive Helicity Injection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A spheromak is formed for the first time using a new steady state inductive helicity injection method. Using two inductive injectors with odd symmetry and oscillating at 5.8 kHz, a steady state spheromak with even symmetry is formed and sustained through nonlinear relaxation. A spheromak with about 13 kA of toroidal current is formed and sustained using about 3 MW of power. This is a much lower power threshold for spheromak production than required for electrode-based helicity injection. Internal magnetic probe data, including oscillations driven by the injectors, agree with the plasma being in the Taylor state. The agreement is remarkable considering the only fitting parameter is the amplitude of the spheromak component of the state.

T. R. Jarboe; W. T. Hamp; G. J. Marklin; B. A. Nelson; R. G. O’Neill; A. J. Redd; P. E. Sieck; R. J. Smith; J. S. Wrobel

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Waterflooding injectate design systems and methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of designing an injectate to be used in a waterflooding operation is disclosed. One aspect includes specifying data representative of chemical characteristics of a liquid hydrocarbon, a connate, and a reservoir rock, of a subterranean reservoir. Charged species at an interface of the liquid hydrocarbon are determined based on the specified data by evaluating at least one chemical reaction. Charged species at an interface of the reservoir rock are determined based on the specified data by evaluating at least one chemical reaction. An extent of surface complexation between the charged species at the interfaces of the liquid hydrocarbon and the reservoir rock is determined by evaluating at least one surface complexation reaction. The injectate is designed and is operable to decrease the extent of surface complexation between the charged species at interfaces of the liquid hydrocarbon and the reservoir rock. Other methods, apparatus, and systems are disclosed.

Brady, Patrick V.; Krumhansl, James L.

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

467

Acetylenic carbon allotrope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

Lagow, R.J.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

468

The Woodland Carbon Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

469

HigHligHts NETL News Release, "Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates CO Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates CO 2 Injection into Michigan Basin." The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), one of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), has commenced a two-month field test that will inject up to 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into a saline formation some 3,200 to 3,500 feet below the Earth's surface. The Core Energy-owned, Antrim gas field location advantageously provides the project with a DTE Energy-owned gas processing plant that supplies the CO 2 ; an eight-mile CO 2 pipeline previously used for enhanced oil

470

DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas Field DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas Field May 21, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- In a newly awarded project, researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are partnering with European scientists to track injected carbon dioxide (CO2) in the world's first and longest running carbon storage operation located at the Sleipner gas field in the North Sea. The researchers--from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) in New York--will conduct surveys on the seafloor to monitor injected CO2 in the 1 kilometer-deep reservoir, where more than

471

On carbon footprints and growing energy use  

SciTech Connect

Could fractional reductions in the carbon footprint of a growing organization lead to a corresponding real reduction in atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions in the next ten years? Curtis M. Oldenburg, head of the Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program of LBNL’s Earth Sciences Division, considers his own organization's carbon footprint and answers this critical question? In addressing the problem of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and climate change, it is essential that we understand which activities are producing GHGs and the scale of emission for each activity, so that reduction efforts can be efficiently targeted. The GHG emissions to the atmosphere of an individual or group are referred to as the ‘carbon footprint’. This terminology is entirely appropriate, because 85% of the global marketed energy supply comes from carbon-rich fossil fuel sources whose combustion produces CO{sub 2}, the main GHG causing global climate change. Furthermore, the direct relation between CO2 emissions and fossil fuels as they are used today makes energy consumption a useful proxy for carbon footprint. It would seem to be a simple matter to reduce energy consumption across the board, both individually and collectively, to help reduce our carbon footprints and therefore solve the energyclimate crisis. But just how much can we reduce carbon footprints when broader forces, such as growth in energy use, cause the total footprint to simultaneously expand? In this feature, I present a calculation of the carbon footprint of the Earth Sciences Division (ESD), the division in which I work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and discuss the potential for reducing this carbon footprint. It will be apparent that in terms of potential future carbon footprint reductions under projections of expected growth, ESD may be thought of as a microcosm of the situation of the world as a whole, in which alternatives to the business-as-usual use of fossil fuels are needed if absolute GHG emission reductions are to be achieved.

Oldenburg, C.M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Influence of frequency scanning on the operation of pulsed lasers with external signal injection  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is made of the influence of variation of the detuning of the frequency of a resonator mode from that of an external injected signal on the operation of pulsed gas lasers. It is found when the detuning is varied with time there is an increase in the width of the locking region of a resonator mode in pulsed lasers. The results are given of numerical calculations of the dependences of the locking efficiency on the parameters on the injected signal and of the laser active medium.

Gapotchenko, N.I.; Likhanskii, V.V.; Napartovich, A.P.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Mesoporous carbon materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

474

Improved Water Flooding through Injection Brine Modification  

SciTech Connect

Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of waterflooding, by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Laboratory waterflood tests show that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery. Numerous fields in the Powder River basin have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Although many uncertainties arise in the interpretation and comparison of field production data, injection of low salinity brine appears to give higher recovery compared to brine of moderate salinity (about 7,000 ppm). Laboratory studies of the effect of brine composition on oil recovery cover a wide range of rock types and crude oils. Oil recovery increases using low salinity brine as the injection water ranged from a low of no notable increase to as much as 37.0% depending on the system being studied. Recovery increases using low salinity brine after establishing residual oil saturation (tertiary mode) ranged from no significant increase to 6.0%. Tests with two sets of reservoir cores and crude oil indicated slight improvement in recovery for low salinity brine. Crude oil type and rock type (particularly the presence and distribution of kaolinite) both play a dominant role in the effect that brine composition has on waterflood oil recovery.

Robertson, Eric Partridge; Thomas, Charles Phillip; Morrow, Norman; (U of Wyoming)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

European Lean Gasoline Direct Injection Vehicle Benchmark  

SciTech Connect

Lean Gasoline Direct Injection (LGDI) combustion is a promising technical path for achieving significant improvements in fuel efficiency while meeting future emissions requirements. Though Stoichiometric Gasoline Direct Injection (SGDI) technology is commercially available in a few vehicles on the American market, LGDI vehicles are not, but can be found in Europe. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) obtained a European BMW 1-series fitted with a 2.0l LGDI engine. The vehicle was instrumented and commissioned on a chassis dynamometer. The engine and after-treatment performance and emissions were characterized over US drive cycles (Federal Test Procedure (FTP), the Highway Fuel Economy Test (HFET), and US06 Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (US06)) and steady state mappings. The vehicle micro hybrid features (engine stop-start and intelligent alternator) were benchmarked as well during the course of that study. The data was analyzed to quantify the benefits and drawbacks of the lean gasoline direct injection and micro hybrid technologies from a fuel economy and emissions perspectives with respect to the US market. Additionally that data will be formatted to develop, substantiate, and exercise vehicle simulations with conventional and advanced powertrains.

Chambon, Paul H [ORNL] [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL] [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL] [ORNL; Norman, Kevin M [ORNL] [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL] [ORNL; Thomas, John F [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Enhanced Carbonate Dissolution as a Means of Capturing and Sequestering Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rau et al., pg. 1 Rau et al., pg. 1 First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington D.C., May 14-17, 2001 Enhanced Carbonate Dissolution as a Means of Capturing and Sequestering Carbon Dioxide Greg H. Rau 1,2 , Ken Caldeira 2 , Kevin G. Knauss 2 , Bill Downs 3 , and Hamid Sarv 3 1 Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (L-103, LLNL, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550; 925-423-7990, rau4@llnl.gov) 2 Energy and Environment Directorate, LLNL, Livermore, CA 94550 3 McDermott Technology, Inc., 1562 Beeson Str., Alliance, OH 44601 Introduction Various methods have been proposed for mitigating anthropogenic CO 2 release to the atmos- phere, including storage via enhanced biological uptake on land or in the ocean and via sub- terranean or -marine injection of captured CO

477

A Call to Action: Carbon Cycle 2.0 (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab Director Paul Alivisatos speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences.Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Alivisatos, Paul

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

478

Injection and Extraction Lines for the ILC Damping Rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INJECTION AND EXTRACTION LINES FOR THE ILC DAMPING RINGS ?the injection and extraction lines into and out of the ILCas the design for the abort line. Due to changes of the geo-

Reichel, Ina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Ocean Sciences 2006 An Estimate of Carbon Sequestration via Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Sciences 2006 An Estimate of Carbon Sequestration via Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation traditional deep water formation via entrainment of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse-active species collected for oxygen, total carbon, alkalinity, nutrients, and CFCs. The alkalinity and total carbon data

Talley, Lynne D.

480

Manufacture of Carbon Materials of Aerogel Type from Carbon Blacks of Various Origins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence exerted by the structure and origin of samples of technical grade carbon, conditions of their thermal treatment (temperature, nature of a gas medium) and preliminary impregnation with activating ...

S. S. Stavitskaya; V. E. Goba; A. N. Tomashevskaya…