National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for infrared spectral radiance

  1. Measuring absolute infrared spectral radiance with correlated photons: new arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migdall, Alan

    metrologia Measuring absolute infrared spectral radiance with correlated photons: new arrangements radiance using correlated photons are presented. The method has the remarkable feature that it allows be measured using correlated photons [1-4]. That work outlined some of the useful features of the method. One

  2. ARM - Measurement - Longwave spectral radiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Roomparticlecontent ARM Datanarrowbandspectral radiance

  3. Physical retrieval of surface emissivity spectrum from hyperspectral infrared radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    Physical retrieval of surface emissivity spectrum from hyperspectral infrared radiances Jun Li,1 emissivity. Using constant or inaccurate surface emissivities typically results in large temperature and moisture profile errors, particularly over semi-arid or arid areas where the variation in emissivity

  4. Evaluating spectral radiances simulated by the HadGEM2 global climate model using longwave satellite measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Emma Catherine

    2015-06-30

    A 'model-to-radiance' comparison of simulated brightness temperatures and radiances from the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model 2 (HadGEM2-A) with longwave measurements from the High Resolution Infrared Radiation ...

  5. Facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Steven W.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Lykke, Keith R

    2006-11-10

    Detectors have historically been calibrated for spectral power responsivity at the National Institute of Standards and Technology by using a lamp-monochromator system to tune the wavelength of the excitation source. Silicon detectors can be calibrated in the visible spectral region with combined standard uncertainties at the 0.1% level. However,uncertainties increase dramatically when measuring an instrument's spectral irradiance or radiance responsivity. We describe what we believe to be a new laser-based facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCUS) that was developed to calibrate instruments directly in irradiance or radiance mode with uncertainties approaching or exceeding those available for spectral power responsivity calibrations. In SIRCUS, the emission from high-power, tunable lasers is introduced into an integrating sphere using optical fibers, producing uniform, quasi-Lambertian, high-radiant-flux sources. Reference standard irradiance detectors, calibrated directly against national primary standards for spectral power responsivity and aperture area measurement,are used to determine the irradiance at a reference plane. Knowing the measurement geometry, the source radiance can be readily determined as well. The radiometric properties of the SIRCUS source coupled with state-of-the-art transfer standard radiometers whose responsivities are directly traceable to primary national radiometric scales result in typical combined standard uncertainties in irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations of less than 0.1%. The details of the facility and its effect on primary national radiometric scales are discussed.

  6. Remote sensing of Greenland ice sheet using multispectral near-infrared and visible radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    .1029/2007JD008742. 1. Introduction [2] The present atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide is about 380Remote sensing of Greenland ice sheet using multispectral near-infrared and visible radiances Petr remote-sensing algorithm that utilizes reflected visible and near-infrared radiation to discriminate

  7. The impact of explicit cloud boundary information on ice cloud microphysical property retrievals from infrared radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    from infrared radiances Steven J. Cooper, Tristan S. L'Ecuyer, and Graeme L. Stephens Department inclusion of explicit cloud boundary information from complementary sensors as well as providing a suite of diagnostic tools for evaluating the dominant sources of uncertainty in all retrieved quantities. Errors

  8. Derivation of global hyperspectral resolution surface emissivity spectra from advanced infrared sounder radiance measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    Derivation of global hyperspectral resolution surface emissivity spectra from advanced infrared 9 July 2008; published 6 August 2008. [1] The global IR surface emissivity spectra are very. In this study, global IR surface emissivity spectra have been generated by using AIRS radiance measurements from

  9. Process of preparing metal parts to be heated by means of infrared radiance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Howard Robinson (Cincinnati, OH); Blue, Craig A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2009-06-09

    A method for preparing metal for heating by infrared radiance to enable uniform and consistent heating. The surface of one or more metal parts, such as aluminum or aluminum alloy parts, is treated to alter the surface finish to affect the reflectivity of the surface. The surface reflectivity is evaluated, such as by taking measurements at one or more points on the surface, to determine if a desired reflectivity has been achieved. The treating and measuring are performed until the measuring indicates that the desired reflectivity has been achieved. Once the treating has altered the surface finish to achieve the desired reflectivity, the metal part may then be exposed to infrared radiance to heat the metal part to a desired temperature, and that heating will be substantially consistent throughout by virtue of the desired reflectivity.

  10. Final Report: High Spectral Resolution Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Studies with the ARM UAV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revercomb, Henry E.

    1999-12-31

    The active participation in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Unmanned Airborne Vehicle (UAV) science team that was anticipated in the grant proposal was indefinitely delayed after the first year due to a programmatic decision to exclude the high spectral resolution observations from the existing ARM UAV program. However, this report shows that substantial progress toward the science objectives of this grant have made with the help of separate funding from NASA and other agencies. In the four year grant period (including time extensions), a new high spectral resolution instrument has been flown and has successfully demonstrated the ability to obtain measurements of the type needed in the conduct of this grant. In the near term, the third water vapor intensive observing period (WVIOP-3) in October 2000 will provide an opportunity to bring the high spectral resolution observations of upwelling radiance into the ARM program to complement the downwelling radiance observations from the existing ARM AERI instruments. We look forward to a time when the ARM-UAV program is able to extend its scope to include the capability for making these high spectral resolution measurements from a UAV platform.

  11. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  12. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Calibrated Radiance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ]· International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) B3 data product· First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE Visible, Infrared, and Water Vapor Images· SAFARI 2000: Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer Data, Southern Africa· LBA: Radiance data 1998-2001, and gridded surface radiation and rain rates 1999 for Amazonia

  13. Solar radius determination from SODISM/PICARD and HMI/SDO observations of the decrease of the spectral solar radiance during the June

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Solar radius determination from SODISM/PICARD and HMI/SDO observations of the decrease of the spectral solar radiance during the June 2012 Venus transit A. Hauchecorne1 , M. Meftah1 , A. Irbah1 , S of Venus provided a rare opportunity to determine the radius of the Sun using solar imagers observing

  14. Infrared spectral properties of M giants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, G C; Ramirez, R M; Kraemer, K E; Engelke, C W

    2015-01-01

    We observed a sample of 20 M giants with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Most show absorption structure at 6.6-6.8 um which we identify as water vapor, and in some cases, the absorption extends from 6.4 um into the SiO band at 7.5 um. Variable stars show stronger H2O absorption. While the strength of the SiO fundamental at 8 um increases monotonically from spectral class K0 to K5, the dependence on spectral class weakens in the M giants. As with previously studied samples, the M giants show considerable scatter in SiO band strength within a given spectral class. All of the stars in our sample also show OH band absorption, most noticeably in the 14-17 um region. The OH bands behave much like the SiO bands, increasing in strength in the K giants but showing weaker dependence on spectral class in the M giants, and with considerable scatter. An examination of the photometric properties reveals that the V-K color may be a better indicator of molecular band strength than the spectral class...

  15. Surface Emissivity Impact on Temperature and Moisture Soundings from Hyperspectral Infrared Radiance Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    Surface Emissivity Impact on Temperature and Moisture Soundings from Hyperspectral Infrared June 2010, in final form 13 December 2010) ABSTRACT An accurate land surface emissivity (LSE the emissivities are fixed in the retrieval process. The results also confirm that the simultaneous retrieval

  16. Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

    2011-05-24

    We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: â?˘ Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. â?˘ Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. â?˘ Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

  17. Monolithically integrated near-infrared and mid-infrared detector array for spectral imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, A. G. Unil

    detector test results ensure the high quality of material suitable for near-infrared/QWIP dual-band focal. A CTIS records spatial and spectral information by imaging a scene through an optical relay system

  18. A cloud detection algorithm using the downwelling infrared radiance measured by an infrared pyrometer of the ground-based microwave radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, M.-H.; Han, D.; Won, H. Y.; Morris, V.

    2015-01-01

    For better utilization of the ground-based microwave radiometer, it is important to detect the cloud presence in the measured data. Here, we introduce a simple and fast cloud detection algorithm by using the optical characteristics of the clouds in the infrared atmospheric window region. The new algorithm utilizes the brightness temperature (Tb) measured by an infrared radiometer installed on top of a microwave radiometer. The two-step algorithm consists of a spectral test followed by a temporal test. The measured Tb is first compared with a predicted clear-sky Tb obtained by an empirical formula as a function of surface air temperature and water vapor pressure. For the temporal test, the temporal variability of the measured Tb during one minute compares with a dynamic threshold value, representing the variability of clear-sky conditions. It is designated as cloud-free data only when both the spectral and temporal tests confirm cloud-free data. Overall, most of the thick and uniform clouds are successfully detected by the spectral test, while the broken and fast-varying clouds are detected by the temporal test. The algorithm is validated by comparison with the collocated ceilometer data for six months, from January to June 2013. The overall proportion of correctness is about 88.3% and the probability of detection is 90.8%, which are comparable with or better than those of previous similar approaches. Two thirds of discrepancies occur when the new algorithm detects clouds while the ceilometer does not, resulting in different values of the probability of detection with different cloud-base altitude, 93.8, 90.3, and 82.8% for low, mid, and high clouds, respectively. Finally, due to the characteristics of the spectral range, the new algorithm is found to be insensitive to the presence of inversion layers.

  19. A cloud detection algorithm using the downwelling infrared radiance measured by an infrared pyrometer of the ground-based microwave radiometer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahn, M. H.; Han, D.; Won, H. Y.; Morris, Victor R.

    2015-02-03

    For better utilization of the ground-based microwave radiometer, it is important to detect the cloud presence in the measured data. Here, we introduce a simple and fast cloud detection algorithm by using the optical characteristics of the clouds in the infrared atmospheric window region. The new algorithm utilizes the brightness temperature (Tb) measured by an infrared radiometer installed on top of a microwave radiometer. The two-step algorithm consists of a spectral test followed by a temporal test. The measured Tb is first compared with a predicted clear-sky Tb obtained by an empirical formula as a function of surface air temperaturemore »and water vapor pressure. For the temporal test, the temporal variability of the measured Tb during one minute compares with a dynamic threshold value, representing the variability of clear-sky conditions. It is designated as cloud-free data only when both the spectral and temporal tests confirm cloud-free data. Overall, most of the thick and uniform clouds are successfully detected by the spectral test, while the broken and fast-varying clouds are detected by the temporal test. The algorithm is validated by comparison with the collocated ceilometer data for six months, from January to June 2013. The overall proportion of correctness is about 88.3% and the probability of detection is 90.8%, which are comparable with or better than those of previous similar approaches. Two thirds of discrepancies occur when the new algorithm detects clouds while the ceilometer does not, resulting in different values of the probability of detection with different cloud-base altitude, 93.8, 90.3, and 82.8% for low, mid, and high clouds, respectively. Finally, due to the characteristics of the spectral range, the new algorithm is found to be insensitive to the presence of inversion layers.« less

  20. Retrieval of cloud-cleared atmospheric temperature profiles from hyperspectral infrared and microwave observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, William Joseph, 1971-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of retrieving the temperature profile of the Earth's atmosphere from overhead infrared and microwave observations of spectral radiance in cloudy conditions. The contributions of the thesis ...

  1. THE INFRARED TELESCOPE FACILITY (IRTF) SPECTRAL LIBRARY: COOL STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, John T.; Cushing, Michael C.; Vacca, William D. E-mail: michael.cushing@gmail.com

    2009-12-01

    We present a 0.8-5 {mu}m spectral library of 210 cool stars observed at a resolving power of R {identical_to} {lambda}/{delta}{lambda} {approx} 2000 with the medium-resolution infrared spectrograph, SpeX, at the 3.0 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The stars have well-established MK spectral classifications and are mostly restricted to near-solar metallicities. The sample not only contains the F, G, K, and M spectral types with luminosity classes between I and V, but also includes some AGB, carbon, and S stars. In contrast to some other spectral libraries, the continuum shape of the spectra is measured and preserved in the data reduction process. The spectra are absolutely flux calibrated using the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Potential uses of the library include studying the physics of cool stars, classifying and studying embedded young clusters and optically obscured regions of the Galaxy, evolutionary population synthesis to study unresolved stellar populations in optically obscured regions of galaxies and synthetic photometry. The library is available in digital form from the IRTF Web site.

  2. Spectral calibration in the mid-infrared: Challenges and solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, G. C. [Cornell University, Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Herter, T. L.; Houck, J. R. [Cornell University, Astronomy Department, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Charmandaris, V. [Department of Physics and ITCP, University of Crete, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece); Sheth, K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Burgdorf, M., E-mail: sloan@isc.astro.cornell.edu [HE Space Operations, Flughafenallee 24, D-28199 Bremen (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    We present spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope of 33 K giants and 20 A dwarfs to assess their suitability as spectrophotometric standard stars. The K giants confirm previous findings that the strength of the SiO absorption band at 8 ?m increases for both later optical spectral classes and redder (B–V){sub 0} colors, but with considerable scatter. For K giants, the synthetic spectra underpredict the strengths of the molecular bands from SiO and OH. For these reasons, the assumed true spectra for K giants should be based on the assumption that molecular band strengths in the infrared can be predicted accurately from neither optical spectral class or color nor synthetric spectra. The OH bands in K giants grow stronger with cooler stellar temperatures, and they are stronger than predicted by synthetic spectra. As a group, A dwarfs are better behaved and more predictable than the K giants, but they are more likely to show red excesses from debris disks. No suitable A dwarfs were located in parts of the sky continuously observable from Spitzer, and with previous means of estimating the true spectra of K giants ruled out, it was necessary to use models of A dwarfs to calibrate spectra of K giants from observed spectral ratios of the two groups and then use the calibrated K giants as standards for the full database of infrared spectra from Spitzer. We also describe a lingering artifact that affects the spectra of faint blue sources at 24 ?m.

  3. GaSb/GaAs type II quantum dot solar cells for enhanced infrared spectral response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    into existing multijunction cells either as a means to increase the current or efficiency by using low band gapGaSb/GaAs type II quantum dot solar cells for enhanced infrared spectral response R. B infrared spectral response of GaAs-based solar cells that incorporate type II GaSb quantum dots QDs formed

  4. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral radiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM

  5. A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Altered Rocks- An Example From The Acoculco Caldera, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt Jump to:...

  6. Accurate, practical simulation of satellite infrared radiometer spectral data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study's purpose is to determine whether a relatively simple random band model formulation of atmospheric radiation transfer in the infrared region can provide valid simulations of narrow interval satellite-borne infrared sounder system data. Detailed ozonesondes provide the pertinent atmospheric information and sets of calibrated satellite measurements provide the validation. High resolution line-by-line model calculations are included to complete the evaluation.

  7. Use of the ARM Measurement of Spectral Zenith Radiance For Better Understanding Of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Jui-Yuan Chiu

    2010-10-19

    Our proposal focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general 3D cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. We also focus on zenith radiance measurements, both active and passive. The proposal has three main parts. Part One exploits the �¢����solar-background�¢��� mode of ARM lidars to allow them to retrieve cloud optical depth not just for thin clouds but for all clouds. This also enables the study of aerosol cloud interactions with a single instrument. Part Two exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by ARM�¢����s zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), especially during CLASIC, to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also propose to take advantage of the SWS�¢���� 1 Hz sampling to study the �¢����twilight zone�¢��� around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part Three involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM�¢����s 2NFOV instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the AMF-COPS/CLOWD deployment, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM�¢����s operational data processing.

  8. Feedback-Driven Evolution of the Far-Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanya Chakrabarti; T. J. Cox; Lars Hernquist; Philip F. Hopkins; Brant Robertson; Tiziana Di Matteo

    2007-01-22

    We calculate infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from simulations of major galaxy mergers and study the effect of AGN and starburst driven feedback on the evolution of the SED as a function of time. We use a self-consistent three-dimensional radiative equilibrium code to calculate the emergent SEDs and to make images. To facilitate a simple description of our findings, we describe our results in reference to an approximate analytic solution for the far-IR SED. We focus mainly on the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) and ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) phases of evolution. We contrast the SEDs of simulations performed with AGN feedback to simulations performed with starburst driven wind feedback. We find that the feedback processes critically determine the evolution of the SED. Changing the source of illumination (whether stellar or AGN) has virtually no impact on the reprocessed far-infrared SED. We find that AGN feedback is particularly effective at dispersing gas and rapidly injecting energy into the ISM. The observational signature of such powerful feedback is a warm SED. In general, simulations performed with starburst driven winds have colder spectra and reprocess more of their emission into the infrared, resulting in higher infrared to bolometric luminosities compared to (otherwise equivalent) simulations performed with AGN feedback. We depict our results in IRAS bands, as well as in Spitzer's MIPS bands, and in Herschel's PACS bands.

  9. Pulsed mid-infrared radiation from spectral broadening in laser wakefield simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, W.; Palastro, J. P.; Antonsen, T. M. [IREAP, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)] [IREAP, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Spectral red-shifting of high power laser pulses propagating through underdense plasma can be a source of ultrashort mid-infrared (MIR) radiation. During propagation, a high power laser pulse drives large amplitude plasma waves, depleting the pulse energy. At the same time, the large amplitude plasma wave provides a dynamic dielectric response that leads to spectral shifting. The loss of laser pulse energy and the approximate conservation of laser pulse action imply that spectral red-shifts accompany the depletion. In this paper, we investigate, through simulation, the parametric dependence of MIR generation on pulse energy, initial pulse duration, and plasma density.

  10. A UNIFIED NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRAL CLASSIFICATION SCHEME FOR T DWARFS Adam J. Burgasser,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgasser, Adam J.

    A UNIFIED NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRAL CLASSIFICATION SCHEME FOR T DWARFS Adam J. Burgasser,1,2 T. R 2005 October 3 ABSTRACT A revised near-infrared classification scheme for T dwarfs is presented, based identified largely in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Two Micron All Sky Survey, nine primary spectral

  11. A Medium-Resolution Near-Infrared Spectral Library of Late Type Stars: I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentin D. Ivanov; Marcia J. Rieke; Charles W. Engelbracht; Almudena Alonso-Herrero; George H. Rieke; Kevin L. Luhman

    2003-11-26

    We present an empirical infrared spectral library of medium resolution (R~2000-3000) H (1.6 micron) and K (2.2 micron) band spectra of 218 red stars, spanning a range of [Fe/H] from ~-2.2 to ~+0.3. The sample includes Galactic disk stars, bulge stars from Baade's window, and red giants from Galactic globular clusters. We report the values of 19 indices covering 12 spectral features measured from the spectra in the library. Finally, we derive calibrations to estimate the effective temperature, and diagnostic relationships to determine the luminosity classes of individual stars from near-infrared spectra. This paper is part of a larger effort aimed at building a near-IR spectral library to be incorporated in population synthesis models, as well as, at testing synthetic stellar spectra.

  12. The Spectra of T Dwarfs I: Near-Infrared Data and Spectral Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam J. Burgasser; J. Davy Kirkpatrick; Michael E. Brown; I. Neill Reid; Adam Burrows; James Liebert; Keith Matthews; John E. Gizis; Conard C. Dahn; David G. Monet; Roc M. Cutri; Michael F. Skrutskie

    2001-08-28

    We present near-infrared spectra for a sample of T dwarfs, including eleven new discoveries made using the Two Micron All Sky Survey. These objects are distinguished from warmer (L-type) brown dwarfs by the presence of methane absorption bands in the 1--2.5 $\\micron$ spectral region. A first attempt at a near-infrared classification scheme for T dwarfs is made, based on the strengths of CH$_4$ and H$_2$O bands and the shapes of the 1.25, 1.6, and 2.1 $\\micron$ flux peaks. Subtypes T1 V through T8 V are defined, and spectral indices useful for classification are presented. The subclasses appear to follow a decreasing T$_{eff}$ scale, based on the evolution of CH$_4$ and H$_2$O bands and the properties of L and T dwarfs with known distances. However, we speculate that this scale is not linear with spectral type for cool dwarfs, due to the settling of dust layers below the photosphere and subsequent rapid evolution of spectral morphology around T$_{eff}$ $\\sim$ 1300--1500 K. Similarities in near-infrared colors and continuity of spectral features suggest that the gap between the latest L dwarfs and earliest T dwarfs has been nearly bridged. This argument is strengthened by the possible role of CH$_4$ as a minor absorber shaping the K-band spectra of the latest L dwarfs. Finally, we discuss one peculiar T dwarf, 2MASS 0937+2931, which has very blue near-infrared colors (J-K$_s$ = $-0.89\\pm$0.24) due to suppression of the 2.1 $\\micron$ peak. The feature is likely caused by enhanced collision-induced H$_2$ absorption in a high pressure or low metallicity photosphere.

  13. Joint spatio-spectral based edge detection for multispectral infrared imagery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Bender, Steven C.; Sharma, Yagya D.; Jang, Woo-Yong; Paskalva, Biliana S.

    2010-06-01

    Image segmentation is one of the most important and difficult tasks in digital image processing. It represents a key stage of automated image analysis and interpretation. Segmentation algorithms for gray-scale images utilize basic properties of intensity values such as discontinuity and similarity. However, it is possible to enhance edge-detection capability by means of using spectral information provided by multispectral (MS) or hyperspectral (HS) imagery. In this paper we consider image segmentation algorithms for multispectral images with particular emphasis on detection of multi-color or multispectral edges. More specifically, we report on an algorithm for joint spatio-spectral (JSS) edge detection. By joint we mean simultaneous utilization of spatial and spectral characteristics of a given MS or HS image. The JSS-based edge-detection approach, termed Spectral Ratio Contrast (SRC) edge-detection algorithm, utilizes the novel concept of matching edge signatures. The edge signature represents a combination of spectral ratios calculated using bands that enhance the spectral contrast between the two materials. In conjunction with a spatial mask, the edge signature give rise to a multispectral operator that can be viewed as a three-dimensional extension of the mask. In the extended mask, the third (spectral) dimension of each hyper-pixel can be chosen independently. The SRC is verified using MS and HS imagery from a quantum-dot in a well infrared (IR) focal plane array, and the Airborne Hyperspectral Imager.

  14. High Spectral Resolution Infrared and Raman Lidar Observations for the ARM Program: Clear and Cloudy Sky Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Revercomb, David Tobin, Robert Knuteson, Lori Borg, Leslie Moy

    2009-06-17

    This grant began with the development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) for ARM. The AERI has provided highly accurate and reliable observations of downwelling spectral radiance (Knuteson et al. 2004a, 2004b) for application to radiative transfer, remote sensing of boundary layer temperature and water vapor, and cloud characterization. One of the major contributions of the ARM program has been its success in improving radiation calculation capabilities for models and remote sensing that evolved from the multi-year, clear-sky spectral radiance comparisons between AERI radiances and line-by-line calculations (Turner et al. 2004). This effort also spurred us to play a central role in improving the accuracy of water vapor measurements, again helping ARM lead the way in the community (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003). In order to add high-altitude downlooking AERI-like observations over the ARM sites, we began the development of an airborne AERI instrument that has become known as the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (Scanning-HIS). This instrument has become an integral part of the ARM Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (ARM-UAV) program. It provides both a cross-track mapping view of the earth and an uplooking view from the 12-15 km altitude of the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft when flown over the ARM sites for IOPs. It has successfully participated in the first two legs of the “grand tour” of the ARM sites (SGP and NSA), resulting in a very good comparison with AIRS observations in 2002 and in an especially interesting data set from the arctic during the Mixed-Phase Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) in 2004. More specifically, our major achievements for ARM include 1. Development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) to function like a satellite on the ground for ARM, providing a steady stream of accurately calibrated spectral radiances for Science Team clear sky and cloud applications (Knuteson et al. 2004a), 2. Detailed radiometric calibration and characterization of AERI radiances, with uncertainty estimates established from complete error analyses and proven by inter-comparison tests (Knuteson et al. 2004b), 3. AERI data quality assessment and maintenance over the extended time frames needed to support ARM (Dedecker et al., 2005) 4. Key role in the radiative transfer model improvements from the AERI/LBLRTM QME (Turner et al. 2004) and AERI-ER especially from the SHEBA experiment (Tobin et al. 1999), 5. Contributed scientific and programmatic leadership leading to significant water vapor accuracy improvements and uncertainty assessments for the low to mid troposphere (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003), 6. Leadership of the ARM assessment of the accuracy of water vapor observations from radiosondes, Raman Lidar and in situ aircraft observations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (Tobin et al. 2002, Ferrare et al. 2004), 7. New techniques for characterizing clouds from AERI (DeSlover et al. 1999, Turner 2003b, Turner et al. 2003b), 8. Initial design and development of the Scanning-HIS aircraft instrument and application to ARM UAV Program missions (Revercomb et al. 2005), and 9. Coordinated efforts leading to the use of ARM observations as a key validation tool for the high resolution Atmospheric IR Sounder on the NASA Aqua platform (Tobin et al. 2005a) 10. Performed ARM site and global clear sky radiative closure studies that shows closure of top-of-atmosphere flux at the level of ~1 W/m2 (Moy et al 2008 and Section 3 of this appendix) 11. Performed studies to characterize SGP site cirrus cloud property retrievals and assess impacts on computed fluxes and heating rate profiles (Borg et al. 2008 and Section 2 of this appendix).

  15. Modelling the Spectral Energy Distribution of Compact Luminous Infrared Galaxies: Constraints from High Frequency Radio Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. R. Prouton; A. Bressan; M. Clemens; A. Franceschini; G. L. Granato; L. Silva

    2004-03-24

    We have performed 23 GHz VLA observations of 7 compact, luminous infrared galaxies, selected to have evidence of starburst activity. New and published multi-frequency data are combined to obtain the spectral energy distributions of all 7 galaxies from the near-infrared to the radio (at 1.4 GHz). These SEDs are compared with new models, for dust enshrouded galaxies, which account for both starburst and AGN components. In all 7 galaxies the starburst provides the dominant contribution to the infrared luminosity; in 4 sources no contribution from an AGN is required. Although AGN may contribute up to 50 percent of the total far--infrared emission, the starbursts always dominate in the radio. The SEDs of most of our sources are best fit with a very high optical depth of (>=50) at 1 micron. The scatter in the far-infrared/radio correlation, found among luminous IRAS sources, is due mainly to the different evolutionary status of their starburst components. The short time-scale of the star formation process amplifies the delay between the far-infrared and radio emission. This becomes more evident at low radio frequencies (below about 1 GHz) where synchrotron radiation is the dominant process. In the far-infrared (at wavelengths shorter than 100 micron) an additional source of scatter is provided by AGN, where present. AGN may be detected in the near-infrared by the absence of the knee, typical of stellar photospheres. However, near-infrared data alone cannot constrain the level at which AGN contribute because the interpretation of their observed properties, in this wave-band, depends strongly on model parameters.

  16. A Near-Infrared Stellar Spectral Library: II. K-Band Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvind C. Ranade; Harinder P. Singh; Ranjan Gupta; N. M. Ashok

    2007-05-31

    This paper is the second in the series of papers on near-infrared (NIR) stellar spectral library produced by reducing the observations carried out with 1.2 meter Gurushikhar Infrared Telescope (GIRT), at Mt. Abu, India using a NICMOS3 HgCdTe 256 X 256 NIR array based spectrometer. In paper I (Ranade et al. 2004), H-band spectra of 135 stars at a resolution of ~16 Ang were presented. The K-band library being released now consists of 114 stars covering spectral types O7--M7 and luminosity classes I--V. The spectra have a moderate resolution of ~22 Ang in the K band and have been continuum shape corrected to their respective effective temperatures. We hope to release the remaining J-band spectra soon. The complete H and K-Band library is available online at: http://vo.iucaa.ernet.in/~voi/NIR_Header.html

  17. Infrared and Raman spectra, DFT-calculations and spectral assignments of germacyclohexane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksa, V. Ozerenskis, D.; Pucetaite, M.; Sablinskas, V.; Cotter, C.; Guirgis, G. A.

    2015-03-30

    Raman spectra of germacyclohexane in liquid and solid states were recorded and depolarization data obtained. Infrared absorption spectra of the vapor and liquid have been studied. The wavenumbers of the vibrational modes were derived in the harmonic and anharmonic approximation in B3LYP/ccpVTZ calculations. According to the calculations, germacyclohexane exists in the stable chair conformation, whereas a possible twist form should have more than 15?kJ·mol{sup -1} higher enthalpy of formation what makes this conformer experimentally not observable. The 27 A' and 21 A'' fundamentals were assigned on the basis of the calculations and infrared and Raman band intensities, contours of gas phase infrared spectral bands and Raman depolarization measurements. An average discrepancy of ca. 0.77 % was found between the observed and the calculated anharmonic wavenumbers for the 48 modes. Substitution of carbon atom with Ge atom in the cyclohexane ring is reasoning flattening of the ring.

  18. THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF THE CARINA NEBULA FROM FAR-INFRARED TO RADIO WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salatino, M.; De Bernardis, P.; Masi, S. [Physics Department, Sapienza Universita di Roma, p.le Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Polenta, G., E-mail: maria.salatino@roma1.infn.it [ASI Science Data Center, ESRIN, via G. Galilei, I-00044, Frascati (Italy)

    2012-03-20

    Multi-wavelength observations are necessary for understanding the physical properties of astrophysical sources. In this paper, we use observations in the far-infrared to radio range to derive the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the Carina nebula. To do this, we carefully subtract the irregularly varying diffuse emission from the Galactic plane, which can be of the order of 10% of the nebula flux at these wavelengths. We find that the far-infrared SED can be modeled as emission from a dust population with a single temperature T{sub d} = (34.5{sup +2.0}{sub -1.8}) K and with a spectral index of emissivity {alpha} = -1.37{sup +0.09}{sub -0.08}. We also find a total infrared luminosity of the nebula of (7.4{sup +2.5}{sub -1.4}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} L{sub Sun} and, assuming a single temperature of the dust, a mass of the dust of (9500{sup +4600}{sub -3500}) M{sub Sun }.

  19. A Near-Infrared Stellar Spectral Library: III. J-Band Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvind C. Ranade; N. M. Ashok; Harinder P. Singh; Ranjan Gupta

    2007-09-28

    This paper is the third in the series of papers published on near-infrared (NIR) stellar spectral library by Ranade et al. (2004 & 2007). The observations were carried out with 1.2 meter Gurushikhar Infrared Telescope (GIRT), at Mt. Abu, India using a NICMOS3 HgCdTe $256 \\times 256$ NIR array based spectrometer. In paper I (Ranade et al. 2004), H-band spectra of 135 stars at a resolution of $\\sim 16$\\AA & paper II (Ranade et al. 2007), K band spectra of 114 stars at a resolution of $\\sim 22$\\AA were presented. The J-band library being released now consists of 126 stars covering spectral types O5--M8 and luminosity classes I--V. The spectra have a moderate resolution of $\\sim 12.5$\\AA in the J band and have been continuum shape corrected to their respective effective temperatures. The complete set of library in near-infrared (NIR) will serve as a good database for researchers working in the field of stellar population synthesis. The complete library in J, H & K is available online at: http://vo.iucaa.ernet.in/$\\sim$voi/NIR\\_Header.html

  20. Spectral response of localized surface plasmon in resonance with mid-infrared light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusa, Fumiya [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakacho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ashihara, Satoshi, E-mail: ashihara@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2014-10-21

    We study spectral responses of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) in gold nanorods, which resonate at mid-infrared frequencies, by transmission spectroscopy and electromagnetic field analyses. The resonance linewidth is found to be linearly proportional to the resonance frequency, indicating that the dephasing due to Drude relaxation is suppressed and that the overall dephasing is dominated by radiative damping. Owing to the reduced radiative/non-radiative damping and large geometrical length of the nanorod, near-field intensity enhancement exceeds several hundred times. Nonetheless the resonance linewidth is comparable with or larger than the bandwidth of a 100-fs pulse, and therefore the enhanced near-field as short as 100-fs can be created upon pulsed excitation. The large enhancements with appropriate bandwidths make LSPs promising for enhanced nonlinear spectroscopies, coherent controls, and strong-field light-matter interactions in the mid-infrared range.

  1. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Archived Data at the University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The AERI instrument is an advanced version of the high spectral resolution interferometer sounder (HIS) designed and fabricated at the University of Wisconsin (Revercomb et al. 1988) to measure upwelling infrared radiances from an aircraft. The AERI is a fully automated ground-based passive infrared interferometer that measures downwelling atmospheric radiance from 3.3 - 18.2 mm (550 - 3000 cm-1) at less than 10-minute temporal resolution with a spectral resolution of one wavenumber. It has been used in DOEĆs Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Much of the data available here at the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS), an institute within the University of Wisconsin’s Space Science and Engineering Center, may also be available in the ARM Archive. On this website, data and images from six different field experiments are available, along with AERIPLUS realtime data for the Madison, Wisconsin location. Realtime data includes temperature and water vapor time-height cross sections, SKEWT diagrams, convective stability indices, and displays from a rooftop Lidar instrument. The field experiments took place in Oaklahoma and Wisconsin with the AERI prototype.

  2. Near infrared spectral imaging of explosives using a tunable laser source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klunder, G L; Margalith, E; Nguyen, L K

    2010-03-26

    Diffuse reflectance near infrared hyperspectral imaging is an important analytical tool for a wide variety of industries, including agriculture consumer products, chemical and pharmaceutical development and production. Using this technique as a method for the standoff detection of explosive particles is presented and discussed. The detection of the particles is based on the diffuse reflectance of light from the particle in the near infrared wavelength range where CH, NH, OH vibrational overtones and combination bands are prominent. The imaging system is a NIR focal plane array camera with a tunable OPO/laser system as the illumination source. The OPO is programmed to scan over a wide spectral range in the NIR and the camera is synchronized to record the light reflected from the target for each wavelength. The spectral resolution of this system is significantly higher than that of hyperspectral systems that incorporate filters or dispersive elements. The data acquisition is very fast and the entire hyperspectral cube can be collected in seconds. A comparison of data collected with the OPO system to data obtained with a broadband light source with LCTF filters is presented.

  3. A Constant Spectral Index for Sagittarius A* During Infrared/X-ray Intensity Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. D. Hornstein; K. Matthews; A. M. Ghez; J. R. Lu; M. Morris; E. E. Becklin; M. Rafelski; F. K. Baganoff

    2007-06-12

    We report the first time-series of broadband infrared (IR) color measurements of Sgr A*, the variable emission source associated with the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center. Using the laser and natural guide star AO systems on the Keck II telescope, we imaged Sgr A* in multiple near-infrared broadband filters with a typical cycle time of ~3 min during 4 observing runs (2005-2006), two of which were simultaneous with Chandra X-ray measurements. In spite of the large range of dereddened flux densities for Sgr A* (2-30 mJy), all of our near-IR measurements are consistent with a constant spectral index of alpha = -0.6+-0.2. Furthermore, this value is consistent with the spectral indices observed at X-ray wavelengths during nearly all outbursts; which is consistent with the synchrotron self-Compton model for the production of the X-ray emission. During the coordinated observations, one IR outburst occurs 1 GeV is generated, and it is this high-energy tail that gives rise to the X-ray outbursts. One possible explanation for this type of variation is from the turbulence induced by a magnetorotational instability, in which the outer scale length of the turbulence varies and changes the high-energy cutoff.

  4. Far-Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions and Photometric Redshifts of Dusty Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanya Chakrabarti; Christopher F. McKee

    2007-10-22

    We infer the large-scale source parameters of dusty galaxies from their observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using the analytic radiative transfer methodology presented in Chakrabarti & McKee (2005). For local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), we show that the millimeter to far-infrared (FIR) SEDs can be well fit using the standard dust opacity index of 2 when self-consistent radiative transfer solutions are employed, indicating that the cold dust in local ULIRGs can be described by a single grain model. We develop a method for determining photometric redshifts of ULIRGs and sub-mm galaxies from the millimeter-FIR SED; the resulting value of $1+z$ is typically accurate to about 10%. As such, it is comparable to the accuracy of near-IR photometric redshifts and provides a complementary means of deriving redshifts from far-IR data, such as that from the upcoming $\\it{Herschel Space Observatory}$. Since our analytic radiative transfer solution is developed for homogeneous, spherically symmetric, centrally heated, dusty sources, it is relevant for infrared bright galaxies that are primarily powered by compact sources of luminosity that are embedded in a dusty envelope. We discuss how deviations from spherical symmetry may affect the applicability of our solution, and we contrast our self-consistent analytic solution with standard approximations to demonstrate the main differences.

  5. Final Scientific/Technical Report Grant title: Use of ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction This is a collaborative project with the NASA GSFC project of Dr. A. Marshak and W. Wiscombe (PIs). This report covers BU activities from February 2011 to June 2011 and BU "Â?no-cost extension" activities from June 2011 to June 2012. This report summarizes results that complement a final technical report submitted by the PIs in 2011.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knyazikhin, Y

    2012-09-10

    Main results are summarized for work in these areas: spectrally-invariant approximation within atmospheric radiative transfer; spectral invariance of single scattering albedo for water droplets and ice crystals at weakly absorbing wavelengths; seasonal changes in leaf area of Amazon forests from leaf flushing and abscission; and Cloud droplet size and liquid water path retrievals from zenith radiance measurements.

  6. Super-radiance in the sodium resonance lines from sodium iodide arc lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karabourniotis, D.; Drakakis, E.

    2010-08-09

    Super-radiance observed within the centers of the sodium resonance D lines emitted by arc lamps containing sodium iodide as additive in a high-pressure mercury plasma environment was studied by high-resolution emission spectroscopy. The spectral radiance of these self-reversed lines including super-radiance was simulated by considering a local enhancement of the source function due to the presence of an additional source of radiation near the arc wall. Causes of this hitherto unrecognized source of radiation are given.

  7. The far-infrared--submm spectral energy distribution of high-redshift quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert S. Priddey; Richard G. McMahon

    2001-04-10

    We combine submm photometric data of z>4 quasars, to obtain a mean far-infrared (FIR) (rest-frame) spectral energy distribution (SED) of thermal emission from dust, parameterised by a single temperature (T) and power-law emissivity index (beta). Best-fit values are T=41+/-5K, beta=1.95+/-0.3. The redshift spread of this set of quasars is exploited to allow us to sample the SED at a greater number of rest wavelengths than is possible for a single object. This parameterisation is of use to any study that extrapolates from a flux at a single submm wavelength, for example to infer dust masses and FIR luminosities. We then interpret the submm component as arising from dust heated by star-formation in the quasar's host galaxy, and investigate a simple scheme of AGN--host coevolution, in which the timescale for formation of the host galaxy is c.0.5-1.0Gyr, with star formation proceeding at a constant rate c.1000Msol/yr. The luminous quasar phase occurs towards the end of the star-forming period, just before the galaxy's reservoir of cold gas is depleted. Given the youth of the Universe at z=4 (1.6Gyr), the coexistence of a massive black hole and a luminous starburst can be a powerful constraint on models of quasar host-galaxy formation.

  8. Method And Apparatus For Examining A Tissue Using The Spectral Wing Emission Therefrom Induced By Visible To Infrared Photoexcitation.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alfano, Robert R. (3777 Independence Ave., Bronx, NY 10463); Demos, Stavros G. (3550 Pacific Ave., Apt. 304, Livermore, CA 94550); Zhang, Gang (3 Rieder Rd., Edison, NJ 08817)

    2003-12-16

    Method and an apparatus for examining a tissue using the spectral wing emission therefrom induced by visible to infrared photoexcitation. In one aspect, the method is used to characterize the condition of a tissue sample and comprises the steps of (a) photoexciting the tissue sample with substantially monochromatic light having a wavelength of at least 600 nm; and (b) using the resultant far red and near infrared spectral wing emission (SW) emitted from the tissue sample to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In one embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a continuous beam of light, and the resultant steady-state far red and near infrared SW emission from the tissue sample is used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In another embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a light pulse, and the resultant time-resolved far red and near infrared SW emission emitted from the tissue sample is used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In still another embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a polarized light pulse, and the parallel and perpendicular components of the resultant polarized time-resolved SW emission emitted from the tissue sample are used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample.

  9. Accepted Applied Optics, May 2001 Thermal Infrared Spectral Band Detection Limits for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkland, Laurel

    for in the remotely sensed spectral data base. Second, since the spectral shape varies with particle size, weathering kirkland@lpi.usra.edu. K. Herr is with The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, California, 90009. J; revised manuscript received 3 April 2001. examined detection limits based on spectral signature mapping

  10. Modelling TOVS radiances of synoptic systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coe, Thomas Eddy

    1992-01-01

    compared against observed satellite radiances by ~ing the analyzed variables into synthetic radiances using a radiative transfer model (~) . Gtme~ 'IOVS satellite radiances are used as a grourd truth, since they are the only scurce of continuous... information similar to the satellite observations. ~ is often too noisy, producing features not verified by the satellite; NMC is often too smooth. NMC more closely resembles the TOVS contours. Modelled water vapor channel analyses resemble observed monthly...

  11. Radiance Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ |RENERCO RenewableRGSRadar JumpRadiance

  12. Radiance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performers:-- Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) – Berkeley, CA-- Greg Ward, Anyhere Software – Berkeley, CA-- National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) – Golden, CO

  13. Radiance in the ocean: effects of wave slope and raman scattering near the surface and at depths through the asymptotic region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slanker, Julie Marie

    2009-05-15

    in shallow and deep water. The nature of the radiance field is also gives an understanding of the living environment for ocean animals. Hydrolight 4.1, a simulation software developed by Curtis D. Mobley, was used to calculate the spectral radiance in clear...

  14. Modeling Wildland Fire Radiance in Synthetic Remote Sensing B.S. Beijing Institute of Technology, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    efforts in phenomenology studies, algorithm development, and sensor evaluation. Synthetic scenes are also and op- tical properties of wildfire and burn area in an infrared remote sensing system will assist look like as seen by the airborne sensor. Radiance scene rendering of the 3D flame iv #12;v includes 2D

  15. AEGIS: Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of MIPS 70 ?m-selected Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symeonidis, M.; Rigopoulou, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Davis, M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Barmby, P.; Egami, E.; Fazio, G. G.; Le Floc'h, E.; Rieke, G.; Willner, S. P.; Wilson, Graham Wallace

    2007-05-01

    We present 0.5-160 ?m spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies, detected at 70 ?m with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS), using broadband imaging data from Spitzer and ground-based telescopes. ...

  16. Super-radiance and flux conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical foundations of the phenomenon known as super-radiance still continues to attract considerable attention. Despite many valiant attempts at pedagogically clear presentations, the effect nevertheless still continues to generate some significant confusion. Part of the confusion arises from the fact that super-radiance in a quantum field theory [QFT] context is not the same as super-radiance (super-fluorescence) in some condensed matter contexts; part of the confusion arises from traditional but sometimes awkward normalization conventions, and part is due to sometimes unnecessary confusion between fluxes and probabilities. We shall argue that the key point underlying the effect is flux conservation, (and, in the presence of dissipation, a controlled amount of flux non-conservation), and that attempting to phrase things in terms of reflection and transmission probabilities only works in the absence of super-radiance. To help clarify the situation we present a simple exactly solvable toy model exhibi...

  17. Continuous time-varying biasing approach for spectrally tunable infrared detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayat, Majeed M.

    and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87106, USA this capability, an algorithm is developed for designing the time- varying bias for an arbitrary spectral-sensing window of interest. Since continuous-time biasing can be implemented within the readout circuit

  18. Far-Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Embedded Protostars and Dusty Galaxies: I. Theory for Spherical Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanya Chakrabarti; Christopher F. McKee

    2005-06-27

    We present analytic radiative transfer solutions for the spectra of unresolved, spherically symmetric, centrally heated, dusty sources. We find that the dust thermal spectrum possesses scaling relations that provide a natural classification for a broad range of sources, from low-mass protostars to dusty galaxies. In particular, we find that, given our assumptions, spectral energy distributions (SEDs) can be characterized by two distance-independent parameters, the luminosity-to-mass ratio, $L/M$, and the surface density, $\\Sigma$, for a set of two functions, namely, the density profile and the opacity curve. The goal is to use SEDs as a diagnostic tool in inferring the large-scale physical conditions in protostellar and extragalactic sources, and ultimately, evolutionary parameters. Our approach obviates the need to use SED templates in the millimeter to far-infrared region of the spectrum; this is a common practice in the extragalactic community that relies on observed correlations established at low redshift that may not necessarily extend to high redshift. Further, we demarcate the limited region of parameter space in which density profiles can be inferred from the SED, which is of particular import in the protostellar community as competing theories of star formation are characterized by different density profiles. The functionality of our model is unique in that in provides for a self-consistent analytic solution that we have validated by comparison with a well-tested radiative transfer code (DUSTY) to find excellent agreement with numerical results over a parameter space that spans low-mass protostars to ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGS).

  19. A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 slicing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2]. Other studies have compared CO2- slicing cloud heights with those computed from lidar data [Smith in assessing the accuracy of the CO2-slicing cloud height algorithm. Infrared measurements of upwelling

  20. Posters Residual Analysis of Surface Spectral Radiances Between Instrument Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document outlines the majorL.Posters95

  1. AUTOMATIC DETECTION OF WATER AND MAFICS IN M3 RADIANCE IMAGES. D. R. Thompson1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AUTOMATIC DETECTION OF WATER AND MAFICS IN M3 RADIANCE IMAGES. D. R. Thompson1,2 , M. Gilmore,3 L. Introduction: We describe the detection of water (OH/H2O) and mafic mineralogy absorption features in Ryder catalog [1]. We employ superpixel endmember analy- sis [2] to detect spectral outliers. Our approach oper

  2. Near-infrared spectral tomography integrated with digital breast tomosynthesis: Effects of tissue scattering on optical data acquisition design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaelsen, Kelly; Krishnaswamy, Venkat; Pogue, Brian W.; Poplack, Steven P.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Design optimization and phantom validation of an integrated digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and near-infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) system targeting improvement in sensitivity and specificity of breast cancer detection is presented. Factors affecting instrumentation design include minimization of cost, complexity, and examination time while maintaining high fidelity NIRST measurements with sufficient information to recover accurate optical property maps. Methods: Reconstructed DBT slices from eight patients with abnormal mammograms provided anatomical information for the NIRST simulations. A limited frequency domain (FD) and extensive continuous wave (CW) NIRST system was modeled. The FD components provided tissue scattering estimations used in the reconstruction of the CW data. Scattering estimates were perturbed to study the effects on hemoglobin recovery. Breast mimicking agar phantoms with inclusions were imaged using the combined DBT/NIRST system for comparison with simulation results. Results: Patient simulations derived from DBT images show successful reconstruction of both normal and malignant lesions in the breast. They also demonstrate the importance of accurately quantifying tissue scattering. Specifically, 20% errors in optical scattering resulted in 22.6% or 35.1% error in quantification of total hemoglobin concentrations, depending on whether scattering was over- or underestimated, respectively. Limited frequency-domain optical signal sampling provided two regions scattering estimates (for fat and fibroglandular tissues) that led to hemoglobin concentrations that reduced the error in the tumor region by 31% relative to when a single estimate of optical scattering was used throughout the breast volume of interest. Acquiring frequency-domain data with six wavelengths instead of three did not significantly improve the hemoglobin concentration estimates. Simulation results were confirmed through experiments in two-region breast mimicking gelatin phantoms. Conclusions: Accurate characterization of scattering is necessary for quantification of hemoglobin. Based on this study, a system design is described to optimally combine breast tomosynthesis with NIRST.

  3. Enhancing mid-infrared spectral response at the LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interface by magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Xin; Zhao, Kun Xi, Jian-Feng; Xiang, Wen-Feng; Lu, Zhi-Qing; Sun, Qi; Wu, Shi-Xiang; Ni, Hao

    2014-12-15

    Many unexpected properties have been found in the LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} heterostructure, but the interaction of the many ground states at its interface remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate an optical property of this n-type heterostructure where the mid-infrared spectral responsivity at the interface is enhanced by an external magnetic field. The field intensity ranged from 0.8 to 6 kOe at a low temperature (19?K) as measured with our spectral response measurement system. Two spectral peaks related to the spin-orbit coupling effect were also observed at wavelengths 2400?nm and 3700?nm. The intriguing phenomena relate to changes in the crystallographic structure and subband structure at the interface.

  4. Super-radiance and open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volya, Alexander [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States); Zelevinsky, Vladimir [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2005-07-08

    Quantum wires, loosely bound nuclei, molecules in chemical reactions and exotic narrow pentaquark states are different examples of open quantum mesoscopic systems. The coupling with and through continuum is their common feature. We discuss general properties of quantum systems in the regime of strong continuum coupling, when the mechanism of Dicke super-radiance changes intrinsic dynamics, signatures of quantum chaos, lifetime of unstable states and reaction cross sections. The examples are shown for various areas of mesoscopic physics.

  5. Spectral analysis software improves con dence in plant and soil water stable isotope analyses performed by isotope ratio infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Greg

    independent tests of this post-processing spectral analysis software on two IRIS systems, OA-ICOS (Los Gatos

  6. On the relationship between radiance and irradiance: determining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    On the relationship between radiance and irradiance: determining the illumination from images between incoming radiance and irradiance. Specifically, we address the question of whether it is possible. This is a fundamental question in computer vision and inverse radiative transfer. We show that the irradiance can

  7. Spectral behavior of the optical constants in the visible/near infrared of GeSbSe chalcogenide thin films grown at glancing angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin-Palma, R. J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Pantano, C. G.

    2007-04-23

    GeSbSe chalcogenide thin films were deposited using glancing angle deposition onto transparent glass substrates for the determination of the spectral behavior of the optical constants (index of refraction n and extinction coefficient k) in the visible and near infrared ranges (400-2500 nm) as a function of the deposition angle. Computational simulations based on the matrix method were employed to determine the values of the optical constants of the different films from the experimental reflectance and transmittance spectra. A significant dependence of the overall optical behavior on the deposition angle is found. Furthermore, the band gap of the GeSbSe thin films was calculated. The accurate determination of the optical constants of films grown at glancing angle will enable the development of sculptured thin film fiber-optic chemical sensors and biosensors.

  8. The Evolving Interstellar Medium of Star Forming Galaxies Since z=2 as Probed by Their Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdis, Georgios E; Bethermin, M; Sargent, M; Elbaz, D; Pannella, M; Dickinson, M; Dannerbauer, H; Da Cunha, E; Walter, F; Rigopoulou, D; Charmandaris, V; Hwang, H -S; Kartaltepe, J

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the mid-infrared to millimeter wavelengths for individual galaxies and for stacked ensembles at 0.5, which is proportional to the dust mass weighted luminosity (LIR/Mdust), and the primary parameter defining the shape of the SED, is equivalent to SFE/Z. For MS galaxies we measure this quantity, , showing that it does not depend significantly on either the stellar mass or the sSFR. This is explained as a simple consequence of the existing correlations between SFR-M*, M*-Z and Mgas-SFR. Instead, we show that (or LIR/Mdust) does evolve, with MS galaxies having harder radiation fields and thus warmer temperatures as redshift increases from z=0 to 2, a trend which can also be understood based on the redshift evolution of the M*-Z and SFR-M* relations. These results motivate the construction of a universal set of SED templates for MS galaxies which vary as a function of redshift with only one parameter, .

  9. A Tale of Three Mysterious Spectral Features in Carbon-Rich Evolved Stars: The 21 Micrometer, 30 Micrometer, and "Unidentified Infrared" Emission Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Ajay; Jiang, B W

    2015-01-01

    The mysterious "21 micrometer" emission feature seen almost exclusively in the short-lived protoplanetary nebula (PPN) phase of stellar evolution remains unidentified since its discovery two decades ago. This feature is always accompanied by the equally mysterious, unidentified "30 micrometer" feature and the so-called "unidentified infrared" (UIR) features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 micrometer which are generally attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. The 30 micrometer feature is commonly observed in all stages of stellar evolution from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) through PPN to the planetary nebula phase. We explore the interrelations among the mysterious 21 micrometer, 30 micrometer, and UIR features in the Galactic and Magellanic Cloud of the 21 micrometer sources. We derive the fluxes emitted in the observed UIR, 21 micrometer, and 30 micrometer features from published ISO or Spitzer/IRS spectra. We find that none of these spectral features correlate with each other. Th...

  10. A SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE FAR-INFRARED SPECTRAL ATLAS OF COMPACT SOURCES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS. I. THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Loon, Jacco Th.; Oliveira, Joana M. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Shiao, Bernie; Boyer, Martha L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kemper, F.; Woods, Paul M. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Marengo, Massimo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Indebetouw, Remy; Chen, C.-H. Rosie [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Sloan, G. C. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)], E-mail: jacco@astro.keele.ac.uk

    2010-01-15

    We present far-infrared spectra, {lambda} = 52-93 {mu}m, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope in the spectral energy distribution mode of its MIPS instrument, of a representative sample of the most luminous compact far-infrared sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These include carbon stars, OH/IR asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, post-AGB objects and planetary nebulae, the R CrB-type star HV 2671, the OH/IR red supergiants (RSGs) WOH G064 and IRAS 05280 - 6910, the three B[e] stars IRAS 04530 - 6916, R 66 and R 126, the Wolf-Rayet star Brey 3a, the luminous blue variable (LBV) R 71, the supernova remnant N 49, a large number of young stellar objects (YSOs), compact H II regions and molecular cores, and a background galaxy at a redshift z {approx_equal} 0.175. We use the spectra to constrain the presence and temperature of cold dust and the excitation conditions and shocks within the neutral and ionized gas, in the circumstellar environments and interfaces with the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). First, we introduce a spectral classification scheme. Then, we measure line strengths, dust temperatures, and IR luminosities. Objects associated with star formation are readily distinguished from evolved stars by their cold dust and/or fine-structure lines. Evolved stars, including the LBV R 71, lack cold dust except in some cases where we argue that this is swept-up ISM. This leads to an estimate of the duration of the prolific dust-producing phase ('superwind') of several thousand years for both RSGs and massive AGB stars, with a similar fractional mass loss experienced despite the different masses. We tentatively detect line emission from neutral oxygen in the extreme RSG WOH G064, which suggests a large dust-free cavity with implications for wind driving. In N 49, the shock between the supernova ejecta and ISM is revealed in spectacular fashion by its strong [O I] {lambda}63 {mu}m emission and possibly water vapor; we estimate that 0.2 M {sub sun} of ISM dust was swept up. On the other hand, some of the compact H II regions display pronounced [O III] {lambda}88 {mu}m emission. The efficiency of photoelectric heating in the interfaces of ionized gas and molecular clouds is estimated at 0.1%-0.3%. We confirm earlier indications of a low nitrogen content in the LMC. Evidence for solid state emission features is found in both young and evolved objects, but the carriers of these features remain elusive; some of the YSOs are found to contain crystalline water ice. The spectra constitute a valuable resource for the planning and interpretation of observations with the Herschel Space Observatory and the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy.

  11. Design, manufacture, and calibration of infrared radiometric blackbody sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrd, D.A.; Michaud, F.D.; Bender, S.C.

    1996-04-01

    A Radiometric Calibration Station (RCS) is being assembled at the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) which will allow for calibration of sensors with detector arrays having spectral capability from about 0.4-15 {mu}m. The configuration of the LANL RCS. Two blackbody sources have been designed to cover the spectral range from about 3-15 {mu}m, operating at temperatures ranging from about 180-350 K within a vacuum environment. The sources are designed to present a uniform spectral radiance over a large area to the sensor unit under test. The thermal uniformity requirement of the blackbody cavities has been one of the key factors of the design, requiring less than 50 mK variation over the entire blackbody surface to attain effective emissivity values of about 0.999. Once the two units are built and verified to the level of about 100 mK at LANL, they will be sent to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), where at least a factor of two improvement will be calibrated into the blackbody control system. The physical size of these assemblies will require modifications of the existing NIST Low Background Infrared (LBIR) Facility. LANL has constructed a bolt-on addition to the LBIR facility that will allow calibration of our large aperture sources. Methodology for attaining the two blackbody sources at calibrated levels of performance equivalent to present state of the art will be explained in the following.

  12. Infrared source test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, L.

    1994-11-15

    The purpose of the Infrared Source Test (IRST) is to demonstrate the ability to track a ground target with an infrared sensor from an airplane. The system is being developed within the Advance Technology Program`s Theater Missile Defense/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) section. The IRST payload consists of an Amber Radiance 1 infrared camera system, a computer, a gimbaled mirror, and a hard disk. The processor is a custom R3000 CPU board made by Risq Modular Systems, Inc. for LLNL. The board has ethernet, SCSI, parallel I/O, and serial ports, a DMA channel, a video (frame buffer) interface, and eight MBytes of main memory. The real-time operating system VxWorks has been ported to the processor. The application code is written in C on a host SUN 4 UNIX workstation. The IRST is the result of a combined effort by physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists.

  13. Comparison of absolute spectral irradiance responsivity measurement techniques using wavelength-tunable lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahtee, Ville; Brown, Steven W.; Larason, Thomas C.; Lykke, Keith R.; Ikonen, Erkki; Noorma, Mart

    2007-07-10

    Independent methods for measuring the absolute spectral irradiance responsivity of detectors have been compared between the calibration facilities at two national metrology institutes, the Helsinki University of Technology (TKK), Finland, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The emphasis is on the comparison of two different techniques for generating a uniform irradiance at a reference plane using wavelength-tunable lasers. At TKK's Laser Scanning Facility (LSF) the irradiance is generated by raster scanning a single collimated laser beam, while at the NIST facility for Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Responsivity Calibrations with Uniform Sources (SIRCUS), lasers are introduced into integrating spheres to generate a uniform irradiance at a reference plane. The laser-based irradiance responsivity results are compared to a traditional lamp-monochromator-based irradiance responsivity calibration obtained at the NIST Spectral Comparator Facility (SCF). A narrowband filter radiometer with a24 nm bandwidth and an effective band-center wavelength of 801 nm was used as the artifact. The results of the comparison between the different facilities, reported for the first time in the near-infrared wavelength range, demonstrate agreement at the uncertainty level of less than 0.1%. This result has significant implications in radiation thermometry and in photometry as well as in radiometry.

  14. Infrared retina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krishna, Sanjay (Albuquerque, NM); Hayat, Majeed M. (Albuquerque, NM); Tyo, J. Scott (Tucson, AZ); Jang, Woo-Yong (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-12-06

    Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

  15. Enhanced Thermal Stability of W-Ni-Al[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] Cermet-Based Spectrally Selective Solar Absorbers with W Infrared Reflectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Feng

    Solar thermal technologies such as solar hot water and concentrated solar power trough systems rely on spectrally selective solar absorbers. These solar absorbers are designed to efficiently absorb the sunlight while ...

  16. Matching of Infrared Emitters with Textiles For Improved Energy Utilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, W. W.; Williamson, V. A.; Johnson, M. R.; Do, B. T.

    1994-01-01

    The successful utilization of infrared radiation is dependent on the spectral characteristics of the material being processed and on how well the spectral output of the infrared source matches those of the material being heated. Very little bas been...

  17. Temperature dependent dielectric function in the near-infrared to vacuum-ultraviolet ultraviolet spectral range of alumina and yttria stabilized zirconia thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt-Grund, R. Lühmann, T.; Böntgen, T.; Franke, H.; Lorenz, M.; Grundmann, M.; Opper, D.

    2013-12-14

    The dielectric function of nano-/polycrystalline alumina and yttria stabilised zirconia thin films has been investigated in a wide spectral range from 1.0?eV to 7.5?eV and temperatures between 10?K and room temperature. In the near band-edge spectral range, we found a broad distribution of optical transitions within the band gap, the so-called Urbach absorption tail which is typical for amorphous or polycrystalline materials due to the lack of long range order in the crystal structure. The coupling properties of the electronic system to the optical phonon bath and thermal lattice vibrations strongly depend on the ratio of the spectral extent of these disorder states to the main phonon energy, which we correlate with the different crystalline structure of our samples. The films have been grown at room temperature and 650?°C by pulsed laser deposition.

  18. Precomputed Radiance Transfer for Real-Time Rendering in Dynamic, Low-Frequency Lighting Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazhdan, Michael

    Precomputed Radiance Transfer for Real-Time Rendering in Dynamic, Low-Frequency Lighting a new, real-time method for rendering diffuse and glossy objects in low-frequency lighting environments-frequency incident lighting into transferred radiance which includes global effects like shadows and interreflections

  19. Direct-to-Indirect Acoustic Radiance Lakulish Antani, Anish Chandak, Micah Taylor and Dinesh Manocha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    the acoustic wave equation. However, their complexity is proportional to the volume of the scene and the fourth1 Direct-to-Indirect Acoustic Radiance Transfer Lakulish Antani, Anish Chandak, Micah Taylor for visual rendering and uses them to develop an improved acoustic radiance transfer technique. We precompute

  20. Mesoscale Spectra of Mars's Atmosphere Derived from MGS TES Infrared Radiances TAKESHI IMAMURA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and potential energy spectra as a function of horizontal wavenumber. Each spectrum has two different wave spectra of the atmospheric potential energy of Mars at mesoscales (wavelengths of 64­957 km) were obtained-scale ends, the spectra sometimes show prominent steepening with slopes from 2 to 3. The power peaks

  1. Convective-scale data assimilation of satellite infrared radiances over the Mediterranean: adaptation of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    project (Cyclogeneses and Precipitation Impacting the Mediterranean) of the program ACI-FNS "Aléas et introduced. satsatsat Standard deviation of differences between Tbspot1 and Tb1column for AIRS water vapor channels 0 0,2 0,4 0,6 0,8 1 1,2 6,2 6,4 6,6 6,8 7 7,2 7,4 7,6 wavelength (microns) Tb(K) standard

  2. Session Papers Preliminary Analysis of Ground-Based Microwave and Infrared Radiance Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 Unlimited Release4: "Short-Term Energy PricesSession

  3. Posters Preliminary Analysis of Ground-Based Microwave and Infrared Radiance Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document outlines the majorL.Posters95 Posters13

  4. CIMEL SUN PHOTOMETERS: UPDATES ON NEW DEPLOYMENTS AND CLOUD MODE ZENITH RADIANCE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CIMEL SUN PHOTOMETERS: UPDATES ON NEW DEPLOYMENTS AND CLOUD MODE ZENITH RADIANCE DATA Richard of Science ABSTRACT Since March 1998, ARM has deployed Cimel Sun PHOTometers (CSPHOT) at several but not all

  5. Exploring the molecular chemistry and excitation in obscured luminous infrared galaxies: An ALMA mm-wave spectral scan of NGC 4418

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costagliola, F; Muller, S; Martín, S; Aalto, S; Harada, N; van der Werf, P; Viti, S; Garcia-Burillo, S; Spaans, M

    2015-01-01

    We obtained an ALMA Cycle 0 spectral scan of the dusty LIRG NGC 4418, spanning a total of 70.7 GHz in bands 3, 6, and 7. We use a combined local thermal equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE (NLTE) fit of the spectrum in order to identify the molecular species and derive column densities and excitation temperatures. We derive molecular abundances and compare them with other Galactic and extragalactic sources by means of a principal component analysis. We detect 317 emission lines from a total of 45 molecular species, including 15 isotopic substitutions and six vibrationally excited variants. Our LTE/NLTE fit find kinetic temperatures from 20 to 350 K, and densities between 10$^5$ and 10$^7$ cm$^{-3}$. The spectrum is dominated by vibrationally excited HC$_3$N, HCN, and HNC, with vibrational temperatures from 300 to 450 K. We find high abundances of HC$_3$N, SiO, H$_2$S, and c-HCCCH and a low CH$_3$OH abundance. A principal component analysis shows that NGC 4418 and Arp 220 share very similar molecular abundances and ...

  6. Method to analyze remotely sensed spectral data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stork, Christopher L. (Albuquerque, NM); Van Benthem, Mark H. (Middletown, DE)

    2009-02-17

    A fast and rigorous multivariate curve resolution (MCR) algorithm is applied to remotely sensed spectral data. The algorithm is applicable in the solar-reflective spectral region, comprising the visible to the shortwave infrared (ranging from approximately 0.4 to 2.5 .mu.m), midwave infrared, and thermal emission spectral region, comprising the thermal infrared (ranging from approximately 8 to 15 .mu.m). For example, employing minimal a priori knowledge, notably non-negativity constraints on the extracted endmember profiles and a constant abundance constraint for the atmospheric upwelling component, MCR can be used to successfully compensate thermal infrared hyperspectral images for atmospheric upwelling and, thereby, transmittance effects. Further, MCR can accurately estimate the relative spectral absorption coefficients and thermal contrast distribution of a gas plume component near the minimum detectable quantity.

  7. BEO Tram Spectral Data 2014

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Torn, Margaret; Serbin, Shawn

    Visible to near-infrared (350-1100nm) vegetation spectral reflectance data collected on the BEO automated tram measurement platform during the 2014 growing season. The spectra were collected using a PP Systems UniSpec-DC instrument and was processed to at-surface reflectance and interpolated to 1nm.

  8. BEO Tram Spectral Data 2014

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Torn, Margaret; Serbin, Shawn

    2015-06-10

    Visible to near-infrared (350-1100nm) vegetation spectral reflectance data collected on the BEO automated tram measurement platform during the 2014 growing season. The spectra were collected using a PP Systems UniSpec-DC instrument and was processed to at-surface reflectance and interpolated to 1nm.

  9. Infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, C.C. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    Infrared thermography is a useful tool for the diagnosis of problems in building systems. In instances where a building owner has several large buildings, an investment in a typical $30,000 infrared system may be cost effective. In most instances, however, the rental of an infrared system or the hiring of an infrared consulting service is a cost effective alternative. As can be seen from the several applications presented here, any mechanical problem manifesting itself in an atypical temperature pattern can usually be detected. The two primary savings generated from infrared analysis of building systems are maintenance and energy.

  10. Semianalytic Monte Carlo calculation of reflected and transmitted radiance in a plane parallel atmosphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffitt, John Russell

    1972-01-01

    for finite atmospheres with phase functions ranging from isotropic to the extremely anisotropic nimbo- stratus model. The main advantages of the Monte Carlo method were illustrated. One such advantage is that parameters, such as the single scattering... as an isotropic one. Another is that a single "computer run" can produce radiance values for a large number of ground albedos for any reasonable number of detectors placed at any desired depth in the atmosphere. 2. The Monte Carlo Method Monte Carlo, in all...

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VISUALIZATION & COMPUTER GRAPHICS 1 Radiance Transfer Biclustering for Real-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Kun

    --We present a real-time algorithm to render all-frequency radiance transfer at both macro-scale and meso-scale. At a meso-scale, the shading is computed on a per-pixel basis by integrating the product of the local inci in a meso-scale, densely sampled at each pixel and mapped over the object. The bi-scale transfer

  12. A validation of the Radiance three-phase simulation method for modeling annual daylight performance of optically-complex fenestration systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    complex fenestration systems (CFS). They include systems asprograms. Again, lack of CFS modeling tools has inhibitedwe discuss a new Radiance CFS annual simulation modeling

  13. A review of cermet-based spectrally selective solar absorbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Feng

    Spectrally selective solar absorbers harvest solar energy in the form of heat. Solar absorbers using cermet-based coatings demonstrate a high absorptance of the solar spectrum and a low emittance in the infrared (IR) regime. ...

  14. Remotely Controlled, Continuous Observations of Infrared Radiance with the CSIRO/ARM Mark II Radiometer at the SGP CART Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners *ReindustrializationEnergy Remote

  15. Acceleration of the matrix multiplication of Radiance three phase daylighting simulations with parallel computing on heterogeneous hardware of personal computer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of Miami; Zuo, Wangda; McNeil, Andrew; Wetter, Michael; Lee, Eleanor S.

    2013-04-30

    Building designers are increasingly relying on complex fenestration systems to reduce energy consumed for lighting and HVAC in low energy buildings. Radiance, a lighting simulation program, has been used to conduct daylighting simulations for complex fenestration systems. Depending on the configurations, the simulation can take hours or even days using a personal computer. This paper describes how to accelerate the matrix multiplication portion of a Radiance three-phase daylight simulation by conducting parallel computing on heterogeneous hardware of a personal computer. The algorithm was optimized and the computational part was implemented in parallel using OpenCL. The speed of new approach was evaluated using various daylighting simulation cases on a multicore central processing unit and a graphics processing unit. Based on the measurements and analysis of the time usage for the Radiance daylighting simulation, further speedups can be achieved by using fast I/O devices and storing the data in a binary format.

  16. Hawking-Unruh Thermal Radiance as Relativistic Exponential Scaling of Quantum Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu

    1996-06-26

    The Hawking-Unruh effect of thermal radiance from a black hole or observed by an accelerated detector is usually viewed as a geometric effect related to the existence of an event horizon. Here we propose a new viewpoint, that the detection of thermal radiance in these systems is a local, kinematic effect arising from the vacuum being subjected to a relativistic exponential scale transformation. This kinematic effect alters the relative weight of quantum versus thermal fluctuations (noise) between the two vacua. This approach can treat conditions which the geometric approach cannot, such as systems which do not even have an event horizon. An example is the case of an observer whose acceleration is nonuniform or only asymptotically uniform. Since this approach is based on concepts and techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, it is more adept to dynamical problems, such as the dissipation, fluctuation, and entropy aspects of particle creation and phase transitions in black hole collapse and in the early universe.

  17. Engineering adenylate cyclases regulated by near-infrared window light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Min-Hyung

    Bacteriophytochromes sense light in the near-infrared window, the spectral region where absorption by mammalian tissues is minimal, and their chromophore, biliverdin IX?, is naturally present in animal cells. These properties ...

  18. Near-infrared and Mid-infrared Spectroscopy with the Infrared Camera (IRC) for AKARI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youichi Ohyama; Takashi Onaka; Hideo Matsuhara; Takehiko Wada; Woojung Kim; Naofumi Fujishiro; Kazunori Uemizu; Itsuki Sakon; Martin Cohen; Miho Ishigaki; Daisuke Ishihara; Yoshifusa Ita; Hirokazu Kataza; Toshio Matsumoto; Hiroshi Murakami; Shinki Oyabu; Toshihiko Tanabe; Toshinobu Takagi; Munetaka Ueno; Fumio Usui; Hidenori Watarai; Chris P. Pearson; Norihide Takeyama; Tomoyasu Yamamuro; Yuji Ikeda

    2007-08-31

    The Infrared Camera (IRC) is one of the two instruments on board the AKARI satellite. In addition to deep imaging from 1.8-26.5um for the pointed observation mode of the AKARI, it has a spectroscopic capability in its spectral range. By replacing the imaging filters by transmission-type dispersers on the filter wheels, it provides low-resolution (lambda/d_lambda ~ 20-120) spectroscopy with slits or in a wide imaging field-of-view (approximately 10'X10'). The IRC spectroscopic mode is unique in space infrared missions in that it has the capability to perform sensitive wide-field spectroscopic surveys in the near- and mid-infrared wavelength ranges. This paper describes specifications of the IRC spectrograph and its in-orbit performance.

  19. To appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Precomputed Local Radiance Transfer for Real-Time Lighting Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Henrik Wann

    -Time Lighting Design Anders Wang Kristensen UCSD Tomas Akenine-M¨oller Lund University Henrik Wann Jensen UCSD Abstract This paper introduces a new method for real-time relight- ing of scenes illuminated by local light sources. We extend previous work on precomputed radiance transfer for distant lighting to local lighting

  20. A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 slicing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    with dual polarization at 0.532 m. The comparisons were performed for 10 flight days during the Subsonic specification of clear-sky radiances. 1. Introduction Clouds have a large impact on the Earth's water and energy budgets. Their impact on the radiation budget can result in a heating or in a cooling of the planet

  1. A comparison of model-generated and satellite-observed radiances 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Donna Ellen Woolley

    1989-01-01

    and sensitivity for January time period for observed and synthetic radiance set. Channel Observed mean 'C Synthetic mean 'C SYN-OBS t' statistic Observed Synthetic SYN-OBS mean C Std Dev. 'C Std Dev. C Normalized 24 03 23 04 16 12 05 11 15 22 06 07... 52. 4 -26. 8 50. 6 3. 0 1. 8 1. 4 1. 3 2. 2 6. 5 1. 8 5. 1 2. 5 2. 5 2. 1 2. 1 2. 5 2. 7 2. 9 4. 1 5. 3 3. 6 0. 9 0. 4 1. 2 1. '2 1. 6 7. 1 1. 8 6. 4 2. 9 2. 9 2. 4 2. 9 3. 9 3. 6 4. 0 5. 1 4. 8 6. 7 4. 4 -0. 7 -0. 8 -0. 1 -0...

  2. A nanoflare model for active region radiance: application of artificial neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazarghan; H. Safari; D. E. Innes; E. Karami; S. K. Solanki

    2008-12-20

    Context. Nanoflares are small impulsive bursts of energy that blend with and possibly make up much of the solar background emission. Determining their frequency and energy input is central to understanding the heating of the solar corona. One method is to extrapolate the energy frequency distribution of larger individually observed flares to lower energies. Only if the power law exponent is greater than 2, is it considered possible that nanoflares contribute significantly to the energy input. Aims. Time sequences of ultraviolet line radiances observed in the corona of an active region are modelled with the aim of determining the power law exponent of the nanoflare energy distribution. Methods. A simple nanoflare model based on three key parameters (the flare rate, the flare duration time, and the power law exponent of the flare energy frequency distribution) is used to simulate emission line radiances from the ions Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii, observed by SUMER in the corona of an active region as it rotates around the east limb of the Sun. Light curve pattern recognition by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) scheme is used to determine the values. Results. The power law exponents, alpha 2.8, 2.8, and 2.6 for Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii respectively. Conclusions. The light curve simulations imply a power law exponent greater than the critical value of 2 for all ion species. This implies that if the energy of flare-like events is extrapolated to low energies, nanoflares could provide a significant contribution to the heating of active region coronae.

  3. Spectral Graph Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    *D. J. Kelleher

    2011-09-30

    Spectral Graph Theory. *D. J. Kelleher2. 2Department of Mathematics. University of Connecticut. UConn— SIGMA Seminar — Fall 2011. D. J. Kelleher. Spectral ...

  4. Relative Infrared (IR) and Terahertz (THz) Signatures of Common Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sheen, David M.; Atkinson, David A.

    2006-11-13

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has recently recorded the infrared (IR) and far-infrared (sometimes called the terahertz, THz) spectral signatures of four common explosives, in the condensed phase. The signatures of RDX, PETN, TNT and Tetryl were recorded both in the infrared and the THz domains, using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Samples consisted of thin films and were made by depositing and subsequent evaporation of an acetone-explosive mixture. The complete spectrum spanned the range from 4,000 to 8 cm-1 at 2.0 cm-1 spectral resolution. Preliminary results in the infrared agree with those of previous workers, while the THz signatures are one order of magnitude weaker than the strongest IR bands.

  5. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  6. Aerosol Properties from Multi-spectral and Multi-angular Aircraft 4STAR Observations: Expected Advantages and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Sinyuk, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The airborne Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) is developed to retrieve aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. The necessarily compact design of the 4STAR may cause noticeable apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles. We assess the sensitivity of expected 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval to such enhancement by applying the operational AERONET retrieval code and constructed synthetic 4STARlike data. Also, we assess the sensitivity of the broadband fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing to uncertainties in aerosol retrievals associated with the sky radiance enhancement. Our sensitivity study results suggest that the 4STARbased aerosol retrieval has limitations in obtaining detailed information on particle size distribution and scattering phase function. However, these limitations have small impact on the retrieved bulk optical parameters, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or ±0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 2%, or ±0.02), and the calculated direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 6%, or 2 Wm-2).

  7. A spectral comparison of (379) Huenna and its satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMeo, Francesca E.

    We present near-infrared spectral measurements of Themis family Asteroid (379) Huenna (D ? 98 km) and its 6 km satellite using SpeX on the NASA IRTF. The companion was farther than 1.5? from the primary at the time of ...

  8. Spectral Operators of Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-10

    Jan 10, 2014 ... a thorough study on a new class of matrix valued functions, coined as spectral operators of ..... not self-adjoint. ...... 9 (1981) 1135–1151.

  9. MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL INDICATORS OF STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States) NAT-Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, Rua Galvao Bueno, 868,...

  10. Study of ice cloud properties using infrared spectral data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Kevin James

    2009-05-15

    fulfilment of the requirements for the degre of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Commite, Ping Yang Commite Members, Shaima L. Nasiri Gerald R. North George Katawar Head of Department, Richard E. Orvile August 2007... Nasiri for her support, encouragement and technical guidance, Dr. Gerald North for his advice and encouragement prior to my applying as a post- bacalaureate and throughout, and Dr. George Katawar. Also, I would like to acknowledge and thank Dr. Don...

  11. Infrared Surveys for AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, H E

    2002-01-01

    From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

  12. Infrared Surveys for AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harding E. Smith

    2002-03-06

    From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

  13. Infrared Inspection Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, A. B.; Bevers, D. V.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared scanning equipment has been used at Amoco's Texas City refinery since 1971 as an inspection tool. A camera scans the field of view and focuses the infrared radiation on a detector which converts the infrared signal to an electrical signal...

  14. High dynamic range measurement of spectral responsivity and linearity of a radiation thermometer using a super-continuum laser and LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Y. S.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. W.; Park, S. N. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-11

    To realize the temperature scale above the freezing point of silver according to the definition of ITS-90, the dynamic range of the spectral responsivity is one of the most important factors which limit its uncertainty. When the residual spectral response at both side bands of a spectral band is not negligible, a significant uncertainty can be caused by a low dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement. In general, incandescent lamps are used to measure the spectral responsivity and the linearity. The dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement is often limited by a trade-off with the desired spectral resolution, which is less than 6 decades. Nonlinearity is another limiting fact of uncertainties of the temperature scale. Tungsten lamps have disadvantage in the nonlinearity measurements in terms of adjustability of radiance level and spectral selectivity. We report spectral responsivity measurements of which the measurable dynamic range is enhanced 50 times after replacing a QTH lamp with a super continuum laser. We also present a spectrally selected linearity measurement over a wide dynamic range using high-brightness light emitting diode arrays to observe a slight saturation of linearity.

  15. Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan Christine [University of Reading] [University of Reading

    2014-04-10

    This project focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general three-dimensional cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. The proposal has two main parts. Part one exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also take advantage of the SWS’ high sampling resolution to study the “twilight zone” around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part two involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM’s 2-channel narrow vield-of-view radiometer and sunphotometer instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the ARM Mobile Facility deployments, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM’s operational data processing.

  16. Evaluating Water Vapor in the NCAR CAM3 Climate Model with RRTMG/McICA using Modeled and Observed AIRS Spectral Radiances

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8) Wigner Home ·the Effect ofEvaluating Water

  17. Thermal infrared emission spectroscopy of titanium-enriched V. E. Hamilton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Victoria E.

    Thermal infrared emission spectroscopy of titanium-enriched pyroxenes V. E. Hamilton Hawai through the use of spectroscopic analysis. Studies of the thermal infrared (vibrational) spectra of many. These spectral variations can be used to identify the approximate composition(s) of pyroxenes in the thermal

  18. INFRARED STUDIES OF EPSILON AURIGAE IN ECLIPSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Kloppenborg, Brian K.; Wall, Randall E.; Hopkins, Jeffrey L.; Howell, Steve B.; Hoard, D. W.; Rayner, John; Bus, Schelte; Tokunaga, Alan; Sitko, Michael L.; Bradford, Suellen; Russell, Ray W.; Lynch, David K.; Hammel, Heidi; Whitney, Barbara; Orton, Glenn; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma; Hora, Joseph L.; Hinz, Philip; Hoffmann, William; and others

    2011-11-15

    We report here on a series of medium resolution spectro-photometric observations of the enigmatic long period eclipsing binary epsilon Aurigae, during its eclipse interval of 2009-2011, using near-infrared spectra obtained with SpeX on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), mid-infrared spectra obtained with BASS on AOES and IRTF, MIRSI on IRTF, and MIRAC4 on the MMT, along with mid-infrared photometry using MIRSI on IRTF and MIRAC4 on the MMT, plus 1995-2000 timeframe published photometry and data obtained with Denver's TNTCAM2 at WIRO. The goals of these observations included: (1) comparing eclipse depths with prior eclipse data, (2) confirming the re-appearance of CO absorption bands at and after mid-eclipse, associated with sublimation in the disk, (3) seeking evidence for any mid-infrared solid state spectral features from particles in the disk, and (4) providing evidence that the externally irradiated disk has azimuthal temperature differences. IR eclipse depths appear similar to those observed during the most recent (1983) eclipse, although evidence for post-mid-eclipse disk temperature increase is present, due to F star heated portions of the disk coming into view. Molecular CO absorption returned 57 days after nominal mid-eclipse, but was not detected at mid-eclipse plus 34 days, narrowing the association with differentially heated sub-regions in the disk. Transient He I 10830A absorption was detected at mid-eclipse, persisting for at least 90 days thereafter, providing a diagnostic for the hot central region. The lack of solid-state features in Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph, BASS, and MIRAC spectra to date suggests the dominance of large particles (micron-sized) in the disk. Based on these observations, mid-infrared studies out of eclipse can directly monitor and map the disk thermal changes, and better constrain disk opacity and thermal conductivity.

  19. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface. 4 figs.

  20. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forman, Steven E. (Framingham, MA); Caunt, James W. (Concord, MA)

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface.

  1. Design and implementation of a rapid-mixer flow cell for time-resolved infrared microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.; Adzic, Aleksandar R.; Sullivan, Michael; Kovacs, Kevin; Miller, Lisa M.; Rousseau, Denis L.; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Chance, Mark R.

    2000-11-01

    A rapid mixer for the analysis of reactions in the millisecond and submillisecond time domains by Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy has been constructed. The cell was tested by examination of cytochrome-c folding kinetics. The device allows collection of full infrared spectral data on millisecond and faster time scales subsequent to chemical jump reaction initiation. The data quality is sufficiently good such that spectral fitting techniques could be applied to analysis of the data. Thus, this method provides an advantage over kinetic measurements at single wavelengths using infrared laser or diode sources, particularly where band overlap exists.

  2. Invited Article: An integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kühne, P., E-mail: kuehne@huskers.unl.edu; Schubert, M., E-mail: schubert@engr.unl.edu; Hofmann, T., E-mail: thofmann@engr.unl.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Nanohybrid Functional Materials, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Herzinger, C. M., E-mail: cherzinger@jawoollam.com; Woollam, J. A., E-mail: jwoollam@jawoollam.com [J. A. Woollam Co., Inc., 645 M Street, Suite 102, Lincoln, Nebraska 68508-2243 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    We report on the development of the first integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument, covering an ultra wide spectral range from 3 cm{sup ?1} to 7000 cm{sup ?1} (0.1–210 THz or 0.4–870 meV). The instrument comprises four sub-systems, where the magneto-cryostat-transfer sub-system enables the usage of the magneto-cryostat sub-system with the mid-infrared ellipsometer sub-system, and the far-infrared/terahertz ellipsometer sub-system. Both ellipsometer sub-systems can be used as variable angle-of-incidence spectroscopic ellipsometers in reflection or transmission mode, and are equipped with multiple light sources and detectors. The ellipsometer sub-systems are operated in polarizer-sample-rotating-analyzer configuration granting access to the upper left 3 × 3 block of the normalized 4 × 4 Mueller matrix. The closed cycle magneto-cryostat sub-system provides sample temperatures between room temperature and 1.4 K and magnetic fields up to 8 T, enabling the detection of transverse and longitudinal magnetic field-induced birefringence. We discuss theoretical background and practical realization of the integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument, as well as acquisition of optical Hall effect data and the corresponding model analysis procedures. Exemplarily, epitaxial graphene grown on 6H-SiC, a tellurium doped bulk GaAs sample and an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structure are investigated. The selected experimental datasets display the full spectral, magnetic field and temperature range of the instrument and demonstrate data analysis strategies. Effects from free charge carriers in two dimensional confinement and in a volume material, as well as quantum mechanical effects (inter-Landau-level transitions) are observed and discussed exemplarily.

  3. Supplemental Discussion Infrared spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael E.

    Supplemental Discussion Infrared spectroscopy We obtained near infrared reflectance spectra of 26 /~160 (see Supplemental Figure 1). The region between 1.81 and 1.89 µm has residual contamination the 50 Myr time period (see Supplemental Figure 2). doi: 10.1038/nature05619 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

  4. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  5. Mid-Infrared Plasmonic Biosensing with Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo, Daniel; Janner, Davide; Etezadi, Dordaneh; de Abajo, F Javier García; Pruneri, Valerio; Altug, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is the technique of choice for chemical identification of biomolecules through their vibrational fingerprints. However, infrared light interacts poorly with nanometric size molecules. Here, we exploit the unique electro-optical properties of graphene to demonstrate a high-sensitivity tunable plasmonic biosensor for chemically-specific label-free detection of protein monolayers. The plasmon resonance of nanostructured graphene is dynamically tuned to selectively probe the protein at different frequencies and extract its complex refractive index. Additionally, the extreme spatial light confinement in graphene, up to two orders of magnitude higher than in metals, produces an unprecedentedly high overlap with nanometric biomolecules, enabling superior sensitivity in the detection of their refractive index and vibrational fingerprints. The combination of tunable spectral selectivity and enhanced sensitivity of graphene opens exciting prospects for biosensing.

  6. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-07-02

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer clouds using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances under conditions when precipitation does not reach the surface. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievalsmore »using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulus under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m-2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the Northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent three-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m-2.« less

  7. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-02-16

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer cloud using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievals using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulusmore »under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m?2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent 3-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m?2.« less

  8. Spectral tailoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.; Carter, L.L.; Karnesky, R.A.

    1987-08-05

    A spectral tailoring device for altering the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in a fast reactor thereby selectively to enhance or inhibit the transmutation rate of a target metrical to form a product isotope. Neutron moderators, neutron filters, neutron absorbers and neutron reflectors may be used as spectral tailoring devices. Depending on the intended use for the device, a member from each of these four classes of materials could be used singularly, or in combination, to provide a preferred neutron energy spectra and flux of the neutrons in the region of the target material. In one embodiment of the invention, an assembly is provided for enhancing the production of isotopes, such as cobalt 60 and gadolinium 153. In another embodiment of the invention, a spectral tailoring device is disposed adjacent a target material which comprises long lived or volatile fission products and the device is used to shift the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in the region of the fission products to preferentially transmute them to produce a less volatile fission product inventory. 6 figs.

  9. Motivation Two spectral preconditioners Recombination issue Using Spectral Information to Precondition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Motivation Two spectral preconditioners Recombination issue Using Spectral Information #12;2 Motivation Two spectral preconditioners Recombination issue #12;3 Motivation Two spectral preconditioners Recombination issue Outline 1 Motivation 2 Two spectral preconditioners 3 Recombination issue #12

  10. A Survey and Analysis of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Spectra of T Tauri Stars in Taurus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Furlan; L. Hartmann; N. Calvet; P. D'Alessio; R. Franco-Hernandez; W. J. Forrest; D. M. Watson; K. I. Uchida; B. Sargent; J. D. Green; L. D. Keller; T. L. Herter

    2006-08-01

    We present mid-infrared spectra of T Tauri stars in the Taurus star-forming region obtained with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). For the first time, the 5-36 micron spectra of a large sample of T Tauri stars belonging to the same star-forming region is studied, revealing details of the mid-infrared excess due to dust in circumstellar disks. We analyze common features and differences in the mid-IR spectra based on disk structure, dust grain properties, and the presence of companions. Our analysis encompasses spectral energy distributions from the optical to the far-infrared, a morphological sequence based on the IRS spectra, and spectral indices in IRS wave bands representative of continuum emission. By comparing the observed spectra to a grid of accretion disk models, we infer some basic disk properties for our sample of T Tauri stars, and find additional evidence for dust settling.

  11. The design and construction of an infrared detector for use with a highway traffic survey system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mundkowsky, William Fredrick

    1961-01-01

    to test the infrared detector system for parameter variations. The hot plate, which was used to simulate a mui'fler, had a surface area of nearly 30 sq. in. This radiating area could be Inzited to I sq. in. by placing a shield across the plate. Fig... The Optics Spectral Filtering Spatial Filtering Design Considerations Test Procedures and. Results 20 CONCLUSION APPENDIX I Basic infrared Radiation Laws APPENDIX II Baclqpound Rad. iation APPENDIX III Atmospheric Transmission...

  12. Method of multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2004-01-06

    A method of determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used to analyze X-ray spectral data generated by operating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an attached Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS).

  13. Photon sorting in the near field using subwavelength cavity arrays in the near-infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandel, Isroel M. Lansey, Eli; Gollub, Jonah N.; Sarantos, Chris H.; Akhmechet, Roman; Golovin, Andrii B.; Crouse, David T.

    2013-12-16

    A frequency selective metasurface capable of sorting photons in the near-infrared spectral range is designed, fabricated, and characterized. The metasurface, a periodic array of dielectric cylindrical cavities in a gold film, localizes and transmits light of two spectral frequency bands into spatially separated cavities, resulting in near-field light splitting. The design and fabrication methodologies of the metasurface are discussed. The transmittance and photon sorting properties of the designed structure is simulated numerically and the measured transmission is presented.

  14. 2MASS J20261584–2943124: AN UNRESOLVED L0.5 + T6 SPECTRAL BINARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelino, Christopher R.

    We identify the L dwarf 2MASS J20261584–2943124 as an unresolved spectral binary, based on low-resolution, near-infrared spectroscopy from IRTF/SpeX. The data reveal a peculiar absorption feature at 1.6 ?m, previously noted ...

  15. Cloudy sounding and cloud-top height retrieval from AIRS alone single field-of-view radiance measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    to 15.4 mm). The spectral coverage includes strong CO2 absorption necessary for temperature profile and Ping Yang4 Received 3 April 2007; accepted 16 May 2007; published 20 June 2007. [1] High) Aqua satellite provide unique information about atmospheric state, surface and cloud properties

  16. Spectral proper orthogonal decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sieber, Moritz; Paschereit, Christian Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The identification of coherent structures from experimental or numerical data is an essential task when conducting research in fluid dynamics. This typically involves the construction of an empirical mode base that appropriately captures the dominant flow structures. The most prominent candidates are the energy-ranked proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and the frequency ranked Fourier decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD). However, these methods fail when the relevant coherent structures occur at low energies or at multiple frequencies, which is often the case. To overcome the deficit of these "rigid" approaches, we propose a new method termed Spectral Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (SPOD). It is based on classical POD and it can be applied to spatially and temporally resolved data. The new method involves an additional temporal constraint that enables a clear separation of phenomena that occur at multiple frequencies and energies. SPOD allows for a continuous shifting from the energetically ...

  17. Near infrared surfaceplasmonpolariton with hyperbolic metamaterials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Near infrared surfaceplasmonpolariton with hyperbolic metamaterials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Near infrared surfaceplasmonpolariton with hyperbolic metamaterials....

  18. Infrared floodlight assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wierzbicki, Julian J. (Peabody, MA); Chakrabarti, Kirti B. (Danvers, MA)

    1987-09-22

    An infrared floodlight assembly (10) including a cast aluminum outer housing (11) defining a central chamber (15) therein. A floodlight (14), having a tungsten halogen lamp as the light source, is spacedly positioned within a heat conducting member (43) within chamber (15) such that the floodlight is securedly positioned in an aligned manner relative to the assembly's filter (35) and lens (12) components. The invention also includes venting means (51) to allow air passage between the interior of the member (43) and the adjacent chamber (15), as well as engagement means (85) for engaging a rear surface of the floodlight (14) to retain it firmly against an internal flange of the member (43). A reflector (61), capable of being compressed to allow insertion or removal, is located within the heat conducting member's interior between the floodlight (14) and filter (35) to reflect infrared radiation toward the filter (35) and spaced lens (12).

  19. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  20. Infrared microcalorimetric spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E [ORNL; Senesac, Larry R [ORNL; Rajic, Slobodan [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL; Smith, Barton [ORNL; Datskos, Panos G [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated an infrared (IR) microcalorimetric spectroscopy technique that can be used to detect the presence of trace amounts of target molecules. The chemical detection is accomplished by obtaining the IR photothermal spectra of molecules absorbed on the surface of uncooled thermal micromechanical detectors. IR microcalorimetric spectroscopy requires no chemical specific coatings and the chemical specificity of the presented method is a consequence of the wavelength-specific absorption of IR photons from tunable quantum cascade lasers due to vibrational spectral bands of the analyte. We have obtained IR photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of RDX and a monolayer of 2-mercaptoethanol, over the wavelength region from 6 to 10 m. We found that in this wavelength region both chemicals exhibit a number of photothermal absorption features that are in good agreement with their respective IR spectra.

  1. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1998-09-22

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

  2. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    The dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, and provides quantified examplesmore »that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.« less

  3. TESTING THE HYPOTHESIS THAT METHANOL MASER RINGS TRACE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS: HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-INFRARED AND MID-INFRARED IMAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Buizer, James M. [Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy-USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, MS N232-12, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Bartkiewicz, Anna; Szymczak, Marian, E-mail: jdebuizer@sofia.usra.edu [Torun Centre for Astronomy, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina 11, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2012-08-01

    Milliarcsecond very long baseline interferometry maps of regions containing 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission have lead to the recent discovery of ring-like distributions of maser spots and the plausible hypothesis that they may be tracing circumstellar disks around forming high-mass stars. We aimed to test this hypothesis by imaging these regions in the near- and mid-infrared at high spatial resolution and compare the observed emission to the expected infrared morphologies as inferred from the geometries of the maser rings. In the near-infrared we used the Gemini North adaptive optics system of ALTAIR/NIRI, while in the mid-infrared we used the combination of the Gemini South instrument T-ReCS and super-resolution techniques. Resultant images had a resolution of {approx}150 mas in both the near-infrared and mid-infrared. We discuss the expected distribution of circumstellar material around young and massive accreting (proto)stars and what infrared emission geometries would be expected for the different maser ring orientations under the assumption that the masers are coming from within circumstellar disks. Based upon the observed infrared emission geometries for the four targets in our sample and the results of spectral energy distribution modeling of the massive young stellar objects associated with the maser rings, we do not find compelling evidence in support of the hypothesis that methanol masers rings reside in circumstellar disks.

  4. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  5. Inverse Spectral Problem Proof of Main Result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanhope, Liz

    Inverse Spectral Problem Proof of Main Result Geodesics on Weighted Projective Spaces Zuoqin Wang of Main Result Inverse Spectral Geometry Main Result Inverse Spectral Geometry Manifold setting: (M, g Proof of Main Result Inverse Spectral Geometry Main Result Inverse Spectral Geometry Manifold setting

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS WITH MID-INFRARED EXCESSES USING GLIMPSE: PICTORIS ANALOGS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemens, Dan

    IDENTIFICATION OF MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS WITH MID-INFRARED EXCESSES USING GLIMPSE: #12; PICTORIS stars, 29 appear to be main-sequence stars on the basis of optical spectral classifications. Five of the 29 main-sequence stars are O or B stars with excesses that can be plausibly explained by thermal

  7. DeMeo taxonomy : categorization of asteroids in the near-infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMeo, Francesca E

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the DeMeo taxonomy, an asteroid taxonomy with 24 classes based on Principal Component Analysis of spectral data over the visible and near-infrared wavelengths, specifically the 0.45 to 2.45 micron range. ...

  8. On the regular slice spectral sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullman, John Richard

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we analyze a variant of the slice spectral sequence of [HHR (or SSS) called the regular slice spectral sequence (or RSSS). This latter spectral sequence is defined using only the regular slice cells. We ...

  9. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Dr. Kyle J. Alvine, kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 21C...

  10. Spectral Measures for $Sp(2)$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David E. Evans; Mathew Pugh

    2015-02-13

    Spectral measures provide invariants for braided subfactors via fusion modules. In this paper we study joint spectral measures associated to the compact connected rank two Lie group $SO(5)$ and its double cover the compact connected, simply-connected rank two Lie group $Sp(2)$, including the McKay graphs for the irreducible representations of $Sp(2)$ and $SO(5)$ and their maximal tori, and fusion modules associated to the $Sp(2)$ modular invariants.

  11. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerwert, Klaus

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy Klaus Gerwert, Lehrstuhl fu¨r Biophysik, Ruhr, Germany Based in part on the previous version of this Encyclopedia of Life Sciences (ELS) article, Fourier Transform IR by Johannes Orphal. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is an experimental technique

  12. Sub-kHz linewidth narrowing of a mid-infrared OPO idler frequency by direct cavity stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricciardi, I; Parisi, M; Maddaloni, P; Santamaria, L; De Natale, P; De Rosa, M

    2015-01-01

    We stabilize the idler frequency of a singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator directly to the resonance of a mid-infrared Fabry-P\\'erot reference cavity. This is accomplished by the Pound-Drever-Hall locking scheme, controlling either the pump laser or the resonant signal frequency. A residual relative frequency noise power spectral density below 10$^3$ Hz$^2$/Hz is reached, with a Gaussian linewidth of 920 Hz over 100 ms, which demonstrates the potential for reaching spectral purity down to the Hz level by locking the optical parametric oscillator against a mid-infrared cavity with state-of-the-art superior performance.

  13. Lateral conduction infrared photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Carroll, Malcolm S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-09-20

    A photodetector for detecting infrared light in a wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m is disclosed. The photodetector has a mesa structure formed from semiconductor layers which include a type-II superlattice formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. Impurity doped regions are formed on sidewalls of the mesa structure to provide for a lateral conduction of photo-generated carriers which can provide an increased carrier mobility and a reduced surface recombination. An optional bias electrode can be used in the photodetector to control and vary a cut-off wavelength or a depletion width therein. The photodetector can be formed as a single-color or multi-color device, and can also be used to form a focal plane array which is compatible with conventional read-out integrated circuits.

  14. Heat Loss Measurement Using Infrared Imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seeber, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    Infrared thermography has proven to be an important tool in numerous plant maintenance and energy conservation applications. Quantitative measurement, using infrared imaging instruments, is a powerful new dimension of infrared thermography...

  15. EFFICIENT SPECTRAL-GALERKIN METHODS FOR FRACTIONAL ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-11-17

    EFFICIENT SPECTRAL-GALERKIN METHODS FOR FRACTIONAL PARTIAL. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH VARIABLE COEFFICIENTS. ZHIPING MAO†

  16. SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN ROTATIONAL EMISSION TOWARDS TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SPITZER INFRARED...

  17. Mid-infrared tunable metamaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brener, Igal; Miao, Xiaoyu; Shaner, Eric A; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Jun, Young Chul

    2015-04-28

    A mid-infrared tunable metamaterial comprises an array of resonators on a semiconductor substrate having a large dependence of dielectric function on carrier concentration and a semiconductor plasma resonance that lies below the operating range, such as indium antimonide. Voltage biasing of the substrate generates a resonance shift in the metamaterial response that is tunable over a broad operating range. The mid-infrared tunable metamaterials have the potential to become the building blocks of chip based active optical devices in mid-infrared ranges, which can be used for many applications, such as thermal imaging, remote sensing, and environmental monitoring.

  18. POLYPHONIC INSTRUMENT RECOGNITION SPECTRAL CLUSTERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzanetakis, George

    POLYPHONIC INSTRUMENT RECOGNITION USING SPECTRAL CLUSTERING Luis Gustavo Martins Telecommunications]@uvic.ca ABSTRACT The identification of the instruments playing in a poly- phonic music signal is an important source separation and tim- bre classification of polyphonic, multi-instrumental music signals. The sound

  19. Spectral Modeling Hot Star Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    Spectral Modeling of X-Rays from Hot Star Winds Emma Wollman Advisor: David Cohen #12;Hot Stars ·· Short-livedShort-lived (~ 1-10 million yrs)(~ 1-10 million yrs) #12;Stellar Winds · Net momentum · More luminosity !"stronger wind · Mass-loss rate determines the fate of the star #12;X-ray Production

  20. 2D radiative modelling of He I spectral lines formed in solar prominences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Leger; F. Paletou

    2008-07-11

    We present preliminary results of 2D radiative modelling of He I lines in solar prominences, using a new numerical code developed by us (Leger, Chevallier and Paletou 2007). It treats self-consistently the radiation transfer and the non-LTE statistical equilibrium of H and, in a second stage, the one of He using a detailed atomic model. Preliminary comparisons with new visible plus near-infrared observations made at high spectral resolution with THeMIS are very satisfactory.

  1. Industrial Use of Infrared Inspections 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duch, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared is and has been an established technology in the military and aerospace fields. However, only relatively recently has this technology found a "use" in the industrial sector. Many reasons exist why the technology has not been used...

  2. The SNAP near infrared detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    it will detect Type Ia supernovć between z = 1 and 1.7 andphotometry for all supernovć. HgCdTe technology, with a cut-Keywords: Cosmology, Supernovae, Dark Energy, Near Infrared,

  3. Method for determining and displaying the spacial distribution of a spectral pattern of received light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    An imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (10, 210) having a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (12) providing a series of images (40) to a focal plane array camera (38). The focal plane array camera (38) is clocked to a multiple of zero crossing occurrences as caused by a moving mirror (18) of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (12) and as detected by a laser detector (50) such that the frame capture rate of the focal plane array camera (38) corresponds to a multiple of the zero crossing rate of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (12). The images (40) are transmitted to a computer (45) for processing such that representations of the images (40) as viewed in the light of an arbitrary spectral "fingerprint" pattern can be displayed on a monitor (60) or otherwise stored and manipulated by the computer (45).

  4. Method for determining and displaying the spacial distribution of a spectral pattern of received light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, C.L.

    1996-07-23

    An imaging Fourier transform spectrometer is described having a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer providing a series of images to a focal plane array camera. The focal plane array camera is clocked to a multiple of zero crossing occurrences as caused by a moving mirror of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and as detected by a laser detector such that the frame capture rate of the focal plane array camera corresponds to a multiple of the zero crossing rate of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The images are transmitted to a computer for processing such that representations of the images as viewed in the light of an arbitrary spectral ``fingerprint`` pattern can be displayed on a monitor or otherwise stored and manipulated by the computer. 2 figs.

  5. Design of the First Infrared Beamline at the Siam Photon Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pattanasiriwisawa, W.; Songsiriritthigul, P.; Dumas, P.

    2010-06-23

    This report presents the optical design and optical simulations for the first infrared beamline at the Siam Photon Laboratory. The beamline collects the edge radiation and bending magnet radiation, producing from the BM4 bending magnet of the 1.2 GeV storage ring of the Siam Photon Source. The optical design is optimized for the far- to mid-infrared spectral range (4000-100 cm{sup -1}) for microspectroscopic applications. The optical performance has been examined by computer simulations.

  6. INT. J. REMOTE SENSING, 2003, VOL. 24, NO. 11, 23232344 Resolution dependence of infrared imagery of active thermal features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    of active thermal features at Kilauea Volcano H. GAONAC'H Centre GEOTOP, Universite´ du Que´bec a` Montre of various vol- canic features in the thermal infrared spectral region (8­12 mm) acquired above the active the (essentially subjective) sensor resolution when interpreting and model- ling active volcanic thermal fields

  7. Controlling the Texture and Crystallinity of Evaporated Lead Phthalocyanine Thin Films for Near-Infrared Sensitive Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Frank

    Controlling the Texture and Crystallinity of Evaporated Lead Phthalocyanine Thin Films for Near-Infrared Sensitive Solar Cells Karolien Vasseur,, Katharina Broch,§ Alexander L. Ayzner, Barry P. Rand, David Cheyns: To achieve organic solar cells with a broadened spectral absorption, we aim to promote the growth of the near

  8. Spectral diagonal ensemble Kalman filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasanický, Ivan; Vejmelka, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A new type of ensemble Kalman filter is developed, which is based on replacing the sample covariance in the analysis step by its diagonal in a spectral basis. It is proved that this technique improves the aproximation of the covariance when the covariance itself is diagonal in the spectral basis, as is the case, e.g., for a second-order stationary random field and the Fourier basis. The method is extended by wavelets to the case when the state variables are random fields, which are not spatially homogeneous. Efficient implementations by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) are presented for several types of observations, including high-dimensional data given on a part of the domain, such as radar and satellite images. Computational experiments confirm that the method performs well on the Lorenz 96 problem and the shallow water equations with very small ensembles and over multiple analysis cycles.

  9. Spectral Emission of Moving Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. X. Zheng-Johansson

    2008-03-17

    A renewed analysis of the H.E. Ives and G.R. Stilwell's experiment on moving hydrogen canal rays (J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1938, v.28, 215) concludes that the spectral emission of a moving atom exhibits always a redshift which informs not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a portion of its internal energy on transiting to a lower-energy state which however has in a moving atom an additional energy gain; this results in a redshift in the emission frequency. Based on auxiliary experimental information and a scheme for de Broglie particle formation, we give a vigorous elucidation of the mechanism for deceleration radiation of atomic electron; the corresponding prediction of the redshift is in complete agreement with the Ives and Stilwell's experimental formula.

  10. AN EFFICIENT AND ACCURATE SPECTRAL METHOD FOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-20

    AN EFFICIENT AND ACCURATE SPECTRAL METHOD FOR. ACOUSTIC SCATTERING IN ELLIPTIC DOMAINS. QIRONG FANG†. JIE SHEN†. AND LI-

  11. Spectral averaging techniques for Jacobi matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael del Rio; Carmen Martinez; Hermann Schulz-Baldes

    2008-02-20

    Spectral averaging techniques for one-dimensional discrete Schroedinger operators are revisited and extended. In particular, simultaneous averaging over several parameters is discussed. Special focus is put on proving lower bounds on the density of the averaged spectral measures. These Wegner type estimates are used to analyze stability properties for the spectral types of Jacobi matrices under local perturbations.

  12. Emission Lines and the Spectral Energy Distributions of Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Wilkes; P. J. Green; S. Mathur; J. C. McDowell

    1996-08-05

    Many years of study have failed to conclusively establish relations between a quasar's spectral energy distribution (SED) and the emission lines it is thought to produce. This is at least partially due to the lack of well-observed SEDs. We present initial results from a line--SED study for a sample of 43 quasars and active galaxies for which we have optical and ultra-violet spectra and far-infrared--X-ray SEDs. We present the results of tests for correlations between line equivalent widths and SED luminosity and slope parameters and compare these results to those from earlier studies. We find that the Baldwin effect is weaker when the luminosity is defined close to the ionising continuum of that line and conclude that the detailed SED is likely to be important in making further progress.

  13. Spectral Energy Distributions for Disk and Halo M--Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K. Leggett; F. Allard; Conard Dahn; P. H. Hauschildt; T. H. Kerr; J. Rayner

    2000-01-07

    We have obtained infrared (1 to 2.5 micron) spectroscopy for 42 halo and disk dwarfs with spectral type M1 to M6.5. These data are compared to synthetic spectra generated by the latest model atmospheres of Allard & Hauschildt. Photospheric parameters metallicity, effective temperature and radius are determined for the sample. We find good agreement between observation and theory except for known problems due to incomplete molecular data for metal hydrides and water. The metal-poor M subdwarfs are well matched by the models as oxide opacity sources are less important in this case. The derived effective temperatures for the sample range from 3600K to 2600K; at these temperatures grain formation and extinction are not significant in the photosphere. The derived metallicities range from solar to one-tenth solar. The radii and effective temperatures derived agree well with recent models of low mass stars.

  14. Solar spectral measurements and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, R.E.; Hulstrom, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A newly developed spectroradiometer for routine measurement of the solar spectra is described. This instrument measures the solar spectrum between 300 and 2500 nm in less than 2.5 min, with 0.7-nm resolution in the visible and 10-nm resolution in the infrared. Many examples of global, direct, and diffuse spectra are illustrated for Bedford, Mass. and Golden, Colo. The effects of air mass, turbidity, and sun tracking on the spectrum are presented, and radiative transfer modeling capabilities and comparisons between models and between models and experiment are discussed.

  15. Electrically tunable infrared metamaterial devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brener, Igal; Jun, Young Chul

    2015-07-21

    A wavelength-tunable, depletion-type infrared metamaterial optical device is provided. The device includes a thin, highly doped epilayer whose electrical permittivity can become negative at some infrared wavelengths. This highly-doped buried layer optically couples with a metamaterial layer. Changes in the transmission spectrum of the device can be induced via the electrical control of this optical coupling. An embodiment includes a contact layer of semiconductor material that is sufficiently doped for operation as a contact layer and that is effectively transparent to an operating range of infrared wavelengths, a thin, highly doped buried layer of epitaxially grown semiconductor material that overlies the contact layer, and a metallized layer overlying the buried layer and patterned as a resonant metamaterial.

  16. Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T; Schaich, David A

    2011-09-01

    We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that itmore »does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.« less

  17. Mid-Infrared Ethane Emission on Neptune and Uranus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. B. Hammel; D. K. Lynch; R. W. Russell; M. L. Sitko; L. S. Bernstein; T. Hewagama

    2006-02-24

    We report 8- to 13-micron spectral observations of Neptune and Uranus from the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility spanning more than a decade. The spectroscopic data indicate a steady increase in Neptune's mean atmospheric 12-micron ethane emission from 1985 to 2003, followed by a slight decrease in 2004. The simplest explanation for the intensity variation is an increase in stratospheric effective temperature from 155 +/- 3 K in 1985 to 176 +/- 3 K in 2003 (an average rate of 1.2 K/year), and subsequent decrease to 165 +/- 3 K in 2004. We also detected variation of the overall spectral structure of the ethane band, specifically an apparent absorption structure in the central portion of the band; this structure arises from coarse spectral sampling coupled with a non-uniform response function within the detector elements. We also report a probable direct detection of ethane emission on Uranus. The deduced peak mole fraction is approximately an order of magnitude higher than previous upper limits for Uranus. The model fit suggests an effective temperature of 114 +/- 3 K for the globally-averaged stratosphere of Uranus, which is consistent with recent measurements indicative of seasonal variation.

  18. Real time infrared aerosol analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL); Reedy, Gerald T. (Bourbonnais, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL)

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

  19. Coronagraphic demonstration experiment using aluminum mirrors for space infrared astronomical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oseki, Shinji; Ishihara, Daisuke; Enya, Keigo; Haze, Kanae; Kotani, Takayuki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nishiyama, Miho; Abe, Lyu; Yamamuro, Tomoyasu

    2015-01-01

    For future space infrared astronomical coronagraphy, we perform experimental studies on the application of aluminum mirrors to a coronagraph. Cooled reflective optics is required for broad-band mid-infrared observations in space, while high-precision optics is required for coronagraphy. For the coronagraph instrument originally proposed for the next-generation infrared astronomical satellite project SPICA (SCI: SPICA Coronagraph Instrument), we fabricated and evaluated the optics consisting of high-precision aluminum off-axis mirrors with diamond-turned surfaces, and conducted a coronagraphic demonstration experiment using the optics with a coronagraph mask. We first measured the wave front errors (WFEs) of the aluminum mirrors with a He-Ne Fizeau interferometer to confirm that the power spectral densities of the WFEs satisfy the SCI requirements. Then we integrated the mirrors into an optical system and evaluated the overall performance of the system. As a result, we estimate the total WFE of the optics to b...

  20. Low temperature optical characterization of near infrared single photon emitter in nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siyushev, P; Aharonovich, I; Kaiser, F; Müller, T; Lombez, L; Atatüre, M; Castelletto, S; Prawer, S; Jelezko, F; Wrachtrup, J

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the optical properties of single defects emitting in the near infrared in nanodiamonds at liquid helium temperature. The nanodiamonds are synthesized using a microwave chemical vapor deposition method followed by nickel implantation and annealing. We show that single defects exhibit several striking features at cryogenic temperature: the photoluminescence is strongly concentrated into a sharp zero-phonon line in the near infrared, the radiative lifetime is in the nanosecond range and the emission is perfectly linearly polarized. The spectral stability of the defects is then investigated. An optical resonance linewidth of 4 GHz is measured using resonant excitation on the zero-phonon line. Although Fourier-transform limited emission is not achieved, our results show that it might be possible to use consecutive photons emitted in the near infrared by single defects in diamond nanocrystals to perform two photon interference experiments, which are at the heart of linear quantum computing p...

  1. Low temperature optical characterization of near infrared single photon emitters in nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Siyushev; V. Jacques; I. Aharonovich; F. Kaiser; T. Muller; L. Lombez; M. Atature; S. Castelletto; S. Prawer; F. Jelezko; J. Wrachtrup

    2009-11-18

    In this paper, we study the optical properties of single defects emitting in the near infrared in nanodiamonds at liquid helium temperature. The nanodiamonds are synthesized using a microwave chemical vapor deposition method followed by nickel implantation and annealing. We show that single defects exhibit several striking features at cryogenic temperature: the photoluminescence is strongly concentrated into a sharp zero-phonon line in the near infrared, the radiative lifetime is in the nanosecond range and the emission is perfectly linearly polarized. The spectral stability of the defects is then investigated. An optical resonance linewidth of 4 GHz is measured using resonant excitation on the zero-phonon line. Although Fourier-transform limited emission is not achieved, our results show that it might be possible to use consecutive photons emitted in the near infrared by single defects in diamond nanocrystals to perform two photon interference experiments, which are at the heart of linear quantum computing protocols.

  2. Thermo Tracer Infrared Thermal Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    -range area G Environment monitoring Volcano, ecology, vegetation, global warming, pollution G R&D Evaluation is a fixed installation type infrared thermal imaging camera to monitor important facilities Production line monitoring Quality anomalies in production processes G Facility monitoring Anomalies

  3. Spectral signatures of penumbral transients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reardon, K. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Tritschler, A. [National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak, P.O. Box 62, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Katsukawa, Y. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-12-20

    In this work we investigate the properties of penumbral transients observed in the upper photospheric and chromospheric region above a sunspot penumbra using two-dimensional spectroscopic observations of the Ca II 854.21 nm line with a 5 s cadence. In our 30 minutes of observations, we identify several penumbral-micro jets (PMJs) with cotemporal observations from Dunn Solar Telescope/IBIS and Hinode/SOT. We find that the line profiles of these PMJ events show emission in the two wings of the line (±0.05 nm), but little modification of the line core. These are reminiscent of the line profiles of Ellerman bombs observed in plage and network regions. Furthermore, we find evidence that some PMJ events have a precursor phase starting 1 minute prior to the main brightening that might indicate initial heating of the plasma prior to an acoustic or bow shock event. With the IBIS data, we also find several other types of transient brightenings with timescales of less than 1 minute that are not clearly seen in the Hinode/SOT data. The spectral profiles and other characteristics of these events are significantly different from those of PMJs. The different appearances of all these transients are an indicator of the general complexity of the chromospheric magnetic field and underscore the highly dynamic behavior above sunspots. It also highlights the care that is needed in interpreting broadband filter images of chromospheric lines, which may conceal very different spectral profiles, and the underlying physical mechanisms at work.

  4. Infrared Dry-peeling Technology for Tomatoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This research will use infrared heating technology for peeling tomatoes. Infrared dry peeling, a device District: 8 Senate District: 5 Application: Nationwide Amount: $324,250 Term: November 1, 2010

  5. Drones, Infrared Imagery, and Body Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, L

    2015-01-01

    afar: The politics of drones and liminal security-scapes.of Communication 8 (2014) Drones, Infrared Imagery, and Body2521 1932–8036/2014FEA0002 Drones, Infrared Imagery, and

  6. Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, T

    2005-07-01

    The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: • Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) • Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) • Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) • Upwelling shortwave (reflected) • Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) • Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

  7. Near-infrared Spectral Features in Single-aged Stellar Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo P. Schiavon; Beatriz Barbuy; Gustavo Bruzual

    1999-10-14

    Synthetic spectra for single-aged stellar populations of metallicities [M/H] = -0.5, 0.0 and +0.5, ages = 3 to 17 Gyrs, and initial mass function exponents x = 0.1 to 2.0 were built in the wavelength range 6000-10200 Angstrons. For such we have employed the grid of synthetic spectra described in Schiavon & Barbuy (1999), computed for the stellar parameters 2500 <= Teff <= 6000 K, -0.5 <= log g <= 5.0, [M/H] = -0.5, 0.0 and +0.5, and [alpha/Fe] = 0.0, together with the isochrones by Bertelli et al. (1994) and Baraffe et al. (1998). The behavior of the features NaI8190, CaII8662, TiO6600 and FeH9900 in the integrated spectra of single stellar populations were studied in terms of metallicity, initial mass function and age variations. The main conclusions are that the NaI doublet is an IMF-sensitive feature, which is however sensitive also to metallicity and age, whereas TiO, CaII and FeH are very sensitive to metallicity and essentially insensitive to IMF and age.

  8. Plasmonics in the near-infrared : spatial, spectral, and temporal studies of surface plasmon polaritons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tetz, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    of SPP pulse provides additional electromagnetic ?eldpulses using a time-resolved spatial heterodyne imaging technique to obtain spatial distributions of the electromagnetic ?pulses using a time-resolved spatial heterodyne imaging (TRSHI) technique to obtain spatial distributions of the electromagnetic ?

  9. A two-parameter model for the infrared/submillimeter/radio spectral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AND ASTRONOMY; ACCRETION DISKS; COLOR; DUSTS; EMISSION; ENERGY SPECTRA; GALAXIES; GALAXY NUCLEI; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; RED SHIFT; SPACE; STARS; TELESCOPES Word...

  10. Fabrication and testing of an infrared spectral control component for thermophotovoltaic power conversion applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Sullivan, Francis M. (Francis Martin), 1980-

    2004-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power conversion is the direct conversion of thermal radiation to electricity. Conceptually, TPV power conversion is a very elegant means of energy conversion. A thermal source emits a radiative ...

  11. A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |Recent Exploration WellMountain,

  12. A two-parameter model for the infrared/submillimeter/radio spectral energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL(Technicalentanglements forusing LSST Photondistributions of

  13. MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL INDICATORS OF STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journalspectroscopy ofArticle) |managementSYNCHROTRON RADIATION CIRCULAR

  14. Infrared Upconversion for Astronomy Robert W. Boyd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Robert W.

    which collects the infrared radiation is designed so as to map each point in the field of view. Infrared radiation of frequency Figure 1. Schematic description of the upconversion process. Infrared radiation of frequency vIR is mixed with an intense laser beam of fre- quency vL in a nonlinear crystal

  15. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.

    2004-03-23

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following prediction or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The hybrid method herein means a combination of an initial calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A spectral shape herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The shape can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  16. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following estimation or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The "hybrid" method herein means a combination of an initial classical least squares analysis calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A "spectral shape" herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The "shape" can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  17. Spectral utilization in thermophotovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clevenger, M.B.; Murray, C.S.

    1997-12-31

    Multilayer assemblies of epitaxially-grown, III-V semiconductor materials are being investigated for use in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion applications. It has been observed that thick, highly-doped semiconductor layers within cell architectures dominate the parasitic free-carrier absorption (FCA) of devices at wavelengths above the bandgap of the semiconductor material. In this work, the wavelength-dependent, free-carrier absorption of p- and n-type InGaAs layers grown epitaxially onto semi-insulating (SI) InP substrates has been measured and related to the total absorption of long-wavelength photons in thermophotovoltaic devices. The optical responses of the TPV cells are then used in the calculation of spectral utilization factors and device efficiencies.

  18. Far-infrared surface emissivity and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Pincus, Robert; Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong

    2014-11-03

    Presently, there are no global measurement constraints on the surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 ?m, even though this surface property in this far-IR region has a direct impact on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and infrared cooling rates where the column precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm. Such dry conditions are common for high-altitude and high-latitude locations, with the potential for modeled climate to be impacted by uncertain surface characteristics. This paper explores the sensitivity of instantaneous OLR and cooling rates to changes in far-IR surface emissivity and how this unconstrained property impacts climate model projections. At high latitudes and altitudes, a 0.05 change in emissivity due to mineralogy and snow grain size can cause a 1.8–2.0 W m?˛ difference in the instantaneous clear-sky OLR. A variety of radiative transfer techniques have been used to model the far-IR spectral emissivities of surface types defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. Incorporating these far-IR surface emissivities into the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario of the Community Earth System Model leads to discernible changes in the spatial patterns of surface temperature, OLR, and frozen surface extent. The model results differ at high latitudes by as much as 2°K, 10 W m?˛, and 15%, respectively, after only 25 y of integration. The calculated difference in far-IR emissivity between ocean and sea ice of between 0.1 and 0.2, suggests the potential for a far-IR positive feedback for polar climate change.

  19. Far-infrared surface emissivity and climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Pincus, Robert; Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong

    2014-11-03

    Presently, there are no global measurement constraints on the surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 ?m, even though this surface property in this far-IR region has a direct impact on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and infrared cooling rates where the column precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm. Such dry conditions are common for high-altitude and high-latitude locations, with the potential for modeled climate to be impacted by uncertain surface characteristics. This paper explores the sensitivity of instantaneous OLR and cooling rates to changes in far-IR surface emissivity and how this unconstrained property impacts climate modelmore »projections. At high latitudes and altitudes, a 0.05 change in emissivity due to mineralogy and snow grain size can cause a 1.8–2.0 W m?˛ difference in the instantaneous clear-sky OLR. A variety of radiative transfer techniques have been used to model the far-IR spectral emissivities of surface types defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. Incorporating these far-IR surface emissivities into the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario of the Community Earth System Model leads to discernible changes in the spatial patterns of surface temperature, OLR, and frozen surface extent. The model results differ at high latitudes by as much as 2°K, 10 W m?˛, and 15%, respectively, after only 25 y of integration. The calculated difference in far-IR emissivity between ocean and sea ice of between 0.1 and 0.2, suggests the potential for a far-IR positive feedback for polar climate change.« less

  20. Holographic Quenches and Fermionic Spectral Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Callebaut; B. Craps; F. Galli; D. C. Thompson; J. Vanhoof; J. Zaanen; Hongbao Zhang

    2014-11-04

    Using holographic methods we investigate the behaviour of fermionic spectral functions of strongly coupled 2+1 dimensional field theories as both temperature and chemical potential are quenched.

  1. Spectral Solar Radiation Data Base at NREL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    *In September 1991 the Solar Energy Research Institute became the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. [Description taken from http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/old_data/spectral/

  2. Magnetorefractive effect in manganites with a colossal magnetoresistance in the visible spectral region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukhorukov, Yu. P., E-mail: suhorukov@imp.uran.ru; Telegin, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Granovsky, A. B., E-mail: granov@magn.ru; Gan'shina, E. A. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A.; Gonzalez, J. [Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV)/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea (EHU), Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica (Spain); Herranz, G. [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB)-CSIC (Spain); Caicedo, J. M. [Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV)/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea (EHU), Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica (Spain); Yurasov, A. N. [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics, and Automation (Technical University) (Russian Federation); Bessonov, V. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Kaul', A. R.; Gorbenko, O. Yu.; Korsakov, I. E. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-15

    The magnetotransmission, magnetoreflection, and magnetoresistance of the La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.9}Ag{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} epitaxial films have been investigated. It has been found that the films exhibit a significant magnetorefractive effect in the case of reflection and transmission of light in the fundamental absorption region both in the vicinity of the Curie temperature and at low temperatures. It has been shown that the magnetorefractive effect in the infrared spectral region of the manganites is determined by a high-frequency response to magnetoresistance, whereas the magnetorefractive effect in the visible spectral region of these materials is associated with a change in the electronic structure in response to a magnetic field, which, in turn, leads to a change in the electron density of states, the probability of interband optical transitions, and the shift of light absorption bands. The obtained values of the magnetotransmittance and magnetoreflectance in the visible spectral region are less than those observed in the infrared region of the spectrum, but they are several times greater than the linear magneto-optical effects. As a result, the magnetorefractive effect, which is a nongyrotropic phenomenon, makes it possible to avoid the use of light analyzers and polarizers in optical circuits.

  3. Minisuperspace models as infrared contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojowald, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A direct correspondence of quantum mechanics as a minisuperspace model for a self-interacting scalar quantum-field theory is established by computing, in several models, the infrared contributions to 1-loop effective potentials of Coleman--Weinberg type. A minisuperspace approximation rather than truncation is thereby obtained. By this approximation, the spatial averaging scale of minisuperspace models is identified with an infrared scale (but not a regulator or cut-off) delimiting the modes included in the minisuperspace model. Some versions of the models studied here have discrete space or modifications of the Hamiltonian expected from proposals of loop quantum gravity. They shed light on the question of how minisuperspace models of quantum cosmology can capture features of full quantum gravity. While it is shown that modifications of the Hamiltonian can well be described by minisuperspace truncations, some related phenomena such as signature change, confirmed and clarified here for modified scalar field th...

  4. Multi-channel infrared thermometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulrickson, Michael A. (East Windsor, NJ)

    1986-01-01

    A device for measuring the two-dimensional temperature profile of a surface comprises imaging optics for generating an image of the light radiating from the surface; an infrared detector array having a plurality of detectors; and a light pipe array positioned between the imaging optics and the detector array for sampling, transmitting, and distributing the image over the detector surfaces. The light pipe array includes one light pipe for each detector in the detector array.

  5. Ferroelectric infrared detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lashley, Jason Charles (Sante Fe, NM); Opeil, Cyril P. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Smith, James Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-03-30

    An apparatus and method are provided for sensing infrared radiation. The apparatus includes a sensor element that is positioned in a magnetic field during operation to ensure a .lamda. shaped relationship between specific heat and temperature adjacent the Curie temperature of the ferroelectric material comprising the sensor element. The apparatus is operated by inducing a magnetic field on the ferroelectric material to reduce surface charge on the element during its operation.

  6. Modeling the Infrared Emission from the Epsilon Eridani Disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, A; Bendo, G J; Li, Aigen

    2003-01-01

    We model the infrared (IR) emission from the ring-like dust disk around the main-sequence (MS) star Epsilon Eridani, a young analog to our solar system, in terms of a porous dust model previously developed for the extended wedge-shaped disk around the MS star $\\beta$ Pictoris and the sharply truncated ring-like disks around the Herbig Ae/Be stars HR 4796A and HD 141569A. It is shown that the porous dust model with a porosity of $\\simali$90% is also successful in reproducing the IR to submillimeter dust emission spectral energy distribution as well as the 850$\\mum$ flux radial profile of the dust ring around the more evolved MS star Epsilon Eridani. Predictions are made for future {\\it SIRTF} observations which may allow a direct test of the porous dust model.

  7. Three-dimensional infrared metamaterial with asymmetric transmission

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kenanakis, George; Xomalis, Aggelos; Selimis, Alexandros; Vamvakaki, Maria; Farsari, Maria; Kafesaki, Maria; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Economou, Eleftherios N.

    2015-01-14

    A novel three-dimensional (3D) metallic metamaterial structure with asymmetric transmission for linear polarization is demonstrated in the infrared spectral region. The structure was fabricated by direct laser writing and selective electroless silver coating, a straightforward, novel technique producing mechanically and chemically stable 3D photonic structures. The structure unit cell is composed of a pair of conductively coupled magnetic resonators, and the asymmetric transmission response results from interplay of electric and magnetic responses; this equips the structure with almost total opaqueness along one propagation direction versus satisfying transparency along the opposite one. It also offers easily adjustable impedance, 90° one-way puremore »optical activity and backward propagation possibility, resulting thus in unique capabilities in polarization control and isolation applications. We show also that scaling down the structure can make it capable of exhibiting its asymmetric transmission and its polarization capabilities in the optical region.« less

  8. The far-infrared emission of the radio-loud quasar 3C318

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podigachoski, P; Peletier, R F; Steendam, S

    2015-01-01

    3C318, a radio-loud quasar at z=1.574, is a subgalactic-sized radio source, and a good test-bed for the interplay between black hole and galaxy growth in the high-z Universe. Based on its IRAS, ISO, and SCUBA detections, it has long been considered as one of the most intrinsically luminous (L$_{\\mathrm{IR}}$ > 10$^{13}$ L$_{\\odot}$) infrared sources in the Universe. Recent far-infrared data from the Herschel Space Observatory reveal that most of the flux associated with 3C318 measured with earlier instruments in fact comes from a bright nearby source. Optical imaging and spectroscopy show that this infrared-bright source is a strongly star-forming pair of interacting galaxies at z=0.35. Adding existing Spitzer and SDSS photometry, we perform a spectral energy distribution analysis of the pair, and find that it has a combined infrared luminosity of L$_{\\mathrm{IR}}$ = 1.5 $\\times$ 10$^{12}$ L$_{\\odot}$, comparable to other intermediate-redshift ultra-luminous infrared galaxies studied with Herschel. Isolating ...

  9. Spectral statistics for scaling quantum graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. Dabaghian

    2006-08-09

    The explicit solution to the spectral problem of quantum graphs is used to obtain the exact distributions of several spectral statistics, such as the oscillations of the quantum momentum eigenvalues around the average, $\\delta k_{n}=k_{n}-\\bar k_{n}$, and the nearest neighbor separations, $s_{n}=k_{n}-k_{n-1}$.

  10. CONSTRAINING THE EXOZODIACAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS: COMPLETE RESULTS FROM THE KECK NULLER MID-INFRARED SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mennesson, B.; Serabyn, E.; Colavita, M. M.; Bryden, G.; Doré, O.; Traub, W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Millan-Gabet, R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Absil, O. [Département d'Astrophysique, Géophysique et Océanographie, Université de Ličge, 17 Allée du Six Aoűt, 4000 Ličge (Belgium); Wyatt, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Danchi, W.; Kuchner, M.; Stapelfeldt, K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Defrčre, D.; Hinz, P. [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ragland, S. [Keck Observatory, 65-1120 Mamalahoa Highway, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Scott, N. [Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy, Georgia State University, Mount Wilson, CA 91023 (United States); Woillez, J., E-mail: Bertrand.Mennesson@jpl.nasa.gov [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    Forty-seven nearby main-sequence stars were surveyed with the Keck Interferometer mid-infrared Nulling instrument (KIN) between 2008 and 2011, searching for faint resolved emission from exozodiacal dust. Observations of a subset of the sample have already been reported, focusing essentially on stars with no previously known dust. Here we extend this previous analysis to the whole KIN sample, including 22 more stars with known near- and/or far-infrared excesses. In addition to an analysis similar to that of the first paper of this series, which was restricted to the 8-9 ?m spectral region, we present measurements obtained in all 10 spectral channels covering the 8-13 ?m instrumental bandwidth. Based on the 8-9 ?m data alone, which provide the highest signal-to-noise measurements, only one star shows a large excess imputable to dust emission (? Crv), while four more show a significant (>3?) excess: ? Leo, ? UMa, ? Lep, and ? Oph. Overall, excesses detected by KIN are more frequent around A-type stars than later spectral types. A statistical analysis of the measurements further indicates that stars with known far-infrared (? ? 70 ?m) excesses have higher exozodiacal emission levels than stars with no previous indication of a cold outer disk. This statistical trend is observed regardless of spectral type and points to a dynamical connection between the inner (zodi-like) and outer (Kuiper-Belt-like) dust populations. The measured levels for such stars are clustering close to the KIN detection limit of a few hundred zodis and are indeed consistent with those expected from a population of dust that migrated in from the outer belt by Poynting-Robertson drag. Conversely, no significant mid-infrared excess is found around sources with previously reported near-infrared resolved excesses, which typically have levels of the order of 1% over the photospheric flux. If dust emission is really at play in these near-infrared detections, the absence of a strong mid-infrared counterpart points to populations of very hot and small (submicron) grains piling up very close to the sublimation radius. For solar-type stars with no known infrared excess, likely to be the most relevant targets for a future exo-Earth direct imaging mission, we find that their median zodi level is 12 ± 24 zodis and lower than 60 (90) zodis with 95% (99%) confidence, if a lognormal zodi luminosity distribution is assumed.

  11. ARM - Measurement - Longwave narrowband radiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Roomparticlecontent ARM Data

  12. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband radiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM Data Discoverydiffusedirect

  13. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband radiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM Datadownwelling

  14. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gehrke, Robert J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Putnam, Marie H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Killian, E. Wayne (Idaho Falls, ID); Helmer, Richard G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kynaston, Ronnie L. (Blackfoot, ID); Goodwin, Scott G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, Larry O. (Pocatello, ID)

    1993-01-01

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and .gamma.-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2000 keV), as well as high-energy .gamma. rays (>1 MeV). A 8192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The .gamma.-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge .gamma.-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and .gamma.-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the .gamma.-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  15. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gehrke, R.J.; Putnam, M.H.; Killian, E.W.; Helmer, R.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.

    1993-04-27

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and [gamma]-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2,000 keV), as well as high-energy [gamma] rays (>1 MeV). A 8,192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The [gamma]-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge [gamma]-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and [gamma]-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the [gamma]-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  16. A NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF THE ACCRETING MAGNETIC WHITE DWARF SDSS J121209.31+013627.7 AND ITS SUBSTELLAR COMPANION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burleigh, Matt

    nature of their light) offer a slight advantage by lacking the often over- whelming luminosity from wind, and that their separations are con- sistent with being essentially detached (Schmidt et al. 2005b of several polars indicate flat infrared spectral energy distributions which are difficult to reconcile

  17. Spectral light separator based on deep-subwavelength resonant apertures in a metallic film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Büyükalp, Yasin; Catrysse, Peter B. Shin, Wonseok; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-07-07

    We propose to funnel, select, and collect light spectrally by exploiting the unique properties of deep-subwavelength resonant apertures in a metallic film. In our approach, each aperture has an electromagnetic cross section that is much larger than its physical size while the frequency of the collected light is controlled by its height through the Fabry-Pérot resonance mechanism. The electromagnetic crosstalk between apertures remains low despite physical separations in the deep-subwavelength range. The resulting device enables an extremely efficient, subwavelength way to decompose light into its spectral components without the loss of photons and spatial coregistration errors. As a specific example, we show a subwavelength-size structure with three deep-subwavelength slits in a metallic film designed to operate in the mid-wave infrared range between 3 and 5.5??m.

  18. Spectral characterization of a frequency comb based on cascaded quadratic nonlinearities inside an optical parametric oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulvila, Ville; Halonen, Lauri; Vainio, Markku

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental study of optical frequency comb generation based on cascaded quadratic nonlinearities inside a continuous-wave-pumped optical parametric oscillator. We demonstrate comb states which produce narrow-linewidth intermode beat note signals, and we verify the mode spacing uniformity of the comb at the Hz level. We also show that spectral quality of the comb can be improved by modulating the parametric gain at a frequency that corresponds to the comb mode spacing. We have reached a high average output power of over 4 W in the near-infrared region, at ~2 {\\mu}m.

  19. Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karr, Thomas J. (Alamo, CA)

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile.

  20. Apparatus and system for multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Kotula, Paul G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus and system for determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a method of multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used by a spectrum analyzer to process X-ray spectral data generated by a spectral analysis system that can include a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an Energy Dispersive Detector and Pulse Height Analyzer.

  1. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-01-11

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  2. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-07-26

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  3. Augmented classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2004-02-03

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  4. Observations of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope II: The IRAS Bright Galaxy Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Armus; V. Charmandaris; J. Bernard-Salas; H. W. W. Spoon; J. A. Marshall; S. J. U Higdon; V. Desai; H. I. Teplitz; L. Hao; D. Devost; B. R. Brandl; Y. Wu; G. C. Sloan; B. T. Soifer; J. R. Houck; T. L. Herter

    2006-10-06

    We present spectra taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on Spitzer covering the 5-38 micron region of the ten Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) found in the IRAS Bright Galaxy Sample. Among the BGS ULIRGs, we find a factor of 50 spread in the rest-frame mid to far-infrared spectral slope. The 9.7 micron silicate optical depths range from less than 0.4 more than 4.2, implying line of sight extinctions of A(V) ~ 8 - 78 mag. There is evidence for water ice and hydrocarbon absorption and C2H2 and HCN absorption features in four and possibly six of the 10 BGS ULIRGs, indicating shielded molecular clouds and a warm, dense ISM. We have detected [NeV] emission in three of the ten BGS ULIRGs, at flux levels of 5-18E-14 erg/cm^2/sec and [NeV] 14.3/[NeII] 12.8 line flux ratios of 0.12-0.85. The remaining BGS ULIRGs have limits on their [NeV]/[NeII] line flux ratios which range from less than 0.15 to less than 0.01. Among the BGS ULIRGs, the AGN fractions implied by either the [NeV]/[NeII] or [OIV]/[NeII] line flux ratios (or their upper limits) are significantly lower than implied by the MIR slope or EQW of the 6.2 micron PAH feature. Fitting the SEDs, we see evidence for hot (T > 300K) dust in five of the BGS ULIRGs, with the fraction of hot dust to total dust luminosity ranging from ~1-23%, before correcting for extinction. When integrated over the IRAC-8, IRS blue peakup, and MIPS-24 filter bandpasses, the IRS spectra imply very blue colors for some ULIRGs at z ~ 1.3. This is most extreme for sources with significant amounts of warm dust and deep silicate absorption.

  5. Infrared Observations of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Elbaz

    1997-11-28

    This short paper reviews some of the results obtained from ISO observations (ISOCAM and ISOPHOT) on galaxy clusters: Chap.1: "Intracluster dust": new evidence for the presence of dust outside galaxies. Chap.2:"Mid-Infrared Emission of Galaxies" origin of the mid-IR emission. Chap.3:"Star Formation in Nearby Clusters" correlation of the 7 and 15 microns fluxes with the SFR. Chap.4:"Star Formation in z=0.2 Galaxy clusters" Study of the mid-IR emission of A1732 and A1689. Chap.5:"Star Formation in z>0.4 Galaxy clusters" Preliminary.

  6. Sensitive Multi-Species Emissions Monitoring: Infrared Laser-Based Detection of Trace-Level Contaminants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steill, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes our development of spectroscopic chemical analysis techniques and spectral modeling for trace-gas measurements of highly-regulated low-concentration species present in flue gas emissions from utility coal boilers such as HCl under conditions of high humidity. Detailed spectral modeling of the spectroscopy of HCl and other important combustion and atmospheric species such as H 2 O, CO 2 , N 2 O, NO 2 , SO 2 , and CH 4 demonstrates that IR-laser spectroscopy is a sensitive multi-component analysis strategy. Experimental measurements from techniques based on IR laser spectroscopy are presented that demonstrate sub-ppm sensitivity levels to these species. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify HCl at ppm levels with extremely high signal-to-noise even under conditions of high relative humidity. Additionally, cavity ring-down IR spectroscopy is used to achieve an extremely high sensitivity to combustion trace gases in this spectral region; ppm level CH 4 is one demonstrated example. The importance of spectral resolution in the sensitivity of a trace-gas measurement is examined by spectral modeling in the mid- and near-IR, and efforts to improve measurement resolution through novel instrument development are described. While previous project reports focused on benefits and complexities of the dual-etalon cavity ring-down infrared spectrometer, here details on steps taken to implement this unique and potentially revolutionary instrument are described. This report also illustrates and critiques the general strategy of IR- laser photodetection of trace gases leading to the conclusion that mid-IR laser spectroscopy techniques provide a promising basis for further instrument development and implementation that will enable cost-effective sensitive detection of multiple key contaminant species simultaneously.

  7. Infra-red signature neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane William (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-10-13

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material that includes a photoluminescent material that generates infrared radiation and generation a by-product of a nuclear reaction due to the activator impinging the receptor material. The method further includes generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect, wherein the light activates the photoluminescent material so as to generate the infrared radiation. Identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the infrared radiation.

  8. Spectral Triples on Proper Etale Groupoids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antti J. Harju

    2014-12-15

    A proper etale Lie groupoid is modelled as a (noncommutative) spectral geometric space. The spectral triple is built on the algebra of smooth functions on the groupoid base which are invariant under the groupoid action. Stiefel-Whitney classes in Lie groupoid cohomology are introduced to measure the orientability of the tangent bundle and the obstruction to lift the tangent bundle to a spinor bundle. In the case of an orientable and spin Lie groupoid, an invariant spinor bundle and an invariant Dirac operator will be constructed. This data gives rise to a spectral triple. The algebraic orientability axiom in noncommutative geometry is reformulated to make it compatible with the geometric model.

  9. Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of California and the ALS has succeeded in probing the intrinsic electronic properties of the charge carriers in organic FETs using infrared spectromicroscopy. The...

  10. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Window Coatings Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings 1 of 5 An oxygen plasma etcher is used to clean test substrates for window coatings. Image: Pacific Northwest...

  11. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been...

  12. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared...

  13. Uncooled infrared imaging using bimaterial microcantilever arrays...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    main figures of merit of the IR imager were found to be comparable to those of uncooled MEMS infrared detectors with substantially higher degree of fabrication complexity. In...

  14. INFRARED MOLECULAR STARBURST FINGERPRINTS IN DEEPLY OBSCURED (ULTRA)LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY NUCLEI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    INFRARED MOLECULAR STARBURST FINGERPRINTS IN DEEPLY OBSCURED (ULTRA)LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY NUCLEI: molecules 1. INTRODUCTION One of the holy grails in the study of luminous and ultra- luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) is to elucidate the true nature of the central energy source. (U)LIRGs emit

  15. Online Spectral Clustering on Network Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Yi

    2012-12-31

    Graph is an extremely useful representation of a wide variety of practical systems in data analysis. Recently, with the fast accumulation of stream data from various type of networks, significant research interests have arisen on spectral clustering...

  16. Efficient Spectral Methods for Transmission Eigenvalues and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-03-24

    Mar 20, 2014 ... Efficient Spectral Methods for Transmission. Eigenvalues and Estimation of the Index of. Refraction. Jing An1,2,?, Jie Shen1,3. 1 School of ...

  17. XOP : a graphical user interface for spectral calculations and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    XOP : a graphical user interface for spectral calculations and x-ray optics utilities. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: XOP : a graphical user interface for spectral...

  18. Mass Correlation of Engine Emissions with Spectral Instruments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mass Correlation of Engine Emissions with Spectral Instruments Mass Correlation of Engine Emissions with Spectral Instruments 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

  19. Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for...

  20. THERMAP: a mid-infrared spectro-imager for space missions to small bodies in the inner solar system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groussin, O; Helbert, J; Reynaud, J -L; Levacher, P; García-Talavera, M Reyes; Alí-Lagoa, V; Blanc, P -E; Brageot, E; Davidsson, B; Delbó, M; Deleuze, M; Delsanti, A; Garcia, J J Diaz; Dohlen, K; Ferrand, D; Green, S; Jorda, L; Álvarez, E Joven; Knollenberg, J; Kührt, E; Lamy, P; Lellouch, E; Merrer, J Le; Marty, B; Mas, G; Rossin, C; Rozitis, B; Sunshine, J; Vernazza, P; Vives, S

    2015-01-01

    We present THERMAP, a mid-infrared (8-16 {\\mu}m) spectro-imager for space missions to small bodies in the inner solar system, developed in the framework of the MarcoPolo-R asteroid sample return mission. THERMAP is very well suited to characterize the surface thermal environment of a NEO and to map its surface composition. The instrument has two channels, one for imaging and one for spectroscopy: it is both a thermal camera with full 2D imaging capabilities and a slit spectrometer. THERMAP takes advantage of the recent technological developments of uncooled microbolometers detectors, sensitive in the mid-infrared spectral range. THERMAP can acquire thermal images (8-18 {\\mu}m) of the surface and perform absolute temperature measurements with a precision better than 3.5 K above 200 K. THERMAP can acquire mid-infrared spectra (8-16 {\\mu}m) of the surface with a spectral resolution {\\Delta}{\\lambda} of 0.3 {\\mu}m. For surface temperatures above 350 K, spectra have a signal-to-noise ratio >60 in the spectral rang...

  1. THE WIRED SURVEY. II. INFRARED EXCESSES IN THE SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debes, John H.; Leisawitz, David T.; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Cohen, Martin

    2011-12-01

    With the launch of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a new era of detecting planetary debris and brown dwarfs (BDs) around white dwarfs (WDs) has begun with the WISE InfraRed Excesses around Degenerates (WIRED) Survey. The WIRED Survey is sensitive to substellar objects and dusty debris around WDs out to distances exceeding 100 pc, well beyond the completeness level of local WDs. In this paper, we present a cross-correlation of the preliminary Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) WD catalog between the WISE, Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and SDSS DR7 photometric catalogs. From {approx}18,000 input targets, there are WISE detections comprising 344 'naked' WDs (detection of the WD photosphere only), 1020 candidate WD+M dwarf binaries, 42 candidate WD+BD systems, 52 candidate WD+dust disk systems, and 69 targets with indeterminate infrared excess. We classified all of the detected targets through spectral energy distribution model fitting of the merged optical, near-IR, and WISE photometry. Some of these detections could be the result of contaminating sources within the large ( Almost-Equal-To 6'') WISE point-spread function; we make a preliminary estimate for the rates of contamination for our WD+BD and WD+disk candidates and provide notes for each target of interest. Each candidate presented here should be confirmed with higher angular resolution infrared imaging or infrared spectroscopy. We also present an overview of the observational characteristics of the detected WDs in the WISE photometric bands, including the relative frequencies of candidate WD+M, WD+BD, and WD+disk systems.

  2. Spectral Energy Distributions for Disk and Halo M Dwarfs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, S. K.; Allard, F.; Dahn, Conard; Hauschildt, P. H.; Kerr, T. H.; Rayner, J.

    2000-06-01

    We have obtained infrared (1-2.5 {mu}m) spectroscopy for 42 halo and disk dwarfs with spectral types M1-M6.5. These data are compared to synthetic spectra generated by the latest model atmospheres of Allard and Hauschildt. Photospheric parameters metallicity, effective temperature, and radius are determined for the sample.We find good agreement between observation and theory except for known problems due to incomplete molecular data for metal hydrides and H2O. The metal-poor M subdwarfs are well matched by the models, as oxide opacity sources are less important in this case. The derived effective temperatures for the sample range from 3600 to 2600 K; at these temperatures grain formation and extinction are not significant in the photosphere. The derived metallicities range from solar to 1/10 solar. The radii and effective temperatures derived agree well with recent models of low-mass stars. The spectra are available in electronic form upon request. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  3. The Use of Infrared Technology To Detect Heat Loss 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, K.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared refers to electro magnetic energy with a wave length longer than those of visible light. Researchers developed methods to quantify, focus and form real-time images to infrared energy. This spawned the development of infrared Thenrography...

  4. Room-temperature near-infrared silicon carbide nanocrystalline emitters based on optically aligned spin defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muzha, A.; Fuchs, F.; Simin, D.; Astakhov, G. V.; Tarakina, N. V.; Trupke, M.; Soltamov, V. A.; Mokhov, E. N.; Baranov, P. G.; Dyakonov, V.; and others

    2014-12-15

    Bulk silicon carbide (SiC) is a very promising material system for bio-applications and quantum sensing. However, its optical activity lies beyond the near infrared spectral window for in-vivo imaging and fiber communications due to a large forbidden energy gap. Here, we report the fabrication of SiC nanocrystals and isolation of different nanocrystal fractions ranged from 600?nm down to 60?nm in size. The structural analysis reveals further fragmentation of the smallest nanocrystals into ca. 10-nm-size clusters of high crystalline quality, separated by amorphization areas. We use neutron irradiation to create silicon vacancies, demonstrating near infrared photoluminescence. Finally, we detect room-temperature spin resonances of these silicon vacancies hosted in SiC nanocrystals. This opens intriguing perspectives to use them not only as in-vivo luminescent markers but also as magnetic field and temperature sensors, allowing for monitoring various physical, chemical, and biological processes.

  5. Terahertz and Infrared Uncooled Detector Based on a Microcantilever as a Radiation Pressure Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gennady P. Berman; Boris M. Chernobrod; Alan R. Bishop; Vyacheslav N. Gorshkov

    2007-03-05

    We consider a far infrared (terahertz), room-temperature detector based on a microcantilever sensor of the radiation pressure. This system has a significantly higher sensitivity than existing uncooled detectors in the far infrared (terahertz) spectral region. The significant enhancement of sensitivity is due the combination non-absorption detection method and high quality optical microcavity. Our theoretical analysis of the detector sensitivity and numerical simulations demonstrate that the narrowband heterodyne detector with the band width 30 MHz has a minimal measurable intensity by three orders of magnitude less than conventional uncooled detectors. In the case of the broadband detector, the noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) is 7.6 mK, which is significantly smaller than for conventional uncooled thermal detectors.

  6. Near-infrared line identification in type Ia supernovae during the transitional phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, Brian; Baron, E.; Wisniewski, John P.; Miller, Timothy R. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, 440 West Brooks Street, Room 100, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Parrent, Jerod T. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Thomas, R. C. [Computational Cosmology Center, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 50B-4206, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marion, G. H. [University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We present near-infrared synthetic spectra of a delayed-detonation hydrodynamical model and compare them to observed spectra of four normal Type Ia supernovae ranging from day +56.5 to day +85. This is the epoch during which supernovae are believed to be undergoing the transition from the photospheric phase, where spectra are characterized by line scattering above an optically thick photosphere, to the nebular phase, where spectra consist of optically thin emission from forbidden lines. We find that most spectral features in the near-infrared can be accounted for by permitted lines of Fe II and Co II. In addition, we find that [Ni II] fits the emission feature near 1.98 ?m, suggesting that a substantial mass of {sup 58}Ni exists near the center of the ejecta in these objects, arising from nuclear burning at high density.

  7. Interstellar Weather Vanes: GLIMPSE Mid-Infrared Stellar-Wind Bowshocks in M17 and RCW49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew S. Povich; Robert A. Benjamin; Barbara A. Whitney; Brian L. Babler; Remy Indebetouw; Marilyn R. Meade; Ed Churchwell

    2008-08-15

    We report the discovery of six infrared stellar-wind bowshocks in the Galactic massive star formation regions M17 and RCW49 from Spitzer GLIMPSE (Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire) images. The InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope clearly resolves the arc-shaped emission produced by the bowshocks. We combine Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), Spitzer, MSX, and IRAS observations to obtain the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the bowshocks and their individual driving stars. We use the stellar SEDs to estimate the spectral types of the three newly-identified O stars in RCW49 and one previously undiscovered O star in M17. One of the bowshocks in RCW49 reveals the presence of a large-scale flow of gas escaping the H II region at a few 10^2 km/s. Radiation-transfer modeling of the steep rise in the SED of this bowshock toward longer mid-infrared wavelengths indicates that the emission is coming principally from dust heated by the star driving the shock. The other 5 bowshocks occur where the stellar winds of O stars sweep up dust in the expanding H II regions.

  8. Main-belt asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared albedos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; Sonnett, S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 183-601, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Grav, T., E-mail: Joseph.Masiero@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: amainzer@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: cnugent@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: James.Bauer@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: Rachel.A.Stevenson@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: sarah.sonnett@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: tgrav@psi.edu [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2014-08-20

    We present revised near-infrared albedo fits of 2835 main-belt asteroids observed by WISE/NEOWISE over the course of its fully cryogenic survey in 2010. These fits are derived from reflected-light near-infrared images taken simultaneously with thermal emission measurements, allowing for more accurate measurements of the near-infrared albedos than is possible for visible albedo measurements. Because our sample requires reflected light measurements, it undersamples small, low-albedo asteroids, as well as those with blue spectral slopes across the wavelengths investigated. We find that the main belt separates into three distinct groups of 6%, 16%, and 40% reflectance at 3.4 ?m. Conversely, the 4.6 ?m albedo distribution spans the full range of possible values with no clear grouping. Asteroid families show a narrow distribution of 3.4 ?m albedos within each family that map to one of the three observed groupings, with the (221) Eos family being the sole family associated with the 16% reflectance 3.4 ?m albedo group. We show that near-infrared albedos derived from simultaneous thermal emission and reflected light measurements are important indicators of asteroid taxonomy and can identify interesting targets for spectroscopic follow-up.

  9. FY 2005 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Bradley M.; Martinez, James E.; Qiao, Hong; Schultz, John F.

    2005-12-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions. During FY 2005, PNNL’s Infrared Photonics research team made measurable progress exploiting the extraordinary optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to develop miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. We investigated sulfur purification methods that will eventually lead to routine production of optical quality chalcogenide glass. We also discovered a glass degradation phenomenon and our investigation uncovered the underlying surface chemistry mechanism and developed mitigation actions. Key research was performed to understand and control the photomodification properties. This research was then used to demonstrate several essential infrared photonic devices, including LWIR single-mode waveguide devices and waveguide couplers. Optical metrology tools were also developed to characterize optical waveguide structures and LWIR optical components.

  10. Solar spectral irradiance changes during cycle 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchenko, S. V.; DeLand, M. T.

    2014-07-10

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by ?0.6% ± 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% ± 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar 'continuum'. Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar 'continuum', the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at ? ? 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  11. THREE NEW GALACTIC CENTER X-RAY SOURCES IDENTIFIED WITH NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeWitt, Curtis; Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Sarajedini, Ata; Sellgren, Kris; Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut; Bauer, Franz E.

    2013-11-01

    We have conducted a near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 47 candidate counterparts to X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory near the Galactic center (GC). Though a significant number of these astrometric matches are likely to be spurious, we sought out spectral characteristics of active stars and interacting binaries, such as hot, massive spectral types or emission lines, in order to corroborate the X-ray activity and certify the authenticity of the match. We present three new spectroscopic identifications, including a Be high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) or a ? Cassiopeiae (Cas) system, a symbiotic X-ray binary, and an O-type star of unknown luminosity class. The Be HMXB/? Cas system and the symbiotic X-ray binary are the first of their classes to be spectroscopically identified in the GC region.

  12. Vacuum ultraviolet and infrared spectra of condensed methyl acetate on cold astrochemical dust analogs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivaraman, B.; Nair, B. G.; Mason, N. J.; Lo, J.-I.; Cheng, B.-M.; Kundu, S.; Davis, D.; Prabhudesai, V.; Krishnakumar, E.; Raja Sekhar, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    Following the recent report of the first identification of methyl acetate (CH{sub 3}COOCH{sub 3}) in the interstellar medium (ISM), we have carried out vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy studies on methyl acetate from 10 K until sublimation in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber simulating astrochemical conditions. We present the first VUV and IR spectra of methyl acetate relevant to ISM conditions. Spectral signatures clearly showed molecular reorientation to have started in the ice by annealing the amorphous ice formed at 10 K. An irreversible phase change from amorphous to crystalline methyl acetate ice was found to occur between 110 K and 120 K.

  13. Mid infrared optical properties of Ge/Si quantum dots with different doping level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sofronov, A. N.; Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Shalygin, V. A.; Panevin, V. Yu.; Vinnichenko, M. Ya.; Tonkikh, A. A.; Danilov, S. N.

    2013-12-04

    Optical characterization of the Ge/Si quantum dots using equilibrium and photo-induced absorption spectroscopy in the mid-infrared spectral range was performed in this work. Equilibrium absorption spectra were measured in structures with various doping levels for different light polarizations. Photo-induced absorption spectra measured in undoped structure under interband optical excitation of non-equilibrium charge carriers demonstrate the same features as doped sample in equilibrium conditions. Hole energy spectrum was determined from the analysis of experimental data.

  14. A representative sample of Be stars IV: Infrared Photometry and the Continuum Excess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Howells; I. A. Steele; John M. Porter; J. Etherton

    2001-01-16

    We present infra-red (JHK) photometry of 52 isolated Be stars of spectral types O9--B9 and luminosity classes III--V. We describe a new method of reduction, enabling separation of interstellar reddening and circumstellar excess. Using this technique we find that the disc emission makes a maximum contribution to the optical (B-V) colour of a few tenths of a magnitude. We find strong correlations between a range of emission lines (H\\alpha, Br\\gamma, Br11, and Br18) from the Be stars' discs, and the circumstellar continuum excesses. We also find that stellar rotation and disc excess are correlated.

  15. Durable silver mirror with ultra-violet thru far infra-red reflection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Jesse D. (Discovery Bay, CA)

    2010-11-23

    A durable highly reflective silver mirror characterized by high reflectance in a broad spectral range of about 300 nm in the UV to the far infrared (.about.10000 nm), as well as exceptional environmental durability. A high absorptivity metal underlayer is used which prevents the formation of a galvanic cell with a silver layer while increasing the reflectance of the silver layer. Environmentally durable overcoat layers are provided to enhance mechanical and chemical durability and protect the silver layer from corrosion and tarnishing, for use in a wide variety of surroundings or climates, including harsh or extreme environments.

  16. Infrared photoconductive PbTe film processing and oxygen sensitization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klingshim, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) thermal detectors and photodetectors have significant applications including thermal imaging, infrared spectroscopy and chemical and biological sensing. In this work we focus on photodetectors, which typically ...

  17. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01

    the fabrication of the MEMS sensors from the readout system,mechanical infrared sensors based on MEMS polymer-ceramicmechanical infrared sensors based on MEMS polymer-ceramic

  18. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01

    C. Vieider, and H. Jakobsen. MEMS-based uncooled infraredin uncooled infrared imaging: A MEMS perspective. Bell Labsstudies of an uncooled MEMS capacitive infrared detector for

  19. Geothermal Exploration with Visible through Long Wave Infrared...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Infrared Imaging Spectrometers Abstract Surface minerals of active geothermal systems have been mapped using visible-short wave infrared and mid wave and long wave imaging...

  20. Information-efficient spectral imaging sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Gentry, Stephen M. (Albuquerque, NM); Boye, Clinton A. (Albuquerque, NM); Grotbeck, Carter L. (Albuquerque, NM); Stallard, Brian R. (Albuquerque, NM); Descour, Michael R. (Tucson, AZ)

    2003-01-01

    A programmable optical filter for use in multispectral and hyperspectral imaging. The filter splits the light collected by an optical telescope into two channels for each of the pixels in a row in a scanned image, one channel to handle the positive elements of a spectral basis filter and one for the negative elements of the spectral basis filter. Each channel for each pixel disperses its light into n spectral bins, with the light in each bin being attenuated in accordance with the value of the associated positive or negative element of the spectral basis vector. The spectral basis vector is constructed so that its positive elements emphasize the presence of a target and its negative elements emphasize the presence of the constituents of the background of the imaged scene. The attenuated light in the channels is re-imaged onto separate detectors for each pixel and then the signals from the detectors are combined to give an indication of the presence or not of the target in each pixel of the scanned scene. This system provides for a very efficient optical determination of the presence of the target, as opposed to the very data intensive data manipulations that are required in conventional hyperspectral imaging systems.

  1. Characterizing Wolf-Rayet stars in the near- and mid-infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Shara, Michael M.; Zurek, David; Kanarek, Graham; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    2014-05-01

    We present refined color-color selection criteria for identifying Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars using available mid-infrared (MIR) photometry from WISE in combination with near-infrared (NIR) photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Using a sample of spectrally classified objects, we find that WR stars are well distinguished from the field stellar population in the (W1 – W2) versus (J – K{sub s} ) color-color diagram, and further distinguished from other emission line objects such as planetary nebulae, Be, and cataclysmic variable stars using a combination of NIR and MIR color constraints. As proof of concept we applied the color constraints to a photometric sample in the Galactic plane, located WR star candidates, and present five new spectrally confirmed and classified WC (1) and WN (4) stars. Analysis of the 0.8-5.0 ?m spectral data for a subset of known, bright WC and WN stars shows that emission lines (primarily He I) extend into the 3.0-5.0 ?m spectral region, although their strength is greatly diminished compared to the 0.8-2.5 ?m region. The WR population stands out relative to background field stars at NIR and MIR colors due to an excess continuum contribution, likely caused by free-free scattering in dense winds. Mean photometric properties of known WRs are presented and imply that reddened late-type WN and WC sources are easier to detect than earlier-type sources at larger Galactic radii. WISE W3 and W4 images of 10 WR stars show evidence of circumstellar shells linked to mass ejections from strong stellar winds.

  2. A NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF YOUNG FIELD ULTRACOOL DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allers, K. N.; Liu, Michael C.

    2013-08-01

    We present a near-infrared (0.9-2.4 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 73 field ultracool dwarfs having spectroscopic and/or kinematic evidence of youth ( Almost-Equal-To 10-300 Myr). Our sample is composed of 48 low-resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 100) spectra and 41 moderate-resolution spectra (R {approx}> 750-2000). First, we establish a method for spectral typing M5-L7 dwarfs at near-IR wavelengths that is independent of gravity. We find that both visual and index-based classification in the near-IR provides consistent spectral types with optical spectral types, though with a small systematic offset in the case of visual classification at J and K band. Second, we examine features in the spectra of {approx}10 Myr ultracool dwarfs to define a set of gravity-sensitive indices based on FeH, VO, K I, Na I, and H-band continuum shape. We then create an index-based method for classifying the gravities of M6-L5 dwarfs that provides consistent results with gravity classifications from optical spectroscopy. Our index-based classification can distinguish between young and dusty objects. Guided by the resulting classifications, we propose a set of low-gravity spectral standards for the near-IR. Finally, we estimate the ages corresponding to our gravity classifications.

  3. Modelling the spectral energy distribution of the red giant in RS Ophiuchi: evidence for irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlenko, Ya V; Rushton, M T; Evans, A; Woodward, C E; Helton, L A; O'Brien, T J; Jones, D; Elkin, V

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of optical and infrared spectra of the recurrent nova RS Oph obtained during between 2006 and 2009. The best fit to the optical spectrum for 2006 September 28 gives effective temperature Tef = 3900~K for log g = 2.0, while for log g = 0.0 we find Tef = 4700~K, and a comparison with template stellar spectra provides Tef $\\sim$ 4500 K. The observed spectral energy distribution (SED), and the intensities of the emission lines, vary on short ($\\sim 1$~day) time-scales, due to disc variability. We invoke a simple one-component model for the accretion disc, and a model with a hot boundary layer, with high ($\\sim 3.9 \\times 10^{-6}$ \\Mdot) and low ($\\sim 2 \\times 10^{-8}$ \\Mdot) accretion rates, respectively. Fits to the accretion disc-extracted infrared spectrum (2008 July 15) yield effective temperatures for the red giant of Tef = 3800 +/- 100~K (log g = 2.0) and Tef = 3700 +/- 100~K (log g = 0.0). Furthermore, using a more sophisticated approach, we reproduced the optical and infrared SEDs ...

  4. Classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An improved classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis method that adds spectral shapes describing non-calibrated components and system effects (other than baseline corrections) present in the analyzed mixture to the prediction phase of the method. These improvements decrease or eliminate many of the restrictions to the CLS-type methods and greatly extend their capabilities, accuracy, and precision. One new application of PACLS includes the ability to accurately predict unknown sample concentrations when new unmodeled spectral components are present in the unknown samples. Other applications of PACLS include the incorporation of spectrometer drift into the quantitative multivariate model and the maintenance of a calibration on a drifting spectrometer. Finally, the ability of PACLS to transfer a multivariate model between spectrometers is demonstrated.

  5. Coherent Raman and Infrared Studies of Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrysostom, Engelene; Vulpanovici, Nicolae; Masiello, Anthony; Barber, Jeffrey B.; Nibler, Joseph W.; Weber, Alfons; Maki, Arthur; Blake, Thomas A.

    2001-07-02

    High resolution (0.001 cm-1) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) was used to observe the Q-branch structure of the IR-inactive n1 symmetric stretching mode of 32S 16O3 and its various 18O isotopomers. The v1 spectrum of 32S 16O3 reveals two intense Q-branch regions in the 1065-1067 cm-1 region, with surprisingly complex vibrational-rotational structure not resolved in earlier studies. Efforts to simulate this with a simple Fermi-resonance model involving v1 and 2v4 do not reproduce the spectral detail nor yield reasonable spectroscopic parameters. A more subtle combination of Fermi resonance and indirect Coriolis interactions with nearby states; 2v4 (l = 0, ? 2), v2+v4 (l = ? 1), 2v2 (l =0) is suspected and a determination of the location of these coupled states by high resolution infrared measurements is underway. At medium resolution (0.125 cm-1), the infrared spectra reveal Q-branch features from which approximate band origins are estimated for the v2, v3, v4 fundamental modes of 32S 18O3, 32S 18O2 16O and 32S 18O 16O2. These and literature data for 32S 16O3 are used to calculate force constants for SO3 and a comparison is made with similar values for SO2 and SO. The frequencies and force constants are in excellent agreement with a recent ab initio calculation by Martin. *In memory of Dr. Nicolae Vulpanovici (1968-2001)

  6. Representations of spectral coordinates in FITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. W. Greisen; M. R. Calabretta; F. G. Valdes; S. L. Allen

    2005-10-07

    Greisen & Calabretta describe a generalized method for specifying the coordinates of FITS data samples. Following that general method, Calabretta & Greisen describe detailed conventions for defining celestial coordinates as they are projected onto a two-dimensional plane. The present paper extends the discussion to the spectral coordinates of wavelength, frequency, and velocity. World coordinate functions are defined for spectral axes sampled linearly in wavelength, frequency, or velocity, linearly in the logarithm of wavelength or frequency, as projected by ideal dispersing elements, and as specified by a lookup table.

  7. Spectral properties of magnetic chain graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavel Exner; Stepan Manko

    2015-07-02

    We discuss spectral properties of a charged quantum particle confined to a chain graph consisting of an infinite array of rings under influence of a magnetic field assuming a $\\delta$-coupling at the points where the rings touch. We start with the situation when the system has a translational symmetry and analyze spectral consequences of perturbations of various kind, such as a local change of the magnetic field, of the coupling constant, or of a ring circumference. A particular attention is paid to weak perturbations, both local and periodic; for the latter we prove a version of Saxon-Hutner conjecture.

  8. Inflation models, spectral index and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Covi

    2000-03-30

    We have evaluated the observational constraints on the spectral index $n$, in the context of a $\\Lambda$CDM model. For $n$ scale-independent, as predicted by most models of inflation, present data require $n\\simeq 1.0 \\pm 0.1$ at the 2-$\\sigma$ level. We have also studied the two-parameter scale-dependent spectral index, predicted by running-mass inflation models. Present data allow significant variation of $n$ in this case, within the theoretically preferred region of parameter space.

  9. Deuteration in infrared dark clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackington, Matias; Pineda, Jaime E; Garay, Guido; Peretto, Nicolas; Traficante, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Much of the dense gas in molecular clouds has a filamentary structure but the detailed structure and evolution of this gas is poorly known. We have observed 54 cores in infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) using N$_2$H$^+$ (1-0) and (3-2) to determine the kinematics of the densest material, where stars will form. We also observed N$_2$D$^+$ (3-2) towards 29 of the brightest peaks to analyse the level of deuteration which is an excellent probe of the quiescent of the early stages of star formation. There were 13 detections of N$_2$D$^+$ (3-2). This is one of the largest samples of IRDCs yet observed in these species. The deuteration ratio in these sources ranges between 0.003 and 0.14. For most of the sources the material traced by N$_2$D$^+$ and N$_2$H$^+$ (3-2) still has significant turbulent motions, however three objects show subthermal N$_2$D$^+$ velocity dispersion. Surprisingly the presence or absence of an embedded 70 $\\mu$m source shows no correlation with the detection of N$_2$D$^+$ (3-2), nor does it correl...

  10. Molecular Hydrogen in Infrared Cirrus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristen Gillmon; J. Michael Shull

    2005-07-25

    We combine data from our recent FUSE survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen absorption toward 50 high-latitude AGN with COBE-corrected IRAS 100 micron emission maps to study the correlation of infrared cirrus with H2. A plot of the H2 column density vs. IR cirrus intensity shows the same transition in molecular fraction, f_H2, as seen with total hydrogen column density, N_H. This transition is usually attributed to H2 self-shielding, and it suggests that many diffuse cirrus clouds contain H2 in significant fractions, f_H2 = 1-30%. These clouds cover approximately 50% of the northern sky at latitudes b > 30 degrees, at temperature-corrected 100 micron intensities D_100 > 1.5 MJy/sr. The sheetlike cirrus clouds, with hydrogen densities n_H > 30 cm^-3, may be compressed by dynamical processes at the disk-halo interface, and they are conducive to H2 formation on grain surfaces. Exploiting the correlation between N(H2) and 100 micron intensity, we estimate that cirrus clouds at b > 30 contain approximately 3000 M_sun in H2. Extrapolated over the inner Milky Way, the cirrus may contain 10^7 M_sun of H2 and 10^8 M_sun in total gas mass. If elevated to 100 pc, their gravitational potential energy is ~10^53 erg.

  11. Science and applications of infrared semiconductor nanocrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Scott Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    In this work we study several applications of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) with infrared band gaps. In the first half, we explore the physics of two systems with applications in NC based photovoltaics. The physics of ...

  12. Synthesis and characterization of infrared quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Daniel Kelly

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the development of synthetic methods to create application ready quantum dots (QDs) in the infrared for biological imaging and optoelectronic devices. I concentrated primarily on controlling the size ...

  13. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Concord, TN); Ohriner, Evan Keith (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  14. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Blue, Craig A.; Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2003-12-23

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  15. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Concord, TN); Ohriner, Evan Keith (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  16. Quantitative nondestructive testing using Infrared Thermography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manohar, Arun

    2012-01-01

    Wind Turbine Blade In- spection Tests at UCSD”, Sensors andWind Turbine Blades and Defect Depth Estimation using Infrared Thermography”, SensorsScalea. Wind turbine inspection tests at ucsd. Sensors and

  17. Carbon nanotubes as near infrared laser susceptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Amir

    2011-01-11

    The coupling efficiency of carbon nanotubes with near infrared laser radiation at 940nm wavelength was investigated. Nanotubes treated with different post processing methods were irradiated at different laser power intensities as dry samples...

  18. Far-infrared Point Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Guiderdoni

    1999-03-08

    The analysis of the submm anisotropies that will be mapped by the forthcoming MAP and PLANCK satellites requires careful foreground subtraction before measuring CMB fluctuations. Among these, the foreground due to IR/submm thermal radiation from dusty sources was poorly known until recent observational breakthroughs began unveiling the properties of these objects. We hereafter briefly review the observational evidence for a strong evolution of IR/submm sources with respect to the local universe explored by IRAS. We present the basic principles of a new modeling effort where consistent spectral energy distributions of galaxies are implemented into the paradigm of hierarchical clustering with the fashionable semi-analytic approach. This model provides us with specific predictions in IR/submm wavebands, that seem to reproduce the current status of the observations and help assessing the capabilities of forthcoming instruments to pursue the exploration of the deep universe at IR/submm wavelengths. Finally, the ability of the PLANCK High Frequency Instrument all-sky survey to produce a catalogue of dusty sources at submm wavelengths is briefly described.

  19. DUST AROUND R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS. I. SPITZER/INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anibal Garcia-Hernandez, D. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna (Spain); Kameswara Rao, N. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Lambert, David L., E-mail: agarcia@iac.es, E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu [W. J. McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

    2011-09-20

    Spitzer/infrared spectrograph (IRS) spectra from 5 to 37 {mu}m for a complete sample of 31 R Coronae Borealis stars (RCBs) are presented. These spectra are combined with optical and near-infrared photometry of each RCB at maximum light to compile a spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs are fitted with blackbody flux distributions and estimates are made of the ratio of the infrared flux from circumstellar dust to the flux emitted by the star. Comparisons for 29 of the 31 stars are made with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) fluxes from three decades earlier: Spitzer and IRAS fluxes at 12 {mu}m and 25 {mu}m are essentially equal for all but a minority of the sample. For this minority, the IRAS to Spitzer flux ratio exceeds a factor of three. The outliers are suggested to be stars where formation of a dust cloud or dust puff is a rare event. A single puff ejected prior to the IRAS observations may have been reobserved by Spitzer as a cooler puff at a greater distance from the RCB. RCBs which experience more frequent optical declines have, in general, a circumstellar environment containing puffs subtending a larger solid angle at the star and a quasi-constant infrared flux. Yet, the estimated subtended solid angles and the blackbody temperatures of the dust show a systematic evolution to lower solid angles and cooler temperatures in the interval between IRAS and Spitzer. Dust emission by these RCBs and those in the LMC is similar in terms of total 24 {mu}m luminosity and [8.0]-[24.0] color index.

  20. THE GALACTIC CENTER IN THE FAR-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etxaluze, M.; Smith, Howard A.; Tolls, V.; Stark, A. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gonzalez-Alfonso, E., E-mail: metxaluz@cfa.harvard.edu [CfA and Universidad de Alcala, Alcala de Henares 28801 (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    We analyze the far-infrared dust emission from the Galactic center region, including the circumnuclear disk (CND) and other structures, using Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric observations. These Herschel data are complemented by unpublished observations by the Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO-LWS), which used parallel mode scans to obtain photometric images of the region with a larger beam than Herschel but with a complementary wavelength coverage and more frequent sampling with 10 detectors observing at 10 different wavelengths in the range from 46 {mu}m to 180 {mu}m, where the emission peaks. We also include data from the Midcourse Space Experiment at 21.3 {mu}m for completeness. We model the combined ISO-LWS continuum plus Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric data toward the central 2 pc in Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), a region that includes the CND. We find that the far-infrared spectral energy distribution is best represented by a continuum that is the sum of three gray body curves from dust at temperatures of 90, 44.5, and 23 K. We obtain temperature and molecular hydrogen column density maps of the region. We estimate the mass of the inner part of the CND to be {approx}5.0 x 10{sup 4} M{sub sun}, with luminosities: L{sub cavity} {approx} 2.2 x 10{sup 6} L{sub sun} and L{sub CND} {approx} 1.5 x 10{sup 6} L{sub sun} in the central 2 pc radius around Sgr A*. We find from the Herschel and ISO data that the cold component of the dust dominates the total dust mass, with a contribution of {approx}3.2 x 10{sup 4} M{sub sun}; this important cold material had escaped the notice of earlier studies that relied on shorter wavelength observations. The hotter component disagrees with some earlier estimates, but is consistent with measured gas temperatures and with models that imply shock heating or turbulent effects are at work. We find that the dust grain sizes apparently change widely across the region, perhaps in response to the temperature variations, and we map that distribution.

  1. Low-Cost Spectral Sensor Development Description.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Yellowhair, Julius

    2014-11-01

    Solar spectral data for all parts of the US is limited due in part to the high cost of commercial spectrometers. Solar spectral information is necessary for accurate photovoltaic (PV) performance forecasting, especially for large utility-scale PV installations. A low-cost solar spectral sensor would address the obstacles and needs. In this report, a novel low-cost, discrete- band sensor device, comprised of five narrow-band sensors, is described. The hardware is comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf components to keep the cost low. Data processing algorithms were developed and are being refined for robustness. PV module short-circuit current ( I sc ) prediction methods were developed based on interaction-terms regression methodology and spectrum reconstruction methodology for computing I sc . The results suggest the computed spectrum using the reconstruction method agreed well with the measured spectrum from the wide-band spectrometer (RMS error of 38.2 W/m 2 -nm). Further analysis of computed I sc found a close correspondence of 0.05 A RMS error. The goal is for ubiquitous adoption of the low-cost spectral sensor in solar PV and other applications such as weather forecasting.

  2. The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectral Scaling on the Heating of the Solar Wind C. S. Ng), Kraichnan (1965) #12;Solar wind turbulence model The steady state solar wind turbulence model developed wind with uniform speed Vsw 1D (radial position r) Turbulence characterized by two fields

  3. Spectral Image Utility Prediction Marcus S. Stefanou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerekes, John

    using the constrained energy minimization matched filter detector. The result of our initial work-distributions. The target models come from a library of target materials and are assumed to be multivariate Gaussian longer term objective is to build on this initial result by developing a more general spectral image

  4. Spectral Hardening of Large Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

    2008-05-01

    RHESSI observations are used to quantitatively study the hard X-ray evolution in 5 large solar flares selected for spectral hardening in the course of the event. The X-ray bremsstrahlung emission from non-thermal electrons is characterized by two spectroscopically distinct phases: impulsive and gradual. The impulsive phase usually consists of several emission spikes following a soft-hard-soft spectral pattern, whereas the gradual stage manifests itself as spectral hardening while the flux slowly decreases. Both the soft-hard-soft (impulsive) phase and the hardening (gradual) phase are well described by piecewise linear dependence of the photon spectral index on the logarithm of the hard X-ray flux. The different linear parts of this relation correspond to different rise and decay phases of emission spikes. The temporal evolution of the spectra is compared with the configuration and motion of the hard X-ray sources in RHESSI images. These observations reveal that the two stages of electron acceleration causing these two different behaviors are closely related in space and time. The transition between the impulsive and gradual phase is found to be smooth and progressive rather than abrupt. This suggests that they arise because of a slow change in a common accelerator rather than being caused by two independent and distinct acceleration processes. We propose that the hardening during the decay phase is caused by continuing particle acceleration with longer trapping in the accelerator before escape.

  5. The spectral irradiance traceability chain at PTB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Nevas, S.

    2013-05-10

    Spectral irradiance is a fundamental radiometric unit. Its application to measurement results requires qualified traceability to basic units of the international system of units (Systeme international d'unites, SI). The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is amongst other national metrological institutes (NMIs) responsible for the realization, maintenance and dissemination of various radiometric and photometric units based on and traceable to national standards. The unit of spectral irradiance is realized and represented by a blackbody-radiator as the national primary standard of the PTB. Based on Planck's radiation law, the irradiance is calculated and realized for any wavelength taking into account the exact knowledge of the radiation temperature and the geometrical parameters. Using a double-monochromator-based spectroradiometer system, secondary standard lamps can be calibrated by direct comparison to the blackbody-radiator (substitution method). These secondary standard lamps are then used at the PTB to calibrate standard lamps of customers. The customers themselves use these so-called transfer standards to calibrate their working standard lamps. These working standards are then used to calibrate own spectroradiometers or sources. This rather complex calibration chain is a common procedural method that for the customers generally leads to satisfying measurement results on site. Nevertheless, the standard lamps in use have to fulfill highest requirements concerning stability and reproducibility. Only this allows achieving comparably low transfer measurement uncertainties, which occur at each calibration step. Thus, the PTB is constantly investigating the improvement and further development of transfer standards and measurement methods for various spectral regions. The realization and dissemination of the spectral irradiance using the blackbody-radiator at the PTB is accomplished with worldwide approved minimized measurement uncertainties confirmed by international intercomparisons among NMIs. Ultimately, the spectral irradiance can be realized with expanded measurement uncertainties of far less than 1 % over a wide spectral range. Thus, for customers with high demands on low measurement uncertainties, it is possible to calibrate their working standards directly against the blackbody-radiator, taking into account the higher necessary effort. In special cases it is possible to calibrate the customer's spectroradiometric facilities directly in front of the blackbody-radiator. In the context of the European Metrology Research Project Traceability for surface spectral solar ultraviolet radiation, the traceability chain will be improved and adapted.

  6. Object detection utilizing a linear retrieval algorithm for thermal infrared imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, M.S. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) spectroscopy and remote sensing have been proven to be extremely valuable tools for mineralogic discrimination. One technique for sub-pixel detection and data reduction, known as a spectral retrieval or unmixing algorithm, will prove useful in the analysis of data from scheduled TIR orbital instruments. This study represents the first quantitative attempt to identify the limits of the model, specifically concentrating on the TIR. The algorithm was written and applied to laboratory data, testing the effects of particle size, noise, and multiple endmembers, then adapted to operate on airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner data of the Kelso Dunes, CA, Meteor Crater, AZ, and Medicine Lake Volcano, CA. Results indicate that linear spectral unmixmg can produce accurate endmember detection to within an average of 5%. In addition, the effects of vitrification and textural variations were modeled. The ability to predict mineral or rock abundances becomes extremely useful in tracking sediment transport, decertification, and potential hazard assessment in remote volcanic regions. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  7. The role of nuclear activity as the power source of ultraluminous infrared galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nardini, E; Watabe, Y; Salvati, M; Sani, E

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a 5-8 micron spectral analysis performed on the largest sample of local ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) selected so far, consisting of 164 objects up to a redshift of ~0.35. The unprecedented sensitivity of the Infrared Spectrograph onboard Spitzer allowed us to develop an effective diagnostic method to disentangle the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and starburst (SB) contribution to this class of objects. The intrinsic bolometric corrections are estimated for both the components, in order to obtain the relative AGN/SB contribution to the total luminosity of each source. Our main results are the following: 1) The AGN detection rate among local ULIRGs amounts up to 70 per cent, with 113/164 convincing detections within our sample, while the global AGN/SB power balance is ~1/3. 2) A general agreement is found with optical classification; however, among the objects with no spectral signatures of nuclear activity, our IR diagnostics find a subclass of elusive, highly obscured AGN...

  8. Characterization of high proper motion objects from the wide-field infrared survey explorer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luhman, K. L.; Sheppard, Scott S.

    2014-06-01

    We present an analysis of high proper motion objects that we have found in a recent study and in this work with multi-epoch astrometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using photometry and proper motions from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey and WISE, we have identified the members of this sample that are likely to be late-type, nearby, or metal-poor. We have performed optical and near-infrared spectroscopy on 41 objects, from which we measure spectral types that range from M4-T2.5. This sample includes 11 blue L dwarfs and 5 subdwarfs; the latter were also classified as such in the recent study by Kirkpatrick and coworkers. Based on their spectral types and photometry, several of our spectroscopic targets may have distances of <20 pc with the closest at ?12 pc. The tangential velocities implied by the spectrophotometric distances and proper motions indicate that four of the five subdwarfs are probably members of the Galactic halo while several other objects, including the early-T dwarf WISE J210529.08–623558.7, may belong to the thick disk.

  9. Exploring the charge dynamics in graphite nanoplatelets by THz and infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.L.; Carr, G.; Worsley, K.A.; Ktkis, M.E.; Haddon, R.C.; Caruso, A.N.; Tung. L.C.; Wang, Y.J.

    2010-11-08

    We present the results of THz, infrared and magneto-optical measurements performed on graphite nanoplatelet films as a function of temperature (4.2-300 K) and magnetic field (0-17.5 T). An effective medium analysis of the low-energy spectral response indicates that the nanoplatelet material is well described by a Drude function plus two infrared absorption bands. Interestingly, the Drude plasma frequency ({approx}1675 cm{sup -1}) decreases slowly with temperature, whereas the carrier scattering rate ({approx}175 cm{sup -1}) is temperature independent. Furthermore, measurements in an applied magnetic field at 4.2 K show that a large portion of the Drude spectral weight is transferred to finite frequency features corresponding to various Landau-level transitions. Some of these transition energies scale as {radical}B, as expected for Dirac-like quasi-particles in graphene and observed in other graphene-like materials. Thus, our results are consistent with recent theoretical calculations indicating that the spectrum of multilayer graphene can be decomposed into subsystems effectively identical to monolayer or bilayer graphene.

  10. Near-Infrared and X-Ray Observations of XSS J12270-4859

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saitou, Kei; Ebisawa, Ken; Ishida, Manabu; Mukai, Koji; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Shogo; Gandhi, Poshak

    2011-01-01

    XSS J12270-4859 (J12270) is an enigmatic source of unknown nature. Previous studies revealed that the source has unusual X-ray temporal characteristics, including repetitive short-term flares followed by spectral hardening, non-periodic dips, and dichotomy in activity; i.e. intervals filled with flares and those without. Together with a power-law X-ray spectrum, it is suggested to be a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). In order to better understand the object, we present the results of our near-infrared (NIR) photometry and linear polarimetry observations as well as X-ray spectroscopy observations, which overlap with each other partially in time, taken respectively with the InfraRed Survey Facility (IRSF) and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We detected several simultaneous NIR and X-ray flares for the first time. No significant NIR polarization was obtained. We assembled data taken with IRSF, RXTE, Suzaku, Swift, and other missions in the literature and compared the flare profile and the spectral energy d...

  11. X-ray and Near-infrared Studies of a Star-forming Cloud; L1448

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tsujimoto; N. Kobayashi; Y. Tsuboi

    2005-06-27

    We present the results of X-ray and near-infrared (NIR) observations of L1448, a star-forming region in the Perseus cloud complex using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the 4 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. We detect 72 X-ray sources in a ~17 arcmin x 17 arcmin region with a ~68 ks ACIS exposure, for which we conduct follow-up NIR imaging observations in a concentric ~11 arcmin x 11 arcmin region with FLAMINGOS down to m_Ks ~ 17 mag. Twelve X-ray sources have NIR or optical counterparts. By plotting X-ray mean energy versus NIR to X-ray flux ratio, the X-ray sources are clearly separated into two groups. The X-ray spectral and temporal features as well as NIR magnitudes and colors indicate that one group mainly consists of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud and the other of background extragalactic sources. Ten X-ray-emitting YSO candidates are thus newly identified, which are low-mass or brown dwarf mass sources from their NIR magnitudes. In addition, a possible X-ray signal is found from a mid-infrared protostar L1448 IRS 3(A). The lack of detection of this source in our deep NIR images indicates that this source has a very steep spectral slope of > 3.2 in 2--10 micron.

  12. Direct probe of spectral inhomogeneity reveals synthetic tunability of single-nanocrystal spectral linewidths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Jian

    The spectral linewidth of an ensemble of fluorescent emitters is dictated by the combination of single-emitter linewidths and sample inhomogeneity. For semiconductor nanocrystals, efforts to tune ensemble linewidths for ...

  13. Spectral line lists of a nitrogen gas discharge for wavelength calibration in the range $4500-11000$cm$^{-1}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boesch, A

    2015-01-01

    A discharge of nitrogen gas, as created in a microwave-induced plasma, exhibits a very dense molecular emission line spectrum. Emission spectra of this kind could serve as wavelength calibrators for high-resolution astrophysical spectrographs in the near-infrared, where only very few calibration sources are currently available. The compilation of a spectral line list and the characterization of line intensities and line density belong to the initial steps when investigating the feasibility of potential wavelength calibration sources. Although the molecular nitrogen spectrum was extensively studied in the past, to our knowledge, no line list exists that covers a continuous range of several thousand wavenumbers in the near-infrared. We recorded three high-resolution ($\\Delta \\tilde{\

  14. Polylogarithmic representation of radiative and thermodynamic properties of thermal radiation in a given spectral range: II. Real-body radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2015-01-01

    The general analytical expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of a real-body are obtained in a finite range of frequencies at different temperatures. The frequency dependence of the spectral emissivity is represented as a power series. The Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, and total emissivity are expressed in terms of the polylogarithm functions. The general expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions are applied for the study of thermal radiation of liquid and solid zirconium carbide. These functions are calculated using experimental data for the frequency dependence of the normal spectral emissivity in the visible-near infrared range at the melting (freezing) point. The gaps between the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of liquid and solid zirconium carbide are observed. The g...

  15. Herbig stars' near-infrared excess: An origin in the protostellar disk's magnetically supported atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, N. J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Benisty, M.; Dullemond, C. P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Hirose, S., E-mail: neal.turner@jpl.nasa.gov [Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3173-25 Showamachi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 236-0001 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    Young stars with masses 2-8 times solar, the Herbig Ae and Be stars, often show a near-infrared excess too large to explain with a hydrostatically supported circumstellar disk of gas and dust. At the same time, the accretion flow carrying the circumstellar gas to the star is thought to be driven by magnetorotational turbulence, which, according to numerical MHD modeling, yields an extended low-density atmosphere supported by the magnetic fields. We demonstrate that the base of the atmosphere can be optically thick to the starlight and that the parts lying near 1 AU are tall enough to double the fraction of the stellar luminosity reprocessed into the near-infrared. We generate synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations with opacities for submicron silicate and carbonaceous grains. The synthetic SEDs closely follow the median Herbig SED constructed recently by Mulders and Dominik and, in particular, match the large near-infrared flux, provided the grains have a mass fraction close to interstellar near the disk's inner rim.

  16. Spectral problems of optical waveguides and quantum graphs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ong, Beng Seong

    2006-10-30

    In this dissertation, we consider some spectral problems of optical waveguide and quantum graph theories. We study spectral problems that arise when considerating optical waveguides in photonic band-gap (PBG) materials. Specifically, we address...

  17. Wave spectral energy variability in the northeast Peter D. Bromirski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromirski, Peter D.

    Wave spectral energy variability in the northeast Pacific Peter D. Bromirski Integrative January 2005; published 8 March 2005. [1] The dominant characteristics of wave energy variability] s wave spectral energy components are considered separately. Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analyses

  18. Infrared curing simulations of liquid composites molding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakouzi, S.; Pancrace, J.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Berthet, F. [Universite de Toulouse (France); INSA, UPS, Mines Albi, ISAE, ICA - Institut Clement Ader, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi cedex 09 (France); Ecole des Mines Albi, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi (France)

    2011-05-04

    Infrared radiation is an effective energy source to cure thermosetting polymers. Its usage is expected to reduce curing time in comparison with thermal heating and mold thermally regulated. In addition, because of the polymerization mechanism and instant on-off control of this power, an improvement in the final properties of the material is also expected. In this paper, we studied the infrared interaction with carbon (or glass) fibers reinforced epoxy matrix, where Liquid resin infusion (LRI) is used to manufacture the composite. Temperature of the composite is a key parameter that affects its mechanical properties and is controlled by the infrared emitters and the exothermic heat released from the polymerization. Radiative heat flux is computed using the in-lab developed software RAYHEAT. Then, the heat flux (or absorbed energy for glass fibers) is exported to the finite element based program COMSOLMULTIPHYSICS where heat balance equation is solved. This equation is coupled with the exothermic heat released during the curing process in order to predict the composite temperature versus time and degree of cure. Numerical simulations will be performed on planar parts (sheet shape) as well as curvilinear shapes. Experimental validations of the infrared curing carbon (glass)-epoxy composite system are presented in this paper Sheet surface temperature distribution are measured thanks to infrared camera. Kinetic parameters were estimated from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experimental data.

  19. A Digital Low Dispersion Spectral Library Covering the 3500-7500AA Region Using the SAAO Radcliffe 1.9m Telescope's Cassegrain Spectrograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, David

    2013-01-01

    We have created a digital spectral library, using low resolution optical spectra, of photometric and spectral standard stars. The data were acquired using the Cassegrain Spectrograph installed on the 1.9m Radcliffe telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory. The library consists of optical wavelength (~ 3500-7500AA) spectra for main sequence and giant stars encompassing those most commonly observed in the Galaxy, namely the late-B, A-, F-, G-, K-, and early- to mid-M stars. We intend that our standard star spectra will be especially useful for spectral classification of stars in the field and Galactic clusters alike, and will have high pedagogic value when included into representative Introductory Astronomy or Stellar Astronomy curricula for undergraduate astronomy major and minor programs. We exploit the spectral library in order to derive spectral types for seventy-six optically and X-ray selected members of the young open cluster NGC 6475. Comparison of spectral-type, optical and infrared phot...

  20. Spectral Change of Hadrons and Chiral Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tetsuo Hatsuda

    2001-04-16

    After a brief summary of the QCD phase structure with light quarks, we discuss two recent developments on in-medium hadrons. First topic is the sigma-meson which is a fluctuation of the chiral order parameter \\bar{q}q. Although sigma is at best a broad resonance in the vacuum, it may suffer a substantial red-shift and show a characteristic spectral enhancement at the 2 m_{pi} threshold at finite temperature and baryon density. Possible experimental signatures of this phenomenon are also discussed. Another topic is the first principle lattice QCD calculation of the hadronic spectral functions using the maximum entropy method (MEM). The basic idea and a successful example of MEM are presented. Possible applications of MEM to study the in-medium hadrons in lattice QCD simulations are discussed.

  1. Laser stabilization using spectral hole burning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Rippe; B. Julsgaard; A. Walther; S. Kröll

    2006-11-05

    We have frequency stabilized a Coherent CR699-21 dye laser to a transient spectral hole on the 606 nm transition in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5. A frequency stability of 1 kHz has been obtained on the 10 microsecond timescale together with a long-term frequency drift below 1 kHz/s. RF magnetic fields are used to repopulate the hyperfine levels allowing us to control the dynamics of the spectral hole. A detailed theory of the atomic response to laser frequency errors has been developed which allows us to design and optimize the laser stabilization feedback loop, and specifically we give a stability criterion that must be fulfilled in order to obtain very low drift rates. The laser stability is sufficient for performing quantum gate experiments in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5.

  2. Fiberoptic probe and system for spectral measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, S.; Young, J.P.

    1998-10-13

    A fused fiberoptic probe, a system, method and embodiments thereof for conducting spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiberoptic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferably silica. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0{degree}, an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head. 12 figs.

  3. Conditionally Convergent Spectral Sequences Contents Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that depend on data internal to the spectral sequence, they lead to satisfactory. convergence and .... For the higher terms, we de ne for all integers s and all r 1: Z. s. r = k 1 (Im[i (r 1) : A .... this is the convergence problem, and is the subject of Part II. Morphisms of .... Otherwise, although it is clear that knowledge of the groups.

  4. EFFICIENT SPECTRAL-GALERKIN METHODS III: POLAR AND ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-10-21

    EFFICIENT SPECTRAL-GALERKIN METHODS III: POLAR AND CYLINDRICAL GEOMETRIES. ?. JIE SHEN†. SIAM J. SCI. COMPUT. c 1997 Society for ...

  5. Spectral resolution in hyperbolic orbifolds, quantum chaos, and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Then

    2007-12-28

    We present a few subjects from physics that have one in common: the spectral resolution of the Laplacian.

  6. Noise Reduction and Increased VAD Accuracy Using Spectral Subtraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown III, Donald R.

    algorithm. The more accurate VAD after the first spectral subtraction is then used to reprocess the original

  7. Black Hole Spectral States and Physical Connections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John A. Tomsick

    2005-09-06

    The dramatic changes seen in the X-ray spectral and timing properties of accreting black hole candidates (BHCs) provide important clues about the accretion and jet formation processes that occur in these systems. Dividing the different source behaviors into spectral states provides a framework for studying BHCs. To date, there have been three main classification schemes with Luminosity-based, Component-based, or Transition-based criteria. The canonical, Luminosity-based criteria and physical models that are based on this concept do not provide clear explanations for several phenomena, including hysteresis of spectral states and the presence of jets. I discuss the re-definitions of states, focusing on an application of the Component-based states to more than 400 RXTE observations of the recurrent BHC 4U 1630-47. We compare the X-ray properties for the recent 2002-2004 outburst to those of an earlier (1998) outburst, during which radio jets were observed. The results suggest a connection between hysteresis of states and major jet ejections, and it is possible that both of these are related to the evolution of the inner radius of the optically thick accretion disk.

  8. Radiometric characterization of a high temperature blackbody in the visible and near infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taubert, R. D.; Hollandt, J.

    2013-09-11

    At the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt the radiance temperature in the range from 962 °C to 3000 °C is disseminated by applying a high temperature blackbody (HTBB) with a directly heated pyrolytic graphite cavity. The thermodynamic radiance temperature of the HTBB was measured in the temperature range from 1000 °C to 3000 °C by applying almost simultaneously absolutely calibrated silicon photodiode based filter radiometers with centre wavelengths at 476 nm, 676 nm, 800 nm, 900 nm and 1000 nm and InGaAs photodiode based filter radiometers with centre wavelengths at 1300 nm, 1550 nm and 1595 nm. The results demonstrate that, expressed in terms of irradiance, within an uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) in a broad wavelength range the thermodynamic radiance temperature of the HTBB is wavelength independent in the investigated temperature interval.

  9. A statistical study of SUMER spectral images: events, turbulence, and intermittency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Buchlin; J. -C. Vial; P. Lemaire

    2006-03-16

    We analyze a series of full-Sun observations, which was performed with the SoHO/SUMER instrument between March and October 1996. Some parameters (radiance, shift and width) of the S VI 93.3 nm, S VI 94.4 nm, and Lyman Epsilon line profiles were computed on board. Radiances and line-of-sight velocities in a large central region of the Sun are studied statistically: distributions of solar structures, field Fourier spectra and structure functions are obtained. The structures have distributions with power-law tails, the Fourier spectra of the radiance fields also display power laws, and the normalized structure functions of the radiance and velocity fields increase at small scales. These results support the idea of the existence of small scales, created by turbulence, and of intermittency of the observed fields. These properties may provide insight into the processes needed for heating the transition region, or, if confirmed in the corona, the corona itself. The difficulties encountered in this analysis, especially for the velocity data, underline the needs for sensitive ultraviolet imaging spectrometers.

  10. Spectral Label Fusion Christian Wachinger1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golland, Polina

    off. The segmentation with spectral label fusion, which fuses image and label information, leadsSpectral Label Fusion Christian Wachinger1,2 and Polina Golland1 1 Computer Science and Artificial a new segmentation approach that combines the strengths of label fusion and spectral clustering

  11. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  12. Thermal tuning of infrared resonant absorbers based on hybrid gold-VO{sub 2} nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocer, Hasan; Butun, Serkan; Aydin, Koray; Banar, Berker; Wang, Kevin; Wu, Junqiao; Tongay, Sefaatttin

    2015-04-20

    Resonant absorbers based on plasmonic materials, metamaterials, and thin films enable spectrally selective absorption filters, where absorption is maximized at the resonance wavelength. By controlling the geometrical parameters of nano/microstructures and materials' refractive indices, resonant absorbers are designed to operate at wide range of wavelengths for applications including absorption filters, thermal emitters, thermophotovoltaic devices, and sensors. However, once resonant absorbers are fabricated, it is rather challenging to control and tune the spectral absorption response. Here, we propose and demonstrate thermally tunable infrared resonant absorbers using hybrid gold-vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) nanostructure arrays. Absorption intensity is tuned from 90% to 20% and 96% to 32% using hybrid gold-VO{sub 2} nanowire and nanodisc arrays, respectively, by heating up the absorbers above the phase transition temperature of VO{sub 2} (68?°C). Phase change materials such as VO{sub 2} deliver useful means of altering optical properties as a function of temperature. Absorbers with tunable spectral response can find applications in sensor and detector applications, in which external stimulus such as heat, electrical signal, or light results in a change in the absorption spectrum and intensity.

  13. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THEVorticesInformation| U.S.InfraredInfrared

  14. Semiclassical Analysis of Spectral Singularities and Their Applications in Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali Mostafazadeh

    2011-05-23

    Motivated by possible applications of spectral singularities in optics, we develop a semiclassical method of computing spectral singularities. We use this method to examine the spectral singularities of a planar slab gain medium whose gain coefficient varies due to the exponential decay of the intensity of pumping beam inside the medium. For both singly- and doubly-pumped samples, we obtain universal upper bounds on the decay constant beyond which no lasing occurs. Furthermore, we show that the dependence of the wavelength of the spectral singularities on the value of the decay constant is extremely mild. This is an indication of the stability of optical spectral singularities.

  15. Discriminating trpzip2 and trpzip4 peptides’ folding landscape using the two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Tianmin; Zhang, Ruiting; Li, Huanhuan; Zhuang, Wei, E-mail: wzhuang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: lijiangy@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China); Yang, Lijiang, E-mail: wzhuang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: lijiangy@pku.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-02-07

    We analyzed, based on the theoretical spectroscopic modeling, how the differences in the folding landscapes of two ?-hairpin peptides trpzip2 and trpzip4 are reflected in their thermal unfolding infrared measurements. The isotope-edited equilibrium FTIR and two dimensional infrared spectra of the two peptides were calculated, using the nonlinear exciton propagation method, at a series of temperatures. The spectra calculations were based on the configuration distributions generated using the GB{sup OBC} implicit solvent MD simulation and the integrated tempering sampling technique. Conformational analysis revealed the different local thermal stabilities for these two peptides, which suggested the different folding landscapes. Our study further suggested that the ellipticities of the isotope peaks in the coherent IR signals are more sensitive to these local stability differences compared with other spectral features such as the peak intensities. Our technique can thus be combined with the relevant experimental measurements to achieve a better understanding of the peptide folding behaviors.

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLE Infrared thermography investigations in transitional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuccher, Simone

    investigation. The additional advantage of no need for special apparatus, except for the infrared camera, makes IRT well suited for both wind-tunnel and in-flight testing. Practical problems and limitations downstream are responsi- ble for energy losses. In subsonic and transonic flight this type of drag

  17. Infrared Brightness Temperature of Mars, 1983-2103

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Wright

    2007-03-25

    The predicted infrared brightness temperature of Mars using the 1976 model of Wright is tabulated here for the period 1983 to 2103. This model was developed for far-infrared calibration, and is still being used for JCMT calibration.

  18. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Wednesday, 29 October 2008 00:00 Graphene-a single layer...

  19. Spectral statistics of nearly unidirectional quantum graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maram Akila; Boris Gutkin

    2015-08-19

    The energy levels of a quantum graph with time reversal symmetry and unidirectional classical dynamics are doubly degenerate and obey the spectral statistics of the Gaussian Unitary Ensemble. These degeneracies, however, are lifted when the unidirectionality is broken in one of the graph's vertices by a singular perturbation. Based on a Random Matrix model we derive an analytic expression for the nearest neighbour distribution between energy levels of such systems. As we demonstrate the result agrees excellently with the actual statistics for graphs with a uniform distribution of eigenfunctions. Yet, it exhibits quite substantial deviations for classes of graphs which show strong scarring.

  20. Modelling spectral emission from fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, H. P.; Badnell, N. R.; Foster, A. R.; Giunta, A.; Guzman, F.; Menchero, L.; Nicholas, C. H.; O'Mullane, M. G.; Whiteford, A. D.; Meigs, A.; Contributors, JET-EFDA [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Association EURATOM-CCFE Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-25

    The paper is a tribute to Nicol Peacock and has a focus on interests and developments at Culham Laboratory from {approx} 1970 when Nicol led the UKAEA spectroscopy team. The paper charts a little of the evolution of these models and their data through the seventies and eighties on into this century at Culham. The paper concludes with the state of efforts to enable easy, universal access to spectral analysis across the scope of Culham activity, of which it is hoped Nicol would approve.

  1. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretaryDepartment7 Annual2 Special Report:405-01Tools » Spectrally

  2. Transmissive infrared frequency selective surfaces and infrared antennas : final report for LDRD 105749.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Hadley, G. Ronald; Samora, Sally; Loui, Hung; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Davids, Paul; Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Johnson, William Arthur; Peters, David William

    2009-09-01

    Plasmonic structures open up new opportunities in photonic devices, sometimes offering an alternate method to perform a function and sometimes offering capabilities not possible with standard optics. In this LDRD we successfully demonstrated metal coatings on optical surfaces that do not adversely affect the transmission of those surfaces at the design frequency. This technology could be applied as an RF noise blocking layer across an optical aperture or as a method to apply an electric field to an active electro-optic device without affecting optical performance. We also demonstrated thin optical absorbers using similar patterned surfaces. These infrared optical antennas show promise as a method to improve performance in mercury cadmium telluride detectors. Furthermore, these structures could be coupled with other components to lead to direct rectification of infrared radiation. This possibility leads to a new method for infrared detection and energy harvesting of infrared radiation.

  3. Application of Infrared Thermography in Building Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Y.; Chen, H.; Xu, Q.; I, D.; Wang, Z.; Fang, X.

    2006-01-01

    of infrared detector according to infrared radiation law. 4TE ??= ?? (1) Where E ? radiometric force, W/m2 ? ? emissivity ? ? the constant of radiation =5.67×10-8 , W/ ? m2?K4? T ? the absolute temperature of the surface , K... OF INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY According to the Planck?s radiation law (equation 1), radiometric force of common object has the biquadratic direct proportion with the absolute temperature of its surface. Infrared ray belongs to the electromagnetic wave, which...

  4. Results of First Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2013-03-01

    The ACP and IRIS are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are unwindowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The first outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from January 28 to February 8, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of IRIS was within 1 W/m2. A difference of 5 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG).

  5. Multi-Spectral imaging of vegetation for detecting CO2 leaking from underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouse, J.H.; Shaw, J.A.; Lawrence, R.L.; Lewicki, J.L.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.S.; Spangler, L.H.

    2010-06-01

    Practical geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration will require long-term monitoring for detection of possible leakage back into the atmosphere. One potential monitoring method is multi-spectral imaging of vegetation reflectance to detect leakage through CO{sub 2}-induced plant stress. A multi-spectral imaging system was used to simultaneously record green, red, and near-infrared (NIR) images with a real-time reflectance calibration from a 3-m tall platform, viewing vegetation near shallow subsurface CO{sub 2} releases during summers 2007 and 2008 at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology field site in Bozeman, Montana. Regression analysis of the band reflectances and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index with time shows significant correlation with distance from the CO{sub 2} well, indicating the viability of this method to monitor for CO{sub 2} leakage. The 2007 data show rapid plant vigor degradation at high CO{sub 2} levels next to the well and slight nourishment at lower, but above-background CO{sub 2} concentrations. Results from the second year also show that the stress response of vegetation is strongly linked to the CO{sub 2} sink-source relationship and vegetation density. The data also show short-term effects of rain and hail. The real-time calibrated imaging system successfully obtained data in an autonomous mode during all sky and daytime illumination conditions.

  6. Real Time Pedestrian Tracking using Thermal Infrared Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Moral , Pierre

    Real Time Pedestrian Tracking using Thermal Infrared Imagery Jianfu Li 1. Key Laboratory@cqu.edu.cn Abstract--In the study, a real time pedestrian tracking algortithm is presented using thermal infrared imagery. It makes use of the characteristics of pedestrian body regions in infrared images, which is based

  7. Efficient, Stable Infrared Photovoltaics Based on Solution-Cast Colloidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    multijunction solar cells offer the prospect of exceeding 40% efficiency7 through the inclusion of infrared and optimized to this purpose. Organic solar cells have already achieved 6.5% solar conversion efficien- cies.6-bandgap materials. In this context, infrared single-junction solar cells should be optimized for infrared power

  8. Efficient, Stable Infrared Photovoltaics Based on Solution-Cast Colloidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conversion ef- ficiency rather than solar power conversion efficiency. For double- and triple-junction solar-bandgap materials. In this context, infrared single-junction solar cells should be optimized for infrared power in the infrared. As a result, the optimal bandgaps for solar cells in both the single-junction and even the tandem

  9. Hard and soft spectral states of ULXs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soria, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    I discuss some differences between the observed spectral states of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) and the canonical scheme of spectral states defined in Galactic black holes. The standard interpretation of ULXs with a curved spectrum, or a moderately steep power-law with soft excess and high-energy downturn, is that they are an extension of the very high state, up to luminosities ~ 1 to 3 L_{Edd}. Two competing models are Comptonization in a warm corona, and slim disk; I suggest bulk motion Comptonization in the radiatively-driven outflow as another possibility. The interpretation of ULXs with a hard power-law spectrum is more problematic. Some of them remain in that state over a large range of luminosities; others switch directly to a curved state without going through a canonical high/soft state. I suggest that those ULXs are in a high/hard state not seen in Galactic black holes; that state may overlap with the low/hard state at lower accretion rates, and extend all the way to Eddington accretion rates....

  10. Hyper-spectral scanner design and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.; Moses, J.; Smith, R.

    1996-06-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). An earlier project produced rough designs for key components of a compact hyper-spectral sensor for environmental and ecological measurements. Such sensors could be deployed on unmanned vehicles, aircraft, or satellites for measurements important to agriculture, the environment, and ecologies. This represents an important advance in remote sensing. Motorola invited us to propose an add-on, proof-of-principle sensor for their Comet satellite, whose primary mission is to demonstrate a channel of the IRIDIUM satellite communications system. Our project converted the preliminary designs from the previous effort into final designs for the telescope, camera, computer and interfaces that constitute the hyper-spectral scanning sensor. The work concentrated on design, fabrication, preliminary integration, and testing of the electronic circuit boards for the computer, data compression board, and interface board for the camera-computer and computer-modulator (transmitter) interfaces.

  11. X-ray spectral states of microquasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Malzac; Renaud Belmont

    2008-10-25

    We discuss the origin of the dramatically different X-ray spectral shapes observed in the Low Hard State (LHS: dominated by thermal comptonisation) and the High Soft State (HSS: dominated by the accretion disc thermal emission and non-thermal comptonisation in the corona). We present numerical simulations using a new code accounting for the so-called synchrotron boiler effect. These numerical simulations when compared to the data allow us to constrain the magnetic field and temperature of the hot protons in the corona. For the hard state of Cygnus X-1 we find a magnetic field below equipartition with radiation, suggesting that the corona is not powered through magnetic field dissipation (as assumed in most accretion disc corona models). On the other hand, our results also point toward proton temperatures that are substantially lower than typical temperatures of the ADAF models. Finally, we show that in both spectral states Comptonising plasma could be powered essentially through power-law acceleration of non-thermal electrons, which are then partly thermalised by the synchrotron and Coulomb boiler. This suggests that, contrary to current beliefs, the corona of the HSS and that of the LHS could be of very similar nature. The differences between the LHS and HSS coronal spectra would then be predominantly caused by the strong disc soft cooling emission which is present in the HSS and absent in the LHS.

  12. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 141, 22D524 (2014) Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein Steffen Wolf,1,2 Erik Freier,2 Qiang Cui,3) Proton conduction along protein-bound "water wires" is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within

  13. Spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova 1987A with ALMA and ATCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanardo, Giovanna; Staveley-Smith, Lister [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), M468, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Indebetouw, Remy; Chevalier, Roger A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Matsuura, Mikako; Barlow, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Gaensler, Bryan M. [Australian Research Council, Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) (Australia); Fransson, Claes; Lundqvist, Peter [Department of Astronomy, Oskar Klein Center, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Manchester, Richard N. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Baes, Maarten [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Kamenetzky, Julia R. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Laki?evi?, Maša [Institute for the Environment, Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Marcaide, Jon M. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Martí-Vidal, Ivan [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Meixner, Margaret [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ng, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Park, Sangwook, E-mail: giovanna.zanardo@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, 108 Science Hall, Box 19059, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); and others

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova (SN) 1987A with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The non-thermal and thermal components of the radio emission are investigated in images from 94 to 672 GHz (? 3.2 mm to 450 ?m), with the assistance of a high-resolution 44 GHz synchrotron template from the ATCA, and a dust template from ALMA observations at 672 GHz. An analysis of the emission distribution over the equatorial ring in images from 44 to 345 GHz highlights a gradual decrease of the east-to-west asymmetry ratio with frequency. We attribute this to the shorter synchrotron lifetime at high frequencies. Across the transition from radio to far infrared, both the synchrotron/dust-subtracted images and the spectral energy distribution (SED) suggest additional emission beside the main synchrotron component (S {sub ?}??{sup –0.73}) and the thermal component originating from dust grains at T ? 22 K. This excess could be due to free-free flux or emission from grains of colder dust. However, a second flat-spectrum synchrotron component appears to better fit the SED, implying that the emission could be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The residual emission is mainly localized west of the SN site, as the spectral analysis yields –0.4 ? ? ? –0.1 across the western regions, with ? ? 0 around the central region. If there is a PWN in the remnant interior, these data suggest that the pulsar may be offset westward from the SN position.

  14. Periodic Schrödinger operators with local defects and spectral pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Cancčs; Virginie Ehrlacher; Yvon Maday

    2011-11-16

    This article deals with the numerical calculation of eigenvalues of perturbed periodic Schr\\"odinger operators located in spectral gaps. Such operators are encountered in the modeling of the electronic structure of crystals with local defects, and of photonic crystals. The usual finite element Galerkin approximation is known to give rise to spectral pollution. In this article, we give a precise description of the corresponding spurious states. We then prove that the supercell model does not produce spectral pollution. Lastly, we extend results by Lewin and S\\'er\\'e on some no-pollution criteria. In particular, we prove that using approximate spectral projectors enables one to eliminate spectral pollution in a given spectral gap of the reference periodic Sch\\"odinger operator.

  15. Simulation framework for spatio-spectral anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Harvey, Neal R; Porter, Reid B; Wohlberg, Brendt E

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a simulation framework for anomalous change detection that considers both the spatial and spectral aspects of the imagery. A purely spectral framework has previously been introduced, but the extension to spatio-spectral requires attention to a variety of new issues, and requires more careful modeling of the anomalous changes. Using this extended framework, they evaluate the utility of spatial image processing operators to enhance change detection sensitivity in (simulated) remote sensing imagery.

  16. THE INFRARED COLORS OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casagrande, L.; Asplund, M.; Ramirez, I.; Melendez, J.

    2012-12-10

    Solar infrared colors provide powerful constraints on the stellar effective temperature scale, but they must be measured with both accuracy and precision in order to do so. We fulfill this requirement by using line-depth ratios to derive in a model-independent way the infrared colors of the Sun, and we use the latter to test the zero point of the Casagrande et al. effective temperature scale, confirming its accuracy. Solar colors in the widely used Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) JHK{sub s} and WISE W1-4 systems are provided: (V - J){sub Sun} = 1.198, (V - H){sub Sun} = 1.484, (V - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 1.560, (J - H){sub Sun} = 0.286, (J - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 0.362, (H - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 0.076, (V - W1){sub Sun} = 1.608, (V - W2){sub Sun} = 1.563, (V - W3){sub Sun} = 1.552, and (V - W4){sub Sun} = 1.604. A cross-check of the effective temperatures derived implementing 2MASS or WISE magnitudes in the infrared flux method confirms that the absolute calibration of the two systems agrees within the errors, possibly suggesting a 1% offset between the two, thus validating extant near- and mid-infrared absolute calibrations. While 2MASS magnitudes are usually well suited to derive T{sub eff}, we find that a number of bright, solar-like stars exhibit anomalous WISE colors. In most cases, this effect is spurious and can be attributed to lower-quality measurements, although for a couple of objects (3% {+-} 2% of the total sample) it might be real, and may hint at the presence of warm/hot debris disks.

  17. Electrically tunable selective reflection of light from ultraviolet to visible and infrared by heliconical cholesterics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang, Jie; Li, Quan; Paterson, Daniel A; Storey, John M D; Imrie, Corrie T; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-01-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals with helicoidal molecular architecture are known for their ability to selectively reflect light with the wavelength that is determined by the periodicity of molecular orientations. Here we demonstrate that by using a cholesteric with oblique helicoidal(heliconical) structure, as opposed to the classic right-angle helicoid, one can vary the wavelength of selectively reflected light in a broad spectral range, from ultraviolet to visible and infrared (360-1520 nm for the same chemical composition) by simply adjusting the electric field applied parallel to the helicoidal axis. The effect exists in a wide temperature range (including the room temperatures) and thus can enable many applications that require dynamically controlled transmission and reflection of electromagnetic waves, from energy-saving smart windows to tunable organic lasers, reflective color display, and transparent see-through displays.

  18. Electrically tunable selective reflection of light from ultraviolet to visible and infrared by heliconical cholesterics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie Xiang; Yannian Li; Quan Li; Daniel A. Paterson; John M. D. Storey; Corrie T. Imrie; Oleg D. Lavrentovich

    2015-03-30

    Cholesteric liquid crystals with helicoidal molecular architecture are known for their ability to selectively reflect light with the wavelength that is determined by the periodicity of molecular orientations. Here we demonstrate that by using a cholesteric with oblique helicoidal(heliconical) structure, as opposed to the classic right-angle helicoid, one can vary the wavelength of selectively reflected light in a broad spectral range, from ultraviolet to visible and infrared (360-1520 nm for the same chemical composition) by simply adjusting the electric field applied parallel to the helicoidal axis. The effect exists in a wide temperature range (including the room temperatures) and thus can enable many applications that require dynamically controlled transmission and reflection of electromagnetic waves, from energy-saving smart windows to tunable organic lasers, reflective color display, and transparent see-through displays.

  19. Herschel Space Observatory - An ESA facility for far-infrared and submillimetre astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilbratt, G L; Passvogel, T; Crone, G; Doyle, D; Gageur, U; Heras, A M; Jewell, C; Metcalfe, L; Ott, S; Schmidt, M

    2010-01-01

    Herschel was launched on 14 May 2009, and is now an operational ESA space observatory offering unprecedented observational capabilities in the far-infrared and submillimetre spectral range 55-671 {\\mu}m. Herschel carries a 3.5 metre diameter passively cooled Cassegrain telescope, which is the largest of its kind and utilises a novel silicon carbide technology. The science payload comprises three instruments: two direct detection cameras/medium resolution spectrometers, PACS and SPIRE, and a very high-resolution heterodyne spectrometer, HIFI, whose focal plane units are housed inside a superfluid helium cryostat. Herschel is an observatory facility operated in partnership among ESA, the instrument consortia, and NASA. The mission lifetime is determined by the cryostat hold time. Nominally approximately 20,000 hours will be available for astronomy, 32% is guaranteed time and the remainder is open to the worldwide general astronomical community through a standard competitive proposal procedure.

  20. CdS/PbSe heterojunction for high temperature mid-infrared photovoltaic detector applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, Binbin, E-mail: binbinweng@ou.edu, E-mail: shi@ou.edu; Qiu, Jijun; Zhao, Lihua; Chang, Caleb [The School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Shi, Zhisheng, E-mail: binbinweng@ou.edu, E-mail: shi@ou.edu [The School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Nanolight, Inc., Norman, Oklahoma 73069 (United States)

    2014-03-24

    n-CdS/p-PbSe heterojunction is investigated. A thin CdS film is deposited by chemical bath deposition on top of epitaxial PbSe film by molecular beam epitaxy on Silicon. Current-voltage measurements demonstrate very good junction characteristics with rectifying ratio of ?178 and ideality factor of 1.79 at 300?K. Detectors made with such structure exhibit mid-infrared spectral photoresponse at room temperature. The peak responsivity R{sub ?} and specific detectivity D{sup *} are 0.055?A/W and 5.482?×?10{sup 8}?cm·Hz{sup 1/2}/W at ??=?4.7??m under zero-bias photovoltaic mode. Temperature-dependent photoresponse measurements show abnormal intensity variation below ?200?K. Possible reasons for this phenomenon are also discussed.

  1. Consequences of Flooding on Spectral Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsten Rudolf; Normann Mertig; Steffen Löck; Arnd Bäcker

    2012-04-05

    We study spectral statistics in systems with a mixed phase space, in which regions of regular and chaotic motion coexist. Increasing their density of states, we observe a transition of the level-spacing distribution P(s) from Berry-Robnik to Wigner statistics, although the underlying classical phase-space structure and the effective Planck constant remain unchanged. This transition is induced by flooding, i.e., the disappearance of regular states due to increasing regular-to-chaotic couplings. We account for this effect by a flooding-improved Berry-Robnik distribution, in which an effectively reduced size of the regular island enters. To additionally describe power-law level repulsion at small spacings, we extend this prediction by explicitly considering the tunneling couplings between regular and chaotic states. This results in a flooding- and tunneling-improved Berry-Robnik distribution which is in excellent agreement with numerical data.

  2. Efficient spectral-Galerkin method II. direct solvers for second

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1, pp. 74–87, Junuary 1995. 006. Efficient Spectral-Galerkin Method II. Direct Solvers of Second and Fourth Order Equations by Using Chebyshev Polynomials

  3. efficient spectral-galerkin methods iv. spherical geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-10-21

    EFFICIENT SPECTRAL-GALERKIN METHODS IV. SPHERICAL GEOMETRIES. ?. JIE SHEN†. SIAM J. SCI. COMPUT. c 1999 Society for Industrial and Applied ...

  4. Preliminary Results from Two Spectral-Geobotanical Surveys over...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has included (1) vegetal spectral data, andor (2) biogeochemical data, andor (3) soil geochemical data. The initial results for the Cove Fort Sulphurdale geothermal area...

  5. Spectral Characteristic Evolution: A New Algorithm for Gravitational Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey J. Handmer; Béla Szilágyi

    2014-09-24

    We present a spectral algorithm for solving the full nonlinear vacuum Einstein field equations in the Bondi framework. Developed within the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC), we demonstrate spectral characteristic evolution as a technical precursor to Cauchy Characteristic Extraction (CCE), a rigorous method for obtaining gauge-invariant gravitational waveforms from existing and future astrophysical simulations. We demonstrate the new algorithm's stability, convergence, and agreement with existing evolution methods. We explain how an innovative spectral approach enables a two orders of magnitude improvement in computational efficiency.

  6. Optimal Spectral-Galerkin Methods Using Generalized Jacobi ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-07

    Dec 1, 2004 ... We extend the definition of the classical Jacobi polynomials ... KEY WORDS: Generalized Jacobi polynomials; spectral-Galerkin method;.

  7. A Fourier-spectral-element method for transmission eigenvalue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-04-22

    Abstract. We develop an efficient spectral-element method for computing the transmission eigenvalues in two-dimensional radially stratified media. Our method.

  8. Application of infrared imaging in ferrocyanide tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, K.L.; Mailhot, R.B. Jr.; McLaren, J.M.; Morris, K.L.

    1994-09-28

    This report analyzes the feasibility of using infrared imaging techniques and scanning equipment to detect potential hot spots within ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. A hot spot is defined as a volumetric region within a waste tank with an excessively warm temperature that is generated by radioactive isotopes. The thermal image of a hot spot was modeled by computer. this model determined the image an IR system must detect. Laboratory and field tests of the imaging system are described, and conclusions based on laboratory and field data are presented. The report shows that infrared imaging is capable of detecting hot spots in ferrocyanide waste tanks with depths of up to 3.94 m (155 in.). The infrared imaging system is a useful technology for initial evaluation and assessment of hot spots in the majority of ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The system will not allow an exact hot spot and temperature determination, but it will provide the necessary information to determine the worst-case hot spot detected in temperature patterns. Ferrocyanide tanks are one type of storage tank on the Watch List. These tanks are identified as priority 1 Hanford Site Tank farm Safety Issues.

  9. Spitzer SAGE-Spec: Near infrared spectroscopy, dust shells, and cool envelopes in extreme Large Magellanic Cloud asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, R. D. [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Srinivasan, S.; Kemper, F.; Ling, B. [Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 11F of Astronomy-Mathematics Building, NTU/AS, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Volk, K. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    K-band spectra are presented for a sample of 39 Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) SAGE-Spec sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The spectra exhibit characteristics in very good agreement with their positions in the near-infrared—Spitzer color-magnitude diagrams and their properties as deduced from the Spitzer IRS spectra. Specifically, the near-infrared spectra show strong atomic and molecular features representative of oxygen-rich and carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars, respectively. A small subset of stars was chosen from the luminous and red extreme ''tip'' of the color-magnitude diagram. These objects have properties consistent with dusty envelopes but also cool, carbon-rich ''stellar'' cores. Modest amounts of dust mass loss combine with the stellar spectral energy distribution to make these objects appear extreme in their near-infrared and mid-infrared colors. One object in our sample, HV 915, a known post-asymptotic giant branch star of the RV Tau type, exhibits CO 2.3 ?m band head emission consistent with previous work that demonstrates that the object has a circumstellar disk.

  10. Large Blue Spectral Isocurvature Spectral Index Signals Time-Dependent Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Daniel J H

    2015-01-01

    We show that if a spectator linear isocurvature dark matter field degree of freedom has a constant mass through its entire evolution history, the maximum measurable isocurvature spectral index that is consistent with the current tensor-to-scalar ratio bound is about 2.4, even if experiments can be sensitive to a $10^{-6}$ contamination of the predominantly adiabatic power spectrum with an isocurvature power spectrum at the shortest observable length scales. Hence, any foreseeable future measurement of a blue isocurvature spectral index larger than about 2.4 may provide nontrivial evidence for dynamical degrees of freedom with time-dependent masses during inflation. The bound is not sensitive to the details of the reheating scenario and can be made mildly smaller if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is better constrained in the future.

  11. Large Blue Spectral Isocurvature Spectral Index Signals Time-Dependent Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel J. H. Chung

    2015-09-19

    We show that if a spectator linear isocurvature dark matter field degree of freedom has a constant mass through its entire evolution history, the maximum measurable isocurvature spectral index that is consistent with the current tensor-to-scalar ratio bound is about 2.4, even if experiments can be sensitive to a $10^{-6}$ contamination of the predominantly adiabatic power spectrum with an isocurvature power spectrum at the shortest observable length scales. Hence, any foreseeable future measurement of a blue isocurvature spectral index larger than about 2.4 may provide nontrivial evidence for dynamical degrees of freedom with time-dependent masses during inflation. The bound is not sensitive to the details of the reheating scenario and can be made mildly smaller if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is better constrained in the future.

  12. SOFIA Infrared Spectrophotometry of Comet C/2012 K1 (Pan-STARRS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodward, Charles E; Harker, David E; Ryan, Erin L; Wooden, Diane H; Sitko, Michael L; Russell, Ray W; Reach, William T; de Pater, Imke; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Gehrz, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    We present pre-perihelion infrared 8 to 31 micron spectrophotometric and imaging observations of comet C/2012 K1 (Pan-STARRS), a dynamically new Oort Cloud comet, conducted with NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) facility (+FORCAST) in 2014 June. As a "new" comet (first inner solar system passage), the coma grain population may be extremely pristine, unencumbered by a rime and insufficiently irradiated by the Sun to carbonize its surface organics. The comet exhibited a weak 10 micron silicate feature ~1.18 +/- 0.03 above the underlying best-fit 215.32 +/- 0.95 K continuum blackbody. Thermal modeling of the observed spectral energy distribution indicates that the coma grains are fractally solid with a porosity factor D = 3 and the peak in the grain size distribution, a_peak = 0.6 micron, large. The sub-micron coma grains are dominated by amorphous carbon, with a silicate-to-carbon ratio of 0.80 (+0.25) (- 0.20). The silicate crystalline mass fraction is 0.20 (+0.30) (-0.10), simila...

  13. Infrared Passbands for Precise Photometry of Variable Stars by Amateur and Professional Astronomers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugene F. Milone; Andrew T. Young

    2008-05-24

    The Infrared spectral region is a rich one for variable star work, especially of cooler stars, but it has been hard to do IR photometry because of high, variable background, and specialized telescopic equipment that is usually required to obtain meaningful data. Typically telescopes with IR detectors have been at high elevations, to minimize water vapor absorption. Nearly all the filters produced for astronomical work at observatories around the world have not been optimized for use at anything other than the highest and driest of observatories. This has made it difficult for amateur astronomers to contribute to this field. Now, however, this is no longer the case. The IAU's Infrared Working Group (IRWG) has designed and tested a set of IR filters less sensitive to water vapor, permitting observations at any site where precise optical photometry can be carried out. Data acquired with these filters can be corrected easily for atmospheric (water vapor) extinction, unlike the situation with the older IR filters. We demonstrate this with data from the University of Calgary's Rothney Astrophysical Observatory.

  14. Discovery of GeV emission from the direction of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 2146

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Qing-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Yu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Thomas Tam, Pak-Hin, E-mail: xywang@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-10

    Recent detections of high-energy gamma-ray emission from starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253 suggest that starburst galaxies are huge reservoirs of cosmic rays and these cosmic rays convert a significant fraction of their energy into gamma-rays by colliding with the dense interstellar medium. In this paper, we report the search for high-energy gamma-ray emission from several nearby star-forming and starburst galaxies using the 68 month data obtained with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We found a ?5.5? detection of gamma-ray emission above 200 MeV from a source spatially coincident with the location of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 2146. Also taking into account the temporal and spectral properties of the gamma-ray emission, we suggest that the gamma-ray source is likely to be the counterpart of NGC 2146. The gamma-ray luminosity suggests that cosmic rays in NGC 2146 convert most of their energy into secondary pions, so NGC 2146 is a 'proton calorimeter'. It is also found that NGC 2146 obeys the quasi-linear scaling relation between gamma-ray luminosity and total infrared luminosity for star-forming galaxies, strengthening the connection between massive star formation and gamma-ray emission of star-forming galaxies. Possible TeV emission from NGC 2146 is predicted and the implications for high-energy neutrino emission from starburst galaxies are discussed.

  15. Hidden Markov model approach to spectral analysis for hyperspectral imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Jenny (Qian)

    divergence (HMMID), is derived to characterize spectral properties. To evaluate the performance of this new). The experimental results show that the HMMID per- forms better than the other three measures in characterizing characterization; spectral information divergence. Paper 990515 received Dec. 27, 1999; revised manuscript received

  16. Investigation into Spectral Parameters as they Impact CPV Module Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S.; Rodriguez, J.

    2011-03-01

    The CPV industry is well aware that performance of triple junction cells depends on spectral conditions but there is a lack of data quantifying this spectral dependence at the module level. This paper explores the impact of precipitable water vapor, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and optical air mass on multiple CPV module technologies on-sun in Golden, CO.

  17. Seeing red in cyclic stratigraphy: Spectral noise estimation for astrochronology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    Seeing red in cyclic stratigraphy: Spectral noise estimation for astrochronology Stephen R. Meyers1.8% confidence level). Citation: Meyers, S. R. (2012), Seeing red in cyclic stratigraphy: Spectral noise is the time increment, rn is the red noise sequence, 0 r

  18. On Gravity, Torsion and the Spectral Action Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Pfaeffle; Christoph A. Stephan

    2011-06-03

    We consider compact Riemannian spin manifolds without boundary equipped with orthogonal connections. We investigate the induced Dirac operators and the associated commutative spectral triples. In case of dimension four and totally anti-symmetric torsion we compute the Chamseddine-Connes spectral action, deduce the equations of motions and discuss critical points.

  19. Custom Spectral Shaping for EMI Reduction in Electronic Ballasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waveforms, resulting in the elimination of power spectral density (PSD) distortion and reduced peak currents power and light color, increase lifetime and realize smaller and lighter ballasts. With such a source used extensively to reduce EMI in power supplies [1-10]. The power spectral density (PSD) is spread

  20. Spectral phase encoded time spread optical code division multiple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    -CDMA, efficient and compact W-CDMA chip develop- ment allowed rapid market-driven transition from the conventionalSpectral phase encoded time spread optical code division multiple access technology for next and summarize the progress of the spectral phase encoded time spreading (SPECTS) optical code division multiple

  1. SPECTRAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE AND ITS ENTROPIC EFFECT ON EARTH'S CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPECTRAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE AND ITS ENTROPIC EFFECT ON EARTH'S CLIMATE Wei Wu1 , Yangang Liu1 of the spectral solar irradiance (SSI) at the top of the Earth's atmosphere by the Solar Radiation and Climate the total solar irradiance (TSI) at the top of the Earth's atmosphere (TOA) varies little (only about 0

  2. Collecting Light with Telescopes Two Fundamentally Different Spectral Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy

    ;Observing problems due to Earth's atmosphere 1. Light Pollution #12;Star viewed with ground-based telescope. · Location/technology can help overcome light pollution and turbulence. · Nothing short of going to space canCollecting Light with Telescopes #12;Two Fundamentally Different Spectral Mechanisms Spectral lines

  3. Spectral Cascade and Energy Dissipation in Kinetic Alfven Wave Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    Spectral Cascade and Energy Dissipation in Kinetic Alfv´en Wave Turbulence Xi Cheng, Zhihong Lin energy sources at large spatial scales. The energy of these non- linearly interacting Alfven waves. 2000). The wave-particle energy exchange rates of these channels depend on the spectral properties near

  4. High Resolution Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of FUors and FUor-like stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Greene; Colin Aspin; Bo Reipurth

    2008-01-27

    We present new high resolution (R=18,000) near-infrared spectroscopic observations of a sample of classical FU Orionis stars (FUors) and other young stars with FUor characteristics that are sources of Herbig-Haro flows. Spectra are presented for the region 2.203 - 2.236 microns which is rich in absorption lines sensitive to both effective temperatures and surface gravities of stars. Both FUors and FUor-like stars show numerous broad and weak unidentified spectral features in this region. Spectra of the 2.280 - 2.300 micron region are also presented, with the 2.2935 micron v=2-0 CO absorption bandhead being clearly the strongest feature seen in the spectra all FUors and Fuor-like stars. A cross-correlation analysis shows that FUor and FUor-like spectra in the 2.203 - 2.236 micron region are not consistent with late-type dwarfs, giants, nor embedded protostars. The cross-correlations also show that the observed FUor-like Herbig-Haro energy sources have spectra that are substantively similar to those of FUors. Both object groups also have similar near-infrared colors. The large line widths and double-peaked nature of the spectra of the FUor-like stars are consistent with the established accretion disk model for FUors, also consistent with their near-infrared colors. It appears that young stars with FUor-like characteristics may be more common than projected from the relatively few known classical FUors.

  5. Absolute diffuse calibration of IRAC through mid-infrared and radio study of HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Cohen; Anne J. Green; Marilyn R. Meade; Brian Babler; Remy Indebetouw; Barbara A. Whitney; Christer Watson; Mark Wolfire; Mike J. Wolff; John S. Mathis; Edward B. Churchwell; .

    2006-10-19

    We investigate the diffuse absolute calibration of the InfraRed Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope at 8.0microns using a sample of 43 HII regions with a wide range of morphologies near GLON=312deg. For each region we carefully measure sky-subtracted,point-source- subtracted, areally-integrated IRAC 8.0-micron fluxes and compare these with Midcourse Space eXperiment (MSX) 8.3-micron images at two different spatial resolutions, and with radio continuum maps. We determine an accurate median ratio of IRAC 8.0-micron/MSX\\8.3-micron fluxes, of 1.55+/-0.15. From robust spectral energy distributions of these regions we conclude that the present 8.0-micron diffuse calibration of the SST is 36% too high compared with the MSX validated calibration, perhaps due to scattered light inside the camera. This is an independent confirmation of the result derived for the diffuse calibration of IRAC by the Spitzer Science Center (SSC). From regression analyses we find that 843-MHz radio fluxes of HII regions and mid-infrared (MIR) fluxes are linearly related for MSX at 8.3-microns and Spitzer at 8.0 microns, confirming the earlier MSX result by Cohen & Green. The median ratio of MIR/843-MHz diffuse continuum fluxes is 600 times smaller in nonthermal than thermal regions, making it a sharp discriminant. The ratios are largely independent of morphology up to a size of ~24 arcsec. We provide homogeneous radio and MIR morphologies for all sources. MIR morphology is not uniquely related to radio structure. Compact regions may have MIR filaments and/or diffuse haloes, perhaps infrared counter- parts to weakly ionized radio haloes found around compact HII regions. We offer two IRAC colour-colour plots as quantitative diagnostics of diffuse HII regions.

  6. Infrared Spectroscopy of the Ultra Low Mass Binary Oph 162225-240515

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexis Brandeker; Ray Jayawardhana; Valentin D. Ivanov; Radostin Kurtev

    2006-10-19

    Binary properties are an important diagnostic of the star and brown dwarf formation processes. While wide binaries appear to be rare in the sub-stellar regime, recent observations have revealed Ophiuchus 162225-240515 (2MASS J16222521-2405139) as a likely young ultra-low-mass binary with an apparent separation of ~240 AU. Here, we present low-resolution near-infrared spectra of the pair from NTT/SOFI (R~600) and VLT/ISAAC (R~1400), covering the 1.0-2.5um spectral region. By comparing to model atmospheres from Chabrier & Baraffe and Burrows et al., we confirm the surface temperatures to be T_A = (2350+/-150) K and T_B = (2100+/-100) K for the two components of the binary, consistent with earlier estimates from optical spectra. Using gravity sensitive K I features, we find the surface gravity to be significantly lower than field dwarfs of the same spectral type, providing the best evidence so far that these objects are indeed young. However, we find that models are not sufficiently reliable to infer accurate ages/masses from surface gravity. Instead, we derive masses of M_A = 13 (+8/-4) M_J and M_B = 10 (+5/-4) M_J for the two objects using the well-constrained temperatures and assuming an age of 1-10 Myr, consistent with the full range of ages reported for the Oph region.

  7. Quantum Graphs: Applications to Quantum Chaos and Universal Spectral Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sven Gnutzmann; Uzy Smilansky

    2006-12-15

    During the last years quantum graphs have become a paradigm of quantum chaos with applications from spectral statistics to chaotic scattering and wave function statistics. In the first part of this review we give a detailed introduction to the spectral theory of quantum graphs and discuss exact trace formulae for the spectrum and the quantum-to-classical correspondence. The second part of this review is devoted to the spectral statistics of quantum graphs as an application to quantum chaos. Especially, we summarise recent developments on the spectral statistics of generic large quantum graphs based on two approaches: the periodic-orbit approach and the supersymmetry approach. The latter provides a condition and a proof for universal spectral statistics as predicted by random-matrix theory.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  10. Spatio-spectral image analysis using classical and neural algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, S.; Gisler, G.R.; Theiler, J.

    1996-12-31

    Remote imaging at high spatial resolution has a number of environmental, industrial, and military applications. Analysis of high-resolution multi-spectral images usually involves either spectral analysis of single pixels in a multi- or hyper-spectral image or spatial analysis of multi-pixels in a panchromatic or monochromatic image. Although insufficient for some pattern recognition applications individually, the combination of spatial and spectral analytical techniques may allow the identification of more complex signatures that might not otherwise be manifested in the individual spatial or spectral domains. We report on some preliminary investigation of unsupervised classification methodologies (using both ``classical`` and ``neural`` algorithms) to identify potentially revealing features in these images. We apply dimension-reduction preprocessing to the images, duster, and compare the clusterings obtained by different algorithms. Our classification results are analyzed both visually and with a suite of objective, quantitative measures.

  11. Multitemporal spectral analysis for cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) classification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Nagendra; Glenn, Nancy F

    2009-07-01

    Operational satellite remote sensing data can provide the temporal repeatability necessary to capture phenological differences among species. This study develops a multitemporal stacking method coupled with spectral analysis for extracting information from Landsat imagery to provide species-level information. Temporal stacking can, in an approximate mathematical sense, effectively increase the 'spectral' resolution of the system by adding spectral bands of several multitemporal images. As a demonstration, multitemporal linear spectral unmixing is used to successfully delineate cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) from soil and surrounding vegetation (77% overall accuracy). This invasive plant is an ideal target for exploring multitemporal methods because of its phenological differences with other vegetation in early spring and, to a lesser degree, in late summer. The techniques developed in this work are directly applicable for other targets with temporally unique spectral differences.

  12. Compressive spectral method for the simulation of the water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cihan Bayindir

    2015-12-19

    In this paper an approach for decreasing the computational effort required for the spectral simulations of the water waves is introduced. Signals with majority of the components zero, are known as the sparse signals. Like majority of the signals in the nature it can be realized that water waves are sparse either in time or in the frequency domain. Using the sparsity property of the water waves in the time or in the frequency domain, the compressive sampling algorithm can be used as a tool for improving the performance of the spectral simulation of the water waves. The methodology offered in this paper depends on the idea of using a smaller number of spectral components compared to the classical spectral method with a high number of components. After performing the time integration with a smaller number of spectral components and using the compressive sampling technique, it is shown that the water wave field can be reconstructed with a significantly better efficiency compared to the classical spectral method with a high number of spectral components, especially for long time evolutions. For the sparse water wave model in the time domain the well-known solitary wave solutions of the Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation is considered. For the sparse water wave model in the frequency domain the well-known Airy (linear) ocean waves with Jonswap spectrum is considered. Utilizing a spectral method, it is shown that by using a smaller number of spectral components compared to the classical spectral method with a high number of components, it is possible to simulate the sparse water waves with negligible error in accuracy and a great efficiency especially for large time evolutions.

  13. Uncooled Micro-Cantilever Infrared Imager Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panagiotis, Datskos G. [ORNL

    2008-02-05

    We report on the development, fabrication and characterization of microcantilever based uncooled focal plane array (FPA) for infrared imaging. By combining a streamlined design of microcantilever thermal transducers with a highly efficient optical readout, we minimized the fabrication complexity while achieving a competitive level of imaging performance. The microcantilever FPAs were fabricated using a straightforward fabrication process that involved only three photolithographic steps (i.e. three masks). A designed and constructed prototype of an IR imager employed a simple optical readout based on a noncoherent low-power light source. The main figures of merit of the IR imager were found to be comparable to those of uncooled MEMS infrared detectors with substantially higher degree of fabrication complexity. In particular, the NETD and the response time of the implemented MEMS IR detector were measured to be as low as 0.5K and 6 ms, respectively. The potential of the implemented designs can also be concluded from the fact that the constructed prototype enabled IR imaging of close to room temperature objects without the use of any advanced data processing. The most unique and practically valuable feature of the implemented FPAs, however, is their scalability to high resolution formats, such as 2000 x 2000, without progressively growing device complexity and cost. The overall technical objective of the proposed work was to develop uncooled infrared arrays based on micromechanical sensors. Currently used miniature sensors use a number of different readout techniques to accomplish the sensing. The use of optical readout techniques sensing require the deposition of thin coatings on the surface of micromechanical thermal detectors. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is uniquely qualified to perform the required research and development (R&D) services that will assist our ongoing activities. Over the past decade ORNL has developed a number of unique methods and techniques that led to improved sensors using a number of different approaches.

  14. Temporal and spectral properties of quantum light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birgit Stiller; Ulrich Seyfarth; Gerd Leuchs

    2014-11-26

    The modes of the electromagnetic field are solutions of Maxwell's equations taking into account the material boundary conditions. The field modes of classical optics - properly normalized - are also the mode functions of quantum optics. Quantum physics adds that the excitation within each mode is quantized in close analogy to the harmonic oscillator. A complete set of mode functions forms a basis with which any new modes can be reconstructed. In full generality each electromagnetic mode function in the four dimensional space-time is mathematically equivalent to a harmonic oscillator. The quantization of the electromagnetic field defines the excitation per mode and the correlation between modes. In classical optics there can be oscillations and stochastic fluctuations of amplitude, phase, polarization et cetera. In quantum optics there are in addition uncertain quantum field components, quantum correlations and quantized energies. Here, we present selected topics from classical to quantum optics. We start in the second chapter with the classical optics description of a light field and its spectral densities, their measurement and their interpretation. In the third chapter the quantum properties of a single light mode are reviewed as well as ways to measure these quantum properties. Gaussian states of a light mode are emphasized, i. e. states for which the Wigner function has a two dimensional Gaussian shape. The fourth chapter will be concerned with more than one mode presenting a unifying approach to quadratic Hamiltonians including phase conjugation which is related to time reversal.

  15. Skyrmions, Spectral Flow and Parity Doubles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Balachandran; S. Vaidya

    1998-03-15

    It is well-known that the winding number of the Skyrmion can be identified as the baryon number. We show in this paper that this result can also be established using the Atiyah-Singer index theorem and spectral flow arguments. We argue that this proof suggests that there are light quarks moving in the field of the Skyrmion. We then show that if these light degrees of freedom are averaged out, the low energy excitations of the Skyrmion are in fact spinorial. A natural consequence of our approach is the prediction of a $(1/2)^{-}$ state and its excitations in addition to the nucleon and delta. Using the recent numerical evidence for the existence of Skyrmions with discrete spatial symmetries, we further suggest that the the low energy spectrum of many light nuclei may possess a parity doublet structure arising from a subtle topological interaction between the slow Skyrmion and the fast quarks. We also present tentative experimental evidence supporting our arguments.

  16. On gigahertz spectral turnovers in pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajwade, Kaustubh; Anderson, Loren D

    2015-01-01

    Pulsars are known to emit non-thermal radio emission that is generally a power-law function of frequency. In some cases, a turnover is seen at frequencies around 100~MHz. Kijak et al. have reported the presence of a new class of ''Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum'' (GPS) pulsars that show spectral turnovers at frequencies around 1 GHz. We apply a model based on free-free thermal absorption to explain these turnovers in terms of surrounding material such as the dense environments found in HII regions, Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), or in cold, partially ionized molecular clouds. We show that the turnover frequency depends on the electron temperature of the environment close to the pulsar, as well as the emission measure along the line of sight. We fitted this model to the radio fluxes of known GPS pulsars and show that it can replicate the GHz turnover. From the thermal absorption model, we demonstrate that normal pulsars would exhibit a GPS-like behaviour if they were in a dense environment. We discuss the application ...

  17. Resonator-quantum well infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, K. K. Sun, J.; Olver, K.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Waczynski, A.

    2013-11-11

    We applied a recent electromagnetic model to design the resonator-quantum well infrared photodetector (R-QWIP). In this design, we used an array of rings as diffractive elements to diffract normal incident light into parallel propagation and used the pixel volume as a resonator to intensify the diffracted light. With a proper pixel size, the detector resonates at certain optical wavelengths and thus yields a high quantum efficiency (QE). To test this detector concept, we fabricated a number of R-QWIPs with different quantum well materials and detector geometries. The experimental result agrees satisfactorily with the prediction, and the highest QE achieved is 71%.

  18. Defining the infrared systems for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichle, R.; Andrew, P.; Drevon, J.-M.; Encheva, A.; Janeschitz, G.; Levesy, B.; Martin, A.; Pitcher, C. S.; Pitts, R.; Thomas, D.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.; Counsell, G.; Johnson, D.; Kusama, Y.

    2010-10-15

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will have wide angle viewing systems and a divertor thermography diagnostic, which shall provide infrared coverage of the divertor and large parts of the first wall surfaces with spatial and temporal resolution adequate for operational purposes and higher resolved details of the divertor and other areas for physics investigations. We propose specifications for each system such that they jointly respond to the requirements. Risk analysis driven priorities for future work concern mirror degradation, interfaces with other diagnostics, radiation damage to refractive optics, reflections, and the development of calibration and measurement methods for varying optical and thermal target properties.

  19. Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedListguided wavesLone StarEnergyInfrared

  20. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THEVorticesInformation| U.S.Infrared Mapping

  1. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THEVorticesInformation| U.S.Infrared

  2. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,ImpactScientificInfluence ofMedia onInfrared Mapping Helps

  3. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,ImpactScientificInfluence ofMedia onInfrared Mapping

  4. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,ImpactScientificInfluence ofMedia onInfrared

  5. Spatial Spectral Estimation forSpatial Spectral Estimation for Reactor Modeling and ControlReactor Modeling and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scarrott, Carl

    in Magnox nuclear reactors l Establish safe operating limits l Issues: ­ Subset of measurements ­ ControlSpatial Spectral Estimation forSpatial Spectral Estimation for Reactor Modeling and ControlReactor Modeling and Control Carl Scarrott Granville Tunnicliffe-Wilson Lancaster University, UK c

  6. Areal-averaged and Spectrally-resolved Surface Albedo from Ground-based Transmission Data Alone: Toward an Operational Retrieval

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Michalsky, Joseph; Hodges, G. B.

    2014-08-22

    We present here a simple retrieval of the areal-averaged and spectrally resolved surface albedo using only ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission under fully overcast conditions. Our retrieval is based on a one-line equation and widely accepted assumptions regarding the weak spectral dependence of cloud optical properties in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. The feasibility of our approach for the routine determinations of albedo is demonstrated for different landscapes with various degrees of heterogeneity using three sets of measurements:(1) spectrally resolved atmospheric transmission from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) at wavelength 415, 500, 615, 673, and 870 nm, (2) tower-based measurements of local surface albedo at the same wavelengths, and (3) areal-averaged surface albedo at four wavelengths (470, 560, 670 and 860 nm) from collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations. These integrated datasets cover both long (2008-2013) and short (April-May, 2010) periods at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site and the NOAA Table Mountain site, respectively. The calculated root mean square error (RMSE), which is defined here as the root mean squared difference between the MODIS-derived surface albedo and the retrieved area-averaged albedo, is quite small (RMSE?0.01) and comparable with that obtained previously by other investigators for the shortwave broadband albedo. Good agreement between the tower-based daily averages of surface albedo for the completely overcast and non-overcast conditions is also demonstrated. This agreement suggests that our retrieval originally developed for the overcast conditions likely will work for non-overcast conditions as well.

  7. Doped carbon nanostructure field emitter arrays for infrared imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korsah, Kofi (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Baylor, Larry R (Farragut, TN) [Farragut, TN; Caughman, John B (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Rack, Philip D (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2009-10-27

    An infrared imaging device and method for making infrared detector(s) having at least one anode, at least one cathode with a substrate electrically connected to a plurality of doped carbon nanostructures; and bias circuitry for applying an electric field between the anode and the cathode such that when infrared photons are adsorbed by the nanostructures the emitted field current is modulated. The detectors can be doped with cesium to lower the work function.

  8. Near-Infrared Adaptive Optics Imaging of the Central Regions of Nearby Sc Galaxies: I. M33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Davidge

    1999-10-18

    Near-infrared images obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Adaptive Optics Bonnette (AOB) are used to investigate the stellar content within 18 arcsec of the center of the Local Group spiral galaxy M33. AGB stars with near-infrared spectral-energy distributions similar to those of giants in the solar neighborhood and Baade's Window are detected over most of the field. The bolometric luminosity function (LF) of these stars has a discontinuity near M_{bol} = -5.25, and comparisons with evolutionary tracks suggest that most of the AGB stars formed in a burst of star formation 1 - 3 Gyr in the past. The images are also used to investigate the integrated near-infrared photometric properties of the nucleus and the central light concentration. The nucleus is bluer than the central light concentration, in agreement with previous studies at visible wavelengths. The CO index of the central light concentration 0.5 arcsec from the galaxy center is 0.05, which corresponds to [Fe/H] = -1.2 for simple stellar systems. Hence, the central light concentration could not have formed from the chemically-enriched material that dominates the present-day inner disk of M33.

  9. AEGIS: Infrared Spectroscopy of an Infrared-luminous Lyman Break Galaxy at z = 3.01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, J.-S.; Rigopoulou, D.; Papovich, C.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Ivison, R.; Laird, E. S.; Webb, T.; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Barmby, P.; Chapman, S.; Conselice, C. J.; McLeod, B.; Shu, C. G.; Smith, H. A.; Le Floc'h, E.; Egami, E.; Willmer, C. A. N.; Fazio, G. G.

    2007-05-01

    We report the detection of rest-frame 6.2 and 7.7 ?m emission features arising from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Spitzer IRS spectrum of an infrared-luminous Lyman break galaxy at z = 3.01. This is currently ...

  10. Applying Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) spectral indices for geological mapping and mineral identification on the Tibetan Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corrie, Robert; Aitchison, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau holds clues to understanding the dynamics and mechanisms associated with continental growth. Part of the region is characterized by zones of ophiolitic melange believed to represent the remnants of ancient oceanic crust and underlying upper mantle emplaced during oceanic closures. However, due to the remoteness of the region and the inhospitable terrain many areas have not received detailed investigation. Increased spatial and spectral resolution of satellite sensors have made it possible to map in greater detail the mineralogy and lithology than in the past. Recent work by Yoshiki Ninomiya of the Geological Survey of Japan has pioneered the use of several spectral indices for the mapping of quartzose, carbonate, and silicate rocks using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) thermal infrared (TIR) data. In this study, ASTER TIR indices have been applied to a region in western-central Tibet for the purposes of assessing their effectiveness for differentiatin...

  11. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near...

  12. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    therefore can provide some of the most interesting information about the electronic properties of a material. In this work, the researchers employed infrared synchrotron radiation...

  13. Infrared Freezing of Euclidean QCD observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul M. Brooks; C. J. Maxwell

    2006-08-22

    We consider the leading one-chain term in a skeleton expansion for QCD observables and show that for energies Q^2>\\Lambda^2, where Q^2=\\Lambda^2 is the Landau pole in the coupling, the skeleton expansion result is equivalent to the standard Borel integral representation, with ambiguities related to infrared (IR) renormalons. For Q^2freezing behaviour, vanishing at Q^2=0. Finiteness at Q^2=\\Lambda^2 implies specific relations between the residues of IR and UV renormalons in the Borel plane. These relations, only one of which has previously been noted (though it remained unexplained) are shown to follow from the continuity of the characteristic function in the skeleton expansion. By considering the compensation of non-perturbative and perturbative ambiguities we are led to a result for the Q^2 dependence of these observables at all Q^2, in which there is a single undetermined non-perturbative parameter, and which involves the skeleton expansion characteristic function. The observables freeze to zero in the infrared. We briefly consider the freezing behaviour of the Minkowskian R_{e+e-} ratio.

  14. Spectral ellipsometry of a nanodiamond composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yastrebov, S. G. Gordeev, S. K.; Garriga, M.; Alonso, I. A.; Ivanov-Omskii, V. I.

    2006-07-15

    Optical properties of a nanodiamond composite were analyzed by methods of spectral ellipsometry in the range of photon energies 1.4-5 eV, which are characteristic of {pi}-{pi}* transitions in amorphous carbon. The nanocomposite was synthesized by molding nanodiamond powder with subsequent binding of diamond nanoparticles by pyrocarbon formed as a result of the heterogeneous chemical reaction of methane decomposition. The dispersion curves of the imaginary and real parts of the dielectric function were reconstructed. It is shown that the imaginary part of the dielectric function can be represented as the sum of two components generated by the two types of {pi}-{pi}* optical transitions. The maximum contribution of the transitions of the first and second types manifests itself at energies of 2.6 and 5.6 eV, respectively, which correspond to peaks in optical density at 2.9 and 6.11 eV. It was established that the main specific features of the normalized optical density of the nanodiamond composite almost coincide with those for poly(para-phenylenevinylene). It was found that the energy of a {sigma} + {pi} plasmon of the pyrocarbon component of the nanodiamond composite is 24.2 eV. On the basis on this value, the pyrocarbon density matrix was estimated to be 2 g/cm{sup 3}. Within the concepts of optimum filling of an elementary volume by carbon atoms in an amorphous material with such a density, the allotropic composition of the pyrocarbon matrix was restored.

  15. Radiance: Synthetic Imaging System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/NevadaaTools <REpowerFormRSIRYPOSRadiance:

  16. Zenith Radiance Retrieval of Cloud Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largestnamed Electrochemical Society

  17. Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-05-01

    This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

  18. Spectral indices in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inyong Cho; Jinn-Ouk Gong

    2015-06-23

    We investigate the scalar and the tensor spectral indices of the quadratic inflation model in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld (EiBI) gravity. We find the EiBI corrections to the spectral indices are of second and first order in the slow-roll approximation for the scalar and the tensor perturbations respectively. This is very promising since the quadratic inflation model in general relativity provides a very nice fit for the spectral indices. Together with the suppression of the tensor-to-scalar ratio EiBI inflation is well along with the observational data.

  19. Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping...

  20. Development of the Ultrashort Pulse Nonlinear Optical Microscopy Spectral Imaging System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Anthony Chien-der

    2012-10-19

    by broadband sub-10-fs pulses. This dissertation will discuss the development of two spectral imaging systems using the principles of nonlinear optical microscopy for pixel-by-pixel spectral segmentation of multiple fluorescent spectra. The first spectral...

  1. A new hybrid spectral similarity measure for discrimination of Vigna species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, M Naresh; Prasad, K S Vara; Kamala, V; Ramana, K V; Dwivedi, R S; Roy, P S

    2015-01-01

    The reflectance spectrum of the species in a hyperspectral data can be modelled as an n-dimensional vector. The spectral angle mapper computes the angle between the vectors which is used to discriminate the species. The spectral information divergence models the data as a probability distribution so that the spectral variability between the bands can be extracted using the stochastic measures. The hybrid approach of spectral angle mapper and spectral information divergence is found to be better discriminator than spectral angle mapper or spectral information divergence alone. The spectral correlation angle is computed as a cosine of the angle of the Pearsonian correlation coefficient between the vectors. The spectral correlation angle is a better measure than the spectral angle mapper as it considers only standardized values of the vectors rather than the absolute values of the vector. In the present paper a new hybrid measure is proposed which is based on the spectral correlation angle and the spectral infor...

  2. Germanium blocked impurity band infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossington, C.S.; Haller, E.E.

    1988-08-01

    Germanium blocked impurity band (BIB) photoconductors have been fabricated and characterized for responsivity, dark current, and noise equivalent power. BIB photoconductors theoretically provide an extension of the spectral response, a reduction in sensitivity to cosmic radiation and a reduction in noise characteristics compared with conventional photoconductors. Silicon BIB detectors have been successfully developed by researchers at Rockwell International, which do indeed meet their theoretical potential. In the proper configuration, these same Si BIB detectors are capable of continuous detection of individual photons in the wavelength range from 0.4 to 28 ..mu..m. Until the BIB concept was developed, detection of individual photons was only possible with photomultiplier tubes which detected visible light. Due to the successes of the Si BIB detectors, it seemed natural to extend this concept to Ge detectors, which would then allow an extension of the spectral response over conventional Ge detectors from /approximately/100 ..mu..m to /approximately/200 ..mu..m. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Visible and Infrared Photometry of Fourteen Kuiper Belt Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, John Keith

    Visible and Infrared Photometry of Fourteen Kuiper Belt Objects John K. Davies Joint Astronomy\\GammaJ colors of 14 Kuiper Belt objects using new infrared (J) data combined, in most cases, with simultaneous. Kuiper Belt objects exhibit a wide range of V\\GammaJ colors but there is no correlation with heliocentric

  4. OIL SPILL SENSOR USING MULTISPECTRAL INFRARED IMAGING VIA 1 MINIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Wotao

    OIL SPILL SENSOR USING MULTISPECTRAL INFRARED IMAGING VIA 1 MINIMIZATION Yingying Li , Wei Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University ABSTRACT Early detection of oil spill events is the key in detecting the early onset of a small-scale oil spill event. Based on an infrared oil-water contrast model

  5. Pressure Calibration by the Infrared Absorption Spectrum of Mineral Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Pressure Calibration by the Infrared Absorption Spectrum of Mineral Oil H. Child, Kenyon College effect is seen in the infrared absorption spectrum of mineral oil. The frequency of two peaks increases as pressure is applied to the mineral oil. At a pressure of about 1 kbar (100 MPa), both peaks are distinct

  6. Fast-Response Infrared Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal Phase Modulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Fast-Response Infrared Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal Phase Modulators Ju-Hyun Lee Yung-Hsun Wu Shin (about 2.3p at k Ľ 1.55 lm under E Ľ 2.5 V=lm) and fast response time ( at an infrared wavelength, say k Ľ 1.55 mm. On the contrary, ferroelectric liquid crystals (FLCs) show very fast

  7. Multivariate classification of infrared spectra of cell and tissue samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Howland D. T. (Albuquerque, NM); Thomas, Edward V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    Multivariate classification techniques are applied to spectra from cell and tissue samples irradiated with infrared radiation to determine if the samples are normal or abnormal (cancerous). Mid and near infrared radiation can be used for in vivo and in vitro classifications using at least different wavelengths.

  8. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos; Stavros (Livermore, CA), Staggs; Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-03-21

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  9. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros (Livermore, CA); Staggs, Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-12-12

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  10. Measurement of Paint Layer Thickness with Photothermal Infrared Radiometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Alfred K.

    Measurement of Paint Layer Thickness with Photothermal Infrared Radiometry P. Dorr, A. K. Louis-physical, optical and geometrical properties of multi-layered samples of paint on a metalic substrate. A special infrared radiometry, paint-#12;lm-thickness is measured using lock-in ampli#12;ers. The phase-di#11;erence

  11. Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fantini, Sergio

    Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer News 25 T he idea of using light to non- invasively detect breast cancer has been revisited in the past of selectively labeling breast tumors may open new opportunities in the optical detection of breast cancer

  12. Direct Experimental Determination of Spectral Densities of Molecular Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo A. Pachon; Paul Brumer

    2014-10-15

    Determining the spectral density of a molecular system immersed in a proteomic scaffold and in contact to a solvent is a fundamental challenge in the coarse-grained description of, e.g., electron and energy transfer dynamics. Once the spectral density is characterized, all the time scales are captured and no artificial separation between fast and slow processes need be invoked. Based on the fluorescence Stokes shift function, we utilize a simple and robust strategy to extract the spectral density of a number of molecular complexes from available experimental data. Specifically, we show that experimental data for dye molecules in several solvents, amino acid proteins in water, and some photochemical systems (e.g., rhodopsin and green fluorescence proteins), are well described by a three-parameter family of sub-Ohmic spectral densities that are characterized by a fast initial Gaussian-like decay followed by a slow algebraic-like decay rate at long times.

  13. Goodwillie calculus and algebras over a spectral operad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, Luis Alexandre Meira Fernandes Alves

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of this thesis is to apply the theory of Goodwillie calculus to the category Algo of algebras over a spectral operad. Its first part generalizes many of the original results of Goodwillie in [14] so that ...

  14. Direct experimental determination of spectral densities of molecular complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-11-07

    Determining the spectral density of a molecular system immersed in a proteomic scaffold and in contact to a solvent is a fundamental challenge in the coarse-grained description of, e.g., electron and energy transfer dynamics. Once the spectral density is characterized, all the time scales are captured and no artificial separation between fast and slow processes need to be invoked. Based on the fluorescence Stokes shift function, we utilize a simple and robust strategy to extract the spectral density of a number of molecular complexes from available experimental data. Specifically, we show that experimental data for dye molecules in several solvents, amino acid proteins in water, and some photochemical systems (e.g., rhodopsin and green fluorescence proteins), are well described by a three-parameter family of sub-Ohmic spectral densities that are characterized by a fast initial Gaussian-like decay followed by a slow algebraic-like decay rate at long times.

  15. Spectral Clustering Gene Ontology Terms to Group Genes by Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    Spectral Clustering Gene Ontology Terms to Group Genes by Function Nora Speer, Christian Spieth­12, 2005. c Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005 #12;2 N. Speer, C. Spieth, and A. Zell part-of is-a GO

  16. Moments of $?$ meson spectral functions in vacuum and nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Gubler; Wolfram Weise

    2015-07-14

    Moments of the $\\phi$ meson spectral function in vacuum and in nuclear matter are analyzed, combining a model based on chiral SU(3) effective field theory (with kaonic degrees of freedom) and finite-energy QCD sum rules. For the vacuum we show that the spectral density is strongly constrained by a recent accurate measurement of the $e^+ e^- \\to K^+ K^-$ cross section. In nuclear matter the $\\phi$ spectrum is modified by interactions of the decay kaons with the surrounding nuclear medium, leading to a significant broadening and an asymmetric deformation of the $\\phi$ meson peak. We demonstrate that both in vacuum and nuclear matter, the first two moments of the spectral function are compatible with finite-energy QCD sum rules. A brief discussion of the next-higher spectral moment involving strange four-quark condensates is also presented.

  17. An improved spectral graph partitioning algorithm for mapping parallel computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1992-09-01

    Efficient use of a distributed memory parallel computer requires that the computational load be balanced across processors in a way that minimizes interprocessor communication. We present a new domain mapping algorithm that extends recent work in which ideas from spectral graph theory have been applied to this problem. Our generalization of spectral graph bisection involves a novel use of multiple eigenvectors to allow for division of a computation into four or eight parts at each stage of a recursive decomposition. The resulting method is suitable for scientific computations like irregular finite elements or differences performed on hypercube or mesh architecture machines. Experimental results confirm that the new method provides better decompositions arrived at more economically and robustly than with previous spectral methods. We have also improved upon the known spectral lower bound for graph bisection.

  18. SPECTRALLY EFFICIENT MULTICARRIER SYSTEMS FOR FIBER-OPTIC TRANSMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2012-05-31

    The purpose of this research is to provide a comprehensive study of spectrally efficient multicarrier systems for fiber-optic transmission. Multicarrier optical systems partition a high-data rate digital signal in a wavelength channel into multiple...

  19. Efficient Spectral-Galerkin Method and Analysis for Elliptic PDEs ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-11-22

    ... use the coercivity of the bilinear form and polynomial approximation theory to derive ...... Ammari, H., Bao, G., Wood, A.W.: Analysis of the electromagnetic scattering ... Quarteroni, A., Zang, T.A.: Spectral Methods: Fundamentals in Single Do-.

  20. APPROXIMATING SPECTRAL INVARIANTS OF HARPER OPERATORS ON GRAPHS II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schick, Thomas

    APPROXIMATING SPECTRAL INVARIANTS OF HARPER OPERATORS ON GRAPHS II VARGHESE MATHAI, THOMAS SCHICK;2 VARGHESE MATHAI, THOMAS SCHICK, AND STUART YATES subset E+ of these edges in which each combinatorial edge

  1. A Spectral-Scanning Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Integrated System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajimiri, Ali

    , detection time, spectral resolution, and the spatial resolution (relative to the sample size) equivalent that the electromotive force (emf) voltage induced in the coils of the MR system, )(tE , is describe by [ ] -= V n d

  2. Spectral Properties of Galactic and Extragalactic Black Hole Candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandip K. Chakrabarti

    1996-11-10

    We review current theoretical understanding of the spectral properties (low and high states, transition of states, quasi-periodic oscillations etc.) of the low mass as well as supermassive black hole candidates.

  3. COLLOQUIUM: Seismic Imaging and Inversion Based on Spectral-Element...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 6, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Seismic Imaging and Inversion Based on Spectral-Element and Adjoint Methods Professor Jeroen Tromp Princeton...

  4. Infrared non-destructive evaluation method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baleine, Erwan; Erwan, James F; Lee, Ching-Pang; Stinelli, Stephanie

    2014-10-21

    A method of nondestructive evaluation and related system. The method includes arranging a test piece (14) having an internal passage (18) and an external surface (15) and a thermal calibrator (12) within a field of view (42) of an infrared sensor (44); generating a flow (16) of fluid characterized by a fluid temperature; exposing the test piece internal passage (18) and the thermal calibrator (12) to fluid from the flow (16); capturing infrared emission information of the test piece external surface (15) and of the thermal calibrator (12) simultaneously using the infrared sensor (44), wherein the test piece infrared emission information includes emission intensity information, and wherein the thermal calibrator infrared emission information includes a reference emission intensity associated with the fluid temperature; and normalizing the test piece emission intensity information against the reference emission intensity.

  5. Mid-Infrared Spectra of Be Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Rinehart; J. R. Houck; J. D. Smith

    1999-10-11

    We present the first medium-resolution ($R\\sim 600$) mid-infrared (8-13.3\\micron) spectra of 11 Be stars. A large number of lines are observed and identified in these spectra, including, as an example, 39 hydrogen recombination lines in the spectrum of $\\gamma$ Cas. In the majority of our spectra, all of the observed lines are attributable to hydrogen recombination. Two of the sources, $\\beta$ Lyr and MWC 349 also show emission from other species. Both of these objects show evidence of [Ne II] emission, and $\\beta$ Lyr also shows evidence of He I emission. We tabulate the effective line strength and line widths for the observed lines, and briefly discuss the physical implications of the observed line series. We also use a simple model of free-free emission to characterize the disks around these sources.

  6. Tunable infrared source employing Raman mixing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L. (Stanford, CA); Herbst, Richard L. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A tunable source of infrared radiation is obtained by irradiating an assemblage of Raman active gaseous atoms or molecules with a high intensity pumping beam of coherent radiation at a pump frequency .omega..sub.p to stimulate the generation of Stokes wave energy at a Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s and to stimulate the Raman resonant mode at the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R within the irradiated assemblage where the pump frequency .omega..sub.p minus the Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s is equal to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R. The stimulated assemblage is irradiated with a tunable source of coherent radiation at a frequency .omega..sub.i to generate the output infrared radiation of the frequency .omega..sub.0 which is related to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R and the input wave .omega..sub.i by the relation .omega..sub.0 =.omega..sub.i .+-..omega..sub.R. In one embodiment the interaction between the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i is collinear and the ratio of the phase velocity mismatch factor .DELTA.k to the electric field exponential gain coefficient T is within the range of 0.1 to 5. In another embodiment the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i have velocity vectors k.sub.p and k.sub.i which cross at an angle to each other to compensate for phase velocity mismatches in the medium. In another embodiment, the Stokes wave energy .omega..sub.s is generated by pump energy .omega..sub.p in a first Raman cell and .omega..sub.s, .omega..sub.i and .omega..sub.p are combined in a second Raman mixing cell to produce the output at .omega..sub.i.

  7. Compressive spectral method for the simulation of the water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayindir, Cihan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper an approach for decreasing the computational effort required for the spectral simulations of the water waves is introduced. Signals with majority of the components zero, are known as the sparse signals. Like majority of the signals in the nature it can be realized that water waves are sparse either in time or in the frequency domain. Using the sparsity property of the water waves in the time or in the frequency domain, the compressive sampling algorithm can be used as a tool for improving the performance of the spectral simulation of the water waves. The methodology offered in this paper depends on the idea of using a smaller number of spectral components compared to the classical spectral method with a high number of components. After performing the time integration with a smaller number of spectral components and using the compressive sampling technique, it is shown that the water wave field can be reconstructed with a significantly better efficiency compared to the classical spectral method w...

  8. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-05-25

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  9. The spectral evolution of impulsive solar X-ray flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

    2004-07-20

    The time evolution of the spectral index and the non-thermal flux in 24 impulsive solar hard X-ray flares of GOES class M was studied in RHESSI observations. The high spectral resolution allows for a clean separation of thermal and non-thermal components in the 10-30 keV range, where most of the non-thermal photons are emitted. Spectral index and flux can thus be determined with much better accuracy than before. The spectral soft-hard-soft behavior in rise-peak-decay phases is discovered not only in the general flare development, but even more pronounced in subpeaks. An empirically found power-law dependence between the spectral index and the normalization of the non-thermal flux holds during the rise and decay phases of the emission peaks. It is still present in the combined set of all flares. We find an asymmetry in this dependence between rise and decay phases of the non-thermal emission. There is no delay between flux peak and spectral index minimum. The soft-hard-soft behavior appears to be an intrinsic signature of the elementary electron acceleration process.

  10. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  11. Spectral analysis of a class of Schroedinger operators exhibiting a parameter-dependent spectral transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diana Barseghyan; Pavel Exner; Andrii Khrabustovskyi; Milos Tater

    2015-10-31

    We analyze two-dimensional Schr\\"odinger operators with the potential $|xy|^p - \\lambda (x^2+y^2)^{p/(p+2)}$ where $p\\ge 1$ and $\\lambda\\ge 0$, which exhibit an abrupt change of its spectral properties at a critical value of the coupling constant $\\lambda$. We show that in the supercritical case the spectrum covers the whole real axis. In contrast, for $\\lambda$ below the critical value the spectrum is purely discrete and we establish a Lieb-Thirring-type bound on its moments. In the critical case the essential spectrum covers the positive halfline while the negative spectrum can be only discrete, we demonstrate numerically the existence of a ground state eigenvalue.

  12. Panchromatic Spectral Energy Distributions of Dusty Galaxies with RADISHE. I. Predictions for Herschel: Correlating Colors with Galactic Energy Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanya Chakrabarti; Barbara Whitney

    2007-11-27

    We present three-dimensional, self-consistent radiative transfer solutions with a new Monte Carlo radiative equilibrium code. The code, RADISHE ($\\bf{RAD}$iative transfer $\\bf{I}$n $\\bf{S}$moothed particle $\\bf{H}$ydrodynamics and $\\bf{E}$ulerian codes), can be applied to calculate the emergent spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and broadband images from optical to millimeter wavelengths of arbitrary density geometries with distributed sources of radiation. One of the primary uses of this code has been to interface with hydrodynamical codes to calculate emergent SEDs along a simulation time sequence. The primary methodological focus of this paper is on the radiative equilibrium temperature calculation. We find that an iterative calculation of the temperature, which takes as the Monte Carlo estimator for the mean free intensity the sum of photon flight paths, is significantly faster than relaxation temperature calculation methods, particularly when large numbers of grid cells are required, i.e., in modeling three-dimensional geometries such as the dust envelopes of turbulent massive protostellar cores or infrared bright galaxies. We present simulated color-color plots for infrared bright galaxies at a range of redshifts, and unfold these plots as color vs the fractional AGN luminosity, to demonstrate that $\\it{Herschel}$ will be able to effectively discriminate between submillimeter galaxies where the energy source is dominated by AGN and those where star formation dominates. [abridged

  13. Spectral Energy Distributions of Gamma Ray Bursts Energized by External Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Dermer; M. Boettcher; J. Chiang

    2000-03-05

    Sari, Piran, and Narayan have derived analytic formulas to model the spectra from gamma-ray burst blast waves that are energized by sweeping up material from the surrounding medium. We extend these expressions to apply to general radiative regimes and to include the effects of synchrotron self-absorption. Electron energy losses due to the synchrotron self-Compton process are also treated in a very approximate way. The calculated spectra are compared with detailed numerical simulation results. We find that the spectral and temporal breaks from the detailed numerical simulation are much smoother than the analytic formulas imply, and that the discrepancies between the analytic and numerical results are greatest near the breaks and endpoints of the synchrotron spectra. The expressions are most accurate (within a factor of ~ 3) in the optical/X-ray regime during the afterglow phase, and are more accurate when epsilon_e, the fraction of swept-up particle energy that is transferred to the electrons, is <~ 0.1. The analytic results provide at best order-of-magnitude accuracy in the self-absorbed radio/infrared regime, and give poor fits to the self-Compton spectra due to complications from Klein-Nishina effects and photon-photon opacity.

  14. The early and late-time spectral and temporal evolution of GRB 050716

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rol, E; Page, K L; McGowan, K E; Beardmore, A P; O'Brien, P T; Levan, A J; Bersier, D; Guidorzi, C; Marshall, F; Fruchter, A S; Tanvir, N R; Monfardini, A; Gomboc, A; Barthelmy, S; Bannister, N P

    2006-01-01

    We report on a comprehensive set of observations of Gamma Ray Burst 050716, detected by the Swift satellite and subsequently followed-up rapidly in X-ray, optical and near infra-red wavebands. The prompt emission is typical of long-duration bursts, with two peaks in a time interval of T90 = 68 seconds (15 - 350 keV). The prompt emission continues at lower flux levels in the X-ray band, where several smaller flares can be seen, on top of a decaying light curve that exhibits an apparent break around 220 seconds post trigger. This temporal break is roughly coincident with a spectral break. The latter can be related to the extrapolated evolution of the break energy in the prompt gamma-ray emission, and is possibly the manifestation of the peak flux break frequency of the internal shock passing through the observing band. A possible 3 sigma change in the X-ray absorption column is also seen during this time. The late-time afterglow behaviour is relatively standard, with an electron distribution power-law index of ...

  15. The early and late-time spectral and temporal evolution of GRB 050716

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Rol; J. P. Osborne; K. L. Page; K. E. McGowan; A. P. Beardmore; P. T . O'Brien; A. J. Levan; D. Bersier; C. Guidorzi; F. Marshall; A. S. Fruchter; N. R. Tanvir; A. Monfardini; A. Gomboc; S. Barthelmy; N. P. Bannister

    2006-11-17

    We report on a comprehensive set of observations of Gamma Ray Burst 050716, detected by the Swift satellite and subsequently followed-up rapidly in X-ray, optical and near infra-red wavebands. The prompt emission is typical of long-duration bursts, with two peaks in a time interval of T90 = 68 seconds (15 - 350 keV). The prompt emission continues at lower flux levels in the X-ray band, where several smaller flares can be seen, on top of a decaying light curve that exhibits an apparent break around 220 seconds post trigger. This temporal break is roughly coincident with a spectral break. The latter can be related to the extrapolated evolution of the break energy in the prompt gamma-ray emission, and is possibly the manifestation of the peak flux break frequency of the internal shock passing through the observing band. A possible 3 sigma change in the X-ray absorption column is also seen during this time. The late-time afterglow behaviour is relatively standard, with an electron distribution power-law index of p = 2 there is no noticable temporal break out to at least 10 days. The broad-band optical/nIR to X-ray spectrum indicates a redshift of z ~> 2 for this burst, with a host-galaxy extinction value of E(B-V) ~ 0.7 that prefers an SMC-like extinction curve.

  16. Nonlinear Bayesian Algorithms for Gas Plume Detection and Estimation from Hyper-spectral Thermal Image Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, Patrick G.; Posse, Christian; Hylden, Jeff L.; Anderson, Kevin K.

    2007-06-13

    This paper presents a nonlinear Bayesian regression algorithm for the purpose of detecting and estimating gas plume content from hyper-spectral data. Remote sensing data, by its very nature, is collected under less controlled conditions than laboratory data. As a result, the physics-based model that is used to describe the relationship between the observed remotesensing spectra, and the terrestrial (or atmospheric) parameters that we desire to estimate, is typically littered with many unknown "nuisance" parameters (parameters that we are not interested in estimating, but also appear in the model). Bayesian methods are well-suited for this context as they automatically incorporate the uncertainties associated with all nuisance parameters into the error estimates of the parameters of interest. The nonlinear Bayesian regression methodology is illustrated on realistic simulated data from a three-layer model for longwave infrared (LWIR) measurements from a passive instrument. This shows that this approach should permit more accurate estimation as well as a more reasonable description of estimate uncertainty.

  17. Spatially Resolved Spitzer-IRS Spectral Maps of the Superwind in M82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beirăo, P; Lehnert, M D; Guillard, P; Heckman, T; Draine, B; Hollenbach, D; Walter, F; Sheth, K; Smith, J D; Shopbell, P; Boulanger, F; Surace, J; Hoopes, C; Engelbracht, C

    2015-01-01

    We have mapped the superwind/halo region of the nearby starburst galaxy M82 in the mid-infrared with $Spitzer-IRS$. The spectral regions covered include the H$_2 S(1)-S(3)$, [NeII], [NeIII] emission lines and PAH features. We estimate the total warm H$_2$ mass and the kinetic energy of the outflowing warm molecular gas to be between $M_{warm}\\sim5-17\\times10^6$ M$_{\\odot}$ and $E_{K}\\sim6-20\\times10^{53}$ erg. Using the ratios of the 6.2, 7.7 and 11.3 micron PAH features in the IRS spectra, we are able to estimate the average size and ionization state of the small grains in the superwind. There are large variations in the PAH flux ratios throughout the outflow. The 11.3/7.7 and the 6.2/7.7 PAH ratios both vary by more than a factor of five across the wind region. The Northern part of the wind has a significant population of PAH's with smaller 6.2/7.7 ratios than either the starburst disk or the Southern wind, indicating that on average, PAH emitters are larger and more ionized. The warm molecular gas to PAH f...

  18. New bright optical spectrophotometric standards: A-type stars from the STIS Next Generation Spectral Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prieto, Carlos Allende

    2015-01-01

    Exoplanets have sparked interest in extremely high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic observations of very bright stars, in a regime where flux calibrators, in particular DA white dwarfs, are not available. We argue that A-type stars offer a useful alternative and reliable space-based spectrophotometry is now available for a number of bright ones in the range 3model fluxes, we identify 18 new very-bright trustworthy A-type flux standards for the optical range (400-800 nm), and provide scaled model fluxes for them. Our tests suggest that the absolute fluxes for these stars in the optical are reliable to within 3%. We limit the spectral range to 400-800 nm, since our models have difficulties to reproduce the observed fluxes in the near-infrared and, especially, in the near-UV, where the discrepancies rise up to ~ 10%. Based on our model fits, we derive angular diameters with an estimated accuracy of about 1%.

  19. Deriving star formation histories from photometry using energy balance spectral energy distribution modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Daniel J B

    2015-01-01

    Panchromatic spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting is a critical tool for determining the physical properties of distant galaxies, such as their stellar mass and star formation rate. One widely used method is the publicly available MAGPHYS code. We build on our previous analysis (Hayward & Smith 2015) by presenting some modifications which enable MAGPHYS to automatically estimate galaxy star formation histories (SFHs), including uncertainties, based on ultra-violet to far-infrared photometry. We use state-of-the art synthetic photometry derived by performing three-dimensional dust radiative transfer on hydrodynamic simulations of isolated disc and merging galaxies to test how well the modified MAGPHYS is able to recover SFHs under idealised conditions, where the true SFH is known. We find that while the SFH of the model with the best fit to the synthetic photometry is a poor representation of the true SFH (showing large variations with the line-of-sight to the galaxy and spurious bursts of star forma...

  20. The Nuclear Spectral Energy Distribution of NGC 4395, The Least Luminous Type 1 Seyfert Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. C. Moran; A. V. Filippenko; L. C. Ho; J. C. Shields; T. Belloni; A. Comastri; S. L. Snowden; R. A. Sramek

    1999-04-28

    We present X-ray (ROSAT), infrared, and radio observations of NGC 4395, which harbors the optically least luminous type 1 Seyfert nucleus discovered thus far. In combination with published optical and ultraviolet spectra, we have used these data to assemble the broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) of the galaxy's nucleus. Interestingly, the SED of NGC 4395 differs markedly from the SEDs of both quasars and typical low-luminosity active galactic nuclei, which may be a manifestation of the different physical conditions (i.e., black hole masses, accretion rates, and/or accretion modes) that exist in these objects. The nuclear X-ray source in NGC 4395 is variable and has an observed luminosity of just ~ 10^38 ergs/s. Although this emission could plausibly be associated with either a weak active nucleus or a bright stellar-mass binary system, the optical and ultraviolet emission-line properties of the nucleus strongly suggest that the X-rays arise from a classical AGN.

  1. Chandra Deep X-ray Observation of a Typical Galactic Plane Region and Near-Infrared Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Ebisawa; M. Tsujimoto; A. Paizis; K. Hamaguchi; A. Bamba; R. Cutri; H. Kaneda; Y. Maeda; G. Sato; A. Senda; M. Ueno; S. Yamauchi; V. Beckmann; T. J. -L. Courvoisier; P. Dubath; E. Nishihara

    2005-07-07

    Using the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer Imaging array (ACIS-I), we have carried out a deep hard X-ray observation of the Galactic plane region at (l,b) ~ (28.5, 0.0), where no discrete X-ray source had been reported previously. We have detected 274 new point X-ray sources (4 sigma confidence) as well as strong Galactic diffuse emission within two partially overlapping ACIS-I fields (~250 arcmin^2in total). Sum of all the detected point source fluxes accounts for only ~ 10 % of the total X-ray flux in the field of view. Even hypothesizing a new population of much dimmer and numerous Galactic point sources, the total observed X-ray flux cannot be explained. Therefore, we conclude that X-ray emission from the Galactic plane has truly diffuse origin. Only 26 point sources were detected both in the soft and hard bands, indicating that there are two distinct classes of the X-ray sources distinguished by the spectral hardness ratio. Surface number density of the hard sources is only slightly higher than that measured at the high Galactic latitude regions, indicating that majority of the hard sources are background AGNs. Following up the Chandra observation, we have performed a near-infrared (NIR) survey with SOFI at ESO/NTT. Almost all the soft X-ray sources have been identified in NIR and their spectral types are consistent with main-sequence stars, suggesting most of them are nearby X-ray active stars. On the other hand, only 22 % of the hard sources had NIR counterparts, which are presumably Galactic. From X-ray and NIR spectral study, they are most likely to be quiescent cataclysmic variables. We have also carried out a precise spectral study of the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission excluding the point sources.

  2. Dispersion properties and low infrared optical losses in epitaxial AlN on sapphire substrate in the visible and infrared range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soltani, A. Stolz, A.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Rousseau, M.; Bourzgui, N.; De Jaeger, J.-C.; Charrier, J.; Mattalah, M.; Barkad, H. A.; Mortet, V.

    2014-04-28

    Optical waveguiding properties of a thick wurtzite aluminum nitride highly [002]-textured hetero-epitaxial film on (001) basal plane of sapphire substrate are studied. The physical properties of the film are determined by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, microRaman, and photocurrent spectroscopy. The refractive index and the thermo-optic coefficients are determined by m-lines spectroscopy using the classical prism coupling technique. The optical losses of this planar waveguide are also measured in the spectral range of 450–1553?nm. The lower value of optical losses is equal to 0.7 dB/cm at 1553?nm. The optical losses due to the surface scattering are simulated showing that the contribution is the most significant at near infrared wavelength range, whereas the optical losses are due to volume scattering and material absorption in the visible range. The good physical properties and the low optical losses obtained from this planar waveguide are encouraging to achieve a wide bandgap optical guiding platform from these aluminum nitride thin films.

  3. Visible and infrared photometry of Kuiper Belt objects: searching for evidence of trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheppard, Scott S.

    Visible and infrared photometry of Kuiper Belt objects: searching for evidence of trends Neil Mc. © 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved. Keywords: Kuiper Belt objects; Photometry; Infrared

  4. Retrieval of Areal-averaged Spectral Surface Albedo from Transmission Data Alone: Computationally Simple and Fast Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Michalsky, Joseph; Hodges, G. B.

    2014-10-25

    We introduce and evaluate a simple retrieval of areal-averaged surface albedo using ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission alone at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673 and 870nm), under fully overcast conditions. Our retrieval is based on a one-line semi-analytical equation and widely accepted assumptions regarding the weak spectral dependence of cloud optical properties, such as cloud optical depth and asymmetry parameter, in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. To illustrate the performance of our retrieval, we use as input measurements of spectral atmospheric transmission from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). These MFRSR data are collected at two well-established continental sites in the United States supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The areal-averaged albedos obtained from the MFRSR are compared with collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) white-sky albedo. In particular, these comparisons are made at four MFRSR wavelengths (500, 615, 673 and 870nm) and for four seasons (winter, spring, summer and fall) at the ARM site using multi-year (2008-2013) MFRSR and MODIS data. Good agreement, on average, for these wavelengths results in small values (?0.01) of the corresponding root mean square errors (RMSEs) for these two sites. The obtained RMSEs are comparable with those obtained previously for the shortwave albedos (MODIS-derived versus tower-measured) for these sites during growing seasons. We also demonstrate good agreement between tower-based daily-averaged surface albedos measured for “nearby” overcast and non-overcast days. Thus, our retrieval originally developed for overcast conditions likely can be extended for non-overcast days by interpolating between overcast retrievals.

  5. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN FIELD RED GIANTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION H-BAND SPECTRA USING THE APOGEE SPECTRAL LINELIST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Shetrone, Matthew D. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto d'Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)] [Instituto d'Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)] [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Garcia Perez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Schiavon, Ricardo [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5UX (United Kingdom)] [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5UX (United Kingdom); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Johnson, Jennifer A., E-mail: vsmith@noao.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants ({alpha} Boo and {mu} Leo), two M-giants ({beta} And and {delta} Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of {sup 12}C synthesized during {sup 4}He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to {approx}0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  6. The infrared medium-deep survey. II. How to trigger radio AGNs? Hints from their environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Yongjung; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Duho; Park, Won-Kee; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin; Chapman, Scott; Pak, Soojong; Edge, Alastair

    2014-12-10

    Activity at the centers of galaxies, during which the central supermassive black hole is accreting material, is nowadays accepted to be rather ubiquitous and most probably a phase of every galaxy's evolution. It has been suggested that galactic mergers and interactions may be the culprits behind the triggering of nuclear activity. We use near-infrared data from the new Infrared Medium-Deep Survey and the Deep eXtragalactic Survey of the VIMOS-SA22 field and radio data at 1.4 GHz from the FIRST survey and a deep Very Large Array survey to study the environments of radio active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over an area of ?25 deg{sup 2} and down to a radio flux limit of 0.1 mJy and a J-band magnitude of 23 mag AB. Radio AGNs are predominantly found in environments similar to those of control galaxies at similar redshift, J-band magnitude, and (M{sub u} – M{sub r} ) rest-frame color. However, a subpopulation of radio AGNs is found in environments up to 100 times denser than their control sources. We thus preclude merging as the dominant triggering mechanism of radio AGNs. By fitting the broadband spectral energy distribution of radio AGNs in the least and most dense environments, we find that those in the least dense environments show higher radio-loudness, higher star formation efficiencies, and higher accretion rates, typical of the so-called high-excitation radio AGNs. These differences tend to disappear at z > 1. We interpret our results in terms of a different triggering mechanism for these sources that is driven by mass loss through winds of young stars created during the observed ongoing star formation.

  7. Radiant energy required for infrared neural stimulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Xiaodong; Rajguru, Suhrud; Young, Hunter; Xia, Nan; Stock, Stuart R.; Xiao, Xianghui; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-08-25

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been proposed as an alternative method to electrical stimulation because of its spatial selective stimulation. Independent of the mechanism for INS, to translate the method into a device it is important to determine the energy for stimulation required at the target structure. Custom-designed, flat and angle polished fibers, were used to deliver the photons. By rotating the angle polished fibers, the orientation of the radiation beam in the cochlea could be changed. INS-evoked compound action potentials and single unit responses in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) were recorded. X-ray computed tomography wasmore »used to determine the orientation of the optical fiber. Maximum responses were observed when the radiation beam was directed towards the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), whereas little responses were seen when the beam was directed towards the basilar membrane. The radiant exposure required at the SGNs to evoke compound action potentials (CAPs) or ICC responses was on average 18.9 ± 12.2 or 10.3 ± 4.9 mJ/cm2, respectively. For cochlear INS it has been debated whether the radiation directly stimulates the SGNs or evokes a photoacoustic effect. The results support the view that a direct interaction between neurons and radiation dominates the response to INS.« less

  8. Infrared Transmission Spectra for Extrasolar Giant Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Tinetti; M. C. Liang; A. Vidal-Madjar; D. Ehrenreich; A. Lecavelier des Etangs; Y. Yung

    2006-11-06

    Among the hot Jupiters that transit their parent stars known to date, the two best candidates to be observed with transmission spectroscopy in the mid-infrared (MIR) are HD189733b and HD209458b, due to their combined characteristics of planetary density, orbital parameters and parent star distance and brightness. Here we simulate transmission spectra of these two planets during their primary eclipse in the MIR, and we present sensitivity studies of the spectra to the changes of atmospheric thermal properties, molecular abundances and C/O ratios. Our model predicts that the dominant species absorbing in the MIR on hot Jupiters are water vapor and carbon monoxide, and their relative abundances are determined by the C/O ratio. Since the temperature profile plays a secondary role in the transmission spectra of hot Jupiters compared to molecular abundances, future primary eclipse observations in the MIR of those objects might give an insight on EGP atmospheric chemistry. We find here that the absorption features caused by water vapor and carbon monoxide in a cloud-free atmosphere, are deep enough to be observable by the present and future generation of space-based observatories, such as Spitzer Space Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope. We discuss our results in light of the capabilities of these telescopes.

  9. Infrared Thermographic Study of Laser Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohler, Jonathan H.; Chow, Charles T. S.

    1986-07-01

    Pyrotechnic ignition has been studied in the past by making a limited number of discrete temperature-time observations during ignition. Present-day infrared scanning techniques make it possible to record thermal profiles, during ignition, with high spacial and temporal resolution. Data thus obtained can be used with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more precise kinetic models of the ignition process. Ignition has been studied theoretically and experimentally using various thermal methods. It has been shown that the whole process can, ideally, be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the sample pellet behaves like an inert body heated by an external heat source. The second stage is governed by the chemical reaction in the heated volume produced during the first stage. High speed thermographic recording of the temperature distribution in the test sample during laser ignition makes it possible to calculate the heat content at any instant. Thus, one can actually observe laser heating and the onset of self-sustained combustion in the pellet. The experimental apparatus used to make these observations is described. The temperature distributions recorded are shown to be in good agreement with those predicted by heat transfer theory. Heat content values calculated from the observed temperature distributions are used to calculate thermal and kinetic parameters for several samples. These values are found to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  10. Infrared thermographic study of laser ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohler, J.H.; Chow, C.T.S.

    1986-07-21

    Pyrotechnic ignition has been studied in the past by making a limited number of discrete temperature-time observations during ignition. Present-day infrared scanning techniques make it possible to record thermal profiles, during ignition, with high spacial and temporal resolution. Data thus obtained can be used with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more precise kinetic models of the ignition process. Ignition has been studied theoretically and experimentally using various thermal methods. It has been shown that the whole process can, ideally, be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the sample pellet behaves like an inert body heated by an external heat source. The second stage is governed by the chemical reaction in the heated volume produced during the first stage. High speed thermographic recording of the temperature distribution in the test sample during laser ignition makes it possible to calculate the heat content at any instant. Thus, one can actually observe laser heating and the onset of self-sustained combustion in the pellet.

  11. Resolution of the spectral technique in kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, Chaincy; Reutter, Bryan W.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2001-02-17

    Physiologic systems can be represented by compartmental models which describe the uptake of radio-labeled tracers from blood to tissue and their subsequent washout. Arterial and venous time-activity curves from isolated heart experiments are analyzed using spectral analysis, in which the impulse response function is represented by a sum of decaying exponentials. Resolution and uniqueness tests are conducted by synthesizing isolated heart data with predefined compartmental models, adding noise, and applying the spectral analysis technique. Venous time-activity curves are generated by convolving a typical arterial input function with the predefined spectrum. The coefficients of a set of decaying exponential basis functions are determined using a non-negative least squares algorithm, and results are compared with the predefined spectrum. The uniqueness of spectral method solutions is investigated by computing model covariance matrices, using error propagation and prior knowledge of noise distributions. Coupling between model parameters is illustrated with correlation matrices.

  12. THE BATSE 5B GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, Adam; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Mallozzi, Robert S.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Paciesas, William S. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We present systematic spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory during its entire nine years of operation. This catalog contains two types of spectra extracted from 2145 GRBs, and fitted with five different spectral models resulting in a compendium of over 19,000 spectra. The models were selected based on their empirical importance to the spectral shape of many GRBs, and the analysis performed was devised to be as thorough and objective as possible. We describe in detail our procedures and criteria for the analyses, and present the bulk results in the form of parameter distributions. This catalog should be considered an official product from the BATSE Science Team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC)

  13. Sweetspot: Near-infrared observations of 13 type Ia supernovae...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of 13 type Ia supernovae from a new NOAO survey probing the nearby smooth Hubble flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sweetspot: Near-infrared observations of 13...

  14. Combustion Control Using Infrared and Visible Light Devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Economics and overall experience have acted against the installation of infrared carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide analyzers on smaller systems for air fuel ratio control. This paper discusses an interesting control signal which can be derived from...

  15. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared emission spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA); Jones, Roger W. (Ames, IA)

    1991-12-24

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a solid material (16, 42) by applying energy from an energy source (20, 70) top a surface region of the solid material sufficient to cause transient heating in a thin surface layer portion of the solid material (16, 42) so as to enable transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion, and by detecting with a spectrometer/detector (28, 58) substantially only the transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion of the solid material. The detected transient thermal emission of infrared radiation is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the solid material of emitted infrared radiation, so as to be indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the solid material.

  16. Characterization of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burghoff, David Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Quantum cascade lasers provide some of the highest output powers available for light in the mid-infrared range (from 3 to 8 m). As many of their applications require portability, designs that have a high wall-plug efficiency ...

  17. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardi, Craig

    Abstract Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). ...

  18. Infra-Red Process for Colour Fixation on Fabrics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biau, D.; Raymond, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Infra-red radiations find wide application in industrial processes as heating, drying, stoving and forming. The results are often far better than those from the other techniques: convection oven, gas IR etc . They come from the electric IR specific...

  19. Application Of High-Resolution Thermal Infrared Sensors For Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Application Of High-Resolution Thermal Infrared Sensors For Geothermal Exploration At The Salton Sea, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  20. Seeing the invisible : single molecule microscopy in the shortwave infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correa, Raoul Emile

    2013-01-01

    Infrared-active nanostructures play an increasingly important role in the nanoscience toolbox, yet little is known about their optical properties at the single nanoparticle level. In this thesis, we detail efforts to extend ...

  1. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01

    et al. , Trilayered Ceramic-Metal-Polymer MicrocantileversPolymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors byLin Spring 2010 Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal

  2. Design of novel dyes towards the near-infrared 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudet, Aurore

    2009-05-15

    A series of seven functionalized near-infrared aza-BODIPY dyes have been synthesized and their spectroscopic properties measured. Their fluorescence emissions could be tuned by altering the electronic substituents on the aryl-groups. A through...

  3. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Graphene-a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice-has very high conductivity that can be tuned...

  4. The Flight Spectral Response of the ACIS Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul P. Plucinsky; Norbert S. Schulz; Herman L. Marshall; Catherine E. Grant; George Chartas; Divas Sanwal; Marcus A. Teter; Alexey A. Vikhlinin; Richard J. Edgar; Michael W. Wise; Glenn E. Allen; Shanil N. Virani; Joseph M. DePasquale; Michael T. Raley

    2002-09-24

    We discuss the flight calibration of the spectral response of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on-board the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO). The spectral resolution and sensitivity of the ACIS instrument have both been evolving over the course of the mission. The spectral resolution of the frontside-illuminated (FI) CCDs changed dramatically in the first month of the mission due to radiation damage. Since that time, the spectral resolution of the FI CCDs and the backside-illuminated (BI) CCDs have evolved gradually with time. We demonstrate the efficacy of charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) correction algorithms which recover some of the lost performance. The detection efficiency of the ACIS instrument has been declining throughout the mission, presumably due to a layer of contamination building up on the filter and/or CCDs. We present a characterization of the energy dependence of the excess absorption and demonstrate software which models the time dependence of the absorption from energies of 0.4 keV and up. The spectral redistribution function and the detection efficiency are well-characterized at energies from 1.5 to 8.0 keV. The calibration at energies below 1.5 keV is challenging because of the lack of strong lines in the calibration source and also because of the inherent non-linear dependence with energy of the CTI and the absorption by the contamination layer. We have been using data from celestial sources with relatively simple spectra to determine the quality of the calibration below 1.5 keV. The analysis of these observations demonstrate that the CTI correction recovers a significant fraction of the spectral resolution of the FI CCDs and the models of the time-dependent absorption result in consistent measurements of the flux at low energies for data from a BI (S3) CCD.

  5. Spectral bidirectional reflectance of Antarctic snow: Measurements and parameterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Stephen

    than wavelength is used as a predictor in the near infrared. The parameterizations cover nearly all, then it is the BRDF of the surface that is obtained. For remote sensing using sensors on satellites it is the BRDF an evaluation of the

  6. Simulating Merging Galaxies: The Infrared View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanya Chakrabarti

    2006-10-29

    We calculate multi-wavelength spectral energy distributions (SEDs) (spanning optical to millimeter wavelengths) from simulations of major galaxy mergers using a three-dimensional radiative transfer code, which treats the absorption and scattering of radiation as well as the reemission from dust grains self-consistently. These calculations allow us to deduce correlations from the X-rays to millimeter wavelengths. We confirm observed correlations for Spitzer Space Telescope's IRAC bands, as well as correlations observed in the IRAS era. We also make predictions that should be testable by future instruments. The power of the dynamical approach afforded by calculating fluxes from the merger simulations is that we can directly correlate observed clustering in the data as seen in IRAC color-color plots with the relative amount of time the system spends in a region of color-color space. We also present photo albums spanning the lifetime of SMGs, from its infancy in the pre-merger phase to its final stage as an elliptical galaxy, as seen in various bands. Finally, we compare the SEDs from the simulations to recent observations of SMGs. Our calculations, which match observed correlations both for local ULIRGs and higher redshift systems, suggest that simulations of major mergers with black hole feedback provide an excellent framework within which to understand the emission from local ULIRGs, and their high redshift cousins, the submillimeter galaxies.

  7. Infrared Optical Imaging Techniques for Gas Visualization and Measurement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safitri, Anisa

    2012-07-16

    imaging techniques for gas detection and visualization. The infrared camera fundamentals and the camera detectors? algorithm to measure the thermal radiation emitted by a target object is described in Section 2. A semi-quantification approach... for detection is the contrast in transmitted radiation between the target and background, which generates a detector output voltage. The infrared camera can see certain gases, mostly hydrocarbons, because the camera?s detector is equipped with a filter which...

  8. On the performance of infrared sensors in earth observations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Luther Franklin

    1972-01-01

    systems is depen- dent upon the radiative properties of targets in addition to constraints imposed by system components . The unclas- sified state-of-the-art of infrared system performance figures is reviewed to indicate the relevance to system... of unclassified infrared literature reveals in- frared systems applications in industry, medicine, and science. Indeed, any detection application is possible if a measurable variation in radiation is caused by the tar- get property of interest. Hudson [10] has...

  9. Cosmogenic Neutrinos from Cosmic Ray Interactions with Extragalactic Infrared Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel De Marco; Todor Stanev; F. W. Stecker

    2005-12-19

    We discuss the production of cosmogenic neutrinos on extragalactic infrared photons in a model of its cosmological evolution. The relative importance of these infrared photons as a target for proton interactions is significant, especially in the case of steep injection spectra of the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. For an E$^{-2.5}$ cosmic ray injection spectrum, for example, the event rate of neutrinos of energy above 1 PeV is more than doubled.

  10. Evaluating undeveloped urban forest resources using color infrared imagery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snelgrove, Robert Todd

    2002-01-01

    EVALUATING UNDEVELOPED URBAN FOREST RESOURCES USING COLOR INFRARED IMAGERY A Thesis by ROBERT TODD SNELGROVE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2002 Major Subject: Forestry EVALUATING UNDEVELOPED URBAN FOREST RESOURCES USING COLOR INFRARED IMAGERY A Thesis by ROBERT TODD SNELGROVE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  11. Fourier-Based Spectral Analysis with Adaptive Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Khilko

    2008-06-04

    Despite being the most popular methods of data analysis, Fourier-based techniques suffer from the problem of static resolution that is currently believed to be a fundamental limitation of the Fourier Transform. Although alternative solutions overcome this limitation, none provide the simplicity, versatility, and convenience of the Fourier analysis. The lack of convenience often prevents these alternatives from replacing classical spectral methods - even in applications that suffer from the limitation of static resolution. This work demonstrates that, contrary to the generally accepted belief, the Fourier Transform can be generalized to the case of adaptive resolution. The generalized transform provides backward compatibility with classical spectral techniques and introduces minimal computational overhead.

  12. SPECTRAL AMPLITUDE AND PHASE EVOLUTION IN PETAWATT LASER PULSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filip, C V

    2010-11-22

    The influence of the active gain medium on the spectral amplitude and phase of amplified pulses in a CPA system is studied. Results from a 10-PW example based on Nd-doped mixed glasses are presented. In conclusion, this study shows that, by using spectral shaping and gain saturation in a mixed-glass amplifier, it is possible to produce 124 fs, 1.4 kJ laser pulses. One detrimental effect, the pulse distortion due to resonant amplification medium, has been investigated and its magnitude as well as its compensation calculated.

  13. Measuring primordial anisotropic correlators with CMB spectral distortions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maresuke Shiraishi; Michele Liguori; Nicola Bartolo; Sabino Matarrese

    2015-10-04

    We show that inflationary models with broken rotational invariance generate testable off-diagonal signatures in the correlation between the $\\mu$-type distortion and temperature fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background. More precisely, scenarios with a quadrupolar bispectrum asymmetry, usually generated by fluctuations of primordial vector fields, produce a nonvanishing $\\mu$-$T$ correlation when $|\\ell_1-\\ell_2|=2$. Since spectral distortions are sensitive to primordial fluctuations up to very small scales, a cosmic variance limited spectral distortion experiment can detect such effects with a high signal-to-noise ratio.

  14. NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF A z = 6.42 QUASAR HOST GALAXY WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mechtley, M.; Windhorst, R. A.; Cohen, S. H.; Jansen, R. A.; Scannapieco, E.; Ryan, R. E.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Schneider, G.; Fan, X.; Hathi, N. P.; Keel, W. C.; Roettgering, H.; Schneider, D. P.; Strauss, M. A.; Yan, H. J.

    2012-09-10

    We report on deep near-infrared F125W (J) and F160W (H) Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images of the z = 6.42 quasar J1148+5251 to attempt to detect rest-frame near-ultraviolet emission from the host galaxy. These observations included contemporaneous observations of a nearby star of similar near-infrared colors to measure temporal variations in the telescope and instrument point-spread function (PSF). We subtract the quasar point source using both this direct PSF and a model PSF. Using direct subtraction, we measure an upper limit for the quasar host galaxy of m{sub J} > 22.8 and m{sub H} > 23.0 AB mag (2 {sigma}). After subtracting our best model PSF, we measure a limiting surface brightness from 0.''3 to 0.''5 radius of {mu}{sub J} > 23.5 and {mu}{sub H} > 23.7 AB mag arcsec{sup -2} (2 {sigma}). We test the ability of the model subtraction method to recover the host galaxy flux by simulating host galaxies with varying integrated magnitude, effective radius, and Sersic index, and conducting the same analysis. These models indicate that the surface brightness limit ({mu}{sub J} > 23.5 AB mag arcsec{sup -2}) corresponds to an integrated upper limit of m{sub J} > 22-23 AB mag, consistent with the direct subtraction method. Combined with existing far-infrared observations, this gives an infrared excess log (IRX) > 1.0 and corresponding ultraviolet spectral slope {beta} > -1.2 {+-} 0.2. These values match those of most local luminous infrared galaxies, but are redder than those of almost all local star-forming galaxies and z {approx_equal} 6 Lyman break galaxies.

  15. Femtosecond measurements of near-infrared pulse induced mid-infrared transmission modulation of quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Hong; Liu, Sheng; Lalanne, Elaine; Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Choa, Fow-Sen; Wang, Xiaojun; Johnson, Anthony M.

    2014-05-26

    We temporally resolved the ultrafast mid-infrared transmission modulation of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) using a near-infrared pump/mid-infrared probe technique at room temperature. Two different femtosecond wavelength pumps were used with photon energy above and below the quantum well (QW) bandgap. The shorter wavelength pump modulates the mid-infrared probe transmission through interband transition assisted mechanisms, resulting in a high transmission modulation depth and several nanoseconds recovery lifetime. In contrast, pumping with a photon energy below the QW bandgap induces a smaller transmission modulation depth but much faster (several picoseconds) recovery lifetime, attributed to intersubband transition assisted mechanisms. The latter ultrafast modulation (>60?GHz) could provide a potential way to realize fast QCL based free space optical communication.

  16. THE HAWAII INFRARED PARALLAX PROGRAM. I. ULTRACOOL BINARIES AND THE L/T TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupuy, Trent J.; Liu, Michael C.

    2012-08-01

    We present the first results from our high-precision infrared (IR) astrometry program at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We measure parallaxes for 83 ultracool dwarfs (spectral types M6-T9) in 49 systems, with a median uncertainty of 1.1 mas (2.3%) and as good as 0.7 mas (0.8%). We provide the first parallaxes for 48 objects in 29 systems, and for another 27 objects in 17 systems, we significantly improve upon published results, with a median (best) improvement of 1.7 times (5 times). Three systems show astrometric perturbations indicative of orbital motion; two are known binaries (2MASS J0518-2828AB and 2MASS J1404-3159AB) and one is spectrally peculiar (SDSS J0805+4812). In addition, we present here a large set of Keck adaptive optics imaging that more than triples the number of binaries with L6-T5 components that have both multi-band photometry and distances. Our data enable an unprecedented look at the photometric properties of brown dwarfs as they cool through the L/T transition. Going from Almost-Equal-To L8 to Almost-Equal-To T4.5, flux in the Y and J bands increases by Almost-Equal-To 0.7 mag and Almost-Equal-To 0.5 mag, respectively (the Y- and J-band 'bumps'), while flux in the H, K, and L' bands declines monotonically. This wavelength dependence is consistent with cloud clearing over a narrow range of temperature, since condensate opacity is expected to dominate at 1.0-1.3 {mu}m. Interestingly, despite more than doubling the near-IR census of L/T transition objects, we find a conspicuous paucity of objects on the color-magnitude diagram just blueward of the late-L/early-T sequence. This 'L/T gap' occurs at (J - H){sub MKO} 0.1-0.3 mag, (J - K){sub MKO} = 0.0-0.4 mag, and implies that the last phases of cloud evolution occur rapidly. Finally, we provide a comprehensive update to the absolute magnitudes of ultracool dwarfs as a function of spectral type using a combined sample of 314 objects.

  17. A monitoring campaign for Luhman 16AB. I. Detection of resolved near-infrared spectroscopic variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, E.; Delrez, L.; Opitom, C.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Radigan, Jacqueline; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.; Plavchan, Peter

    2014-04-10

    We report resolved near-infrared spectroscopic monitoring of the nearby L dwarf/T dwarf binary WISE J104915.57–531906.1AB (Luhman 16AB), as part of a broader campaign to characterize the spectral energy distribution and temporal variability of this system. A continuous 45 minute sequence of low-resolution IRTF/SpeX data spanning 0.8-2.4 ?m were obtained, concurrent with combined-light optical photometry with ESO/TRAPPIST. Our spectral observations confirm the flux reversal of this binary, and we detect a wavelength-dependent decline in the relative spectral fluxes of the two components coincident with a decline in the combined-light optical brightness of the system over the course of the observation. These data are successfully modeled as a combination of achromatic (brightness) and chromatic (color) variability in the T0.5 Luhman 16B, consistent with variations in overall cloud opacity; and no significant variability was found in L7.5 Luhman 16A, consistent with recent resolved photometric monitoring. We estimate a peak-to-peak amplitude of 13.5% at 1.25 ?m over the full light curve. Using a simple two-spot brightness temperature model for Luhman 16B, we infer an average cold covering fraction of ?30%-55%, varying by 15%-30% over a rotation period assuming a ?200-400 K difference between hot and cold regions. We interpret these variations as changes in the covering fraction of a high cloud deck and corresponding 'holes' which expose deeper, hotter cloud layers, although other physical interpretations are possible. A Rhines scale interpretation for the size of the variable features explains an apparent correlation between period and amplitude for Luhman 16B and the variable T dwarfs SIMP 0136+0933 and 2MASS J2139+0220, and predicts relatively fast winds (1-3 km s{sup –1}) for Luhman 16B consistent with light curve evolution on an advective time scale (1-3 rotation periods). The strong variability observed in this flux reversal brown dwarf pair supports the model of a patchy disruption of the mineral cloud layer as a universal feature of the L dwarf/T dwarf transition.

  18. An Infrared Multiplicity Survey of Class I/Flat-Spectrum Systems in the Rho Ophiuchi and Serpens Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. E. Haisch Jr.; M. Barsony; T. P. Greene; M. E. Ressler

    2002-09-11

    We present new near- and mid-infrared observations of 19 Class I/flat-spectrum young stellar objects in the nearby Rho Oph (d=125pc) and Serpens (d=310pc) dark clouds. These observations are part of a larger systematic infrared multiplicity survey of Class I/flat-spectrum objects in the nearest dark clouds. We find 7/19 (37% +/- 14%) of the sources surveyed to be multiple systems over a separation range of ~150 - 1800 AU. This is consistent with the fraction of multiple systems found among older pre-main-sequence stars in each of the Taurus, Rho Oph, Chamaeleon, Lupus, and Corona Australis star-forming regions over a similar separation range. However, solar-type main-sequence stars in the solar neighborhood have a fraction approximately one-third that of our Class I/flat- spectrum sample (11% +/- 3%). This may be attributed to evolutionary effects or environmental differences. An examination of the spectral energy distributions of the SVS 20 and WL 1 binaries reveals that the individual components of each source exhibit the same SED classifications, similar to what one typically finds for binary T Tauri star (TTS) systems, where the companion of a classical TTS also tends to be of the same SED type.

  19. Evolution of mid-infrared galaxy luminosity functions from the entire AKARI NEP-Deep field with new CFHT photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goto, Tomotsugu; Ohyama, Youichi; Malkan, Matthew; Matsuhara, Hideo; Wada, Takehiko; Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Nakagawa, Takao; Buat, Veronique; Burgarella, Denis; Sedgwick, Chris; Toba, Yoshiki; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Marchetti, Lucia; Ma?ek, Katarzyna; Koptelova, Ekaterina; Chao, Dani; Wu, Yi-Han; Pearson, Chris; Takagi, Toshinobu; Lee, Hyung Mok; Serjeant, Stephen; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T; Kim, Seong Jin

    2015-01-01

    We present infrared galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) deep field using recently-obtained, wider CFHT optical/near-IR images. AKARI has obtained deep images in the mid-infrared (IR), covering 0.6 deg$^2$ of the NEP deep field. However, our previous work was limited to the central area of 0.25 deg$^2$ due to the lack of optical coverage of the full AKARI NEP survey. To rectify the situation, we recently obtained CFHT optical and near-IR images over the entire AKARI NEP deep field. These new CFHT images are used to derive accurate photometric redshifts, allowing us to fully exploit the whole AKARI NEP deep field. AKARI's deep, continuous filter coverage in the mid-IR wavelengths (2.4, 3.2, 4.1, 7, 9, 11, 15, 18, and 24$\\mu$m) exists nowhere else, due to filter gaps of other space telescopes. It allows us to estimate restframe 8$\\mu$m and 12$\\mu$m luminosities without using a large extrapolation based on spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting, which was the largest uncer...

  20. Results of Second Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and InfraRed Integrating Sphere radiometer (IRIS) are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are un-windowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The second outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from September 30 to October 11, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of the IRIS was within 1 W/m2 (3 IRISs: PMOD + Australia + Germany). From the first and second comparisons, a difference of 4-6 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). This presentation includes results from the first and second comparison in an effort to establish the world reference for pyrgeometer calibrations, a key deliverable for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and the DOE-ASR.

  1. Two Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift ~2 : Improved Classification and Redshift Determination with Medium-band Infrared Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodney, Steven A; Scolnic, Daniel M; Jones, David O; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Molino, Alberto; McCully, Curtis; Mobasher, Bahram; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Graur, Or; Hayden, Brian; Casertano, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We present two supernovae (SNe) discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), an HST multi-cycle treasury program. We classify both objects as Type Ia SNe and find redshifts of z = 1.80+-0.02 and 2.26 +0.02 -0.10, the latter of which is the highest redshift Type Ia SN yet seen. Using light curve fitting we determine luminosity distances and find that both objects are consistent with a standard Lambda-CDM cosmological model. These SNe were observed using the HST Wide Field Camera 3 infrared detector (WFC3-IR), with imaging in both wide- and medium-band filters. We demonstrate that the classification and redshift estimates are significantly improved by the inclusion of single-epoch medium-band observations. This medium-band imaging approximates a very low resolution spectrum (lambda/delta lambda ~ 100) which can isolate broad spectral absorption features that differentiate Type Ia SNe from their most common core collapse cousins...

  2. NEAR-INFRARED THERMAL EMISSION DETECTIONS OF A NUMBER OF HOT JUPITERS AND THE SYSTEMATICS OF GROUND-BASED NEAR-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert, Loic

    We present detections of the near-infrared thermal emission of three hot Jupiters and one brown dwarf using the Wide-field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). These include Ks-band secondary ...

  3. PIXE-quantified AXSIA : elemental mapping by multivariate spectral analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Antolak, Arlyn J. (Sandia National Labs, Livermore, CA); Campbell, J. L. (University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada); Ryan, C. G. (CSIRO Exploration and Mining Bayview Road, Clayton VIC, Australia); Provencio, Paula Polyak; Barrett, Keith E. (Primecore Systems, Albuquerque, NM,); Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2005-07-01

    Automated, nonbiased, multivariate statistical analysis techniques are useful for converting very large amounts of data into a smaller, more manageable number of chemical components (spectra and images) that are needed to describe the measurement. We report the first use of the multivariate spectral analysis program AXSIA (Automated eXpert Spectral Image Analysis) developed at Sandia National Laboratories to quantitatively analyze micro-PIXE data maps. AXSIA implements a multivariate curve resolution technique that reduces the spectral image data sets into a limited number of physically realizable and easily interpretable components (including both spectra and images). We show that the principal component spectra can be further analyzed using conventional PIXE programs to convert the weighting images into quantitative concentration maps. A common elemental data set has been analyzed using three different PIXE analysis codes and the results compared to the cases when each of these codes is used to separately analyze the associated AXSIA principal component spectral data. We find that these comparisons are in good quantitative agreement with each other.

  4. Noise Suppression and Spectral Decomposition for State-Dependent Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    Noise Suppression and Spectral Decomposition for State-Dependent Noise in the Presence been shown that the observed noise amplitude of an intrinsically noisy system may be reduced by causing noise reduction in terms of the low-frequency end of the spectrum as well as the integrated spectrum

  5. Spectral Analysis and Connectivity of Porous Microstructures in Bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    that quantifies brine connectivity and its thermal evolution can also help assess the impact of osteoporosis on trabecular structure. Central to our approach is the spectral measure of a composite material, which contains, in dense cortical bone the pores can be sparse and disconnected, yet exhibit increasing volume fraction

  6. Spectral estimation on a sphere in geophysics and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. A. Dahlen; Frederik J Simons

    2007-05-22

    We address the problem of estimating the spherical-harmonic power spectrum of a statistically isotropic scalar signal from noise-contaminated data on a region of the unit sphere. Three different methods of spectral estimation are considered: (i) the spherical analogue of the one-dimensional (1-D) periodogram, (ii) the maximum likelihood method, and (iii) a spherical analogue of the 1-D multitaper method. The periodogram exhibits strong spectral leakage, especially for small regions of area $A\\ll 4\\pi$, and is generally unsuitable for spherical spectral analysis applications, just as it is in 1-D. The maximum likelihood method is particularly useful in the case of nearly-whole-sphere coverage, $A\\approx 4\\pi$, and has been widely used in cosmology to estimate the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation from spacecraft observations. The spherical multitaper method affords easy control over the fundamental trade-off between spectral resolution and variance, and is easily implemented regardless of the region size, requiring neither non-linear iteration nor large-scale matrix inversion. As a result, the method is ideally suited for most applications in geophysics, geodesy or planetary science, where the objective is to obtain a spatially localized estimate of the spectrum of a signal from noisy data within a pre-selected and typically small region.

  7. Energy Spectral Property in an Isolated CME-driven Shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xin; Ding, Mingde; Wang, Na; Shan, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Observations from multiple spacecraft show that there are energy spectral "breaks" at 1-10MeV in some large CME-driven shocks. However, numerical models can hardly simulate this property due to high computational expense. The present paper focuses on analyzing these energy spectral "breaks" by Monte Carlo particle simulations of an isolated CME-driven shock. Taking the Dec 14 2006 CME-driven shock as an example, we investigate the formation of this energy spectral property. For this purpose, we apply different values for the scattering time in our isolated shock model to obtain the highest energy "tails", which can potentially exceed the "break" energy range. However, we have not found the highest energy "tails" beyond the "break" energy range, but instead find that the highest energy "tails" reach saturation near the range of energy at 5MeV. So, we believe that there exists an energy spectral "cut off" in an isolated shock. If there is no interaction with another shock, there would not be formation of the en...

  8. VALIDATION OF SPECTRAL UNMIXING METHODS USING PHOTOMETRY AND TOPOGRAPHY INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    VALIDATION OF SPECTRAL UNMIXING METHODS USING PHOTOMETRY AND TOPOGRAPHY INFORMATION Rubén Marrero1 topography and photometry of the scene. The validation of the different methods and deconvolution processes topography and most importantly photometry are precisely known. On the other hand better distribution maps

  9. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Liu, Xiaowen

    2014-12-18

    Background: Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. Results: In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showedmore »that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. Conclusions: L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.« less

  10. A spectral graph based approach to analyze hyperspectral data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Andrea L.

    A spectral graph based approach to analyze hyperspectral data Blake Hunter Department of Mathematics, UCLA 520 Portola Plaza Los Angeles, CA 90095 Email: blakehunter@math.ucla.edu Yifei Lou Department of Mathematics, UCLA 520 Portola Plaza Los Angeles, CA 90095 Email: bertozzi

  11. GIS and Spectral Soil Laboratory Key faculty member: Sabine Grunwald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    GIS and Spectral Soil Laboratory Key faculty member: Sabine Grunwald Contact: Soil and Water information systems (GIS), geostatistical and statistical methods, space-time landscape modeling, remote laboratory. Available software include: MS Office Suite; MS SQL database; ArcGIS Suite (ESRI) including

  12. Vector spectral functions and transport properties in quenched QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heng-Tong Ding; Olaf Kaczmarek; Florian Meyer

    2014-12-18

    We present new results on the reconstruction of mesonic spectral functions for three temperatures $1.1T_c$, $1.2T_c$ and $1.4T_c$ in quenched QCD. Making use of non-perturbatively improved clover Wilson valence quarks allows for a clean extrapolation of correlator data to the continuum limit. For the case of vanishing momentum the spectral function is obtained by fitting the data to a well motivated ansatz, using the full covariance matrix of the continuum extrapolated data in the fit. We found that vector correlation function is almost temperature independent in the current temperature window. The electrical conductivity of the hot medium, related to the origin of the vector spectral function at zero momentum, is computed from the resulting parameters at all three temperatures, leading to an estimate of $0.2C_{em}\\lesssim \\sigma/T\\lesssim0.4C_{em}$. The dilepton rates resulting from the obtained spectral functions show no significant temperature dependence.

  13. Spectral Discrimination between Quarry Blasts and Earthquakes in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shearer, Peter

    Short Note Spectral Discrimination between Quarry Blasts and Earthquakes in Southern California, with the goal of developing methods to discriminate between these events. We process the spectra using reliable explosion discriminant than the S-to-P am- plitude ratio and works for about 90% of the events

  14. Typesetting spectral sequences in LATEX with Tilman Bauer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Tilman

    The present package, sseq, facilitates the typesetting of mathematical objects called spectral sequence charts circles or boxes, digits etc.), possibly decorated with labels, and between any two such symbols may or may not be a connection--e. g., a line, an arrow, or some curved line. The sseq package is built

  15. Surface temperature and spectral measurements at Santiaguito lava dome, Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Surface temperature and spectral measurements at Santiaguito lava dome, Guatemala Steve T. M, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, USA Otoniel Matias INSIVUMEH, Guatemala City, Guatemala Received 4 June 2004; revised 23 July 2004; accepted 20 September 2004; published 13 October 2004

  16. SPECTRAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE AND ITS ENTROPIC EFFECT ON EARTH'S CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    comparison with a conventional approach by using a blackbody Sun's brightness temperature exhibits Experiment (SORCE) satellite are used to examine the magnitude and spectral distribution of the Earth radiation received at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is the same as that radiated at the Sun's surface

  17. SPECTRAL PROBLEMS FOR OPERATORS WITH CROSSED MAGNETIC AND ELECTRIC FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petkov, Vesselin

    SPECTRAL PROBLEMS FOR OPERATORS WITH CROSSED MAGNETIC AND ELECTRIC FIELDS MOUEZ DIMASSI Consider the two-dimensional Schr¨odinger operator with homogeneous magnetic and electric fields H = H and > 0 are proportional to the strength of the homogeneous magnetic and electric fields and V (x, y

  18. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Qiang [Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ. Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Wu, Si [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Xiaowen [Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Background: Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. Results: In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showed that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. Conclusions: L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.

  19. High Performance Computing with a Conservative Spectral Boltzmann Solver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Performance Computing with a Conservative Spectral Boltzmann Solver Jeffrey R. Haack and Irene the structure of the collisional formulation for high performance computing environments. The locality in space on high performance computing resources. We also use the improved computational power of this method

  20. University of Alberta A MULTI-SPECTRAL DECIMATION SCHEME FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Malcolm

    University of Alberta A MULTI-SPECTRAL DECIMATION SCHEME FOR TURBULENCE SIMULATIONS by Malcolm Ian and Statistical Sciences c Malcolm Ian William Roberts Fall, 2006 Edmonton, Alberta Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single #12;copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies