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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

The Infrared Sky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The infrared sky from space is the sum of a cosmic signal from galaxies, quasars, and perhaps more exotic sources; and foregrounds from the Milky Way and from the Solar System. At a distance of 1 AU from the Sun, the foreground from interplanetary dust is very bright between 5 and 100 microns, but ``very bright'' is still several million times fainter than the background produced by ground-based telescopes. In the near infrared 1-2.2 micron range the space infrared sky is a thousand times fainter than the OH nightglow from the Earth's atmosphere. As a result of these advantages, wide-field imaging from space in the infrared can be an incredibly sensitive method to study the Universe.

E. L. Wright

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

2

Infrared Sky Brightness Monitors for Antarctica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Two sky brightness monitorsone for the near-infrared and one for the mid-infraredhave been developed for site survey work in Antarctica. The instruments, which we refer to as the NISM (Near-Infrared Sky Monitor) and the MISM (Mid-Infrared Sky Monitor), are part of a suite of instruments being deployed in the Automated Astrophysical Site-Testing Observatory (AASTO). The chief design constraints include reliable, autonomous operation, low power consumption, and of course the ability to operate under conditions of extreme cold. The instruments are currently operational at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, prior to deployment at remote, unattended sites on the high antarctic plateau. 1. INTRODUCTION The antarctic plateau is recognized as having the potential to provide some of the best astronomical observing conditions on earth (see, e.g., Burton et al. 1994). Almost all the site testing to date has been carried out at the South Pole, where it has already been demonstrated t...

Storey Ashley Boccas; J. W. V. Storey; M. C. B. Ashley; M. Boccas; M. A. Phillips; A. E. T. Schinckel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Image Inferral of Sky Cover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Image Inferral of Sky Cover. C. N. Long, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1) Introduction In observing the cloudless sky, one can often notice that the area near the sun is whiter and brighter than the rest of the hemisphere. Additionally, even a slight haze will make a large angular area of the horizon whiter and brighter when the sun is low on the horizon. The human eye has an amazing ability to handle a range of light intensity spanning orders of magnitude. But one of the persistent problems in using sky images to infer fractional sky cover is the intensity range limitations of the camera detector. It is desirable to have bright enough images to be able to detect thin clouds, yet this often means the part of the image near the

4

Correcting Calibrated Infrared Sky Imagery for the Effect of an Infrared Window  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is demonstrated for deriving a correction for the effects of an infrared window when used to weatherproof a radiometrically calibrated thermal infrared imager. The technique relies on initial calibration of two identical imagers without ...

Paul W. Nugent; Joseph A. Shaw; Nathan J. Pust; Sabino Piazzolla

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deep Sky Astronomical Image Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Key Challenges: Develop, store, analyze, and make available an astronomical image database of unprecedented depth, temporal breadth, and sky coverage, consisting of images from the seven-year span of the Palomar-Quest and Near-Earth Astroid Tracking (NEAT) transient surveys and the current Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). The database currently has over 13 million images stored on the NERSC Global Filesystem but data from the PTF are accumulating at the rate of about 105TB per year. The challenge is not only archiving the data but processing it in near-real time to observe rare and fleeting cosmic events as they happen so that experimental astronomers can be alerted. Why it Matters: The PTF will probe gaps in the transient phase space and

6

Extraction of cloud statistics from whole sky imaging cameras  

SciTech Connect

Computer codes have been developed to extract basic cloud statistics from whole sky imaging (WSI) cameras. This report documents, on an algorithmic level, the steps and processes underlying these codes. Appendices comment on code details and on how to adapt to future changes in either the source camera or the host computer.

Kegelmeyer, W.P. Jr.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Retrieving Cloud Characteristics from Ground-Based Daytime Color All-Sky Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discussion is presented of daytime sky imaging and techniques that may be applied to the analysis of full-color sky images to infer cloud macrophysical properties. Descriptions of two different types of sky-imaging systems developed by the ...

C. N. Long; J. M. Sabburg; J. Calbó; D. Pagès

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Aerosol effects on red blue ratio of clear sky images, and impact on solar forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

urban, and desert dust aerosols ." JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICALand K. V. S. Badarinath. "Aerosol climatology: dependence ofUsing a Sky Imager for aerosol characterization."

Ghonima, Mohamed Sherif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Computation of Cloud-Base Height from Paired Whole-Sky Imaging Cameras  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed a novel approach to the extraction of cloud-base height (CBH) from pairs of whole-sky images. The core problem is to spatially register cloud fields from widely separated whole-sky imaging (WSI) cameras; this complete ...

Mark C. Allmen; W. Philip Kegelmeyer Jr.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The computation of cloud base height from paired whole-sky imaging cameras  

SciTech Connect

A major goal for global change studies is to improve the accuracy of general circulation models (GCMs) capable of predicting the timing and magnitude of greenhouse gas-induced global warming. Research has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climate responses to human activity. Of particular value to reducing the uncertainties associated with cloud-radiation interactions is the measurement of cloud base height (CBH), both because it is a dominant factor in determining the infrared radiative properties of clouds with respect to the earth`s surface and lower atmosphere and because CBHs are essential to measuring cloud cover fraction. We have developed a novel approach to the extraction of cloud base height from pairs of whole sky imaging (WSI) cameras. The core problem is to spatially register cloud fields from widely separated WSI cameras; this complete, triangulation provides the CBH measurements. The wide camera separation (necessary to cover the desired observation area) and the self-similarity of clouds defeats all standard matching algorithms when applied to static views of the sky. To address this, our approach is based on optical flow methods that exploit the fact that modern WSIs provide sequences of images. We will describe the algorithm and present its performance as evaluated both on real data validated by ceilometer measurements and on a variety of simulated cases.

Allmen, M.C.; Kegelmeyer, W.P. Jr.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Cloud classification using whole-sky imager data  

SciTech Connect

Clouds are one of the most important moderators of the earth radiation budget and one of the least understood. The effect that clouds have on the reflection and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation is strongly influenced by their shape, size, and composition. Physically accurate parameterization of clouds is necessary for any general circulation model (GCM) to yield meaningful results. The work presented here is part of a larger project that is aimed at producing realistic three-dimensional (3D) volume renderings of cloud scenes, thereby providing the important shape information for parameterizing GCMs. The specific goal of the current study is to develop an algorithm that automatically classifies (by cloud type) the clouds observed in the scene. This information will assist the volume rendering program in determining the shape of the cloud. Much work has been done on cloud classification using multispectral satellite images. Most of these references use some kind of texture measure to distinguish the different cloud types and some also use topological features (such as cloud/sky connectivity or total number of clouds). A wide variety of classification methods has been used, including neural networks, various types of clustering, and thresholding. The work presented here utilizes binary decision trees to distinguish the different cloud types based on cloud feature vectors.

Buch, K.A. Jr.; Sun, Chen-Hui

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Feature Extraction from Whole-Sky Ground-Based Images for Cloud-Type Recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several features that can be extracted from digital images of the sky and that can be useful for cloud-type classification of such images are presented. Some features are statistical measurements of image texture, some are based on the Fourier ...

Josep Calbó; Jeff Sabburg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Infrared Cloud Imager Deployment at the North Slope of Alaska During Early 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrared Cloud Imager Deployment Infrared Cloud Imager Deployment at the North Slope of Alaska During Early 2002 J. A. Shaw and B. Thurairajah Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University Bozeman, Montana E. Edqvist National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. Mizutani Communications Research Laboratory Koganei, Tokyo, Japan Introduction Starting in February 2002, we deployed a new cloud-radiation sensor called the infrared cloud imager (ICI) at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site near Barrow, Alaska (71.32 N, 156.62 W). ICI records radiometrically calibrated images of the thermal infrared sky radiance in the 8µm to 14 µm wavelength band, from which spatial cloud statistics and spatially resolved cloud radiance can be determined.

14

Coherent infrared imaging camera (CIRIC)  

SciTech Connect

New developments in 2-D, wide-bandwidth HgCdTe (MCT) and GaAs quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIP) coupled with Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) technology are now making focal plane array coherent infrared (IR) cameras viable. Unlike conventional IR cameras which provide only thermal data about a scene or target, a coherent camera based on optical heterodyne interferometry will also provide spectral and range information. Each pixel of the camera, consisting of a single photo-sensitive heterodyne mixer followed by an intermediate frequency amplifier and illuminated by a separate local oscillator beam, constitutes a complete optical heterodyne receiver. Applications of coherent IR cameras are numerous and include target surveillance, range detection, chemical plume evolution, monitoring stack plume emissions, and wind shear detection.

Hutchinson, D.P.; Simpson, M.L.; Bennett, C.A.; Richards, R.K.; Emery, M.S.; Crutcher, R.I.; Sitter, D.N. Jr.; Wachter, E.A.; Huston, M.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Cloud Coverage Based on All-Sky Imaging and Its Impact on Surface Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Lauder, Central Otago, New Zealand, two all-sky imaging systems have been in operation for more than 1 yr, measuring the total, opaque, and thin cloud fraction, as well as indicating whether the sun is obscured by clouds. The data provide a ...

G. Pfister; R. L. McKenzie; J. B. Liley; A. Thomas; B. W. Forgan; C. N. Long

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

FISICA: The Florida Image Slicer for Infrared Cosmology & Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the design, fabrication, and on-sky performance of the Florida Image Slicer for Infrared Cosmology and Astrophysics (FISICA)- a fully-cryogenic all-reflective image-slicing integral field unit for the FLAMINGOS near-infrared spectrograph. Designed to accept input beams near f/15, FISICA with FLAMINGOS provides R \\sim 1300 spectra over a 16x33-arcsec field-of-view on the Cassegrain f/15 focus of the KPNO 4-meter telescope, or a 6x12-arcsec field-of-view on the Nasmyth or Bent Cassegrain foci of the Gran Telescopio Canarias 10.4-meter telescope. FISICA accomplishes this using three sets of "monolithic" powered mirror arrays, each with 22 mirrored surfaces cut into a single piece of aluminum. We review the optical and opto-mechanical design and fabrication of FISICA, as well as laboratory test results for FISICA integrated with the FLAMINGOS instrument. Finally, we present performance results from observations with FISICA at the KPNO 4-m telescope and comparisons of FISICA performance to other available IFUs on 4-m to 8-m-class telescopes.

Stephen Eikenberry; S. Nicholas Raines; Nicolas Gruel; Richard Elston; Rafael Guzman; Jeff Julian; Glenn Boreman; Paul Glenn; Greg Hull-Allen; Jeff Hoffmann; Michael Rodgers; Kevin Thompson; Scott Flint; Lovell Comstock; Bruce Myrick

2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

17

Triggering of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes: PMT trigger rates due to night-sky photons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imaging air Cherenkov telescopes are usually triggered on a coincidence of two or sometimes more pixels, with discriminator thresholds in excess of 20 photoelectrons applied for each pixel. These thresholds required to suppress night-sky background are significantly higher than expected on the basis of a Poisson distribution in the number of night-sky photoelectrons generated during the characteristic signal integration time. We studied noise trigger rates under controlled conditions using an artificial background light source. Large tails in the PMT amplitude response to single photoelectrons are identified as a dominant contribution to noise triggers. The rate of such events is very sensitive to PMT operating parameters.

G. Hermann; C. Köhler; T. Kutter; W. Hofmann

1995-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

18

Four Faint T Dwarfs from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Southern Stripe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of four faint T dwarfs newly discovered from the UKIDSS first data release. The sample, drawn from an imaged area of ~136 square degrees to a depth of Y=19.9 (5-sigma, Vega), is located in the SDSS Southern Equatorial Stripe, a region of significant future deep imaging potential. We detail the selection and followup of these objects, three of which are spectroscopically confirmed brown dwarfs ranging from type T2.5 to T7.5, and one is photometrically identified as early T. Their magnitudes range from Y=19.01 to 19.88 with derived distances from 34 to 98 pc, making these among the coldest and faintest brown dwarfs known. The sample brings the total number of T dwarfs found or confirmed by UKIDSS data in this region to nine, and we discuss the projected numbers of dwarfs in the future survey data. We estimate that ~240 early- and late-T dwarfs are discoverable in the UKIDSS LAS data, falling significantly short of published model projections and suggesting that IMFs and/or birthrates may be at the low end of possible models. Thus, deeper optical data has good potential to exploit the UKIDSS survey depth more fully, but may still find the potential Y dwarf sample to be extremely rare.

Kuenley Chiu; Michael C. Liu; Linhua Jiang; Katelyn N. Allers; Daniel P. Stark; Andrew Bunker; Xiaohui Fan; Karl Glazebrook; Trent J. Dupuy

2007-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

19

Source Catalog Data from FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 2?7 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and CLEANed using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. Source catalogs with flux densities and size information are generated from the coadded images also. The July, 2008 catalog is the latest version and has been tested to ensure reliability and completness. The catalog, generated from the 1993 through 2004 images, contains 816,000 sources and covers more than 9000 square degrees. A specialized search interface for the catalog resides at this website, and the catalog is also available as a compressed ASCII file. The user may also view earlier versions of the source catalog. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

20

Measuring Total Column Water Vapor by Pointing an Infrared Thermometer at the Sky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2-yr study affirms that the temperature indicated by an inexpensive ($20–$60) IR thermometer pointed at the cloud-free zenith sky (Tz) is a proxy for total column water vapor [precipitable water (PW)]. From 8 September 2008 to 18 October 2010 Tz was ...

Forrest M. Mims III; Lin Hartung Chambers; David R. Brooks

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Infrared Images of Shock-Heated Tin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution, gated infrared images were taken of tin samples shock heated to just below the 505 K melting point. Sample surfaces were either polished or diamond-turned, with grain sizes ranging from about 0.05 to 10 mm. A high explosive in contact with a 2-mm-thick tin sample induced a peak sample stress of 18 GPa. Interferometer data from similarly-driven tin shots indicate that immediately after shock breakout the samples spall near the free (imaged) surface with a scab thickness of about 0.1 mm.

Craig W. McCluskey; Mark D. Wilke; William D. Turley; Gerald D. Stevens; Lynn R. Veeser; Michael Grover

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

Demos; Stavros (Livermore, CA), Staggs; Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

Demos, Stavros (Livermore, CA); Staggs, Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

24

The use of measured sky radiance data to improve infrared signature modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss the complications of modelling the infrared signature of objects, for example ships and land-vehicles. Specifically we focus on the difficulties of accounting correctly for the effect of the environment on the signature. We attribute ...

Marcus Wilson; Ross Elliott; Keith Youern

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Earth Occultation Imaging of the Low Energy Gamma-Ray Sky with GBM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Earth Occultation Technique (EOT) has been applied to Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) to perform all-sky monitoring for a predetermined catalog of hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray sources. Imaging with a Differential filter using the Earth Occultation Method (IDEOM) has been developed to search for sources not in the catalog, thus completing the catalog and reducing a source of systematic error in EOT. IDEOM is a tomographic imaging method that takes advantage of the orbital precession of the Fermi satellite. Using IDEOM, all-sky images have been generated for ~4 years of GBM data in the 12-50 keV, 50-100 keV and 100-300 keV energy bands in search of sources otherwise unmodeled by the GBM occultation analysis. Analysis resulted in the detection of 43 sources in the 12-50 keV energy band, 23 sources in the 50-100 keV energy band, and 7 sources in the 100-300 keV energy band. IDEOM analysis has resulted in the addition of 16 sources to the GBM-EOT catalog. We also present the first joined averaged spectra fo...

Rodi, J; Case, G L; Camero-Arranz, A; Chaplin, C; Finger, M H; Jenke, P; Wilson-Hodge, C A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The infrared imaging spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: on-instrument wavefront sensors and NFIRAOS interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) is a first light client science instrument for the TMT observatory that operates as a client of the NFIRAOS facility multi-conjugate adaptive optics system. This paper reports on the concept study and baseline concept design of the On-Instrument WaveFront Sensors (OIWFS) and NFIRAOS interface subsystems of the IRIS science instrument, a collaborative effort by NRC-HIA, Caltech, and TMT AO and Instrument teams. This includes work on system engineering, structural and thermal design, sky coverage modeling, patrol geometry, probe optics and mechanics design, camera design, and controls design.

Loop, David; Fletcher, Murray; Wooff, Robert; Dunn, Jennifer; Moore, Anna; Smith, Roger; Hale, David; Dekany, Richard; Wang, Lianqi; Ellerbroek, Brent; Simard, Luc; Crampton, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Cesiated Carbon Nanoflakes Field Emitter Array Infrared Imager  

Cesiated Carbon Nanoflakes Field Emitter Array Infrared Imager ... The field emission current of each cesiated carbon nanoflake structure is modulated by the

28

An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative" calibrations, from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve ~1% relative calibration errors across 8500 sq.deg. in griz; the errors are ~2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory. These calibrations, dubbed "ubercalibration", are now public with SDSS Data Release 6, and will be a part of subsequent SDSS data releases.

N. Padmanabhan; D. J. Schlegel; D. P. Finkbeiner; J. C. Barentine; M. R. Blanton; H. J. Brewington; J. E. Gunn; M. Harvanek; D. W. Hogg; Z. Ivezic; D. Johnston; S. M. Kent; S. J. Kleinman; G. R. Knapp; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; E. H. Neilsen; A. Nitta; C. Loomis; R. H. Lupton; S. Roweis; S. A. Snedden; M. A. Strauss; D. L. Tucker

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

29

An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative" calibrations, from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve ~1% relative calibration errors across 8500 sq.deg. in griz; the errors are ~2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory.

Padmanabhan, N; Finkbeiner, D P; Barentine, J C; Blanton, M R; Brewington, H J; Gunn, J E; Harvanek, M; Hogg, D W; Ivezic, Z; Johnston, D; Kent, S M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Neilsen, E H; Nitta, A; Loomis, C; Lupton, R H; Roweis, S; Snedden, S A; Strauss, M A; Tucker, D L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of ''relative'' calibrations from that of ''absolute'' calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve {approx}1% relative calibration errors across 8500 deg{sup 2} in griz; the errors are {approx}2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodeled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory.

Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Schlegel, D.J.; Finkbeiner, D.P.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, M.R.; Brewington, H.J.; Gunn, J.E.; Harvanek, M.; Hogg, D.W.; Ivezic, Z.; Johnston, D.; /LBL, Berkeley /Princeton U. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Texas U., Astron. Dept. /Apache Point Observ. /New York U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Caltech, JPL /Fermilab /Subaru Telescope /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Geothermal Exploration with Visible through Long Wave Infrared Imaging  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with Visible through Long Wave Infrared Imaging with Visible through Long Wave Infrared Imaging Spectrometers Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Exploration with Visible through Long Wave Infrared Imaging Spectrometers Abstract Surface minerals of active geothermal systems have been mapped using visible-short wave infrared and mid wave and long wave imaging spectrometers separately. May and June 2008, the Prospectir sensor and SEBASS (Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System) were located on together on a roll compensated mount viewing through the same camera port in a Twin Otter. These two imaging spectrometers have similar Instantaneous Fields of View (IFOV) and together collect over 600 channels of spectral information from the visible to the long wave infrared.

32

An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital SkySurvey Imaging Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate widefield optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for thecalibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlappingobservations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative"calibrations from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolutecalibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entiresurvey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of thecalibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes indownstream analyses. Applying this to the SloanDigital Sky Survey imagingdata, we achieve ~;1 percent relative calibration errors across 8500sq.deg/ in griz; the errors are ~;2 percent for the u band. These errorsare dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache PointObservatory. These calibrations, dubbed ubercalibration, are now publicwith SDSS Data Release 6, and will be a part of subsequent SDSS datareleases.

Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brewington, Howard J.; Gunn, JamesE.; Harvanek, Michael; Hogg, David W.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Johnston, David; Kent, Stephen M.; Kleinman, S.J.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen Jr., Eric H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Loomis, Craig; Lupton,Robert H.; Roweis, Sam; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Strauss, Michael A.; Tucker, Douglas L.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

OIL SPILL SENSOR USING MULTISPECTRAL INFRARED IMAGING VIA 1 MINIMIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL SPILL SENSOR USING MULTISPECTRAL INFRARED IMAGING VIA 1 MINIMIZATION Yingying Li , Wei Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University ABSTRACT Early detection of oil spill events is the key in detecting the early onset of a small-scale oil spill event. Based on an infrared oil-water contrast model

Yin, Wotao

34

The Earth’s Clear-Sky Radiation Budget and Water Vapor Absorption in the Far Infrared  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed observational data are used to simulate the sensitivity of clear-sky outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) to water vapor perturbations in order to investigate the effect of uncertainties in water vapor measurements and spectroscopic ...

Ashok Sinha; John E. Harries

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Almost a Century of “Imaging” Clouds Over the Whole-Sky Dome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological whole-sky photography can be traced back to just after the turn of the century. Capturing an objective and well-determined view of the cloud cover over the whole-sky dome has been one of the principal goals of subsequent ...

K. McGuffe; A. Henderson-Sellers

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Astronomical Images from FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, from the Very Large Array (VLA) First Survey  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 27 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and cleaned using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. These maps have 1.8" pixels, a typical rms of 0.15 mJy, and a resolution of 5". The best way to gain access to specific images is through the FIRST Cutout Server. It allows users to extract a specific image section from the coadded image database. All images taken through 2004 are available through the Cutout Server. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected. Both images and catalogs, searchable through specialized interfaces, are available at the FIRST website, and images are also available via anonymous ftp at ftp://archive.stsci.edu/pub/vla_first/data. Data were collected from 1993 through 2002.

Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

37

ARM - Evaluation Product - Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAirborne Visible/Infrared Imaging ProductsAirborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) 1997.08.01 - 1997.08.01 Site(s) SGP General Description AVIRIS is an optical sensor that delivers calibrated images of the upwelling spectral radiance in 224 contiguous spectral channels (bands) with wavelengths from 400 to 2500 nanometers. AVIRIS has been flown on two aircraft platforms: a NASA ER-2 jet and the Twin Otter turboprop. The main objective of the AVIRIS project is to identify, measure, and monitor constituents of the Earth's surface and atmosphere based on molecular absorption and particle scattering signatures. Research with

38

Aerosol effects on red blue ratio of clear sky images, and impact on solar forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bergin, M.H. From weather forecasting to exploring the solarWai, et al. "Intra-hour forecasting with a total sky imagerand Impact on Solar Forecasting A Thesis submitted in

Ghonima, Mohamed Sherif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Climatological Diurnal Cycles in Clear-Sky Brightness Temperatures from the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climatology of the diurnal cycles of HIRS clear-sky brightness temperatures was developed based on measurements over the period 2002–07. This was done by fitting a Fourier series to monthly gridded brightness temperatures of HIRS channels 1–12. ...

Anders V. Lindfors; Ian A. Mackenzie; Simon F. B. Tett; Lei Shi

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation is disclosed. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features. 1 fig.

Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Dolan, K.W.; Perkins, D.E.

1995-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Infrared Optical Imaging Techniques for Gas Visualization and Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advancement in infrared imaging technology has allowed the thermal imaging to detect and visualize several gases, mostly hydrocarbon gases. In addition, infrared cameras could potentially be used as a non-contact temperature measurement for gas and vapor. However, current application of infrared imaging techniques for gas measurements are still limited due to several uncertainties in their performance parameters. The aim of this research work was to determine the key factors in the application of infrared imaging technology for gas visualization and a non-contact temperature measurement. Furthermore, the concentration profile and emission rate of the gas are predicted by combining the application of the infrared imaging method with gas dispersion modeling. In this research, infrared cameras have been used to visualize liquefied natural gas (LNG) plumes from LNG spills on water. The analyses of the thermograms showed that the apparent temperatures were different from the thermocouple measurement which occurred due to the assumption of that the object emissivity was always equal to unity. The emissivity for pure methane gas and a mixture of methane and atmospheric gases were then evaluated in order to obtain the actual temperature distribution of the gas cloud. The results showed that by including the emissivity value of the gas, the temperature profile of the dispersed gas obtained from a thermal imaging measurement was in good agreement with the measurement using the thermocouples. Furthermore, the temperature distribution of the gas was compared to the concentration of a dispersed LNG vapor cloud to obtain a correlation between the temperature and the concentration of the cloud. Other application of infrared imaging technique was also conducted for leak detection of natural gas from a pipeline. The capability of an infrared camera to detect a fugitive gas leak was combined with the simulation of vapor discharge and dispersion in order to obtain a correlation between the emission rates and the sizes of the gas plume to the minimum detectable concentration. The relationship of the methane gas cloud size to the gas emission rate was highly dependent to the prevailing atmospheric condition. The results showed that the correlation were best to predict the emission rate less than 0.2 kg/s. At higher emission rate, the increase in gas release rate did not change the size of the cloud significantly.

Safitri, Anisa

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Temperature profile of the infrared image Heat exchange between  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T Temperature profile of the infrared image Heat exchange between atmosphere and ocean References part at high frequencies delivers the exchange time. Cool skin of the ocean the net heat flux between gas exchange and wind speed over the ocean, J. Geophys. Res. 97, 7373-7381, 1992, Nightingale, P

Jaehne, Bernd

43

Sloan digital sky survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey will produce a detailed digital photometric map of half the northern sky to about 23 magnitude using a special purpose wide field 2.5 meter telescope. From this map we will select {approximately} 10{sup 6} galaxies and 10{sup 5} quasars, and obtain high resolution spectra using the same telescope. The imaging catalog will contain 10{sup 8} galaxies, a similar number of stars, and 10{sup 6} quasar candidates.

Kent, S.M.; Stoughton, C.; Newberg, H.; Loveday, J.; Petravick, D.; Gurbani, V.; Berman, E.; Sergey, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Lupton, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

COBE Sky Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COBE sky map COBE sky map This map of the ancient sky shows the minute variations in the microwave background discovered by the team led by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory astrophysicist George Smoot. As seen in the map, vast regions of space have minute variations in temperature. Over billions of years, gravity magnified these small differences into the clusters of galaxies we observe today. Displayed horizontally across the middle of the map is the Milky Way galaxy. The image, a 360-degree map of the whole sky, shows the relic radiation from the Big Bang. The map was derived from one year of data taken by the Differential Microwave Radiometers onboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer satellite. Using Galactic coordinates, the map shows the plane of the Milky Way galaxy horizontally and the center of our galaxy at its

45

Validation of MODIS-Retrieved Cloud Fractions Using Whole Sky Imager Measurements at the Three ARM Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODIS-Retrieved Cloud Fractions Using MODIS-Retrieved Cloud Fractions Using Whole Sky Imager Measurements at the Three ARM Sites Z. Li, M. C. Cribb, and F.-L. Chang Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction Given the importance of clouds in modulating the surface energy budget, it is critical to obtain accurate estimates of their fractional amount in the atmospheric column for use in modeling studies. Satellite remote sensing of cloud properties such as cloud amount has the advantage of providing global coverage on a regular basis. Ground-based surveys of cloud fraction offer a practical database for use in determining the accuracy of these remotely sensed estimates of cloud fraction on a regional scale.

46

Chemical detection using the airborne thermal infrared imaging spectrometer (TIRIS)  

SciTech Connect

A methodology is described for an airborne, downlooking, longwave infrared imaging spectrometer based technique for the detection and tracking of plumes of toxic gases. Plumes can be observed in emission or absorption, depending on the thermal contrast between the vapor and the background terrain. While the sensor is currently undergoing laboratory calibration and characterization, a radiative exchange phenomenology model has been developed to predict sensor response and to facilitate the sensor design. An inverse problem model has also been developed to obtain plume parameters based on sensor measurements. These models, the sensors, and ongoing activities are described.

Gat, N.; Subramanian, S.; Sheffield, M.; Erives, H. [Opto-Knowledge Systems, Inc. (United States); Barhen, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A liquid crystal tunable filter based shortwave infrared spectral imaging system: Calibration and characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calibration is a critical step for developing spectral imaging systems. This paper presents a systematic calibration and characterization approach for a liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF) based shortwave infrared (SWIR) spectral imaging system. A series ... Keywords: Characterization, Inspection, LCTF, Shortwave infrared, Spectral imaging, System calibration

Weilin Wang; Changying Li; Ernest W. Tollner; Glen C. Rains; Ronald D. Gitaitis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Clear Skies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clear Skies A. A. lacis NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Institute for Space Studies New York, NY 10025 "convective adjustment"takes place. Energy is transported upward within the...

49

Dual-band ultraviolet-short-wavelength infrared imaging via luminescent downshifting with colloidal quantum dots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) cameras in the visible and ultraviolet (UV) regions is limited by the absorption of high-energy photons in inactive regions of the imaging array. Dual-band UV-SWIR imaging ...

Geyer, Scott M.

50

Ground-Based Temperature and Humidity Profiling Using Spectral Infrared and Microwave Observations. Part I: Simulated Retrieval Performance in Clear-Sky Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two independent ground-based passive remote sensing methods are used to retrieve lower-tropospheric temperature and humidity profiles in clear-sky cases. A simulation study for two distinctly different climatic zones is performed to evaluate the ...

Ulrich Löhnert; D. D. Turner; S. Crewell

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

FUSION OF VISIBLE AND INFRARED IMAGES USING EMPIRICAL MODE DECOMPOSITION TO IMPROVE FACE RECOGNITION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FUSION OF VISIBLE AND INFRARED IMAGES USING EMPIRICAL MODE DECOMPOSITION TO IMPROVE FACE of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN-37996 ABSTRACT In this effort, we propose a new image fusion technique, utilizing). In this method, we decompose images from different imaging modalities into their IMFs. Fusion is performed

Koschan, Andreas

52

A liquid crystal tunable filter based shortwave infrared spectral imaging system: Design and integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the methodology to design and integrate a liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF) based shortwave infrared (SWIR) spectral imaging system. The system consisted of an LCTF-based SWIR spectral imager, an illumination unit, a frame grabber, ... Keywords: Food quality and safety, Hyperspectral imaging, LCTF, Nondestructive inspection, SWIR, System design

Weilin Wang; Changying Li; Ernest W. Tollner; Glen C. Rains; Ronald D. Gitaitis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Detecting sources of heat loss in residential buildings from infrared imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrared image analysis was conducted to determine the most common sources of heat loss during the winter in residential buildings. 135 houses in the greater Boston and Cambridge area were photographed, stitched, and tallied ...

Shao, Emily Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Infrared birefringence imaging of residual stress and bulk defects in multicrystalline silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This manuscript concerns the application of infrared birefringence imaging (IBI) to quantify macroscopic and microscopic internal stresses in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cell materials. We review progress to ...

Ganapati, Vidya

55

Intergalactic stars in z~0.25 galaxy clusters: systematic properties from stacking of Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyse the spatial distribution and colour of the intracluster light (ICL) in 683 clusters of galaxies between z=0.2 and 0.3, selected from approx 1500 deg^2 of the SDSS-DR1. Surface photometry in the g, r and i bands is conducted on stacked images of the clusters, after rescaling them to the same metric size and masking out resolved sources. We are able to trace the average surface brightness profile of the ICL out to 700 kpc, where it is less than 1/10,000 of the mean surface brightness of the dark night sky. The ICL appears as a clear surface brightness excess with respect to an inner R^1/4 profile which characterises the mean profile of the BCG. The surface brightness (SB) of the ICL ranges from 27.5 mag/arcsec^2 at 100 kpc to roughly 32 at 700 kpc in the observed r-band (26.5 to 31 in the rest-frame g-band). We find that, on average, the ICL contributes only a small fraction of the total optical emission in a cluster (10.9+-5.0% within 500 kpc). The radial distribution of the ICL is more centrally concentrated than that of the cluster galaxies, but the colours of the two components are identical within the statistical uncertainties. In the mean the ICL is aligned with and more flattened than the BCG itself. This alignment is substantially stronger than that of the cluster light as a whole. The SB of the ICL correlates both with BCG luminosity and with cluster richness, while the fraction of the total light in the ICL is almost independent of these quantities. These results support the idea that the ICL is produced by stripping and disruption of galaxies as they pass through the central regions of clusters. Our measurements of the diffuse light also constrain the faint-end slope of the cluster LF. Slopes alphalight from undetected galaxies than is observed in the diffuse component.

Stefano Zibetti; Simon D. M. White; Donald P. Schneider; Jon Brinkmann

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

56

Estimating Tropical Cyclone Intensity from Infrared Image Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes results from a near-real-time objective technique for estimating the intensity of tropical cyclones from satellite infrared imagery in the North Atlantic Ocean basin. The technique quantifies the level of organization or ...

Miguel F. Piñeros; Elizabeth A. Ritchie; J. Scott Tyo

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A physically-based night sky model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a physically-based model of the night sky for realistic image synthesis. We model both the direct appearance of the night sky and the illumination coming from the Moon, the stars, the zodiacal light, and the atmosphere. To accurately ...

Henrik Wann Jensen; Frédo Durand; Julie Dorsey; Michael M. Stark; Peter Shirley; Simon Premože

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Ralph: A Visible/Infrared Imager for the New Horizons Pluto/Kuiper Belt Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Horizons instrument named Ralph is a visible/near infrared multi-spectral imager and a short wavelength infrared spectral imager. It is one of the core instruments on New Horizons, NASA's first mission to the Pluto/Charon system and the Kuiper Belt. Ralph combines panchromatic and color imaging capabilities with IR imaging spectroscopy. Its primary purpose is to map the surface geology and composition of these objects, but it will also be used for atmospheric studies and to map the surface temperature. It is a compact, low-mass (10.5 kg), power efficient (7.1 W peak), and robust instrument with good sensitivity and excellent imaging characteristics. Other than a door opened once in flight, it has no moving parts. These characteristics and its high degree of redundancy make Ralph ideally suited to this long-duration flyby reconnaissance mission.

Reuter, Dennis C; Scherrer, John; Jennings, Donald E; Baer, James; Hanley, John; Hardaway, Lisa; Lunsford, Allen; McMuldroch, Stuart; Moore, Jeffrey; Olkin, Cathy; Parizek, Robert; Reitsma, Harold; Sabatke, Derek; Spencer, John; Stone, John; Throop, Henry; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Weigle, Gerald E; Young, Leslie A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Ralph: A Visible/Infrared Imager for the New Horizons Pluto/Kuiper Belt Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Horizons instrument named Ralph is a visible/near infrared multi-spectral imager and a short wavelength infrared spectral imager. It is one of the core instruments on New Horizons, NASA's first mission to the Pluto/Charon system and the Kuiper Belt. Ralph combines panchromatic and color imaging capabilities with IR imaging spectroscopy. Its primary purpose is to map the surface geology and composition of these objects, but it will also be used for atmospheric studies and to map the surface temperature. It is a compact, low-mass (10.5 kg), power efficient (7.1 W peak), and robust instrument with good sensitivity and excellent imaging characteristics. Other than a door opened once in flight, it has no moving parts. These characteristics and its high degree of redundancy make Ralph ideally suited to this long-duration flyby reconnaissance mission.

Dennis C. Reuter; S. Alan Stern; John Scherrer; Donald E. Jennings; James Baer; John Hanley; Lisa Hardaway; Allen Lunsford; Stuart McMuldroch; Jeffrey Moore; Cathy Olkin; Robert Parizek; Harold Reitsma; Derek Sabatke; John Spencer; John Stone; Henry Throop; Jeffrey Van Cleve; Gerald E. Weigle; Leslie A. Young

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

60

Near Infrared Surface Plasmon Resonance Phase Imaging and Nanoparticle-Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Phase Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilized a near-infrared 860 nm light emitting diode (LED) light source and a wedge depolarizer to create

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Visualizing Chemical Compositions and Kinetics of Sol-Gel by Near-Infrared Multispectral Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Visualizing Chemical Compositions and Kinetics of Sol-Gel by Near-Infrared Multispectral Imaging in order to determine the presence of any chemical and kinetic inhomogeneity. Unfortunately, to date, NIR to determine the chemical and kinetic inho- mogeneity of sol-gel. Preliminary results on the kinetics of sol

Reid, Scott A.

62

Big Sky Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

(Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership, Big Sky [BSCSP; ,

63

Method and apparatus for coherent imaging of infrared energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coherent camera system performs ranging, spectroscopy, and thermal imaging. Local oscillator radiation is combined with target scene radiation to enable heterodyne detection by the coherent camera`s two-dimensional photodetector array. Versatility enables deployment of the system in either a passive mode (where no laser energy is actively transmitted toward the target scene) or an active mode (where a transmitting laser is used to actively illuminate the target scene). The two-dimensional photodetector array eliminates the need to mechanically scan the detector. Each element of the photodetector array produces an intermediate frequency signal that is amplified, filtered, and rectified by the coherent camera`s integrated circuitry. By spectroscopic examination of the frequency components of each pixel of the detector array, a high-resolution, three-dimensional or holographic image of the target scene is produced for applications such as air pollution studies, atmospheric disturbance monitoring, and military weapons targeting. 8 figs.

Hutchinson, D.P.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

64

An Infrared Imaging Study of the Bipolar Proto-Planetary Nebula IRAS 16594-4656  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution mid-infrared images have been obtained in N-band and Q-band for the proto-planetary nebula IRAS 16594-4656. A bright equatorial torus and a pair of bipolar lobes can clearly be seen in the infrared images. The torus appears thinner at the center than at the edges, suggesting that it is viewed nearly edge-on. The infrared lobes correspond to the brightest lobes of the reflection nebula seen in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical image, but with no sign of the point-symmetric structure seen in the visible image. The lobe structure shows a close correspondence with a molecular hydrogen map obtained with HST, suggesting that the dust emission in the lobes traces the distribution of the shocked gas. The shape of the bipolar lobes shows clearly that the fast outflow is still confined by the remnant circumstellar envelope of the progenitor asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star. However, the non-detection of the dust outside of the lobes suggests that the temperature of the dust in the AGB envelope is too low for it to be detected at 20 microns.

Kevin Volk; Bruce J. Hrivnak; Kate Y. L. Su; Sun Kwok

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

65

Retrieval of cloud properties using CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer. Part II: effective diameter and ice water path  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the version 3 Level 2 operational analysis of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) data collected in the framework of the CALIPSO mission to retrieve cirrus cloud effective diameter and ice water path in synergy with the ...

Anne Garnier; Jacques Pelon; Philippe Dubuisson; Ping Yang; Michaël Faivre; Olivier Chomette; Nicolas Pascal; Pat Lucker; Tim Murray

66

Potential for ultrafast dynamic chemical imaging with few-cycle infrared lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We studied the photoelectron spectra generated by an intense few-cycle infrared laser pulse. By focusing on the angular distributions of the back rescattered high energy photoelectrons, we show that accurate differential elastic scattering cross sections of the target ion by free electrons can be extracted. Since the incident direction and the energy of the free electrons can be easily changed by manipulating the laser's polarization, intensity, and wavelength, these extracted elastic scattering cross sections, in combination with more advanced inversion algorithms, may be used to reconstruct the effective single-scattering potential of the molecule, thus opening up the possibility of using few-cycle infrared lasers as powerful table-top tools for imaging chemical and biological transformations, with the desired unprecedented temporal and spatial resolutions.

Morishita, T; Chen, Z; Lin, C D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

High-sensitivity, and cost-effective system for infrared imaging of concealed objects in dynamic mode.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel, cost-efficient, and highly-sensitive IR imaging systems play an important role in homeland security functions. Technical limitations in the areas of sensitivity, contrast ratio, bandwidth and cost continue to constrain imaging capabilities. We have designed and prototyped a compact computer-piloted high sensitivity infrared imaging system. The device consists of infrared optics, cryostat, low-noise pre-amplifier, Analog-to-Digital hardware, feedback electronics, and unique image processing software. Important advantages of the developed system are: (i) Eight electronic channels are available for simultaneous registration of IR and visible images in multiple spectral ranges, (ii) Capability of real-time analysis such as comparing the 'sensed' image with 'reference' images from a database, (iii) High accuracy temperature measurement of multiple points on the image by referencing the radiation intensity from the object to a black body model, (iv) Image generation by real-time integration of images from multiple sensors operating from the visible to the terahertz range. The device was tested with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled, single-pixel HgCdTe detector for imaging in 8-12 microns range. The demonstrated examples of infrared imaging of concealed objects in static and dynamic modes include a hammer (metal head and wooden handle), plastic imitator of handguns hidden under clothes, powder in an envelope, and revealing complex wall structures under decorative plaster.

Gordiyenko, E.; Yefremenko, V.; Pearson, J.; Bader, S.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

68

Infrared Imaging of Temperature Distribution in a High Temperature X-Ray Diffraction Furnace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Temperature X-ray Diffraction (HTXRD) is a very powerful tool for studies of reaction kinetics, phase transformations, and lattice thermal expansion of advanced materials. Accurate temperature measurement is a critical part of the technique. Traditionally, thermocouples, thermistors, and optical pyrometers have been used for temperature control and measurement and temperature could only be measured at a single point. Infrared imaging was utilized in this study to characterize the thermal gradients resulting from various sample and furnace configurations in a commercial strip heater furnace. Furnace configurations include a metallic strip heater, with and without a secondary surround heater, or a surround heater alone. Sample configurations include low and high thermal conductivity powders and solids. The IR imaging results have been used to calibrate sample temperatures in the HTXRD furnace.

Payzant, E.A.; Wang, H.

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

69

Autonomous Observing and Control Systems for PAIRITEL, a 1.3m Infrared Imaging Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Peters Automated Infrared Imaging Telescope (PAIRITEL) is the first meter-class telescope operating as a fully robotic IR imaging system. Dedicated in October 2004, PAIRITEL began regular observations in mid-December 2004 as part of a 1.5 year commissioning period. The system was designed to respond without human intervention to new gamma-ray burst transients: this milestone was finally reached on November 9, 2005 but the telescope had a number of semi-automated sub-10 minute responses throughout early commissioning. When not operating in Target of Opportunity mode, PAIRITEL performs a number of queue scheduled transient monitoring campaigns. To achieve this level of automation, we have developed communicating tools to connect the various sub-systems: an intelligent queue scheduling database, run-time configurable observation sequence software, a data reduction pipeline, and a master state machine which monitors and controls all functions within and affecting the observatory.

J. S. Bloom; Dan L. Starr; Cullen H. Blake; M. F. Skrutskie; Emilio E. Falco

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Near infrared spectral imaging of explosives using a tunable laser source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diffuse reflectance near infrared hyperspectral imaging is an important analytical tool for a wide variety of industries, including agriculture consumer products, chemical and pharmaceutical development and production. Using this technique as a method for the standoff detection of explosive particles is presented and discussed. The detection of the particles is based on the diffuse reflectance of light from the particle in the near infrared wavelength range where CH, NH, OH vibrational overtones and combination bands are prominent. The imaging system is a NIR focal plane array camera with a tunable OPO/laser system as the illumination source. The OPO is programmed to scan over a wide spectral range in the NIR and the camera is synchronized to record the light reflected from the target for each wavelength. The spectral resolution of this system is significantly higher than that of hyperspectral systems that incorporate filters or dispersive elements. The data acquisition is very fast and the entire hyperspectral cube can be collected in seconds. A comparison of data collected with the OPO system to data obtained with a broadband light source with LCTF filters is presented.

Klunder, G L; Margalith, E; Nguyen, L K

2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

71

Seeing the sky through Hubble's eye: The COSMOS SkyWalker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large, high-resolution space-based imaging surveys produce a volume of data that is difficult to present to the public in a comprehensible way. While megapixel-sized images can still be printed out or downloaded via the World Wide Web, this is no longer feasible for images with 10^9 pixels (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys [ACS] images of the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs [GEMS] project) or even 10^10 pixels (for the ACS Cosmic Evolution Survey [COSMOS]). We present a Web-based utility called the COSMOS SkyWalker that allows viewing of the huge ACS image data set, even through slow Internet connections. Using standard HTML and JavaScript, the application successively loads only those portions of the image at a time that are currently being viewed on the screen. The user can move within the image by using the mouse or interacting with an overview image. Using an astrometrically registered image for the COSMOS SkyWalker allows the display of calibrated world coordinates for use in science. The SkyWalker "technique" can be applied to other data sets. This requires some customization, notably the slicing up of a data set into small (e.g., 256^2 pixel) subimages. An advantage of the SkyWalker is the use of standard Web browser components; thus, it requires no installation of any software and can therefore be viewed by anyone across many operating systems.

K. Jahnke; S. F. Sanchez; A. Koekemoer

2006-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

72

Uncooled thin film infrared imaging device with aerogel thermal isolation: Deposition and planarization techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have successfully integrated a thermally insulating silica aerogel thin film into a new uncooled monolithic thin film infrared (IR) imaging device. Compared to other technologies (bulk ceramic and microbridge), use of an aerogel layer provides superior thermal isolation of the pyroelectric imaging element from the relatively massive heat sinking integrated circuit. This results in significantly higher thermal and temporal resolutions. They have calculated noise equivalent temperature differences of 0.04--0.10 C from a variety of Pb{sub x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PZT) and Pb{sub x}La{sub 1{minus}x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PLZT) pyroelectric imaging elements in monolithic structures. In addition, use of aerogels results in an easier, less expensive fabrication process and a more robust device. Fabrication of these monolithic devices entails sol-gel deposition of the aerogel, sputter deposition of the electrodes, and solution chemistry deposition of the pyroelectric imaging elements. Uniform pyroelectric response is achieved across the device by use of appropriate planarization techniques. These deposition and planarization techniques are described. Characterization of the individual layers and monolithic structure using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Byer-Roundy techniques also is discussed.

Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A.; Brinker, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sriram, C.S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Bullington, J.A. [AMMPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fourier Transform Near Infrared Microspectroscopy, Infrared Chemical Imaging, High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Microspectroscopy Detection of Single Cancer Cells and Single Viral Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single Cancer Cells from Human tumors are being detected and imaged by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Fourier Transform Near Infrared (FT-NIR)Hyperspectral Imaging and Fluorescence Correlation Microspectroscopy. The first FT-NIR chemical, microscopic images of biological systems approaching one micron resolution are here reported. Chemical images obtained by FT-NIR and FT-IR Microspectroscopy are also presented for oil in soybean seeds and somatic embryos under physiological conditions. FT-NIR spectra of oil and proteins were obtained for volumes as small as two cubic microns. Related, HR-NMR analyses of oil contents in somatic embryos as well as 99% accurate calibrations are also presented here with nanoliter precision. Such high-resolution, 400 MHz H-1 NMR analyses allowed the selection of mutagenized embryos with higher oil content (e.g. >~20%) compared to the average levels in non-mutagenized control embryos. Moreover, developmental changes in single soybean seeds and/or somatic embryos may be monito...

Baianu,I C; Hofmann, N E; Korban, S S; Lozano, P; You, T

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Sky Train Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Train Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Train Corp. Place Palm Harbor, Florida Zip 34684 Sector Services Product Sky Train Corporation is a consultant company...

75

The Determination of Sky View-Factors in Urban Environments Using Video Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique is described whereby sky view-factors may be determined using a video camera equipped with a fish-eye lens. The video image is digitized and then analyzed to distinguish between “sky” and “non-sky” pixels. View-factors are calculated ...

D. G. Steyn; J. E. Hay; Ian D. Watson; Glenn T. Johnson

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Sky Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Energy Place Germany Product A German company which is involved with the development of a 10MW STEG plant in the Moura region of...

77

A Calibrated Measurement of the Near-IR Continuum Sky Brightness Using Magellan/FIRE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterize the near-IR sky background from 308 observations with the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) spectrograph at Magellan. A subset of 105 observations selected to minimize lunar and thermal effects gives ...

Sullivan, Peter William

78

Climate Model–Simulated Diurnal Cycles in HIRS Clear-Sky Brightness Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clear-sky brightness temperature measurements from the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) are simulated with two climate models via a radiative transfer code. The models are sampled along the HIRS orbit paths to derive diurnal ...

Ian A. MacKenzie; Simon F. B. Tett; Anders V. Lindfors

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Near Infrared Microspectroscopy, Fluorescence Microspectroscopy, Infrared Chemical Imaging and High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis of Soybean Seeds, Somatic Embryos and Single Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Novel methodologies are currently being developed and established for the chemical analysis of soybean seeds, embryos and single cells by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Fourier Transform Near Infrared (FT-NIR) Microspectroscopy, Fluorescence and High-Resolution NMR (HR-NMR). The first FT-NIR chemical images of biological systems approaching one micron resolution are presented here. Chemical images obtained by FT-NIR and FT-IR Microspectroscopy are presented for oil in soybean seeds and somatic embryos under physiological conditions. FT-NIR spectra of oil and proteins were obtained for volumes as small as two cubic microns. Related, HR-NMR analyses of oil contents in somatic embryos are also presented here with nanoliter precision. Such 400 MHz 1H NMR analyses allowed the selection of mutagenized embryos with higher oil content (e.g. ~20%) compared to non-mutagenized control embryos. Moreover, developmental changes in single soybean seeds and/or somatic embryos may be monitored by FT-NIR with a precision ...

Baianu, I C; Hofmann, N E; Korban, S S; Lozano, P; You, T; AOCS 94th Meeting, Kansas

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Imaging the Material Properties of Bone Specimens Using Reflection-Based Infrared Microspectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) is a widely used method for mapping the material properties of bone and other mineralized tissues, including mineralization, crystallinity, carbonate substitution, and collagen cross-linking. This technique is traditionally performed in a transmission-based geometry, which requires the preparation of plastic-embedded thin sections, limiting its functionality. Here, we theoretically and empirically demonstrate the development of reflection-based FTIRM as an alternative to the widely adopted transmission-based FTIRM, which reduces specimen preparation time and broadens the range of specimens that can be imaged. In this study, mature mouse femurs were plastic-embedded and longitudinal sections were cut at a thickness of 4 {micro}m for transmission-based FTIRM measurements. The remaining bone blocks were polished for specular reflectance-based FTIRM measurements on regions immediately adjacent to the transmission sections. Kramers-Kronig analysis of the reflectance data yielded the dielectric response from which the absorption coefficients were directly determined. The reflectance-derived absorbance was validated empirically using the transmission spectra from the thin sections. The spectral assignments for mineralization, carbonate substitution, and collagen cross-linking were indistinguishable in transmission and reflection geometries, while the stoichiometric/nonstoichiometric apatite crystallinity parameter shifted from 1032/1021 cm{sup -1} in transmission-based to 1035/1025 cm{sup -1} in reflection-based data. This theoretical demonstration and empirical validation of reflection-based FTIRM eliminates the need for thin sections of bone and more readily facilitates direct correlations with other methods such as nanoindentation and quantitative backscatter electron imaging (qBSE) from the same specimen. It provides a unique framework for correlating bone's material and mechanical properties.

Acerbo A. S.; Carr, G.L.; Judex, S.; Miller, L.M.

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Infrared birefringence imaging of residual stress and bulk defects in multicrystalline silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manuscript concerns the application of infrared birefringence imaging (IBI) to quantify macroscopic and microscopic internal stresses in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cell materials. We review progress to date, and advance four closely related topics. (1) We present a method to decouple macroscopic thermally-induced residual stresses and microscopic bulk defect related stresses. In contrast to previous reports, thermally-induced residual stresses in wafer-sized samples are generally found to be less than 5 MPa, while defect-related stresses can be several times larger. (2) We describe the unique IR birefringence signatures, including stress magnitudes and directions, of common microdefects in mc-Si solar cell materials including: {beta}-SiC and {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} microdefects, twin bands, nontwin grain boundaries, and dislocation bands. In certain defects, local stresses up to 40 MPa can be present. (3) We relate observed stresses to other topics of interest in solar cell manufacturing, including transition metal precipitation, wafer mechanical strength, and minority carrier lifetime. (4) We discuss the potential of IBI as a quality-control technique in industrial solar cell manufacturing.

Ganapati, Vidya; Schoenfelder, Stephan; Castellanos, Sergio; Oener, Sebastian; Koepge, Ringo; Sampson, Aaron; Marcus, Matthew A.; Lai, Barry; Morhenn, Humphrey; Hahn, Giso; Bagdahn, Joerg; Buonassisi1, Tonio

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

83

Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

EXPLORING THE VARIABLE SKY WITH LINEAR. I. PHOTOMETRIC RECALIBRATION WITH THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We describe photometric recalibration of data obtained by the asteroid survey LINEAR. Although LINEAR was designed for astrometric discovery of moving objects, the data set described here contains over 5 billion photometric measurements for about 25 million objects, mostly stars. We use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data from the overlapping {approx}10,000 deg{sup 2} of sky to recalibrate LINEAR photometry and achieve errors of 0.03 mag for sources not limited by photon statistics with errors of 0.2 mag at r {approx} 18. With its 200 observations per object on average, LINEAR data provide time domain information for the brightest four magnitudes of the SDSS survey. At the same time, LINEAR extends the deepest similar wide-area variability survey, the Northern Sky Variability Survey, by 3 mag. We briefly discuss the properties of about 7000 visually confirmed periodic variables, dominated by roughly equal fractions of RR Lyrae stars and eclipsing binary stars, and analyze their distribution in optical and infrared color-color diagrams. The LINEAR data set is publicly available from the SkyDOT Web site.

Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stuart, J. Scott [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lexington, MA 02420-9108 (United States); Ivezic, Zeljko; Morgan, Dylan P.; Becker, Andrew C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Wozniak, Przemyslaw [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT): High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy in the far-infrared  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results of a recently-completed pre-Formulation Phase study of SPIRIT, a candidate NASA Origins Probe mission. SPIRIT is a spatial and spectral interferometer with an operating wavelength range 25 - 400 microns. SPIRIT will provide sub-arcsecond resolution images and spectra with resolution R = 3000 in a 1 arcmin field of view to accomplish three primary scientific objectives: (1) Learn how planetary systems form from protostellar disks, and how they acquire their inhomogeneous composition; (2) characterize the family of extrasolar planetary systems by imaging the structure in debris disks to understand how and where planets of different types form; and (3) learn how high-redshift galaxies formed and merged to form the present-day population of galaxies. Observations with SPIRIT will be complementary to those of the James Webb Space Telescope and the ground-based Atacama Large Millimeter Array. All three observatories could be operational contemporaneously.

David Leisawitz; Charles Baker; Amy Barger; Dominic Benford; Andrew Blain; Rob Boyle; Richard Broderick; Jason Budinoff; John Carpenter; Richard Caverly; Phil Chen; Steve Cooley; Christine Cottingham; Julie Crooke; Dave DiPietro; Mike DiPirro; Michael Femiano; Art Ferrer; Jacqueline Fischer; Jonathan P. Gardner; Lou Hallock; Kenny Harris; Kate Hartman; Martin Harwit; Lynne Hillenbrand; Tupper Hyde; Drew Jones; Jim Kellogg; Alan Kogut; Marc Kuchner; Bill Lawson; Javier Lecha; Maria Lecha; Amy Mainzer; Jim Mannion; Anthony Martino; Paul Mason; John Mather; Gibran McDonald; Rick Mills; Lee Mundy; Stan Ollendorf; Joe Pellicciotti; Dave Quinn; Kirk Rhee; Stephen Rinehart; Tim Sauerwine; Robert Silverberg; Terry Smith; Gordon Stacey; H. Philip Stahl; Johannes Staguhn; Steve Tompkins; June Tveekrem; Sheila Wall; Mark Wilson

2007-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

86

Mid?Infrared Spectral Diagnostics of Luminous Infrared Galaxies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a statistical analysis of 248 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) which comprise the Great Observatories All?sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) observed with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on?board Spitzer in the rest?frame wavelength range between 5 and 38 ?m. The GOALS sample enables a direct measurement of the relative contributions of star?formation and active galactic nuclei (AGN) to the total infrared (IR) emission from a large

A. Petric; The GOALS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

An infrared image of a dog, with warmest areas appearing the brightest.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sunlight, a roaring fire, a radiator or a warm sidewalk is infrared radiation. Although our eyes cannot see in space. Infrared astronomy is the art of measuring incredibly small values of thermal energy astronomers face the same problem when they try to detect heat from space. At room temperature

88

Low-Temperature Calibration of Infrared Thermometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method was developed for calibrating infrared thermometers to properly measure target temperatures ranging from ?70 to 0°C. Once calibrated for this range, the thermometer can then be used to measure the flux of thermal radiation from the sky. ...

B. A. Kimball; S. T. Mitchell

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

High-speed four-color infrared digital imaging for study in-cylinder processes in a di diesel engine  

SciTech Connect

The study was to investigate in-cylinder events of a direct injection-type diesel engine by using a new high-speed infrared (IR) digital imaging systems for obtaining information that was difficult to achieve by the conventional devices. For this, a new high-speed-dual-spectra infrared digital imaging system was developed to simultaneously capture two geometrically identical (in respective spectral) sets of IR images having discrete digital information in a (64x64) matrix at rates as high as over 1,800 frames/sec each with exposure period as short as 20 usec. At the same time, a new advanced four-color IR imaging system was constructed. The first two sets of spectral data were the radiation from water vapor emission bands to compute the distributions of temperature and specie in the gaseous mixture and the remaining two sets of data were to find the instantaneous temperature distribution over the cylinder surface. More than eight reviewed publications have been produced to report many new findings including: Distributions of Water Vapor and Temperature in a Flame; End Gas Images Prior to Onset of Knock; Effect of MTBE on Diesel Combustion; Impact of Oxygen Enrichment on In-cylinder Reactions; Spectral IR Images of Spray Plume; Residual Gas Distribution; Preflame Reactions in Diesel Combustion; Preflame Reactions in the End Gas of an SI Engine; Postflame Oxidation; and Liquid Fuel Layers during Combustion in an SI Engine. In addition, some computational analysis of diesel combustion was performed using KIVA-II program in order to compare results from the prediction and the measurements made using the new IR imaging diagnostic tool.

Rhee, K.T.

1995-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

90

An Approach for Improving Cirrus Cloud-Top Pressure/Height Estimation by Merging High-Spatial-Resolution Infrared-Window Imager Data with High-Spectral-Resolution Sounder Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The next-generation Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) offers infrared (IR)-window measurements with a horizontal spatial resolution of at least 1 km, but it lacks IR spectral bands that are sensitive to absorption by carbon ...

Elisabeth Weisz; W. Paul Menzel; Nadia Smith; Richard Frey; Eva E. Borbas; Bryan A. Baum

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Seeing the sky through Hubble's eye: The COSMOS SkyWalker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large, high-resolution space-based imaging surveys produce a volume of data that is difficult to present to the public in a comprehensible way. While megapixel-sized images can still be printed out or downloaded via the World Wide Web, this is no longer feasible for images with 10^9 pixels (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys [ACS] images of the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs [GEMS] project) or even 10^10 pixels (for the ACS Cosmic Evolution Survey [COSMOS]). We present a Web-based utility called the COSMOS SkyWalker that allows viewing of the huge ACS image data set, even through slow Internet connections. Using standard HTML and JavaScript, the application successively loads only those portions of the image at a time that are currently being viewed on the screen. The user can move within the image by using the mouse or interacting with an overview image. Using an astrometrically registered image for the COSMOS SkyWalker allows the display of calibrated world coordinates f...

Jahnke, K; Koekemoer, A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

FAR-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF TYPE 1 QUASARS  

SciTech Connect

We use the Spitzer Space Telescope Enhanced Imaging Products and the Spitzer Archival Far-InfraRed Extragalactic Survey to study the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of spectroscopically confirmed type 1 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). By combining the Spitzer and SDSS data with the Two Micron All Sky Survey, we are able to construct a statistically robust rest-frame 0.1-100 {mu}m type 1 quasar template. We find that the quasar population is well-described by a single power-law SED at wavelengths less than 20 {mu}m, in good agreement with previous work. However, at longer wavelengths, we find a significant excess in infrared luminosity above an extrapolated power-law, along with significant object-to-object dispersion in the SED. The mean excess reaches a maximum of 0.8 dex at rest-frame wavelengths near 100 {mu}m.

Hanish, D. J.; Teplitz, H. I.; Capak, P.; Desai, V.; Armus, L.; Brinkworth, C.; Brooke, T.; Colbert, J.; Fadda, D.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Paladini, R. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 220-6, 1200 E California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Frayer, D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Huynh, M. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, M468, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Lacy, M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Murphy, E. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Scarlata, C. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Shenoy, S., E-mail: hanish@ipac.caltech.edu [Space Science Division, NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Earth Occultation Imaging Applied to BATSE -- Application to a Combined BATSE-GBM Survey of the Hard X-Ray Sky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined BATSE-GBM hard X-ray catalog is presented based on Earth Occultation Imaging applied to a reanalysis of BATSE data. An imaging approach has been developed for the reanalysis of Earth Occultation analysis of BATSE data. The standard occultation analysis depends on a predetermined catalog of potential sources, so that a real source not present in the catalog may induce systematic errors when source counts associated with an uncatalogued source are incorrectly attributed to catalog sources. The goal of the imaging analysis is to find a complete set of hard X-ray sources, including sources not in the original BATSE occultation catalog. Using the imaging technique, we have identified 15 known sources and 17 unidentified sources and added them to the BATSE occultation catalog. The resulting expanded BATSE catalog of sources observed during 1991-2000 is compared to the ongoing GBM survey.

Zhang, Yuan; Case, Gary; Ling, James; Wheaton, William

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Sky Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy, Inc is a company located in Greenville, South Carolina . References "Sky Energy, Inc" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSkyEnergyInc&oldid351167...

95

Satellite-based reconstruction of the tropical oceanic clear sky outgoing longwave radiation and comparison with climate models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The changes of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) in clear-sky conditions have been calculated using High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) observations from 1979 to 2004. After applying corrections for satellite orbital drift and ...

Guillaume Gastineau; Brian J. Soden; Darren L. Jackson; Chris W. O’Dell

96

Measurements of sky luminance, sky illuminance, and horizontal solar radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents initial findings of a sky measurement program currently in progress at the National Bureau of Standards. Measurements are reported on sky luminance and illuminance and how they relate to horizontal solar radiation and sun position. Correlations are presented relating horizontal illuminance to horizontal solar radiation, and zenith luminance to solar altitude. These empirical models are particularly suitable for use in daylighting energy studies since they are based on existing solar data currently available on standard weather tapes.

Treado, S.; Gillette, G.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

THE WIRED SURVEY. II. INFRARED EXCESSES IN THE SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG  

SciTech Connect

With the launch of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a new era of detecting planetary debris and brown dwarfs (BDs) around white dwarfs (WDs) has begun with the WISE InfraRed Excesses around Degenerates (WIRED) Survey. The WIRED Survey is sensitive to substellar objects and dusty debris around WDs out to distances exceeding 100 pc, well beyond the completeness level of local WDs. In this paper, we present a cross-correlation of the preliminary Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) WD catalog between the WISE, Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and SDSS DR7 photometric catalogs. From {approx}18,000 input targets, there are WISE detections comprising 344 'naked' WDs (detection of the WD photosphere only), 1020 candidate WD+M dwarf binaries, 42 candidate WD+BD systems, 52 candidate WD+dust disk systems, and 69 targets with indeterminate infrared excess. We classified all of the detected targets through spectral energy distribution model fitting of the merged optical, near-IR, and WISE photometry. Some of these detections could be the result of contaminating sources within the large ( Almost-Equal-To 6'') WISE point-spread function; we make a preliminary estimate for the rates of contamination for our WD+BD and WD+disk candidates and provide notes for each target of interest. Each candidate presented here should be confirmed with higher angular resolution infrared imaging or infrared spectroscopy. We also present an overview of the observational characteristics of the detected WDs in the WISE photometric bands, including the relative frequencies of candidate WD+M, WD+BD, and WD+disk systems.

Debes, John H.; Leisawitz, David T. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hoard, D. W. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wachter, Stefanie [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cohen, Martin [Monterey Institute for Research in Astronomy, Marina, CA 93933 (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Imaging Local Chemical Microstructure of Germinated Wheat with Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

The spatial resolution enabled by in situ Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy as predicted from our earlier report in Spectroscopy (1) is applied to localized chemical analysis in this vital biological process of seed germination. Germination includes several different biochemical and structural processes. Ultimately, the entire seed is consumed in sustaining the new life that results after sprouting and growth (2-4). Alpha amylase production is the standard evidence for detection of sprouted (germinated) wheat at harvest. Moist preharvest conditions can cause devastating losses and render the harvested wheat unfit for flour production. Dormancy of dry seeds following harvest retards sprouting under proper storage.

Koc,H.; Wetzel, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Sky Volt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volt Volt Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Volt Facility Sky Volt Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Sky Volt LLC (community owned) Energy Purchaser City of Greenfield - excess to Central Iowa Power Cooperative Location Greenfield IA Coordinates 41.29038343°, -94.48851585° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.29038343,"lon":-94.48851585,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

100

RECIPIENT:SkyFuel, Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SkyFuel, Inc. SkyFuel, Inc. u.s. DEPARTl.\IIEN T OF ENER qY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlvIINATION Page 1 of2 STATE: CO PROJECT TITL E: SkyFuel 8aseload Parabolic Trough Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement I.nstrument N mber NEPA Control Number CID Number Baseload DE-EEOO03584 GFO-OOO3584-002 G03584 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed achon, as NEP] Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4Sl.tA), I have made the followmg determmatlOn: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Descnptlon : 83.6 Small-scale Sltmg, construction, modification, operation, and de mmlSSlonlng of faCilities for smaliscale research research and and development projects; conventionallaboralory 0 rations (such as preparation of chemical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Polarization-dependent wavelength-selective structures for multispectral polarimetric infrared imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for compact, rugged, low-cost multispectral-polarimetric filtering technology exists in both the civilian and defense communities. Such technology can be used for object detection, object recognition, and image ...

Dunmeyer, David Richard, 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky August 26, 2008 - 3:20pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA announced today that the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) has revealed its first all-sky map in gamma rays. The onboard Large Area Telescope's (LAT) all-sky image-which shows the glowing gas of the Milky Way, blinking pulsars and a flaring galaxy billions of light-years away-was created using only 95 hours of "first light" observations, compared with past missions which took years to produce a similar image. Scientists expect the telescope will discover many new pulsars in our own galaxy, reveal powerful

103

NERSC's Deep Sky Project Provides a Portal into Data Universe - NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deep Sky Project Deep Sky Project Provides a Portal into Data Universe Deep Sky Project Provides a Portal into Data Universe March 30, 2009 STARLIGHT: This image of the Coma cluster was made by combining over 500 images collected between 2001 and 2007. Every night approximately 3,000 astronomical files flow to the National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center from automated sky scanning systems all over the world for archiving. After a decade of collecting, the center currently holds over 8 million images, making this one of the largest troves of ground-based celestial images available. Now, a multidisciplinary team of astronomers, computer scientists, and engineers from NERSC are collaborating to develop a user-friendly database system and interface to instantly serve up high-resolution cosmic reference

104

Sloan Digital Sky Survey III: Data Release Eight  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are:

  • Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)
  • SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration)
  • The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)
  • The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS)

[Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

SDSS Collaboration

105

OPTICAL DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OF THE ODIN UV/VISIBLE SPECTROGRAPH AND INFRARED IMAGER INSTRUMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by mercury and sodium street lights. Radiometric calibration is not provided internally. V. Details of IR excellent spectral imaging performance and stray-light rejection. This paper first briefly describes will provide important contributions to stratospheric ozone research. The scientific analysis

Saskatchewan, University of

106

THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR LENS SEARCH. II. STATISTICAL LENS SAMPLE FROM THETHIRD DATA RELEASE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the first results of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars using the spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Among 46,420 quasars from the SDSS Data Release 3 ({approx}4188 deg{sup 2}), we select a subsample of 22,683 quasars that are located at redshifts between 0.6 and 2.2 and are brighter than the Galactic extinction corrected i-band magnitude of 19.1. We identify 220 lens candidates from the quasar subsample, for which we conduct extensive and systematic follow-up observations in optical and near-infrared wavebands, in order to construct a complete lensed quasar sample at image separations between 1-inch and 20-inch and flux ratios of faint to bright lensed images larger than 10{sup -0.5}. We construct a statistical sample of 11 lensed quasars. Ten of these are galaxy-scale lenses with small image separations ({approx} 1-inch - 2-inch) and one is a large separation (15-inch) system which is produced by a massive cluster of galaxies, representing the first statistical sample of lensed quasars including both galaxy- and cluster-scale lenses. The Data Release 3 spectroscopic quasars contain an additional 11 lensed quasars outside the statistical sample.

Inada, N; Oguri, M; Becker, R H; Shin, M; Richards, G T; Hennawi, J F; White, R L; Pindor, B; Strauss, M A; Kochanek, C S; Johnston, D E; Gregg, M D; Kayo, I; Eisenstein, D; Hall, P B; Castander, F J; Clocchiatti, A; Chiu, K; Kawano, Y; Scranton, R; Frieman, J; Keeton, C R; Morokuma, T; Rix, H; Turner, E L; Burless, S; Brunner, R J; Sheldon, E S; Bahcall, N A; Fukugita, M

2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

107

Science satellites scour skies for Santa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

satellites scour skies for Santa Science satellites scour skies for Santa Beginning at 6 a.m. Monday, Dec. 24, scientists will use two advanced science satellites to mark the...

108

The Use of Euclidean Geometric Distance on RGB Color Space for the Classification of Sky and Cloud Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current work describes the use of multidimensional Euclidean geometric distance (EGD) and Bayesian methods to characterize and classify the sky and cloud patterns present in image pixels. From specific images and using visualization tools, it ...

Sylvio Luiz Mantelli Neto; Aldo von Wangenheim; Enio Bueno Pereira; Eros Comunello

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

`blue-sky' science Spending review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Cooling Towers Fiddlers Ferry #12;What are the benefits of `blue-sky' science? At a time where every penny

110

Probing the nuclear obscuration in radio-galaxies with near infrared imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first near-infrared (K'-band) homogeneous observations of a complete sub-sample of the 3CR radio catalogue comprising all High Excitation Galaxies (HEGs) at znuclear K'-band excess in all but two HEGs -- most likely directly associated to their nuclear emission -- and we measure the corresponding 2.12 $\\mu$m nuclear luminosities. Within the frame of the unification scheme for radio-loud active galactic nuclei, it appears that obscuration alone is not able to account for the different nuclear properties of the majority of the HEGs and Broad Line Radio Galaxies (BLRGs), and also scattering of the (optically) hidden nuclear light from a compact region must be invoked. More precisely, for ~70% of the HEGs the observed point-like optical emission is dominated by the scattered component, while in the K'-band both scattered and direct light passing through the torus contribute to the observed nuclear luminosity. The estimated fraction of scattered light ranges from a few tenths to a few percent, while the torus extinction is between 15

Danilo Marchesini; Alessandro Capetti; Annalisa Celotti

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

All Sky Cameras for the characterization of the Cherenkov Telescope Array candidate sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The All Sky Camera (ASC) was developed as a universal device for the monitoring of the night sky quality. Eight ASCs are already installed and measure night sky parameters at eight of the candidate sites of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) gamma-ray observatory. The ACS system consists of an astronomical CCD camera, a fish eye lens, a control computer and associated electronics. The measurement is carried out during astronomical night. The images are automatically taken every 5 minutes and automatically processed using the control computer of the device. The analysis results are the cloud fraction (the percentage of the sky covered by clouds) and night sky brightness (in mag/arcsec$^{2}$)

Mandát, Dušan; Ebr, Jan; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Bulik, Tomasz; Allekotte, Ingomar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Sky View Factors from High-Resolution Scanned Fish-eye Lens Photographic Negatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computerized method for calculating the sky view factor from fish-eye lens photographic negatives is presented. The images are scanned and stored on CD ROM, each CD holding 100 images. The images can be retrieved at very high resolutions of up ...

Kristina Blennow

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its First Data Release. This consists of 2099 square degrees of five-band (u, g, r, i, z) imaging data, 186,240 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 1360 square degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data go to a depth of r ~ 22.6 and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordinate, respectively. The spectra cover the range 3800--9200 A, with a resolution of 1800--2100. Further characteristics of the data are described, as are the data products themselves.

Abazajian, Kevork N; Agüeros, Marcel A; Allam, Sahar S; Anderson, Scott F; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A; Baldry, Ivan K; Bastian, Steven; Berlind, Andreas A; Bernardi, Mariangela; Blanton, Michael R; Blythe, Norman; Bochanski, John J; Boroski, William N; Brewington, Howard; Briggs, John W; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, Robert J; Budavari, Tamas; Carey, Larry N; Carr, Michael A; Castander, F J; Chiu, Kuenley; Collinge, Matthew J; Connolly, A J; Covey, Kevin R; Csabai, Istvan; Dodelson, Scott; Doi, Mamoru; Dong, Feng; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Evans, Michael L; Fan, Xiaohui; Feldman, Paul D; Finkbeiner, Douglas P; Friedman, Scott D; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Gal, Roy R; Gillespie, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Gonzalez, Carlos F; Gray, Jim; Grebel, Eva K; Grodnicki, Lauren; Gunn, James E; Gurbani, Vijay K; Hall, Patrick B; Hao, Lei; Harbeck, Daniel; Harris, Frederick H; Harris, Hugh C; Harvanek, Michael J; Hawley, Suzanne L; Heckman, Timothy M; Helmboldt, J F; Hendry, John S; Hennessy, Gregory S; Hindsley, Robert B; Hogg, David W; Holmgren, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A; Homer, Lee; Hui, Lam; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Inkmann, John P; Ivezic, Z; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E; Jordan, Beatrice; Jordan, Wendell P; Jorgensen, Anders M; Juric, Mario; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kent, Stephen M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Kniazev, Alexei Yu; Kron, Richard G; Krzesinski, Jurek; Kunszt, Peter Z; Kuropatkin, Nickolai; Lamb, Donald Q; Lampeitl, Hubert; Laubscher, Bryan E; Lee, Brian C; Leger, R French; Li No Lan; Lidz, Adam; Lin, Huan; Loh Yeong Shang; Long, Daniel C; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H; Malik, Tanu; Margon, Bruce; McGehee, Peregrine M; McKay, Timothy A; Meiksin, Avery; Miknaitis, Gajus A; Moorthy, Bhasker K; Munn, Jeffrey A; Murphy, Tara; Nakajima, Reiko; Narayanan, Vijay K; Nash, Thomas; Neilsen, Erich; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newman, Peter R; Nichol, Robert C; Nicinski, Tom; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Nitta, Atsuko; Odenkirchen, Michael; Okamura, Sadanori; Ostriker, Jeremiah P; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Peoples, John; Pier, Jeffrey R; Pindor, Bartosz; Pope, Adrian C; Quinn, Thomas R; Rafikov, R R; Raymond, Sean N; Richards, Gordon T; Richmond, Michael W; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M; Schaye, Joop; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, D P; Schroeder, Joshua; Scranton, Ryan; Sekiguchi, Maki; Seljak, Uros; Sergey, Gary; Sesar, Branimir; Sheldon, E S; Shimasaku, Kazu; Siegmund, Walter A; Silvestri, Nicole M; Sinisgalli, Allan J; Sirko, Edwin; Smith, Allyn J; Smolcic, Vernesa; Snedden, Stephanie A; Stebbins, Albert; Steinhardt, Charles; Stinson, Gregory M; Stoughton, Chris; Strateva, Iskra V; Strauss, Michael A; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S; Istvan Szapudi; Szkody, Paula; Tasca, Lidia; Tegmark, Max; Thakar, Aniruddha R; Tremonti, Christy A; Tucker, Douglas L; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Vandenberg, Jan; Vogeley, Michael S; Voges, Wolfgang; Vogt, Nicole P; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Weinberg, David H; West, Andrew A; White, Simon D M; Wilhite, Brian C; Willman, Beth; Xu Yong Hong; Yanny, Brian; Yarger, Jean; Yasuda, Naoki; Yip, Ching-Wa; Yocum, D R; York, Donald G; Zakamska, Nadia L; Zheng, Wei; Zibetti, Stefano; Zucker, Daniel B

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Sky in Google Earth: The Next Frontier in Astronomical Data Discovery and Visualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Astronomy began as a visual science, first through careful observations of the sky using either an eyepiece or the naked eye, then on to the preservation of those images with photographic media and finally the digital encoding of that information via CCDs. This last step has enabled astronomy to move into a fully automated era -- where data is recorded, analyzed and interpreted often without any direct visual inspection. Sky in Google Earth completes that circle by providing an intuitive visual interface to some of the largest astronomical imaging surveys covering the full sky. By streaming imagery, catalogs, time domain data, and ancillary information directly to a user, Sky can provide the general public as well as professional and amateur astronomers alike with a wealth of information for use in education and research. We provide here a brief introduction to Sky in Google Earth, focusing on its extensible environment, how it may be integrated into the research process and how it can bring astronomical research to a broader community. With an open interface available on Linux, Mac OS X and Windows, applications developed within Sky are accessible not just within the Google framework but through any visual browser that supports the Keyhole Markup Language. We present Sky as the embodiment of a virtual telescope.

Ryan Scranton; Andrew Connolly; Simon Krughoff; Jeremy Brewer; Alberto Conti; Carol Christian; Brian McLean; Craig Sosin; Greg Coombe; Paul Heckbert

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

115

PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM NEOWISE: AN ENHANCEMENT TO THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER FOR SOLAR SYSTEM SCIENCE  

SciTech Connect

The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has surveyed the entire sky at four infrared wavelengths with greatly improved sensitivity and spatial resolution compared to its predecessors, the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and the Cosmic Background Explorer. NASA's Planetary Science Division has funded an enhancement to the WISE data processing system called 'NEOWISE' that allows detection and archiving of moving objects found in the WISE data. NEOWISE has mined the WISE images for a wide array of small bodies in our solar system, including near-Earth objects (NEOs), Main Belt asteroids, comets, Trojans, and Centaurs. By the end of survey operations in 2011 February, NEOWISE identified over 157,000 asteroids, including more than 500 NEOs and {approx}120 comets. The NEOWISE data set will enable a panoply of new scientific investigations.

Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J.; Masiero, J.; Eisenhardt, P. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Grav, T. [Department of Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cutri, R. M.; Dailey, J.; Alles, R.; Beck, R.; Brandenburg, H.; Conrow, T.; Evans, T.; Fowler, J.; Jarrett, T. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); McMillan, R. S. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Kuiper Space Science Bldg. 92, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Wright, E. [UCLA Astronomy, P.O. Box 91547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Walker, R. [Monterey Institute for Research in Astronomy, Monterey, CA (United States); Jedicke, R.; Tholen, D. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Spahr, T., E-mail: amainzer@jpl.nasa.gov [Minor Planet Center, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2011-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

116

Imaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Imaging Print Imaging Print The wavelengths of soft x-ray photons (1-15 nm) are very well matched to the creation of "nanoscopes" capable of probing the interior structure of biological cells and inorganic mesoscopic systems.Topics addressed by soft x-ray imaging techniques include cell biology, nanomagnetism, environmental science, and polymers. The tunability of synchrotron radiation is absolutely essential for the creation of contrast mechanisms. Cell biology CAT scans are performed in the "water window" (300-500 eV). Nanomagnetism studies require the energy range characteristic of iron, cobalt, and nickel (600-900 eV). Mid- and far-infrared (energies below 1 eV) microprobes using synchrotron radiation are being used to address problems such as chemistry in biological tissues, chemical identification and molecular conformation, environmental biodegradation, mineral phases in geological and astronomical specimens, and electronic properties of novel materials. Infrared synchrotron radiation is focused through, or reflected from, a small spot on the specimen and then analyzed using a spectrometer. Tuning to characteristic vibrational frequencies serves as a sensitive fingerprint for molecular species. Images of the various species are built up by raster scanning the specimen through the small illuminated spot.

117

SkyBuilt Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name SkyBuilt Power Place Arlington, Virginia Zip 22207 Sector Hydro, Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product US-based renewable energy system...

118

Comparing Optical and Near Infrared Luminosity Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey [SDSS] has measured an optical luminosity function for galaxies in 5 bands, finding 1.5 to 2.1 times more luminosity density than previous work. This note compares the SDSS luminosity density to two recent determinations of the near infrared luminosity function based on 2MASS data, and finds that an extrapolation of the SDSS results gives a 2.3 times greater near infrared luminosity density.

Edward L. Wright

2001-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

119

Evaluating Cloud Contamination in Clear-Sky MODIS Terra Daytime Land Surface Temperatures Using Ground-Based Meteorology Station Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environment Canada meteorological station hourly sampled air temperatures Tair at four stations in the southwest Yukon were used to identify cloud contamination in the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra clear-sky daytime ...

Scott N. Williamson; David S. Hik; John A. Gamon; Jeffrey L. Kavanaugh; Saewan Koh

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Sky Vegetables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetables Vegetables Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Vegetables Address 45 Rosemary Street, Suite F Place Needham, MA Zip 02494 Sector Solar Website http://www.skyvegetables.com/i Coordinates 42.2882945°, -71.2335259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.2882945,"lon":-71.2335259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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121

Einstein and the Daytime Sky - D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D. Fun with polarizers D. Fun with polarizers In one respect, Einstein's mathematical analysis (like Rayleigh's earlier one) proves quite accurate, in a way that's easy to demonstrate. This has to do with how the sky's scattered light is polarized. Try looking at a patch of clear sky through one lens of a pair of polarizing sunglasses while you rotate the lens. You'll notice that the sky looks brighter as you look through the lens in some positions, and darker when the lens is in other positions. If the sun is not far from the patch of sky you're looking at, you'll find that the sky looks brightest when the sun is to the left or right of the lens, and darkest when the sun is "above the top" or "below the bottom" of the lens. Why is this? Any kind of wave-whether sound wave, water wave, light wave-is associated

122

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP ATLAS THE UNITED S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP ATLAS THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration...

123

SkyPower Pekon Electronics JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name SkyPower-Pekon Electronics JV Place India Sector Wind energy Product Joint venture for development of Indian wind farms. References SkyPower-Pekon Electronics...

124

Beijing Sky Solar Investment Management Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Solar Investment Management Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Beijing Sky Solar Investment & Management Co. Place Beijing, China Sector Solar Product Beijing based company...

125

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

126

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Comparison of Infrared Atmospheric Brightness Temperatures Measured by a Fourier Transform Spectrometer and a Filter Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased interest in using atmospheric brightness temperature measurements from simple infrared radiometers combined with radars and lidars has prompted the investigation of their accuracy for various sky conditions. In comparisons of ...

Joseph A. Shaw; Jack B. Snider; James H. Churnside; Mark D. Jacobson

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

SURVEYING THE DYNAMIC RADIO SKY WITH THE LONG WAVELENGTH DEMONSTRATOR ARRAY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a search for radio transients at a frequency of 73.8 MHz (4 m wavelength) using the all-sky imaging capabilities of the Long Wavelength Demonstrator Array (LWDA). The LWDA was a 16-dipole phased array telescope, located on the site of the Very Large Array in New Mexico. The field of view of the individual dipoles was essentially the entire sky, and the number of dipoles was sufficiently small that a simple software correlator could be used to make all-sky images. From 2006 October to 2007 February, we conducted an all-sky transient search program, acquiring a total of 106 hr of data; the time sampling varied, being 5 minutes at the start of the program and improving to 2 minutes by the end of the program. We were able to detect solar flares, and in a special-purpose mode, radio reflections from ionized meteor trails during the 2006 Leonid meteor shower. We detected no transients originating outside of the solar system above a flux density limit of 500 Jy, equivalent to a limit of no more than about 10{sup -2} events yr{sup -1} deg{sup -2}, having a pulse energy density {approx}>1.5 x 10{sup -20} J m{sup -2} Hz{sup -1} at 73.8 MHz for pulse widths of about 300 s. This event rate is comparable to that determined from previous all-sky transient searches, but at a lower frequency than most previous all-sky searches. We believe that the LWDA illustrates how an all-sky imaging mode could be a useful operational model for low-frequency instruments such as the Low Frequency Array, the Long Wavelength Array station, the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array, and potentially the Lunar Radio Array.

Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Lane, W. M.; Gross, C.; Kassim, N. E.; Hicks, B.; Polisensky, E.; Stewart, K. [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ray, P. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375-5382 (United States); Wood, D. [Praxis, Inc., 5845 Richmond Highway, Suite 700, Alexandria, VA 22303 (United States); York, J. A.; Kerkhoff, A. [Applied Research Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, P.O. Box 8029, Austin, TX 78713-8029 (United States); Dalal, N. Paravastu [American Society for Engineering Education, Washington, DC 20036 (United States); Cohen, A. S. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Erickson, W. C., E-mail: Joseph.Lazio@jpl.nasa.go [School of Mathematics and Science, University of Tasmania, Churchill Ave., Sandy Bay, Tasmania 7005 (Australia)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

THE TAIWAN ECDFS NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY: ULTRA-DEEP J AND K{sub S} IMAGING IN THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD-SOUTH  

SciTech Connect

We present ultra-deep J and K{sub S} imaging observations covering a 30' Multiplication-Sign 30' area of the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (ECDFS) carried out by our Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS). The median 5{sigma} limiting magnitudes for all detected objects in the ECDFS reach 24.5 and 23.9 mag (AB) for J and K{sub S} , respectively. In the inner 400 arcmin{sup 2} region where the sensitivity is more uniform, objects as faint as 25.6 and 25.0 mag are detected at 5{sigma}. Thus, this is by far the deepest J and K{sub S} data sets available for the ECDFS. To combine TENIS with the Spitzer IRAC data for obtaining better spectral energy distributions of high-redshift objects, we developed a novel deconvolution technique (IRACLEAN) to accurately estimate the IRAC fluxes. IRACLEAN can minimize the effect of blending in the IRAC images caused by the large point-spread functions and reduce the confusion noise. We applied IRACLEAN to the images from the Spitzer IRAC/MUSYC Public Legacy in the ECDFS survey (SIMPLE) and generated a J+K{sub S} -selected multi-wavelength catalog including the photometry of both the TENIS near-infrared and the SIMPLE IRAC data. We publicly release the data products derived from this work, including the J and K{sub S} images and the J+K{sub S} -selected multi-wavelength catalog.

Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Wang, Wei-Hao; Hsieh, Chih-Chiang; Lin, Lihwai; Lim, Jeremy; Ho, Paul T. P. [Institute of Astrophysics and Astronomy, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Yan Haojing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Big Sky Wind Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Wind Facility Sky Wind Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Big Sky Wind Facility Facility Big Sky Wind Facility Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Energy Developer Edison Mission Energy Energy Purchaser PJM Market Location Bureau County IL Coordinates 41.579967°, -89.46177° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.579967,"lon":-89.46177,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

132

Sky River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky River Wind Farm Sky River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky River Wind Farm Facility Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Zond Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

133

SkyFuel Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SkyFuel Inc SkyFuel Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: SkyFuel Inc Name SkyFuel Inc Address 18300 W Highway 72 Place Arvada, Colorado Zip 80007 Sector Solar Product Solar thermal power Website http://www.skyfuel.com/ Coordinates 39.862942°, -105.206509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.862942,"lon":-105.206509,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

134

North Sky River | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky River Sky River Jump to: navigation, search Name North Sky River Facility North Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.335578°, -118.186347° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.335578,"lon":-118.186347,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

135

Einstein and the Daytime Sky - C  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Einstein "Einstein and the Daytime Sky" (continued) A B C D C. Imitation of opal Since Einstein was addressing a more general question than the color of the atmosphere, his results...

136

Sky Power LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power LLC Place Portland, Oregon Zip 97204 Sector Wind energy Product Developer of a high-altitude wind turbine technology. References Sky Power LLC1 LinkedIn Connections...

137

SDSS J0806+2006 and SDSS J1353+1138: Two New Gravitationally Lensed Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discoveries of two, two-image gravitationally lensed quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: SDSS J0806+2006 at z_s=1.540 and SDSS J1353+1138 at z_s=1.629 with image separations of 1.40" and 1.41" respectively. Spectroscopic and optical/near-infrared imaging follow-up observations show that the quasar images have identical redshifts and possess extended objects between the images that are likely to be lens galaxies at z_l~0.6 in SDSS J0806+2006 and z_l~0.3 in SDSS J1353+1138. The field of SDSS J0806+2006 contains several nearby galaxies that may significantly perturb the system, and SDSS J1353+1138 has an extra component near its Einstein ring that is probably a foreground star. Simple mass models with reasonable parameters reproduce the quasar positions and fluxes of both systems.

Inada, N; Becker, R H; White, R L; Gregg, M D; Schechter, P L; Kawano, Y; Kochanek, C S; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Barentine, J C; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S J; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Neilsen, E H; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A; York, D G; Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Schechter, Paul L.; Kawano, Yozo; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brewington, Howard J.; Harvanek, Michael; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen, Eric H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Snedden, Stephanie A.; York, Donald G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

SDSS J0806+2006 and SDSS J1353+1138: Two New Gravitationally Lensed Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discoveries of two, two-image gravitationally lensed quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: SDSS J0806+2006 at z_s=1.540 and SDSS J1353+1138 at z_s=1.629 with image separations of 1.40" and 1.41" respectively. Spectroscopic and optical/near-infrared imaging follow-up observations show that the quasar images have identical redshifts and possess extended objects between the images that are likely to be lens galaxies at z_l~0.6 in SDSS J0806+2006 and z_l~0.3 in SDSS J1353+1138. The field of SDSS J0806+2006 contains several nearby galaxies that may significantly perturb the system, and SDSS J1353+1138 has an extra component near its Einstein ring that is probably a foreground star. Simple mass models with reasonable parameters reproduce the quasar positions and fluxes of both systems.

Naohisa Inada; Masamune Oguri; Robert H. Becker; Richard L. White; Michael D. Gregg; Paul L. Schechter; Yozo Kawano; Christopher S. Kochanek; Gordon T. Richards; Donald P. Schneider; J. C. Barentine; Howard J. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; Michael Harvanek; S. J. Kleinman; Jurek Krzesinski; Dan Long; Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Atsuko Nitta; Stephanie A. Snedden; Donald G. York

2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

139

Sdss j0806+2006 and sdss j1353+1138: two new gravitationally lensed quasars from the sloan digital sky survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the discoveries of two, two-image gravitationally lensed quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: SDSS J0806+2006 at z{sub s}=1.540 and SDSS J1353+1138 at z{sub s}=1.629 with image separations of 1.40'' and 1.41'' respectively. Spectroscopic and optical/near-infrared imaging follow-up observations show that the quasar images have identical redshifts and possess extended objects between the images that are likely to be lens galaxies at z{sub l} {approx} 0.6 in SDSS J0806+2006 and z{sub l} {approx} 0.3 in SDSS J1353+1138. The field of SDSS J0806+2006 contains several nearby galaxies that may significantly perturb the system, and SDSS J1353+1138 has an extra component near its Einstein ring that is probably a foreground star. Simple mass models with reasonable parameters reproduce the quasar positions and fluxes of both systems.

Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Schechter, Paul L.; Kawano, Yozo; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Barentine, J.C.; Brewington, Howard J.; Brinkmann, J.; Harvanek, Michael; Kleinman, S.J.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; Nitta, Atsuko; Snedden, Stephanie A.; York, Donald G.; /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron. /Princeton U. Observ. /Tokyo U. /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /MIT, MKI /Nagoya U. /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Johns Hopkins U. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Apache Point Observ. /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Chicago U., EFI

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Infrared Thermography Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrared Thermography Laboratory Infrared Thermography Laboratory The Infrared Thermography Laboratory (IRLab) conducts detailed laboratory experiments on the thermal performance of windows and other insulated systems. During a typical experiment, a specimen is placed between two environmental chambers that simulate a long, cold night during winter. Besides generating informative thermal images, the experiments collect several types of quantitative data with high spatial resolution that are useful for understanding subtle details in the thermal performance and for validating computer simulations of heat and fluid flows. Thermography experiments in the IRLab use an infrared imager to produce qualitative thermal images, or thermograms, that help provide a visual interpretation of how heat is flowing through the specimen. The infrared thermograms are also taken and postprocessed to extract numerical data to perform quantitative thermography that produces a database of the distribution of surface temperatures on the warm side of various specimen. A traversing system is also used to measure the distribution of air temperatures and velocities near the specimen. Research results are presented at various technical conferences -- see our schedule of upcoming conferences. Technical papers on infrared thermography are available for downloading. The IRLab contains a machine tool shop area that supports fabrication efforts in the Building Technologies Department. Other types of research, such as Non-Destructive Evaluation, are also conducted in the IRLab.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Google Sky, WorldWide Telescope & Celestia in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google Sky, WorldWide Telescope & Celestia in the Undergraduate Non-Science Major Classroom & Lab of Public Outreach Dept.Astronomy & Astrophysics University of Chicago Sky #12;Google Sky, World interactive labs and self-directed modules that utilize new, emerging, software tools, specifically Google Sky

Collar, Juan I.

142

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan Capalbo

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

AN OPTICAL-INFRARED STUDY OF THE YOUNG MULTIPOLAR PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 6644  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the compact planetary nebula NGC 6644 has revealed two pairs of bipolar lobes and a central ring lying close to the plane of the sky. From mid-infrared imaging obtained with the Gemini Telescope, we have found a dust torus which is oriented nearly perpendicular to one pair of the lobes. We suggest that NGC 6644 is a multipolar nebula and construct a three-dimensional model that allows the visualization of the object from different lines of sight. These results suggest that NGC 6644 may have similar intrinsic structures as other multipolar nebulae and the phenomenon of multipolar nebulosity may be more common than previously believed.

Hsia, Chih Hao; Kwok Sun; Zhang Yong [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Koning, Nico [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Volk, Kevin, E-mail: xiazh@hku.h, E-mail: sunkwok@hku.h, E-mail: zhangy96@hku.h, E-mail: nkoning@iras.ucalgary.c, E-mail: volk@stsci.ed [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

An Optical-Infrared Study of the Young Multipolar Planetary Nebula NGC 6644  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution HST imaging of the compact planetary nebula NGC 6644 has revealed two pairs of bipolar lobes and a central ring lying close to the plane of the sky. From mid-infrared imaging obtained with the Gemini Telescope, we have found a dust torus which is oriented nearly perpendicular to one pair of the lobes. We suggest that NGC 6644 is a multipolar nebula and have constructed a 3-D model which allows the visualization of the object from different lines of sight. These results suggest that NGC 6644 may have similar intrinsic structures as other multipolar nebulae and the phenomenon of multipolar nebulosity may be more common than previously believed.

Hsia, Chih Hao; Zhang, Yong; Koning, Nico; Volk, Kevin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Cloudy Sky Version of Bird's Broadband Hourly Clear Sky Model (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on Bird's Broadband Hourly Clear Sky Model given by NREL's Daryl Myers at SOLAR 2006. The objective of this report is to produce ''all sky'' modeled hourly solar radiation. This is based on observed cloud cover data using a SIMPLE model.

Myers, D.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Preliminary Design of The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a NASA MIDEX mission, will survey the entire sky in four bands from 3.3 to 23 microns with a sensitivity 1000 times greater than the IRAS survey. The WISE survey will extend the Two Micron All Sky Survey into the thermal infrared and will provide an important catalog for the James Webb Space Telescope. Using 1024x1024 HgCdTe and Si:As arrays at 3.3, 4.7, 12 and 23 microns, WISE will find the most luminous galaxies in the universe, the closest stars to the Sun, and it will detect most of the main belt asteroids larger than 3 km. The single WISE instrument consists of a 40 cm diamond-turned aluminum afocal telescope, a two-stage solid hydrogen cryostat, a scan mirror mechanism, and reimaging optics giving 5" resolution (full-width-half-maximum). The use of dichroics and beamsplitters allows four color images of a 47'x47' field of view to be taken every 8.8 seconds, synchronized with the orbital motion to provide total sky coverage with overlap between revolutions. WISE will be placed into a Sun-synchronous polar orbit on a Delta 7320-10 launch vehicle. The WISE survey approach is simple and efficient. The three-axis-stabilized spacecraft rotates at a constant rate while the scan mirror freezes the telescope line of sight during each exposure. WISE is currently in its Preliminary Design Phase, with the mission Preliminary Design Review scheduled for July, 2005. WISE is scheduled to launch in mid 2009; the project web site can be found at www.wise.ssl.berkeley.edu.

A. K. Mainzer; P. Eisenhardt; E. L. Wright; F. Liu; W. Irace; I. Heinrichsen; R. Cutri; V. Duval

2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

In-scene atmospheric correction of hyperspectral thermal infrared images with nadir, horizontal, and oblique view angles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric corrections for hyperspectral thermal images acquired with nadir, horizontal, and oblique views have typically relied on atmospheric modelling software, such as Moderate Resolution Atmospheric Transmission MODTRAN, to estimate atmospheric ...

MattR. Smith; AlanR. Gillespie; Hugau Mizzon; LeeK. Balick; Juan Carlos Jiménez-Muñoz; JoseA. Sobrino

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Dimensional reduction in the sky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the cosmological implications of a mechanism found in several approaches to quantum-gravity, whereby the spectral dimension of spacetime runs from the standard value of 4 in the infrared (IR) to a smaller value in the ultraviolet (UV). Specifically, we invoke the picture where the phenomenon is associated with modified dispersion relations. With minimal assumptions, we find that UV behaviour leading to 2 spectral dimensions results in an exactly scale-invariant spectrum of vacuum scalar and tensor fluctuations, regardless of the equation of state. The fluctuation production mechanism is analogous to the one known for varying speed of sound/light models and, unlike in inflation, the spectrum is already scale-invariant before leaving the horizon, remaining so after freeze-in. In the light of Planck's recent results we also discuss scenarios that break exact scale-invariance, such as the possibility that the spectral dimension runs down to a value slightly higher than 2, or runs down to 2 but with an extremely slow transient. We further show that the tensor to scalar ratio is fixed by the UV ratio between the speed of gravity and the speed of light. Not only does our model not require inflation, but at its most minimal it seems incompatible with it. In contrast, we find that running spectral dimensions can improve the outlook of the cyclic/ekpyrotic scenario, solving the main problems present in its simplest and most appealing realisations.

Giovanni Amelino-Camelia; Michele Arzano; Giulia Gubitosi; Joao Magueijo

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

150

SolarSkies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarSkies SolarSkies Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarSkies Address 106 Donovan Drive Place Alexandria, Minnesota Zip 56308 Country United States Sector Solar Coordinates 45.88897°, -95.3536576° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.88897,"lon":-95.3536576,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

151

Infrared Thermography Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists measuring sample at IR Thermography lab Scientists measuring sample at IR Thermography lab Infrared Thermography Laboratory In the Infrared Thermography Laboratory (IRLab), researchers test the thermal performance of windows and other insulated systems. Test specimens are placed between chambers that simulate different climate conditions, including household room temperature versus extreme winter cold with high exterior wind speed. Using an infrared imaging system, the IRLab produces calibrated quantitative thermal images, or surface temperature maps, of the specimens in heat transfer experiments. This high resolution non-contact surface temperature data help researchers understand details of thermal performance and validate computer simulations of heat and fluid flow, as well as provide a powerful visualization of detailed thermal features in

152

Data acquisition systems for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) will image {Pi} steradians about the north galactic cap in five filters, and acquire one million spectra using a dedicated 2.5 meter telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico. The authors describe the data acquisition system for the survey`s three main detectors: an imaging camera, mounting 54 Tektronix charge-coupled devices (CCD); a pair of spectrographs, each mounting a pair of CCDs; and a smaller monitor telescope camera. The authors describe the system`s hardware and software architecture, and relate it to the survey`s special requirements for high reliability and need to understand its instrumentation in order to produce a consistent survey over a five year period.

Petravick, D.; Berman, E.; MacKinnon, B.; Nicinski, T.; Pordes, R.; Sergey, G.; Rechenmacher, R.; Annis, J.; Kent, S.; McKay, T.; Stoughton, C.; Husby, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Soil Moisture Estimation Using GOES-VISSR Infrared Data: A Case Study with a Simple Statistical Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five days of clear sky observations over Kansas and Nebraska are used to examine the statistical relationship between soil moisture and infrared surface temperature observations taken from a geosynchronous satellite. The approach relies on ...

Peter J. Wetzel; Robert H. Woodward

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Infrared Thermometer Measurements of the Temperature of the Clouds from the Surface during the 7 March 1970 Total Eclipse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An infrared thermometer was used to observe the apparent radiation temperature of the overcast sky during a 15 h period including the total solar eclipse of 7 March 1970 at the Suwannee River State Park, Florida. An effective cloud temperature ...

L. F. Hall

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Image Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mosaic of earth and sky images Mosaic of earth and sky images Image Resources Free image resources covering energy, environment, and general science. Here are some links to energy- and environment-related photographic databases. Berkeley Lab Photo Archive Berkeley Lab's online digital image collection. National Science Digital Library (NSDL) NSDL is the Nation's online library for education and research in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The World Bank Group Photo Library A distinctive collection of over 11,000 images that illustrate development through topics such as Agriculture, Education, Environment, Health, Trade and more. Calisphere Compiles the digital collections of libraries, museums, and cultural heritage organizations across California, and organizes them by theme, such

156

Optical Sky Brightness at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory from 1992 to 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present optical UBVRI sky brightness measures from 1992 through 2006. The data are based on CCD imagery obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m, 1.3-m, and 1.5-m telescopes. The B- and V-band data are in reasonable agreement with measurements previously made at Mauna Kea, though on the basis of a small number of images per year there are discrepancies for the years 1992 through 1994. Our CCD-based data are not significantly different than values obtained at Cerro Paranal. We find that the yearly averages of V-band sky brightness are best correlated with the 10.7-cm solar flux taken 5 days prior to the sky brightness measures. This implies an average speed of 350 km/sec for the solar wind. While we can measure an enhancement of the night sky levels over La Serena 10 degrees above the horizon, at elevation angles above 45 degrees we find no evidence that the night sky brightness at Cerro Tololo is affected by artificial light of nearby towns and cities.

Krisciunas, Kevin; Sanhueza, Pedro; Schwarz, Hugo E; Semler, Dylan R; Suntzeff, Nicholas B; Vera, Sergio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A Satellite-Derived Climate-Quality Data Record of the Clear-Sky Surface Temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed a climate-quality data record of the clear-sky surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) ice-surface temperature (IST) algorithm. Daily and monthly ...

Dorothy K. Hall; Josefino C. Comiso; Nicolo E. DiGirolamo; Christopher A. Shuman; Jeffrey R. Key; Lora S. Koenig

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Identification of insect-damaged wheat kernels using short-wave near-infrared hyperspectral and digital colour imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthy wheat kernels and wheat kernels damaged by the feeding of the insects: rice weevil (Sitophilus oryzae), lesser grain borer (Rhyzopertha dominica), rusty grain beetle (Cryptolestes ferrugineus), and red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) were ... Keywords: Grain quality, Hyperspectral imaging, Machine vision, NIR

Chandra B. Singh; Digvir S. Jayas; Jitendra Paliwal; Noel D. G. White

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Desert Sky Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Sky Wind Farm Desert Sky Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Desert Sky Wind Farm Facility Desert Sky Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner American Electric Power Developer GE Energy Energy Purchaser City of San Antonio Texas (Utility Company) Location Pecos County TX Coordinates 30.926626°, -102.100067° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.926626,"lon":-102.100067,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

160

SkyFuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SkyFuel SkyFuel Jump to: navigation, search Logo: SkyFuel Name SkyFuel Address 18300 West Highway 72 Place Arvada, Colorado Zip 80007 Sector Solar Product Parabolic Trough Solar Collector Year founded 2007 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number 303.330.0276 Website http://www.skyfuel.com Coordinates 39.8630176°, -105.2064482° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8630176,"lon":-105.2064482,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

American Clean Skies Foundation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Skies Foundation Skies Foundation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: American Clean Skies Foundation Name American Clean Skies Foundation Address 750 1st Street NE, Suite 1100 Place Washington, DC Zip 20002 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year founded 2007 Phone number (202) 682-6294 Website http://www.cleanskies.org/ Coordinates 38.899704°, -77.007068° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.899704,"lon":-77.007068,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

162

Multiple protostellar systems. II. A high resolution near-infrared imaging survey in nearby star-forming regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) Our project endeavors to obtain a robust view of multiplicity among embedded Class I and Flat Spectrum protostars in a wide array of nearby molecular clouds to disentangle ``universal'' from cloud-dependent processes. We have used near-infrared adaptive optics observations at the VLT through the H, Ks and L' filters to search for tight companions to 45 Class I and Flat Spectrum protostars located in 4 different molecular clouds (Taurus-Auriga, Ophiuchus, Serpens and L1641 in Orion). We complemented these observations with published high-resolution surveys of 13 additional objects in Taurus and Ophiuchus. We found multiplicity rates of 32+/-6% and 47+/-8% over the 45-1400 AU and 14-1400 AU separation ranges, respectively. These rates are in excellent agreement with those previously found among T Tauri stars in Taurus and Ophiuchus, and represent an excess of a factor ~1.7 over the multiplicity rate of solar-type field stars. We found no non-hierarchical triple systems, nor any quadruple or higher-or...

Duchêne, G; Bouvier, J; André, P; Djupvik, A A; Ghez, A M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Multiple protostellar systems. II. A high resolution near-infrared imaging survey in nearby star-forming regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) Our project endeavors to obtain a robust view of multiplicity among embedded Class I and Flat Spectrum protostars in a wide array of nearby molecular clouds to disentangle ``universal'' from cloud-dependent processes. We have used near-infrared adaptive optics observations at the VLT through the H, Ks and L' filters to search for tight companions to 45 Class I and Flat Spectrum protostars located in 4 different molecular clouds (Taurus-Auriga, Ophiuchus, Serpens and L1641 in Orion). We complemented these observations with published high-resolution surveys of 13 additional objects in Taurus and Ophiuchus. We found multiplicity rates of 32+/-6% and 47+/-8% over the 45-1400 AU and 14-1400 AU separation ranges, respectively. These rates are in excellent agreement with those previously found among T Tauri stars in Taurus and Ophiuchus, and represent an excess of a factor ~1.7 over the multiplicity rate of solar-type field stars. We found no non-hierarchical triple systems, nor any quadruple or higher-order systems. No significant cloud-to-cloud difference has been found, except for the fact that all companions to low-mass Orion protostars are found within 100 AU of their primaries whereas companions found in other clouds span the whole range probed here. Based on this survey, we conclude that core fragmentation always yields a high initial multiplicity rate, even in giant molecular clouds such as the Orion cloud or in clustered stellar populations as in Serpens, in contrast with predictions of numerical simulations. The lower multiplicity rate observed in clustered Class II and Class III populations can be accounted for by a universal set of properties for young systems and subsequent ejections through close encounters with unrelated cluster members.

G. Duchêne; S. Bontemps; J. Bouvier; P. André; A. A. Djupvik; A. M. Ghez

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

164

Multi-channel infrared thermometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for measuring the two-dimensional temperature profile of a surface comprises imaging optics for generating an image of the light radiating from the surface; an infrared detector array having a plurality of detectors; and a light pipe array positioned between the imaging optics and the detector array for sampling, transmitting, and distributing the image over the detector surfaces. The light pipe array includes one light pipe for each detector in the detector array.

Ulrickson, Michael A. (East Windsor, NJ)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Treaty on Open Skies sensor technologies with potential international safeguards applications  

SciTech Connect

The Treaty on Open Skies is a precedent-setting agreement that allows signatory states to fly aircraft over each other`s territory with sensor systems. The purpose of the Treaty is to improve confidence and security with respect to military activities of the signatories. This paper reviews the sensor technology that is currently allowed by the Treaty on Open Skies and potential future sensor technology. The Treaty on Open Skies does have provisions to allow for the improvement of the technology of the current sensor systems and for the proposal of new sensors after a period of time. This can occur only after the Treaty has been ratified and has entered into force. If this regime was to be used for other than Treaty on Open Skies applications some modifications to the allowed sensor technology should be examined. This paper presents some ideas on potential improvements to existing allowed sensor technology as well as some suggested new advanced sensor systems that would be useful for future potential monitoring of safeguard`s related activities. This paper addresses advanced imaging sensors and non-imaging sensors for potential use in aerial remote sensing roles that involve international data sharing.

Sandoval, M.B.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Comparisons of Clear-Sky Outgoing Far-IR Flux Inferred from Satellite Observations and Computed from the Three Most Recent Reanalysis Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The far-IR spectrum plays an important role in the earth’s radiation budget and remote sensing. The authors compare the near-global (80°S–80°N) outgoing clear-sky far-IR flux inferred from the collocated Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and ...

Xiuhong Chen; Xianglei Huang; Norman G. Loeb; Heli Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Cosmological Simulations for Large-Scale Sky Surveys | Argonne Leadership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Christos Altantzis, MIT, and Martin Schmitt, LAV. All the images were generated from their work at LAV. Cosmological Simulations for Large-Scale Sky Surveys PI Name: Christos Frouzakis PI Email: frouzakis@lav.mavt.ethz.ch Institution: Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 100 Million Year: 2014 Research Domain: Chemistry The combustion of coal and petroleum-based fuels supply most of the energy needed to meet the world's transportation and power generation demands. To address the anticipated petroleum shortage, along with increasing energy

168

Blue Sky Bio Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bio Fuels Bio Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Bio-Fuels Place Oakland, California Zip 94602 Product Blue Sky owns and operates a biodiesel plant in Idaho with a capacity of 37.9mLpa (10m gallons annually). Coordinates 37.805065°, -122.273024° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.805065,"lon":-122.273024,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

169

NETL: News Release - Eyes in the Sky...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 28, 2003 August 28, 2003 Eyes in the Sky... Remote Sensing Technology Maps Flow of Groundwater from the Air Photo: Remote Sensor Suspended Beneath a Helicopter Detects Groundwater Beneath the Surface DOE is using remote sensors suspended from helicopters to map the flow of groundwater that may be affected by energy projects. In four states this past spring and summer, eyes have turned skyward as helicopters zig-zagged over hills and valleys, towing torpedo- or spiderweb-like contraptions that conjured up thoughts of Superman - "Look! Up in the sky!" But the "x-ray vision" in this case isn't comic-book fantasy. Instead, using aerial remote sensing techniques, researchers working with the U.S. Department of Energy are "seeing" through solid ground to create

170

New Sky Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Sky Energy New Sky Energy Place Boulder, Colorado Sector Carbon Product Colorado-based startup that focuses on using chemical technology to convert carbon dioxide to usable outputs. Coordinates 42.74962°, -109.714163° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.74962,"lon":-109.714163,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

171

Einstein and the Daytime Sky - A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The distinction between a fluid's liquid and gaseous phases breaks down at a certain temperature and pressure; when illuminated under these conditions, the fluid looks milky white, like a common opal. Einstein found how this relates to the reason the sky is blue. A B C D A. A path with a detour If you look at many artists' renderings of Albert Einstein, you are likely to find some that depict Einstein with some representation of the universe as a whole, or black holes, or other objects in deep space. Because many such pictures exist, we may, somewhat unconsciously, associate Einstein with the dark nighttime sky. This is a quite reasonable association, since Einstein's theories of space and time deal with the universe as a whole and with certain astrophysical

172

Blue Sky Optimum Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Optimum Energy Optimum Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Optimum Energy Place Buffalo, New York Product Blue Sky offers a processing system to produce biodiesel at a cheaper price. Coordinates 42.88544°, -78.878464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.88544,"lon":-78.878464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

173

THE SEVENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), marking the completion of the original goals of the SDSS and the end of the phase known as SDSS-II. It includes 11,663 deg{sup 2} of imaging data, with most of the {approx}2000 deg{sup 2} increment over the previous data release lying in regions of low Galactic latitude. The catalog contains five-band photometry for 357 million distinct objects. The survey also includes repeat photometry on a 120 deg. long, 2.{sup 0}5 wide stripe along the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap, with some regions covered by as many as 90 individual imaging runs. We include a co-addition of the best of these data, going roughly 2 mag fainter than the main survey over 250 deg{sup 2}. The survey has completed spectroscopy over 9380 deg{sup 2}; the spectroscopy is now complete over a large contiguous area of the Northern Galactic Cap, closing the gap that was present in previous data releases. There are over 1.6 million spectra in total, including 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data release includes improved stellar photometry at low Galactic latitude. The astrometry has all been recalibrated with the second version of the USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog, reducing the rms statistical errors at the bright end to 45 milliarcseconds per coordinate. We further quantify a systematic error in bright galaxy photometry due to poor sky determination; this problem is less severe than previously reported for the majority of galaxies. Finally, we describe a series of improvements to the spectroscopic reductions, including better flat fielding and improved wavelength calibration at the blue end, better processing of objects with extremely strong narrow emission lines, and an improved determination of stellar metallicities.

Abazajian, Kevork N. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Adelman-McCarthy, Jennifer K.; Allam, Sahar S.; Annis, James; Berman, Eileen F. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Agueeros, Marcel A. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury SL Mary, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); An, Deokkeun [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Anderson, Kurt S. J. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Becker, Andrew C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bahcall, Neta A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bell, Eric F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Barentine, J. C. [McDonald Observatory and Dept. of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Bassett, Bruce A. [South African Astronomical Observatory, Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa); Beers, Timothy C. [Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics, CSCE: Center for the Study of Cosmic Evolution, and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Belokurov, Vasily [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Berlind, Andreas A. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bernardi, Mariangela [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)] (and others)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Conergy SkyPower JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SkyPower JV SkyPower JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Conergy & SkyPower JV Place Canada Sector Solar Product Canada-based solar project developer. References Conergy & SkyPower JV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Conergy & SkyPower JV is a company located in Canada . References ↑ "Conergy & SkyPower JV" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Conergy_SkyPower_JV&oldid=343842" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

175

Cogenra Solar formerly SkyWatch Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogenra Solar formerly SkyWatch Energy Cogenra Solar formerly SkyWatch Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy) Place Mountain View, California Zip 94043 Sector Solar Product California-based and founded by a former Applied Materials executive, Cogenra Solar is a stealth mode solar company. References Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy) is a company located in Mountain View, California . References ↑ "Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cogenra_Solar_formerly_SkyWatch_Energy&oldid=343766"

176

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalog: ninth data release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the Data Release 9 Quasar (DR9Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the survey, are spectrocopically confirmed as quasars via visual inspection, have luminosities Mi[z=2]2.15$ (61,931) is ~2.8 times larger than the number of z>2.15 quasars previously known. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 7,533 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object the catalog presents five-band (u,g,r,i,z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys.

Pâris, Isabelle; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Arnau, Eduard; Bautista, Julian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N; Brewington, Howard; Brownstein, Joel R; Busca, Nicolas; Capellupo, Daniel; Carithers, William; Croft, Rupert A C; Dawson, Kyle; Delubac, Timothée; Ebelke, Garrett; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Engelke, Philip; Fan, Xiaohui; Ak, Nur Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Gibson, Robert R; Hall, Patrick B; Hamann, Fred; Hennawi, Joseph F; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jiang, Linhua; Kimball, Amy E; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A; Lee, Khee-Gan; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lundgren, Britt; MacLeod, Chelsea L; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Muna, Demitri; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Perez-Fournon, Ismaël; Pieri, Matthew M; Richards, Gordon T; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Sheldon, Erin S; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Slosar, Anze; Shelden, Alaina; Shen, Yue; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Suzuki, Nao; Tinker, Jeremy; Viel, Matteo; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yèche, Christophe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile.

Karr, T.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile. 9 figs.

Karr, T.J.

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

179

Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile.

Karr, Thomas J. (Alamo, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Software standards, methods and quality control for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Collaboration involves upwards of 50 scientists, many of whom are involved in the development and use of the software needed to acquire, process and archive the image and spectroscopic data sets. Fermilab has major responsibilities in the development and maintenance of the project`s software and for its software engineering practices. The authors report on the standards and methodologies they have developed in support of these activities.

Pordes, R.; Berman, E.; Petravick, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States). Computing Div.] [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope  

SciTech Connect

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

Grenier, Isabelle (University Paris Diderot and CEA Saclay, France)

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Comparing MODIS and AIRS Infrared-Based Cloud Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons are described for infrared-derived cloud products retrieved from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) using measured spatial response functions obtained from prelaunch ...

Shaima L. Nasiri; H. Van T. Dang; Brian H. Kahn; Eric J. Fetzer; Evan M. Manning; Mathias M. Schreier; Richard A. Frey

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SkyVision  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SkyVision SkyVision SkyVision logo. Calculates the overall optical characteristics (transmittance, absorptance, reflectance and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient) of conventional and tubular skylights, performance indicators of skylight/room interfaces (well efficiency and coefficient of utilization), indoor daylight availability (daylight factor and illuminance) and daily/annual lighting energy savings. SkyVision accounts for the skylight shape and glazing, geometry of the indoor space (curb, well, room), skylight layouts, lighting and shading controls, site location and sky/ground conditions. SkyVision is unique--it uses the state-of-art glazing models and ray-tracing-based methods to compute the optical characteristics of skylights and indoor daylight availability. Screen Shots

184

Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

Marriner, John; /Fermilab

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

185

In Vivo Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Monitoring of Tumor Response to Combretastatin A-4-Phosphate Correlated With Therapeutic Outcome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a combination treatment consisting of combretastatin A-4-phosphate (CA4P) with radiation based on tumor oxygenation status. Methods and Materials: In vivo near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were applied to noninvasively monitor changes in tumor blood oxygenation and necrosis induced by CA4P (30 mg/kg) in rat mammary 13762NF adenocarcinoma, and the evidence was used to optimize combinations of CA4P and radiation treatment (a single dose of 5 Gy). Results: NIRS showed decreasing concentrations of tumor vascular oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin during the first 2 h after CA4P treatment, indicating significant reductions in tumor blood oxygenation and perfusion levels (p < 0.001). Twenty-four hours later, in response to oxygen inhalation, significant recovery was observed in tumor vascular and tissue oxygenation according to NIRS and pimonidazole staining results, respectively (p < 0.05). DW MRI revealed significantly increased water diffusion in tumors measured by apparent diffusion coefficient at 24 h (p < 0.05), suggesting that CA4P-induced central necrosis. In concordance with the observed tumor oxygen dynamics, we found that treatment efficacy depended on the timing of the combined therapy. The most significant delay in tumor growth was seen in the group of tumors treated with radiation while the rats breathed oxygen 24 h after CA4P administration. Conclusions: Noninvasive evaluation of tumor oxygen dynamics allowed us to rationally enhance the response of syngeneic rat breast tumors to combined treatment of CA4P with radiation.

Zhao Dawen, E-mail: Dawen.Zhao@UTSouthwestern.ed [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Chang Chenghui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Kim, Jae G.; Liu Hanli [Joint Program in Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas Arlington and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Arlington, Texas (United States); Mason, Ralph P. [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Joint Program in Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas Arlington and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Arlington, Texas (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Imaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

range characteristic of iron, cobalt, and nickel (600-900 eV). Mid- and far-infrared (energies below 1 eV) microprobes using synchrotron radiation are being used to address...

187

Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Kevin Dome...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Services Vecta Oil & Gas, Ltd. Washington State University Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Kevin Dome Development Phase Project Background The U.S....

188

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SkyVision  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and dailyannual lighting energy savings. SkyVision accounts for the skylight shape and glazing, geometry of the indoor space (curb, well, room), skylight layouts,...

189

NETL: Carbon Storage - Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BSCSP BSCSP Carbon Storage Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing BSCSP efforts can be found on their website. The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) is led by Montana State University-Bozeman and represents a coalition of more than 60 organizations including universities, national laboratories, private companies, state agencies, Native American tribes, and international collaborators. The partners are engaged in several aspects of BSCSP projects and contribute to the efforts to deploy carbon storage projects in the BSCSP region. The BSCSP region encompasses Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, South Dakota, and eastern Washington and Oregon. BSCSP Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region

190

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA,...

191

Clear Skies Group Inc Holdings Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Solar Product Designs and installs photovoltaic, solar thermal and co-generation power generation systems for domestic use. References Clear Skies Group Inc Holdings...

192

SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Full sky imaging polarimetry for initial polarized modtran validation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Although military studies of the last ten years have shown that visible polarimetry supplies supplemental surveillance information, the polarimetric signatures of ground-based objects greatly depend… (more)

Pust, Nathaniel Joel.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Session Papers The Whole Sky Imager -A Year of Progress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5°). The light is filtered by spectral and neutral density filters, and transferred via a tapered fiber optic bundle (with approximately 106 optical fibers) to the CCD. The tapered fiber optic bundle provides a different type of gasketing on the optical dome. The system has otherwise performed quite well. Several

Buckingham, Michael

195

Definition: Forward-Looking Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forward-Looking Infrared Forward-Looking Infrared Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Forward-Looking Infrared Forward Looking InfraRed (FLIR) cameras flown from fixed-wing aircraft measure the amount of energy radiated in the infrared (7.5 - 13 micrometer) to detect detailed information on the land surface temperature distribution that might indicate areas of geothermal activity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Forward looking infrared (FLIR) cameras, typically used on military and civilian aircraft, use an imaging technology that senses infrared radiation. The sensors installed in forward-looking infrared cameras-as well as those of other thermal imaging cameras-use detection of infrared radiation, typically emitted from a heat source, to create a "picture"

196

Infrared retina  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

Krishna, Sanjay (Albuquerque, NM); Hayat, Majeed M. (Albuquerque, NM); Tyo, J. Scott (Tucson, AZ); Jang, Woo-Yong (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

197

Real-time rendering of daylight sky scene for virtual environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Realistic rendering of sky scene is important in virtual environment. Traditional methods are mostly based on skybox, thus failing to realistically simulate the change of sky scene under different weathers and conditions. In this paper, a new sky light ...

Changbo Wang

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

a prospective for new mid-infrared medical endoscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that chalcogenide glass fiberoptics could underpin new mid-infrared medical endoscopic systems for real-time molecular sensing, imaging and ...

199

INFORMATION ON THE MILKY WAY FROM THE 2MASS ALL SKY STAR COUNT: BIMODAL COLOR DISTRIBUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The J - K{sub s} color distributions (CDs) with a bin size of 0.05 mag has been carried out for the entire Milky Way using the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS PSC). The CDs are bimodal, with a red peak at 0.8 < J - K{sub s} < 0.85 and a blue peak at 0.3 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4. The colors of the red peak are more or less the same for the whole sky, but those of the blue peak depend on Galactic latitude (J - K{sub s} {approx} 0.35 at low Galactic latitudes and 0.35 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4 for other sky areas). The blue peak dominates the bimodal CDs at low Galactic latitudes and becomes comparable with the red peak in other sky regions. In order to explain the bimodal distribution and the global trend shown by the all-sky 2MASS CDs, we assemble an empirical Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, which is composed of observational-based near-infrared H-R diagrams and color-magnitude diagrams, and incorporate a Milky Way model. In the empirical H-R diagram, the main-sequence turn-off for stars in the thin disk is relatively bluer, (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.31, compared with that of the thick disk which is (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.39. The age of the thin/thick disk is roughly estimated to be around 4-5/8-9 Gyr according to the color-age relation of the main-sequence turn-off. In general, the 2MASS CDs can be treated as a tool to measure the age of the stellar population of the Milky Way in a statistical manner and to our knowledge it is the first attempt to do so.

Chang, Chan-Kao; Lai, Shao-Yu; Peng, Ting-Hung [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China); Ko, Chung-Ming, E-mail: rex@astro.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: cmko@astro.ncu.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics and Center of Complex Systems, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

Pink Skies coming to Northern New Mexico October 15-16  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pink Skies Coming To Northern New Mexico Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues submit Pink Skies coming to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-step process which involves data from three different telescopes: the 1.0-m telescope at the US Naval Observatory (USNO), Flagstaff Station, Arizona (which was used to establish the SDSS standard star network); the SDSS 0.5-m Photometric Telescope (PT) at the Apache Point Observatory (APO), New Mexico (which calculates nightly extinctions and calibrates secondary patch transfer fields); and the SDSS 2.5-m telescope at APO (which obtains the imaging data for the SDSS proper). In this paper, we describe the Monitor Telescope Pipeline, MTPIPE, the software pipeline used in processing the data from the single-CCD telescopes used in the photometric calibration of the SDSS (i.e., the USNO 1.0-m and the PT). We also describe transformation equations that convert photometry on the USNO-1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system to photometry the SDSS 2.5m ugriz system and the results of various validation tests of the MTPIPE software. Further, we discuss the semi-automated PT factory, which runs MTPIPE in the day-to-day standard SDSS operations at Fermilab. Finally, we discuss the use of MTPIPE in current SDSS-related projects, including the Southern u'g'r'i'z' Standard Star project, the u'g'r'i'z' Open Star Clusters project, and the SDSS extension (SDSS-II).

D. L. Tucker; S. Kent; M. W. Richmond; J. Annis; J. A. Smith; S. S. Allam; C. T. Rodgers; J. L. Stute; J. K. Adelman-McCarthy; J. Brinkmann; M. Doi; D. Finkbeiner; M. Fukugita; J. Goldston; B. Greenway; J. E. Gunn; J. S. Hendry; D. W. Hogg; S. -I. Ichikawa; Z. Ivezic; G. R. Knapp; H. Lampeitl; B. C. Lee; H. Lin; T. A. McKay; A. Merrelli; J. A. Munn; E. H. Neilsen, Jr.; H. J. Newberg; G. T. Richards; D. J. Schlegel; C. Stoughton; A. Uomoto; B. Yanny

2006-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

202

Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.  

SciTech Connect

Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Uncooled infrared photon detector and multicolor infrared detection using microoptomechanical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods for infrared detection are described. An optomechanical photon detector includes a semiconductor material and is based on measurement of a photoinduced lattice strain. A multicolor infrared sensor includes a stack of frequency specific optomechanical detectors. The stack can include one, or more, of the optomechanical photon detectors that function based on the measurement of photoinduced lattice strain. The systems and methods provide advantages in that rapid, sensitive multicolor infrared imaging can be performed without the need for a cooling subsystem.

Datskos, Panagiotis G. (Knoxville, TN); Rajic, Solobodan (Knoxville, TN); Datskou, Irene C. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Multi-wavelength study of 14000 star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) We studied a large sample of ~14000 dwarf star-forming galaxies with strong emission lines selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and distributed in the redshift range of z~0-0.6. We modelled spectral energy distributions (SED) of all galaxies which were based on the SDSS spectra in the visible range of 0.38-0.92 micron and included both the stellar and ionised gas emission. These SEDs were extrapolated to the UV and mid-infrared ranges to cover the wavelength range of 0.1-22 micron. The SDSS spectroscopic data were supplemented by photometric data from the GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, IRAS, and NVSS all-sky surveys. We derived global characteristics of the galaxies, such as their element abundances, luminosities, and stellar masses. The luminosities and stellar masses range within the sample over ~5 orders of magnitude, thereby linking low-mass and low-luminosity blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies to luminous galaxies, which are similar to high-redshift Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). The lumi...

Izotov, Y I; Fricke, K J; Henkel, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Tentative Detection of the Cosmic Infrared Background at 2.2 and 3.5 microns Using Ground Based and Space Based Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cosmic InfraRed Background (CIRB) is the sum total of the redshifted and reprocessed short wavelength radiation from the era of galaxy formation, and hence contains vital information about the history of galactic evolution. One of the main problems associated with estimating an isotropic CIRB in the near infrared (1-5 microns) is the unknown contribution from stars within our own galaxy. The optimal observational window to search for a background in the near-IR is at 3.5 microns since that is the wavelength region where the other main foreground, the zodiacal dust emission, is the least. It is not possible to map out the entire 3.5 micron sky at a resolution which will accurately estimate the flux from stars. However, since the CIRB is presumably isotropic, it can potentially be detected by selecting a smaller field and imaging it at good resolution to estimate the stellar intensity. We selected a 2x2 degree "dark spot" near the North Galactic Pole which had the least intensity at 3.5 microns after a zodiacal light model was subtracted from the all-sky maps generated by the Diffuse InfraRed Background Experiment (DIRBE). The measured total intensity of the few bright stars in this field was combined with a model for the contribution from dimmer stars and subtracted from the zodi-subtracted DIRBE map. The contribution from the interstellar medium was also subtracted leaving a residual intensity at 2.2 microns of: 16.4+/-4.4 kJy/sr or 22.4+/-6 nW/m^2/sr, and at 3.5 microns: 12.8+/-3.8 kJy/sr or 11+/-3.3 nW/m^2/sr. [Abridged

V. Gorjian; E. L. Wright; R. R. Chary

1999-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Local Government Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Home Weatherization Solar Program Info Start Date 2005 State Montana Program Type Grant Program Provider Montana Department of Commerce The Big Sky Trust Fund reimburses expenses incurred in the purchase, leasing, or relocation of real assets for direct use of the assisted business or employee training costs. A local or tribal government on behalf of any business may apply. The funding limit of the program is $5,000 per new qualifying job created or $7,500 per qualifying job created in a high poverty county. A dollar for dollar match (or 50% match in a high poverty

207

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

208

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa January 18, 2006 - 10:47am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is placing a new, portable atmospheric laboratory with sophisticated instruments and data systems in Niger, Africa, to gain a better understanding of the potential impacts of Saharan dust on global climate. Dust from Africa's Sahara desert-the largest source of dust on the planet-reaches halfway around the globe. Carried by winds and clouds, the dust travels through West African, Mediterranean, and European skies, and across the Atlantic into North America. Unfortunately, Africa is one of the most under-sampled climate regimes in the world, leaving scientists to

209

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

210

Real-Time Sky-View Factor Calculation and Approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously, the acquisition of sky-view factor data for climate studies has been time consuming and dependent on postprocessing. However, advances in technology now mean that techniques using fish-eye imagery can be algorithmically processed in ...

L. Chapman; J. E. Thornes

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Clear-Sky Nocturnal Temperatures Forecast and the Greenhouse Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nocturnal evolution of air and soil temperatures are computed for clear-sky situations. The model takes into account the soil heat conduction and the atmospheric radiative transfers by using radiosonde data for temperature, water vapor, and ...

A. Quinft; J. Vanderborght

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Empirical Estimation of Daily Clear Sky Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The suitability of two simple empirical equations for the estimation of clear sky radiation was investigated. Results indicated that latitude and altitude were sufficient to estimate the empirical equation coefficients and that the estimates of ...

D. F. Heermann; G. J. Harrington; K. M. Stahl

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

American Clean Skies Foundation | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Clean Skies Foundation Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 2 October, 2012 - 14:01 Nominations open for 250,000 Multimedia Clean...

214

SkySails GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kite, with which it supplements the momentum of commercial vessels on long journeys, saving fuel costs. References SkySails GmbH1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

215

Factors Controlling ERBE Longwave Clear Sky and Cloud Forcing Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The factors controlling the Earth Radiation Budget satellite (ERBS) longwave clear sky and cloud-forcing fluxes are investigated using statistical analyses of the ERBS fluxes with International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud ...

Bryan C. Weare

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Feasibility of night-sky radiation with heat pumps  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the procedure involved in the determination of the feasibility of high-sky radiation as the means of rejecting heat through solar collectors for a sample residential house in the Evansville area. It presents conclusions on different types of coatings that are used on solar collectors. It also designs the system, and its backup, in schematic form. For the purpose of cost analysis it discusses the difference of a cooling tower and night-sky radiation.

McKinney, T.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Validation Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

218

Dynamic Infrared Simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The increased usage of infrared sensors by pilots has created a growing demand for simulated environments based on infrared radiation. This has led to… (more)

Dehlin, Jonas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Display of clouds taking into account multiple anisotropic scattering and sky light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: clouds, multiple scattering, optical length, participating media, photo-realism, radiative transfer, sky light

Tomoyuki Nishita; Yoshinori Dobashi; Eihachiro Nakamae

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

IS THE TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY CLUSTERING DIPOLE CONVERGENT?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a long-standing controversy about the convergence of the dipole moment of the galaxy angular distribution (the so-called clustering dipole). Is the dipole convergent at all, and if so, what is the scale of the convergence? We study the growth of the clustering dipole of galaxies as a function of the limiting flux of the sample from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Contrary to some earlier claims, we find that the dipole does not converge before the completeness limit of the 2MASS Extended Source Catalog, i.e., up to 13.5 mag in the near-infrared K{sub s} band (equivalent to an effective distance of 300 Mpc h{sup -1}). We compare the observed growth of the dipole with the theoretically expected, conditional one (i.e., given the velocity of the Local Group relative to the cosmic microwave background), for the {Lambda}CDM power spectrum and cosmological parameters constrained by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The observed growth turns out to be within 1{sigma} confidence level of its theoretical counterpart once the proper observational window of the 2MASS flux-limited catalog is included. For a contrast, if the adopted window is a top hat, then the predicted dipole grows significantly faster and converges (within the errors) to its final value for a distance of about 300 Mpc h{sup -1}. By comparing the observational windows, we show that for a given flux limit and a corresponding distance limit, the 2MASS flux-weighted window passes less large-scale signal than the top-hat one. We conclude that the growth of the 2MASS dipole for effective distances greater than 200 Mpc h{sup -1} is only apparent. On the other hand, for a distance of 80 Mpc h{sup -1} (mean depth of the 2MASS Redshift Survey) and the {Lambda}CDM power spectrum, the true dipole is expected to reach only {approx}80% of its final value. Eventually, since for the window function of 2MASS the predicted growth is consistent with the observed one, we can compare the two to evaluate {beta} {identical_to} {Omega}{sub m}{sup 0.55}/b. The result is {beta} = 0.38 {+-} 0.04, which leads to an estimate of the density parameter {Omega}{sub m} = 0.20 {+-} 0.08.

Bilicki, Maciej; Chodorowski, Michal [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716, Warsaw (Poland); Jarrett, Thomas [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mamon, Gary A., E-mail: bilicki@camk.edu.pl [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris - UMR 7095 CNRS and UPMC, 98 bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Original paper: Detection of Fusarium damaged kernels in Canada Western Red Spring wheat using visible/near-infrared hyperspectral imaging and principal component analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusarium damage in wheat reduces the quality and safety of food and feed products. In this study, the use of hyperspectral imaging was investigated to detect fusarium damaged kernels (FDK) in Canadian wheat samples. Eight hundred kernels of Canada Western ... Keywords: Fusarium damage, Spectral imaging, Wheat

Muhammad A. Shahin; Stephen J. Symons

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Wave Infrared Long-Wave Infrared Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Long-Wave Infrared Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map characteristic minerals associated with hot springs/mineral deposits Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Map surface temperatures Dictionary.png Long-Wave Infrared: Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) refers to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the 8 to 15 µm wavelength range. LWIR surveys are sometimes referred to as "thermal imaging" and can be used to identify relatively warm features

223

Infrared and Sub-millimetre Observing Conditions on the Antarctic Plateau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Antarctic plateau provides the best terrestrial sites for infrared and sub-millimetre astronomy. In this paper we examine the relative importance of temperature, aerosol content and precipitable water vapour to determine which parameters have the greatest influence on atmospheric transmission and sky brightness. We use the atmospheric modelling program, MODTRAN, to model the observed sky spectrum at the South Pole from the near-IR to the sub-millimetre. We find that temperature and aerosol content determine the quality of nearIR observing conditions, aerosol content is the determining factor in the mid-IR up to 20m, while at longer wavelengths, including the sub-millimetre, it is the water vapour content that matters. Finding a location where aerosol levels are minimised is a key constraint in determining the optimum site on the Antarctic plateau for an infrared observatory. Keywords: Site testing, atmospheric effects, infrared: general. 1 Introduction It is now well es...

Marton G. Hidas; Michael G. Burton; Matthew A. Chamberlain; John W.V. Storey

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

C-GOALS: Chandra observations of a complete sample of luminous infrared galaxies from the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present X-ray data for a complete sample of 44 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), obtained with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. These are the X-ray observations of the high luminosity portion of the Great Observatory All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), which includes the most luminous infrared selected galaxies, log (Lir/Lsun) > 11.73, in the local universe, z < 0.088. X-rays were detected from 43 out of 44 objects, and their arcsec-resolution images, spectra, and radial brightness distributions are presented. With a selection by hard X-ray colour and the 6.4 keV iron line, AGN are found in 37% of the objects, with higher luminosity sources more likely to contain an AGN. These AGN also tend to be found in late-stage mergers. The AGN fraction would increase to 48% if objects with mid-IR [Ne V] detection are included. Double AGN are clearly detected only in NGC 6240 among 24 double/triple systems. Other AGN are found either in single nucleus objects or in one of the double nuclei at similar rates. Objects withou...

Iwasawa, K; Teng, Stacy H; U, Vivian; Armus, L; Evans, A S; Howell, J H; Komossa, S; Mazzarella, J M; Petric, A O; Surace, J A; Vavilkin, T; Veilleux, S; Trentham, N

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Zhenjiang Sky Solar Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zhenjiang Sky Solar Co Ltd Zhenjiang Sky Solar Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Zhenjiang Sky-Solar Co Ltd Place Zhenjiang, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 212009 Sector Solar Product A high-tech enterprise specialized in developing and manufacturing solar series lights and solar panels. Coordinates 31.966261°, 119.472687° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.966261,"lon":119.472687,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

226

A blue sky catastrophe in double-diffusive convection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A global bifurcation of the blue sky catastrophe type has been found in a small Prandtl number binary mixture contained in a laterally heated cavity. The system has been studied numerically applying the tools of bifurcation theory. The catastrophe corresponds to the destruction of an orbit which, for a large range of Rayleigh numbers, is the only stable solution. This orbit is born in a global saddle-loop bifurcation and becomes chaotic in a period doubling cascade just before its disappearance at the blue sky catastrophe.

Esteban Meca; Isabel Mercader; Oriol Batiste; Laureano Ramirez-Piscina

2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

227

Microsoft Word - NEPA Big Sky Final EA .doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886 886 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For The Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY April 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Environmental Assessment i April 2013 COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Environmental Assessment for the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project (DOE/EA-1886) Contact: For additional copies or more information about this Environmental Assessment, please contact: Mr. Bill Gwilliam U.S. Department of Energy

228

Molecular Hydrogen in Infrared Cirrus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine data from our recent FUSE survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen absorption toward 50 high-latitude AGN with COBE-corrected IRAS 100 micron emission maps to study the correlation of infrared cirrus with H2. A plot of the H2 column density vs. IR cirrus intensity shows the same transition in molecular fraction, f_H2, as seen with total hydrogen column density, N_H. This transition is usually attributed to H2 self-shielding, and it suggests that many diffuse cirrus clouds contain H2 in significant fractions, f_H2 = 1-30%. These clouds cover approximately 50% of the northern sky at latitudes b > 30 degrees, at temperature-corrected 100 micron intensities D_100 > 1.5 MJy/sr. The sheetlike cirrus clouds, with hydrogen densities n_H > 30 cm^-3, may be compressed by dynamical processes at the disk-halo interface, and they are conducive to H2 formation on grain surfaces. Exploiting the correlation between N(H2) and 100 micron intensity, we estimate that cirrus clouds at b > 30 contain approximately 3000 M_sun in H2. Extrapolated over the inner Milky Way, the cirrus may contain 10^7 M_sun of H2 and 10^8 M_sun in total gas mass. If elevated to 100 pc, their gravitational potential energy is ~10^53 erg.

Kristen Gillmon; J. Michael Shull

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

229

Infrared Surveys for AGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

Smith, H E

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Infrared Surveys for AGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

Harding E. Smith

2002-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

231

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Name Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Address 2327 University Way, 3rd Floor Place Bozeman, Montana Zip 59715 Region Pacific Northwest Area Phone number 406-994-3755 Notes One of the US DOE's seven regional carbon sequestration partnerships. Coordinates 45.6565752°, -111.041813° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.6565752,"lon":-111.041813,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

232

Mapping of a reactor coolant effluent ground disposal test using an infrared imaging system and ground water potential and temperature measurements  

SciTech Connect

The concept of reactor effluent disposal to ground in infiltration trenches was proposed by Nelson and Alkire in 1963. At that time the available data indicated that radionuclide infiltration rates were probably adequate for trench disposal and that decontamination factors of 10 to 100 should be obtainable. Field tests at 100-F Area 1965 and 100-D Area 1967 have indicated that the infiltration rates are adequate and DF`s of from 2.5 for {sup 51}Cr to 7276 for {sup 65}Zn were obtained during the 100-D test. The purpose of this report is to present the results and interpretations of data from studies conducted over a reactor coolant effluent disposal test site. Data presented in this report were collected over the 100-C Area test in which a significant percentage of the reactor coolant effluent was disposed to an existing trench for a five-month period. Results of infrared thermal surveys and ground water temperature and potential measurements collected during this test are presented.

Eliason, J.R.

1969-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Clear-Sky Greenhouse Effect Sensitivity to a Sea Surface Temperature Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The clear-sky greenhouse effect response to a sea surface temperature (SST or Ts) change is studied using outgoing clear-sky longwave radiation measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Considering geographical distributions ...

J. Ph Duvel; F. M. Bréon

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Technique for Mapping the Distribution of Diffuse Solar Radiation over the Sky Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique to map the distribution of diffuse solar radiation over the sky hemisphere is described. The method is based on an analysis of all-sky, visible photographs and concurrent actinometric measurements of diffuse solar radiance. The ...

L. J. Bruce McArthur; John E. Hay

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Feasibility of GRB with TeV gamma ray all sky monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss feasibility of Gamma ray burst (GRB) with TeV gamma ray all sky monitor and discuss necessity of TeV gamma ray cherenkov all sky monitor.

S. Osone

2003-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Study of the Incoming Longwave Atmospheric Radiation from a Clear Sky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A band model for atmospheric absorption is used to calculate the incoming longwave atmospheric radiative flux for some typical clear sky conditions. The sky radiation is also measured using a specially-designed calorimetric apparatus over a wide ...

J. W. Ramsey; H. D. Chiang; R. J. Goldstein

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large ...

Frieman, Joshua A; Becker, A; Choi, C; Cinabro, D; De Jongh, F; Depoy, D L; Dilday, B; Doi, M; Garnavich, P M; Hogan, C J; Holtzman, J; Im, M; Jha, S; Kessler, R; Konishi, K; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Marshall, J L; McGinnis, D; Miknaitis, G; Nichol, R C; Prieto, J L; Riess, A G; Richmond, M W; Romani, R; Sako, M; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; van der Heyden, K; Yasuda, N; Zheng, C; Adelman-McCarthy, J; Annis, J; Assef, R J; Barentine, J; Bender, R; Blandford, R D; Boroski, W N; Bremer, M; Brewington, H; Collins, C A; Crotts, A; Dembicky, J; Eastman, J; Edge, A; Edmondson, E; Elson, E; Eyler, M E; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Frank, S; Goobar, A; Gueth, T; Gunn, J E; Harvanek, M; Hopp, U; Ihara, Y; IveziÄ?, Ž; Kahn, S; Kaplan, J; Kent, S; Ketzeback, W; Kleinman, S J; Kollatschny, W; Kron, R G; KrzesiÅ?ski, J; Lamenti, D; Leloudas, G; Lin, H; Long, D C; Lucey, J; Lupton, R H; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; McMillan, R J; Méndez, J; Morgan, C W; Morokuma, T; Nitta, A; Ostman, L; Pan, K; Rockosi, C M; Romer, A K; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Saurage, G; Schlesinger, K; Snedden, S A; Sollerman, J; Stoughton, C; Stritzinger, M; Subba-Rao, M; Tucker, D; Väisänen, P; Watson, L C; Watters, S; Wheeler, J C; Yanny, B; York, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Choi, Changsu; /Seoul Natl. U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U.; McGinnis, David; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Portsmouth U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Fermilab /Fermilab /Ohio State U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Fermilab /Bristol U. /Apache Point Observ. /Liverpool John Moores U., ARI /Columbia U., CBA /Apache Point Observ. /Ohio State U. /Durham U. /Portsmouth U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Naval Academy, Annapolis /UC, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Ohio State U. /Stockholm U. /New Mexico State U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Jefferson Lab /Apache Point Observ. /Gottingen U. /Chicago U. /San Francisco State U. /DARK Cosmology Ctr. /Fermilab /Apache Point Observ. /Durham U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Barcelona U. /Stockholm U. /Apache Point Observ. /Lick Observ. /Sussex U. /Barcelona U. /Apache Point Observ. /Ohio State U. /Apache Point Observ. /Fermilab /DARK Cosmology Ctr. /Chicago U. /Fermilab /South African Astron. Observ. /Ohio State U. /Apache Point Observ. /Texas U., McDonald Observ. /Fermilab

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

Joshua A. Frieman; B. Bassett; A. Becker; C. Choi; D. Cinabro; F. DeJongh; D. L. Depoy; B. Dilday; M. Doi; P. M. Garnavich; C. J. Hogan; J. Holtzman; M. Im; S. Jha; R. Kessler; K. Konishi; H. Lampeitl; J. Marriner; J. L. Marshall; D. McGinnis; G. Miknaitis; R. C. Nichol; J. L. Prieto; A. G. Riess; M. W. Richmond; R. Romani; M. Sako; D. P. Schneider; M. Smith; N. Takanashi; K. Tokita; K. van der Heyden; N. Yasuda; C. Zheng; J. Adelman-McCarthy; J. Annis; R. J. Assef; J. Barentine; R. Bender; R. D. Blandford; W. N. Boroski; M. Bremer; H. Brewington; C. A. Collins; A. Crotts; J. Dembicky; J. Eastman; A. Edge; E. Edmondson; E. Elson; M. E. Eyler; A. V. Filippenko; R. J. Foley; S. Frank; A. Goobar; T. Gueth; J. E. Gunn; M. Harvanek; U. Hopp; Y. Ihara; Ž. Ivezi?; S. Kahn; J. Kaplan; S. Kent; W. Ketzeback; S. J. Kleinman; W. Kollatschny; R. G. Kron; J. Krzesi?ski; D. Lamenti; G. Leloudas; H. Lin; D. C. Long; J. Lucey; R. H. Lupton; E. Malanushenko; V. Malanushenko; R. J. McMillan; J. Mendez; C. W. Morgan; T. Morokuma; A. Nitta; L. Ostman; K. Pan; C. M. Rockosi; A. K. Romer; P. Ruiz-Lapuente; G. Saurage; K. Schlesinger; S. A. Snedden; J. Sollerman; C. Stoughton; M. Stritzinger; M. SubbaRao; D. Tucker; P. Vaisanen; L. C. Watson; S. Watters; J. C. Wheeler; B. Yanny; D. York

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

Persistent Nanophosphors for In-vivo Optical Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Optical imaging requires more sensitive tools intended for biomedical research and medical applications. Near-infrared persistent luminescence ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

THE INFRARED COLORS OF THE SUN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar infrared colors provide powerful constraints on the stellar effective temperature scale, but they must be measured with both accuracy and precision in order to do so. We fulfill this requirement by using line-depth ratios to derive in a model-independent way the infrared colors of the Sun, and we use the latter to test the zero point of the Casagrande et al. effective temperature scale, confirming its accuracy. Solar colors in the widely used Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) JHK{sub s} and WISE W1-4 systems are provided: (V - J){sub Sun} = 1.198, (V - H){sub Sun} = 1.484, (V - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 1.560, (J - H){sub Sun} = 0.286, (J - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 0.362, (H - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 0.076, (V - W1){sub Sun} = 1.608, (V - W2){sub Sun} = 1.563, (V - W3){sub Sun} = 1.552, and (V - W4){sub Sun} = 1.604. A cross-check of the effective temperatures derived implementing 2MASS or WISE magnitudes in the infrared flux method confirms that the absolute calibration of the two systems agrees within the errors, possibly suggesting a 1% offset between the two, thus validating extant near- and mid-infrared absolute calibrations. While 2MASS magnitudes are usually well suited to derive T{sub eff}, we find that a number of bright, solar-like stars exhibit anomalous WISE colors. In most cases, this effect is spurious and can be attributed to lower-quality measurements, although for a couple of objects (3% {+-} 2% of the total sample) it might be real, and may hint at the presence of warm/hot debris disks.

Casagrande, L.; Asplund, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia); Ramirez, I. [McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400 Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Melendez, J., E-mail: luca@mso.anu.edu.au [Departamento de Astronomia do IAG/USP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Sao Paulo, 05508-900 SP (Brazil)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

242

Data reduction pipeline for the MMT Magellan Infrared Spectrograph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe principal components of the new spectroscopic data pipeline for the multi-object MMT/Magellan Infrared Spectrograph (MMIRS). The pipeline is implemented in IDL and C++. The performance of the data processing algorithms is sufficient to reduce a single dataset in 2--3 min on a modern PC workstation so that one can use the pipeline as a quick-look tool during observations. We provide an example of the spectral data processed by our pipeline and demonstrate that the sky subtraction quality gets close to the limits set by the Poisson photon statistics.

Chilingarian, Igor; Fabricant, Daniel; McLeod, Brian; Roll, John; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Infrared sensing techniques for adaptive robotic welding  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using infrared sensors to monitor the welding process. Data were gathered using an infrared camera which was trained on the molten metal pool during the welding operation. Several types of process perturbations which result in weld defects were then intentionally induced and the resulting thermal images monitored. Gas tungsten arc using ac and dc currents and gas metal arc welding processes were investigated using steel, aluminum and stainless steel plate materials. The thermal images obtained in the three materials and different welding processes revealed nearly identical patterns for the same induced process perturbation. Based upon these results, infrared thermography is a method which may be very applicable to automation of the welding process.

Lin, T.T.; Groom, K.; Madsen, N.H.; Chin, B.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Sloan Digital Sky Survey's (SDSS) Supernova Data and the Stripe82 Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The seventh data release (DR7) from the SDSS represents a completion of the overall, original project, though SDSS-III began in 2008 and will build upon the knowledge gained already.

The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).[taken and edited from Supernova Survey page at http://www.sdss.org/supernova/aboutsupernova.html]

All three surveys summarized are:

  • Legacy: an imaging survey in five bands over a contiguous 7646 deg2 high-latitude elliptical region in the Northern Galactic Cap, plus an additional 750 deg2 in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with spectroscopy of complete samples of galaxies and quasars covering about 8200 square degrees. The total imaging area in the Legacy survey is 8423 square degrees.
  • SEGUE (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration): additional imaging of 3240 deg2 of sky at lower Galactic latitudes, together with spectroscopy of 240,000 stars towards 200 sightlines covering 1400 square degrees (spread throughout the Legacy and SEGUE imaging footprints), to study the structure of the Milky Way.
  • Supernova: the equivalent of about 80 repeated imaging scans of the Southern Equatorial Stripe (ra > 310 or ra < 59; -1.25 > dec < 1.25) obtained in variable weather conditions (some clouds) to search for supernovae in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.4.
The catalog derived from the images includes more than 350 million celestial objects, and spectra of 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data are fully calibrated and reduced, carefully checked for quality, and publically accessible through efficient databases. The data have been publicly released in a series of annual data releases, culminating in the final data release, DR7.[Copied from http://www.sdss.org/dr7/start/aboutdr7.html

SDSS Collaboration

245

Resonant-cavity-enhanced multispectral infrared photodetectors for monolithic integration on silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multispectral infrared (IR) detection has been widely employed for numerous applications including hyperspectral imaging, IR spectroscopy, and target identification. Traditional multispectral detection technology is based ...

Wang, Jianfei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Short-Term Arctic Cloud Statistics at NSA from the Infrared Cloud...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. A. Shaw and B. Thurairajah Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University Bozeman, Montana Introduction The infrared cloud imager (ICI) is a...

247

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 sq. deg. region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometr...

Sako, Masao; Becker, A; Cinabro, D; De Jongh, F; Depoy, D L; Dilday, B; Doi, M; Frieman, J A; Garnavich, P M; Hogan, C J; Holtzman, J; Jha, S; Kessler, R; Konishi, K; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Miknaitis, G; Nichol, R C; Prieto, J L; Reiss, A G; Richmond, M W; Romani, R; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Subba-Rao, M; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; van der Heyden, K; Yasuda, N; Zheng, C; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Choi, C; Dembicky, J; Harnavek, M; Ihara, Y; Im, M; Ketzeback, W; Kleinman, S J; KrzesiÅ?ski, J; Long, D C; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; McMillan, R J; Morokuma, T; Nitta, A; Pan, K; Saurage, G; Snedden, S A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Big Sky, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky, Montana: Energy Resources Sky, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.2846507°, -111.368292° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.2846507,"lon":-111.368292,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

249

Seasonal variations of the clear-sky greenhouse effect: The role of changes in atmospheric temperatures and humidities  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis of the factors which control the seasonal variations of the clear-sky greenhouse effect, based on satellite observations and radiative transfer simulations. The satellite observations include the radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment and the total column moisture content derived from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager. The simulations were performed with the SAMSON system described in an earlier paper, using atmospheric temperatures and humidities from operational analyses produced by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. At low latitudes, the magnitude of the clear-sky greenhouse effect is dominated by the strong thermodynamic link between the total column moisture content of the atmosphere and sea surface temperatures, with minimal seasonal variations. In contrast, at middle to high latitudes there are strong seasonal variations, the clear-sky greenhouse effect being largest in winter and smallest in summer. These variations cannot be explained by the seasonal cycle in the total column moisture content, as this is largest in summer and smallest in winter. The variations are controlled instead by the seasonal changes in atmospheric temperatures. The colder atmosphere in winter enhances the temperature differential between the atmosphere and the sea surface, leading to a larger greenhouse effect despite the lower moisture contents. The magnitude of the clear-sky greenhouse effect is thus controlled by atmospheric humidity at low latitudes, but by atmospheric temperature at middle and high latitudes. These controls are illustrated by results from sensitivity experiments with SAMSON and are interpreted in terms of a simple model.

Webb, M.J.; Slingo, A. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Stephens, G.L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Candidate spectroscopic binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have examined the radial velocity data for stars spectroscopically observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) more than once to investigate the incidence of spectroscopic binaries, and to evaluate the accuracy of the SDSS stellar radial velocities. We find agreement between the fraction of stars with significant velocity variations and the expected fraction of binary stars in the halo and thick disk populations. The observations produce a list of 675 possible new spectroscopic binary stars and orbits for eight of them.

D. Pourbaix; G. R. Knapp; P. Szkody; Z. Ivezic; S. J. Kleinman; D. Long; S. A. Snedden; A. Nitta; M. Harvanek; J. Krzesinski; H. J. Brewington; J. C. Barentine; E. H. Neilsen; J. Brinkman

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

251

Candidate spectroscopic binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have examined the radial velocity data for stars spectroscopically observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) more than once to investigate the incidence of spectroscopic binaries, and to evaluate the accuracy of the SDSS stellar radial velocities. We find agreement between the fraction of stars with significant velocity variations and the expected fraction of binary stars in the halo and thick disk populations. The observations produce a list of 675 possible new spectroscopic binary stars and orbits for eight of them.

Pourbaix, D; Szkody, P; Ivezic, Z; Kleinman, S J; Long, D; Snedden, S A; Nitta, A; Harvanek, M; Krzesínski, J; Brewington, H J; Barentine, J C; Neilsen, E H; Brinkmann, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

OZZ Solar Inc Sky Ozz International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OZZ Solar Inc Sky Ozz International OZZ Solar Inc Sky Ozz International Jump to: navigation, search Name OZZ Solar Inc. (Sky Ozz International) Place Concord, Ontario, Canada Zip L4K 4R1 Sector Solar Product Ontario-based OZZ Solar was formed to build commercial and residential rooftop solar projects under the province's feed-in tariff programme. Coordinates 37.344704°, -78.975299° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.344704,"lon":-78.975299,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

253

Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa March 1, 2013 - 7:19pm Addthis In addition to the planned 250-MW solar farm set to begin construction in June 2013, the Moapa Band of Paiutes is working on a second 150-MW project that would use both PV and concentrated solar technologies to generate power for the Tribe. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. In addition to the planned 250-MW solar farm set to begin construction in June 2013, the Moapa Band of Paiutes is working on a second 150-MW project that would use both PV and concentrated solar technologies to generate power for the Tribe. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. Moapa Band of Paiutes Chairman William Anderson. In addition to the planned 250-MW solar farm set to begin construction in June 2013, the Moapa Band of Paiutes is working on a second 150-MW project that would use both PV and concentrated solar technologies to generate power for the Tribe. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes.

254

Correlated Errors in the COBE DMR Sky Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The {\\it COBE} DMR sky maps contain low-level correlated noise. We obtain estimates of the amplitude and pattern of the correlated noise from three techniques: angular averages of the covariance matrix, Monte Carlo simulations of two-point correlation functions, and direct analysis of the DMR maps. The results from the three methods are mutually consistent. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky map is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1\\%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occurs with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of $60 \\deg$ due to the $60 \\deg$ separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance at $60 \\deg$ is $0.45\\% ^{+0.18}_{-0.14}$ of the mean variance. Additionally, the variance in a given pixel is $0.7\\%$ greater than would be expected from a single beam experiment with the same noise properties. Auto-correlation functions suffer from a $\\sim 1.5\\; \\sigma$ positive bias at $60 \\deg$ while cross-correlations have no bias. Published {\\it COBE} DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise. COBE pre-print 94-

C. H. Lineweaver; G. F. Smoot; C. L. Bennett; E. L. Wright; L. Tenorio; A. Kogut; P. B. Keegstra; G. Hinshaw; A. J. Banday

1994-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Infrared microscope inspection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface. 4 figs.

Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

1985-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

256

IRAS-based whole-sky upper limit on Dyson Spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Dyson Sphere is a hypothetical construct of a star purposely cloaked by a thick swarm of broken-up planetary material to better utilize all of the stellar energy. A clean Dyson Sphere identification would give a significant signature for intelligence at work. A search for Dyson Spheres has been carried out using the 250,000 source database of the IRAS infrared satellite which covered 96% of the sky. The search has used the Calgary data collection of the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS) to look for fits to blackbody spectra. Searches have been conducted for both pure (fully cloaked) and partial Dyson Spheres in the blackbody temperature region 100 {le} T {le} 600 K. Other stellar signatures that resemble a Dyson Sphere are reviewed. When these signatures are used to eliminate sources that mimic Dyson Spheres very few candidates remain and even these are ambiguous. Upper limits are presented for both pure and partial Dyson Spheres. The sensitivity of the LRS was enough to find solar-sized Dyson Spheres out to 300 pc, a reach that encompasses a million solar-type stars.

Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog III. Third Data Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 4188 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties o...

Schneider, D P; Richards, G T; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Anderson, S F; Fan, X; Jester, S; Stoughton, C; Strauss, M A; Subba-Rao, M; Brandt, W; Gunn, J E; Yanny, B; Bahcall, Neta A; Barentine, J C; Blanton, M R; Boroski, W N; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, R; Csabai, I; Doi, M; Eisenstein, D J; Frieman, J A; Fukugita, M; Gray, J; Harvanek, M; Heckman, T M; Ivezic, Z; Kent, S; Kleinman, S; Knapp, G R; Kron, R G; Krzesínski, J; Long, D C; Loveday, J; Lupton, R H; Margon, B; Munn, J A; Neilsen, E H; Newberg, H J; Newman, P R; Nichol, R; Nitta, A; Pier, J R; Rockosi, C M; Saxe, D H; Schlegel, D J; Snedden, S A; Szalay, A S; Thakar, A R; Uomoto, A; York, D G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Infrared Thermography Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

funds for Fiscal Year 2014. Title Infrared Thermography Systems Publication Type Book Chapter LBNL Report Number LBNL-46590 Year of Publication 2000 Authors Griffith, Brent...

259

Issues with infrared thermography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract Infrared scanning radiometers are used to generate temperature maps of building envelope components, including windows and insulation. These temperature maps may...

260

Convective Activity over Africa and the Tropical Atlantic Inferred from 20 Years of Geostationary Meteosat Infrared Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 20-yr (1986–2005) time series of Meteosat Visible and Infrared Imager (MVIRI) geostationary infrared observations was used to study deep convection over Africa and the tropical Atlantic. The 20-yr time period is covered by six consecutive ...

Ralf Bennartz; Marc Schroeder

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey: I. Source selection and observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS) is an international collaborative program which has obtained high-resolution radio images of over 10000 flat-spectrum radio sources in order to create the largest and best studied statistical sample of radio-loud gravitationally lensed systems. With this survey, combined with detailed studies of the lenses found therein, constraints can be placed on the expansion rate, matter density, and dark energy (e.g. cosmological constant, quintessence) content of the Universe that are complementary to and independent of those obtained through other methods. CLASS is aimed at identifying lenses where multiple images are formed from compact flat-spectrum radio sources, which should be easily identifiable in the radio maps. Because CLASS is radio-based, dust obscuration in lensing galaxies is not a factor, and the relative insensitivity of the instrument to environmental conditions leads to nearly uniform sensitivity and resolution over the entire survey. In four observing seasons from 1994-1999, CLASS has observed 13783 radio sources with the VLA at 8.4 GHz at 0.2 arcsecond resolution. When combined with the JVAS survey, the CLASS sample contains over 16,000 images. A complete sample of 11685 flat-spectrum sources was observed, selected from GB6 catalogue at 4.85 GHz and the NVSS at 1.4 GHz. So far, CLASS has found 16 new gravitational lens systems, and the JVAS/CLASS survey contains a total of 22 lenses. (Abridged)

S. T. Myers; N. J. Jackson; I. W. A. Browne; A. G. de Bruyn; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; P. N. Wilkinson; A. D. Biggs; R. D. Blandford; C. D. Fassnacht; L. V. E. Koopmans; D. R. Marlow; J. P. McKean; M. A. Norbury; P. M. Phillips; D. Rusin; M. C. Shepherd; C. M. Sykes

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

262

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 sq. deg. region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

Masao Sako; B. Bassett; A. Becker; D. Cinabro; F. DeJongh; D. L. Depoy; B. Dilday; M. Doi; J. A. Frieman; P. M. Garnavich; C. J. Hogan; J. Holtzman; S. Jha; R. Kessler; K. Konishi; H. Lampeitl; J. Marriner; G. Miknaitis; R. C. Nichol; J. L. Prieto; A. G. Riess; M. W. Richmond; R. Romani; D. P. Schneider; M. Smith; M. SubbaRao; N. Takanashi; K. Tokita; K. van der Heyden; N. Yasuda; C. Zheng; J. Barentine; H. Brewington; C. Choi; J. Dembicky; M. Harnavek; Y. Ihara; M. Im; W. Ketzeback; S. J. Kleinman; J. Krzesi?ski; D. C. Long; E. Malanushenko; V. Malanushenko; R. J. McMillan; T. Morokuma; A. Nitta; K. Pan; G. Saurage; S. A. Snedden

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

263

Infrared Basics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Infrared Basics Citation Protherm. Infrared Basics Internet. 2013. cited...

264

Clean Cities: Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition (Western North Carolina) Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition (Western North Carolina) The Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina) works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina) Contact Information Bill Eaker 828-251-6622 x142 bill@landofsky.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Bill Eaker Photo of Bill Eaker Bill Eaker established the Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition, serving the Western North Carolina region, in 2004 and has served as the coalition's coordinator since then. Eaker has over 31 years of experience in environmental, land use, and growth management planning at the local, regional, and state scales. He has worked at Land of Sky Regional Council

265

Multi-Spectral imaging of vegetation for detecting CO2 leaking from underground  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration will require long-term monitoring for detection of possible leakage back into the atmosphere. One potential monitoring method is multi-spectral imaging of vegetation reflectance to detect leakage through CO{sub 2}-induced plant stress. A multi-spectral imaging system was used to simultaneously record green, red, and near-infrared (NIR) images with a real-time reflectance calibration from a 3-m tall platform, viewing vegetation near shallow subsurface CO{sub 2} releases during summers 2007 and 2008 at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology field site in Bozeman, Montana. Regression analysis of the band reflectances and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index with time shows significant correlation with distance from the CO{sub 2} well, indicating the viability of this method to monitor for CO{sub 2} leakage. The 2007 data show rapid plant vigor degradation at high CO{sub 2} levels next to the well and slight nourishment at lower, but above-background CO{sub 2} concentrations. Results from the second year also show that the stress response of vegetation is strongly linked to the CO{sub 2} sink-source relationship and vegetation density. The data also show short-term effects of rain and hail. The real-time calibrated imaging system successfully obtained data in an autonomous mode during all sky and daytime illumination conditions.

Rouse, J.H.; Shaw, J.A.; Lawrence, R.L.; Lewicki, J.L.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.S.; Spangler, L.H.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Optical Physics of Imaging and Interferometric Phased Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microwave, submillimetre-wave, and far-infrared phased arrays are of considerable importance for astronomy. We consider the behaviour imaging phased arrays and interferometric phased arrays from a functional perspective. It is shown that the average powers, field correlations, power fluctuations, and correlations between power fluctuations at the output ports of an imaging or interferometric phased array can be found once the synthesised reception patterns are known. The reception patterns do not have to be orthogonal or even linearly independent. It is shown that the operation of phased arrays is intimately related to the mathematical theory of frames, and that the theory of frames can be used to determine the degree to which any class of intensity or field distribution can be reconstructed unambiguously from the complex amplitudes of the travelling waves at the output ports. The theory can be used to set up a likelihood function that can, through Fisher information, be used to determine the degree to which a phased array can be used to recover the parameters of a parameterised source. For example, it would be possible to explore the way in which a system, perhaps interferometric, might observe two widely separated regions of the sky simultaneously.

Stafford Withington; George Saklatvala; Michael P. Hobson

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

267

Blue Sky Green Field Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Field Wind Farm Green Field Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Green Field Wind Farm Facility Blue Sky Green Field Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner We Energies Developer We Energies Energy Purchaser We Energies Location Fond du Lac County WI Coordinates 43.908549°, -88.305384° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.908549,"lon":-88.305384,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

268

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has surveyed the distribution and kinematics of ionized gas in the Galaxy above declination -30 degrees. The WHAM Northern Sky Survey (WHAM-NSS) has an angular resolution of one degree and provides the first absolutely-calibrated, kinematically-resolved map of the H-Alpha emission from the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM) within ~ +/-100 km/s of the Local Standard of Rest. Leveraging WHAM's 12 km/s spectral resolution, we have modeled and removed atmospheric emission and zodiacal absorption features from each of the 37,565 spectra. The resulting H-Alpha profiles reveal ionized gas detected in nearly every direction on the sky with a sensitivity of 0.15 R (3 sigma). Complex distributions of ionized gas are revealed in the nearby spiral arms up to 1-2 kpc away from the Galactic plane. Toward the inner Galaxy, the WHAM-NSS provides information about the WIM out to the tangent point down to a few degrees from the plane. Ionized gas is also detected toward many intermediate velocity clouds at high latitudes. Several new H II regions are revealed around early B-stars and evolved stellar cores (sdB/O). This work presents the details of the instrument, the survey, and the data reduction techniques. The WHAM-NSS is also presented and analyzed for its gross properties. Finally, some general conclusions are presented about the nature of the WIM as revealed by the WHAM-NSS.

L. M. Haffner; R. J. Reynolds; S. L. Tufte; G. J. Madsen; K. P. Jaehnig; J. W. Percival

2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

269

High speed infrared imaging system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for radiation detection with an increased frame rate. A semi-parallel processing configuration is used to process a row or column of pixels in a focal-plane array in parallel to achieve a processing rate up to and greater than 1 million frames per second.

Zehnder, Alan T. (Ithaca, NY); Rosakis, Ares J. (Altadena, CA); Ravichandran, G. (Arcadia, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Infrared Protein Crystallography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We consider the application of infrared spectroscopy to protein crystals, with particular emphasis on exploiting molecular orientation through polarization measurements on oriented single crystals. Infrared microscopes enable transmission measurements on individual crystals using either thermal or nonthermal sources, and can accommodate flow cells, used to measure spectral changes induced by exposure to soluble ligands, and cryostreams, used for measurements of flash-cooled crystals. Comparison of unpolarized infrared measurements on crystals and solutions probes the effects of crystallization and can enhance the value of the structural models refined from X-ray diffraction data by establishing solution conditions under which they are most relevant. Results on several proteins are consistent with similar equilibrium conformational distributions in crystal and solutions. However, the rates of conformational change are often perturbed. Infrared measurements also detect products generated by X-ray exposure, including CO{sub 2}. Crystals with favorable symmetry exhibit infrared dichroism that enhances the synergy with X-ray crystallography. Polarized infrared measurements on crystals can distinguish spectral contributions from chemically similar sites, identify hydrogen bonding partners, and, in opportune situations, determine three-dimensional orientations of molecular groups. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Structure and Function in the Crystalline State.

J Sage; Y Zhang; J McGeehan; R Ravelli; M Weik; J van Thor

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog III. Third Data Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 4188 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800--9200A at a spectral resolution about 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. A total of 44,221 objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS; 28,400 of the SDSS discoveries are reported here for the first time.

D. P. Schneider; P. B. Hall; G. T. Richards; D. E. Vanden Berk; S. F. Anderson; X. Fan; S. Jester; C. Stoughton; M. A. Strauss; M. SubbaRao; W. Brandt; J. E. Gunn; B. Yanny; N. A. Bahcall; J. Barentine; M. R. Blanton; W. N. Boroski; H. J. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; R. Brunner; I. Csabai; M. Doi; D. J. Eisenstein; J. A. Frieman; M. Fukugita; J. Gray; M. Harvanek; T. M. Heckman; Željko Ivezi?; S. Kent; S. Kleinman; G. R. Knapp; R. G. Kron; J. Krzesinski; D. C. Long; J. Loveday; R. H. Lupton; B. Margon; J. A. Munn; E. H. Neilsen; H. Jo Newberg; P. R. Newman; R. Nichol; A. Nitta; J. R. Pier; C. M. Rockosi; D. H. Saxe; D. J. Schlegel; S. A. Snedden; A. S. Szalay; A. R. Thakar; A. Uomoto; D. G. York

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog IV. Fifth Data Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the fourth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog contains 77,429 objects; this is an increase of over 30,000 entries since the previous edition. The catalog consists of the objects in the SDSS Fifth Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7) have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s, or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i=15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 5740 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.48; the catalog includes 891 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 36 are at redshifts greater than five. Approximately half of the catalog quasars have i < 19; nearly all have i < 21. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains basic radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800--9200A at a spectral resolution of ~2000. The spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. The average SDSS colors of quasars as a function of redshift, derived from the catalog entries, are presented in tabular form. Approximately 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS.

Donald P. Schneider; Patrick B. Hall; Gordon T. Richards; Michael A. Strauss; Daniel E. Vanden Berk; Scott F. Anderson; W. N. Brandt; Xiaohui Fan; Sebastian Jester; Jim Gray; James E. Gunn; Mark U. SubbaRao; Anirudda R. Thakar; Chris Stoughton; Alexander S. Szalay; Brian Yanny; Donald G. York; Neta A. Bahcall; J. Barentine; Michael R. Blanton; Howard Brewington; J. Brinkmann; Robert J. Brunner; Francisco J. Castander; Istvan Csabai; Joshua A. Frieman; Masataka Fukugita; Michael Harvanek; David W. Hogg; Zeljko Ivezic; Stephen M. Kent; S. J. Kleinman; G. R. Knapp; Richard G. Kron; Jurek Krzesinski; Daniel C. Long; Robert H. Lupton; Atsuko Nitta; Jeffrey R. Pier; David H. Saxe; Yue Shen; Stephanie A. Snedden; David H. Weinberg; Jian Wu

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

273

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog. 3. Third data release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is {approx} 4188 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2'' rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 at a spectral resolution of {approx} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. A total of 44,221 objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS; 28,400 of the SDSS discoveries are reported here for the first time.

Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Richards, Gordon T.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Anderson, Scott F.; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Jester, Sebastian; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss, Michael A.; SubbaRao, Mark; Brandt, W.N.; Gunn, James E.; Yanny, Brian; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Boroski, William N.; Brewington, Howard J.; Brinkmann, J.; Brunner, Robert; Csabai, Istvan; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /York U., Canada /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Adler Planetarium, Chicago /Apache Point Observ. /New York U. /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept. /Eotvos U. /Tokyo U., Astron. Dept. /Tokyo U., RESCEU /Tokyo U., ICRR /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /Microsoft, BARC /Johns Hopkins U. /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /Sussex U., Astron. Ctr. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Monitoring of IR Clear-Sky Radiances over Oceans for SST (MICROS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring of IR Clear-Sky Radiances over Oceans for SST (MICROS) is a Web-based tool to monitor “model minus observation” (M ? O) biases in clear-sky brightness temperatures (BTs) and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) produced by the Advanced Clear-...

Xingming Liang; Alexander Ignatov

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

ENSEMBLE VARIABILITY OF NEAR-INFRARED-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the properties of the ensemble variability V for nearly 5000 near-infrared active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the catalog of Quasars and Active Galactic Nuclei (13th Edition) and the SDSS-DR7 quasar catalog. From three near-infrared point source catalogs, namely, Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), Deep Near Infrared Survey (DENIS), and UKIDSS/LAS catalogs, we extract 2MASS-DENIS and 2MASS-UKIDSS counterparts for cataloged AGNs by cross-identification between catalogs. We further select variable AGNs based on an optimal criterion for selecting the variable sources. The sample objects are divided into subsets according to whether near-infrared light originates by optical emission or by near-infrared emission in the rest frame; and we examine the correlations of the ensemble variability with the rest-frame wavelength, redshift, luminosity, and rest-frame time lag. In addition, we also examine the correlations of variability amplitude with optical variability, radio intensity, and radio-to-optical flux ratio. The rest-frame optical variability of our samples shows negative correlations with luminosity and positive correlations with rest-frame time lag (i.e., the structure function, SF), and this result is consistent with previous analyses. However, no well-known negative correlation exists between the rest-frame wavelength and optical variability. This inconsistency might be due to a biased sampling of high-redshift AGNs. Near-infrared variability in the rest frame is anticorrelated with the rest-frame wavelength, which is consistent with previous suggestions. However, correlations of near-infrared variability with luminosity and rest-frame time lag are the opposite of these correlations of the optical variability; that is, the near-infrared variability is positively correlated with luminosity but negatively correlated with the rest-frame time lag. Because these trends are qualitatively consistent with the properties of radio-loud quasars reported by some previous studies, most of our sample objects are probably radio-loud quasars. Finally, we also discuss the negative correlations seen in the near-infrared SFs.

Kouzuma, S. [School of International Liberal Studies, Chukyo University, Toyota 470-0393 (Japan); Yamaoka, H., E-mail: skouzuma@lets.chukyo-u.ac.jp, E-mail: yamaoka@phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Imprint of Intergalactic Shocks on the Radio Sky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strong intergalactic shocks are a natural consequence of structure formation in the universe. They are expected to deposit large fractions of their energy in relativistic electrons (xi_e~0.05 according to SNR observations) and magnetic fields (xi_B~0.01 according to cluster halo observations). We calculate the synchrotron emission from such shocks using an analytical model, calibrated with a hydrodynamical LCDM simulation. The resulting signal composes a large fraction of the extragalactic radio background (ERB) below 500 MHz. The associated angular fluctuations dominate the sky for frequencies nu3*10^-4. The fluctuating signal is most pronounced for nugas and magnetic fields. Space missions such as ALFA will thus provide important insight into the structure and composition of our Galaxy (abridged).

Uri Keshet; Eli Waxman; Abraham Loeb

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

277

Blue Sky Energy Inc BSE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Inc BSE Energy Inc BSE Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Energy Inc (BSE) Place Vista, California Zip 92081 Product MPPT (Maximum Power Point Tracking) technology. Own a patented technology allowing an increase of power from a PV array of up to 30% more than conventional controllers. Coordinates 37.989712°, -93.665689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.989712,"lon":-93.665689,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

278

Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Validation Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Technology Program Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov William Aljoe Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6569 william.aljoe@netl.doe.gov Leslie L. Schmidt Business Contact Montana State University-Bozeman 309 Montana Hall Bozeman, MT 59717-2470 406-994-2381 lschmidt@montana.edu Lee Spangler Technical Contact Montana State University-Bozeman P.O. Box 172460 Bozeman, MT 59717-2470 406-994-4399 spangler@montana.edu PARTNERS Battelle Pacific Northwest Division Center for Advanced Energy Studies Cimarex Energy Columbia University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Crow Tribe Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration

279

Running the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data archive server  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Archive Server (DAS) provides public access to over 12Tb of data in 17 million files produced by the SDSS data reduction pipeline. Many tasks which seem trivial when serving smaller, less complex data sets present challenges when serving data of this volume and technical complexity. The included output files should be chosen to support as much science as possible from publicly released data, and only publicly released data. Users must have the resources needed to read and interpret the data correctly. Server administrators must generate new data releases at regular intervals, monitor usage, quickly recover from hardware failures, and monitor the data served by the DAS both for contents and corruption. We discuss these challenges, describe tools we use to administer and support the DAS, and discuss future development plans.

Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; Stoughton, Chris; /Fermilab

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a survey in Balmer Alpha of the entire Northern sky above declination -30 deg. This survey provides the first calibrated, velocity-resolved map of the H-Alpha emission from the Galaxy. With one-degree spatial resolution, 12 km s^{-1} velocity resolution, and sensitivity to features as faint as 0.1 R (EM ~ 0.2 cm^{-6} pc), this survey provides the deepest maps of the ionized content of the Galaxy to date. In addition to probing the detailed kinematic structure of the Warm Ionized Medium and the vertical structure of the ionized content in spiral arms, initial results include the discovery of several faint, extended (d > 1\\deg) H II regions and the first map of the ionized component of an intermediate velocity cloud.

L. M. Haffner

2000-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Warming Trends in the Arctic from Clear Sky Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite thermal infrared data on surface temperatures provide pan-Arctic coverage from 1981 to 2001 during cloud-free conditions and reveal large warming anomalies in the 1990s compared to the 1980s and regional variability in the trend. The ...

Josefino C. Comiso

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Imaging Fourier transform spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer having a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer providing a series of images to a focal plane array camera. The focal plane array camera is clocked to a multiple of zero crossing occurrences as caused by a moving mirror of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and as detected by a laser detector such that the frame capture rate of the focal plane array camera corresponds to a multiple of the zero crossing rate of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The images are transmitted to a computer for processing such that representations of the images as viewed in the light of an arbitrary spectral ``fingerprint`` pattern can be displayed on a monitor or otherwise stored and manipulated by the computer.

Bennett, C.L.

1993-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

283

Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Aerosol Scattering Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Aerosol Scattering Parameters P. J. Ricchiazzi and C. Gautier University of California Santa Barbara, California Introduction Recent studies of clear-sky radiation indicate that current radiative transfer (RT) models underestimate atmospheric absorption when standard aerosol properties are used. This so-called clear-sky anomaly is manifested in predicted levels of diffuse radiation significantly below those observed at Southern Great Plains (SGP) and other sites in the continental United States (e.g., Halthore et al. 1998 GRL). Other observations at pristine sites do not show a discrepancy (Barnard and Powell 2001, 2001; Kato et al. 1997; Halthore 1998). These results may indicate that the clear-sky anomaly is only observed at sites

284

THE MULTI-OBJECT, FIBER-FED SPECTROGRAPHS FOR THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY AND THE BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present the design and performance of the multi-object fiber spectrographs for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and their upgrade for the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Originally commissioned in Fall 1999 on the 2.5 m aperture Sloan Telescope at Apache Point Observatory, the spectrographs produced more than 1.5 million spectra for the SDSS and SDSS-II surveys, enabling a wide variety of Galactic and extra-galactic science including the first observation of baryon acoustic oscillations in 2005. The spectrographs were upgraded in 2009 and are currently in use for BOSS, the flagship survey of the third-generation SDSS-III project. BOSS will measure redshifts of 1.35 million massive galaxies to redshift 0.7 and Ly{alpha} absorption of 160,000 high redshift quasars over 10,000 deg{sup 2} of sky, making percent level measurements of the absolute cosmic distance scale of the universe and placing tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy. The twin multi-object fiber spectrographs utilize a simple optical layout with reflective collimators, gratings, all-refractive cameras, and state-of-the-art CCD detectors to produce hundreds of spectra simultaneously in two channels over a bandpass covering the near-ultraviolet to the near-infrared, with a resolving power R = {lambda}/FWHM {approx} 2000. Building on proven heritage, the spectrographs were upgraded for BOSS with volume-phase holographic gratings and modern CCD detectors, improving the peak throughput by nearly a factor of two, extending the bandpass to cover 360 nm < {lambda} < 1000 nm, and increasing the number of fibers from 640 to 1000 per exposure. In this paper we describe the original SDSS spectrograph design and the upgrades implemented for BOSS, and document the predicted and measured performances.

Smee, Stephen A.; Barkhouser, Robert H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gunn, James E.; Carr, Michael A.; Lupton, Robert H.; Loomis, Craig [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Uomoto, Alan [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Roe, Natalie; Schlegel, David [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rockosi, Constance M. [UC Observatories and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, 375 Interdisciplinary Sciences Building (ISB) Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Leger, French; Owen, Russell; Anderson, Lauren [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 09195 (United States); Dawson, Kyle S.; Olmstead, Matthew D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Brinkmann, Jon; Long, Dan [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Honscheid, Klaus [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Harding, Paul [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Annis, James, E-mail: smee@pha.jhu.edu [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); and others

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

An Automated Cirrus Cloud Detection Method for a Ground-Based Cloud Image  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud detection is a basic research for achieving cloud-cover state and other cloud characteristics. Because of the influence of sunlight, the brightness of sky background on the ground-based cloud image is usually nonuniform, which increases the ...

Jun Yang; Weitao Lu; Ying Ma; Wen Yao

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Intercalibration of Broadband Geostationary Imagers Using AIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostationary simultaneous nadir observations (GSNOs) are collected for Earth Observing System (EOS) Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on board Aqua and a global array of geostationary imagers. The imagers compared in this study are on (...

Mathew M. Gunshor; Timothy J. Schmit; W. Paul Menzel; David C. Tobin

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Method for imaging a concealed object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for imaging a concealed object is described and which includes a step of providing a heat radiating body, and wherein an object to be detected is concealed on the heat radiating body; imaging the heat radiating body to provide a visibly discernible infrared image of the heat radiating body; and determining if the visibly discernible infrared image of the heat radiating body is masked by the presence of the concealed object.

Davidson, James R [Idaho Falls, ID; Partin, Judy K [Idaho Falls, ID; Sawyers, Robert J [Idaho Falls, ID

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

288

Spiral Disk Opacity from Occulting Galaxy Pairs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A spiral galaxy partially ovelapping a more distant elliptical offers an unique opportunity to measure the dust extinction in the foreground spiral. From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR4 spectroscopic sample, we selected 83 occulting galaxy pairs and measured disk opacity over the redshift range z = 0.0-0.2 with the goal to determine the recent evolution of disk dust opacity. The enrichment of the ISM changes over the lifetime of a disk and it is reasonable to expect the dust extinction properties of spiral disks as a whole to change over their lifetime. When they do, the change will affect our measurements of galaxies over the observable universe. From the SDSS pairs we conclude that spiral disks show evidence of extinction to ~2 effective radii. However, no evidence for recent evolution of disk opacity is evident, due to the limited redshift range and our inability to distinguish other factors on disk opacity such as the presence of spiral arms and Hubble type. Such effects also mask any relation between surface brightness and optical depth that has been found in nearby galaxies. Hence, we conclude that the SDSS spectral catalog is an excellent way to find occulting pairs and construct a uniform local sample. However, higher resolution than the SDSS images is needed to disentangle the effects of spiral arms and Hubble type from evolution since z = 0.2.

B. W. Holwerda; W. C. Keel; A. Bolton

2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

289

Solar Infrared Photometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sun photometer which operates at five wavelengths in the near infrared between 1.0 and 4.0 ?m has been developed. The instrument is a manually operated, fitter wheel design and has principal applications for atmospheric aerosol studies. The ...

J. D. Spinhirne; M. G. Strange; L. R. Blaine

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (2009) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

And-Or Near Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (2009) And-Or Near Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date 2009 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the importance of elevation and temperature inversions using thermal infrared satellite images Notes Examples of nighttime temperature inversions are shown in thermal infrared satellite images collected over the Coso geothermal field in eastern California. Temperature-elevation plots show the normal trend of temperature decrease with elevation, on which temperature inversions appear

291

Ensemble Properties of Comets in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the ensemble properties of 31 comets (27 resolved and 4 unresolved) observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This sample of comets represents about 1 comet per 10 million SDSS photometric objects. Five-band (u, g, r, i, z) photometry is used to determine the comets colors, sizes, surface brightness profiles, and rates of dust production in terms of the Afp formalism. We find that the cumulative luminosity function for the Jupiter Family Comets in our sample is well fit by a power law of the form N(

Solontoi, Michael; /Adler Planetarium, Chicago; Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Juric, Mario; /Harvard Coll. Observ.; Becker, Andrew C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; West, Andrew A.; /Boston U.; Kent, Steve; /Fermilab; Lupton, Robert H.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Claire, Mark; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Quinn, Tom; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Princeton U. Observ.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes For this project, fused imagery was created using ASTER data and USGS Digital Orthophoto Quandrangles (DOQs). The ASTER data have a spatial resolution of 15 m for the visible to infrared and near_infrared bands, and 30 m for shortwave_infrared bands; with a cost of $85.00 per 60 x 60 km image. Thermal anomalies were mapped using ASTER kinetic temperature data

293

Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface downward far-infrared (far-IR) spectra were collected from NASA’s Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument from August to October 2009 at an altitude of 5.4 km near the summit of Cerro Toco, Chile. This region is known for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST observes the very fine spectral structure in the far-IR with differences as small as +/- 0.7% for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky simulations. Clear sky model analysis demonstrated the greatest sensitivity to atmospheric conditions is between 300 and 500 cm-1. The cloudy-sky simulations demonstrated that the far-IR radiation has minimal sensitivity to cloud particle effective radius, yet is very sensitive to cloud optical thickness at wavenumbers between 400 - 600 cm-1. In fact, cirrus optical thickness found to be inferred from the brightness temperature differences at 250 and 559.5 cm-1. Aerosols proved to reduce downwelling radiance by half that a clear-sky would emit, but had little effect on the total far-IR radiative forcing. Furthermore, these far-IR measurements open a new window to understanding the radiative impacts of various atmospheric constituents such as water vapor and clouds, and to understanding and modeling the Earth’s climate and energy budget.

Baugher, Elizabeth

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL and SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL and SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright Future for Solar Energy NREL and SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright Future for Solar Energy In this video, NREL Principal Scientist Gary Jorgensen and SkyFuel Chief Technology Officer Randy Gee talk about their partnership to develop a thin film to substitute for bulkier glass mirrors on solar-collecting parabolic troughs. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. Credit: Fireside Production More Information For more information about NREL's partnership with SkyFuel, read Award-Winning Reflector to Cut Solar Cost and New Solar Technology Concentrates on Cost, Efficiency. Learn more about NREL's Concentrating Solar Power Research. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements Research Facilities

295

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model M. J. Iacono, J. S. Delamere, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, United Kingdom Introduction An important step toward improving radiative transfer codes in general circulation models (GCMs) is their thorough evaluation by comparison to measurements directly, or to other data-validated radiation models. This work extends the clear-sky shortwave (SW) GCM evaluation presented by Iacono et al. (2001) to computations including clouds. The rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) SW radiation model accurately reproduces clear-sky direct beam fluxes from the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer

296

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2013 Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of...

297

Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology  

SciTech Connect

The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

298

Lidar Determinations of Atmospheric Ice Crystal Layers at South Pole during Clear-Sky Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of lidar measurements of atmospheric ice crystal layers during 36 clear-sky precipitation events at South Pole (2850 m MSL) during the winter over the period March-November 1975 are presented and correlated with ice crystal replicator, ...

Vern N. Smiley; Bruce M. Whitcomb; Bruce M. Morley; Joseph A. Warburton

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A Variable Sky-View Platform for the Measurement of Ultraviolet Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the more difficult tasks confronting atmospheric researchers today is the acquisition of long-term radiometric measurements that encapsulate variability in the sky hemisphere as well as time. High quality spatial measurements would allow ...

Christopher Kuchinke; Manuel Nunez

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Network-ready Camera System Development for All-Sky Observing System Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be located on a rooftop and continually monitors the sky for flashes such as bright meteor fireballs, accuracy of time stamping 2. Research autonomous power options (e.g., solar cells). Considerations include

Johnson, Eric E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Transmission of Sunlight through Cloudy Skies: An Analysis Based on Standard Meteorological Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work examines the use of standard meteorological information to describe the attenuation of sunlight associated with cloudy skies. Datasets consisting of broadband ultraviolet and total spectrally integrated solar irradiance are available ...

John E. Frederick; H. Donnan Steele

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The universe at extreme scale: multi-petaflop sky simulation on the BG/Q  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remarkable observational advances have established a compelling cross-validated model of the Universe. Yet, two key pillars of this model -- dark matter and dark energy -- remain mysterious. Next-generation sky surveys will map billions of galaxies to ...

Salman Habib; Vitali Morozov; Hal Finkel; Adrian Pope; Katrin Heitmann; Kalyan Kumaran; Tom Peterka; Joe Insley; David Daniel; Patricia Fasel; Nicholas Frontiere; Zarija Luki?

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Improved Simulation of Clear-Sky Shortwave Radiative Transfer in the CCC-GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposition of mean July clear-sky solar radiation in the Canadian Climate Centre second-generation general circulation model (CCC-GCMII) was analyzed by comparing top of the atmosphere (TOA) net fluxes with earth radiation budget experiment (...

Howard W. Barker; Zhanqing Li

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Clear-Sky Direct-Beam Solar Radiation Versus Altitude: A Proposal for Standard Soundings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author reexamines Klein's (1948) quantitative statements relating clear-sky direct-beam solar radiation to altitude for the lower troposphere, which are of the form (transmissivity) = B + A log (altitude). Klein's summaries are judged to be ...

William P. Lowry

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis within Three-Dimensional Clouds Subjected to Solar and Sky Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional radiative heat transfer analysis of an arbitrary-shaped modeled cloud subjected to solar and sky irradiation has been performed. The Radiation Element Method by Ray Emission Model (REM2) was used for numerical simulation. ...

Toru Nishikawa; Shigenao Maruyama; Seigo Sakai

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Clear-Sky Window Channel Radiances: A Comparison between Observations and the ECMWF Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of clear-sky radiances of the Meteosat window channel with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model results is presented, aiming to assess both the model's performance and the quality of the observations. ...

Isabel F. Trigo; Pedro Viterbo

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

A Comparison of Computed and Observed Insolation under Clear Skies over the Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to verify computational methods for ocean heat budgets, observations of insulation under clear skies for 26 days were compared with values computed by a formula previously derived from the Smithsonian Tables. The agreement between ...

R. K. Reed; R. E. Brainard

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

On the Relationship between Clear-Sky Planetary and Surfae Albedos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on simulations, a simple linear relationship is derived between planetary albedo and the surface albedo for the case of clear skies. This relationship enables one to estimate the planetary albedo, given only the surface albedo, and vice ...

T. S. Chen; George Ohring

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Intrinsic Feature-Based Pose Measurement for Medical Imaging ...  

Tracking is done without using extrinsic markers, fiducials, or other added features. Optical images are acquired from two or more cameras with infrared or visible

310

Detection of the Cosmic Infrared Background at 2.2 and 3.5 microns Using DIRBE Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compare data from the Diffuse InfraRed Background Experiment (DIRBE) on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite to the the Wainscoat et al. (1992) model of the infrared sky. The model is first compared with broadband K (2.2 microns) star counts. Its success at K gives credence to its physical approach which is extrapolated to the L band (3.5 microns). We have analyzed the histograms of the pixel by pixel intensities in the 2.2 and 3.5 micron maps from DIRBE after subtracting the zodiacal light. The shape of these histograms agrees quite well with the histogram shape predicted using the Wainscoat et al. model of the infrared sky, but the predicted histograms must be displaced by a constant intensity in order to match the data. This shift is the cosmic infrared background, which is 16.9+/-4.4 kJy/sr or 23.1+/-5.9 nW/m^2/sr at 2.2 microns, and 14.4+/-3.7 kJy/sr or 12.4+/-3.2 nW/m^2/sr at 3.5 microns.

E. L. Wright; E. D. Reese

1999-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

Galaxy Zoo 2: detailed morphological classifications for 304,122 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the data release for Galaxy Zoo 2 (GZ2), a citizen science project with more than 16 million morphological classifications of 304,122 galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Morphology is a powerful probe for quantifying a galaxy's dynamical history; however, automatic classifications of morphology (either by computer analysis of images or by using other physical parameters as proxies) still have drawbacks when compared to visual inspection. The large number of images available in current surveys makes visual inspection of each galaxy impractical for individual astronomers. GZ2 uses classifications from volunteer citizen scientists to measure morphologies for all galaxies in the DR7 Legacy survey with m_r>17, in addition to deeper images from SDSS Stripe 82. While the original Galaxy Zoo project identified galaxies as early-types, late-types, or mergers, GZ2 measures finer morphological features. These include bars, bulges, and the shapes of edge-on disks, as well as quantifying the relat...

Willett, Kyle W; Bamford, Steven P; Masters, Karen L; Simmons, Brooke D; Casteels, Kevin R V; Edmondson, Edward M; Fortson, Lucy F; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C; Melvin, Thomas; Nichol, Robert C; Raddick, M Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Simpson, Robert J; Skibba, Ramin A; Smith, Arfon M; Thomas, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

Sako, Masao; /Pennsylvania U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, D.L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Craig, Hogan, J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U.; Richmond, Michael W.; /Rochester Inst. Tech.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Smith, Mathew; /Portsmouth U.; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Apache Point Observ. /Seoul Natl. U. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Tokyo U. /Seoul Natl. U. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ.

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

313

Possibilities and Limitations for Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts Using Nowcasting Methods with Infrared Geosynchronous Satellite Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rainfall nowcasting system is developed that identifies locations of raining clouds on consecutive infrared geosynchronous satellite images while predicting the movement of the rain cells for up to 10 h using cloud-motion-based winds. As part ...

Andrew M. E. Grose; Eric A. Smith; Hyo-Sang Chung; Mi-Lim Ou; Byung-Ju Sohn; F. Joseph Turk

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Application of CALIOP Measurements to the Evaluation of Cloud Phase Derived from MODIS Infrared Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) infrared-based cloud thermodynamic phase retrievals are evaluated using Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) retrievals for the 6 months from January to ...

Hyoun-Myoung Cho; Shaima L. Nasiri; Ping Yang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Autofluorescence detection and imaging of bladder cancer realized through a cystoscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence and utilizing interior examination techniques and equipment are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and/or tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

Demos, Stavros G. (Livermore, CA); deVere White, Ralph W. (Sacramento, CA)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

316

Algorithm of feature estimation for real time objects detection in thermal images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objects detection in thermal or infrared images is an actual and necessary problem in wide range of thermo visual systems applications. The goal of this article is to select a suitable set of features for objects detection in thermal images. Using the ... Keywords: features estimation, infrared images, real time objects detection, thermal images

Snejana Pleshkova

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Nano-Mechanical Infrared Detectors  

SciTech Connect

Infrared radiation (IR) is electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths between 0.7 m and 100 m. It extends from visible light to THz waves. Because fundamentally different phenomena can be observed within the IR region, four sub-bands are usually distinguished: near-IR (NIR), mid-wave-IR (MWIR), long-wave-IR (LWIR) and very long-wave-IR (VLWIR). Although somewhat different definitions exist in literature, wavelengths from 0.7 m to 2.5 m belong to NIR, from 2.5 m to 8 m belong to MWIR, from 8 m to 14 m belong to LWIR and wavelengths above 14 m belong to VLWIR. The IR photon energies range from 1.77 eV for 0.7 m photons to 0.0124 eV for 100 m photons. The significance and practical applications of IR detectors are related to two distinct phenomena: emission of electromagnetic waves by all objects at T > 0 K and interaction of electromagnetic waves with vibrational modes of molecular bonds. Thermal imaging and molecular spectroscopy are, respectively, the two major fields that critically depend on the ability to detect IR radiation.

Grbovic, Dragoslav [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL; Rajic, Slobodan [ORNL; Hunter, Scott [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL; Datskos, Panos G [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SASIR: The Synoptic All-Sky Infrared Imaging Survey Concept SASIR: The Synoptic All-Sky Infrared Imaging Survey Concept Joshua Bloom UC Berkeley Abstract: I describe an ambitious project - a synoptic survey, of the entire night sky at infrared wavelengths to unprecedented depths using a dedicated wide-field 6.5-meter telescope in San Pedro Martir (SPM), Mexico. The concept is part of a new initiative for a ground-based telescope in partnership with Mexico and the University of California. What the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) are to the Digitized Sky Survey (DSS), this project will be to the seminal 2 micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS). The science drivers for the synoptic all-sky infrared (SASIR) survey are numerous, from discovery of the precious and rare high-redshift QSOs in the static sky to uncovering and studying

319

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

Wurden, Glen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

Wurden, G.A.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Aerosol effects on red blue ratio of clear sky images, and impact on solar forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all solar zenith angle within the time period, set and sun-all solar zenith angle within the time period, set and sun-at 0 to 30 sun-pixel angles to avoid solar beam radiation

Ghonima, Mohamed Sherif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Aerosol effects on red blue ratio of clear sky images, and impact on solar forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20 Table 4.3.1: COD, MBE and MAD for RBR estimate vs. RBRmodel, the coefficient of determination (COD) was calculatedas follows: COD is the measurment value, ? is the model

Ghonima, Mohamed Sherif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Measuring overcast colors with all-sky imaging Raymond L. Lee, Jr.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and MODTRAN4 cannot explain these characteristic patterns, a simple semiempirical model based on the radiative experience with general-purpose radiative transfer models such as MODTRAN4 suggests that they can simulate, for a reasonable choice of input parameters, MODTRAN4 produces spectra that are nearly congruent with individual

Lee Jr., Raymond L.

324

Comparison of Cloud Cover from All-Sky Imager and Meteorological Observer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naked-eye observation of cloud cover has widely resisted automation. Replacement of human observation by instruments is an inexorable trend for the development of ground-based macroscopic cloud observation. In this paper, cloud covers from an all-...

Juan Huo; Daren Lu

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

THE CONTRIBUTION OF TP-AGB STARS TO THE MID-INFRARED COLORS OF NEARBY GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We study the mid-infrared color space of 30 galaxies from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) survey for which Sloan Digital Sky Survey data are also available. We construct two-color maps for each galaxy and compare them to results obtained from combining Maraston evolutionary synthesis models, galactic thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) colors, and smooth star formation histories. For most of the SINGS sample, the spatially extended mid-IR emission seen by Spitzer in normal galaxies is consistent with our simple model in which circumstellar dust from TP-AGB stars dominates at 8 and 24 {mu}m. There is a handful of exceptions that we identify as galaxies that have high star formation rates presumably with star formation histories that cannot be assumed to be smooth, or anemic galaxies, which were depleted of their H I at some point during their evolution and have very low ongoing star formation rates.

Chisari, Nora E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Kelson, Daniel D., E-mail: nchisari@astro.princeton.edu [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Science, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

326

Open Skies and monitoring a fissile materials cut-off treaty  

SciTech Connect

The Treaty on Open Skies (Open Skies) is intended among other things to provide, in the words of its preamble, means ``to facilitate the monitoring of compliance with existing or future arms control agreements.`` Open Skies permits overflights of the territory of member states by aircraft equipped with an array of sensors of various types. Their types and capabilities are treaty-limited. To find useful application in monitoring a cut-off treaty Open Skies would need to be amended. The number of signatories would need to be expanded so as to provide greater geographical coverage, and restrictions on sensor-array capabilities would need to be relaxed. To facilitate the detection of impending violations of a cut-off convention by Open Skies overflights, the data base provided by parties to the former should include among other things an enumeration of existing and former fuel cycle and research facilities including those converted to other uses, their precise geographic location, and a site plan.

Allentuck, J.; Lemley, J.R.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Satellite-Image-derived Gulf Stream Currents Compared with Numerical Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sequential infrared satellite imagery is used to objectively compute surface currents in the Gulf Stream region using the maximum correlation (MCC) method. The infrared images, filtered for cloud cover, are used to find the displacement of ...

W. J. Emery; C. Fowler; C. A. Clayson

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS and SDSS-II): Data from the SDSS Legacy Survey (Data Release 7)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The seventh data release (DR7) from the SDSS represents a completion of the overall, original project, though SDSS-III began in 2008 and will build upon the knowledge gained already. The SDSS Legacy Survey provided a uniform, well-calibrated map of more than 7,500 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap, and three stripes in the South Galactic Cap totaling 740 square degrees. The central stripe in the South Galactic Gap, Stripe 82, was scanned multiple times to enable a deep co-addition of the data and to enable discovery of variable objects. Legacy data supported studies ranging from asteroids and nearby stars to the large-scale structure of the universe. All of the imaging data have been processed to yield calibrated astrometric and photometric parameters and classifications. These parameters are available in one or more tables in a database accessible via the Catalog Archive Server (CAS) at http://cas.sdss.org/astro. [taken and edited from the Legacy page at http://www.sdss.org/legacy/index.html] All three surveys summarized are: 1) Legacy: an imaging survey in five bands over a contiguous 7646 deg2 high-latitude elliptical region in the Northern Galactic Cap, plus an additional 750 deg2 in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with spectroscopy of complete samples of galaxies and quasars covering about 8200 square degrees. The total imaging area in the Legacy survey is 8423 square degrees; 2) SEGUE: (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration): additional imaging of 3240 deg2 of sky at lower Galactic latitudes, together with spectroscopy of 240,000 stars towards 200 sight lines covering 1400 square degrees (spread throughout the Legacy and SEGUE imaging footprints), to study the structure of the Milky Way; 3) Supernova: the equivalent of about 80 repeated imaging scans of the Southern Equatorial Stripe (ra > 310 or ra < 59; -1.25 > dec < 1.25) obtained in variable weather conditions (some clouds) to search for supernovae in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.4. The catalog derived from the images includes more than 350 million celestial objects, and spectra of 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data are fully calibrated and reduced, carefully checked for quality, and publicly accessible through efficient databases. The data have been publicly released in a series of annual data releases, culminating in the final data release, DR7.[Copied from http://www.sdss.org/dr7/start/aboutdr7.html

329

Principal Component Image Analysis of MODIS for Volcanic Ash. Part II: Simulation of Current GOES and GOES-M Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper the infrared bands of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were analyzed using principal component image analysis for volcanic ash signals. The analyses performed determined that several of the thermal ...

Donald W. Hillger; James D. Clark

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Principal Component Image Analysis of MODIS for Volcanic Ash. Part I: Most Important Bands and Implications for Future GOES Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper, the infrared bands of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are analyzed for volcanic ash signals using principal component image analysis. Target volcanoes included Popocatepetl volcano near Mexico ...

Donald W. Hillger; James D. Clark

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Use of Aeronet Aerosol Retrievals to Calculate Clear-Sky Irradiance at the Surface  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AERONET Aerosol Retrievals to AERONET Aerosol Retrievals to Calculate Clear-Sky Irradiance at the Surface G. L. Schuster National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia O. Dubovik National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics Greenbelt, Maryland Motivation The worldwide aerosol robotic network (AERONET) of ground-based radiometers was developed (in part) as a satellite validation tool (Holben et al. 1998). These sites utilize spectral sky-scanning radiometers, providing more information for aerosol retrievals than conventional sunphotometer measurements. The use of the almucantar sky radiance scans in conjunction with the aerosol optical thicknesses are the basis of the AERONET Dubovik retrievals, which provide the aerosol size

332

Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky December 24, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis The Energy Department's Los Alamos National Lab is tracking Santa Claus as he circles the globe the night before Christmas. The Energy Department's Los Alamos National Lab is tracking Santa Claus as he circles the globe the night before Christmas. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Every year since 1998, the Energy Department's Los Alamos National Lab has been using state-of-the-art technology to track Santa Claus as he circles the globe the night before Christmas. You'll be able to monitor St. Nick's journey here starting at 6 a.m. ET on Christmas Eve. Since Santa doesn't file his flight path with the Federal Aviation

333

Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in First  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in First Long-Term Climate Experiment Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in First Long-Term Climate Experiment June 27, 2011 - 12:42pm Addthis ARM Mobile Facility instrumentation is installed in June 2011 at the ARIES Observatory in Nainital, India, for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX). | Courtesy of ARM.gov ARM Mobile Facility instrumentation is installed in June 2011 at the ARIES Observatory in Nainital, India, for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX). | Courtesy of ARM.gov Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Energy Department's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility recently deployed its mobile facility to

334

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

335

3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky 3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky 3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky July 24, 2012 - 10:56am Addthis This is an artist's rendering of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the 8.4 meter wide-field telescope that the National Science Board recently approved to advance to its final design stage. Construction is expected to begin in 2014 and take about five years. | Photo courtesy of LSST Corporation. This is an artist's rendering of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the 8.4 meter wide-field telescope that the National Science Board recently approved to advance to its final design stage. Construction is expected to begin in 2014 and take about five years. | Photo courtesy of LSST Corporation. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux

336

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

337

A SEARCH FOR CONCENTRIC CIRCLES IN THE 7 YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE TEMPERATURE SKY MAPS  

SciTech Connect

In this Letter, we search for concentric circles with low variance in cosmic microwave background sky maps. The detection of such circles would hint at new physics beyond the current cosmological concordance model, which states that the universe is isotropic and homogeneous, and filled with Gaussian fluctuations. We first describe a set of methods designed to detect such circles, based on matched filters and {chi}{sup 2} statistics, and then apply these methods to the best current publicly available data, the 7 year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) temperature sky maps. We compare the observations with an ensemble of 1000 Gaussian {Lambda}CDM simulations. Based on these tests, we conclude that the WMAP sky maps are fully compatible with the Gaussian and isotropic hypothesis as measured by low-variance ring statistics.

Wehus, I. K. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Eriksen, H. K., E-mail: i.k.wehus@fys.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Infrared laser system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

Cantrell, Cyrus D. (Santa Fe, NM); Carbone, Robert J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cooper, Ralph S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Infrared laser system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

Cantrell, Cyrus D. (Richardson, TX); Carbone, Robert J. (Johnson City, TN); Cooper, Ralph (Hayward, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Improving face segmentation in thermograms using image signatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to present a method for the automatic segmentation of face images captured in Long Wavelength Infrared (LWIR), allowing for a large range of face rotations and expressions. The motivation behind this effort is to enable better ... Keywords: face segmentation, human skin segmentation, image segmentation, infrared thermal

Sílvio Filipe; Luís A. Alexandre

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

PRIMORDIAL GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTABILITY WITH DEEP SMALL-SKY COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

We use the Bayesian estimation on direct T - Q - U cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps to forecast errors on the tensor-to-scalar power ratio r, and hence on primordial gravitational waves, as a function of sky coverage f{sub sky}. This map-based likelihood filters the information in the pixel-pixel space into the optimal combinations needed for r detection for cut skies, providing enhanced information over a first-step linear separation into a combination of E, B, and mixed modes, and ignoring the latter. With current computational power and for typical resolutions appropriate for r detection, the large matrix inversions required are accurate and fast. Our simulations explore two classes of experiments, with differing bolometric detector numbers, sensitivities, and observational strategies. One is motivated by a long duration balloon experiment like Spider, with pixel noise {proportional_to}{radical}(f{sub sky}) for a specified observing period. This analysis also applies to ground-based array experiments. We find that, in the absence of systematic effects and foregrounds, an experiment with Spider-like noise concentrating on f{sub sky} {approx} 0.02-0.2 could place a 2{sigma}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 0.014 boundary ({approx}95% confidence level), which rises to 0.02 with an l-dependent foreground residual left over from an assumed efficient component separation. We contrast this with a Planck-like fixed instrumental noise as f{sub sky} varies, which gives a Galaxy-masked (f{sub sky} = 0.75) 2{sigma}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 0.015, rising to Almost-Equal-To 0.05 with the foreground residuals. Using as the figure of merit the (marginalized) one-dimensional Shannon entropy of r, taken relative to the first 2003 WMAP CMB-only constraint, gives -2.7 bits from the 2012 WMAP9+ACT+SPT+LSS data, and forecasts of -6 bits from Spider (+ Planck); this compares with up to -11 bits for CMBPol, COrE, and PIXIE post-Planck satellites and -13 bits for a perfectly noiseless cosmic variance limited experiment. We thus confirm the wisdom of the current strategy for r detection of deeply probed patches covering the f{sub sky} minimum-error trough with balloon and ground experiments.

Farhang, M.; Bond, J. R.; Netterfield, C. B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Dore, O. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Full-sky correlation functions for CMB experiments with asymmetric window functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss full-sky convolution of the instrumental beam with the CMB sky signal in CMB single-dish and interferometry experiments, using the method (Challinor et al. 2000) that the measured temperature and polarization anisotropies are defined globally on the group manifold of the three-dimensional rotation by means of Wigner D-functions. We re-derive the anisotropy and polarization correlation functions incorporated with asymmetric window functions, which are then explicitly calculated for a single-dish elliptical Gaussian beam and an interferometric Gaussian beam.

Kin-Wang Ng

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15, 2007 [Facility News] 15, 2007 [Facility News] Commercial Infrared Sky Imagers Compared Bookmark and Share Three of the four instruments used in the sky imager intercomparison are visible in this photo taken on the Guest Instrument Facility platform at the SGP site. They are the Solmirus All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer (foreground); Heitronics Nubiscope (top right); and Atmos Cloud Infrared Radiometer-4 (far left). Three of the four instruments used in the sky imager intercomparison are visible in this photo taken on the Guest Instrument Facility platform at the SGP site. They are the Solmirus All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer (foreground); Heitronics Nubiscope (top right); and Atmos Cloud Infrared Radiometer-4 (far left). Four infrared imaging instruments were installed and operated at the ARM

344

Forward looking infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Forward looking infrared Citation Wikipedia. Forward looking infrared...

345

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrared Sky Imager Takes a Shot in the Dark Infrared Sky Imager Takes a Shot in the Dark Bookmark and Share Processed images from the Infrared Sky Imager are limited to a field-of-view (FOV) of 160 degrees to eliminate the problems inherent in retrievals along the horizon line. This is where any cloud signal is masked by the integrated infrared signal along the long path length through the atmosphere. Processed images from the Infrared Sky Imager are limited to a field-of-view (FOV) of 160 degrees to eliminate the problems inherent in retrievals along the horizon line. This is where any cloud signal is masked by the integrated infrared signal along the long path length through the atmosphere. Imaging technologies help scientists correlate and compare data retrieved by sensors and lasers against visual data. One such technology used by ARM

346

Definition: Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Long-Wave Infrared Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Long-Wave Infrared Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) refers to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the 8 to 15 µm wavelength range. LWIR surveys are sometimes referred to as "thermal imaging" and can be used to identify relatively warm features such as hot springs, fumaroles, and snow melt. LWIR can also be used to map the distribution of certain minerals related to hydrothermal alterations.[2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ Katherine Young,Timothy Reber,Kermit Witherbee. 2012. Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange on Openei. In: Proceedings of the Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal

347

A Search for Mid-Infrared Emission from Hot Molecular Core Candidates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present here mid-infrared images of seven sites of water maser emission thought to be associated with the hot molecular core (HMC) phase of massive star formation. Observations were obtained at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility 3-m, the Gemini 8-m, and Keck II 10-m telescopes. We have detected mid-infrared sources at the locations of two HMC candidates, G11.94-0.62 and G45.07-0.13. We observed G19.61-0.23 and G34.26+0.15, each of which have HMCs previously detected in the mid-infrared. We did not detect mid-infrared emission from either HMC source, and we place new upper limits on the mid-infrared flux densities for these HMCs that are much lower than their previously reported flux densities. We were able to obtain extremely accurate astrometry for our mid-infrared images of G9.62+0.19, and conclude that the mid-infrared emission thought to be coming from the HMC in this field is in fact coming from a different source altogether.

James M. De Buizer; James T. Radomski; Charles M. Telesco; Robert K. Pina

2003-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

Determination of the Far-Infrared Cosmic Background Using COBE/DIRBE and WHAM Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determination of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at far infrared wavelengths using COBE/DIRBE data is limited by the accuracy to which foreground interplanetary and Galactic dust emission can be modeled and subtracted. Previous determinations of the far infrared CIB (e.g., Hauser et al. 1998) were based on the detection of residual isotropic emission in skymaps from which the emission from interplanetary dust and the neutral interstellar medium were removed. In this paper we use the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper (WHAM) Northern Sky Survey as a tracer of the ionized medium to examine the effect of this foreground component on determination of the CIB. We decompose the DIRBE far infrared data for five high Galactic latitude regions into H I and H-alpha correlated components and a residual component. We find the H-alpha correlated component to be consistent with zero for each region, and we find that addition of an H-alpha correlated component in modeling the foreground emission has negligible effect on derived ...

Odegard, N; Dwek, E; Haffner, L M; Hauser, M G; Reynolds, R J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A 15-year Simulation of the Clear-Sky Greenhouse Effect Using the ECMWF Reanalyses: Fluxes and Comparisons with ERBE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from the project Clear-sky Longwave from ERA (CLERA), in which simulations were performed of clear-sky longwave fluxes and heating rates for the period 1979–93, based on data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather ...

A. Slingo; J. A. Pamment; M. J. Webb

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

IMAGE ORIENTATION DETECTION WITH INTEGRATED HUMAN PERCEPTION CUES (OR WHICH WAY IS UP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMAGE ORIENTATION DETECTION WITH INTEGRATED HUMAN PERCEPTION CUES (OR WHICH WAY IS UP) Lei Wang In this paper, we propose a set of human perceptual cues used jointly to automatically detect image orientation. The cues used are: orientation of faces, position of the sky, brighter regions, and textured objects

Chen, Yiling

351

The Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey:II. Gravitational lens candidate selection and follow-up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the final results of the search for gravitationally lensed flat-spectrum radio sources found in the combination of CLASS (Cosmic Lens All Sky Survey) and JVAS (Jodrell-Bank VLA Astrometric Survey). VLA observations of 16,503 sources have been made, resulting in the largest sample of arcsec-scale lens systems available. Contained within the 16,503 sources is a complete sample of 11,685 sources having two-point spectral indices between 1.4 and 5 GHz flatter than -0.5 and 5 GHz flux densities $\\geq$30 mJy. A subset of 8,958 sources form a well-defined statistical sample suitable for analysis of the lens statistics. We describe the systematic process by which 149 candidate lensed sources were picked from the statistical sample on the basis of possessing multiple compact components in the 0.2 arcsec-resolution VLA maps. Candidates were followed up with 0.05 arcsec resolution MERLIN and 0.003 arcsec VLBA observations at 5 GHz and rejected as lens systems if they failed well-defined surface brightness and/or morphological tests. Maps for all the candidates can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/research/gravlens/index.html We summarize the properties of each of the 22 gravitational lens systems in JVAS/CLASS. Twelve are double-image systems, nine are four-image systems and one is a six-image system. Thirteen constitute a statistically well-defined sample giving a point-source lensing rate of 1:690$\\pm$190. The interpretation of the results in terms of the properties of the lensing galaxy population and cosmological parameters will be published elsewhere. (Abridged)

I. W. A. Browne; P. N. Wilkinson; N. J. F. Jackson; S. T. Myers; C. D. Fassnacht; L. V. E. Koopmans; D. R. Marlow; M. Norbury; D. Rusin; C. M. Sykes; A. D. Biggs; R. D. Blandford; A. G. de Bruyn; K-H. Chae; P. Helbig; L. J. King; J. P. McKean; T. J. Pearson; P. M. Phillips; A. C. S. Readhead; E. Xanthopoulos; T. York

2002-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

352

Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents results of an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50,1?190]??Hz and with frequency derivative range of ?[-20,1.1]×10[superscript -10]??Hz?s[superscript -1] for the ...

Barsotti, Lisa

353

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky. The algorithm, based on the Independent Component Analysis (ICA) technique, is aimed at recovering both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations, without any a priori assumption on properties of the components to be separated, except that all of them, but at most one, must have non-Gaussian distributions. The analysis starts from very simple toy-models of the sky emission in order to assess the quality of the reconstruction when inputs are well known and controlled. In particular we study the dependence of the results of separation conducted on and off the Galactic plane independently, showing that optimal separation is achieved for sky regions where components are smoothly distributed. Then we move to more realistic applications on simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal

D. Maino; A. Farusi; C. Baccigalupi; F. Perrotta; L. Bedini

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Analog Sky Condition Forecasting Based on a k-nn Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very short-range, cloudy–clear sky condition forecasts are important for a variety of military, civil, and commercial activities. In this investigation, an approach based on a k-nearest neighbors (k-nn) algorithm was developed and implemented to ...

Timothy J. Hall; Rachel N. Thessin; Greg J. Bloy; Carl N. Mutchler

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Clear-Sky Longwave Irradiance at the Earth’s Surface—Evaluation of Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of the clear-sky longwave irradiance at the earth’s surface (LI) simulated in climate models and in satellite-based global datasets is presented. Algorithm-based estimates of LI, derived from global observations of column water ...

J. R. Garratt

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Comparison of Regional Clear-Sky Albedos Inferred from Satellite Observations and Model Computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have taken an important first step in validating climate models by comparing model and satellite inferred clear sky TOA (top-of-atmosphere) albedos. Model albodos were computed on a 1° × 1° latitude-longitude grid, allowing for variations in ...

B. P. Briegleb; P. Minnis; V. Ramanathan; E. Harrison

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Investigation of astrophysical phenomena in short time scales with "Pi of the Sky" apparatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis the data analysis designed by author for the "Pi of the Sky" experiment is presented. The data analysis consists of data reduction and specific algorithms for identification of short time scale astrophysical processes. The algorithms have been tested and their efficiency has been determined and described. The "Pi of the Sky" prototype is collecting data since June 2004 and algorithms could be intensively studied and improved during over 700 nights. A few events of confirmed astrophysical origin and above 100 events in 10s time scale of unknown nature have been discovered. During the data collection period 3 Gamma Ray Bursts (out of 231) occurred in the field of view of the telescope, but no optical counterpart has been found. The upper limits for brightness of the optical counterpart have been determined. The continuous monitoring of the sky and own trigger for optical flashes allowed to determine limits on the number of GRBs without corresponding gamma-ray detection. This allowed determining limits on the ratio of emission collimation in optical and gamma bands, which is R >= 4.4. The perspectives of the full "Pi of the Sky" system has been studied and number of positive detections has been estimated on the level of ~ 2.5 events per year.

Marcin Sokolowski

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

358

Evaluation of a Ground-Based Sky Camera System for Use inSurface Irradiance Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the evaluation of a ground-based sky camera system for studying the effect of clouds on the level of the ambient ultraviolet radiation. The system has been developed for research in the characterization of the effect of ...

Jeff Sabburg; Joe Wong

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Statistical Exmination of Sky Cover Changes in the Contiguous United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sette Weather Chart constructed in 1939 with data from 1900 to 1936 was used to describe the climatology of cloudless days and to predict cloudless days in the United States for 14 regions. When the data for days having 0.1 sky cover or less ...

William L. Seaver; James E. Lee

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Solar Irradiance Anomalies Caused by Clear-Sky Transmission Variations above Mauna Loa: 1958–99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The clear-sky transmission of the atmosphere contributes to determining the amount of solar irradiance that reaches various levels in the atmosphere, which in turn is fundamental to defining the climate of the earth. As of the end of 1999, ...

Ellsworth G. Dutton; Barry A. Bodhaine

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The MOXE X-ray all-sky monitor for Spectrum-X-Gamma  

SciTech Connect

MOXE is an X-ray all-sky monitor to be flown on the Russian Spectrum-X-Gamma satellite, to be launched in a few years. It will monitor several hundred X-ray sources on a daily basis, and will be the first instrument to monitor most of the X-ray sky most of the time. MOXE will alert users of more sensitive instruments on Russia`s giant high energy astrophysics observatory and of other instruments to transient activity. MOXE consists of an array of 6 X-ray pinhole cameras, sensitive from 3 to 25 keV, which views 4{pi} steradians (except for a 20{degree} {times} 80{degree} patch which includes the Sun). The pinhole apertures of 0.625 {times} 2.556 cm{sup 2} imply an angular resolution of 2{degree}.4 {times} 9{degree}.7 (on-axis). The MOXE hardware program includes an engineering model, now delivered, and a flight model. The flight instrument will mass approximately 118 kg and draw 38 Watts. For a non-focusing all-sky instrument that is limited by sky background, the limiting sensitivity is a function only of detector area. MOXE, with 6,000 cm{sup 2} of detector area, will, for a 24 hrs exposure, have a sensitivity of approximately 2 mCrab. MOXE distinguishes itself with respect to other all-sky monitors in its high duty cycle, thus being particularly sensitive to transient phenomena with time scales between minutes and hours.

In`t Zand, J.J.M.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Moss, C.E. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Studying the Imaging Characteristics of Ultra Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) through Numerical Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) is one of the five payloads aboard the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO)'s ASTROSAT space mission. The science objectives of UVIT are broad, extending from individual hot stars, star-forming regions to active galactic nuclei. Imaging performance of UVIT would depend on several factors in addition to the optics, e.g. resolution of the detectors, Satellite Drift and Jitter, image frame acquisition rate, sky background, source intensity etc. The use of intensified CMOS-imager based photon counting detectors in UVIT put their own complexity over reconstruction of the images. All these factors could lead to several systematic effects in the reconstructed images. A study has been done through numerical simulations with artificial point sources and archival image of a galaxy from GALEX data archive, to explore the effects of all the above mentioned parameters on the reconstructed images. In particular the issues of angular resolution, photometric accuracy and photometric...

Srivastava, Mudit K; Tandon, Shyam N

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Contribution of Mesoscale Convective Complexes to Rainfall in Sahelian Africa: Estimates from Geostationary Infrared and Passive Microwave Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contribution of mesoscale convective complexes to the July–September rainfall in Sahelian Africa is assessed using passive microwave data from the Special Sensor Microwave Image and infrared (IR) data from the European Geostationary ...

Arlene G. Laing; J. Michael Fritsch; Andrew J. Negri

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Mt Ranier Area Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Ranier Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Infrared images acquired through joint US. Department of Energy and U.S. Geological Survey efforts (Kieffer et al., 1982) show a representative pattern of heat emission from the summit area (Fig. 5). References David Frank (1995) Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System At Mount Rainier, Washington Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_And-Or_Near_Infrared_At_Mt_Ranier_Area_(Frank,_1995)&oldid=386481" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes

365

A Survey of z>5.7 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Discovery of Seven Additional Quasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the discovery of seven quasars at z>5.7, selected from ~2000 deg^2 of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z=5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-sigma limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly alpha+NV line is 5 A. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z>6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z=6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z=6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly alpha. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z>6.2 and do not have complete Ly beta absorption.

Xiaohui Fan; Michael A. Strauss; Gordon T. Richards; Joseph F. Hennawi; Robert H. Becker; Richard L. White; Aleksandar M. Diamond-Stanic; Jennifer L. D onley; Linhua Jiang; J. Serena Kim; Marianne Vestergaard; Jason E. Young; James E. Gunn; Robert H. Lupton; Gillian R. Knapp; Donald P. Schneider; W. N. Brandt; Neta A. Bahcall; J. C. Barentine; J. Brinkmann; Howard J. Brewington; Masataka F ukugita; Michael Harvanek; S. J. Kleinman; Jurek Krzesinski; Dan Long; Eric H. N eilsen, Jr.; Atsuko Nitta; Stephanie A. Snedden; Wolfgang Voges

2005-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

366

A Survey of z>5.7 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Discovery of Seven Additional Quasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the discovery of seven quasars at z>5.7, selected from ~2000 deg^2 of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z=5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-sigma limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly alpha+NV line is 5 A. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z>6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z=6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z=6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly alpha. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z>6.2 and do not have complete Ly beta absorption.

Fan, X; Barentine, J C; Becker, R H; Brandt, W N; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Gunn, J E; Harvanek, M; Hennawi, J F; Jiang, L; Kim, J S; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Lupton, R H; Nitta, A; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Snedden, S A; Strauss, M A; Vestergaard, M; Voges, W; White, R L; Young, J E; eilsen, E H N; onley, J L D; ukugita, M F; Bahcall, Neta A.; Becker, Robert H.; Brewington, Howard J.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Gunn, James E.; Harvanek, Michael; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Jiang, Linhua; Knapp, Gillian R.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Voges, Wolfgang; White, Richard L.; Young, Jason E.; eilsen, Eric H. N; onley, Jennifer L. D; ukugita, Masataka F

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Survey of z > 5.7 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Discovery of Seven Additional Quasars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present the discovery of seven quasars at z > 5.7, selected from {approx} 2000 deg{sup 2} of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z = 5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-{sigma} limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly{alpha}+NV line is 5 {angstrom}. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z > 6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z = 6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z = 6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson troughs in Ly{alpha}. These troughs are narrower than those observed among quasars at z > 6.2 and do not have complete Ly{beta} absorption.

Fan, X; Strauss, M A; Richards, G T; Hennawi, J F; Becker, R H; White, R L; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Donley, J L; Jiang, L; Kim, J S; Vestergaard, M; Young, J E; Gunn, J E; Lupton, R H; Knapp, G R; Schneider, D P; Brandt, W N; Bahcall, N A; Barentine, J C; Brinkmann, J; Brewington, H J; Fukugita, M; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S J; Krzesinski, J; Long, D; Neilsen Jr., E H; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A; Voges, W

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

368

A survey of z > 5.7 quasars in the sloan digital sky survey. 4. discovery of seven additional quasars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the discovery of seven quasars at z > 5.7, selected from {approx}2000 deg{sup 2} of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z = 5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-{sigma} limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly{alpha} + NV line is 5 {angstrom}. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z > 6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z = 6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z = 6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly{alpha}. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z > 6.2 and do not have complete Ly{beta} absorption.

Fan, Xiao-Hui; Strauss, Michael A.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; onley, Jennifer L.D; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Kim, J.Serena; Vestergaard, Marianne; Young, Jason E.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W.N.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Brinkmann, J.; Brewington, Howard J.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Princeton U. Observ. /Johns Hopkins U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Davis /LLNL, Livermore /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Apache Point Observ. /Tokyo U., ICRR /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /Fermilab /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Automated Spot Weld Inspection using Infrared Thermography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated non-contact and non-destructive resistance spot weld inspection system based on infrared (IR) thermography was developed for post-weld applications. During inspection, a weld coupon was heated up by an auxiliary induction heating device from one side of the weld, while the resulting thermal waves on the other side were observed by an IR camera. The IR images were analyzed to extract a thermal signature based on normalized heating time, which was then quantitatively correlated to the spot weld nugget size. The use of normalized instead of absolute IR intensity was found to be useful in minimizing the sensitivity to the unknown surface conditions and environment interference. Application of the IR-based inspection system to different advanced high strength steels, thickness gauges and coatings were discussed.

Chen, Jian [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Yu, Zhenzhen [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Development of fluorescent semi-conductor nanocrystal conjugates for in vitro and in vivo imaging applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Semiconductor nanocrystals, also known as quantum dots (QDs), are promising imaging probes with characteristic optical properties: tunable bandgap from visible to infrared, narrow and symmetric emission features, broad ...

Han, Hee-Sun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: Frequency Comb, Ultrafast Laser. ...

372

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: Iron-Based Superconductors. Description ...

373

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: Space Weather Forecasts. Description ...

374

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: Organic Solar Power. Description ...

375

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Nanotechnology; Biotechnology/Health; Nanocrystals; Hwang. ...

376

A CCD Imaging Search for Wide Metal-Poor Binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explored the regions within a radius of 25 arcsec around 473 nearby, low-metallicity G- to M-type stars using (VR)I optical filters and small-aperture telescopes. About 10% of the sample was searched up to angular separations of 90 arcsec. We applied photometric and astrometric techniques to detect true physical companions to the targets. The great majority of the sample stars was drawn from the Carney-Latham surveys; their metallicities range from roughly solar to [Fe/H]=-3.5 dex. Our I-band photometric survey detected objects that are between 0 and 5 mag fainter (completeness) than the target stars; the maximum dynamical range of our exploration is 9 mag. We also investigated the literature and inspected images from the Digitized Sky Surveys to complete our search. By combining photometric and proper motion measurements, we retrieved 29 previously known companions, and identified 13 new proper motion companions. Near-infrared 2MASS photometry is provided for the great majority of them. Low-resolution optical spectroscopy (386-1000 nm) was obtained for eight of the new companion stars. These spectroscopic data confirm them as cool, late-type, metal-depleted dwarfs, with spectral classes from esdK7 to sdM3. After comparison with low-metallicity evolutionary models, we estimate the masses of the proper motion companion stars to be in the range 0.5-0.1 Msol. They are orbiting their primary stars at projected separations between ~32 and ~57000 AU. These orbital sizes are very similar to those of solar-metallicity stars of the same spectral types. Our results indicate that about 15% of the metal-poor stars have stellar companions at large orbits, which is in agreement with the binary fraction observed among main sequence G- to M-type stars and T Tauri stars.

M. R. Zapatero Osorio; E. L. Martin

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

377

Low-Surface-Brightness Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. I. Search Method and Test Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present results of a pilot study to use imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to search for low-surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies. For our pilot study we use a test sample of 92 galaxies from the catalog of Impey et al. (1996) distributed over 93 SDSS fields of the Early Data Release (EDR). Many galaxies from the test sample are either LSB or dwarf galaxies. To deal with the SDSS data most effectively a new photometry software was created, which is described in this paper. We present the results of the selection algorithms applied to these 93 EDR fields. Two galaxies from the Impey et al. test sample are very likely artifacts, as confirmed by follow-up imaging. With our algorithms, we were able to recover 87 of the 90 remaining test sample galaxies, implying a detection rate of $\\sim$96.5%. The three missed galaxies fall too close to very bright stars or galaxies. In addition, 42 new galaxies with parameters similar to the test sample objects were found in these EDR fields (i.e., $\\sim$47% additional galaxies). We present the main photometric parameters of all identified galaxies and carry out first statistical comparisons. We tested the quality of our photometry by comparing the magnitudes for our test sample galaxies and other bright galaxies with values from the literature. All these tests yielded consistent results. We briefly discuss a few unusual galaxies found in our pilot study, including an LSB galaxy with a two-component disk and ten new giant LSB galaxies.

Alexei Y. Kniazev; Eva K. Grebel; Simon A. Pustilnik; Alexander G. Pramskij; Tamara F. Kniazeva; Francisco Prada; Daniel Harbeck

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

378

Sloan Digital Sky Survey Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE): Data from a Spectroscopic Survey of 240,000 Stars with g=14-20  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The seventh data release (DR7) from the SDSS represents a completion of the overall, original project, though SDSS-III began in 2008 and will build upon the knowledge gained already.

SEGUE, which stands for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration, was one of those three surveys. The images and spectra obtained by SEGUE allowed astronomers to map the positions and velocities of hundreds of thousands of stars, from faint, relatively near-by (within about 100 pc or roughly 300 light-years) ancient stellar embers known as white dwarfs to bright stellar giants located in the outer reaches of the stellar halo, more than 100,000 light-years away. Encoded within the spectral data are the composition and temperature of these stars, vital clues for determining the age and origin of different populations of stars within the Galaxy. [from the SEGUE page at http://www.sdss.org/segue/] View illustrative spectra for various types of stars or go directly to the SDSS page for Data Release Seven at http://www.sdss.org/dr7/.

All three surveys summarized are:

  • Legacy: an imaging survey in five bands over a contiguous 7646 deg2 high-latitude elliptical region in the Northern Galactic Cap, plus an additional 750 deg2 in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with spectroscopy of complete samples of galaxies and quasars covering about 8200 square degrees. The total imaging area in the Legacy survey is 8423 square degrees.
  • SEGUE (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration): additional imaging of 3240 deg2 of sky at lower Galactic latitudes, together with spectroscopy of 240,000 stars towards 200 sightlines covering 1400 square degrees (spread throughout the Legacy and SEGUE imaging footprints), to study the structure of the Milky Way.
  • Supernova: the equivalent of about 80 repeated imaging scans of the Southern Equatorial Stripe (ra > 310 or ra < 59; -1.25 > dec < 1.25) obtained in variable weather conditions (some clouds) to search for supernovae in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.4.
The catalog derived from the images includes more than 350 million celestial objects, and spectra of 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data are fully calibrated and reduced, carefully checked for quality, and publically accessible through efficient databases. The data have been publicly released in a series of annual data releases, culminating in the final data release, DR7.[Copied from http://www.sdss.org/dr7/start/aboutdr7.html

SDSS-II SEGUE Collaboration; Yanny, Brian; Rockosi, Constance; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Knapp, Gillian R.

379

Infrared Thermography Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dual Glazing vs. Single Pane Dual Glazing vs. Single Pane On the left is a normal double glazed window. On the right is a single pane window. The single pane window is only slightly warmer than the cold air behind it. The dual pane window is considerably warmer which indicates that less heat is flowing out through the window and that the indoor space will be more comfortable. The two windows here are being cooled on the back side with wind at 0°C (32°F). (The other thermograms in this series are taken with colder conditions on the back side so don't try to cross compare these pictures. Too much frost builds up on the single pane window to allow testing it at the temperatures used for the other images). For more information contact: Howdy Goudey Building Technologies Program

380

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky, based on the fast Independent Component Analysis technique (FastICA). It allows to recover both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations. We apply FastICA to simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal levels for the Planck satellite, containing the most important known diffuse signals: the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Galactic synchrotron, dust and free-free emissions. A method for calibrating the reconstructed maps of each component at each frequency has been devised. The spatial pattern of all the components have been recovered on all scales probed by the instrument. In particular, the CMB angular power spectra is recovered at the percent level up to $\\ell_{max}\\simeq 2000$. Freque...

Maino, D; Baccigalupi, C; Perrotta, F; Banday, A J; Bedini, L; Burigana, C; Zotti, G D; Górski, K M; Salerno, E

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, NASA Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, NASA Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, Steve Dunagan, Roy Johnson: Steve Dunagan, Roy Johnson: Battelle PND: Connor Flynn, Beat Schmid, Battelle PND: Connor Flynn, Beat Schmid, Evgueni Kassianov Evgueni Kassianov NASA GSFC: Alexander Sinyuk, Brent NASA GSFC: Alexander Sinyuk, Brent Holben Holben , , & AERONET Team & AERONET Team Collaboration involving: Collaboration involving: NASA Ames, Battelle PND, NASA GSFC NASA Ames, Battelle PND, NASA GSFC 4S 4S TAR TAR : : S S pectrometer for pectrometer for S S ky ky - - S S canning, canning, S S un un - - T T racking racking A A tmospheric tmospheric R R esearch esearch 4STAR: 4STAR: Spectrometer Spectrometer for for Sky Sky - - Scanning Scanning , , Sun Sun - - Tracking Tracking Atmospheric Research Atmospheric Research

382

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey of Galactic Ionized Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a one-degree resolution, velocity-resolved northern sky survey of H-alpha emission from our Galaxy. The unprecedented sensitivity of the instrument and accurate spectral subtraction of atmospheric features allow us to detect Galactic features as faint as 0.1 Rayleighs (EM ~ 0.25 cm^{-6} pc). This survey allows a direct comparison of the ionized and neutral components of the ISM on a global scale for the first time. All-sky maps of H-alpha emission in select velocity bands highlight the rich kinematic structure of the Galaxy's ionized gas. The full set of data from the WHAM survey is now available at http://www.astro.wisc.edu/wham/. (abridged)

G. J. Madsen; L. M. Haffner; R. J. Reynolds

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

CGRaBS: An All-Sky Survey of Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a uniform all-sky survey of bright blazars, selected primarily by their flat radio spectra, that is designed to provide a large catalog of likely gamma-ray AGN. The defined sample has 1625 targets with radio and X-ray properties similar to those of the EGRET blazars, spread uniformly across the |b| > 10 deg sky. We also report progress toward optical characterization of the sample; of objects with known R < 23, 85% have been classified and 81% have measured redshifts. One goal of this program is to focus attention on the most interesting (e.g., high redshift, high luminosity, ...) sources for intensive multiwavelength study during the observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST.

Healey, Stephen E; Cotter, Garret; Michelson, Peter F; Schlafly, Edward F; Readhead, Anthony C S; Giommi, Paolo; Chaty, Sylvain; Grenier, Isabelle A; Weintraub, Lawrence C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

On the Estimation of Clear-Sky Upwelling Shortwave and Longwave  

SciTech Connect

Previous work (Long and Ackerman 2000; Long 2004) has concentrated on estimation of the downwelling clear-sky irradiances and the calculation of the effect of clouds on the downwelling radiative energy budget. However, cloud forcing is defined for the difference between clear- and cloudy-sky net radiation, which includes the upwelling components. Thus, if we are to estimate the surface radiative cloud forcing, the means must be developed to estimate what the upwelling shortwave and longwave irradiance would be if the clouds were not present. Estimation of the upwelling longwave (LW) is particularly troublesome in that the emitted upwelling LW is a function of the total surface energy exchange including latent and sensible heat, which is related to but not necessarily always totally driven by the radiative exchange alone, but also involves the evolving soil and vegetation properties and changes in soil moisture amounts.

Long, C.N.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

385

Tests for Non-Gaussian Statistics in the DMR Four-Year Sky Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search the high-latitude portion of the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) 4-year sky maps for evidence of a non-Gaussian temperature distribution in the cosmic microwave background. The genus, 3-point correlation function, and 2-point correlation function of temperature maxima and minima are all in excellent agreement with the hypothesis that the CMB anisotropy on angular scales of 7 degrees or larger represents a random-phase Gaussian field. A likelihood comparison of the DMR sky maps to a set of random-phase non-Gaussian toy models selects the exact Gaussian model as most likely. Monte Carlo simulations show that the 2-point correlation of the peaks and valleys in the maps provides the greatest discrimination among the class of models tested.

A. Kogut; A. J. Banday; C. L. Bennett; K. Gorski; G. Hinshaw; G. F. Smoot; E. L. Wright

1996-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

386

Determination of the Far-Infrared Cosmic Background Using COBE/DIRBE and WHAM Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determination of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at far infrared wavelengths using COBE/DIRBE data is limited by the accuracy to which foreground interplanetary and Galactic dust emission can be modeled and subtracted. Previous determinations of the far infrared CIB (e.g., Hauser et al. 1998) were based on the detection of residual isotropic emission in skymaps from which the emission from interplanetary dust and the neutral interstellar medium were removed. In this paper we use the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper (WHAM) Northern Sky Survey as a tracer of the ionized medium to examine the effect of this foreground component on determination of the CIB. We decompose the DIRBE far infrared data for five high Galactic latitude regions into H I and H-alpha correlated components and a residual component. We find the H-alpha correlated component to be consistent with zero for each region, and we find that addition of an H-alpha correlated component in modeling the foreground emission has negligible effect on derived CIB results. Our CIB detections and 2 sigma upper limits are essentially the same as those derived by Hauser et al. and are given by nu I_nu (nW m-2 sr-1) < 75, < 32, 25 +- 8, and 13 +- 3 at 60, 100, 140, and 240 microns, respectively. Our residuals have not been subjected to a detailed anisotropy test, so our CIB results do not supersede those of Hauser et al. We derive upper limits on the 100 micron emissivity of the ionized medium that are typically about 40% of the 100 micron emissivity of the neutral atomic medium. This low value may be caused in part by a lower dust-to-gas mass ratio in the ionized medium than in the neutral medium, and in part by a shortcoming of using H-alpha intensity as a tracer of far infrared emission.

N. Odegard; R. G. Arendt; E. Dwek; L. M. Haffner; M. G. Hauser; R. J. Reynolds

2007-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

387

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky, based on the fast Independent Component Analysis technique (FastICA). It allows to recover both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations. We apply FastICA to simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal levels for the Planck satellite, containing the most important known diffuse signals: the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Galactic synchrotron, dust and free-free emissions. A method for calibrating the reconstructed maps of each component at each frequency has been devised. The spatial pattern of all the components have been recovered on all scales probed by the instrument. In particular, the CMB angular power spectra is recovered at the percent level up to $\\ell_{max}\\simeq 2000$. Frequency scalings and normalization have been recovered with better than percent precision for all the components at frequencies and in sky regions where their signal-to-noise ratio exceeds 1.5; the error increases at ten percent level for signal-to-noise ratios about 1. Runs have been performed on a Pentium III 600 MHz computer; FastICA typically took a time of the order of 10 minutes for all-sky simulations with 3.5 arcminutes pixel size. We conclude that FastICA is an extremly promising technique for analyzing the maps that will be obtained by the forthcoming high resolution CMB experiments.

D. Maino; A. Farusi; C. Baccigalupi; F. Perrotta; A. J. Banday; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; K. M. Gorski; E. Salerno

2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

388

Wood Inspection by Infrared Thermography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wood is used everywhere and for everything. With times, this material presents many adulterations, witch degrade his physical properties. This work present a study of infrared thermography NDT for wood decay detection. The study is based on the difference of moisture content between sound wood and decay. In the first part, moisture content influence on response signal is determine. The second part define the limits of infrared thermography for wood decay detection. Results show that this method could be used, but with many cautions on depth and size of wood defects.

A. Wyckhuyse; X. Maldague; X. Maldague Corresponding

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Real time infrared aerosol analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL); Reedy, Gerald T. (Bourbonnais, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Neural networks and separation of background and foregrounds in astrophysical sky maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm is implemented as a neural network for separating signals of different origin in astrophysical sky maps. Due to its self-organizing capability, it works without prior assumptions on the signals, neither on their frequency scaling, nor on the signal maps themselves; instead, it learns directly from the input data how to separate the physical components, making use of their statistical independence. To have a first insight into the capabilities of this approach, we apply the ICA algorithm on sky patches, taken from simulations and observations, at the microwave frequencies, that are going to be deeply explored in a few years on the whole sky, by the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) and by the Planck Surveyor Satellite. The maps are at the frequencies of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) aboard the Planck satellite (30, 44, 70 and 100 GHz), and contain simulated astrophysical radio sources, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, and Galactic diffuse emissions from thermal dust and synchrotron. We show that the ICA algorithm is able to recover each

C. Baccigalupi; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; A. Farusi; D. Maino; M. Maris; F. Perrotta; E. Salerno; L. Toffolatti; A. Tonazzini

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long-period binary companion.

J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. S. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Cain; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr?czi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; W. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; M. R. Ganija; J. Garcia; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; I. Kamaretsos; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; D. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; M. Kinsey; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak

2011-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

392

All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space wher...

Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, D; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinsey, M; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

THE 70 MONTH SWIFT-BAT ALL-SKY HARD X-RAY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present the catalog of sources detected in 70 months of observations with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray detector on the Swift gamma-ray burst observatory. The Swift-BAT 70 month survey has detected 1171 hard X-ray sources (more than twice as many sources as the previous 22 month survey) in the 14-195 keV band down to a significance level of 4.8{sigma}, associated with 1210 counterparts. The 70 month Swift-BAT survey is the most sensitive and uniform hard X-ray all-sky survey and reaches a flux level of 1.03 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} over 50% of the sky and 1.34 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} over 90% of the sky. The majority of new sources in the 70 month survey continue to be active galactic nuclei, with over 700 in the catalog. As part of this new edition of the Swift-BAT catalog, we also make available eight-channel spectra and monthly sampled light curves for each object detected in the survey in the online journal and at the Swift-BAT 70 month Web site.

Baumgartner, W. H.; Tueller, J.; Markwardt, C. B.; Skinner, G. K.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mushotzky, R. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Evans, P. A., E-mail: whbaumga@alum.mit.edu [X-Ray and Observational Astronomy Group/Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Power Spectrum of Primordial Inhomogeneity Determined from the 4-Year COBE DMR Sky Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fourier analysis and power spectrum estimation of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy on an incompletely sampled sky developed by Gorski (1994) has been applied to the high-latitude portion of the 4-year COBE DMR 31.5, 53 and 90 GHz sky maps. Likelihood analysis using newly constructed Galaxy cuts (extended beyond |b| = 20deg to excise the known foreground emission) and simultaneously correcting for the faint high latitude galactic foreground emission is conducted on the DMR sky maps pixelized in both ecliptic and galactic coordinates. The Bayesian power spectrum estimation from the foreground corrected 4-year COBE DMR data renders n ~ 1.2 +/- 0.3, and Q_{rms-PS} ~ 15.3^{+3.7}_{-2.8} microK (projections of the two-parameter likelihood). These results are consistent with the Harrison-Zel'dovich n=1 model of amplitude Q_{rms-PS} ~ 18 microK detected with significance exceeding 14sigma (dQ/Q < 0.07). (A small power spectrum amplitude drop below the published 2-year results is predominantly due to the application of the new, extended Galaxy cuts.)

K. M. Gorski; A. J. Banday; C. L. Bennett; G. Hinshaw; A. Kogut; G. F. Smoot; E. L. Wright

1996-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

395

All-sky search for gravitational-wave bursts in the first joint LIGO-GEO-Virgo run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from an all-sky search for unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO, GEO 600 and Virgo detectors between November 2006 and October 2007. The search is performed by three ...

Weiss, Rainer

396

Starlight's Story: What can the light we see in the night sky tell us about the universe?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deal about an object from the light it emits. R eferencess S tory what can the light we see in the night sky tell usGriffin Rodgers a Visible light is a small band of

Rodgers, Griffen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Performance of Observation-Based Prediction Algorithms for Very Short-Range, Probabilistic Clear-Sky Condition Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very short-range sky condition forecasts are produced to support a variety of military, civil, and commercial activities. In this investigation, six advanced, observation (obs)-based prediction algorithms were developed and tested that generated ...

Timothy J. Hall; Carl N. Mutchler; Greg J. Bloy; Rachel N. Thessin; Stephanie K. Gaffney; Jonathan J. Lareau

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A MaxBCG Catalog of 13,823 Galaxy Clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of galaxy clusters selected using the maxBCG redsequence method from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data. This catalog includes 13,823 clusters with velocity dispersions greater than 400 km/s, and is the largest galaxy cluster catalog assembled to date. They are selected in an approximately volume-limited way from a 0.5 Gpc^3 region covering 7500 square degrees of sky between redshifts 0.1 and 0.3. (ABRIGDED)

Koester, B P; Annis, J; Wechsler, R H; Evrard, A; Bleem, L; Becker, M; Johnston, D; Sheldon, E; Nichol, R; Miller, C; Scranton, R; Bahcall, N; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Nitta, A; Schneider, D; Sneddin, S; Voges, W; York, D; 10.1086/509599

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A MaxBCG Catalog of 13,823 Galaxy Clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of galaxy clusters selected using the maxBCG redsequence method from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data. This catalog includes 13,823 clusters with velocity dispersions greater than 400 km/s, and is the largest galaxy cluster catalog assembled to date. They are selected in an approximately volume-limited way from a 0.5 Gpc^3 region covering 7500 square degrees of sky between redshifts 0.1 and 0.3. (ABRIGDED)

B. P. Koester; T. A. McKay; J. Annis; R. H. Wechsler; A. Evrard; L. Bleem; M. Becker; D. Johnston; E. Sheldon; R. Nichol; C. Miller; R. Scranton; N. Bahcall; J. Barentine; H. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; M. Harvanek; S. Kleinman; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; A. Nitta; D. Schneider; S. Sneddin; W. Voges; D. York; SDSS collaboration

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

400

CLUSTERING OF SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY III PHOTOMETRIC LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE MEASUREMENT, SYSTEMATICS, AND COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveyed 14,555 deg{sup 2}, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. We present a study of galaxy clustering using 900,000 luminous galaxies with photometric redshifts, spanning between z = 0.45 and z = 0.65, constructed from the SDSS using methods described in Ross et al. This data set spans 11,000 deg{sup 2} and probes a volume of 3 h {sup -3} Gpc{sup 3}, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We describe in detail the construction of the survey window function and various systematics affecting our measurement. With such a large volume, high-precision cosmological constraints can be obtained given careful control and understanding of the observational systematics. We present a novel treatment of the observational systematics and its applications to the clustering signals from the data set. In this paper, we measure the angular clustering using an optimal quadratic estimator at four redshift slices with an accuracy of {approx}15%, with a bin size of {delta}{sub l} = 10 on scales of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs; at l {approx} 40-400). We also apply corrections to the power spectra due to systematics and derive cosmological constraints using the full shape of the power spectra. For a flat {Lambda}CDM model, when combined with cosmic microwave background Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7 (WMAP7) and H{sub 0} constraints from using 600 Cepheids observed by Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3; HST), we find {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.73 {+-} 0.019 and H{sub 0} to be 70.5 {+-} 1.6 s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1} km. For an open {Lambda}CDM model, when combined with WMAP7 + HST, we find {Omega}{sub K} = 0.0035 {+-} 0.0054, improved over WMAP7+HST alone by 40%. For a wCDM model, when combined with WMAP7+HST+SN, we find w = -1.071 {+-} 0.078, and H{sub 0} to be 71.3 {+-} 1.7 s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1} km, which is competitive with the latest large-scale structure constraints from large spectroscopic surveys such as the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7) and WiggleZ. We also find that systematic-corrected power spectra give consistent constraints on cosmological models when compared with pre-systematic correction power spectra in the angular scales of interest. The SDSS-III Data Release 8 (SDSS-III DR8) Angular Clustering Data allow a wide range of investigations into the cosmological model, cosmic expansion (via BAO), Gaussianity of initial conditions, and neutrino masses. Here, we refer to our companion papers for further investigations using the clustering data. Our calculation of the survey selection function, systematics maps, and likelihood function for the COSMOMC package will be released at http://portal.nersc.gov/project/boss/galaxy/photoz/.

Ho, Shirley; White, Martin; Schlegel, David J.; Seljak, Uros; Reid, Beth [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 50R-5045, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cuesta, Antonio; Padmanabhan, Nikhil [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Seo, Hee-Jong [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, LBL and Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); De Putter, Roland [ICC, University of Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ross, Ashley J.; Percival, Will J. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Saito, Shun [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, CA (United States); Schlafly, Eddie [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden St. MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos [Centro de Estudios de Fisica del Cosmos de Aragon (CEFCA), Plaza de San Juan 1, planta 2, E-44001 Teruel (Spain); Sanchez, Ariel G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Blanton, Michael [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Skibba, Ramin [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Schneider, Don [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mena, Olga [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC (Spain); Viel, Matteo, E-mail: cwho@lbl.gov [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); and others

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Imaging the Surface of Altair  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spatially resolving the surfaces of nearby stars promises to advance our knowledge of stellar physics. Using optical long-baseline interferometry, we present here a near-infrared image of the rapidly rotating hot star Altair with results, requiring differential rotation, alternative gravity darkening laws, or both.

John D. Monnier; M. Zhao; E. Pedretti; N. Thureau; M. Ireland; P. Muirhead; J. -P. Berger; R. Millan-Gabet; G. Van Belle; T. ten Brummelaar; H. McAlister; S. Ridgway; N. Turner; L. Sturmann; J. Sturmann; D. Berger

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

402

Infrared Dry-peeling Technology for Tomatoes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research will use infrared heating technology for peeling tomatoes. Infrared dry peeling, a device District: 8 Senate District: 5 Application: Nationwide Amount: $324,250 Term: November 1, 2010

403

Thermal Imaging Control of Furnaces and Combustors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The object if this project is to demonstrate and bring to commercial readiness a near-infrared thermal imaging control system for high temperature furnaces and combustors. The thermal imaging control system, including hardware, signal processing, and control software, is designed to be rugged, self-calibrating, easy to install, and relatively transparent to the furnace operator.

David M. Rue; Serguei Zelepouga; Ishwar K. Puri

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

404

Infrared Thermography Guide (Revision 3)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Costly equipment outages can be reduced by implementing a comprehensive predictive maintenance program. Infrared thermography (IR), a fundamental component of such programs, uses nonintrusive techniques to monitor the operating condition of equipment and components. This revised report provides updated information to assist utilities in implementing an effective IR program.

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Industrial Use of Infrared Inspections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrared is and has been an established technology in the military and aerospace fields. However, only relatively recently has this technology found a "use" in the industrial sector. Many reasons exist why the technology has not been used, but in the final analysis it comes down to the fact that the industrial management responsible for the operations and production budgets did not, and in many cases, still does not understand the economic benefits to the company that infrared industrial inspections can bring about. Over the last 2-3 years a number of articles have appeared in various industrial publications concerning infrared surveys. However, all of the articles have dealt with the technical aspects of infrared inspections, with the economics either completely neglected or mentioned only in passing. I believe that in the real industrial world it is the economic benefits of a technology that allow the product of that technology to reach the market and become a success, and not the fact that a technology is useful per se. In this presentation, I shall be focusing primarily on the major economic aspects of the surveys and what the end results really represent in terms of economic benefits. Once the economic benefits of these inspections are clearly understood, it will be readily apparent why the industrial use of these inspections is developing rapidly.

Duch, A. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Infrared emitting device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infrared emitting device and method. The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns.

Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Dawson, L. Ralph (Albuquerque, NM); Howard, Arnold J. (Albuquerque, NM); Baucom, Kevin C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A catalog of bright calibrator stars for 200-meter baseline near-infrared stellar interferometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present in this paper a catalog of reference stars suitable for calibrating infrared interferometric observations. In the K band, visibilities can be calibrated with a precision of 1% on baselines up to 200 meters for the whole sky, and up to 300 meters for some part of the sky. This work, extending to longer baselines a previous catalog compiled by Borde et al. (2002), is particularly well adapted to hectometric-class interferometers such as the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI, Glindemann et al. 2003) or the CHARA array (ten Brummelaar et al. 2003) when observing well resolved, high surface brightness objects (K<8). We use the absolute spectro-photometric calibration method introduced by Cohen et al. (1999) to derive the angular diameters of our new set of 948 G8--M0 calibrator stars extracted from IRAS, 2MASS and MSX catalogs. Angular stellar diameters range from 0.6 mas to 1.8 mas (median is 1.1 mas) with a median precision of 1.35%. For both the northern and southern hemispheres, the closest calibrator star is always less than 10 degree away.

A. Merand; P. Borde; V. Coude du Foresto

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

Dust Tracking Using Composite Visible/IR Images: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visible and infrared (IR) images from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer are composited to improve the depiction of airborne dust over coastlines. On IR images, wind-raised dust ...

Thomas F. Lee

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Convective Tendency Images Derived from a Combination of Lightning and Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique is presented for generating convective tendency products by combining satellite images with observations of cloud-to-ground lightning activity. Rapid scan (5-min) infrared satellite images are used to define the areal distribution of ...

Steven J. Goodman; Dennis E. Buechler; Paul J. Meyer

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Infrared Thermography Measurements of Window Thermal Test Specimen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrared Thermography Measurements of Window Thermal Test Specimen: Surface Temperatures Title Infrared Thermography Measurements of Window Thermal Test Specimen: Surface...

411

Cloudy Skies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Cloud Radiative Forcing andFeedback Analysis of Cloud Radiative Forcing andFeedback in a Climate General Circulation Model A. A. lacis NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Institute for Space Studies New York, NY 10225 The principal objectives of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program research at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) are 1) to improve and validate the radiation parameterizations in the GISS general circulation model (GCM) through model intercomparisons with line-by-line calculations and through comparisons with ARM observations, 2) to improve the GCM diagnostic output to enable more effective comparisons to global cloud/radiation data sets, and 3) to use ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) data to develop improved parameterization of clouds in the GCM and to study the

412

Cloudy Skies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. linn J. linn Space Science and Technology Division Los Alamos National Laboratory iLos Alamos, NM 87545 The earth's weather and climate are influenced strongly by phenomena associated with clouds. Therefore, a general circulation model (GCM) that models the evolution of weather and climate must include an accurate physical model of the clouds. This paper describes our efforts to develop a suitable cloud model. It concentrates on the microphysical processes that determine the evolution of droplet and ice crystal size distributions, precipitation rates, total and condensed water content, and radiative extinction coefficients. We assume a fixed temperature, acloud vertical thickness, and concentrations and size distributions of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice condensation nuclei

413

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Quantum Physics; Quantum Communications; Ultrafast Photon Detector; Nam. ...

414

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Energy; Fossil Fuels;Distillation Curves for Complex Fuel Mixtures. ...

415

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Scanning Electron Microscope with Spin Polarization Analysis. ...

416

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Metrology, Basic Units; Mass; Electronic Kilogram. Description ...

417

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nist.gov. 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Public safety & Smart Grid. Description: Electrical engineer ...

418

A Helicopter-Borne Video Thermal Infrared Survey Of The Rotorua Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helicopter-Borne Video Thermal Infrared Survey Of The Rotorua Geothermal Helicopter-Borne Video Thermal Infrared Survey Of The Rotorua Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Helicopter-Borne Video Thermal Infrared Survey Of The Rotorua Geothermal Field Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Delineation and monitoring of surface thermal activity at geothermal development sites and in tourist and urban areas is important for safety, planning, scientific and field management reasons. Because the standard ground-based temperature measurement methods employed for such work are incomplete, expensive and often impractical, we have developed a helicopter-borne video thermal infrared scanner technique to replace them. The imagery obtained is conveniently stored on videotape and powerful image

419

Infrared Tracers of Mass-Loss Histories and Wind-ISM Interactions in Hot Star Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrared observations of hot massive stars and their environments provide a detailed picture of mass loss histories, dust formation, and dynamical interactions with the local stellar medium that can be unique to the thermal regime. We have acquired new infrared spectroscopy and imaging with the sensitive instruments onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope in guaranteed and open time programs comprised of some of the best known examples of hot stars with circumstellar nebulae, supplementing with unpublished Infrared Space Observatory spectroscopy. Here we present highlights of our work on the environment around the extreme P Cygni-type star HDE316285, revealing collisionally excited H2 for the first time in a hot star nebula, and providing some defining characteristics of the star's evolution and interactions with the ISM at unprecented detail in the infrared.

P. Morris; the Spitzer WRRINGS Team

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Definition: Near Infrared Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Near Infrared Surveys Near Infrared Surveys Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Near Infrared Surveys Near infrared surveys refer to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the region just outside wavelengths detectable by the human eye. Near infrared wavelengths are generally considered to be between approximately 0.75-1.4 micrometers. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Infrared (IR) light is electromagnetic radiation with longer wavelengths than those of visible light, extending from the nominal red edge of the visible spectrum at 700 nanometres (nm) to 1 mm. This range of wavelengths corresponds to a frequency range of approximately 430 THz down to 300 GHz, and includes most of the thermal radiation emitted by objects near room temperature. Infrared light is emitted or absorbed by molecules

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image No 150 DPI Version 300 DPI Image. Title: Ultrafast Laser Speeds Up Quest for Atomic Control. ...

422

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: House; Trees. Description: *BFRL. Subjects (names): ...

423

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: New Imaging Tool is Boon to Fuel Cell Research. Description: NIST ...

424

C.D. Tran, J. Near Infrared Spectrosc. 8, 89102 (2000) 89 NIR Publications 2000, ISSN 0967-0335  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-0335 Visualising chemical composition and reaction kinetics by the near infrared multispectral imaging technique on some of applications of the imaging spectrometer including the kinetic deter- mination of curing;92 Visualising Chemical Composition and Reaction Kinetics tion than the NIR camera. Specifically, the visible CCD

Reid, Scott A.

425

Molecular Clouds and Infrared Stellar Clusters in the Far-Outer Ronald L. Snell 1 , John M. Carpenter 2 , Mark H. Heyer 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Clouds and Infrared Stellar Clusters in the Far-Outer Galaxy Ronald L. Snell 1 , John M We present a study of the molecular cloud content and star formation ac- tivity in the far-0) and K 0 -band near-infrared imaging. This region contains 63 far-outer Galaxy molecular clouds; the most

Carpenter, John

426

Neural networks and separation of Cosmic Microwave Background and astrophysical signals in sky maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm is implemented as a neural network for separating signals of different origin in astrophysical sky maps. Due to its self-organizing capability, it works without prior assumptions on the signals, neither on their frequency scaling, nor on the signal maps themselves; instead, it learns directly from the input data how to separate the physical components, making use of their statistical independence. To test the capabilities of this approach, we apply the ICA algorithm on sky patches, taken from simulations and observations, at the microwave frequencies, that are going to be deeply explored in a few years on the whole sky, by the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) and by the {\\sc Planck} Surveyor Satellite. The maps are at the frequencies of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) aboard the {\\sc Planck} satellite (30, 44, 70 and 100 GHz), and contain simulated astrophysical radio sources, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, and Galactic diffuse emissions from thermal dust and synchrotron. We show that the ICA algorithm is able to recover each signal, with precision going from 10% for the Galactic components to percent for CMB; radio sources are almost completely recovered down to a flux limit corresponding to $0.7\\sigma_{CMB}$, where $\\sigma_{CMB}$ is the rms level of CMB fluctuations. The signal recovering possesses equal quality on all the scales larger then the pixel size. In addition, we show that the frequency scalings of the input signals can be partially inferred from the ICA outputs, at the percent precision for the dominant components, radio sources and CMB.

C. Baccigalupi; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; A. Farusi; D. Maino; M. Maris; F. Perrotta; E. Salerno; L. Toffolatti; A. Tonazzini

2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

427

HARMONIC IN-PAINTING OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND SKY BY CONSTRAINED GAUSSIAN REALIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The presence of astrophysical emissions between the last scattering surface and our vantage point requires us to apply a foreground mask on cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky maps, leading to large cuts around the Galactic equator and numerous holes. Since many CMB analysis, in particular on the largest angular scales, may be performed on a whole-sky map in a more straightforward and reliable manner, it is of utmost importance to develop an efficient method to fill in the masked pixels in a way compliant with the expected statistical properties and the unmasked pixels. In this Letter, we consider the Monte Carlo simulation of a constrained Gaussian field and derive it CMB anisotropy in harmonic space, where a feasible implementation is possible with good approximation. We applied our method to simulated data, which shows that our method produces a plausible whole-sky map, given the unmasked pixels, and a theoretical expectation. Subsequently, we applied our method to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe foreground-reduced maps and investigated the anomalous alignment between quadrupole and octupole components. From our investigation, we find that the alignment in the foreground-reduced maps is even higher than the Internal Linear Combination map. We also find that the V-band map has higher alignment than other bands, despite the expectation that the V-band map has less foreground contamination than other bands. Therefore, we find it hard to attribute the alignment to residual foregrounds. Our method will be complementary to other efforts on in-painting or reconstructing the masked CMB data, and of great use to Planck surveyor and future missions.

Kim, Jaiseung; Naselsky, Pavel [Niels Bohr Institute and Discovery Center, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Mandolesi, Nazzareno, E-mail: jkim@nbi.dk [INAF/IASF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Ferroelectric infrared detector and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are provided for sensing infrared radiation. The apparatus includes a sensor element that is positioned in a magnetic field during operation to ensure a .lamda. shaped relationship between specific heat and temperature adjacent the Curie temperature of the ferroelectric material comprising the sensor element. The apparatus is operated by inducing a magnetic field on the ferroelectric material to reduce surface charge on the element during its operation.

Lashley, Jason Charles (Sante Fe, NM); Opeil, Cyril P. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Smith, James Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

The WHAM Northern Sky Survey and the Nature of the Warm Ionized Medium in the Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a velocity-resolved map of diffuse H-alpha emission of the entire northern sky, providing the first comprehensive picture of both the distribution and kinematics of diffuse ionized gas in the Galaxy. WHAM continues to advance our understanding of the physical conditions of the warm ionized medium through observations of other optical emission lines throughout the Galactic disk and halo. We discuss some highlights from the survey, including an optical window into the inner Galaxy and the relationship between HI and HII in the diffuse ISM.

Madsen, G J

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

THE WHAM NORTHERN SKY SURVEY AND THE NATURE OF THE WARM IONIZED MEDIUM IN THE GALAXY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a velocity-resolved map of diffuse H? emission of the entire northern sky, providing the first comprehensive picture of both the distribution and kinematics of diffuse ionized gas in the Galaxy. WHAM continues to advance our understanding of the physical conditions of the warm ionized medium through observations of other optical emission lines throughout the Galactic disk and halo. We discuss some highlights from the survey, including an optical window into the inner Galaxy and the relationship between H I and H II in the diffuse ISM. 1.

G. J. Madsen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The WHAM Northern Sky Survey and the Nature of the Warm Ionized Medium in the Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a velocity-resolved map of diffuse H-alpha emission of the entire northern sky, providing the first comprehensive picture of both the distribution and kinematics of diffuse ionized gas in the Galaxy. WHAM continues to advance our understanding of the physical conditions of the warm ionized medium through observations of other optical emission lines throughout the Galactic disk and halo. We discuss some highlights from the survey, including an optical window into the inner Galaxy and the relationship between HI and HII in the diffuse ISM.

G. J. Madsen

2003-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Cataclysmic Variables From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. VI. the Sixth Year (2005)  

SciTech Connect

The 28 cataclysmic variables found in 2005 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are presented with their coordinates, magnitudes and spectra. Five of these systems are previously known CVs (HH Cnc, SX LMi, QZ Ser, RXJ1554.2+2721 and HS1016+3412) and the rest are new discoveries. Additional spectroscopic, photometric and/or polarimetric observations of 10 systems were carried out, resulting in estimates of the orbital periods for seven of the new binaries. The 23 new CVs include one eclipsing system, one new Polar and five systems whose spectra clearly reveal atmospheric absorption lines from the underlying white dwarf.

Szkody, Paula; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Henden, Arne; /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /AAVSO, Cambridge; Mannikko, Lee; Mukadam, Anjum; /Washington U., Seattle,; Schmidt, Gary D.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Bochanski, John J.; Agueros, Marcel; Anderson, Scott F.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; /Washington U., Seattle,; Dahab, William E.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Oguri, Masamune; /Princeton U. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Shin,; Strauss, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; West, Andrew A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

New Neutrino Mass Bounds from Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Data Release 8 Photometric Luminous Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present neutrino mass bounds using 900,000 luminous galaxies with photometric redshifts measured from Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Data Release Eight (SDSS DR8). The galaxies have photometric redshifts between $z = 0.45$ and $z = 0.65$, and cover 10,000 square degrees and thus probe a volume of 3$h^{-3}$Gpc$^3$, enabling tight constraints to be derived on the amount of dark matter in the form of massive neutrinos. A new bound on the sum of neutrino masses $\\sum m_\

de Putter, Roland; Giusarma, Elena; Ho, Shirley; Cuesta, Antonio; Seo, Hee-Jong; Ross, Ashley; White, Martin; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Kirkby, David; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Percival, Will J; Ross, Nicholas P; Schneider, Donald P; Shelden, Alaina; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Infrared emitting device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns. 8 figs.

Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.; Dawson, L.R.; Howard, A.J.; Baucom, K.C.

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

435

Terahertz imaging and quantum cascade laser based devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The terahertz (THz) frequency range (f=0.3-10 THz, [lambda]=30-1000 lam) is much less technologically developed that the adjacent microwave and infrared frequency ranges, but offers several advantages for imaging applications: ...

Lee, Alan Wei Min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes IR remote sensing has located elevated surface temperatures (<12 degrees C above background) near Socorro Peak). A four-year compellation of ASTER satellite IR imaging was used. These images work on a 5-band, TIR processor

437

ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

Nitin Bharadwaj; Kevin Widener

438

Near infrared detectors for SNAP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pixel Fowler-4 Fowler-16 ‡ Spatial Resolution di?raction limited atat image. A series of two Fowler-1 exposures ([I1, I2] i )

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Infra-red detector and method of making and using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-cost infra-red detector is disclosed including a method of making and using the same. The detector employs a substrate, a filtering layer, a converting layer, and a diverter to be responsive to wavelengths up to about 1600 nm. The detector is useful for a variety of applications including spectroscopy, imaging, and defect detection.

Craig, Richard A. (Richland, WA); Griffin, Jeffrey W. (Kennewick, WA)

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

440

Influence of sky radiance measurement errors on inversion-retrieved aerosol properties  

SciTech Connect

Remote sensing of the atmospheric aerosol is a well-established technique that is currently used for routine monitoring of this atmospheric component, both from ground-based and satellite. The AERONET program, initiated in the 90's, is the most extended network and the data provided are currently used by a wide community of users for aerosol characterization, satellite and model validation and synergetic use with other instrumentation (lidar, in-situ, etc.). Aerosol properties are derived within the network from measurements made by ground-based Sun-sky scanning radiometers. Sky radiances are acquired in two geometries: almucantar and principal plane. Discrepancies in the products obtained following both geometries have been observed and the main aim of this work is to determine if they could be justified by measurement errors. Three systematic errors have been analyzed in order to quantify the effects on the inversion-derived aerosol properties: calibration, pointing accuracy and finite field of view. Simulations have shown that typical uncertainty in the analyzed quantities (5% in calibration, 0.2 Degree-Sign in pointing and 1.2 Degree-Sign field of view) yields to errors in the retrieved parameters that vary depending on the aerosol type and geometry. While calibration and pointing errors have relevant impact on the products, the finite field of view does not produce notable differences.

Torres, B.; Toledano, C.; Cachorro, V. E.; Bennouna, Y. S.; Fuertes, D.; Gonzalez, R.; Frutos, A. M. de [Atmospheric Optics Group (GOA), University of Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain); Berjon, A. J. [Izana Atmospheric Research Center, Meteorological State Agency of Spain (AEMET), Sta. Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Dubovik, O.; Goloub, P.; Podvin, T.; Blarel, L. [Laboratory of Atmospheric Optics, Universite Lille 1, Villeneuve d'Ascq (France)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared sky imager" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Galactic Globular and Open Clusters in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. I. Crowded Field Photometry and Cluster Fiducial Sequences in ugriz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present photometry for globular and open cluster stars observed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In order to exploit over 100 million stellar objects with r < 22.5 mag observed by SDSS, we need to understand the characteristics of stars in the SDSS ugriz filters. While star clusters provide important calibration samples for stellar colors, the regions close to globular clusters, where the fraction of field stars is smallest, are too crowded for the standard SDSS photometric pipeline to process. To complement the SDSS imaging survey, we reduce the SDSS imaging data for crowded cluster fields using the DAOPHOT/ALLFRAME suite of programs and present photometry for 17 globular clusters and 3 open clusters in a SDSS value-added catalog. Our photometry and cluster fiducial sequences are on the native SDSS 2.5-meter ugriz photometric system, and the fiducial sequences can be directly applied to the SDSS photometry without relying upon any transformations. Model photometry for red giant branch and main...

An, Deokkeun; Clem, James L; Yanny, Brian; Rockosi, Constance M; Morrison, Heather L; Harding, Paul; Gunn, James E; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Beers, Timothy C; Cudworth, Kyle M; Ivans, Inese I; Ivezic, Zeljko; Lee, Young Sun; Lupton, Robert H; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Watters, Shannon; York, Donald G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Galactic Globular and Open Clusters in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. I. Crowded Field Photometry and Cluster Fiducial Sequences in ugriz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present photometry for globular and open cluster stars observed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In order to exploit over 100 million stellar objects with r < 22.5 mag observed by SDSS, we need to understand the characteristics of stars in the SDSS ugriz filters. While star clusters provide important calibration samples for stellar colors, the regions close to globular clusters, where the fraction of field stars is smallest, are too crowded for the standard SDSS photometric pipeline to process. To complement the SDSS imaging survey, we reduce the SDSS imaging data for crowded cluster fields using the DAOPHOT/ALLFRAME suite of programs and present photometry for 17 globular clusters and 3 open clusters in a SDSS value-added catalog. Our photometry and cluster fiducial sequences are on the native SDSS 2.5-meter ugriz photometric system, and the fiducial sequences can be directly applied to the SDSS photometry without relying upon any transformations. Model photometry for red giant branch and main-sequence stars obtained by Girardi et al. cannot be matched simultaneously to fiducial sequences; their colors differ by ~0.02-0.05 mag. Good agreement (< ~0.02 mag in colors) is found with Clem et al. empirical fiducial sequences in u'g'r'i'z' when using the transformation equations in Tucker et al.

Deokkeun An; Jennifer A. Johnson; James L. Clem; Brian Yanny; Constance M. Rockosi; Heather L. Morrison; Paul Harding; James E. Gunn; Carlos Allende Prieto; Timothy C. Beers; Kyle M. Cudworth; Inese I. Ivans; Zeljko Ivezic; Young Sun Lee; Robert H. Lupton; Dmitry Bizyaev; Howard Brewington; Elena Malanushenko; Viktor Malanushenko; Dan Oravetz; Kaike Pan; Audrey Simmons; Stephanie Snedden; Shannon Watters; Donald G. York

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z