National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for infrared ir rays

  1. Relative Infrared (IR) and Terahertz (THz) Signatures of Common Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sheen, David M.; Atkinson, David A.

    2006-11-13

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has recently recorded the infrared (IR) and far-infrared (sometimes called the terahertz, THz) spectral signatures of four common explosives, in the condensed phase. The signatures of RDX, PETN, TNT and Tetryl were recorded both in the infrared and the THz domains, using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Samples consisted of thin films and were made by depositing and subsequent evaporation of an acetone-explosive mixture. The complete spectrum spanned the range from 4,000 to 8 cm-1 at 2.0 cm-1 spectral resolution. Preliminary results in the infrared agree with those of previous workers, while the THz signatures are one order of magnitude weaker than the strongest IR bands.

  2. X-ray transient absorption and picosecond IR spectroscopy of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray transient absorption and picosecond IR spectroscopy of fulvalene(tetracarbonyl)diruthenium on photoexcitation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray transient ...

  3. Phase-matched generation of coherent soft and hard X-rays using IR lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popmintchev, Tenio V.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Bahabad, Alon; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2013-06-11

    Phase-matched high-order harmonic generation of soft and hard X-rays is accomplished using infrared driving lasers in a high-pressure non-linear medium. The pressure of the non-linear medium is increased to multi-atmospheres and a mid-IR (or higher) laser device provides the driving pulse. Based on this scaling, also a general method for global optimization of the flux of phase-matched high-order harmonic generation at a desired wavelength is designed.

  4. Infrared (IR) photon-sensitive spectromicroscopy in a cryogenic environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pereverzev, Sergey

    2016-06-14

    A system designed to suppress thermal radiation background and to allow IR single-photon sensitive spectromicroscopy of small samples by using both absorption, reflection, and emission/luminescence measurements. The system in one embodiment includes: a light source; a plurality of cold mirrors configured to direct light along a beam path; a cold or warm sample holder in the beam path; windows of sample holder (or whole sample holder) are transparent in a spectral region of interest, so they do not emit thermal radiation in the same spectral region of interest; a cold monochromator or other cold spectral device configured to direct a selected fraction of light onto a cold detector; a system of cold apertures and shields positioned along the beam path to prevent unwanted thermal radiation from arriving at the cold monochromator and/or the detector; a plurality of optical, IR and microwave filters positioned along the beam path and configured to adjust a spectral composition of light incident upon the sample under investigation and/or on the detector; a refrigerator configured to maintain the detector at a temperature below 1.0K; and an enclosure configured to: thermally insulate the light source, the plurality of mirrors, the sample holder, the cold monochromator and the refrigerator.

  5. On the Relative Utility of Infrared (IR) versus Terahertz (THz) for Optical Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Gassman, Paul L.; Atkinson, David A.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Williams, Stephen D.

    2007-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has active programs investigating the optical absorption strengths of several types of molecules including toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), microbiological threats such as bacteria, as well as explosives such as RDX, PETN and TNT. While most of our work has centered on the mid-infrared domain (600 to 6,500 cm-1), more recent work has also included work in the far-infrared, also called the terahertz (THz) region (500 to ~8 cm-1). Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, we have been able to compare the relative, and in some cases absolute, IR/THz cross sections of a number of species in the solid and liquid phases. The relative band strengths of a number of species of interest are discussed in terms of both experimental and computational results.

  6. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion (SICWC): Arc Lamp, InfraRed (IR) Thermal Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Sebright, J.

    2007-12-15

    The primary goal of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) betwe1311 UT-Battelle (Contractor) and Caterpillar Inc. (Participant) was to develop the plasma arc lamp (PAL), infrared (IR) thermal processing technology 1.) to enhance surface coating performance by improving the interfacial bond strength between selected coatings and substrates; and 2.) to extend this technology base for transitioning of the arc lamp processing to the industrial Participant. Completion of the following three key technical tasks (described below) was necessary in order to accomplish this goal. First, thermophysical property data sets were successfully determined for composite coatings applied to 1010 steel substrates, with a more limited data set successfully measured for free-standing coatings. These data are necessary for the computer modeling simulations and parametric studies to; A.) simulate PAL IR processing, facilitating the development of the initial processing parameters; and B.) help develop a better understanding of the basic PAL IR fusing process fundamentals, including predicting the influence of melt pool stirring and heat tnmsfar characteristics introduced during plasma arc lamp infrared (IR) processing; Second, a methodology and a set of procedures were successfully developed and the plasma arc lamp (PAL) power profiles were successfully mapped as a function of PAL power level for the ORNL PAL. The latter data also are necessary input for the computer model to accurately simulate PAL processing during process modeling simulations, and to facilitate a better understand of the fusing process fundamentals. Third, several computer modeling codes have been evaluated as to their capabilities and accuracy in being able to capture and simulate convective mixing that may occur during PAL thermal processing. The results from these evaluation efforts are summarized in this report. The intention of this project was to extend the technology base and provide for

  7. A JOINT MODEL OF X-RAY AND INFRARED BACKGROUNDS. II. COMPTON...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-RAY AND INFRARED BACKGROUNDS. II. COMPTON-THICK ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ABUNDANCE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A JOINT MODEL OF X-RAY AND INFRARED BACKGROUNDS. II. ...

  8. Cadmium zinc telluride based infrared interferometry for X-ray detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohstroh, A. Della Rocca, I.; Parsons, S.; Langley, A.; Shenton-Taylor, C.; Blackie, D.

    2015-02-09

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is a wide band gap semiconductor for room temperature radiation detection. The electro-optic Pockels effect of the material has been exploited in the past to study electric field non-uniformities and their consequence on conventional detector signals in CZT, by imaging the intensity distribution of infrared (IR) light transmitted through a device placed between crossed polarizers. Recently, quantitative monitoring of extremely high intensity neutron pulses through the change of transmitted IR intensity was demonstrated, offering the advantage to place sensitive electronics outside the measured radiation field. In this work, we demonstrate that X-ray intensity can be deduced directly from measuring the change in phase of 1550 nm laser light transmitted through a 7 × 7 × 2 mm{sup 3} CZT based Pockels cell in a simple Mach Zehnder interferometer. X-rays produced by a 50 kVp Mo X-ray tube incident on the CZT cathode surface placed at 7 mm distance cause a linearly increasing phase shift above 0.3 mA tube current, with 1.58 ± 0.02 rad per mA for an applied bias of 500 V across the 2 mm thick device. Pockels images confirm that the sample properties are in agreement with the literature, exhibiting electric field enhancement near the cathode under irradiation, which may cause the non-linearity at low X-ray tube anode current settings. The laser used to probe the X-ray intensity causes itself some space charge, whose spatial distribution does not seem to be exclusively determined by the incident laser position, i.e., charge carrier generation location, with respect to the electrodes.

  9. Simulations of the infrared, Raman, and 2D-IR photon echo spectra of water in nanoscale silica pores

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burris, Paul C.; Laage, Damien; Thompson, Ward H.

    2016-05-20

    Vibrational spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize nanoconfined liquids and probe the effect of the confining framework on the liquid structure and dynamics relative to the corresponding bulk fluid. However, it is still unclear what molecular-level information can be obtained from such measurements. In this Paper, we address this question by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reproduce the linear infrared (IR), Raman, and two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) photon echo spectra for water confined within hydrophilic (hydroxyl-terminated) silica mesopores. To simplify the spectra the OH stretching region of isotopically dilute HOD in D2O is considered. An empirical mapping approach is usedmore » to obtain the OH vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and transition polarizabilities from the MD simulations. The simulated linear IR and Raman spectra are in good general agreement with measured spectra of water in mesoporous silica reported in the literature. The key effect of confinement on the water spectrum is a vibrational blueshift for OH groups that are closest to the pore interface. The blueshift can be attributed to the weaker hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the OH groups and silica oxygen acceptors. Non-Condon effects greatly diminish the contribution of these OH moieties to the linear IR spectrum, but these weaker H-bonds are readily apparent in the Raman spectrum. The 2D-IR spectra have not yet been measured and thus the present results represent a prediction. Lastly, the simulated spectra indicate that it should be possible to probe the slower spectral diffusion of confined water compared to the bulk liquid by analysis of the 2D-IR spectra.« less

  10. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED MONITORING OF THE BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY GX 339-4 DURING 2002-2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buxton, Michelle M.; Bailyn, Charles D.; Capelo, Holly L.; Chatterjee, Ritaban; Dincer, Tolga; Kalemci, Emrah; Tomsick, John A.

    2012-06-15

    We present the optical/infrared (O/IR) light curve of the black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4 collected at the SMARTS 1.3 m telescope from 2002 to 2010. During this time the source has undergone numerous state transitions including hard-to-soft state transitions when we see large changes in the near-IR flux accompanied by modest changes in optical flux, and three rebrightening events in 2003, 2005, and 2007 after GX 339-4 transitioned from the soft state to the hard. All but one outburst show similar behavior in the X-ray hardness-intensity diagram. We show that the O/IR colors follow two distinct tracks that reflect either the hard or soft X-ray state of the source. Thus, either of these two X-ray states can be inferred from O/IR observations alone. From these correlations we have constructed spectral energy distributions of the soft and hard states. During the hard state, the near-IR data have the same spectral slope as simultaneous radio data when GX 339-4 was in a bright optical state, implying that the near-IR is dominated by a non-thermal source, most likely originating from jets. Non-thermal emission dominates the near-IR bands during the hard state at all but the faintest optical states, and the fraction of non-thermal emission increases with increasing optical brightness. The spectral slope of the optical bands indicate that a heated thermal source is present during both the soft and hard X-ray states, even when GX 339-4 is at its faintest optical state. We have conducted a timing analysis of the light curve for the hard and soft states and find no evidence of a characteristic timescale within the range of 4-230 days.

  11. In Situ Diffuse Reflectance IR Spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Fast Catalytic Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N Marinkovic; Q Wang; A Frenkel

    2011-12-31

    A new instrument for synchronous in situ investigations of catalytic materials by IR and X-ray absorption spectroscopies was designed and built at the X18A beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides analytical tools for solving structural, electronic and kinetic problems in catalysis science by two complementary methods. Among the features attractive for catalysis research are the broad range of catalytically active elements that can be investigated (starting with Ni and beyond), the wide range of reaction conditions (temperatures up to 873 K, various reactive gases) and time scales (starting from tens of seconds). The results of several representative experiments that illustrate the attractive capabilities of the new set-up are discussed.

  12. A COMPARISON OF X-RAY AND MID-INFRARED SELECTION OF OBSCURED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckart, Megan E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; McGreer, Ian D.; Helfand, David J.; Stern, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We compare the relative merits of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selection at X-ray and mid-infrared wavelengths using data from moderately deep fields observed by both Chandra and Spitzer. The X-ray-selected AGN sample and associated photometric and spectroscopic optical follow-up are drawn from a subset of fields studied as part of the Serendipitous Extragalactic X-ray Source Identification (SEXSI) program. Mid-infrared data in these fields are derived from targeted and archival Spitzer imaging, and mid-infrared AGN selection is accomplished primarily through application of the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color-color AGN 'wedge' selection technique. Nearly all X-ray sources in these fields which exhibit clear spectroscopic signatures of AGN activity have mid-infrared colors consistent with IRAC AGN selection. These are predominantly the most luminous X-ray sources. X-ray sources that lack high-ionization and/or broad lines in their optical spectra are far less likely to be selected as AGNs by mid-infrared color selection techniques. The fraction of X-ray sources identified as AGNs in the mid-infrared increases monotonically as the X-ray luminosity increases. Conversely, only 22% of mid-infrared-selected AGNs are detected at X-ray energies in the moderately deep ((t{sub exp}) approx 100 ks) SEXSI Chandra data. We hypothesize that IRAC sources with AGN colors that lack X-ray detections are predominantly high-luminosity AGNs that are obscured and/or lie at high redshift. A stacking analysis of X-ray-undetected sources shows that objects in the mid-infrared AGN selection wedge have average X-ray fluxes in the 2-8 keV band 3 times higher than sources that fall outside the wedge. Their X-ray spectra are also harder. The hardness ratio of the wedge-selected stack is consistent with moderate intrinsic obscuration, but is not suggestive of a highly obscured, Compton-thick source population. It is evident from this comparative study that in order to create a complete

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling Backus

    2012-05-14

    In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

  14. The phase transition in VO2 probed using x-ray, visible and infrared

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiations phase transition in VO2 probed using x-ray, visible and infrared radiations The phase transition in VO2 probed using x-ray, visible and infrared radiations Print Thursday, 18 February 2016 10:48 The nearly simultaneous Mott (electronic) and Peierls (structural) transitions in vanadium dioxide are of significant scientific interest and have tremendous technological promise in computing, memory, optics, and micromechanics. The cover features nanoscale-resolution maps of the Mott and

  15. PRIMUS: INFRARED AND X-RAY AGN SELECTION TECHNIQUES AT 0.2 < z < 1.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendez, Alexander J.; Coil, Alison L.; Aird, James; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Moustakas, John; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu Guangtun

    2013-06-10

    We present a study of Spitzer/IRAC and X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) selection techniques in order to quantify the overlap, uniqueness, contamination, and completeness of each. We investigate how the overlap and possible contamination of the samples depend on the depth of both the IR and X-ray data. We use Spitzer/IRAC imaging, Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray imaging, and spectroscopic redshifts from the PRism MUlti-object Survey to construct galaxy and AGN samples at 0.2 < z < 1.2 over 8 deg{sup 2}. We construct samples over a wide range of IRAC flux limits (SWIRE to GOODS depth) and X-ray flux limits (10 ks to 2 Ms). We compare IR-AGN samples defined using both the IRAC color selection of Stern et al. and Donley et al. with X-ray-detected AGN samples. For roughly similar depth IR and X-ray surveys, we find that {approx}75% of IR-selected AGNs are also identified as X-ray AGNs. This fraction increases to {approx}90% when comparing against the deepest X-ray data, indicating that at most {approx}10% of IR-selected AGNs may be heavily obscured. The IR-AGN selection proposed by Stern et al. suffers from contamination by star-forming galaxies at various redshifts when using deeper IR data, though the selection technique works well for shallow IR data. While similar overall, the IR-AGN samples preferentially contain more luminous AGNs, while the X-ray AGN samples identify a wider range of AGN accretion rates including low specific accretion rate AGNs, where the host galaxy light dominates at IR wavelengths. The host galaxy populations of the IR and X-ray AGN samples have similar rest-frame colors and stellar masses; both selections identify AGNs in blue, star-forming and red, quiescent galaxies.

  16. Maskelynite formation via solid-state transformation: Evidence of infrared and x-ray anisotropy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaret, Steven J.; Ehm, Lars; Woerner, William R.; Phillips, Brian L.; Nekvasil, Hanna; Wright, Shawn P.; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2015-03-24

    We present optical microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, high-energy X-ray total scattering experiments, and micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy on shocked labradorite from the Lonar Crater, India. We show that maskelynite of shock class 2 is structurally more similar to fused glass than to crystalline plagioclase. However, there are slight but significant differences preservation of original pre-impact igneous zoning, anisotropy at Infrared wavelengths, X-ray anisotropy, and preservation of some intermediate range order which are all consistent with a solid-state transformation formation of maskelynite.

  17. Maskelynite formation via solid-state transformation: Evidence of infrared and x-ray anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaret, Steven J.; Ehm, Lars; Woerner, William R.; Phillips, Brian L.; Nekvasil, Hanna; Wright, Shawn P.; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2015-03-24

    We present optical microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, high-energy X-ray total scattering experiments, and micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy on shocked labradorite from the Lonar Crater, India. We show that maskelynite of shock class 2 is structurally more similar to fused glass than to crystalline plagioclase. However, there are slight but significant differences – preservation of original pre-impact igneous zoning, anisotropy at Infrared wavelengths, X-ray anisotropy, and preservation of some intermediate range order – which are all consistent with a solid-state transformation formation of maskelynite.

  18. THREE NEW GALACTIC CENTER X-RAY SOURCES IDENTIFIED WITH NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeWitt, Curtis; Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Sarajedini, Ata; Sellgren, Kris; Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut; Bauer, Franz E.

    2013-11-01

    We have conducted a near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 47 candidate counterparts to X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory near the Galactic center (GC). Though a significant number of these astrometric matches are likely to be spurious, we sought out spectral characteristics of active stars and interacting binaries, such as hot, massive spectral types or emission lines, in order to corroborate the X-ray activity and certify the authenticity of the match. We present three new spectroscopic identifications, including a Be high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) or a ? Cassiopeiae (Cas) system, a symbiotic X-ray binary, and an O-type star of unknown luminosity class. The Be HMXB/? Cas system and the symbiotic X-ray binary are the first of their classes to be spectroscopically identified in the GC region.

  19. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr₂IrO₄ using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Jaouen, N.; Nicolaou, A.; Yin, W. G.; Rayan Serrao, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ding, H.; et al

    2015-04-28

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr₂IrO₄, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edgemore » RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.« less

  20. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr₂IrO₄ using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Jaouen, N.; Nicolaou, A.; Yin, W. G.; Rayan Serrao, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ding, H.; Hill, J. P.

    2015-04-28

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr₂IrO₄, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edge RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.

  1. CROSS-CORRELATING COSMIC INFRARED AND X-RAY BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS: EVIDENCE OF SIGNIFICANT BLACK HOLE POPULATIONS AMONG THE CIB SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Moseley, S. H.; Arendt, R. G.; Finoguenov, A.; Fazio, G. G.; Hasinger, G.; Miyaji, T.

    2013-05-20

    In order to understand the nature of the sources producing the recently uncovered cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations, we study cross-correlations between the fluctuations in the source-subtracted CIB from Spitzer/IRAC data and the unresolved cosmic X-ray background from deep Chandra observations. Our study uses data from the EGS/AEGIS field, where both data sets cover an {approx_equal} 8' Multiplication-Sign 45' region of the sky. Our measurement is the cross-power spectrum between the IR and X-ray data. The cross-power signal between the IRAC maps at 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m and the Chandra [0.5-2] keV data has been detected, at angular scales {approx}> 20'', with an overall significance of {approx_equal} 3.8{sigma} and {approx_equal} 5.6{sigma}, respectively. At the same time we find no evidence of significant cross-correlations at the harder Chandra bands. The cross-correlation signal is produced by individual IR sources with 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m magnitudes m{sub AB} {approx}> 25-26 and [0.5-2] keV X-ray fluxes <<7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. We determine that at least 15%-25% of the large scale power of the CIB fluctuations is correlated with the spatial power spectrum of the X-ray fluctuations. If this correlation is attributed to emission from accretion processes at both IR and X-ray wavelengths, this implies a much higher fraction of accreting black holes than among the known populations. We discuss the various possible origins for the cross-power signal and show that neither local foregrounds nor the known remaining normal galaxies and active galactic nuclei can reproduce the measurements. These observational results are an important new constraint on theoretical modeling of the near-IR CIB fluctuations.

  2. Andromeda (M31) optical and infrared disk survey. I. Insights in wide-field near-IR surface photometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sick, Jonathan; Courteau, Stphane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; McDonald, Michael; De Jong, Roelof; Tully, R. Brent

    2014-05-01

    We present wide-field near-infrared J and K{sub s} images of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) taken with WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope as part of the Andromeda Optical and Infrared Disk Survey. This data set allows simultaneous observations of resolved stars and near-infrared (NIR) surface brightness across M31's entire bulge and disk (within R = 22 kpc), permitting a direct test of the stellar composition of near-infrared light in a nearby galaxy. Here we develop NIR observation and reduction methods to recover a uniform surface brightness map across the 3 1 disk of M31 with 27 WIRCam fields. Two sky-target nodding strategies are tested, and we find that strictly minimizing sky sampling latency cannot improve background subtraction accuracy to better than 2% of the background level due to spatio-temporal variations in the NIR skyglow. We fully describe our WIRCam reduction pipeline and advocate using flats built from night-sky images over a single night, rather than dome flats that do not capture the WIRCam illumination field. Contamination from scattered light and thermal background in sky flats has a negligible effect on the surface brightness shape compared to the stochastic differences in background shape between sky and galaxy disk fields, which are ?0.3% of the background level. The most dramatic calibration step is the introduction of scalar sky offsets to each image that optimizes surface brightness continuity. Sky offsets reduce the mean surface brightness difference between observation blocks from 1% to <0.1% of the background level, though the absolute background level remains statistically uncertain to 0.15% of the background level. We present our WIRCam reduction pipeline and performance analysis to give specific recommendations for the improvement of NIR wide-field imaging methods.

  3. Spectroscopic infrared near-field microscopy and x-ray reflectivity studies of order and clustering in lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Generosi, J.; Margaritondo, G.; Sanghera, J. S.; Aggarwal, I. D.; Tolk, N. H.; Piston, D. W.; Castellano, A. Congiu; Cricenti, A.

    2006-12-04

    Lipid membranes were studied by infrared scanning near-field optical microscopy at several wavelengths and by x-ray reflectivity. Together with the x-ray data, the optical images indicate the formation of locally ordered multiple bilayers, and the topographical micrographs reveal the presence of islands at the surface, both critically important features for biotechnology and medical applications such as biosensors and gene therapy.

  4. The contribution of z ≲ 6 sources to the spatial coherence in the unresolved cosmic near-infrared and X-ray backgrounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helgason, K.; Ricotti, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Hasinger, G.; Kashlinsky, A.

    2014-04-10

    A spatial clustering signal has been established in Spitzer/IRAC measurements of the unresolved cosmic near-infrared background (CIB) out to large angular scales, ∼1°. This CIB signal, while significantly exceeding the contribution from the remaining known galaxies, was further found to be coherent at a highly statistically significant level with the unresolved soft cosmic X-ray background (CXB). This measurement probes the unresolved CXB to very faint source levels using deep near-IR source subtraction. We study contributions from extragalactic populations at low to intermediate redshifts to the measured positive cross-power signal of the CIB fluctuations with the CXB. We model the X-ray emission from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), normal galaxies, and hot gas residing in virialized structures, calculating their CXB contribution including their spatial coherence with all infrared emitting counterparts. We use a halo model framework to calculate the auto and cross-power spectra of the unresolved fluctuations based on the latest constraints of the halo occupation distribution and the biasing of AGNs, galaxies, and diffuse emission. At small angular scales (≲ 1'), the 4.5 μm versus 0.5-2 keV coherence can be explained by shot noise from galaxies and AGNs. However, at large angular scales (∼10'), we find that the net contribution from the modeled populations is only able to account for ∼3% of the measured CIB×CXB cross-power. The discrepancy suggests that the CIB×CXB signal originates from the same unknown source population producing the CIB clustering signal out to ∼1°.

  5. ARM - Datastreams - goes7ir

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ir Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : GOES7IR GOES-7: infrared, channels 7, 10, 12

  6. Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources: Hunting Gamma-Ray Blazars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; Ajello, M.; Gasparrini, A.Paggi.D.

    2012-04-02

    One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the large improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated to low energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of Active Galactic Nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated to the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated to {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

  7. Infrared retina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Tyo, J. Scott; Jang, Woo-Yong

    2011-12-06

    Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

  8. A NEARBY GAMMA-RAY BURST HOST PROTOTYPE FOR z {approx} 7 LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES: SPITZER-IRS AND X-SHOOTER SPECTROSCOPY OF THE HOST GALAXY OF GRB 031203

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.; French, J.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Castro Ceron, J. M.; Christensen, L.; O'Halloran, B.; Michalowski, M.; Gordon, K. D.; Covino, S.

    2011-11-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies have been studied extensively in optical photometry and spectroscopy. Here we present the first mid-infrared spectrum of a GRB host, HG 031203. It is one of the nearest GRB hosts at z = 0.1055, allowing both low- and high-resolution spectroscopy with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). Medium-resolution UV to K-band spectroscopy with the X-shooter spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope is also presented, along with Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry, as well as radio and submillimeter observations. These data allow us to construct a UV to radio spectral energy distribution with almost complete spectroscopic coverage from 0.3 to 35 {mu}m of a GRB host galaxy for the first time, potentially valuable as a template for future model comparisons. The IRS spectra show strong, high-ionization fine structure line emission indicative of a hard radiation field in the galaxy-in particular the [S IV]/[S III] and [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios-suggestive of strong ongoing star formation and a very young stellar population. The absence of any polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission supports these conclusions, as does the probable hot peak dust temperature, making HG 031203 similar to the prototypical blue compact dwarf galaxy (BCD), II Zw 40. The selection of HG 031203 via the presence of a GRB suggests that it might be a useful analog of very young star-forming galaxies in the early universe, and hints that local BCDs may be used as more reliable analogs of star formation in the early universe than typical local starbursts. We look at the current debate on the ages of the dominant stellar populations in z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 8 galaxies in this context. The nebular line emission is so strong in HG 031203 that at z {approx} 7, it can reproduce the spectral energy distributions of z-band dropout galaxies with elevated IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m fluxes without the need to invoke a 4000 A break. Indeed, photometry of HG 031203 shows elevation of

  9. Tunable Surface Plasmon Infrared Modulator - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Industries Infrared Modulator IR Counter Measures Photonic Circuitry Metamaterials Chemical Sensing Variable Attenuation Patents and Patent Applications ID Number...

  10. The potential for detecting gamma-ray burst afterglows from population III stars with the next generation of infrared telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macpherson, D. [ICRAR, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Coward, D. M. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Zadnik, M. G., E-mail: damien.macpherson@icrar.org [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2013-12-10

    We investigate the detectability of a proposed population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from the collapse of Population III (Pop III) stars. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will be able to observe the late time infrared afterglows. We have developed a new method to calculate their detectability, which takes into account the fundamental initial mass function and formation rates of Pop III stars, from which we find the temporal variability of the afterglows and ultimately the length of time JWST and SPICA can detect them. In the range of plausible Pop III GRB parameters, the afterglows are always detectable by these instruments during the isotropic emission, for a minimum of 55 days and a maximum of 3.7 yr. The average number of detectable afterglows will be 2.96 10{sup 5} per SPICA field of view (FOV) and 2.78 10{sup 6} per JWST FOV. These are lower limits, using a pessimistic estimate of Pop III star formation. An optimal observing strategy with SPICA could identify a candidate orphan afterglow in ?1.3 yr, with a 90% probability of confirmation with further detailed observations. A beamed GRB will align with the FOV of the planned GRB detector Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope once every 9 yr. Pop III GRBs will be more easily detected by their isotropic emissions (i.e., orphan afterglows) rather than by their prompt emissions.

  11. Identification of {gamma} rays from {sup 172}Au and {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au, {sup 168}Ir, and {sup 164}Re

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadinia, B.; Cederwall, B.; Andgren, K.; Baeck, T.; Johnson, A.; Khaplanov, A.; Wyss, R.; Page, R. D.; Grahn, T.; Paul, E. S.; Sandzelius, M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, J.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.

    2009-12-15

    The very neutron deficient odd-odd nucleus {sup 172}Au was studied in reactions of 342 and 348 MeV {sup 78}Kr beams with an isotopically enriched {sup 96}Ru target. The {alpha} decays previously reported for {sup 172}Au were confirmed and the decay chain extended down to {sup 152}Tm through the discovery of a new {alpha}-decaying state in {sup 164}Re[E{sub {alpha}}=5623(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=864{sub -110}{sup +150} ms; b{sub {alpha}}=3(1)%]. Fine structure in these {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au and {sup 168}Ir were identified. A new {alpha}-decaying state was also observed and assigned as the ground state in {sup 172}Au[E{sub {alpha}}=6762(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=22{sub -5}{sup +6} ms]. This decay chain was also correlated down to {sup 152}Tm through previously reported {alpha} decays. Prompt {gamma} rays from excited states in {sup 172}Au have been identified using the recoil-decay tagging technique. The partial level scheme constructed for {sup 172}Au indicates that it has an irregular structure. Possible configurations of the {alpha}-decaying states in {sup 172}Au are discussed in terms of the systematics of nuclei in this region and total Routhian surface calculations.

  12. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, datamore » analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.« less

  13. ARM - Datastreams - goes7ir8

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ir8 Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : GOES7IR8 GOES-7: infrared, channel 8

  14. Conformers, infrared spectrum, UV-induced photochemistry, and near-IR-induced generation of two rare conformers of matrix-isolated phenylglycine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borba, Ana Fausto, Rui; Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea

    2014-10-21

    The conformational space of α-phenylglycine (PG) have been investigated theoretically at both the DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and MP2/6-311++G(d,p) levels of approximation. Seventeen different minima were found on the investigated potential energy surfaces, which are characterized by different dominant intramolecular interactions: type I conformers are stabilized by hydrogen bonds of the type N–H···O=C, type II by a strong O–H···N hydrogen bond, type III by weak N–H···O–H hydrogen bonds, and type IV by a C=O···H–C contact. The calculations indicate also that entropic effects are relevant in determining the equilibrium populations of the conformers of PG in the gas phase, in particular in the case of conformers of type II, where the strong intramolecular O–H···N hydrogen bond considerably diminishes entropy by reducing the conformational mobility of the molecule. In consonance with the relative energies of the conformers and barriers for conformational interconversion, only 3 conformers of PG were observed for the compound isolated in cryogenic Ar, Xe, and N{sub 2} matrices: the conformational ground state (ICa), and forms ICc and IITa. All other significantly populated conformers existing in the gas phase prior to deposition convert either to conformer ICa or to conformer ICc during matrix deposition. The experimental observation of ICc had never been achieved hitherto. Narrowband near-IR irradiation of the first overtone of νOH vibrational mode of ICa and ICc in nitrogen matrices (at 6910 and 6930 cm{sup −1}, respectively) led to selective generation of two additional conformers of high-energy, ITc and ITa, respectively, which were also observed experimentally for the first time. In addition, these experiments also provided the key information for the detailed vibrational characterization of the 3 conformers initially present in the matrices. On the other hand, UV irradiation (λ = 255 nm) of PG isolated in a xenon matrix revealed that

  15. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2013-05-28

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  16. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2014-11-25

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  17. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ACS IMAGING OF THE GOALS SAMPLE: QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF NEARBY LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES WITH L{sub IR} > 10{sup 11.4} L{sub Sun}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D.-C.; Evans, A. S.; Privon, G. C. E-mail: aevans@virginia.edu; and others

    2013-05-10

    A Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys study of the structural properties of 85 luminous and ultraluminous (L{sub IR} > 10{sup 11.4} L{sub Sun }) infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) sample is presented. Two-dimensional GALFIT analysis has been performed on F814W ''I-band'' images to decompose each galaxy, as appropriate, into bulge, disk, central point-spread function (PSF) and stellar bar components. The fraction of bulge-less disk systems is observed to be higher in LIRGs (35%) than in ULIRGs (20%), with the disk+bulge systems making up the dominant fraction of both LIRGs (55%) and ULIRGs (45%). Further, bulge+disk systems are the dominant late-stage merger galaxy type and are the dominant type for LIRGs and ULIRGs at almost every stage of galaxy-galaxy nuclear separation. The mean I-band host absolute magnitude of the GOALS galaxies is -22.64 {+-} 0.62 mag (1.8{sup +1.4}{sub -0.4} L{sup *}{sub I}), and the mean bulge absolute magnitude in GOALS galaxies is about 1.1 mag fainter than the mean host magnitude. Almost all ULIRGs have bulge magnitudes at the high end (-20.6 to -23.5 mag) of the GOALS bulge magnitude range. Mass ratios in the GOALS binary systems are consistent with most of the galaxies being the result of major mergers, and an examination of the residual-to-host intensity ratios in GOALS binary systems suggests that smaller companions suffer more tidal distortion than the larger companions. We find approximately twice as many bars in GOALS disk+bulge systems (32.8%) than in pure-disk mergers (15.9%) but most of the disk+bulge systems that contain bars are disk-dominated with small bulges. The bar-to-host intensity ratio, bar half-light radius, and bar ellipticity in GOALS galaxies are similar to those found in nearby spiral galaxies. The fraction of stellar bars decreases toward later merger stages and smaller nuclear separations, indicating that bars are destroyed as the merger

  18. IR keeps coal miners safe and reduces downtime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, L.G.

    2009-01-15

    Infrared (IR) cameras can inspect the direct current trolley system that powers mantrips and locomotives that transport men and supplies to an underground mine. If trolley insulators become shorted or electrically leaky they can heat the roof and cause a fire or cave-in. The article explains how IR inspection works and describes typical problems that can be identified by thermograms. 8 figs.

  19. X-ray nanotomography of SiO{sub 2}-coated Pt{sub 90}Ir{sub 10} tips with sub-micron conducting apex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, V.; Chien, T. Y.; Hiller, J.; Rosenmann, D.; Winarski, R. P.

    2011-10-24

    Hard x-ray nanotomography provides an important three-dimensional view of insulator-coated ''smart tips'' that can be utilized for modern emerging scanning probe techniques. Tips, entirely coated by an insulating SiO{sub 2} film except at the very tip apex, are fabricated by means of electron beam physical vapor deposition, focused ion beam milling and ion beam-stimulated oxide growth. Although x-ray tomography studies confirm the structural integrity of the oxide film, transport measurements suggest the presence of defect-induced states in the SiO{sub 2} film. The development of insulator-coated tips can facilitate nanoscale analysis with electronic, chemical, and magnetic contrast by synchrotron-based scanning probe microscopy.

  20. PROPERTIES OF THE 24 DAY MODULATION IN GX 13+1 FROM NEAR-INFRARED AND X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbet, Robin H. D.; Pearlman, Aaron B.; Buxton, Michelle; Levine, Alan M. E-mail: aaronp1@umbc.ed

    2010-08-10

    A 24 day period for the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) GX 13+1 was previously proposed on the basis of seven years of RXTE All-Sky Monitor (ASM) observations and it was suggested that this was the orbital period of the system. This would make it one of the longest known orbital periods for a Galactic LMXB powered by Roche lobe overflow. We present here the results of (1) K-band photometry obtained with the SMARTS Consortium CTIO 1.3 m telescope on 68 nights over a 10 month interval; (2) continued monitoring with the RXTE ASM, analyzed using a semi-weighted power spectrum instead of the data filtering technique previously used; and (3) Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray observations. Modulation near 24 days is seen in both the K band and additional statistically independent ASM X-ray observations. However, the modulation in the ASM is not strictly periodic. The periodicity is also not detected in the Swift BAT observations, but modulation at the same relative level as seen with the ASM cannot be ruled out. If the 24 day period is the orbital period of system, this implies that the X-ray modulation is caused by structure that is not fixed in location. A possible mechanism for the X-ray modulation is the dipping behavior recently reported from XMM-Newton observations.

  1. Enhancement of Aluminum Alloy Forgings Using Rapid Infrared Heating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and industry partners, Queen City Forging Company and Infra Red Heating Technologies LLC, have developed a process for forging aluminum parts using infrared (IR) technology. ...

  2. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements ... and other oxygenated organics, yet little quantitative IR data exists for isoprene. ...

  3. X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO INFRARED-SELECTED GALAXY CLUSTERS AT z > 1.4 IN THE IRAC SHALLOW CLUSTER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodwin, M.; Vikhlinin, A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Snyder, G.; Stern, D.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Moustakas, L. A.; Stanford, S. A.; Zeimann, G.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Gettings, D.; Mancone, C.; Bautz, M.; Miller, E. D.; Dey, A.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Hickox, R. C.; Ruel, J.

    2011-05-01

    We report the X-ray detection of two z > 1.4 infrared-selected galaxy clusters from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We present new data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the W. M. Keck Observatory that spectroscopically confirm cluster ISCS J1432.4+3250 at z = 1.49, the most distant of 18 confirmed z > 1 clusters in the ISCS to date. We also present new spectroscopy for ISCS J1438.1+3414, previously reported at z = 1.41, and measure its dynamical mass. Clusters ISCS J1432.4+3250 and ISCS J1438.1+3414 are detected in 36 ks and 143 ks Chandra exposures at significances of 5.2{sigma} and 9.7{sigma}, from which we measure total masses of log (M{sub 200,L{sub X}}/M{sub sun}) = 14.4 {+-} 0.2 and 14.35 {sup +0.14}{sub -0.11}, respectively. The consistency of the X-ray and dynamical properties of these high-redshift clusters further demonstrates that the ISCS is robustly detecting massive clusters to at least z = 1.5.

  4. A UV to mid-IR study of AGN selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Sun Mi; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Assef, Roberto; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stern, Daniel; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Moustakas, John

    2014-07-20

    We classify the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 431,038 sources in the 9 deg{sup 2} Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS). There are up to 17 bands of data available per source, including ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (NDWFS), near-IR (NEWFIRM), and mid-infrared (IRAC and MIPS) data, as well as spectroscopic redshifts for ∼20,000 objects, primarily from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. We fit galaxy, active galactic nucleus (AGN), stellar, and brown dwarf templates to the observed SEDs, which yield spectral classes for the Galactic sources and photometric redshifts and galaxy/AGN luminosities for the extragalactic sources. The photometric redshift precision of the galaxy and AGN samples are σ/(1 + z) = 0.040 and σ/(1 + z) = 0.169, respectively, with the worst 5% outliers excluded. On the basis of the χ{sub ν}{sup 2} of the SED fit for each SED model, we are able to distinguish between Galactic and extragalactic sources for sources brighter than I = 23.5 mag. We compare the SED fits for a galaxy-only model and a galaxy-AGN model. Using known X-ray and spectroscopic AGN samples, we confirm that SED fitting can be successfully used as a method to identify large populations of AGNs, including spatially resolved AGNs with significant contributions from the host galaxy and objects with the emission line ratios of 'composite' spectra. We also use our results to compare with the X-ray, mid-IR, optical color, and emission line ratio selection techniques. For an F-ratio threshold of F > 10, we find 16,266 AGN candidates brighter than I = 23.5 mag and a surface density of ∼1900 AGN deg{sup –2}.

  5. Correlation between Active Center Structure and Enhanced Dioxygen Binding in Co(salen) Nanoparticles: Characterization by In Situ Infrared, Raman, and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson,C.; Long, B.; Nguyen, J.; Day, V.; Borovik, A.; Subramaniam, B.; Guzman, J.

    2008-01-01

    The structure and ligand environment of Co(salen) nanoparticles and unprocessed Co(salen) have been determined by the combined application of infrared, Raman, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments before and during interaction with O2. The Co(salen) nanoparticles were prepared by the precipitation with compressed antisolvent (PCA) technique using commercially obtained Co(salen) [denoted as unprocessed Co(salen)] as the parent compound. The unprocessed Co(salen) particles exist as dimer species with a square-pyramidal coordination geometry that display no measurable O2 binding at room temperature. In sharp contrast, the Co(salen) nanoparticles show near-stoichiometric O2 adsorption, as demonstrated by microbalance gas binding experiments. The spectroscopy results indicate the presence of CoII centers with distorted tetrahedral geometry in the Co(salen) nanoparticles with no evidence of metallic Co clusters, confirmed by the lack of Co-Co contributions at bonding distances in the EXAFS spectra and the presence of characteristic features of CoII in the XANES spectra. The EXAFS data also indicate that there are on average two Co-N and two Co-O bonds with a distance of 1.81 {+-} 0.02 and 1.90 {+-} 0.02 Angstroms, respectively, consistent with typical metal salen structures. Upon O2 binding on the Co(salen) nanoparticles, the XANES results indicate oxidation of the CoII to CoIII, consistent with the vibrational data showing new bands associated with oxygen species bonded to Co centers and the increase in the oxygen coordination number from 1.8 to 2.9 in the EXAFS data. The results indicate that the enhanced O2 binding properties of Co(salen) nanoparticles are related to the unique distorted tetrahedral geometry, which is not observed in the unprocessed samples that contain mainly dimers with square planar geometry. The results presented here provide a

  6. Hf-irJ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hf-irJ jnj,4 States Governmen Department of Energy Inemorandum DOTE: DAY o 1S5a . 7 EPY TO F . O 0 NE-24 SUJEC': Authorization for Remedial Action of Residential Vicinity ...

  7. Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on High Energy Delayed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on High Energy Delayed Gamma-Rays From Gamma-Ray Bursts Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on...

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES WITH MULTIFREQUENCY ARCHIVAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowperthwaite, Philip S.; Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A.; Tosti, G.

    2013-11-01

    Blazars are a highly variable, radio-loud subclass of active galactic nuclei. In order to better understand such objects we must be able to easily identify candidate blazars from the growing population of unidentified sources. Working toward this goal, we attempt to identify new gamma-ray blazar candidates from a sample of 102 previously unidentified sources. These sources are selected from The Astronomer's Telegram and the literature on the basis of non-periodic variability and multi-wavelength behavior. We then attempt to associate these objects to an IR counterpart in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer all-sky survey. We are able to identify 16 candidate sources whose IR colors are consistent with those of the blazar population. Of those, 13 sources have IR colors indicative of being gamma-ray emitting blazar candidates. These sources all possess archival multi-wavelength observations that support their blazar-like nature.

  9. MODELING THE INFRARED EMISSION IN CYGNUS A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Privon, G. C.; Baum, S. A.; Noel-Storr, J.; O'Dea, C. P.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A.; Gallimore, J.

    2012-03-01

    We present new Spitzer IRS spectroscopy of Cygnus A, one of the most luminous radio sources in the local universe. Data on the inner 20'' are combined with new reductions of MIPS and IRAC photometry as well as data from the literature to form a radio through mid-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED). This SED is then modeled as a combination of torus reprocessed active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation, dust enshrouded starburst, and a synchrotron jet. This combination of physically motivated components successfully reproduces the observed emission over almost 5 dex in frequency. The bolometric AGN luminosity is found to be 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun} (90% of L{sub IR}), with a clumpy AGN-heated dust medium extending to {approx}130 pc from the supermassive black hole. Evidence is seen for a break or cutoff in the core synchrotron emission. The associated population of relativistic electrons could in principle be responsible for some of the observed X-ray emission though the synchrotron self-Compton mechanism. The SED requires a cool dust component, consistent with dust-reprocessed radiation from ongoing star formation. Star formation contributes at least 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} L{sub Sun} to the bolometric output of Cygnus A, corresponding to a star formation rate of {approx}10 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  10. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  11. Optically active substituted polyacetylene@carbon nanotube hybrids: Preparation, characterization and infrared emissivity property study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Yuming Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yongjuan; Zhang, Zewu; He, Man

    2014-08-15

    Optically active substituted polyacetylene@multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SPA@MWCNTs) nanohybrids were fabricated by wrapping helical SPA copolymers onto the surface of modified nanotubes through ester bonding linkage. SPA copolymer based on chiral phenylalanine and serine was pre-polymerized by a rhodium zwitterion catalyst in THF, and evidently proved to possess strong optical activity and adopt a predominately one-handed helical conformation. Various characterizations including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the SPA had been covalently grafted onto the nanotubes without destroying their original graphite structure. The wrapped SPA was found to exhibit an enhancement in thermal stability and still maintained considerable optical activity after grafting. The infrared emissivity property of the nanohybrids at 8–14 μm was investigated in addition. The results indicated that the SPA@MWCNTs hybrid matrix could possess a much lower infrared emissivity value (ε=0.707) than raw MWCNTs, which might be due to synergistic effect of the unique helical conformation of optically active SPA and strengthened interfacial interaction between the organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids with low infrared emissivity. - Highlights: • Synthesis of optically active SPA copolymer derived from serine and phenylalanine. • Preparation and characterization of optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids. • Application study of the SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids (ε=0.707) in lowering the infrared emissivity.

  12. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes IR remote sensing has located elevated surface temperatures (<12 degrees C above...

  13. Gated IR Images of Shocked Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. S. Lutz; W. D. Turley; P. M. Rightley; L. E. Primas

    2001-06-01

    Gated infrared (IR) images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin. Metal coupons machined with steps and flats were mounted directly to the high explosive. The explosive was point-initiated and 500-ns to 1-microsecond-wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera (SBF-134). Spatial distributions of surface radiance were extracted from the images of the shocked samples and found to be non-single-valued. Several geometries were modeled using CTH, a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode.

  14. Infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, C.C. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    Infrared thermography is a useful tool for the diagnosis of problems in building systems. In instances where a building owner has several large buildings, an investment in a typical $30,000 infrared system may be cost effective. In most instances, however, the rental of an infrared system or the hiring of an infrared consulting service is a cost effective alternative. As can be seen from the several applications presented here, any mechanical problem manifesting itself in an atypical temperature pattern can usually be detected. The two primary savings generated from infrared analysis of building systems are maintenance and energy.

  15. A CENSUS OF MID-INFRARED-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTERS AT 0 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomczak, Adam R.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Saintonge, Amelie

    2011-09-01

    We conduct a deep mid-infrared (mid-IR) census of nine massive galaxy clusters at (0 < z < 1.3) with a total of {approx}1500 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies using Spitzer/IRAC photometry and established mid-IR color selection techniques. Of the 949 cluster galaxies that are detected in at least three of the four IRAC channels at the {>=}3{sigma} level, we identify 12 that host mid-IR-selected active galactic nuclei (IR-AGNs). To compare the IR-AGNs across our redshift range, we define two complete samples of cluster galaxies: (1) optically selected members with rest-frame V{sub AB} magnitude < - 21.5 and (2) mid-IR-selected members brighter than (M*{sub 3.6} + 0.5), i.e., essentially a stellar mass cut. In both samples, we measure f{sub IR-AGN} {approx} 1% with a strong upper limit of {approx}3% at z < 1. This uniformly low IR-AGN fraction at z < 1 is surprising given that the fraction of 24 {mu}m sources in the same galaxy clusters is observed to increase by about a factor of four from z {approx} 0 to z {approx} 1; this indicates that most of the detected 24 {mu}m flux is due to star formation. Only in our single galaxy cluster at z = 1.24 is the IR-AGN fraction measurably higher at {approx}15% (all members; {approx}70% for late-types only). In agreement with recent studies, we find that the cluster IR-AGNs are predominantly hosted by late-type galaxies with blue optical colors, i.e., members with recent/ongoing star formation. The four brightest IR-AGNs are also X-ray sources; these IR+X-ray AGNs all lie outside the cluster core (R{sub proj} {approx}> 0.5 Mpc) and are hosted by highly morphologically disturbed members. Although our sample is limited, our results suggest that f{sub IR-AGN} in massive galaxy clusters is not strongly correlated with star formation at z < 1 and that IR-AGNs have a more prominent role at z {approx}> 1.

  16. I\r'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    r' ( g-.] ic' fz .; w .fl ! : L ' ..j : i ?- z -2"" . 2,-3X-~ Aw23-t 11, 1949 J c. s. ?.%omic ?zaru ccm3ission 7-t i-~n,~-;ra-& 3&-p.Cz' ;"ica P. ' 3. 30x 3 Eacsrs 17, lIaw York :. , ::; /. 1 httetii OP J xl-. P, 3. 2gp C+~t~Sil;lsXl t ?~~$Tly~lf .t: GA.3 L?wjpnaJiQn Of p-3&7:2-Liop 9.0";:7~+50 s' , -ir ,.,,3 iashlla+im it i3 our da3irs 20 be rslia-T.73 of _"\L:t&?T --:wzk&ili* of the SC1298 ' _ _ Zj31Wf end i~i3sio~~31.3 rsskeri31ii izxLi.c~~t&

  17. Nanosecond Time Resolved and Steady State Infrared Studies of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ultrafast time-resolved infrared and steady state Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectroscopies were used to probe TATB and its products after photoexcitation with a 5 ns pulse of 532 ...

  18. Posters Long-Pathlength Infrared Absorption Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Posters Long-Pathlength Infrared Absorption Measurements in the 8- to 14-µm Atmospheric Window: Self-Broadening Coefficient Data T. J. Kulp (a) and J. Shinn Geophysics and Environmental Research Program Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California Introduction The accurate characterization of the latent infrared (IR) absorption in the atmospheric window regions continues to be an area of research interest for the global climate modeling community. In the window between 8 and

  19. Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom: Crystal structure and magnetic study with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chai, Feng [Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China); Chen, YiPing, E-mail: ypchen007@sina.com [Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); You, ZhuChai; Xia, ZeMin; Ge, SuZhi; Sun, YanQiong; Huang, BiHua [Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China)

    2013-06-01

    Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates, [Co(phen)?]?[CoW??O??]9H?O 1 (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) and [Fe(phen)?]?[FeW??O??]H?OH?O 2, have been synthesized via the hydrothermal technique and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR, XPS, TG analysis, UVDRS, XRD, thermal-dependent and magnetic-dependent 2D-COS IR (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Crystal structure analysis reveals that the polyanions in compound 1 are linked into 3D supramolecule through hydrogen bonding interactions between lattice water molecules and terminal oxygen atoms of polyanion units, and [Co(phen)?]? cations distributed in the polyanion framework with many hydrogen bonding interactions. The XPS spectra indicate that all the Co atoms in 1 are +2 oxidation state, the Fe atoms in 2 existing with +2 and +3 mixed oxidation states. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic-dependent synchronous 2D correlation IR spectra of 1 (a), 2 (b) over 050 mT in the range of 6001000 cm?, the obvious response indicate two Keggin polyanions skeleton susceptible to applied magnetic field. Highlights: Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom has been obtained. Compound 1 forms into 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding between water molecules and polyanions. Magnetic-dependent 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy was introduced to discuss the magnetism of polyoxometalate.

  20. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  1. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Charles C.; Taylor, Larry T.

    1986-01-01

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  2. FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A.; Williams, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

  3. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogawa, Shinpei Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-26

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF{sub 2} etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  4. Searching for Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates Among the Unidentified INTEGRAL Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; /Perugia U.

    2012-04-02

    The identification of low-energy counterparts for {gamma}-ray sources is one of the biggest challenge in modern {gamma}-ray astronomy. Recently, we developed and successfully applied a new association method to recognize {gamma}-ray blazar candidates that could be possible counterparts for the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources above 100 MeV in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog (2FGL). This method is based on the Infrared (IR) colors of the recent Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. In this letter we applied our new association method to the case of unidentified INTEGRAL sources (UISs) listed in the fourth soft gamma-ray source catalog (4IC). Only 86 UISs out of the 113 can be analyzed, due to the sky coverage of the WISE Preliminary data release. Among these 86 UISs, we found that 18 appear to have a {gamma}-ray blazar candidate within their positional error region. Finally, we analyzed the Swift archival data available for 10 out these 18 {gamma}-ray blazar candidates, and we found that 7 out of 10 are clearly detected in soft X-rays and/or in the optical-ultraviolet band. We cannot confirm the associations between the UISs and the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates due to the discrepancies between the INTEGRAL and the soft X-ray spectra. However, the discovery of the soft X-ray counterparts for the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates adds an important clue to help understand their origin and to confirm their blazar nature.

  5. IR-2003- | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    IR-2003- (20.04 KB) More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: Clean Coal Technology Ushers In New Era in Energy Fact Sheet: Clean Coal Technology Ushers In New Era in Energy ...

  6. Infrared floodlight

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levin, Robert E.; English, George J.

    1986-08-05

    An infrared floodlight assembly designed particularly for security purposes and including a heat-conducting housing, a lens secured to the housing to provide a closure therefor, and a floodlight located within (and surrounded by) the housing. The floodlight combines the use of a tungsten halogen light source and dichroic hot and cold mirrors for directing substantially only infrared radiation toward the assembly's forward lens. Visible radiation is absorbed by the housing's interior wall(s) and, optionally, by a filter located between the floodlight and lens. An optional means may be used within the floodlight to reflect all forward radiation back toward the paraboloidal hot mirror or, alternatively, to reflect only visible radiation in this direction. The dichroic hot and cold mirrors preferably each comprise a glass substrate having multiple layers of titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide thereon.

  7. Infrared Debonding - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Find More Like This Return to Search Infrared Debonding Y-12 National Security Complex Contact Y12 About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Fact Sheet (302 KB) PDF Document Publication Presentation (370 KB) PDF Document Publication Patent (48 KB) <p align="left">&nbsp;</p> <p><em><span style="font-size: x-small;">Y-12 worker elevates object for positioning inside the IR

  8. ON THE NATURE OF THE GAMMA-RAY SOURCE 2FGL J1823.8+4312: THE DISCOVERY OF A NEW CLASS OF EXTRAGALACTIC X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massaro, F.; Digel, S. W.; Funk, S.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Grindlay, J. E.; Smith, Howard A.; Tosti, G.

    2012-10-01

    One of the unsolved mysteries of gamma-ray astronomy concerns the nature of unidentified gamma-ray sources. Recently, using the Second Fermi LAT source catalog (2FGL) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) archive, we discovered that the WISE counterparts of gamma-ray blazars, a class of active galactic nuclei, delineate a region (the WISE Gamma-ray Strip) in three-dimensional infrared color space well separated from the locus of other astronomical objects. Based on this result, we built an association procedure to recognize if there are WISE blazar candidates within the positional uncertainty region of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Here we report on our analysis of 2FGL J1823.8+4312, a gamma-ray active galactic nucleus of uncertain type associated with the X-ray source 1RXS J182418.7+430954 according to the 2FGL, to verify whether it is a blazar. Applying our association method we found two sources with IR colors typical of gamma-ray blazars, located within the 99.9% confidence region of 2FGL J1823.8+4312: WISE J182352.33+431452.5 and WISE J182409.25+431404.7. We then searched in the Chandra, NVSS, and SDSS archival observations for their counterparts. We discovered that WISE J182352.33+431452.5, our preferred gamma-ray blazar candidate according to our WISE association procedure, is detected in the optical and in the X-rays but not in the radio, making it extremely unusual if it is a blazar. Given its enigmatic spectral energy distribution, we considered the possibility that it is a 'radio-faint blazar' or the prototype of a new class of extragalactic sources; our conclusion is independent of whether WISE J182352.33+431452.5 is the actual counterpart of 2FGL J1823.8+4312.

  9. On the Nature of the Gamma-ray Source 2FGL J1823.8 4312: The Discovery of a New Class of Extragalactic X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massaro, Francesco

    2012-08-03

    One of the unsolved mysteries of gamma-ray astronomy concerns the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Recently, using the Second Fermi LAT source catalog (2FGL) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) archive, we discovered that the WISE counterparts of gamma-ray blazars, a class of active galactic nuclei, delineate a region (the WISE Gamma-ray Strip) in the 3-dimensional infrared color space well separated from the locus of the other astronomical objects. Based on this result, we built an association procedure to recognize if there areWISE blazar candidates within the positional uncertainty region of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Here we report on our analysis of 2FGL J1823.8+4312, a gamma-ray active galactic nucleus of uncertain type associated with the X-ray source 1RXS J182418.7+430954 according to the 2FGL, to verify whether it is a blazar. Applying our association method we found two sources with IR colors typical of gamma-ray blazars, located within the 99.9% confidence region of 2FGL J1823.8+4312: WISE J182352.33+431452.5 and WISE J182409.25+431404.7. Then we searched in the Chandra, NVSS and SDSS archival observations for their counterparts. We discovered that WISE J182352.33+431452.5, our preferred gamma-ray blazar candidate according to our WISE association procedure, is detected in the optical and in the X-rays but not in the radio, making it extremely unusual if it is a blazar. Given its enigmatic spectral energy distribution, we considered the possibility that it is a 'radio faint blazar' or the prototype of a new class of extragalactic sources, our conclusion is independent of whether WISE J182352.33+431452.5 is the actual counterpart of 2FGL J1823.8+4312.

  10. Combined in Situ X-ray absorption and diffuse reflectance infraredspectroscopy: An attractive tool for catalytic investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinkovic, N.S.; Ehrlich, S.; Wang, Q.; Barrio, L.; Khalid, S.; et.al.

    2010-11-24

    Catalysis investigations are often followed in a range of spectroscopic techniques. While diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) can be done on a bench-top instrument, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques, such as extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) require synchrotron light. In order to ensure the same conditions during in situ catalysis for each method, a combined XAS/DRIFTS has been developed at beamline X18A at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. A rapid-scan FTIR spectrometer capable of both mid- and far-infrared measurements is equipped with an arm to redirect the IR beam outside the spectrometer. An in situ reaction chamber, equipped with glassy carbon windows for X-ray light and a KBr window for IR light passage is installed firmly on the arm. The reaction cell can be heated to 600 C and allows passage of gases through the catalyst so that both XAS and DRIFTS techniques can be done simultaneously in controlled environment conditions. Together with a fast-moving monochromator for quick-EXAFS and mass-spectrometric residual gas analysis, this new tool is a powerful method for testing catalytic reactions in real time.

  11. Epitaxial growth of iridate pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gallagher, J. C.; Esser, B. D.; Morrow, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Williams, R. E. A.; Woodward, P. M.; McComb, D. W.; Yang, F. Y.

    2016-02-29

    Epitaxial films of the pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 have been grown on (111)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates by off-axis sputtering followed by post-growth annealing. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results demonstrate phase-pure epitaxial growth of the pyrochlore films on YSZ. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) investigation of an Nd2Ir2O7 film with a short post-annealing provides insight into the mechanism for crystallization of Nd2Ir2O7 during the post-annealing process. STEM images reveal clear pyrochlore ordering of Nd and Ir in the films. As a result, the epitaxial relationship between the YSZ and Nd2Ir2O7 is observed clearly while some interfacial regions show a thin region with polycrystallinemore » Ir nanocrystals.« less

  12. Non-destructive component separation using infrared radiant energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Russell, Steven W.; Holt, Jerrid S.; Brown, John D.

    2011-03-01

    A method for separating a first component and a second component from one another at an adhesive bond interface between the first component and second component. Typically the method involves irradiating the first component with infrared radiation from a source that radiates substantially only short wavelengths until the adhesive bond is destabilized, and then separating the first component and the second component from one another. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is placed inside an enclosure and the assembly is illuminated from an IR source that is external to the enclosure. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is simultaneously irradiated by a multi-planar array of IR sources. Often the IR radiation is unidirectional. In some embodiments the IR radiation is narrow-band short wavelength infrared radiation.

  13. Negligible sample heating from synchrotron infrared beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Michael C.; Tsvetkova, Nelly M.; Crowe, John H.; McKinney, Wayne R.

    2000-08-30

    The use of synchrotron sources for infrared (IR) spectromicroscopy provides greatly increased brightness enabling high-quality IR measurements at diffraction-limited spatial resolutions. This permits synchrotron-based IR spectromicroscopy to be applied to biological applications at spatial resolutions of the order of the size of a single mammalian cell. The question then arises, ''Does the intense synchrotron beam harm biological samples?'' Mid-IR photons are too low in energy to break bonds directly, however they could cause damage to biological molecules due to heating. In this work, we present measurements showing negligible sample heating effects from a diffraction-limited synchrotron IR source. The sample used is fully hydrated lipid bilayers composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine(DPPC), which undergoes a phase transition from a gel into a liquid-crystalline state at about 315 K during heating. Several IR-active vibrational modes clearly shift in frequency when the sample passes through the phase transition. We calibrate and then use these shifting vibrational modes as an in situ temperature sensor.

  14. Infrared pulse characterization using four-wave mixing inside a few cycle pulse filament in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marceau, Claude Thomas, Steven; Kassimi, Yacine; Gingras, Guillaume; Witzel, Bernd

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate a four-wave mixing (FWM) technique to measure near- and mid-infrared (IR) laser pulse shapes in time domain. Few cycle 800?nm laser pulses were synchronized with the IR pulse and focused colinearly to generate a plasma filament in air. Second harmonic radiation around 400?nm was generated through FWM, with a yield proportional to the IR pulse intensity. Excellent signal to noise ratio was observed from 2.1??m to 18??m. With proper phase stabilization of the IR beam, this technique is a promising step toward direct electric field sensing of near-IR pulses in air.

  15. Theoretical studies of Ir5Th and Ir5Ce nanoscale precipitates in Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, James R; Averill, Frank; Cooper, Valentino R

    2014-01-01

    Experimentally, it is known that very small amounts of thorium and/or cerium added to iridium metal form a precipitate, Ir5Th / Ir5Ce, which improves the high temperature mechanical properties of the resulting alloys. We demonstrate that there are low-energy configurations for nano-scale precipitates of these phases in Ir, and that these coherent arrangements may assist in producing improved mechanical properties. One precipitate/matrix orientation gives a particularly low interfacial energy, and a low lattice misfit. Nanolayer precipitates with this orientation are found to be likely to form, with little driving force to coarsen. The predicted morphology of the precipitates and their orientation with the matrix phase provide a potential experiment that could be used to test these predictions.

  16. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  17. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1998-09-22

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

  18. Electronic excitations and structure of Li{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} thin films grown on ZrO{sub 2}:Y (001) substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenderka, Marcus Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger; Grundmann, Marius; Lorenz, Michael

    2015-01-14

    Thin films are a prerequisite for application of the emergent exotic ground states in iridates that result from the interplay of strong spin-orbit coupling and electronic correlations. We report on pulsed laser deposition of Li{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} films on ZrO{sub 2}:Y (001) single crystalline substrates. X-ray diffraction confirms preferential (001) and (10-1) out-of-plane crystalline orientations with well defined in-plane orientation. Resistivity between 35 and 300 K is dominated by a three-dimensional variable range hopping mechanism. The dielectric function is determined by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and, complemented by Fourier transform infrared transmission spectroscopy, reveals a small optical gap of ≈300 meV, a splitting of the 5d-t{sub 2g} manifold, and several in-gap excitations attributed to phonons and possibly magnons.

  19. A spectroelectrochemical cell for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Vogt, Tim; Winter, Ernst; Bredenbeck, Jens E-mail: bredenbeck@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.de

    2015-08-15

    A spectroelectrochemical cell has been designed to combine electrochemistry and ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy, which is a powerful tool to extract structure and dynamics information on the femtosecond to picosecond time scale. Our design is based on a gold mirror with the dual role of performing electrochemistry and reflecting IR light. To provide the high optical surface quality required for laser spectroscopy, the gold surface is made by electron beam evaporation on a glass substrate. Electrochemical cycling facilitates in situ collection of ultrafast dynamics of redox-active molecules by means of 2D-IR. The IR beams are operated in reflection mode so that they travel twice through the sample, i.e., the signal size is doubled. This methodology is optimal for small sample volumes and successfully tested with the ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox system of which the corresponding electrochemically induced 2D-IR difference spectrum is reported.

  20. Methods and apparatus for mid-infrared sensing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Pao Tai; Cai, Yan; Agarwal, Anuradha Murthy; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2015-06-02

    A chip-scale, air-clad semiconductor pedestal waveguide can be used as a mid-infrared (mid-IR) sensor capable of in situ monitoring of organic solvents and other analytes. The sensor uses evanescent coupling from a silicon or germanium waveguide, which is highly transparent in the mid-IR portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, to probe the absorption spectrum of fluid surrounding the waveguide. Launching a mid-IR beam into the waveguide exposed to a particular analyte causes attenuation of the evanescent wave's spectral components due to absorption by carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and/or nitrogen bonds in the surrounding fluid. Detecting these changes at the waveguide's output provides an indication of the type and concentration of one or more compounds in the surrounding fluid. If desired, the sensor may be integrated onto a silicon substrate with a mid-IR light source and a mid-IR detector to form a chip-based spectrometer.

  1. T-rays: What a Bright Future | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T-rays are part of the broad spectrum of electromagnetic radiation that includes radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, X-rays and gamma rays. They cycle at ...

  2. IR Imaging Using Arrays of SiO2 Micromechanical Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grbovic, Dragoslav; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G; Hunter, Scott Robert

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we describe the fabrication of an array of bimaterial detectors for infrared (IR) imaging that utilize SiO2 as a structural material. All the substrate material underneath the active area of each detector element was removed. Each detector element incorporates an optical resonant cavity layer in the IR absorbing region of the sensing element. The simplified microfabrication process requires only four photolithographic steps with no wet etching or sacrificial layers. The thermomechanical deflection sensitivity was 7.9 10-3 rad/K which corresponds to a noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 2.9 mK. In the present work the array was used to capture IR images while operating at room temperature and atmospheric pressure and no need for vacuum packaging. The average measured NETD of our IR detector system was approximately 200 mK but some sensing elements exhibited an NETD of 50 mK.

  3. IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76% IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76% IRS Parking Facility Lighting ...

  4. FAR-INFRARED FINE-STRUCTURE LINE DIAGNOSTICS OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrah, D.; Petty, S. M.; Harris, K.; Lebouteiller, V.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Pearson, C.; Rigopoulou, D.; Smith, H. A.; Gonzlez-Alfonso, E.; Clements, D. L.; Efstathiou, A.; Cormier, D.; Afonso, J.; Hurley, P.; Borys, C.; Verma, A.; Cooray, A.; Salvatelli, V.

    2013-10-10

    We present Herschel observations of 6 fine-structure lines in 25 ultraluminous infrared galaxies at z < 0.27. The lines, [O III]52 ?m, [N III]57 ?m, [O I]63 ?m, [N II]122 ?m, [O I]145 ?m, and [C II]158 ?m, are mostly single Gaussians with widths <600 km s{sup 1} and luminosities of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} L{sub ?}. There are deficits in the [O I]63/L{sub IR}, [N II]/L{sub IR}, [O I]145/L{sub IR}, and [C II]/L{sub IR} ratios compared to lower luminosity systems. The majority of the line deficits are consistent with dustier H II regions, but part of the [C II] deficit may arise from an additional mechanism, plausibly charged dust grains. This is consistent with some of the [C II] originating from photodissociation regions or the interstellar medium (ISM). We derive relations between far-IR line luminosities and both the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We find that [N II] and both [O I] lines are good tracers of the IR luminosity and star formation rate. In contrast, [C II] is a poor tracer of the IR luminosity and star formation rate, and does not improve as a tracer of either quantity if the [C II] deficit is accounted for. The continuum luminosity densities also correlate with the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We derive ranges for the gas density and ultraviolet radiation intensity of 10{sup 1} < n < 10{sup 2.5} and 10{sup 2.2} < G{sub 0} < 10{sup 3.6}, respectively. These ranges depend on optical type, the importance of star formation, and merger stage. We do not find relationships between far-IR line properties and several other parameters: active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity, merger stage, mid-IR excitation, and SMBH mass. We conclude that these far-IR lines arise from gas heated by starlight, and that they are not strongly influenced by AGN activity.

  5. Industrial applications of accelerator-based infrared sources: Analysis using infrared microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bantignies, J.L.; Fuchs, G.; Wilhelm, C.; Carr, G.L.; Dumas, P.

    1997-09-01

    Infrared Microspectroscopy, using a globar source, is now widely employed in the industrial environment, for the analysis of various materials. Since synchrotron radiation is a much brighter source, an enhancement of an order of magnitude in lateral resolution can be achieved. Thus, the combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful tool enabling sample regions only few microns size to be studied. This opens up the potential for analyzing small particles. Some examples for hair, bitumen and polymer are presented.

  6. Far-infrared surface emissivity and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Pincus, Robert; Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong

    2014-11-03

    Presently, there are no global measurement constraints on the surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 μm, even though this surface property in this far-IR region has a direct impact on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and infrared cooling rates where the column precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm. Such dry conditions are common for high-altitude and high-latitude locations, with the potential for modeled climate to be impacted by uncertain surface characteristics. This paper explores the sensitivity of instantaneous OLR and cooling rates to changes in far-IR surface emissivity and how this unconstrained property impacts climate model projections. At high latitudes and altitudes, a 0.05 change in emissivity due to mineralogy and snow grain size can cause a 1.8–2.0 W m⁻² difference in the instantaneous clear-sky OLR. A variety of radiative transfer techniques have been used to model the far-IR spectral emissivities of surface types defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. Incorporating these far-IR surface emissivities into the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario of the Community Earth System Model leads to discernible changes in the spatial patterns of surface temperature, OLR, and frozen surface extent. The model results differ at high latitudes by as much as 2°K, 10 W m⁻², and 15%, respectively, after only 25 y of integration. The calculated difference in far-IR emissivity between ocean and sea ice of between 0.1 and 0.2, suggests the potential for a far-IR positive feedback for polar climate change.

  7. Far-infrared surface emissivity and climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Pincus, Robert; Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong

    2014-11-03

    Presently, there are no global measurement constraints on the surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 μm, even though this surface property in this far-IR region has a direct impact on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and infrared cooling rates where the column precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm. Such dry conditions are common for high-altitude and high-latitude locations, with the potential for modeled climate to be impacted by uncertain surface characteristics. This paper explores the sensitivity of instantaneous OLR and cooling rates to changes in far-IR surface emissivity and how this unconstrained property impacts climate modelmore » projections. At high latitudes and altitudes, a 0.05 change in emissivity due to mineralogy and snow grain size can cause a 1.8–2.0 W m⁻² difference in the instantaneous clear-sky OLR. A variety of radiative transfer techniques have been used to model the far-IR spectral emissivities of surface types defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. Incorporating these far-IR surface emissivities into the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario of the Community Earth System Model leads to discernible changes in the spatial patterns of surface temperature, OLR, and frozen surface extent. The model results differ at high latitudes by as much as 2°K, 10 W m⁻², and 15%, respectively, after only 25 y of integration. The calculated difference in far-IR emissivity between ocean and sea ice of between 0.1 and 0.2, suggests the potential for a far-IR positive feedback for polar climate change.« less

  8. Real time capable infrared thermography for ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sieglin, B. Faitsch, M.; Herrmann, A.; Brucker, B.; Eich, T.; Kammerloher, L.; Martinov, S.

    2015-11-15

    Infrared (IR) thermography is widely used in fusion research to study power exhaust and incident heat load onto the plasma facing components. Due to the short pulse duration of today’s fusion experiments, IR systems have mostly been designed for off-line data analysis. For future long pulse devices (e.g., Wendelstein 7-X, ITER), a real time evaluation of the target temperature and heat flux is mandatory. This paper shows the development of a real time capable IR system for ASDEX Upgrade. A compact IR camera has been designed incorporating the necessary magnetic and electric shielding for the detector, cooler assembly. The camera communication is based on the Camera Link industry standard. The data acquisition hardware is based on National Instruments hardware, consisting of a PXIe chassis inside and a fibre optical connected industry computer outside the torus hall. Image processing and data evaluation are performed using real time LabVIEW.

  9. Broadband enhancement of infrared absorption in microbolometers using Ag nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyun, Jerome K.; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Woo Choong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Hyun, Moon Seop; Kim, Hee Yeoun E-mail: jhpark@nnfc.re.kr; Park, Jae Hong E-mail: jhpark@nnfc.re.kr; Lee, Won-Oh

    2015-12-21

    High performance microbolometers are widely sought for thermal imaging applications. In order to increase the performance limits of microbolometers, the responsivity of the device to broadband infrared (IR) radiation needs to be improved. In this work, we report a simple, quick, and cost-effective approach to modestly enhance the broadband IR response of the device by evaporating Ag nanocrystals onto the light entrance surface of the device. When irradiated with IR light, strong fields are built up within the gaps between adjacent Ag nanocrystals. These fields resistively generate heat in the nanocrystals and underlying substrate, which is transduced into an electrical signal via a resistive sensing element in the device. Through this method, we are able to enhance the IR absorption over a broadband spectrum and improve the responsivity of the device by ∼11%.

  10. GOODS-HERSCHEL: SEPARATING HIGH-REDSHIFT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND STAR-FORMING GALAXIES USING INFRARED COLOR DIAGNOSTICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David; Pannella, Maurilio; Aussel, Herve; Dasyra, Kalliopi; Leiton, Roger; Scott, Douglas; Magnelli, Benjamin; Popesso, Paola; Altieri, Bruno; Coia, Daniela; Valtchanov, Ivan; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Dickinson, Mark; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Magdis, Georgios

    2013-02-15

    We have compiled a large sample of 151 high-redshift (z = 0.5-4) galaxies selected at 24 {mu}m (S {sub 24} > 100 {mu}Jy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-infrared spectrum into contributions from star formation and activity in the galactic nuclei. In addition, we have a wealth of photometric data from Spitzer IRAC/MIPS and Herschel PACS/SPIRE. We explore how effective different infrared color combinations are at separating our mid-IR spectroscopically determined active galactic nuclei from our star-forming galaxies. We look in depth at existing IRAC color diagnostics, and we explore new color-color diagnostics combining mid-IR, far-IR, and near-IR photometry, since these combinations provide the most detail about the shape of a source's IR spectrum. An added benefit of using a color that combines far-IR and mid-IR photometry is that it is indicative of the power source driving the IR luminosity. For our data set, the optimal color selections are S {sub 250}/S {sub 24} versus S {sub 8}/S {sub 3.6} and S {sub 100}/S {sub 24} versus S {sub 8}/S {sub 3.6}; both diagnostics have {approx}10% contamination rate in the regions occupied primarily by star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei, respectively. Based on the low contamination rate, these two new IR color-color diagnostics are ideal for estimating both the mid-IR power source of a galaxy when spectroscopy is unavailable and the dominant power source contributing to the IR luminosity. In the absence of far-IR data, we present color diagnostics using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-IR bands which can efficiently select out high-z (z {approx} 2) star-forming galaxies.

  11. ILLUMINATING THE DARKEST GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH RADIO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zauderer, B. A.; Berger, E.; Margutti, R.; Fong, W.; Laskar, T.; Chornock, R.; Soderberg, A. M. [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Olivares E, F.; Greiner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Perley, D. A.; Horesh, A.; Carpenter, J. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States); Updike, A. C. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Menten, K. M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Nakar, E. [Department of Astrophysics, Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Chandra, P. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Castro-Tirado, A. J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA-CSIC), P.O. Box 03004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Bremer, M. [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique, 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d'Heres (France); and others

    2013-04-20

    We present X-ray, optical, near-infrared (IR), and radio observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) 110709B and 111215A, as well as optical and near-IR observations of their host galaxies. The combination of X-ray detections and deep optical/near-IR limits establish both bursts as ''dark''. Sub-arcsecond positions enabled by radio detections lead to robust host galaxy associations, with optical detections that indicate z {approx}< 4 (110709B) and z Almost-Equal-To 1.8-2.9 (111215A). We therefore conclude that both bursts are dark due to substantial rest-frame extinction. Using the radio and X-ray data for each burst we find that GRB 110709B requires A{sub V}{sup host}{approx}>5.3 mag and GRB 111215A requires A{sub V}{sup host}{approx}>8.5 mag (assuming z = 2). These are among the largest extinction values inferred for dark bursts to date. The two bursts also exhibit large neutral hydrogen column densities of N{sub H,{sub int}} {approx}> 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (z = 2) as inferred from their X-ray spectra, in agreement with the trend for dark GRBs. Moreover, the inferred values are in agreement with the Galactic A{sub V} -N{sub H} relation, unlike the bulk of the GRB population. Finally, we find that for both bursts the afterglow emission is best explained by a collimated outflow with a total beaming-corrected energy of E{sub {gamma}} + E{sub K} Almost-Equal-To (7-9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg (z = 2) expanding into a wind medium with a high density, M Almost-Equal-To (6-20) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} (n Almost-Equal-To 100-350 cm{sup -3} at Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 17} cm). While the energy release is typical of long GRBs, the inferred density may be indicative of larger mass-loss rates for GRB progenitors in dusty (and hence metal rich) environments. This study establishes the critical role of radio observations in demonstrating the origin and properties of dark GRBs. Observations with the JVLA and ALMA will provide a sample with sub

  12. LENS MODELS OF HERSCHEL-SELECTED GALAXIES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-IR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calanog, J. A.; Cooray, A.; Ma, B.; Casey, C. M.; Fu, Hai; Wardlow, J.; Amber, S.; Baker, A. J.; Baes, M.; Bock, J.; Bourne, N.; Dye, S.; Bussmann, R. S.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; and others

    2014-12-20

    We present Keck-Adaptive Optics and Hubble Space Telescope high resolution near-infrared (IR) imaging for 500 ?m bright candidate lensing systems identified by the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey and Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. Out of 87 candidates with near-IR imaging, 15 (?17%) display clear near-IR lensing morphologies. We present near-IR lens models to reconstruct and recover basic rest-frame optical morphological properties of the background galaxies from 12 new systems. Sources with the largest near-IR magnification factors also tend to be the most compact, consistent with the size bias predicted from simulations and previous lensing models for submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). For four new sources that also have high-resolution submillimeter maps, we test for differential lensing between the stellar and dust components and find that the 880 ?m magnification factor (?{sub 880}) is ?1.5 times higher than the near-IR magnification factor (?{sub NIR}), on average. We also find that the stellar emission is ?2 times more extended in size than dust. The rest-frame optical properties of our sample of Herschel-selected lensed SMGs are consistent with those of unlensed SMGs, which suggests that the two populations are similar.

  13. INFRARED STUDIES OF EPSILON AURIGAE IN ECLIPSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Kloppenborg, Brian K.; Wall, Randall E.; Hopkins, Jeffrey L.; Howell, Steve B.; Hoard, D. W.; Rayner, John; Bus, Schelte; Tokunaga, Alan; Sitko, Michael L.; Bradford, Suellen; Russell, Ray W.; Lynch, David K.; Hammel, Heidi; Whitney, Barbara; Orton, Glenn; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma; Hora, Joseph L.; Hinz, Philip; Hoffmann, William; and others

    2011-11-15

    We report here on a series of medium resolution spectro-photometric observations of the enigmatic long period eclipsing binary epsilon Aurigae, during its eclipse interval of 2009-2011, using near-infrared spectra obtained with SpeX on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), mid-infrared spectra obtained with BASS on AOES and IRTF, MIRSI on IRTF, and MIRAC4 on the MMT, along with mid-infrared photometry using MIRSI on IRTF and MIRAC4 on the MMT, plus 1995-2000 timeframe published photometry and data obtained with Denver's TNTCAM2 at WIRO. The goals of these observations included: (1) comparing eclipse depths with prior eclipse data, (2) confirming the re-appearance of CO absorption bands at and after mid-eclipse, associated with sublimation in the disk, (3) seeking evidence for any mid-infrared solid state spectral features from particles in the disk, and (4) providing evidence that the externally irradiated disk has azimuthal temperature differences. IR eclipse depths appear similar to those observed during the most recent (1983) eclipse, although evidence for post-mid-eclipse disk temperature increase is present, due to F star heated portions of the disk coming into view. Molecular CO absorption returned 57 days after nominal mid-eclipse, but was not detected at mid-eclipse plus 34 days, narrowing the association with differentially heated sub-regions in the disk. Transient He I 10830A absorption was detected at mid-eclipse, persisting for at least 90 days thereafter, providing a diagnostic for the hot central region. The lack of solid-state features in Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph, BASS, and MIRAC spectra to date suggests the dominance of large particles (micron-sized) in the disk. Based on these observations, mid-infrared studies out of eclipse can directly monitor and map the disk thermal changes, and better constrain disk opacity and thermal conductivity.

  14. Uncooled infrared photon detector and multicolor infrared detection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A multicolor infrared sensor includes a stack of frequency specific optomechanical ... lattice; strain; multicolor; infrared; sensor; stack; frequency; specific; ...

  15. Studies of planetary boundary layer by infrared thermal imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albina, Bogdan; Dimitriu, Dan Gheorghe Gurlui, Silviu Octavian; Cazacu, Marius Mihai; Timofte, Adrian

    2014-11-24

    The IR camera is a relatively novel device for remote sensing of atmospheric thermal processes from the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) based on measurements of the infrared radiation. Infrared radiation is energy radiated by the motion of atoms and molecules on the surface of aerosols, when their temperature is more than absolute zero. The IR camera measures directly the intensity of radiation emitted by aerosols which is converted by an imaging sensor into an electric signal, resulting a thermal image. Every image pixel that corresponds to a specific radiance is pre-processed to identify the brightness temperature. The thermal infrared imaging radiometer used in this study, NicAir, is a precision radiometer developed by Prata et al. The device was calibrated for the temperature range of 270–320 K and using a calibration table along with image processing software, important information about variations in temperature can be extracted from acquired IR images. The PBL is the lowest layer of the troposphere where the atmosphere interacts with the ground surfaces. The importance of PBL lies in the fact that it provides a finite but varying volume in which pollutants can disperse. The aim of this paper is to analyze the PBL altitude and thickness variations over Iasi region using the IR imaging camera as well as its behavior from day to night and thermal processes occurring in PBL.

  16. Modulated IR radiometry for determining thermal properties and basic characteristics of titanium thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apreutesei, Mihai; Lopes, Claudia; Vaz, Filipe; Macedo, Francisco; Borges, Joel

    2014-07-01

    Titanium thin films of different thicknesses were prepared by direct current magnetron sputtering to study modulated infrared (IR) radiometry as a tool for analyzing film thickness. Thickness was varied by regularly increasing the deposition time, keeping all the other deposition parameters constant. The influence of film thickness on morphological, structural, and electrical properties of the titanium coatings also was investigated. The experimental results revealed a systematic grain growth with increasing film thickness, along with enhanced film crystallinity, which led to increased electrical conductivity. Using the results obtained by modulated IR radiometry, the thickness of each thin film was calculated. These thickness values were then compared with the coating thickness measurements obtained by scanning electron microscopy. The values confirmed the reliability of modulated IR radiometry as an analysis tool for thin films and coatings, and for determining thicknesses in the micrometer range, in particular.

  17. IR Spectrometer Using 90-degree Off-axis Parabolic Mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert M. Malone, Richard, G. Hacking, Ian J. McKenna, and Daniel H. Dolan

    2008-09-02

    A gated spectrometer has been designed for real-time, pulsed infrared (IR) studies at the National Synchrotron Light ource at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A pair of 90-degree, off-axis parabolic mirrors are used to relay the light from an entrance slit to an output IR recording camera. With an initial wavelength range of 15004500 nm required, gratings could not be used in the spectrometer because grating orders would overlap. A magnesium oxide prism, placed between these parabolic mirrors, serves as the dispersion element. The spectrometer is doubly telecentric. With proper choice of the air spacing between the prism and the second parabolic mirror, any spectral region of interest within the InSb camera arrays sensitivity region can be recorded. The wavelengths leaving the second parabolic mirror are collimated, thereby relaxing the camera positioning tolerance. To set up the instrument, two different wavelength (visible) lasers are introduced at the entrance slit and made collinear with the optical axis via flip mirrors. After dispersion by the prism, these two laser beams are directed to tick marks located on the outside housing of the gated IR camera. This provides first-order wavelength calibration for the instrument. Light that is reflected off the front prism face is coupled into a high-speed detector to verify steady radiance during the gated spectral imaging. Alignment features include tick marks on the prism and parabolic mirrors. This instrument was designed to complement singlepoint pyrometry, which provides continuous time histories of a small collection of spots from shock-heated targets.

  18. Broadly tunable picosecond IR source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campillo, Anthony J.; Hyer, Ronald C.; Shapiro, Stanley J.

    1982-01-01

    A picosecond traveling-wave parametric device capable of controlled spectral bandwidth and wavelength in the infrared is reported. Intense 1.064 .mu.m picosecond pulses (1) pass through a 4.5 cm long LiNbO.sub.3 optical parametric oscillator crystal (2) set at its degeneracy angle. A broad band emerges, and a simple grating (3) and mirror (4) arrangement is used to inject a selected narrow-band into a 2 cm long LiNbO.sub.3 optical parametric amplifier crystal (5) along a second pump line. Typical input energies at 1.064 .mu.m along both pump lines are 6-8 mJ for the oscillator and 10 mJ for the amplifier. This yields 1 mJ of tunable output in the range 1.98 to 2.38 .mu.m which when down-converted in a 1 cm long CdSe crystal mixer (6) gives 2 .mu.J of tunable radiation over the 14.8 to 18.5 .mu.m region. The bandwidth and wavelength of both the 2 and 16 .mu.m radiation output are controlled solely by the diffraction grating.

  19. Broadly tunable picosecond ir source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campillo, A.J.; Hyer, R.C.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1980-04-23

    A picosecond traveling-wave parametric device capable of controlled spectral bandwidth and wavelength in the infrared is reported. Intense 1.064 ..mu..m picosecond pulses (1) pass through a 4.5 cm long LiNbO/sub 3/ optical parametric oscillator crystal (2) set at its degeneracy angle. A broad band emerges, and a simple grating (3) and mirror (4) arrangement is used to inject a selected narrow-band into a 2 cm long LiNbO/sub 3/ optical parametric amplifier crystal (5) along a second pump line. Typical input energies at 1.064 ..mu..m along both pump lines are 6 to 8 mJ for the oscillator and 10 mJ for the amplifier. This yields 1 mJ of tunable output in the range 1.98 to 2.38 ..mu..m which when down-converted in a 1 cm long CdSe crystal mixer (6) gives 2 ..mu..J of tunable radiation over the 14.8 to 18.5 ..mu..m region. The bandwidth and wavelength of both the 2 and 16 ..mu..m radiation output are controlled solely by the diffraction grating.

  20. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface. 4 figs.

  1. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forman, Steven E.; Caunt, James W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface.

  2. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations, second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gezari, D.Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J.M.

    1988-08-01

    The Far Infrared Supplement: Catalog of Infrared Observations summarizes all infrared astronomical observations at far infrared wavelengths (5 to 1000 microns) published in the scientific literature from 1965 through 1986. The Supplement list contain 25 percent of the observations in the full Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO), and essentially eliminates most visible stars from the listings. The Supplement is thus more compact than the main catalog, and is intended for easy reference during astronomical observations. The Far Infrared Supplement (2nd Edition) includes the Index of Infrared Source Positions and the Bibliography of Infrared Astronomy for the subset of far infrared observations listed.

  3. Near-infrared radiation curable multilayer coating systems and methods for applying same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, Mark P; Verdun, Shelley D; Post, Gordon L

    2015-04-28

    Multilayer coating systems, methods of applying and related substrates are disclosed. The coating system may comprise a first coating comprising a near-IR absorber, and a second coating deposited on a least a portion of the first coating. Methods of applying a multilayer coating composition to a substrate may comprise applying a first coating comprising a near-IR absorber, applying a second coating over at least a portion of the first coating and curing the coating with near infrared radiation.

  4. IR Spectral Bands and Performance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for IR Spectral Bands and Performance Citation Chris Douglass. IR Spectral Bands...

  5. Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability and Instrumentation Working Group Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, ...

  6. GaSb substrates with extended IR wavelength for advanced space based applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Lisa P.; Flint, Patrick; Dallas, Gordon; Bakken, Daniel; Blanchat, Kevin; Brown, Gail J.; Vangala, Shivashankar R.; Goodhue, William D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

    2009-05-01

    GaSb substrates have advantages that make them attractive for implementation of a wide range of infrared (IR) detectors with higher operating temperatures for stealth and space based applications. A significant aspect that would enable widespread commercial application of GaSb wafers for very long wavelength IR (VLWIR) applications is the capability for transmissivity beyond 15 m. Due largely to the GaSb (antisite) defect and other point defects in undoped GaSb substrates, intrinsic GaSb is still slightly p-type and strongly absorbs in the VLWIR. This requires backside thinning of the GaSb substrate for IR transmissivity. An extremely low n-type GaSb substrate is preferred to eliminate thinning and provide a substrate solution for backside illuminated VLWIR devices. By providing a more homogeneous radial distribution of the melt solute to suppress GaSb formation and controlling the cooling rate, ultra low doped n:GaSb has been achieved. This study examines the surface properties and IR transmission spectra of ultra low doped GaSb substrates at both room and low temperatures. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), homoepitaxy by MBE, and infrared Fourier transform (FTIR) analysis was implemented to examine material quality. As compared with standard low doped GaSb, the ultra low doped substrates show over 50% transmission and consistent wavelength transparency past 23 m with improved %T at low temperature. Homoepitaxy and AFM results indicate the ultra low doped GaSb has a low thermal desorbtion character and qualified morphology. In summary, improvements in room temperature IR transmission and extended wavelength characteristics have been shown consistently for ultra low doped n:GaSb substrates.

  7. A far-infrared spectroscopic survey of intermediate redshift (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdis, Georgios E.; Rigopoulou, D.; Hopwood, R.; Clements, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Farrah, D.; Pearson, C.; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Bock, J. J.; Cooray, A.; Griffin, M. J.; Oliver, S.; Perez Fournon, I.; Riechers, D.; Swinyard, B. M.; Thatte, N.; Scott, D.; Valtchanov, I.; Vaccari, M.

    2014-11-20

    We present Herschel far-IR photometry and spectroscopy as well as ground-based CO observations of an intermediate redshift (0.21 ? z ? 0.88) sample of Herschel-selected (ultra)-luminous infrared galaxies (L {sub IR} > 10{sup 11.5} L {sub ?}). With these measurements, we trace the dust continuum, far-IR atomic line emission, in particular [C II] 157.7 ?m, as well as the molecular gas of z ? 0.3 luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) and perform a detailed investigation of the interstellar medium of the population. We find that the majority of Herschel-selected intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs have L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratios that are a factor of about 10 higher than that of local ULIRGs and comparable to that of local normal and high-z star-forming galaxies. Using our sample to bridge local and high-z [C II] observations, we find that the majority of galaxies at all redshifts and all luminosities follow an L {sub C} {sub II}L {sub FIR} relation with a slope of unity, from which local ULIRGs and high- z active-galactic-nucleus-dominated sources are clear outliers. We also confirm that the strong anti-correlation between the L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratio and the far-IR color L {sub 60}/L {sub 100} observed in the local universe holds over a broad range of redshifts and luminosities, in the sense that warmer sources exhibit lower L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} at any epoch. Intermediate redshift ULIRGs are also characterized by large molecular gas reservoirs and by lower star formation efficiencies compared to that of local ULIRGs. The high L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratios, the moderate star formation efficiencies (L {sub IR}/L{sub CO}{sup ?} or L {sub IR}/M{sub H{sub 2}}), and the relatively low dust temperatures of our sample (which are also common characteristics of high-z star-forming galaxies with ULIRG-like luminosities) indicate that the evolution of the physical properties of (U)LIRGs between the present day and z

  8. Role of Dipolar Correlations in the Infrared Spectra of Water and Ice |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Role of Dipolar Correlations in the Infrared Spectra of Water and Ice Authors: Chen, W., Sharma, M., Resta, R., Galli, G., Car, R. We report simulated infrared (IR) spectra of deuterated water and ice using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics with maximally localized Wannier functions. Experimental features are accurately reproduced within the harmonic approximation. By decomposing the line shapes in terms of intramolecular and intermolecular dipole

  9. Infrared-sensitive photocathode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mariella, R.P. Jr.; Cooper, G.A.

    1995-04-04

    A single-crystal, multi-layer device is described incorporating an IR absorbing layer that is compositionally different from the Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x}Sb layer which acts as the electron emitter. Many different IR absorbing layers can be envisioned for use in this embodiment, limited only by the ability to grow quality material on a chosen substrate. A non-exclusive list of possible IR absorbing layers would include GaSb, InAs and InAs/Ga{sub w}In{sub y}Al{sub 1{minus}y{minus}w}Sb superlattices. The absorption of the IR photon excites an electron into the conduction band of the IR absorber. An externally applied electric field then transports electrons from the conduction band of the absorber into the conduction band of the Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x}Sb, from which they are ejected into vacuum. Because the band alignments of Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x}Sb can be made the same as that of GaAs, emitting efficiencies comparable to GaAs photocathodes are obtainable. The present invention provides a photocathode that is responsive to wavelengths within the range of 0.9 {mu}m to at least 10 {mu}m. 9 figures.

  10. Infrared-sensitive photocathode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Cooper, Gregory A.

    1995-01-01

    A single-crystal, multi-layer device incorporating an IR absorbing layer that is compositionally different from the Ga.sub.x Al.sub.1-x Sb layer which acts as the electron emitter. Many different IR absorbing layers can be envisioned for use in this embodiment, limited only by the ability to grow quality material on a chosen substrate. A non-exclusive list of possible IR absorbing layers would include GaSb, InAs and InAs/Ga.sub.w In.sub.y Al.sub.1-y-w Sb superlattices. The absorption of the IR photon excites an electron into the conduction band of the IR absorber. An externally applied electric field then transports electrons from the conduction band of the absorber into the conduction band of the Ga.sub.x Al.sub.1-x Sb, from which they are ejected into vacuum. Because the band alignments of Ga.sub.x Al.sub.1-x Sb can be made the same as that of GaAs, emitting efficiencies comparable to GaAs photocathodes are obtainable. The present invention provides a photocathode that is responsive to wavelengths within the range of 0.9 .mu.m to at least 10 .mu.m.

  11. Determination of partial (n,xngamma) cross-sections in 193-Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talou, P; Chadwick, M B; Nelson, R; Fotiades, N; Devlin, M; Garrett, P E; Younes, W; Becker, J A

    2003-10-15

    The {sup 193}Ir(n,n'){sup 193m}Ir cross section for the production of the 80-keV isomer in {sup 193}Ir is evaluated using a combination of experimental data and nuclear reaction modeling, from threshold to about 20 MeV. Four discrete {gamma} lines feeding the isomer were recently observed with the GEANIE {gamma}-ray detector at LANSCE. Theoretical calculations of the nuclear reaction mechanisms in play are then carried out to evaluate the contributions not accounted for in the experimental setup (direct population; fraction of {gamma}-lines not observed in the experiment; etc). Experiment and modeling are then combined to provide a total cross section for the production of the Iridium isomer. We finally compare our result with activation measurement data available for a few energy points.

  12. Curing the UV/IR mixing for field theories with translation-invariant star products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanasa, Adrian; Vitale, Patrizia

    2010-03-15

    The ultraviolet/infrared (UV/IR) mixing of noncommutative field theories has been recently shown to be a generic feature of translation-invariant associative products. In this paper we propose to take into account the quantum corrections of the model to modify in this way the noncommutative action. This idea was already used to cure the UV/IR mixing for theories on Moyal space. We show that in the present framework also, this proposal proves successful for curing the mixing. We achieve this task by explicit calculations of one and higher loops Feynman amplitudes. For the sake of completeness, we compute the form of the new action in the matrix base for the Wick-Voros product.

  13. Elastic, magnetic and electronic properties of iridium phosphide Ir2P

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Pei; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Shanmin; Qin, Jiaqian; Leinenweber, Kurt; Chen, Haihua; et al

    2016-02-24

    Cubic (space group: Fm3¯m) iridium phosphide, Ir2P, has been synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements on Ir2P powder using a diamond-anvil cell at room temperature and high pressures (up to 40.6 GPa) yielded a bulk modulus of B0 = 306(6) GPa and its pressure derivative B0'= 6.4(5). Such a high bulk modulus attributed to the short and strongly covalent Ir-P bonds as revealed by first – principles calculations and three-dimensionally distributed [IrP4] tetrahedron network. Indentation testing on a well–sintered polycrystalline sample yielded the hardness of 11.8(4) GPa. Relatively low shear modulus of ~64 GPamore » from theoretical calculations suggests a complicated overall bonding in Ir2P with metallic, ionic, and covalent characteristics. Additionally, a spin glass behavior is indicated by magnetic susceptibility measurements.« less

  14. Elastic, magnetic and electronic properties of iridium phosphide Ir2P

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Pei; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Shanmin; Qin, Jiaqian; Leinenweber, Kurt; Chen, Haihua; et al

    2016-02-24

    Cubic (space group: Fm3¯m) iridium phosphide, Ir2P, has been synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements on Ir2P powder using a diamond-anvil cell at room temperature and high pressures (up to 40.6 GPa) yielded a bulk modulus of B0 = 306(6) GPa and its pressure derivative B0' = 6.4(5). Such a high bulk modulus attributed to the short and strongly covalent Ir-P bonds as revealed by first – principles calculations and three-dimensionally distributed [IrP4] tetrahedron network. Indentation testing on a well–sintered polycrystalline sample yielded the hardness of 11.8(4) GPa. Relatively low shear modulus of ~64more » GPa from theoretical calculations suggests a complicated overall bonding in Ir2P with metallic, ionic, and covalent characteristics. Additionally, a spin glass behavior is indicated by magnetic susceptibility measurements.« less

  15. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF FAR-INFRARED COOLING LINES IN INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT (ULTRA)-LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigopoulou, D.; Magdis, G. E.; Thatte, N.; Hopwood, R.; Clements, D.; Swinyard, B. M.; Pearson, C.; Farrah, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Bock, J. J.; Cooray, A.; Griffin, M. J.; Oliver, S.; Smith, A.; Wang, L.; Riechers, D.; Scott, D.; Vaccari, M.; Valtchanov, I.

    2014-01-20

    We report the first results from a spectroscopic survey of the [C II] 158?m line from a sample of intermediate redshift (0.2 infrared galaxies, (U)LIRGs (L {sub IR} > 10{sup 11.5} L {sub ?}), using the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver-Fourier Transform Spectrometer on board the Herschel Space Observatory. This is the first survey of [C II] emission, an important tracer of star formation, at a redshift range where the star formation rate density of the universe increases rapidly. We detect strong [C II] 158?m line emission from over 80% of the sample. We find that the [C II] line is luminous, in the range (0.8-4) 10{sup 3} of the far-infrared continuum luminosity of our sources, and appears to arise from photodissociation regions on the surface of molecular clouds. The L{sub [C} {sub II]}/L {sub IR} ratio in our intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs is on average ?10times larger than that of local ULIRGs. Furthermore, we find that the L{sub [C} {sub II]}/L {sub IR} and L{sub [CII]}/L{sub CO(1-0)} ratios in our sample are similar to those of local normal galaxies and high-z star-forming galaxies. ULIRGs at z ? 0.5 show many similarities to the properties of local normal and high-z star-forming galaxies. Our findings strongly suggest that rapid evolution in the properties of the star-forming regions of (U)LIRGs is likely to have occurred in the last 5 billion years.

  16. Ternary Electrocatalysts for Oxidizing Ethanol to Carbon Dioxide: Making Ir Capable of Splitting C-C bond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Meng; Cullen, David A; Sasaki, Kotaro; Marinkovic, N.; More, Karren Leslie; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2013-01-01

    Splitting the C-C bond is the main obstacle to electroxidation of ethanol (EOR) to CO2. We recently demonstrated that the ternary PtRhSnO2 electrocatalyst can accomplish that reaction at room temperature with Rh having a unique capability to split the C-C bond. In this article we report the finding that Ir can be induced to split the C-C bond as a component of the ternary catalyst. We synthesized, characterized and compared the properties of several ternary electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported nanoparticle (NP) electrocatalysts comprising a SnO2 NP core decorated with multi-metallic nanoislands (MM = PtIr, PtRh, IrRh, PtIrRh) were prepared using a seeded growth approach. An array of characterization techniques were employed to establish the composition and architecture of the synthesized MM /SnO2 NPs, while electrochemical and in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies elucidated trends in activity and the nature of the reaction intermediates and products. Both EOR reactivity and selectivity towards CO2 formation of several of these MM /SnO2/C electrocatalysts are significantly higher compared to conventional Pt/C and Pt/SnO2/C catalysts. We demonstrate that the PtIr/SnO2/C catalyst with high Ir content shows outstanding catalytic property with the most negative EOR onset potential and reasonably good selectivity towards ethanol complete oxidation to CO2. PtRh/SnO2/C catalysts with a moderate Rh content exhibit the highest EOR selectivity, as deduced from infrared studies.

  17. WARM MOLECULAR GAS IN LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, N.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, C. K.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Howell, J.; Appleton, P.; Lord, S.; Schulz, B.; Gao, Y.; Armus, L.; Daz-Santos, T.; Surace, J.; Isaak, K. G.; Petric, A. O.; Charmandaris, V.; Evans, A. S.; Inami, H.; Iwasawa, K.; Leech, J.; Sanders, D. B.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present our initial results on the CO rotational spectral line energy distribution (SLED) of the J to J1 transitions from J = 4 up to 13 from Herschel SPIRE spectroscopic observations of 65 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey. The observed SLEDs change on average from one peaking at J ? 4 to a broad distribution peaking around J ? 6 to 7 as the IRAS 60-to-100?m color, C(60/100), increases. However, the ratios of a CO line luminosity to the total infrared luminosity, L {sub IR}, show the smallest variation for J around 6 or 7. This suggests that, for most LIRGs, ongoing star formation (SF) is also responsible for a warm gas component that emits CO lines primarily in the mid-J regime (5 ? J ? 10). As a result, the logarithmic ratios of the CO line luminosity summed over CO(54), (65), (76), (87) and (109) transitions to L {sub IR}, log R {sub midCO}, remain largely independent of C(60/100), and show a mean value of 4.13 (?log?R{sub midCO}{sup SF}) and a sample standard deviation of only 0.10 for the SF-dominated galaxies. Including additional galaxies from the literature, we show, albeit with a small number of cases, the possibility that galaxies, which bear powerful interstellar shocks unrelated to the current SF, and galaxies, in which an energetic active galactic nucleus contributes significantly to the bolometric luminosity, have their R {sub midCO} higher and lower than R{sub midCO}{sup SF}, respectively.

  18. AN X-RAY-SELECTED GALAXY CLUSTER IN THE LOCKMAN HOLE AT REDSHIFT 1.753

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Henry, J.; Salvato, Mara; Hasinger, Guenther; Finoguenov, Alexis; Brunner, Hermann; Burwitz, Vadim; Buschkamp, Peter; Foerster-Schreiber, Natasha; Genzel, Reinhard; Rovilos, Manolis; Szokoly, Gyula; Bouche, Nicolas; Egami, Eiichi; Fotopoulou, Sotiria; Mainieri, Vincenzo

    2010-12-10

    We have discovered an X-ray-selected galaxy cluster with a spectroscopic redshift of 1.753. The redshift is of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), which is coincident with the peak of the X-ray surface brightness. We also have concordant photometric redshifts for seven additional candidate cluster members. The X-ray luminosity of the cluster is (3.68 {+-} 0.70) x 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.1-2.4 keV band. The optical/IR properties of the BCG imply that its formation redshift was {approx}5 if its stars formed in a short burst. This result continues the trend from lower redshift in which the observed properties of BCGs are most simply explained by a single monolithic collapse at very high redshift instead of the theoretically preferred gradual hierarchical assembly at later times. However, the models corresponding to different formation redshifts are more clearly separated as our observation epoch approaches the galaxy formation epoch. Although our infrared photometry is not deep enough to define a red sequence, we do identify a few galaxies at the cluster redshift that have the expected red sequence photometric properties.

  19. Infrared source test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, L.

    1994-11-15

    The purpose of the Infrared Source Test (IRST) is to demonstrate the ability to track a ground target with an infrared sensor from an airplane. The system is being developed within the Advance Technology Program`s Theater Missile Defense/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) section. The IRST payload consists of an Amber Radiance 1 infrared camera system, a computer, a gimbaled mirror, and a hard disk. The processor is a custom R3000 CPU board made by Risq Modular Systems, Inc. for LLNL. The board has ethernet, SCSI, parallel I/O, and serial ports, a DMA channel, a video (frame buffer) interface, and eight MBytes of main memory. The real-time operating system VxWorks has been ported to the processor. The application code is written in C on a host SUN 4 UNIX workstation. The IRST is the result of a combined effort by physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists.

  20. Variable waveband infrared imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Scott R.

    2013-06-11

    A waveband imager includes an imaging pixel that utilizes photon tunneling with a thermally actuated bimorph structure to convert infrared radiation to visible radiation. Infrared radiation passes through a transparent substrate and is absorbed by a bimorph structure formed with a pixel plate. The absorption generates heat which deflects the bimorph structure and pixel plate towards the substrate and into an evanescent electric field generated by light propagating through the substrate. Penetration of the bimorph structure and pixel plate into the evanescent electric field allows a portion of the visible wavelengths propagating through the substrate to tunnel through the substrate, bimorph structure, and/or pixel plate as visible radiation that is proportional to the intensity of the incident infrared radiation. This converted visible radiation may be superimposed over visible wavelengths passed through the imaging pixel.

  1. CANDELS/GOODS-S, CDFS, and ECDFS: photometric redshifts for normal and X-ray-detected galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, Li-Ting; Salvato, Mara; Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Bender, Ralf; Buchner, Johannes; Brightman, Murray; Georgakakis, Antonis; Donley, Jennifer L.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Guo, Yicheng; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Rangel, Cyprian; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Budavri, Tams; Szalay, Alexander S.; Dahlen, Tomas; and others

    2014-11-20

    We present photometric redshifts and associated probability distributions for all detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). This work makes use of the most up-to-date data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) in addition to other data. We also revisit multi-wavelength counterparts for published X-ray sources from the 4 Ms CDFS and 250 ks ECDFS surveys, finding reliable counterparts for 1207 out of 1259 sources (?96%). Data used for photometric redshifts include intermediate-band photometry deblended using the TFIT method, which is used for the first time in this work. Photometric redshifts for X-ray source counterparts are based on a new library of active galactic nuclei/galaxy hybrid templates appropriate for the faint X-ray population in the CDFS. Photometric redshift accuracy for normal galaxies is 0.010 and for X-ray sources is 0.014 and outlier fractions are 4% and 5.2%, respectively. The results within the CANDELS coverage area are even better, as demonstrated both by spectroscopic comparison and by galaxy-pair statistics. Intermediate-band photometry, even if shallow, is valuable when combined with deep broadband photometry. For best accuracy, templates must include emission lines.

  2. THE WISE BLAZAR-LIKE RADIO-LOUD SOURCES: AN ALL-SKY CATALOG OF CANDIDATE γ-RAY BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, H. A.; Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.

    2014-11-01

    We present a catalog of radio-loud candidate γ-ray emitting blazars with WISE mid-infrared colors similar to the colors of confirmed γ-ray blazars. The catalog is assembled from WISE sources detected in all four WISE filters, with colors compatible with the three-dimensional locus of the WISE γ-ray emitting blazars, and which can be spatially cross-matched with radio sources from one of the three radio surveys: NVSS, FIRST, and/or SUMSS. Our initial WISE selection uses a slightly modified version of previously successful algorithms. We then select only the radio-loud sources using a measure of the radio-to-IR flux, the q {sub 22} parameter, which is analogous to the q {sub 24} parameter known in the literature but which instead uses the WISE band-four flux at 22 μm. Our final catalog contains 7855 sources classified as BL Lacs, FSRQs, or mixed candidate blazars; 1295 of these sources can be spatially re-associated as confirmed blazars. We describe the properties of the final catalog of WISE blazar-like radio-loud sources and consider possible contaminants. Finally, we discuss why this large catalog of candidate γ-ray emitting blazars represents a new and useful resource to address the problem of finding low-energy counterparts to currently unidentified high-energy sources.

  3. An empirical determination of the intergalactic background light using near-infrared deep galaxy survey data out to 5 ?m and the gamma-ray opacity of the universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scully, Sean T.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2014-04-01

    We extend our previous model-independent determination of the intergalactic background light, based purely on galaxy survey data, out to a wavelength of 5 ?m. Our approach enables us to constrain the range of photon densities, based on the uncertainties from observationally determined luminosity densities and colors. We further determine a 68% confidence upper and lower limit on the opacity of the universe to ?-rays up to energies of 1.6/(1 + z) TeV. A comparison of our lower limit redshift-dependent opacity curves to the opacity limits derived from the results of both ground-based air Cerenkov telescope and Fermi-LAT observations of PKS 1424+240 allows us to place a new upper limit on the redshift of this source, independent of IBL modeling.

  4. Young stellar object variability (YSOVAR): Long timescale variations in the mid-infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebull, L. M.; Cody, A. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Morales-Calderón, M.; Carey, S. J.; Covey, K. R.; Günther, H. M.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Hora, J. L.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Plavchan, P.; Gutermuth, R.; Song, I.; Barrado, D.; Bayo, A.; James, D.; Vrba, F. J.; Alves de Oliveira, C.; Bouvier, J.; and others

    2014-11-01

    The YSOVAR (Young Stellar Object VARiability) Spitzer Space Telescope observing program obtained the first extensive mid-infrared (3.6 and 4.5 μm) time series photometry of the Orion Nebula Cluster plus smaller footprints in 11 other star-forming cores (AFGL 490, NGC 1333, Mon R2, GGD 12-15, NGC 2264, L1688, Serpens Main, Serpens South, IRAS 20050+2720, IC 1396A, and Ceph C). There are ∼29,000 unique objects with light curves in either or both IRAC channels in the YSOVAR data set. We present the data collection and reduction for the Spitzer and ancillary data, and define the 'standard sample' on which we calculate statistics, consisting of fast cadence data, with epochs roughly twice per day for ∼40 days. We also define a 'standard sample of members' consisting of all the IR-selected members and X-ray-selected members. We characterize the standard sample in terms of other properties, such as spectral energy distribution shape. We use three mechanisms to identify variables in the fast cadence data—the Stetson index, a χ{sup 2} fit to a flat light curve, and significant periodicity. We also identified variables on the longest timescales possible of six to seven years by comparing measurements taken early in the Spitzer mission with the mean from our YSOVAR campaign. The fraction of members in each cluster that are variable on these longest timescales is a function of the ratio of Class I/total members in each cluster, such that clusters with a higher fraction of Class I objects also have a higher fraction of long-term variables. For objects with a YSOVAR-determined period and a [3.6]-[8] color, we find that a star with a longer period is more likely than those with shorter periods to have an IR excess. We do not find any evidence for variability that causes [3.6]-[4.5] excesses to appear or vanish within our data set; out of members and field objects combined, at most 0.02% may have transient IR excesses.

  5. Infrared Extraction Change for the NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blednykh,A.; Carr, L.; Coburn, D.; Krinsky, S.

    2009-05-04

    The short- and long-range wakepotentials have been studied for the design of the infrared (IR) extraction chamber with large full aperture: 67mm vertical and 134mm horizontal. The IR-chamber will be installed within a 2.6m long wide-gap bending magnet with 25m bend radius. Due to the large bend radius it is difficult to separate the light from the electron trajectory. The required parameters of the collected IR radiation at the extraction mirror are {approx}50mrad horizontal and {approx}25mrad vertical (full radiation opening angles). If the extraction mirror is seen by the beam, resonant modes are generated in the chamber. In this paper, we present the detailed calculated impedance for the design of the far-IR chamber, and show that placing the extraction mirror in the proper position eliminates the resonances. In this case, the impedance reduces to that of a simple tapered structure, which is acceptable in regard to its impact on the electron beam.

  6. Infrared Basics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Infrared Basics Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Infrared Basics Author Protherm Published Publisher Not Provided, 2013 DOI Not Provided...

  7. Graphene oxide/carbon nanoparticle thin film based IR detector: Surface properties and device characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, Farzana Aktar; Hossain, Mohammad Abul; Uchida, Koji; Tamura, Takahiro; Sugawa, Kosuke; Mochida, Tomoaki; Otsuki, Joe; Mohiuddin, Tariq; Boby, Monny Akter; Alam, Mohammad Sahabul

    2015-10-15

    This work deals with the synthesis, characterization, and application of carbon nanoparticles (CNP) adorned graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite materials. Here we mainly focus on an emerging topic in modern research field presenting GO-CNP nanocomposite as a infrared (IR) radiation detector device. GO-CNP thin film devices were fabricated from liquid phase at ambient condition where no modifying treatments were necessary. It works with no cooling treatment and also for stationary objects. A sharp response of human body IR radiation was detected with time constants of 3 and 36 sec and radiation responsivity was 3 mAW{sup −1}. The current also rises for quite a long time before saturation. This work discusses state-of-the-art material developing technique based on near-infrared photon absorption and their use in field deployable instrument for real-world applications. GO-CNP-based thin solid composite films also offer its potentiality to be utilized as p-type absorber material in thin film solar cell, as well.

  8. Sandia Infrared Analysis Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-05-11

    SandIR is a sophisticated Windows2000/WindowsXP program for the capture and analysis of thermal images in real time. It is a 32-bit, 5 thread C++ OOP application that rests on Microsoft’s MFC and DirectDraw libraries, the DT3152LS driver functions and the LabEngine link libraries of Origin 4.1 for full functionality. Images may be loaded in from saved files or viewed live by connection to a FLIR (Inframetrics) 600 or 760 IR camera or a video cassettemore » recorder playing tapes recorded from a FLIR (Inframetrlcs) 600 or 760 IR camera- At this time, no other IR camera formats are supported. The raw radiosity data used by SandiR is derived from the 8-bit, 256 level, RS-170 (grayscale) NTSC camera signal. The FLIR camera images contain 175x131 pixels of real IR data. SandIR displays these data in a 604x410 image. The maximum matrix size is 640x452 Including VIR and grayscale. Live IR images can be frozen and then stored to computer disk. An incrementing save command makes It easy to save a sequence of images with a series of related file names. These files can then be loaded into SandIR at a later time for anatysis by a number of predefined tools or data probes. Multiple pseudo-color palettes containing 64 colors are available as well as a 256 level grayscale palette for image colorizing. SandtR always processes all the data in the ROt for each acquired image; so a complete temperature matrix is always available for any frozen image. SandIR performs nearly 7 million temperature calculations per second and updates the image display through Direct Draw over the PCI bus at frequencies of 30 Hz. 3-d surface plots, projections, wire maps or contour plots of absolute temperatures are also updated at 20 to 30 Hz which approaches the real-time acquisition rate of the camera, These plots may be viewed full-screen or frozen in separate windows for comparison to later images. The full set of both 2-d and 3-d Origin plotting tools can be used to manipulate the attached plots

  9. An industrial FT-IR process gas analyzer for stack gas cems analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, G.M.; Herman, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes utilizing Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) technology to meet and exceed EPA requirements to Continuously Monitor Carbon Monoxide (CO) and Sulfur Dioxide (SO){sub 2} in an oil refinery. The application consists of Continuous Emission Monitoring (CEMS) of two stacks from a Fluid Catalytic Cracking unit (FCCU). The discussion will follow the project from initial specifications, installation, start-up, certification results (RATA, 7 day drift), Cylinder Gas Audit (CGA) and the required maintenance. FT-IR is a powerful analytical tool suitable for measurement of stack component gases required to meet CEMS regulations, and allows simultaneous multi-component analysis of complex stack gas streams with a continuous sample stream flow through the measurement cell. The Michelson Interferometer in a unique {open_quotes}Wishbone{close_quotes} design and with a special alignment control enables standardized configuration of the analyzer for flue gas analysis. Normal stack gas pollutants: NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and CO; as well as water soluble pollutants such as NH{sub 3} and HCI may be accurately determined and reported even in the presence of 0-31 Vol % water vapor concentrations (hot and wet). This FT-IR analyzer has been operating with EPA Certification in an oil refinery environment since September 1994.

  10. Infrared floodlight assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wierzbicki, Julian J.; Chakrabarti, Kirti B.

    1987-09-22

    An infrared floodlight assembly (10) including a cast aluminum outer housing (11) defining a central chamber (15) therein. A floodlight (14), having a tungsten halogen lamp as the light source, is spacedly positioned within a heat conducting member (43) within chamber (15) such that the floodlight is securedly positioned in an aligned manner relative to the assembly's filter (35) and lens (12) components. The invention also includes venting means (51) to allow air passage between the interior of the member (43) and the adjacent chamber (15), as well as engagement means (85) for engaging a rear surface of the floodlight (14) to retain it firmly against an internal flange of the member (43). A reflector (61), capable of being compressed to allow insertion or removal, is located within the heat conducting member's interior between the floodlight (14) and filter (35) to reflect infrared radiation toward the filter (35) and spaced lens (12).

  11. IR-Improved DGLAP-CS Theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ward, B. F. L.

    2008-01-01

    We show that it is possible to improve the infrared aspects of the standard treatment of the DGLAP-CS evolution theory to take into account a large class of higher-order corrections that significantly improve the precision of the theory for any given level of fixed-order calculation of its respective kernels. We illustrate the size of the effects we resum using the moments of the parton distributions.

  12. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir4+ ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory and Madelung potential analyses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gordon, Elijah E.; Xiang, Hongjun; Koehler, Jurgen; Whangbo, Myung -Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The spins of the low-spin Ir4+ (S = 1/2, d5) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of DFT calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3,more » both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir4+ spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axes directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir4+ ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir4+ ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. As a result, the spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir4+ is not as strong as has been assumed lately.« less

  13. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 um and 50 um, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 um to 3 um, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 um to 1 um. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and are calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet are calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 um to 50 um, as a first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degrees to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  14. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Konings, J.; Xie, Y.; Dooraghi, M.; Sengupta, M.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 micrometers and 50 micrometers, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 micrometers to 3 micrcometers, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 micrometers to 1 micrometers. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 micrometers to 50 micrometers, as first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degres to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  15. Synchrotron IR microspectroscopy for protein structure analysis: Potential and questions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced technique to the study of pure protein inherent structure at a cellular level in biological tissues. In this review, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of the newly developed, advancedmore » synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to localize relatively “pure“ protein in the plant tissues and relatively reveal protein inherent structure and protein molecular chemical make-up within intact tissue at cellular and subcellular levels. Several complex protein IR spectra data analytical techniques (Gaussian and Lorentzian multi-component peak modeling, univariate and multivariate analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) are employed to relatively reveal features of protein inherent structure and distinguish protein inherent structure differences between varieties/species and treatments in plant tissues. By using a multi-peak modeling procedure, RELATIVE estimates (but not EXACT determinations) for protein secondary structure analysis can be made for comparison purpose. The issues of pro- and anti-multi-peaking modeling/fitting procedure for relative estimation of protein structure were discussed. By using the PCA and CLA analyses, the plant molecular structure can be qualitatively separate one group from another, statistically, even though the spectral assignments are not known. The synchrotron-based technology provides a new approach for protein structure research in

  16. Laser Microperforated Biodegradable Microbial Polyhydroxyalkanoate Substrates for Tissue Repair Strategies: An Infrared Microspectroscopy Studey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G Ellis; P Cano; M Jadraque; M Martin; L Lopez; T Nunez; E de la Pena; C Marco; L Garrido

    2011-12-31

    Flexible and biodegradable film substrates prepared by solvent casting from poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBHV) solutions in chloroform were microperforated by ultraviolet laser ablation and subsequently characterized using infrared (IR) microspectroscopy and imaging techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both transmission synchrotron IR microspectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance microspectroscopy measurements demonstrate variations in the polymer at the ablated pore rims, including evidence for changes in chemical structure and crystallinity. SEM results on microperforated PHBHV substrates after cell culture demonstrated that the physical and chemical changes observed in the biomaterial did not hinder cell migration through the pores.

  17. Vacuum ultraviolet and infrared spectra of condensed methyl acetate on cold astrochemical dust analogs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivaraman, B.; Nair, B. G.; Mason, N. J.; Lo, J.-I.; Cheng, B.-M.; Kundu, S.; Davis, D.; Prabhudesai, V.; Krishnakumar, E.; Raja Sekhar, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    Following the recent report of the first identification of methyl acetate (CH{sub 3}COOCH{sub 3}) in the interstellar medium (ISM), we have carried out vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy studies on methyl acetate from 10 K until sublimation in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber simulating astrochemical conditions. We present the first VUV and IR spectra of methyl acetate relevant to ISM conditions. Spectral signatures clearly showed molecular reorientation to have started in the ice by annealing the amorphous ice formed at 10 K. An irreversible phase change from amorphous to crystalline methyl acetate ice was found to occur between 110 K and 120 K.

  18. THE MID-INFRARED AND NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET EXCESS EMISSIONS OF QUIESCENT GALAXIES ON THE RED SEQUENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Jongwan; Lee, Jong Chul; Hwang, Ho Seong; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2013-04-10

    We study the mid-infrared (IR) and near-ultraviolet (UV) excess emissions of spectroscopically selected quiescent galaxies on the optical red sequence. We use the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-IR and Galaxy Evolution Explorer near-UV data for a spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to study the possible connection between quiescent red-sequence galaxies with and without mid-IR/near-UV excess. Among 648 12 {mu}m detected quiescent red-sequence galaxies without H{alpha} emission, 26% and 55% show near-UV and mid-IR excess emissions, respectively. When we consider only bright (M{sub r} < -21.5) galaxies with an early-type morphology, the fraction of galaxies with recent star formation is still 39%. The quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR and near-UV excess emissions are optically fainter and have slightly smaller D{sub n} 4000 than those without mid-IR and near-UV excess emissions. We also find that mid-IR weighted mean stellar ages of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR excess are larger than those with near-UV excess, and smaller than those without mid-IR and near-UV excess. The environmental dependence of the fraction of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR and near-UV excess seems strong even though the trends of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with near-UV excess differ from those with mid-IR excess. These results indicate that the recent star formation traced by near-UV ({approx}< 1 Gyr) and mid-IR ({approx}< 2 Gyr) excess is not negligible among nearby, quiescent, red, early-type galaxies. We suggest a possible evolutionary scenario of quiescent red-sequence galaxies from quiescent red-sequence galaxies with near-UV excess to those with mid-IR excess to those without near-UV and mid-IR excess.

  19. IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l' w&m PadmmmTuJ tmml' aIs~#l!REm m-t, - 188kwxm BYI alahard 0. cr*rrror cy- r' , ' .~ -' - -' ^ , /' cs< 4. .c :' ; *. .h,- ' (z&&y .' ,/ ;f. .* &J >l a. L \' P" ,,,' ,.' I * :{' \ !' l t ..b c&~ tf ~ , r ,, r. ,* .;;;., k J ;, b $y$' Lrmprrw)rlt&tmxJ- a@. Frqrr at t&i8 raoLli:.y SC\ daummiI~Luualndr8rr~lfCUIf@@?~~oy-~ d )I t rq ,i .* 1 Virium~~bUrlJlOgarspvlr at ma rdutw. (500 p-4 3) i" 1 ) ,ip" 2. rt A8 - u %I* mm

  20. Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopy of powerful 2Jy and 3CRR radio galaxies. II. AGN power indicators and unification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dicken, D.; Tadhunter, C.; Morganti, R.; Axon, D.; Robinson, A.; Magagnoli, M.; Kharb, P.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Hardcastle, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Singh, V.; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Rose, M.; Spoon, H.; Inskip, K. J.; Holt, J.

    2014-06-20

    It remains uncertain which continuum and emission line diagnostics best indicate the bolometric powers of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), especially given the attenuation caused by the circumnuclear material and the possible contamination by components related to star formation. Here we use mid-IR spectra along with multiwavelength data to investigate the merit of various diagnostics of AGN radiative power, including the mid-IR [Ne III] ?25.89 ?m and [O IV] ?25.89 ?m fine-structure lines, the optical [O III] ?5007 forbidden line, and mid-IR 24 ?m, 5 GHz radio, and X-ray continuum emission, for complete samples of 46 2Jy radio galaxies (0.05 < z < 0.7) and 17 3CRR FRII radio galaxies (z < 0.1). We find that the mid-IR [O IV] line is the most reliable indicator of AGN power for powerful radio-loud AGNs. By assuming that the [O IV] is emitted isotropically, and comparing the [O III] and 24 ?m luminosities of the broad- and narrow-line AGNs in our samples at fixed [O IV] luminosity, we show that the [O III] and 24 ?m emission are both mildly attenuated in the narrow-line compared to the broad-line objects by a factor of ?2. However, despite this attenuation, the [O III] and 24 ?m luminosities are better AGN power indicators for our sample than either the 5 GHz radio or the X-ray continuum luminosities. We also detect the mid-IR 9.7 ?m silicate feature in the spectra of many objects but not ubiquitously: at least 40% of the sample shows no clear evidence for these features. We conclude that, for the majority of powerful radio galaxies, the mid-IR lines are powered by AGN photoionization.

  1. Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability and Instrumentation Working Group Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Summary of the Optics, ...

  2. Ir-based alloys for ultra-high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T.; George, Easo P.; Bloom, Everett E.

    2006-01-03

    An alloy composition includes, in atomic percent: about 1 to about 10% of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Zr and Hf, balance Ir.

  3. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES ...

  4. Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline Ir...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline Ir(111) thin films Prev Next Title: Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline...

  5. ON THE VIABILITY OF THE PAH MODEL AS AN EXPLANATION OF THE UNIDENTIFIED INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yong; Kwok, Sun E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are widely considered the preferred candidate for the carrier of the unidentified infrared emission bands observed in the interstellar medium and circumstellar envelopes. In this paper, we report the results of fitting a variety of non-PAH spectra (silicates, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, coal, and even artificial spectra) using the theoretical infrared spectra of PAHs from the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. We show that these non-PAH spectra can be well fitted by PAH mixtures. This suggests that a general match between astronomical spectra and those of PAH mixtures does not necessarily provide definitive support for the PAH hypothesis.

  6. Preparation and characterization of Chitosan/Konjac glucomannan/CdS nanocomposite film with low infrared emissivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Feng-Ying; Zhou, Yu-Ming; Sun, Yan-qing; Chen, Jing; Ye, Xiao-yun; Huang, Jing-yi

    2010-07-15

    Novel organic-inorganic nanocomposite films were prepared with Chitosan (CS), Konjac glucomannan (KGM) and CdS by one-step synthesis. As-prepared films were characterized by IR spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and infrared emissometer (IR). The results indicated that grown CdS dendrites were formed with reaction time of 12 h for Cd{sup 2+} and CS/KGM, and were well dispersed in CS/KGM with an average diameter of 40 nm. The CS/KGM/CdS nanocomposite films had significantly low infrared emissivity. When the mole ratio of CdS to summation of CS and KGM construction units was 1.0 with CdS size of 10-20 nm, the film got the lowest infrared emissivity value of 0.011, which could be attributed to the strong synergism effect existing between CS/KGM and CdS dendrites.

  7. The role of the (111) texture on the exchange bias and interlayer coupling effects observed in sputtered NiFe/IrMn/Co trilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, I. L.; Nascimento, V. P.; Passamani, E. C.; Takeuchi, A. Y.; Larica, C.; Tafur, M.; Pelegrini, F.

    2013-05-28

    Magnetic properties of sputtered NiFe/IrMn/Co trilayers grown on different seed layers (Cu or Ta) deposited on Si (100) substrates were investigated by magnetometry and ferromagnetic resonance measurements. Exchange bias effect and magnetic spring behavior have been studied by changing the IrMn thickness. As shown by X-ray diffraction, Ta and Cu seed layers provoke different degrees of (111) fcc-texture that directly affect the exchange bias and indirectly modify the exchange spring coupling behavior. Increasing the IrMn thickness, it was observed that the coupling angle between the Co and NiFe ferromagnetic layers increases for the Cu seed system, but it reduces for the Ta case. The results were explained considering (i) different anisotropies of the Co and IrMn layers induced by the different degree of the (111) texture and (ii) the distinct exchange bias set at the NiFe/IrMn and IrMn/Co interfaces in both systems. The NiFe and Co interlayer coupling angle is strongly correlated with both exchange bias and exchange magnetic spring phenomena. It was also shown that the highest exchange bias field occurs when an unstressed L1{sub 2} IrMn structure is stabilized.

  8. Large enhancement of Blocking temperature by control of interfacial structures in Pt/NiFe/IrMn/MgO/Pt multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xi; Wang, Shouguo Han, Gang; Jiang, Shaolong; Yang, Kang; Liu, Qianqian; Yu, Guanghua; Liu, Jialong; Wang, Rongming

    2015-09-15

    The Blocking temperature (T{sub B}) of Pt/NiFe/IrMn/MgO/Pt multilayers was greatly enhanced from far below room temperature (RT) to above RT by inserting 1 nm thick Mg layer at IrMn/MgO interface. Furthermore, the exchange bias field (H{sub eb}) was increased as well by the control of interfacial structures. The evidence for a significant fraction of Mn-O bonding at IrMn/MgO interface without Mg insertion layer was provided by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The bonding between Mn and O can decrease the antiferromagnetism of IrMn film, leading to lower value of T{sub B} in Pt/NiFe/IrMn/MgO/Pt multilayers. Ultrathin Mg film inserted at IrMn/MgO interface acting as an oxygen sinking layer can suppress the oxidation reactions between Mn and O and reduce the formation of Mn-O bonding greatly. The oxidation suppression results in the recovery of the antiferromagnetism of IrMn film, which can enhance T{sub B} and H{sub eb}. Furthermore, the high resolution transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the Mg insertion layer can efficiently promote a high-quality MgO (200) texture. This study will enhance the understanding of physics in antiferromagnet-based spintronic devices.

  9. Infrared laser system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph

    1982-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  10. Infrared laser system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph S.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  11. Lateral conduction infrared photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin K.; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2011-09-20

    A photodetector for detecting infrared light in a wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m is disclosed. The photodetector has a mesa structure formed from semiconductor layers which include a type-II superlattice formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. Impurity doped regions are formed on sidewalls of the mesa structure to provide for a lateral conduction of photo-generated carriers which can provide an increased carrier mobility and a reduced surface recombination. An optional bias electrode can be used in the photodetector to control and vary a cut-off wavelength or a depletion width therein. The photodetector can be formed as a single-color or multi-color device, and can also be used to form a focal plane array which is compatible with conventional read-out integrated circuits.

  12. Soft X-ray irradiation of methanol ice: Formation of products as a function of photon energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Juang, K.-J.; Yih, T.-S.; Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Muoz Caro, G. M.; Jimnez-Escobar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Pure methanol ices have been irradiated with monochromatic soft X-rays of 300 and 550 eV close to the 1s resonance edges of C and O, respectively, and with a broadband spectrum (250-1200 eV). The infrared (IR) spectra of the irradiated ices show several new products of astrophysical interest such as CH{sub 2}OH, H{sub 2}CO, CH{sub 4}, HCOOH, HCOCH{sub 2}OH, CH{sub 3}COOH, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and (CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, as well as HCO, CO, and CO{sub 2}. The effect of X-rays is the result of the combined interactions of photons and electrons with the ice. A significant contribution to the formation and growth of new species in the CH{sub 3}OH ice irradiated with X-rays is given by secondary electrons, whose energy distribution depends on the energy of X-ray photons. Within a single experiment, the abundances of the new products increase with the absorbed energy. Monochromatic experiments show that product abundances also increase with the photon energy. However, the abundances per unit energy of newly formed species show a marked decrease in the broadband experiment as compared to irradiations with monochromatic photons, suggesting a possible regulatory role of the energy deposition rate. The number of new molecules produced per absorbed eV in the X-ray experiments has been compared to those obtained with electron and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiments.

  13. Discovery of GeV emission from the direction of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 2146

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Qing-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Yu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Thomas Tam, Pak-Hin, E-mail: xywang@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-10

    Recent detections of high-energy gamma-ray emission from starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253 suggest that starburst galaxies are huge reservoirs of cosmic rays and these cosmic rays convert a significant fraction of their energy into gamma-rays by colliding with the dense interstellar medium. In this paper, we report the search for high-energy gamma-ray emission from several nearby star-forming and starburst galaxies using the 68 month data obtained with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We found a ?5.5? detection of gamma-ray emission above 200 MeV from a source spatially coincident with the location of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 2146. Also taking into account the temporal and spectral properties of the gamma-ray emission, we suggest that the gamma-ray source is likely to be the counterpart of NGC 2146. The gamma-ray luminosity suggests that cosmic rays in NGC 2146 convert most of their energy into secondary pions, so NGC 2146 is a 'proton calorimeter'. It is also found that NGC 2146 obeys the quasi-linear scaling relation between gamma-ray luminosity and total infrared luminosity for star-forming galaxies, strengthening the connection between massive star formation and gamma-ray emission of star-forming galaxies. Possible TeV emission from NGC 2146 is predicted and the implications for high-energy neutrino emission from starburst galaxies are discussed.

  14. In-situ FT-IR diagnostics for monitoring and control of fossil fuel combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonanno, A.S.; Wojtowicz, M.A.; Serio, M.A.; Nelson, C.M.; Solomon, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the development and testing of a prototype fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) based measurement system for continuous emission monitoring (CEM) and process control in fossil fuel-fired power plants. On several occasions, prototype systems have been transported and assembled at full-scale and pilot-scale fossil fuel-fired combustors. The in-situ version of the prototype is able to measure NH{sub 3} and HCl concentrations, which are difficult to measure extractively, as well as CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, H{sub 2}O, and SO{sub x} concentrations. The results of recent tests will be presented which involve in-situ monitoring of selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) of NO{sub x} based on simultaneous measurement of NO, NH{sub 3} and CO.

  15. Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organci molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan Thomas; Michael Kelley

    2007-06-18

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on ?-alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto ?-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

  16. Simultaneous multi-beam planar array IR (pair) spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmore, Douglas L.; Rabolt, John F.; Tsao, Mei-Wei

    2005-09-13

    An apparatus and method capable of providing spatially multiplexed IR spectral information simultaneously in real-time for multiple samples or multiple spatial areas of one sample using IR absorption phenomena requires no moving parts or Fourier Transform during operation, and self-compensates for background spectra and degradation of component performance over time. IR spectral information and chemical analysis of the samples is determined by using one or more IR sources, sampling accessories for positioning the samples, optically dispersive elements, a focal plane array (FPA) arranged to detect the dispersed light beams, and a processor and display to control the FPA, and display an IR spectrograph. Fiber-optic coupling can be used to allow remote sensing. Portability, reliability, and ruggedness is enhanced due to the no-moving part construction. Applications include determining time-resolved orientation and characteristics of materials, including polymer monolayers. Orthogonal polarizers may be used to determine certain material characteristics.

  17. NaIrO3A Pentavalent Post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Bremholm; S Dutton; P Stephens; R Cava

    2011-12-31

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides.

  18. Sensitive Multi-Species Emissions Monitoring: Infrared Laser-Based Detection of Trace-Level Contaminants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steill, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes our development of spectroscopic chemical analysis techniques and spectral modeling for trace-gas measurements of highly-regulated low-concentration species present in flue gas emissions from utility coal boilers such as HCl under conditions of high humidity. Detailed spectral modeling of the spectroscopy of HCl and other important combustion and atmospheric species such as H 2 O, CO 2 , N 2 O, NO 2 , SO 2 , and CH 4 demonstrates that IR-laser spectroscopy is a sensitive multi-component analysis strategy. Experimental measurements from techniques based on IR laser spectroscopy are presented that demonstrate sub-ppm sensitivity levels to these species. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify HCl at ppm levels with extremely high signal-to-noise even under conditions of high relative humidity. Additionally, cavity ring-down IR spectroscopy is used to achieve an extremely high sensitivity to combustion trace gases in this spectral region; ppm level CH 4 is one demonstrated example. The importance of spectral resolution in the sensitivity of a trace-gas measurement is examined by spectral modeling in the mid- and near-IR, and efforts to improve measurement resolution through novel instrument development are described. While previous project reports focused on benefits and complexities of the dual-etalon cavity ring-down infrared spectrometer, here details on steps taken to implement this unique and potentially revolutionary instrument are described. This report also illustrates and critiques the general strategy of IR- laser photodetection of trace gases leading to the conclusion that mid-IR laser spectroscopy techniques provide a promising basis for further instrument development and implementation that will enable cost-effective sensitive detection of multiple key contaminant species simultaneously.

  19. Comparison of laser-based mitigation of fused silica surface damage using mid- versus far-infrared lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2009-12-16

    Laser induced growth of optical damage can limit component lifetime and therefore operating costs of large-aperture fusion-class laser systems. While far-infrared (IR) lasers have been used previously to treat laser damage on fused silica optics and render it benign, little is known about the effectiveness of less-absorbing mid-IR lasers for this purpose. In this study, they quantitatively compare the effectiveness and efficiency of mid-IR (4.6 {micro}m) versus far-IR (10.6 {micro}m) lasers in mitigating damage growth on fused silica surfaces. The non-linear volumetric heating due to mid-IR laser absorption is analyzed by solving the heat equation numerically, taking into account the temperature-dependent absorption coefficient {alpha}(T) at {lambda} = 4.6 {micro}m, while far-IR laser heating is well-described by a linear analytic approximation to the laser-driven temperature rise. In both cases, the predicted results agree well with surface temperature measurements based on infrared radiometry, as well as sub-surface fictive temperature measurements based on confocal Raman microscopy. Damage mitigation efficiency is assessed using a figure of merit (FOM) relating the crack healing depth to laser power required, under minimally-ablative conditions. Based on their FOM, they show that for cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation with a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation with a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser. This conclusion is corroborated by direct application of each laser system to the mitigation of pulsed laser-induced damage possessing fractures up to 225 {micro}m in depth.

  20. Sonic IR crack detection of aircraft turbine engine blades with multi-frequency ultrasound excitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ding; Han, Xiaoyan; Newaz, Golam

    2014-02-18

    Effectively and accurately detecting cracks or defects in critical engine components, such as turbine engine blades, is very important for aircraft safety. Sonic Infrared (IR) Imaging is such a technology with great potential for these applications. This technology combines ultrasound excitation and IR imaging to identify cracks and flaws in targets. In general, failure of engine components, such as blades, begins with tiny cracks. Since the attenuation of the ultrasound wave propagation in turbine engine blades is small, the efficiency of crack detection in turbine engine blades can be quite high. The authors at Wayne State University have been developing the technology as a reliable tool for the future field use in aircraft engines and engine parts. One part of the development is to use finite element modeling to assist our understanding of effects of different parameters on crack heating while experimentally hard to achieve. The development has been focused with single frequency ultrasound excitation and some results have been presented in a previous conference. We are currently working on multi-frequency excitation models. The study will provide results and insights of the efficiency of different frequency excitation sources to foster the development of the technology for crack detection in aircraft engine components.

  1. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of the series of double perovskites (Ca,Sr){sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bufaial, L.; Adriano, C.; Lora-Serrano, R.; Duque, J.G.S.; Mendona-Ferreira, L.; Rojas-Ayala, C.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.; Bittar, E.M.; Pagliuso, P.G.

    2014-04-01

    Polycrystalline samples of the series of double perovskites Sr{sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} were synthesized. Their structural, electronic and magnetic properties were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, Mssbauer spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity and electrical resistivity experiments. The compounds crystallize in a monoclinic structure and were fitted in space group P2{sub 1}/n, with a significant degree of Fe/Ir cationic disorder. As in Ca{sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} the Sr-based system seems to evolve from an antiferromagnetic ground state for the end members (x=0.0 and x=2.0) to a ferrimagnetic order in the intermediate regions (x?1). Since Mssbauer spectra indicate that Fe valence remains 3+ with doping, this tendency of change in the nature of the microscopic interaction could be attributed to Ir valence changes, induced by La{sup 3+} electrical doping. Upon comparing both Ca and Sr series, Sr{sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} is more structurally homogenous and presents higher magnetization and transition temperatures. Magnetic susceptibility measurements at high temperatures on Sr{sub 1.2}La{sub 0.8}FeIrO{sub 6} indicate a very high ferrimagnetic Curie temperature T{sub C}?700K. For the Sr{sub 2}FeIrO{sub 6} compound, electrical resistivity experiments under applied pressure suggest that this material might be a Mott insulator. - Graphical abstract: The Weiss constant as a function of La doping for the (Ca,Sr){sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} series, indicating changes in FeIr magnetic coupling on both families. - Highlights: The double perovskite series (Ca,Sr){sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} were synthesized. Changes in the Fe-Ir magnetic coupling due to La doping on both series. Evidence of high T{sub C} on Sr{sub 1.2}La{sub 0.8}FeIrO{sub 6}. Indication of Mott insulator behavior on Sr{sub 2}FeIrO{sub 6}.

  2. Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Wednesday, 26 July 2006 00:00 Silicon-based transistors are well-understood,...

  3. Forward looking infrared | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    looking infrared Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Forward looking infrared Author Wikipedia Published Publisher Not Provided, 2013...

  4. Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Print Tuesday, 22 January 2013 00:00 A cold sulfur...

  5. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    infrared microspectroscopy at the ALS, with a diffraction-limited infrared beam diameter of less than 10 m, can overcome this hurdle. And while previous studies used...

  6. Effect of L1{sub 2} ordering in antiferromagnetic Ir-Mn epitaxial layer on exchange bias of FePd films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Y. C.; Duh, J. G. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Hsiao, S. N. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Liu, S. H.; Su, S. H.; Chiu, K. F.; Hsieh, W. C.; Chen, S. K.; Lin, Y. G. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Lee, H. Y.; Sung, C. K.

    2015-05-07

    Two series of samples of single-layer IrMn and IrMn/FePd bilayer films, deposited on a single-crystal MgO substrate at different IrMn deposition temperatures (T{sub s} = 300–700 °C), were investigated using magnetron sputtering. L1{sub 2} ordering was revealed for the 30 nm-thick IrMn epitaxial (001) films with T{sub s} ≥ 400 °C, determined by synchrotron radiation x-ray diffractometry (XRD). XRD results also provide evidence of the epitaxial growth of the IrMn films on MgO substrate. Increasing T{sub s} from 400 to 700 °C monotonically increases the ordering parameter of L1{sub 2} phases from 0.17 to 0.81. An in-plane exchange bias field (H{sub eb}) of 22 Oe is obtained in a 10 nm-thick FePd film that is deposited on the disordered IrMn films. As the L1{sub 2} ordering of the IrMn layers increases, the H{sub eb} gradually decreases to 0 Oe, meaning that the exchange bias behavior vanishes. The increased surface roughness, revealed by atomic force microscopy, of the epitaxial IrMn layers with increasing T{sub s} cannot be the main cause of the decrease in H{sub eb} due to the compensated surface spins regardless of the disordered and ordered (001) IrMn layers. The change of antiferromagnetic structure from the A1 to the L1{sub 2} phase was correlated with the evolution of H{sub eb}.

  7. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF ABELL 1763. I. INFRARED AND OPTICAL PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Louise O. V.; Fadda, Dario; Biviano, Andrea

    2010-02-15

    We present a photometric analysis of the galaxy cluster Abell 1763 at visible and infrared wavelengths. Included are fully reduced images in r', J, H, and K{sub s} obtained using the Palomar 200in telescope, as well as the IRAC and MIPS images from Spitzer. The cluster is covered out to approximately 3 virial radii with deep 24 {mu}m imaging (a 5{sigma} depth of 0.2 mJy). This same field of {approx}40' x 40' is covered in all four IRAC bands as well as the longer wavelength MIPS bands (70 and 160 {mu}m). The r' imaging covers {approx}0.8 deg{sup 2} down to 25.5 mag, and overlaps with most of the MIPS field of view. The J, H, and K{sub s} images cover the cluster core and roughly half of the filament galaxies, which extend toward the neighboring cluster, Abell 1770. This first, in a series of papers on Abell 1763, discusses the data reduction methods and source extraction techniques used for each data set. We present catalogs of infrared sources (with 24 and/or 70 {mu}m emission) and their corresponding emission in the optical (u', g', r', i', z'), and near- to far-IR (J, H, K{sub s} , IRAC, and MIPS 160 {mu}m). We provide the catalogs and reduced images to the community through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive.

  8. AN EVOLVING COMPACT JET IN THE BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY MAXI J1836-194

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, D. M.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Soria, R.; Slaven-Blair, T.; Curran, P. A.; O'Brien, K.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Lewis, F.; Markoff, S.; Altamirano, D.; Homan, J.; Rupen, M. P.; Dhawan, V.; Belloni, T. M.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Casella, P.; Corbel, S.; Gallo, E.; and others

    2013-05-10

    We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from {approx}10{sup 11} to {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high-energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process.

  9. Mid-infrared tunable metamaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brener, Igal; Miao, Xiaoyu; Shaner, Eric A; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Jun, Young Chul

    2015-04-28

    A mid-infrared tunable metamaterial comprises an array of resonators on a semiconductor substrate having a large dependence of dielectric function on carrier concentration and a semiconductor plasma resonance that lies below the operating range, such as indium antimonide. Voltage biasing of the substrate generates a resonance shift in the metamaterial response that is tunable over a broad operating range. The mid-infrared tunable metamaterials have the potential to become the building blocks of chip based active optical devices in mid-infrared ranges, which can be used for many applications, such as thermal imaging, remote sensing, and environmental monitoring.

  10. Infrared tomography for diagnostic imaging of port wine stain blood vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, D.

    1994-11-15

    The objective of this work is the development of Infrared Tomography (IRT) for detecting and characterizing subsurface chromophores in human skin. Characterization of cutaneous chromophores is crucial for advances in the laser treatment of pigmented lesions (e.g., port wine stain birthmarks and tatoos). Infrared tomography (IRT) uses a fast infrared focal plane array (IR-FPA) to detect temperature rises in a substrate induced by pulsed radiation. A pulsed laser is used to produce transient heating of an object. The temperature rise, due to the optical absorption of the pulsed laser light, creates an increase in infrared emission which is measured by the IR-FPA. Although the application of IRT to image subsurface cracks due to metal fatigue is a topic of great interest in the aircraft industry, the application to image subsurface chromophores in biological materials is novel. We present an image recovery method based on a constrained conjugate gradient algorithm that has obtained the first ever high quality images of port wine blood vessels.

  11. A NEW INFRARED COLOR CRITERION FOR THE SELECTION OF 0 < z < 7 AGNs: APPLICATION TO DEEP FIELDS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR JWST SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messias, H.; Afonso, J.; Salvato, M.; Mobasher, B.; Hopkins, A. M.

    2012-08-01

    It is widely accepted that observations at mid-infrared (mid-IR) wavelengths enable the selection of galaxies with nuclear activity, which may not be revealed even in the deepest X-ray surveys. Many mid-IR color-color criteria have been explored to accomplish this goal and tested thoroughly in the literature. Besides missing many low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs), one of the main conclusions is that, with increasing redshift, the contamination by non-active galaxies becomes significant (especially at z {approx}> 2.5). This is problematic for the study of the AGN phenomenon in the early universe, the main goal of many of the current and future deep extragalactic surveys. In this work new near- and mid-IR color diagnostics are explored, aiming for improved efficiency-better completeness and less contamination-in selecting AGNs out to very high redshifts. We restrict our study to the James Webb Space Telescope wavelength range (0.6-27 {mu}m). The criteria are created based on the predictions by state-of-the-art galaxy and AGN templates covering a wide variety of galaxy properties, and tested against control samples with deep multi-wavelength coverage (ranging from the X-rays to radio frequencies). We show that the colors K{sub s} - [4.5], [4.5] - [8.0], and [8.0] - [24] are ideal as AGN/non-AGN diagnostics at, respectively, z {approx}< 1, 1 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.5, and z {approx}> 2.5-3. However, when the source redshift is unknown, these colors should be combined. We thus develop an improved IR criterion (using K{sub s} and IRAC bands, KI) as a new alternative at z {approx}< 2.5. KI does not show improved completeness (50%-60% overall) in comparison to commonly used Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) based AGN criteria, but is less affected by non-AGN contamination (revealing a >50%-90% level of successful AGN selection). We also propose KIM (using K{sub s} , IRAC, and MIPS 24 {mu}m bands, KIM), which aims to select AGN hosts from local distances to as far

  12. IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Treasury and the IRS published new guidance today allocating Tribal Economic Development Bonds (TEDBs) for Tribes that have projects that are in the final stages of going to the market to receive financing.

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - IR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send...

  14. New IRS Rules for Small and Medium Wind Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Small Wind Certification Council (SWCC) will host a webinar on how certification is being used to meet the new Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requirements for small and medium wind turbines...

  15. DWEA Webinar: IRS Guidance for Small Wind Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued Notice 2015-4 providing new performance and quality standards of small wind turbines – defined as having a nameplate capacity of up to 100 kW – in...

  16. Wet Chemical Compositional and Near IR Spectra Data Sets for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Wet Chemical Compositional and Near IR Spectra Data ... Wet chemical compositional data and NIR spectra exist for the following types of biomass ...

  17. The Use of Microscopes and Telescopes in IR Imaging (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    working in a research environment, where applications can vary from week to week. ... In these cases, the thermographer must rely on an IR microscope for close-up work with a ...

  18. Energy Efficient Clothes Dryer with IR Heating and Electrostatic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Precipitator | Department of Energy Clothes Dryer with IR Heating and Electrostatic Precipitator Energy Efficient Clothes Dryer with IR Heating and Electrostatic Precipitator This project seeks to demonstrate a ventless residential dryer with an energy factor greater than 4.04.<br /> Photo credit: GE Global Research This project seeks to demonstrate a ventless residential dryer with an energy factor greater than 4.04. Photo credit: GE Global Research Project team members left to right

  19. Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

  20. A REDSHIFT SURVEY OF HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED SELECTED STARBURSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR OBSCURED STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, C. M.; Budynkiewicz, J.; Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B.; Bethermin, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G.; Burgarella, D.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conselice, C. J.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ivison, R. J.; and others

    2012-12-20

    We present Keck spectroscopic observations and redshifts for a sample of 767 Herschel-SPIRE selected galaxies (HSGs) at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m, taken with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and the Keck II DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph. The redshift distribution of these SPIRE sources from the Herschel Multitiered Extragalactic Survey peaks at z = 0.85, with 731 sources at z < 2 and a tail of sources out to z {approx} 5. We measure more significant disagreement between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts (({Delta}z/(1 + z{sub spec})) = 0.29) than is seen in non-infrared selected samples, likely due to enhanced star formation rates and dust obscuration in infrared-selected galaxies. The infrared data are used to directly measure integrated infrared luminosities and dust temperatures independent of radio or 24 {mu}m flux densities. By probing the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) at its peak, we estimate that the vast majority (72%-83%) of z < 2 Herschel-selected galaxies would drop out of traditional submillimeter surveys at 0.85-1 mm. We find that dust temperature traces infrared luminosity, due in part to the SPIRE wavelength selection biases, and partially from physical effects. As a result, we measure no significant trend in SPIRE color with redshift; if dust temperature were independent of luminosity or redshift, a trend in SPIRE color would be expected. Composite infrared SEDs are constructed as a function of infrared luminosity, showing the increase in dust temperature with luminosity, and subtle change in near-infrared and mid-infrared spectral properties. Moderate evolution in the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation is measured for this partially radio-selected sample, with q{sub IR}{proportional_to}(1 + z){sup -0.30{+-}0.02} at z < 2. We estimate the luminosity function and implied star formation rate density contribution of HSGs at z < 1.6 and find overall agreement with work based on 24 {mu}m extrapolations of the LIRG

  1. Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T.; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T.; Schaich, David A

    2011-09-01

    We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that itmore » does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.« less

  2. Electrically tunable infrared metamaterial devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brener, Igal; Jun, Young Chul

    2015-07-21

    A wavelength-tunable, depletion-type infrared metamaterial optical device is provided. The device includes a thin, highly doped epilayer whose electrical permittivity can become negative at some infrared wavelengths. This highly-doped buried layer optically couples with a metamaterial layer. Changes in the transmission spectrum of the device can be induced via the electrical control of this optical coupling. An embodiment includes a contact layer of semiconductor material that is sufficiently doped for operation as a contact layer and that is effectively transparent to an operating range of infrared wavelengths, a thin, highly doped buried layer of epitaxially grown semiconductor material that overlies the contact layer, and a metallized layer overlying the buried layer and patterned as a resonant metamaterial.

  3. INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF SEYFERT GALAXIES: SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE 12 {mu}m SAMPLE OF ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallimore, J. F.; Yzaguirre, A.; Jakoboski, J.; Stevenosky, M. J.; Axon, D. J.; O'Dea, C. P.; Robinson, A.; Baum, S. A.; Buchanan, C. L.; Elitzur, M.; Elvis, M.

    2010-03-01

    The mid-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 83 active galaxies, mostly Seyfert galaxies, selected from the extended 12 {mu}m sample are presented. The data were collected using all three instruments, Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS), aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The IRS data were obtained in spectral mapping mode, and the photometric data from IRAC and IRS were extracted from matched, 20'' diameter circular apertures. The MIPS data were obtained in SED mode, providing very low-resolution spectroscopy (R {approx} 20) between {approx}55 and 90 {mu}m in a larger, 20'' x 30'' synthetic aperture. We further present the data from a spectral decomposition of the SEDs, including equivalent widths and fluxes of key emission lines; silicate 10 {mu}m and 18 {mu}m emission and absorption strengths; IRAC magnitudes; and mid-far-infrared spectral indices. Finally, we examine the SEDs averaged within optical classifications of activity. We find that the infrared SEDs of Seyfert 1s and Seyfert 2s with hidden broad line regions (HBLRs, as revealed by spectropolarimetry or other technique) are qualitatively similar, except that Seyfert 1s show silicate emission and HBLR Seyfert 2s show silicate absorption. The infrared SEDs of other classes within the 12 {mu}m sample, including Seyfert 1.8-1.9, non-HBLR Seyfert 2 (not yet shown to hide a type 1 nucleus), LINER, and H II galaxies, appear to be dominated by star formation, as evidenced by blue IRAC colors, strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission, and strong far-infrared continuum emission, measured relative to mid-infrared continuum emission.

  4. Real time infrared aerosol analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Stanley A.; Reedy, Gerald T.; Kumar, Romesh

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

  5. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, P. K.; Wang, Kefeng; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    Magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (SR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field SR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field SR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ?? with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap valuemoreof 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.less

  6. Infrared emitting device and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Biefeld, Robert M.; Dawson, L. Ralph; Howard, Arnold J.; Baucom, Kevin C.

    1997-01-01

    An infrared emitting device and method. The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns.

  7. Low Dose IR Creates an Oncogenic Microenvironment by Inducing Premature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2013-04-28

    Introduction Much of the work addressing ionizing radiation-induced cellular response has been carried out mainly with the traditional cell culture technique involving only one cell type, how cellular response to IR is influenced by the tissue microenvironment remains elusive. By use of a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system to model critical interactions of different cell types with their neighbors and with their environment, we recently showed that low-dose IR-induced extracellular signaling via the tissue environment affects profoundly cellular responses. This proposal aims at determining the response of mammary epithelial cells in a tissue-like setting.

  8. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Poster...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and infrared bands below and above 0.2 micrometers and 50 micrometers, respectively. ... the direct solar beam from 3 micrometers to 50 micrometers, as first step that might be ...

  9. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Presentati...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 um and 50 um, respectively. ... in the direct solar beam from 3 um to 50 um, as a first step that might be used to ...

  10. Infrared tip of the red giant branch and distances to the MAFFEI/IC 342 group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Po-Feng; Tully, R. Brent; Jacobs, Bradley A.; Rizzi, Luca; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Karachentsev, Igor D.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we extend the use of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method to near-infrared wavelengths from the previously used I-band, using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Upon calibration of a color dependency of the TRGB magnitude, the IR TRGB yields a random uncertainty of ∼5% in relative distance. The IR TRGB methodology has an advantage over the previously used Advance Camera for Surveys F606W and F814W filter set for galaxies that suffer from severe extinction. Using the IR TRGB methodology, we obtain distances toward three principal galaxies in the Maffei/IC 342 complex, which are located at low Galactic latitudes. New distance estimates using the TRGB method are 3.45{sub −0.13}{sup +0.13} Mpc for IC 342, 3.37{sub −0.23}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 1, and 3.52{sub −0.30}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 2. The uncertainties are dominated by uncertain extinction, especially for Maffei 1 and Maffei 2. Our IR calibration demonstrates the viability of the TRGB methodology for observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  11. A survey of infrared supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seok, Ji Yeon; Koo, Bon-Chul; Onaka, Takashi

    2013-12-20

    We present a comprehensive infrared study of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using near- to mid-infrared images taken by Infrared Array Camera (IRAC; 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 μm) and Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS; 24 and 70 μm) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. Among the 47 bona fide LMC SNRs, 29 were detected in infrared, giving a high detection rate of 62%. All 29 SNRs show emission at 24 μm, and 20 out of 29 show emission in one or several IRAC bands. We present their 4.5, 8, 24, and 70 μm images and a table summarizing their Spitzer fluxes. We find that the LMC SNRs are considerably fainter than the Galactic SNRs, and that, among the LMC SNRs, Type Ia SNRs are significantly fainter than core-collapse SNRs. We conclude that the MIPS emission of essentially all SNRs originates from dust emission, whereas their IRAC emissions originate from ionic/molecular lines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emission, or synchrotron emission. The infrared fluxes show correlation with radio and X-ray fluxes. For SNRs that have similar morphology in infrared and X-rays, the ratios of 24 to 70 μm fluxes have good correlation with the electron density of hot plasma. The overall correlation is explained well by the emission from collisionally heated silicate grains of 0.1 μm size, but for mature SNRs with relatively low gas temperatures, the smaller-sized grain population is favored more. For those that appear different between infrared and X-rays, the emission in the MIPS bands is probably from dust heated by shock radiation.

  12. MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION AND ITS VARIATION WITH GALACTIC LONGITUDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao Jian; Jiang, B. W.; Li Aigen E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.c

    2009-12-10

    Based on the data obtained from the Spitzer/Galactic Legacy Infrared Midplane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIPMSE) Legacy Program and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) project, we derive the extinction in the four IRAC bands, [3.6], [4.5], [5.8], and [8.0] mum, relative to the 2MASS K{sub s} band (at 2.16 mum) for 131 GLIPMSE fields along the Galactic plane within |l| <= 65 deg., using red giants and red clump giants as tracers. As a whole, the mean extinction in the IRAC bands (normalized to the 2MASS K{sub s} band), A{sub [3.6]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.63+-0.01, A{sub [4.5]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.57+-0.03, A{sub [5.8]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.49+-0.03, A{sub [8.0]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.55+-0.03, exhibits little variation with wavelength (i.e., the extinction is somewhat flat or gray). This is consistent with previous studies and agrees with that predicted from the standard interstellar grain model for R{sub V} = 5.5 by Weingartner and Draine. As far as individual sightline is concerned, however, the wavelength dependence of the mid-infrared interstellar extinction A{sub l}ambda/A{sub K{sub s}} varies from one sightline to another, suggesting that there may not exist a 'universal' IR extinction law. We, for the first time, demonstrate the existence of systematic variations of extinction with Galactic longitude which appears to correlate with the locations of spiral arms as well as with the variation of the far-infrared luminosity of interstellar dust.

  13. Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, T

    2005-07-01

    The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) Upwelling shortwave (reflected) Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

  14. Infrared spectroscopic investigation of nuclear spin conversion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    relaxation processes mediated by phonons to the temperature dependence of these ... INFRARED SPECTRA; METHANE; MOLECULES; PHONONS; RELAXATION; SOLIDS; SPIN; TEMPERATURE ...

  15. Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckels, Joel Del (Livermore, CA); Klunder, Gregory L. (Oakland, CA)

    2008-03-04

    An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

  16. Infrared characteristics of VO{sub 2} thin films for smart window and laser protection applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Zhangli; Chen Sihai; Lv Chaohong; Huang Ying; Lai Jianjun

    2012-11-05

    Vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) films with a low semiconductor-to-metal transition temperature of 45 Degree-Sign C were fabricated through direct current magnetron sputtering followed by a post-annealing. Atomic force microscopy measurements show that the VO{sub 2} grain size is about one hundred of nanometers. Infrared (IR) characteristic is well investigated by applying a He-Ne laser power intensity measurement, and the result reveals that the VO{sub 2} film exhibits excellent IR switching property. Furthermore, solar smart window and laser protection experiments demonstrate that the obtained VO{sub 2} thin film is a promising material for the application in related fields.

  17. Coupling mid-infrared light from a photonic crystal waveguide to metallic transmission lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea E-mail: r.hillenbrand@nanogune.eu; Dpto. Electronica y Telecom., E.T.S. Ingeniera Bilbao, UPV Sarriugarte, Paulo; Garcia-Adeva, Angel; Zubia, Joseba; IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao, Bizkaia

    2014-01-06

    We propose and theoretically study a hybrid structure consisting of a photonic crystal waveguide (PhC-wg) and a two-wire metallic transmission line (TL), engineered for efficient transfer of mid-infrared (mid-IR) light between them. An efficiency of 32% is obtained for the coupling from the transverse magnetic (TM) photonic mode to the symmetric mode of the TL, with a predicted intensity enhancement factor of 53 at the transmission line surface. The strong coupling is explained by the small phase velocity mismatch and sufficient spatial overlapping between the modes. This hybrid structure could find applications in highly integrated mid-IR photonic-plasmonic devices for biological and gas sensing, among others.

  18. Sr2IrO4: Gateway to cuprate superconductivity?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-06-05

    High temperature superconductivity in cuprates remains a defining challenge in condensed matter physics. Recently, a new set of related compounds based on Ir rather than Cu has been discovered that may be on the verge of superconductivity themselves or be able to shed new light on the underlying interactions responsible for superconductivity in the cuprates.

  19. Radiant energy required for infrared neural stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Xiaodong; Rajguru, Suhrud; Young, Hunter; Xia, Nan; Stock, Stuart R.; Xiao, Xianghui; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-08-25

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been proposed as an alternative method to electrical stimulation because of its spatial selective stimulation. Independent of the mechanism for INS, to translate the method into a device it is important to determine the energy for stimulation required at the target structure. Custom-designed, flat and angle polished fibers, were used to deliver the photons. By rotating the angle polished fibers, the orientation of the radiation beam in the cochlea could be changed. INS-evoked compound action potentials and single unit responses in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) were recorded. X-ray computed tomography was used to determine the orientation of the optical fiber. Maximum responses were observed when the radiation beam was directed towards the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), whereas little responses were seen when the beam was directed towards the basilar membrane. The radiant exposure required at the SGNs to evoke compound action potentials (CAPs) or ICC responses was on average 18.9 ± 12.2 or 10.3 ± 4.9 mJ/cm2, respectively. For cochlear INS it has been debated whether the radiation directly stimulates the SGNs or evokes a photoacoustic effect. The results support the view that a direct interaction between neurons and radiation dominates the response to INS.

  20. Radiant energy required for infrared neural stimulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Xiaodong; Rajguru, Suhrud; Young, Hunter; Xia, Nan; Stock, Stuart R.; Xiao, Xianghui; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-08-25

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been proposed as an alternative method to electrical stimulation because of its spatial selective stimulation. Independent of the mechanism for INS, to translate the method into a device it is important to determine the energy for stimulation required at the target structure. Custom-designed, flat and angle polished fibers, were used to deliver the photons. By rotating the angle polished fibers, the orientation of the radiation beam in the cochlea could be changed. INS-evoked compound action potentials and single unit responses in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) were recorded. X-ray computed tomography wasmore » used to determine the orientation of the optical fiber. Maximum responses were observed when the radiation beam was directed towards the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), whereas little responses were seen when the beam was directed towards the basilar membrane. The radiant exposure required at the SGNs to evoke compound action potentials (CAPs) or ICC responses was on average 18.9 ± 12.2 or 10.3 ± 4.9 mJ/cm2, respectively. For cochlear INS it has been debated whether the radiation directly stimulates the SGNs or evokes a photoacoustic effect. The results support the view that a direct interaction between neurons and radiation dominates the response to INS.« less

  1. Investigation of the physical properties of the tetragonal CeMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt) compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ghimire, N. J.; Ronning, F.; Williams, D. J.; Scott, B. L.; Luo, Yongkang; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, E. D.

    2014-12-15

    The synthesis, crystal structure and physical properties studied by means of x-ray diffraction, magnetic, thermal and transport measurements of CeMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt) are reported, along with the electronic structure calculations for LaMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt). These materials adopt a tetragonal crystal structure (space group P4/mmm) comprised of BaAl4 blocks, separated by MAl2 units, stacked along the c-axis. Both CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2 order antiferromagnetically below TN1 = 14 and 16 K, respectively, and undergo a second antiferromagnetic transitition at lower temperature (TN2 = 9 and 14 K, respectively). CePtAl4Si2 orders ferromagnetically below TC = 3 Kmore » with an ordered moment of μsat = 0.8 μB for a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the c-axis. Electronic structure calculations reveal quasi-2D character of the Fermi surface.« less

  2. Multi-channel infrared thermometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulrickson, Michael A.

    1986-01-01

    A device for measuring the two-dimensional temperature profile of a surface comprises imaging optics for generating an image of the light radiating from the surface; an infrared detector array having a plurality of detectors; and a light pipe array positioned between the imaging optics and the detector array for sampling, transmitting, and distributing the image over the detector surfaces. The light pipe array includes one light pipe for each detector in the detector array.

  3. Multi-channel infrared thermometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulrickson, M.A.

    A device for measuring the two-dimensional temperature profile of a surface comprises imaging optics for generating an image of the light radiating from the surface; an infrared detector array having a plurality of detectors; and optical means positioned between the imaging optics and the detector array for sampling, transmitting, and distributing the image over the detector surfaces. The optical means may be a light pipe array having one light pipe for each detector in the detector array.

  4. Ferroelectric infrared detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lashley, Jason Charles; Opeil, Cyril P.; Smith, James Lawrence

    2010-03-30

    An apparatus and method are provided for sensing infrared radiation. The apparatus includes a sensor element that is positioned in a magnetic field during operation to ensure a .lamda. shaped relationship between specific heat and temperature adjacent the Curie temperature of the ferroelectric material comprising the sensor element. The apparatus is operated by inducing a magnetic field on the ferroelectric material to reduce surface charge on the element during its operation.

  5. ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    engineering data Title: ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST): engineering data Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral ...

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... method in a ternary solution and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, ultraviolet-visible ...

  7. Inorganic-organic hybrid semiconductor nanomaterials: (ZnSe)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    method in a ternary solution and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, ultraviolet-visible ...

  8. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  9. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  10. Infrared emitting device and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.; Dawson, L.R.; Howard, A.J.; Baucom, K.C.

    1997-04-29

    The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns. 8 figs.

  11. THE SPITZER MID-INFRARED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SURVEY. I. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF OBSCURED CANDIDATES AND NORMAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SELECTED IN THE MID-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacy, M.; Ridgway, S. E.; Gates, E. L.; Petric, A. O.; Sajina, A.; Urrutia, T.; Cox Drews, S.; Harrison, C.; Seymour, N.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of a program of optical and near-infrared spectroscopic follow-up of candidate active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected in the mid-infrared. This survey selects both normal and obscured AGNs closely matched in luminosity across a wide range, from Seyfert galaxies with bolometric luminosities L {sub bol} ? 10{sup 10} L {sub ?} to highly luminous quasars (L {sub bol} ? 10{sup 14} L {sub ?}), all with redshifts ranging from 0 to 4.3. Samples of candidate AGNs were selected with mid-infrared color cuts at several different 24 ?m flux density limits to ensure a range of luminosities at a given redshift. The survey consists of 786 candidate AGNs and quasars, of which 672 have spectroscopic redshifts and classifications. Of these, 137 (20%) are type 1 AGNs with blue continua, 294 (44%) are type 2 objects with extinctions A{sub V} ?> 5 toward their AGNs, 96 (14%) are AGNs with lower extinctions (A{sub V} ? 1), and 145 (22%) have redshifts, but no clear signs of AGN activity in their spectra. Of the survey objects 50% have L {sub bol} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ?}, in the quasar regime. We present composite spectra for type 2 quasars and objects with no signs of AGN activity in their spectra. We also discuss the mid-infraredemission-line luminosity correlation and present the results of cross correlations with serendipitous X-ray and radio sources. The results show that: (1) obscured objects dominate the overall AGN population, (2) mid-infrared selected AGN candidates exist which lack AGN signatures in their optical spectra but have AGN-like X-ray or radio counterparts, and (3) X-ray and optical classifications of obscured and unobscured AGNs often differ.

  12. Wavelength Comparison Radio Infrared Ultraviolet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... What is the origin of the nuclei found on Earth? AM Radio Microwave Visible Sunlight X-ray TV and FM Radio Mt. Everest Skyscraper Person Pinhead Fingernail Virus Atom Atomic ...

  13. Quantitative IR Spectrum and Vibrational Assignments for Glycolaldehyde Vapor: Glycolaldehyde Measurements in Biomass Burning Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.; Profeta, Luisa T.; Akagi, Sheryl; Burling, Ian R.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Williams, Stephen D.

    2013-04-15

    Glycolaldehyde (GA, 2-hydroxyethanal, C2H4O2) is a semi-volatile molecule of atmospheric importance, recently proposed as a precursor in the formation of aqueous-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA). There are few methods to measure glycolaldehyde vapor, but infrared spectroscopy has been used successfully. Using vetted protocols we have completed the first assignment of all fundamental vibrational modes and derived quantitative IR absorption band strengths using both neat and pressure-broadened GA vapor. Even though GA is problematic due to its propensity to both dimerize and condense, our intensities agree well with the few previously published values. Using the reference ?10 band Q-branch at 860.51 cm-1, we have also determined GA mixing ratios in biomass burning plumes generated by field and laboratory burns of fuels from the southeastern and southwestern United States, including the first field measurements of glycolaldehyde in smoke. The GA emission factors were anti-correlated with modified combustion efficiency confirming release of GA from smoldering combustion. The GA emission factors (g of GA emitted per kg dry biomass burned on a dry mass basis) had a low dependence on fuel type consistent with the production mechanism being pyrolysis of cellulose. GA was emitted at 0.23 0.13% of CO from field fires and we calculate that it accounts for ~18% of the aqueous-phase SOA precursors that we were able to measure.

  14. The ITER VIS/IR wide angle viewing system: Challenges and on-going R and D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travere, J. M.; Aumeunier, M. H.; Joanny, M.; Jouve, M.; Martin, V.; Moncada, V.; Salasca, S.; Marot, L.; Chabaud, D.; Ferme, J. J.; Bremond, F.; Thonnat, M.

    2011-07-01

    The ITER tokamak is the next generation fusion device which will allow studying burning plasma obtained by a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fusion reaction during hundreds of seconds. ITER vacuum vessel real-time protection will be mandatory during plasma operation to avoid water leaks and critical plasma facing components degradation. The protection system will be based on a wide angle viewing system (WAVS) composed with 18 visible (VIS) and 18 infrared (IR) cameras covering 80 % of the vacuum vessel which will be one of the major imaging systems of ITER. Compared to protection systems routinely used on current tokamaks and based on imaging (VIS and/or IR), new constraints must be taken into account because of their influence on the system performance: the harsh environment (high neutron flux) and the metallic plasma facing components (both first wall and divertor). In this new demanding context, we have achieved three mandatory R and D studies starting from the understanding of the source of signals by using realistic photonic simulation up to real-time processing strategy taken into account first order optical design constraints to define what type of performance could be reached for ITER vacuum vessel protection. (authors)

  15. THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND INTENSITY AND ANISOTROPIES DURING THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooray, Asantha; Gong Yan; Smidt, Joseph; Santos, Mario G.

    2012-09-01

    A fraction of the extragalactic near-infrared (near-IR) background light involves redshifted photons from the ultraviolet (UV) emission from galaxies present during reionization at redshifts above 6. The absolute intensity and the anisotropies of the near-IR background provide an observational probe of the first-light galaxies and their spatial distribution. We estimate the extragalactic background light intensity during reionization by accounting for the stellar and nebular emission from first-light galaxies. We require the UV photon density from these galaxies to generate a reionization history that is consistent with the optical depth to electron scattering from cosmic microwave background measurements. We also require the bright-end luminosity function (LF) of galaxies in our models to reproduce the measured Lyman-dropout LFs at redshifts of 6-8. The absolute intensity is about 0.1-0.4 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at the peak of its spectrum at {approx}1.1 {mu}m. We also discuss the anisotropy power spectrum of the near-IR background using a halo model to describe the galaxy distribution. We compare our predictions for the anisotropy power spectrum to existing measurements from deep near-IR imaging data from Spitzer/IRAC, Hubble/NICMOS, and AKARI. The predicted rms fluctuations at tens of arcminute angular scales are roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the existing measurements. While strong arguments have been made that the measured fluctuations do not have an origin involving faint low-redshift galaxies, we find that measurements in the literature are also incompatible with galaxies present during the era of reionization. The measured near-IR background anisotropies remain unexplained with an unknown origin.

  16. Direct observation of a photoinduced Wolff rearrangement in PMMA using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippert, T.; Koskelo, A.; Stoutland, P.O.

    1996-02-14

    As part of a program to develop diagnostics for laser-driven reaction in polymer matrices, we have investigated the photoinduced decomposition of 5-diazo-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-4,6-dione (5-diazo Meldrum`s acid, DM) in a PMMA matrix. This particular diazoketone is sensitive to deep UV (200-260nm), making it suitable for high-resolution lithographic applications. It has historically been difficult to study the chemistry of such resists as many of the intermediates are short-lived and absorb only in the UV. Recent advances in ultrafast infrared spectroscopy, however, now allow us to directly examine the initial steps occurring in UV photoresists with infrared spectroscopy. Herein, we describe the first room temperature observation of intermediates in the photochemistry of DM with utlrafast infrared spectroscopy. In summary, these experiments have provided the first example of how ultrafast infrared spectroscopy may be used to examine laser-driven reactions in polymeric matrices. We have determined that the photoinduced Wolff rearrangement of DM in a PMMA matrix is complete within 20 ps. The IR band assignable to the ketene is centered at 2161 cm{sup -1} and has a width of 29 cm{sup -1}. The rapid formation of the ketene is a key element of the high quantum yield of carboxylic acid formation and a key element as well for the use of DM as an ablation sensitizer. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  17. IR OPTICS MEASUREMENT WITH LINEAR COUPLING'S ACTION-ANGLE PARAMETERIZATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUO, Y.; BAI, M.; PILAT, R.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.

    2005-05-16

    A parameterization of linear coupling in action-angle coordinates is convenient for analytical calculations and interpretation of turn-by-turn (TBT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. We demonstrate how to use this parameterization to extract the twiss and coupling parameters in interaction regions (IRs), using BPMs on each side of the long IR drift region. The example of TBT BPM analysis was acquired at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), using an AC dipole to excite a single eigenmode. Besides the full treatment, a fast estimate of beta*, the beta function at the interaction point (IP), is provided, along with the phase advance between these BPMs. We also calculate and measure the waist of the beta function and the local optics.

  18. First lasing of the IR upgrade FEL at Jefferson lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Behre; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Christopher Curtis; David Douglas; H. Dylla; L. Dillon-townes; Richard Evans; Albert Grippo; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; John Heckman; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Tommy Hiatt; Kevin Jordan; Nikolitsa Merminga; George Neil; Joseph Preble; Harvey Rutt; Michelle D. Shinn; Timothy Siggins; Hiroyuki Toyokawa; David W. Waldman; Richard Walker; Neil Wilson; Byung Yunn; Shukui Zhang

    2004-08-01

    We report initial lasing results from the IR Upgrade FEL at Jefferson Lab[1]. The electron accelerator was operated with low average current beam at 80 MeV. The time structure of the beam was 120 pC bunches at 4.678 MHz with up to 750 {micro}sec pulses at 2Hz. Lasing was established over the entire wavelength range of the mirrors (5.5-6.6 {micro}m). The detuning curve length, turn-on time, and power were in agreement with modeling results assuming a 1 psec FWHM micropulse. The same model predicts over 10 kW of power output with 10 mA of beam and 10% output coupling, which is the ultimate design goal of the IR Upgrade FEL. The behavior of the laser while the dispersion section strength was varied was found to qualitatively match predictions. Initial CW lasing results also will be presented.

  19. THE WIRED SURVEY. II. INFRARED EXCESSES IN THE SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debes, John H.; Leisawitz, David T.; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Cohen, Martin

    2011-12-01

    With the launch of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a new era of detecting planetary debris and brown dwarfs (BDs) around white dwarfs (WDs) has begun with the WISE InfraRed Excesses around Degenerates (WIRED) Survey. The WIRED Survey is sensitive to substellar objects and dusty debris around WDs out to distances exceeding 100 pc, well beyond the completeness level of local WDs. In this paper, we present a cross-correlation of the preliminary Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) WD catalog between the WISE, Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and SDSS DR7 photometric catalogs. From {approx}18,000 input targets, there are WISE detections comprising 344 'naked' WDs (detection of the WD photosphere only), 1020 candidate WD+M dwarf binaries, 42 candidate WD+BD systems, 52 candidate WD+dust disk systems, and 69 targets with indeterminate infrared excess. We classified all of the detected targets through spectral energy distribution model fitting of the merged optical, near-IR, and WISE photometry. Some of these detections could be the result of contaminating sources within the large ( Almost-Equal-To 6'') WISE point-spread function; we make a preliminary estimate for the rates of contamination for our WD+BD and WD+disk candidates and provide notes for each target of interest. Each candidate presented here should be confirmed with higher angular resolution infrared imaging or infrared spectroscopy. We also present an overview of the observational characteristics of the detected WDs in the WISE photometric bands, including the relative frequencies of candidate WD+M, WD+BD, and WD+disk systems.

  20. Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane C-H bond activation reaction by CpRh(CO)2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sub-picosecond IR study of ...

  1. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of ...

  2. The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures We present a ...

  3. 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: ...

  4. Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A. [and others

    1998-01-01

    Uncooled pyroelectric IR imaging systems, such as night vision goggles, offer important strategic advantages in battlefield scenarios and reconnaissance surveys. Until now, the current technology for fabricating these devices has been limited by low throughput and high cost which ultimately limit the availability of these sensor devices. We have developed and fabricated an alternative design for pyroelectric IR imaging sensors that utilizes a multilayered thin film deposition scheme to create a monolithic thin film imaging element on an active silicon substrate for the first time. This approach combines a thin film pyroelectric imaging element with a thermally insulating SiO{sub 2} aerogel thin film to produce a new type of uncooled IR sensor that offers significantly higher thermal, spatial, and temporal resolutions at a substantially lower cost per unit. This report describes the deposition, characterization and optimization of the aerogel thermal isolation layer and an appropriate pyroelectric imaging element. It also describes the overall integration of these components along with the appropriate planarization, etch stop, adhesion, electrode, and blacking agent thin film layers into a monolithic structure. 19 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karr, T.J.

    1997-01-21

    An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile. 9 figs.

  6. Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karr, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile.

  7. Carbon-Supported IrNi Core-Shell Nanoparticles: Synthesis Characterization and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K Sasaki; K Kuttiyiel; L Barrio; D Su; A Frenkel; N Marinkovic; D Mahajan; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    We synthesized carbon-supported IrNi core-shell nanoparticles by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing in H{sub 2}, and verified the formation of Ir shells on IrNi solid solution alloy cores by various experimental methods. The EXAFS analysis is consistent with the model wherein the IrNi nanoparticles are composed of two-layer Ir shells and IrNi alloy cores. In situ XAS revealed that the Ir shells completely protect Ni atoms in the cores from oxidation or dissolution in an acid electrolyte under elevated potentials. The formation of Ir shell during annealing due to thermal segregation is monitored by time-resolved synchrotron XRD measurements, coupled with Rietveld refinement analyses. The H{sub 2} oxidation activity of the IrNi nanoparticles was found to be higher than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. This is predominantly due to Ni-core-induced Ir shell contraction that makes the surface less reactive for IrOH formation, and the resulting more metallic Ir surface becomes more active for H{sub 2} oxidation. This new class of core-shell nanoparticles appears promising for application as hydrogen anode fuel cell electrocatalysts.

  8. Infrared systems, SPIE proceedings. Vol. 256

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanmann, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    The seminar focused on infrared systems sensor specifications, applications of infrared thermography in the analysis of induced surface currents due to incident electromagnetic radiation on complex shapes, advanced optical ceramics for sensor windows, digital processing in calibrated infrared imagery, and calibration. Papers were presented on nearby object radiometry, homing overlay experiment radiometric error terminology, design of radiometric calibration sources and spectroradiometers, and the Lockheed sensor test facility.

  9. Infra-red signature neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane William [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-10-13

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material that includes a photoluminescent material that generates infrared radiation and generation a by-product of a nuclear reaction due to the activator impinging the receptor material. The method further includes generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect, wherein the light activates the photoluminescent material so as to generate the infrared radiation. Identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the infrared radiation.

  10. Infrared trace element detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.; Matthew, M.W.

    1988-11-15

    An infrared trace element detection system includes an optical cell into which the sample fluid to be examined is introduced and removed. Also introduced into the optical cell is a sample beam of infrared radiation in a first wavelength band which is significantly absorbed by the trace element and a second wavelength band which is not significantly absorbed by the trace element for passage through the optical cell through the sample fluid. The output intensities of the sample beam of radiation are selectively detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The intensities of a reference beam of the radiation are similarly detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The sensed output intensity of the sample beam in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other and similarly, the intensity of the reference beam of radiation in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other. The normalized sample beam intensity and normalized reference beam intensity are then compared to provide a signal from which the amount of trace element in the sample fluid can be determined. 11 figs.

  11. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings Addthis 1 of 5 An oxygen plasma etcher is ... Kyle Alvine checks on the progress of the plasma etch. Image: Pacific Northwest National ...

  12. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    signature, allowing their evolution into the final product to be precisely monitored with infrared spectroscopy. Although other (non-synchrotron) spectroscopic tools have the...

  13. SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MOLECULAR HYDROGEN ROTATIONAL EMISSION TOWARDS TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN ...

  14. Wide-angle ITER-prototype tangential infrared and visible viewing system for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasnier, C. J. Allen, S. L.; Ellis, R. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; McLean, A. G.; Meyer, W. H.; Morris, K.; Seppala, L. G.; Crabtree, K.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2014-11-15

    An imaging system with a wide-angle tangential view of the full poloidal cross-section of the tokamak in simultaneous infrared and visible light has been installed on DIII-D. The optical train includes three polished stainless steel mirrors in vacuum, which view the tokamak through an aperture in the first mirror, similar to the design concept proposed for ITER. A dichroic beam splitter outside the vacuum separates visible and infrared (IR) light. Spatial calibration is accomplished by warping a CAD-rendered image to align with landmarks in a data image. The IR camera provides scrape-off layer heat flux profile deposition features in diverted and inner-wall-limited plasmas, such as heat flux reduction in pumped radiative divertor shots. Demonstration of the system to date includes observation of fast-ion losses to the outer wall during neutral beam injection, and shows reduced peak wall heat loading with disruption mitigation by injection of a massive gas puff.

  15. Nonequilibrium fixed points in longitudinally expanding scalar theories: Infrared cascade, Bose condensation and a challenge for kinetic theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Berges, J.; Schlichting, S.; Boguslavski, K.; Venugopalan, R.

    2015-11-05

    In [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 061601 (2015)], we reported on a new universality class for longitudinally expanding systems, encompassing strongly correlated non-Abelian plasmas and N-component self-interacting scalar field theories. Using classical-statistical methods, we showed that these systems share the same self-similar scaling properties for a wide range of momenta in a limit where particles are weakly coupled but their occupancy is high. Here we significantly expand on our previous work and delineate two further self-similar regimes. One of these occurs in the deep infrared (IR) regime of very high occupancies, where the nonequilibrium dynamics leads to the formation of amore » Bose-Einstein condensate. The universal IR scaling exponents and the spectral index characterizing the isotropic IR distributions are described by an effective theory derived from a systematic large-N expansion at next-to-leading order. Remarkably, this effective theory can be cast as a vertex-resummed kinetic theory. The other novel self-similar regime occurs close to the hard physical scale of the theory, and sets in only at later times. In this study, we argue that the important role of the infrared dynamics ensures that key features of our results for scalar and gauge theories cannot be reproduced consistently in conventional kinetic theory frameworks.« less

  16. Nonequilibrium fixed points in longitudinally expanding scalar theories: Infrared cascade, Bose condensation and a challenge for kinetic theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berges, J.; Schlichting, S.; Boguslavski, K.; Venugopalan, R.

    2015-11-05

    In [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 061601 (2015)], we reported on a new universality class for longitudinally expanding systems, encompassing strongly correlated non-Abelian plasmas and N-component self-interacting scalar field theories. Using classical-statistical methods, we showed that these systems share the same self-similar scaling properties for a wide range of momenta in a limit where particles are weakly coupled but their occupancy is high. Here we significantly expand on our previous work and delineate two further self-similar regimes. One of these occurs in the deep infrared (IR) regime of very high occupancies, where the nonequilibrium dynamics leads to the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate. The universal IR scaling exponents and the spectral index characterizing the isotropic IR distributions are described by an effective theory derived from a systematic large-N expansion at next-to-leading order. Remarkably, this effective theory can be cast as a vertex-resummed kinetic theory. The other novel self-similar regime occurs close to the hard physical scale of the theory, and sets in only at later times. In this study, we argue that the important role of the infrared dynamics ensures that key features of our results for scalar and gauge theories cannot be reproduced consistently in conventional kinetic theory frameworks.

  17. Compensated infrared absorption sensor for carbon dioxide and other infrared absorbing gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owen, Thomas E.

    2005-11-29

    A gas sensor, whose chamber uses filters and choppers in either a semicircular geometry or annular geometry, and incorporates separate infrared radiation filters and optical choppers. This configuration facilitates the use of a single infrared radiation source and a single detector for infrared measurements at two wavelengths, such that measurement errors may be compensated.

  18. A NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF YOUNG FIELD ULTRACOOL DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allers, K. N.; Liu, Michael C.

    2013-08-01

    We present a near-infrared (0.9-2.4 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 73 field ultracool dwarfs having spectroscopic and/or kinematic evidence of youth ( Almost-Equal-To 10-300 Myr). Our sample is composed of 48 low-resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 100) spectra and 41 moderate-resolution spectra (R {approx}> 750-2000). First, we establish a method for spectral typing M5-L7 dwarfs at near-IR wavelengths that is independent of gravity. We find that both visual and index-based classification in the near-IR provides consistent spectral types with optical spectral types, though with a small systematic offset in the case of visual classification at J and K band. Second, we examine features in the spectra of {approx}10 Myr ultracool dwarfs to define a set of gravity-sensitive indices based on FeH, VO, K I, Na I, and H-band continuum shape. We then create an index-based method for classifying the gravities of M6-L5 dwarfs that provides consistent results with gravity classifications from optical spectroscopy. Our index-based classification can distinguish between young and dusty objects. Guided by the resulting classifications, we propose a set of low-gravity spectral standards for the near-IR. Finally, we estimate the ages corresponding to our gravity classifications.

  19. MULTI-TUBE POWER LEADS TOWER FOR BEPCII IR MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JIA,L.X.; ZHANG,X.B.; WANG,L.; WANG,T.H.; YAO,Z.L.

    2004-05-11

    A power lead tower containing the multi-tube power leads is designed and under fabrication for the superconducting IR quadrupole magnets in the Beijing Electron Position Collider Upgrade (BEPCII). The lead tower consists of six pairs of gas-cooled leads for seven superconducting coils at various operating currents. The power lead is designed in a modular fashion, which can be easily applied to suit different operating current. The end copper block of the tube lead has a large cold mass that provide a large time constant in case of cooling flow interruption. A novel cryogenic electrical isolator is used for the leads.

  20. Nanosecond Mid-Infrared Detection for Pulse Radiolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grills,D.C.; Preses, J.M.; Wishart, J.F.; Cook, A.R.

    2009-07-12

    Pulse radiolysis, utilizing electron pulses from accelerators, is the definitive method for adding single positive or negative charges to molecules. It is also among the most effective means for creating free radicals. Such species are particularly important in applications such as redox catalysis relevant to solar energy conversion and advanced nuclear energy systems. Coupled with fast UV-visible detection, pulse radiolysis has become an extremely powerful method for monitoring the kinetics of the subsequent reactions of these species on timescales ranging from picoseconds to seconds. However, in many important contexts the radicals formed are difficult to identify due to their broad and featureless UV-visible absorption spectra. Time-resolved infrared (TRIR) absorption spectroscopy is a powerful structural probe of short-lived intermediates, which allows multiple transient species to be clearly identified and simultaneously monitored in a single process. Unfortunately, due to technical challenges the coupling of fast (sub-millisecond) TRIR with pulse radiolysis has received little attention, being confined to gas-phase studies. Taking advantage of recent developments in mid-IR laser technology, we have recently begun developing nanosecond TRIR detection methodologies for condensed-phase samples at our Laser Electron Accelerator Facility (LEAF). The results of preliminary pulse radiolysis-TRIR investigations on the formation of the one-electron reduced forms of CO{sub 2} reduction catalysts (e.g. see above) and their interactions with CO{sub 2} will be presented.

  1. FY 2005 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Bradley M.; Martinez, James E.; Qiao, Hong; Schultz, John F.

    2005-12-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrologyall specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions. During FY 2005, PNNLs Infrared Photonics research team made measurable progress exploiting the extraordinary optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to develop miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. We investigated sulfur purification methods that will eventually lead to routine production of optical quality chalcogenide glass. We also discovered a glass degradation phenomenon and our investigation uncovered the underlying surface chemistry mechanism and developed mitigation actions. Key research was performed to understand and control the photomodification properties. This research was then used to demonstrate several essential infrared photonic devices, including LWIR single-mode waveguide devices and waveguide

  2. Large exchange bias enhancement in (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co trilayers with ultrathin IrMn thanks to interfacial Cu dusting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinai, G. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, CEA/INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Crocus Technology, 4 Place Robert Schuman, 38054 Grenoble (France); Moritz, J. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS - Universit de Lorraine, Bd des Aiguillettes, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Bandiera, S. [Crocus Technology, 4 Place Robert Schuman, 38054 Grenoble (France); Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, CEA/INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-04-21

    The magnitude of exchange bias (H{sub ex}) at room temperature can be significantly enhanced in IrMn/Co and (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co structures thanks to the insertion of an ultrathin Cu dusting layer at the IrMn/Co interface. The combination of trilayer structure and interfacial Cu dusting leads to a three-fold increase in H{sub ex} as compared to the conventional IrMn/Co bilayer structure, with an increased blocking temperature (T{sub B}) and a concave curvature of the temperature dependence H{sub ex}(T), ideal for improved Thermally Assisted-Magnetic Random Access Memory storage layer. This exchange bias enhancement is ascribed to a reduction of the spin frustration at the IrMn/Co interface thanks to interfacial Cu addition.

  3. Gamma ray generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  4. Qualification tests for {sup 192}Ir sealed sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iancso, Georgeta Iliescu, Elena Iancu, Rodica

    2013-12-16

    This paper describes the results of qualification tests for {sup 192}Ir sealed sources, available in Testing and Nuclear Expertise Laboratory of National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering 'Horia Hulubei' (I.F.I.N.-HH), Romania. These sources had to be produced in I.F.I.N.-HH and were tested in order to obtain the authorization from The National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). The sources are used for gammagraphy procedures or in gammadefectoscopy equipments. Tests, measurement methods and equipments used, comply with CNCAN, AIEA and International Quality Standards and regulations. The qualification tests are: 1. Radiological tests and measurements: dose equivalent rate at 1 m; tightness; dose equivalent rate at the surface of the transport and storage container; external unfixed contamination of the container surface. 2. Mechanical and climatic tests: thermal shock; external pressure; mechanic shock; vibrations; boring; thermal conditions for storage and transportation. Passing all tests, it was obtained the Radiological Security Authorization for producing the {sup 192}Ir sealed sources. Now IFIN-HH can meet many demands for this sealed sources, as the only manufacturer in Romania.

  5. Strong lattice correlation of non-equilibrium quasiparticles in a pseudospin-1/2 Mott insulator Sr2IrO4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Yuelin; Schaller, Richard D.; Zhu, Mengze; Walko, Donald A.; Kim, Jungho; Ke, Xianglin; Miao, Ludi; Mao, Z. Q.

    2016-01-20

    In correlated oxides the coupling of quasiparticles to other degrees of freedom such as spin and lattice plays critical roles in the emergence of symmetry-breaking quantum ordered states such as high temperature superconductivity. We report a strong lattice coupling of photon-induced quasiparticles in spin-orbital coupling Mott insulator Sr2IrO4 probed via optical excitation. Combining time-resolved x-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy techniques, we reconstruct a spatiotemporal map of the diffusion of these quasiparticles. Lastly, due to the unique electronic configuration of the quasiparticles, the strong lattice correlation is unexpected but extends the similarity between Sr2IrO4 and cuprates to a new dimension ofmore » electron-phonon coupling which persists under highly non-equilibrium conditions.« less

  6. The continued optical to mid-infrared evolution of V838 Monocerotis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loebman, S. R.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Schmidt, S. J.; Kowalski, A. F.; Barry, R. K.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Hammel, H. B.; Hawley, S. L.; Szkody, P.; Hebb, L.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W.; Sitko, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    The eruptive variable V838 Monocerotis (V838 Mon) gained notoriety in 2002 when it brightened nine magnitudes in a series of three outbursts and then rapidly evolved into an extremely cool supergiant. We present optical, near-infrared (near-IR), and mid-IR spectroscopic and photometric observations of V838 Mon obtained between 2008 and 2012 at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m, NASA IRTF 3 m, and Gemini South 8 m telescopes. We contemporaneously analyze the optical and IR spectroscopic properties of V838 Mon to arrive at a revised spectral type L3 supergiant and effective temperature T{sub eff}?20002200 K. Because there are no existing optical observational data for L supergiants, we speculate that V838 Mon may represent the prototype for L supergiants in this wavelength regime. We find a low level of H? emission present in the system, consistent with interaction between V838 Mon and its B3V binary; however, we cannot rule out a stellar collision as the genesis event, which could result in the observed H? activity. Based upon a two-component blackbody fit to all wavelengths of our data, we conclude that, as of 2009, a shell of ejecta surrounded V838 Mon at a radius of R=26310 AU with a temperature of T=2852 K. This result is consistent with IR interferometric observations from the same era and predictions from the Lynch et al. model of the expanding system, which provides a simple framework for understanding this complicated system.

  7. Volatile out gassing characteristics of highly filled ethylene vinyl acetate binder materials: Gas phase infra-red spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, Mogon; Bowditch, Martin; Jones, Ben; Netherton, David; Khan, Niaz; Letant, Sonia; Maxwell, Robert S.; Birdsell, Stephen A.

    2012-12-08

    Gas phase Infra-red (IR) spectroscopy has been used to investigate volatile out gassing properties of highly filled poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) materials. In these studies, a Scout-ENTM heated gas cell was interfaced to a vacuum FTIR spectrometer, and the quantification of evolved species was achieved through calibration of the gas cell with certified gas standards. The volatile out gassing properties were monitored as a function of time during storage at 75°C under vacuum conditions (< 1mbar). Acetic acid, carbon dioxide and water were identified as the major out gassing products through IR absorption peaks at 1797, 2354 and 3853 cm-1, respectively. We present a comparison of three highly filled poly (ethyleneco- vinyl acetate) resins.

  8. Phase transition in bulk single crystals and thin films of VO2 by nanoscale infrared spectroscopy and imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Mengkun; Sternbach, Aaron J.; Wagner, Martin; Slusar, Tetiana V.; Kong, Tai; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Kittiwatanakul, Salinporn; Qazilbash, M. M.; McLeod, Alexander; Fei, Zhe; et al

    2015-06-29

    We have systematically studied a variety of vanadium dioxide (VO2) crystalline forms, including bulk single crystals and oriented thin films, using infrared (IR) near-field spectroscopic imaging techniques. By measuring the IR spectroscopic responses of electrons and phonons in VO2 with sub-grain-size spatial resolution (~20nm), we show that epitaxial strain in VO2 thin films not only triggers spontaneous local phase separations, but leads to intermediate electronic and lattice states that are intrinsically different from those found in bulk. Generalized rules of strain- and symmetry-dependent mesoscopic phase inhomogeneity are also discussed. Furthermore, these results set the stage for a comprehensive understanding ofmore » complex energy landscapes that may not be readily determined by macroscopic approaches.« less

  9. Volatile out gassing characteristics of highly filled ethylene vinyl acetate binder materials: Gas phase infra-red spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Patel, Mogon; Bowditch, Martin; Jones, Ben; Netherton, David; Khan, Niaz; Letant, Sonia; Maxwell, Robert S.; Birdsell, Stephen A.

    2012-12-08

    Gas phase Infra-red (IR) spectroscopy has been used to investigate volatile out gassing properties of highly filled poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) materials. In these studies, a Scout-ENTM heated gas cell was interfaced to a vacuum FTIR spectrometer, and the quantification of evolved species was achieved through calibration of the gas cell with certified gas standards. The volatile out gassing properties were monitored as a function of time during storage at 75°C under vacuum conditions (< 1mbar). Acetic acid, carbon dioxide and water were identified as the major out gassing products through IR absorption peaks at 1797, 2354 and 3853 cm-1, respectively.more » We present a comparison of three highly filled poly (ethyleneco- vinyl acetate) resins.« less

  10. THE MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION LAW AND ITS VARIATION IN THE COALSACK NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Shu; Gao Jian; Jiang, B. W.; Chen Yang; Li Aigen E-mail: jiangao@bnu.edu.cn E-mail: cheny@bnu.edu.cn

    2013-08-10

    In recent years, the wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction from the ultraviolet (UV) to the near- and mid-infrared (IR) has been studied extensively. Although it is well established that the UV/optical extinction law varies significantly among the different lines of sight, it is not clear how IR extinction varies among various environments. In this work, using the color-excess method and taking red giants as the extinction tracer, we determine interstellar extinction A{sub {lambda}} in the four Spitzer/IRAC bands in [3.6], [4.5], [5.8], [8.0] {mu}m (relative to A{sub K{sub s}}, extinction in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) K{sub s} band at 2.16 {mu}m) of the Coalsack nebula, a nearby starless dark cloud, based on the data obtained from the 2MASS and Spitzer/GLIMPSE surveys. We select five individual regions across the nebula that span a wide variety of physical conditions ranging from diffuse and translucent to dense environments, as traced by the visual extinction, the Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m emission, and CO emission. We find that A{sub {lambda}}/A{sub K{sub s}}, mid-IR extinction relative to A{sub K{sub s}}, decreases from diffuse to dense environments, which may be explained in terms of ineffective dust growth in dense regions. The mean extinction (relative to A{sub K{sub s}}) is calculated for the four IRAC bands as well and exhibits a flat mid-IR extinction law consistent with previous determinations for other regions. Extinction in the IRAC 4.5 {mu}m band is anomalously high, much higher than that of the other three IRAC bands, and cannot be explained in terms of CO and CO{sub 2} ice. Mid-IR extinction in the four IRAC bands has also been derived for four representative regions in the Coalsack Globule 2, which respectively exhibit strong ice absorption, moderate or weak ice absorption, and very weak or no ice absorption. The derived mid-IR extinction curves are all flat, with A{sub {lambda}}/A{sub K{sub s}} increasing with the decrease of the

  11. Category:Near Infrared Surveys | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Infrared Surveys Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:NearInfraredSurveys&oldid794164" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  12. Category:Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Infrared Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:Long-WaveInfrared&oldid794161" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference...

  13. ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1 data Title: ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST): channel 1 data Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology ...

  14. ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    summary data Title: ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST): summary data Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology ...

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Cloud Infrared Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsArctic Cloud Infrared Imaging Campaign Links Field Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Arctic Cloud Infrared Imaging 2012.07.16 - 2014.07.31 Lead Scientist : Joseph Shaw For data sets, see below. Abstract The 3rd-generation Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) instrument was deployed close to the Great White facility at the North Slope of Alaska site and operated as

  16. Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruffner, Judith A.; Bullington, Jeff A.; Clem, Paul G.; Warren, William L.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Schwartz, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    A monolithic infrared detector structure which allows integration of pyroelectric thin films atop low thermal conductivity aerogel thin films. The structure comprises, from bottom to top, a substrate, an aerogel insulating layer, a lower electrode, a pyroelectric layer, and an upper electrode layer capped by a blacking layer. The aerogel can offer thermal conductivity less than that of air, while providing a much stronger monolithic alternative to cantilevered or suspended air-gap structures for pyroelectric thin film pixel arrays. Pb(Zr.sub.0.4 Ti.sub.0.6)O.sub.3 thin films deposited on these structures displayed viable pyroelectric properties, while processed at 550.degree. C.

  17. Spitzer SAGE-Spec: Near infrared spectroscopy, dust shells, and cool envelopes in extreme Large Magellanic Cloud asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, R. D.; Srinivasan, S.; Kemper, F.; Ling, B.

    2014-11-01

    K-band spectra are presented for a sample of 39 Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) SAGE-Spec sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The spectra exhibit characteristics in very good agreement with their positions in the near-infrared—Spitzer color-magnitude diagrams and their properties as deduced from the Spitzer IRS spectra. Specifically, the near-infrared spectra show strong atomic and molecular features representative of oxygen-rich and carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars, respectively. A small subset of stars was chosen from the luminous and red extreme ''tip'' of the color-magnitude diagram. These objects have properties consistent with dusty envelopes but also cool, carbon-rich ''stellar'' cores. Modest amounts of dust mass loss combine with the stellar spectral energy distribution to make these objects appear extreme in their near-infrared and mid-infrared colors. One object in our sample, HV 915, a known post-asymptotic giant branch star of the RV Tau type, exhibits CO 2.3 μm band head emission consistent with previous work that demonstrates that the object has a circumstellar disk.

  18. A new architecture as transparent electrodes for solar and IR applications based on photonic structures via soft lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, Ping

    2011-05-15

    Transparent conducting electrodes with the combination of high optical transmission and good electrical conductivity are essential for solar energy harvesting and electric lighting devices. Currently, indium tin oxide (ITO) is used because ITO offers relatively high transparency (>80%) to visible light and low sheet resistance (R{sub s} = 10 ohms/square ({Omega}#2;/?)) for electrical conduction. However, ITO is costly due to limited indium reserves, and it is brittle. These disadvantages have motivated the search for other conducting electrodes with similar or better properties. There has been research on a variety of electrode structures involving carbon nanotube networks, graphene films, nanowire and nanopatterned meshes and grids. Due to their novel characteristics in light manipulation and collection, photonic crystal structures show promise for further improvement. Here, we report on a new architecture consisting of nanoscale high aspect ratio metallic photonic structures as transparent electrodes fabricated via a combination of processes. For (Au) and silver (Ag) structures, the visible light transmission can reach as high as 80%, and the sheet resistance of the structure can be as low as 3.2{Omega}#2;/?. The optical transparency of the high aspect ratio metal structures at visible wavelength range is comparable to that of ITO glass, while their sheet resistance is more than 3 times lower, which indicates a much higher electrical conductivity of the metal structures. Furthermore, the high aspect ratio metal structures have very high infrared (IR) reflection (90%) for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode, which can lead to the development of fabrication of metallic structures as IR filters for heat control applications. Investigations of interdigitated structures based on the high aspect ratio metal electrodes are ongoing to study the feasibility in smart window applications in light transmission modulation.

  19. Phthalocyanine adsorption to graphene on Ir(111): Evidence for decoupling from vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endlich, M. Gozdzik, S.; Néel, N.; Kröger, J.; Rosa, A. L. da; Frauenheim, T.; Wehling, T. O.

    2014-11-14

    Phthalocyanine molecules have been adsorbed to Ir(111) and to graphene on Ir(111). From a comparison of scanning tunneling microscopy images of individual molecules adsorbed to the different surfaces alone it is difficult to discern potential differences in the molecular adsorption geometry. In contrast, vibrational spectroscopy using inelastic electron scattering unequivocally hints at strong molecule deformations on Ir(111) and at a planar adsorption geometry on graphene. The spectroscopic evidence for the different adsorption configurations is supported by density functional calculations.

  20. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings 1 of 5 An oxygen plasma etcher is used to ... Kyle Alvine checks on the progress of the plasma etch. Image: Pacific Northwest National ...

  1. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Blue, Craig A.; Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2002-01-01

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  2. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Blue, Craig A.; Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2001-01-01

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  3. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Blue, Craig A.; Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2003-12-23

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  4. Discriminating trpzip2 and trpzip4 peptides folding landscape using the two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Tianmin; Zhang, Ruiting; Li, Huanhuan; Zhuang, Wei, E-mail: wzhuang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: lijiangy@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China); Yang, Lijiang, E-mail: wzhuang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: lijiangy@pku.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-02-07

    We analyzed, based on the theoretical spectroscopic modeling, how the differences in the folding landscapes of two ?-hairpin peptides trpzip2 and trpzip4 are reflected in their thermal unfolding infrared measurements. The isotope-edited equilibrium FTIR and two dimensional infrared spectra of the two peptides were calculated, using the nonlinear exciton propagation method, at a series of temperatures. The spectra calculations were based on the configuration distributions generated using the GB{sup OBC} implicit solvent MD simulation and the integrated tempering sampling technique. Conformational analysis revealed the different local thermal stabilities for these two peptides, which suggested the different folding landscapes. Our study further suggested that the ellipticities of the isotope peaks in the coherent IR signals are more sensitive to these local stability differences compared with other spectral features such as the peak intensities. Our technique can thus be combined with the relevant experimental measurements to achieve a better understanding of the peptide folding behaviors.

  5. X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including film developing and scanning, and image plate scanning. Related images X-ray framing camera being loaded into the TIM in the Trident North Target Area. X-ray framing...

  6. IR Imaging Using Arrays of SiO2 Micromechanical Detectors (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Each detector element incorporates an optical resonant cavity layer in the IR absorbing region of the sensing element. The simplified microfabrication process requires only four ...

  7. Structure and magnetic properties of the pyrochlore iridate Y2Ir2O7...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structure and magnetic properties of the pyrochlore iridate Y2Ir2O7 Citation Details ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud ...

  8. On Loops in Inflation II: IR Effects in Single Clock Inflation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: On Loops in Inflation II: IR Effects in Single Clock Inflation Authors: Senatore, Leonardo ; Stanford U., ITP KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Zaldarriaga, Matias ; Princeton, Inst. ...

  9. Uncooled infrared photon detector and multicolor infrared detection using microoptomechanical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.; Rajic, Solobodan; Datskou, Irene C.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for infrared detection are described. An optomechanical photon detector includes a semiconductor material and is based on measurement of a photoinduced lattice strain. A multicolor infrared sensor includes a stack of frequency specific optomechanical detectors. The stack can include one, or more, of the optomechanical photon detectors that function based on the measurement of photoinduced lattice strain. The systems and methods provide advantages in that rapid, sensitive multicolor infrared imaging can be performed without the need for a cooling subsystem.

  10. THE NUCLEAR INFRARED EMISSION OF LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R. E.; Lopez-Rodriguez, E.; Packham, C.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Elitzur, M.; Aretxaga, I.; Roche, P. F.; Oi, N.

    2012-07-15

    We present high-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) imaging, nuclear spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and archival Spitzer spectra for 22 low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs; L{sub bol} {approx}< 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}). Infrared (IR) observations may advance our understanding of the accretion flows in LLAGNs, the fate of the obscuring torus at low accretion rates, and, perhaps, the star formation histories of these objects. However, while comprehensively studied in higher-luminosity Seyferts and quasars, the nuclear IR properties of LLAGNs have not yet been well determined. We separate the present LLAGN sample into three categories depending on their Eddington ratio and radio emission, finding different IR characteristics for each class. (1) At the low-luminosity, low-Eddington-ratio (log L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} < -4.6) end of the sample, we identify 'host-dominated' galaxies with strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bands that may indicate active (circum-)nuclear star formation. (2) Some very radio-loud objects are also present at these low Eddington ratios. The IR emission in these nuclei is dominated by synchrotron radiation, and some are likely to be unobscured type 2 AGNs that genuinely lack a broad-line region. (3) At higher Eddington ratios, strong, compact nuclear sources are visible in the MIR images. The nuclear SEDs of these galaxies are diverse; some resemble typical Seyfert nuclei, while others lack a well-defined MIR 'dust bump'. Strong silicate emission is present in many of these objects. We speculate that this, together with high ratios of silicate strength to hydrogen column density, could suggest optically thin dust and low dust-to-gas ratios, in accordance with model predictions that LLAGNs do not host a Seyfert-like obscuring torus. We anticipate that detailed modeling of the new data and SEDs in terms of accretion disk, jet, radiatively inefficient accretion flow, and torus components will provide further insights into the nuclear

  11. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared microspectroscopy, while the state of the catalyst along the flow

  12. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared microspectroscopy, while the state of the catalyst along the flow

  13. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared microspectroscopy, while the state of the catalyst along the flow

  14. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared microspectroscopy, while the state of the catalyst along the flow

  15. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared microspectroscopy, while the state of the catalyst along the flow

  16. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared microspectroscopy, while the state of the catalyst along the flow

  17. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared microspectroscopy, while the state of the catalyst along the flow

  18. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print Wednesday, 20 August 2014 07:59 A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ

  19. Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Wednesday, 26 July 2006 00:00 Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is growing need for the development of electronic devices based on organic polymer materials. Organic field-effect transistors (FETs) are ideal for special applications that require large areas, light weight, and structural flexibility. They also

  20. Ray J. Corey- Biography

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ray Corey currently serves as the Assistance Manager for Safety and Environment at the DOE Richland Operations office (RL).

  1. THE INFRARED SPECTRUM OF URANIUM HOLLOW CATHODE LAMPS FROM 850...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CATHODES; ELECTRODES; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ELEMENTS; INFRARED RADIATION; INTEGRAL TRANSFORMATIONS; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; METALS; RADIATIONS; SPECTRA; SPECTROMETERS; ...

  2. HIGH-RESOLUTION MID-INFRARED IMAGING OF THE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS OF HERBIG Ae/Be STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinas, N.; Telesco, C. M.; Packham, C.; Fisher, R. S.

    2011-08-20

    We have imaged the circumstellar environments of 17 Herbig Ae/Be stars at 12 and 18 {mu}m using MICHELLE on Gemini North and T-ReCS on Gemini South. Our sample contained eight Group I sources, those having large rising near- to far-infrared (IR) fluxes, and nine Group II sources, those having more modest mid-IR fluxes relative to their near-IR flux (in the classification of Meeus et al.). We have resolved extended emission from all Group I sources in our target list. The majority of these sources have radially symmetric mid-IR emission extending from a radius of 10 AU to hundreds of AU. Only one of the nine Group II sources is resolved at the FWHM level, with another two Group II sources resolved at fainter levels. Models by Dullemond et al. explain the observed spectral energy distribution of Group II sources using self-shadowed cold disks. If this is the case for all the Group II sources, we do not expect to detect extended emission with this study, since the IR emission measured should arise from a region only a few AU in size, which is smaller than our resolution. The fact that we do resolve some of the Group II sources implies that their disks are not completely flat, and might represent an intermediate stage. We also find that none of the more massive (>3 M{sub sun}) Herbig Ae/Be stars in our sample belongs to Group I, which may point to a relationship between stellar mass and circumstellar dust evolution. Disks around more massive stars might evolve faster so that stars are surrounded by a more evolved flat disk by the time they become optically visible, or they might follow a different evolutionary path altogether.

  3. X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diagnostics X-Ray Diagnostics Maintenance of existing devices and development of advanced concepts Contact John Oertel (505) 665-3246 Email Hot, dense matter produced by intense laser interaction with a solid target often produces x-rays with energies from 100 eV to those exceeding 100 keV. A suite of diagnostics and methods have been deployed at Trident to diagnose the x-ray emission from laser-matter interaction experiments, or to use the x-rays as a probe of dense matter. These

  4. Oxidation preventative capping layer for deep-ultra-violet and soft x-ray multilayers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prisbrey, Shon T.

    2004-07-06

    The invention uses iridium and iridium compounds as a protective capping layer on multilayers having reflectivity in the deep ultra-violet to soft x-ray regime. The iridium compounds can be formed in one of two ways: by direct deposition of the iridium compound from a prepared target or by depositing a thin layer (e.g., 5-50 angstroms) of iridium directly onto an element. The deposition energy of the incoming iridium is sufficient to activate the formation of the desired iridium compound. The compounds of most interest are iridium silicide (IrSi.sub.x) and iridium molybdenide (IrMo.sub.x).

  5. Evolution of competing magnetic order in the Jeff=1/2 insulating state of Sr2Ir1-xRuxO4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Calder, Stuart A.; Kim, Jong-Woo; Cao, Guixin; Cantoni, Claudia; May, Andrew F; Cao, Huibo B.; Aczel, Adam A.; Matsuda, Masaaki; Choi, Yongseong; Haskel, Daniel; et al

    2015-10-27

    We investigate the magnetic properties of the series Sr2Ir1-xRuxO4 with neutron, resonant x-ray and magnetization measurements. The results indicate an evolution and coexistence of magnetic structures via a spin flop transition from ab-plane to c-axis collinear order as the 5d Ir4+ ions are replaced with an increasing concentration of 4d Ru4+ ions. The magnetic structures within the ordered regime of the phase diagram (x<0.3) are reported. Despite the changes in magnetic structure no alteration of the Jeff=1/2 ground state is observed. This behavior of Sr2Ir1-xRuxO4 is consistent with electronic phase separation and diverges from a standard scenario of hole doping.more » The role of lattice alterations with doping on the magnetic and insulating behavior is considered. Our results presented here provide insight into the magnetic insulating states in strong spin-orbit coupled materials and the role perturbations play in altering the behavior.« less

  6. IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76%

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document provides an overview of how the IRS and MC Realty Group, its property management firm, achieved a 76% reduction in lighting energy use at an IRS facility parking garage in Kansas City, Missouri. The retrofit resulted in annual energy savings of 2 million kWh, annual cost savings of over $122,000, and a simple payback of 2.5 years.

  7. NaIrO{sub 3}-A pentavalent post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bremholm, M.; Dutton, S.E.; Stephens, P.W.; Cava, R.J.

    2011-03-15

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3,} was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides. -- Graphical abstract: Sodium iridium(V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions is found to crystallize as the post-perovskite structure and is the first example of a pentavalent ABO{sub 3} post-perovskite. Research highlights: {yields} NaIrO{sub 3} post-perovskite stabilized by pressure. {yields} First example of a pentavalent oxide post-perovskite. {yields} Non-metallic and non-magnetic behavior of NaIrO{sub 3}.

  8. Enhanced oxygen evolution activity of IrO2 and RuO2 (100) surfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Enhanced oxygen evolution activity of IrO2 and RuO2 (100) surfaces Citation Details In-Document Search ... Here we report that the (100) surface of IrO2 and RuO2 is ...

  9. The Influence of Chain Dynamics on the Far Infrared Spectrum of Liquid Methanol-Water Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, K.N.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-07-12

    Far-infrared absorption spectroscopy has been used to study the low frequency ({center_dot} 100 cm{sup -1}) intermolecular modes of methanol in mixtures with water. With the aid of a first principles molecular dynamics simulation on an equivalent system, a detailed understanding about the origin of the low frequency IR modes has been established. The total dipole spectrum from the simulation suggests that the bands appearing in the experimental spectra at approximately 55 cm{sup -1} and 70 cm{sup -1} in methanol and methanol-rich mixtures arise from both fluctuations and torsional motions occurring within the methanol hydrogen-bonded chains. The influence of these modes on both the solvation dynamics and the relaxation mechanisms in the liquid are discussed within the context of recent experimental and theoretical results that have emerged from studies focusing on the short time dynamics in the methanol hydrogen bond network.

  10. A Radiometric All-Sky Infrared Camera (RASICAM) for DES/CTIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Peter M.; Rogers, Howard; Schindler, Rafe H.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A novel radiometric all-sky infrared camera [RASICAM] has been constructed to allow automated real-time quantitative assessment of night sky conditions for the Dark Energy Camera [DECam] located on the Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The camera is optimized to detect the position, motion and optical depth of thin, high (8-10km) cirrus clouds and contrails by measuring their apparent temperature above the night sky background. The camera system utilizes a novel wide-field equiresolution catadioptic mirror system that provides sky coverage of 2{pi} azimuth and 14-90{sup o} from zenith. Several new technological and design innovations allow the RASICAM system to provide unprecedented cloud detection and IR-based photometricity quantification. The design of the RASICAM system is presented.

  11. Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy Study of Film Formation and Breakdown on Copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendres, C. A.; Hahn, F.

    2010-02-03

    This work demonstrates the utility of synchrotron infrared reflectance microspectroscopy (SIRM), in the far and mid IR, for the determination of the composition of electrogenerated surface films formed during the general and localized corrosion of copper in bicarbonate solution. The back-reflection geometry was used. The anodic passivation film formed on copper at 0.2 V, in 0.01 M NaHCO{sub 3} solution consisted mainly of bicarbonate, copper carbonate dihydroxide or malachite [CuCO{sub 3}.Cu(OH){sub 2}], Cu(OH){sub 2}, and possibly some CuO. At higher potentials, the passive film breaks down and localized corrosion occurs leading to the formation of pits. The composition of the surface films inside the pits formed at 0.6 V was found to be essentially the same as that outside but the relative amount of Cu(OH){sub 2} is higher.

  12. The development of in-situ calibration method for divertor IR thermography in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeuchi, M.; Sugie, T.; Ogawa, H.; Takeyama, S.; Itami, K.

    2014-08-21

    For the development of the calibration method of the emissivity in IR light on the divertor plate in ITER divertor IR thermography system, the laboratory experiments have been performed by using IR instruments. The calibration of the IR camera was performed by the plane black body in the temperature of 100–600 degC. The radiances of the tungsten heated by 280 degC were measured by the IR camera without filter (2.5–5.1 μm) and with filter (2.95 μm, 4.67 μm). The preliminary data of the scattered light of the laser of 3.34 μm that injected into the tungsten were acquired.

  13. X-RAYS FROM THE POWER SOURCES OF THE CEPHEUS A STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pravdo, Steven H.; Tsuboi, Yohko; Uzawa, Akiko; Ezoe, Yuichiro E-mail: tsuboi@phys.chuo-u.ac.j E-mail: ezoe@phys.metro-u.ac.j

    2009-10-20

    We report an observation of X-ray emission from the exciting region of Cepheus A with the Chandra/ACIS instrument. What had been an unresolved X-ray source comprising the putative power sources is now resolved into at least three point-like sources, each with similar X-ray properties and differing radio and submillimeter properties. The sources are HW9, HW3c, and a new source that is undetected at other wavelengths 'h10'. They each have inferred X-ray luminosities >= 10{sup 31} erg s{sup -1} with hard spectra, T >= 10{sup 7} K, and high low-energy absorption equivalent to tens to as much as a hundred magnitudes of visual absorption. The star usually assumed to be the most massive and energetic, HW2, is not detected with an upper limit about seven times lower than the detections. The X-rays may arise via thermal bremsstrahlung in diffuse emission regions associated with a gyrosynchrotron source for the radio emission, or they could arise from powerful stellar winds. We also analyzed the Spitzer/IRAC mid-IR observation from this star formation region and present the X-ray results and mid-IR classifications of the nearby stars. HH 168 is not as underluminous in X-rays as previously reported.

  14. Infrared curing simulations of liquid composites molding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakouzi, S.; Pancrace, J.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Berthet, F. [Universite de Toulouse (France); INSA, UPS, Mines Albi, ISAE, ICA - Institut Clement Ader, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi cedex 09 (France); Ecole des Mines Albi, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi (France)

    2011-05-04

    Infrared radiation is an effective energy source to cure thermosetting polymers. Its usage is expected to reduce curing time in comparison with thermal heating and mold thermally regulated. In addition, because of the polymerization mechanism and instant on-off control of this power, an improvement in the final properties of the material is also expected. In this paper, we studied the infrared interaction with carbon (or glass) fibers reinforced epoxy matrix, where Liquid resin infusion (LRI) is used to manufacture the composite. Temperature of the composite is a key parameter that affects its mechanical properties and is controlled by the infrared emitters and the exothermic heat released from the polymerization. Radiative heat flux is computed using the in-lab developed software RAYHEAT. Then, the heat flux (or absorbed energy for glass fibers) is exported to the finite element based program COMSOLMULTIPHYSICS where heat balance equation is solved. This equation is coupled with the exothermic heat released during the curing process in order to predict the composite temperature versus time and degree of cure. Numerical simulations will be performed on planar parts (sheet shape) as well as curvilinear shapes. Experimental validations of the infrared curing carbon (glass)-epoxy composite system are presented in this paper Sheet surface temperature distribution are measured thanks to infrared camera. Kinetic parameters were estimated from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experimental data.

  15. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Biefeld, Robert M.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    1999-01-01

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  16. Study of the hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.P.

    1982-08-01

    The reaction of uranium hexafluoride with water has been studied by using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Several different methods for accomplishing this task have been carried out. In addition, interpretatins of the results have been made. These interpretations have been based on literature values for the reactants and for compounds analogous to possible products. It was shown that classical matrix-isolation techniques proved to be unsatisfactory for studying this reaction. Other methods were developed in order to obtain results. They were: (1) the codeposition of pure UF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/O on a cold window at 16/sup 0/K, (2) the codeposition of argon matrix to sample ratios of 10:1 to 2:1 of UF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/O at 16/sup 0/K, and (3) the annealing of the samples produced by (1) and (2) while they were being scanned with FT-IR. 78 refs., 86 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. The anharmonic quartic force field infrared spectra of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackie, Cameron J. Candian, Alessandra; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Huang, Xinchuan; Maltseva, Elena; Buma, Wybren Jan; Petrignani, Annemieke; Oomens, Jos; Lee, Timothy J.

    2015-12-14

    Current efforts to characterize and study interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) rely heavily on theoretically predicted infrared (IR) spectra. Generally, such studies use the scaled harmonic frequencies for band positions and double harmonic approximation for intensities of species, and then compare these calculated spectra with experimental spectra obtained under matrix isolation conditions. High-resolution gas-phase experimental spectroscopic studies have recently revealed that the double harmonic approximation is not sufficient for reliable spectra prediction. In this paper, we present the anharmonic theoretical spectra of three PAHs: naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene, computed with a locally modified version of the SPECTRO program using Cartesian derivatives transformed from Gaussian 09 normal coordinate force constants. Proper treatments of Fermi resonances lead to an impressive improvement on the agreement between the observed and theoretical spectra, especially in the C–H stretching region. All major IR absorption features in the full-scale matrix-isolated spectra, the high-temperature gas-phase spectra, and the most recent high-resolution gas-phase spectra obtained under supersonically cooled molecular beam conditions in the CH-stretching region are assigned.

  18. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Wishart, James F.

    2015-04-27

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm⁻¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ~40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ~100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. As a result, this new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  19. HECTOSPEC AND HYDRA SPECTRA OF INFRARED LUMINOUS SOURCES IN THE AKARI NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE SURVEY FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, Hyunjin; Im, Myungshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Kim, Seong Jin; Lee, Hyung Mok; Ko, Jongwan; Karouzos, Marios; Papovich, Casey; Willmer, Christopher; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2013-08-15

    We present spectra of 1796 sources selected in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Wide Survey field, obtained with MMT/Hectospec and WIYN/Hydra, for which we measure 1645 redshifts. We complemented the generic flux-limited spectroscopic surveys at 11 {mu}m and 15 {mu}m, with additional sources selected based on the MIR and optical colors. In MMT/Hectospec observations, the redshift identification rates are {approx}80% for objects with R < 21.5 mag. On the other hand, in WIYN/Hydra observations, the redshift identification rates are {approx}80% at R magnitudes brighter than 19 mag. The observed spectra were classified through the visual inspection or from the line diagnostics. We identified 1128 star-forming or absorption-line-dominated galaxies, 198 Type-1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 8 Type-2 AGNs, 121 Galactic stars, and 190 spectra in unknown category due to low signal-to-noise ratio. The spectra were flux-calibrated but to an accuracy of 0.1-0.18 dex for most of the targets and worse for the remainder. We derive star formation rates (SFRs) from the mid-infrared fluxes or from the optical emission lines, showing that our sample spans an SFR range of 0.1 to a few hundred M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We find that the extinction inferred from the difference between the IR and optical SFR increases as the IR luminosity increases but with a large scatter.

  20. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grills, David C. Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Wishart, James F.; Bernstein, Herbert J.

    2015-04-15

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330 to 1051 cm{sup ?1}. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ?40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ?100 ?OD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. This new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  1. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Wishart, James F.

    2015-04-27

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm?. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ~40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ~100 OD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. As a result, this new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  2. Infrared Chemical Nano-Imaging: Accessing Structure, Coupling, and Dynamics on Molecular Length Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, Eric A.; Pollard, Benjamin; Raschke, Markus Bernd

    2015-04-02

    This Perspective highlights recent advances in infrared vibrational chemical nano-imaging. In its implementations of scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) and photothermal-induced resonance (PTIR), IR nanospectroscopy provides few-nanometer spatial resolution for the investigation of polymer, biomaterial, and related soft-matter surfaces and nanostructures. Broad-band IR s-SNOM with coherent laser and synchrotron sources allows for chemical recognition with small-ensemble sensitivity and the potential for sensitivity reaching the single-molecule limit. Probing selected vibrational marker resonances, it gives access to nanoscale chemical imaging of composition, domain morphologies, order/disorder, molecular orientation, or crystallographic phases. Local intra- and intermolecular coupling can be measured through frequency shifts of a vibrational marker in heterogeneous environments and associated inhomogeneities in vibrational dephasing. In combination with ultrafast spectroscopy, the vibrational coherent evolution of homogeneous sub-ensembles coupled to their environment can be observed. Outstanding challenges are discussed in terms of extensions to coherent and multidimensional spectroscopies, implementation in liquid and in situ environments, general sample limitations, and engineering s-SNOM scanning probes to better control the nano-localized optical excitation and to increase sensitivity.

  3. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Wishart, James F.

    2015-04-27

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of amore » unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm⁻¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ~40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ~100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. As a result, this new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.« less

  4. CITIUS: An infrared-extreme ultraviolet light source for fundamental and applied ultrafast science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grazioli, C.; Gauthier, D.; Ivanov, R.; De Ninno, G.; Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste ; Callegari, C.; Spezzani, C.; Ciavardini, A.; Coreno, M.; Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas , Montelibretti, Roma ; Frassetto, F.; Miotti, P.; Poletto, L.; Golob, D.; Kivimäki, A.; Mahieu, B.; Service des Photons Atomes et Molécules, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, Bâtiment 522, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette ; Bučar, B.; Merhar, M.; Polo, E.; Ressel, B.

    2014-02-15

    We present the main features of CITIUS, a new light source for ultrafast science, generating tunable, intense, femtosecond pulses in the spectral range from infrared to extreme ultraviolet (XUV). The XUV pulses (about 10{sup 5}-10{sup 8} photons/pulse in the range 14-80 eV) are produced by laser-induced high-order harmonic generation in gas. This radiation is monochromatized by a time-preserving monochromator, also allowing one to work with high-resolution bandwidth selection. The tunable IR-UV pulses (10{sup 12}-10{sup 15} photons/pulse in the range 0.4-5.6 eV) are generated by an optical parametric amplifier, which is driven by a fraction of the same laser pulse that generates high order harmonics. The IR-UV and XUV pulses follow different optical paths and are eventually recombined on the sample for pump-probe experiments. We also present the results of two pump-probe experiments: with the first one, we fully characterized the temporal duration of harmonic pulses in the time-preserving configuration; with the second one, we demonstrated the possibility of using CITIUS for selective investigation of the ultra-fast dynamics of different elements in a magnetic compound.

  5. IR and SFG vibrational spectroscopy of the water bend in the bulk liquid and at the liquid-vapor interface, respectively

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Yicun; Skinner, J. L.

    2015-07-07

    Vibrational spectroscopy of the water bending mode has been investigated experimentally to study the structure of water in condensed phases. In the present work, we calculate the theoretical infrared (IR) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectra of the HOH bend in liquid water and at the water liquid/vapor interface using a mixed quantum/classical approach. Classical molecular dynamics simulation is performed by using a recently developed water model that explicitly includes three-body interactions and yields a better description of the water surface. Ab-initio-based transition frequency, dipole, polarizability, and intermolecular coupling maps are developed for the spectral calculations. The calculated IR and SFG spectra show good agreement with the experimental measurements. In the theoretical imaginary part of the SFG susceptibility for the water liquid/vapor interface, we find two features: a negative band centered at 1615 cm{sup −1} and a positive band centered at 1670 cm{sup −1}. We analyze this spectrum in terms of the contributions from molecules in different hydrogen-bond classes to the SFG spectral density and also compare to SFG results for the OH stretch. SFG of the water bending mode provides a complementary picture of the heterogeneous hydrogen-bond configurations at the water surface.

  6. THE SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DEBRIS DISK CATALOG. II. SILICATE FEATURE ANALYSIS OF UNRESOLVED TARGETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittal, Tushar; Chen, Christine H.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Manoj, P.; Sargent, Benjamin A.; Watson, Dan M.; Lisse, Carey M.

    2015-01-10

    During the Spitzer Space Telescope cryogenic mission, astronomers obtained Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of hundreds of debris disk candidates that have been compiled in the Spitzer IRS Debris Disk Catalog. We have discovered 10 and/or 20 μm silicate emission features toward 120 targets in the catalog and modeled the IRS spectra of these sources, consistent with MIPS 70 μm observations, assuming that the grains are composed of silicates (olivine, pyroxene, forsterite, and enstatite) and are located either in a continuous disk with power-law size and surface density distributions or thin rings that are well-characterized using two separate dust grain temperatures. For systems better fit by the continuous disk model, we find that (1) the dust size distribution power-law index is consistent with that expected from a collisional cascade, q = 3.5-4.0, with a large number of values outside this range, and (2) the minimum grain size, a {sub min}, increases with stellar luminosity, L {sub *}, but the dependence of a {sub min} on L {sub *} is weaker than expected from radiation pressure alone. In addition, we also find that (3) the crystalline fraction of dust in debris disks evolves as a function of time with a large dispersion in crystalline fractions for stars of any particular stellar age or mass, (4) the disk inner edge is correlated with host star mass, and (5) there exists substantial variation in the properties of coeval disks in Sco-Cen, indicating that the observed variation is probably due to stochasticity and diversity in planet formation.

  7. Line Focus Receiver Infrared Temperature Survey System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-06-01

    For ongoing maintenance and performance purposes, solar parabolic trough field operators desire to know that the Heat Collection Elements (HCEs) are performing properly. Measuring their temperature is one way of doing this One 30MW field can contain approximately 10,000 HCE's. This software interfaces with a GPS receiver and an infrared camera. It takes global positioning data from the GPS and uses this information to automate the infrared image capture and temperature analysis of individual solarmore » parabolic HCEs in a solar parabolic trough field With this software system an entire 30MW field can be surveyed in 2-3 days.« less

  8. RECONSTRUCTING THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS FROM KNOWN GALAXY POPULATIONS USING MULTIBAND MEASUREMENTS OF LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helgason, Kari; Ricotti, Massimo; Kashlinsky, Alexander

    2012-06-20

    We model fluctuations in the cosmic infrared background (CIB) arising from known galaxy populations using 233 measured UV, optical, and near-IR luminosity functions (LFs) from a variety of surveys spanning a wide range of redshifts. We compare best-fit Schechter parameters across the literature and find clear indication of evolution with redshift. Providing fitting formulae for the multi-band evolution of the LFs out to z {approx} 5, we calculate the total emission redshifted into the near-IR bands in the observer frame and recover the observed optical and near-IR galaxy counts to good accuracy. Our empirical approach, in conjunction with a halo model describing the clustering of galaxies, allows us to compute the fluctuations of the unresolved CIB and compare the models to current measurements. We find that fluctuations from known galaxy populations are unable to account for the large-scale CIB clustering signal seen by Spitzer/IRAC and AKARI/IRC and continue to diverge out to larger angular scales. This holds true even if the LFs are extrapolated out to faint magnitudes with a steep faint-end slope all the way to z = 8. We also show that removing resolved sources to progressively fainter magnitude limits isolates CIB fluctuations to increasingly higher redshifts. Our empirical approach suggests that known galaxy populations are not responsible for the bulk of the fluctuation signal seen in the measurements and favors a very faint population of highly clustered sources.

  9. THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN TAURUS PROBED BY INFRARED POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Li Di; Clemens, D. P.; Krco, Marko

    2011-11-01

    We present maps of the plane-of-sky magnetic field within two regions of the Taurus molecular cloud: one in the dense core L1495/B213 filament and the other in a diffuse region to the west. The field is measured from the polarization of background starlight seen through the cloud. In total, we measured 287 high-quality near-infrared polarization vectors in these regions. In L1495/B213, the percent polarization increases with column density up to A{sub V} {approx} 9 mag, the limits of our data. The radiative torques model for grain alignment can explain this behavior, but models that invoke turbulence are inconsistent with the data. We also combine our data with published optical and near-infrared polarization measurements in Taurus. Using this large sample, we estimate the strength of the plane-of-sky component of the magnetic field in nine subregions. This estimation is done with two different techniques that use the observed dispersion in polarization angles. Our values range from 5 to 82 {mu}G and tend to be higher in denser regions. In all subregions, the critical index of the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio is sub-unity, implying that Taurus is magnetically supported on large scales ({approx}2 pc). Within the region observed, the B213 filament takes a sharp turn to the north and the direction of the magnetic field also takes a sharp turn, switching from being perpendicular to the filament to becoming parallel. This behavior can be understood if we are observing the rim of a bubble. We argue that it has resulted from a supernova remnant associated with a recently discovered nearby gamma-ray pulsar.

  10. Argonne X-rays validate quantum magnetism model | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory X-rays validate quantum magnetism model May 20, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany have validated a theorized model of quantum magnetism by observing it firsthand in a honeycomb lattice. The research is featured in an article titled "Direct evidence for dominant bond-directional interactions in a honeycomb lattice iridate Na2IrO3" published

  11. Extraction and analysis of pollutant organics from contaminated solids using off-line supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and on-line SFE-infrared spectroscopy. Task 2. Semiannual report, November 1995--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, S.B.

    1996-04-01

    This document describes activities in the following tasks associated with a project on environmental management technology decontamination and commercialization: A commercialized version of a field-portable instrument for performing supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with on-line Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) detection;pyrolysis of plastic wastes associated with mixtures of radioactive wastes;management and reporting activities; centrifugal membrane filtration with application to tank waste remediation; technology development integration activities associated with remedial action and waste management.

  12. NGC 7538 IRS 1 - Subarcsecond resolution recombination line and (N-15)H3 maser observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaume, R.A.; Johnston, K.J.; Nguyen, H.A.; Wilson, T.L.; Dickel, H.R. Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Radioastronomie, Bonn Illinois Univ., Urbana )

    1991-08-01

    The present imaging of the NGC 7538 IRS 1-associated (N-15)H3 (J, K) = (3, 3) maser emission with 0.2-arcsec resolution shows the strongest such masers, which may be amplifying the strong double-lobe radio continuum core of the IRS 1 H II region, to be concentrated in two regions separated by about 0.2 arcsec. Observations of several hydrogen recombination line transitions indicate that the velocity of the IRS H II region is similar to that of the ambient molecular cloud. 23 refs.

  13. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  14. Chest x-Rays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica.

  15. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  16. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  17. MID-IR SPECTRA OF TYPE Ia SN 2014J IN M82 SPANNING THE FIRST 4 MONTHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telesco, Charles M.; Li, Dan; Barnes, Peter J.; Mariñas, Naibí; Zhang, Han; Höflich, Peter; Álvarez, Carlos; Fernández, Sergio; Rebolo, Rafael; Hough, James H.; Levenson, N. A.; Pantin, Eric; Roche, Patrick E-mail: phoeflich77@gmail.com

    2015-01-10

    We present a time series of 8-13 μm spectra and photometry for SN 2014J obtained 57, 81, 108, and 137 days after the explosion using CanariCam on the Gran Telescopio Canarias. This is the first mid-IR time series ever obtained for a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). These observations can be understood within the framework of the delayed detonation model and the production of ∼0.6 M {sub ☉} of {sup 56}Ni, consistent with the observed brightness, the brightness decline relation, and the γ-ray fluxes. The [Co III] line at 11.888 μm is particularly useful for evaluating the time evolution of the photosphere and measuring the amount of {sup 56}Ni and thus the mass of the ejecta. Late-time line profiles of SN 2014J are rather symmetric and not shifted in the rest frame. We see argon emission, which provides a unique probe of mixing in the transition layer between incomplete burning and nuclear statistical equilibrium. We may see [Fe III] and [Ni IV] emission, both of which are observed to be substantially stronger than indicated by our models. If the latter identification is correct, then we are likely observing stable Ni, which might imply central mixing. In addition, electron capture, also required for stable Ni, requires densities larger than ∼1 × 10{sup 9} g cm{sup –3}, which are expected to be present only in white dwarfs close to the Chandrasekhar limit. This study demonstrates that mid-IR studies of SNe Ia are feasible from the ground and provide unique information, but it also indicates the need for better atomic data.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and mid-infrared continuum emission in a z > 4 submillimeter galaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riechers, Dominik A.; Pope, Alexandra; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Carilli, Christopher L.; Walter, Fabian; Hodge, Jacqueline; Morrison, Glenn E.; Dickinson, Mark; Dannerbauer, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    We report the detection of 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and rest-frame 4-7 μm continuum emission in the z = 4.055 submillimeter galaxy GN20, using the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. This represents the first detection of PAH emission at z > 4. The strength of the PAH emission feature is consistent with a very high star formation rate of ∼1600 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We find that this intense starburst powers at least ∼1/3 of the faint underlying 6 μm continuum emission, with an additional, significant (and perhaps dominant) contribution due to a power-law-like hot dust source, which we interpret to likely be a faint, dust-obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). The inferred 6 μm AGN continuum luminosity is consistent with a sensitive upper limit on the hard X-ray emission as measured by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory if the previously undetected AGN is Compton-thick. This is in agreement with the finding at optical/infrared wavelengths that the galaxy and its nucleus are heavily dust-obscured. Despite the strong power-law component enhancing the mid-infrared continuum emission, the intense starburst associated with the photon-dominated regions that give rise to the PAH emission appears to dominate the total energy output in the infrared. GN20 is one of the most luminous starburst galaxies known at any redshift, embedded in a rich protocluster of star-forming galaxies. This investigation provides an improved understanding of the energy sources that power such exceptional systems, which represent the extreme end of massive galaxy formation at early cosmic times.

  19. Activities of the CLIO infrared facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortega, J.M.; Berset, J.M.; Chaput, R.

    1995-12-31

    The CLIO infrared FEL is operated since 1992. It is based on a 3 GHz RF linac. The laser beam time was about 2400 h in 1994, 1600 for users and 800 for FEL physics and machine optimisation. The beam time is limited mainly by user ability to work during nights.

  20. X-ray generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  1. Transmissive infrared frequency selective surfaces and infrared antennas : final report for LDRD 105749.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Hadley, G. Ronald; Samora, Sally; Loui, Hung; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Davids, Paul; Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Johnson, William Arthur; Peters, David William

    2009-09-01

    Plasmonic structures open up new opportunities in photonic devices, sometimes offering an alternate method to perform a function and sometimes offering capabilities not possible with standard optics. In this LDRD we successfully demonstrated metal coatings on optical surfaces that do not adversely affect the transmission of those surfaces at the design frequency. This technology could be applied as an RF noise blocking layer across an optical aperture or as a method to apply an electric field to an active electro-optic device without affecting optical performance. We also demonstrated thin optical absorbers using similar patterned surfaces. These infrared optical antennas show promise as a method to improve performance in mercury cadmium telluride detectors. Furthermore, these structures could be coupled with other components to lead to direct rectification of infrared radiation. This possibility leads to a new method for infrared detection and energy harvesting of infrared radiation.

  2. THE INFRARED PROPERTIES OF SOURCES MATCHED IN THE WISE ALL-SKY AND HERSCHEL ATLAS SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Nicholas A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Amblard, Alexandre; Blain, Andrew W.; Dunne, Loretta; Maddox, Steve J.; Hoyos, Carlos; Bourne, Nathan; Smith, Daniel J. B.; Bonfield, David; Baes, Maarten; Bridge, Carrie; Buttiglione, Sara; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Cava, Antonio; Clements, David; Cooray, Asantha; Dariush, Ali; and others

    2012-05-01

    We describe the infrared properties of sources detected over {approx}36 deg{sup 2} of sky in the GAMA 15 hr equatorial field, using data from both the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large-Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and Wide-field Infrared Survey (WISE). With 5{sigma} point-source depths of 34 and 0.048 mJy at 250 {mu}m and 3.4 {mu}m, respectively, we are able to identify 50.6% of the H-ATLAS sources in the WISE survey, corresponding to a surface density of {approx}630 deg{sup -2}. Approximately two-thirds of these sources have measured spectroscopic or optical/near-IR photometric redshifts of z < 1. For sources with spectroscopic redshifts at z < 0.3, we find a linear correlation between the infrared luminosity at 3.4 {mu}m and that at 250 {mu}m, with {+-}50% scatter over {approx}1.5 orders of magnitude in luminosity, {approx}10{sup 9}-10{sup 10.5} L{sub Sun }. By contrast, the matched sources without previously measured redshifts (r {approx}> 20.5) have 250-350 {mu}m flux density ratios which suggest either high-redshift galaxies (z {approx}> 1.5) or optically faint low-redshift galaxies with unusually low temperatures (T {approx}< 20). Their small 3.4-250 {mu}m flux ratios favor a high-redshift galaxy population, as only the most actively star-forming galaxies at low redshift (e.g., Arp 220) exhibit comparable flux density ratios. Furthermore, we find a relatively large active galactic nucleus fraction ({approx}30%) in a 12 {mu}m flux-limited subsample of H-ATLAS sources, also consistent with there being a significant population of high-redshift sources in the no-redshift sample.

  3. Rapid infrared joining takes on the advanced materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blue, C.A.; Warrier, S.G.; Robson, M.T.; Lin, R.Y. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    Applying the rapid infrared joining technique, the authors have successfully joined steels, Inconel[sup [reg sign

  4. New insulating antiferromagnetic quaternary iridates MLa10Ir4O24...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The canonical example is the Ruddlesden-Popper compound Sr2IrO4, which has been suggested as a potential route to a new class of high temperature superconductor due to the formal ...

  5. Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in Sr2Ir1...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    evolution in Sr2Ir1-xRhxO4 This content will become publicly available on November 23, 2016 Prev Next Title: Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in ...

  6. Infrared detection of (H2O)20 isomers of exceptional stability: A drop-like and a face-sharing pentagonal prism cluster

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pradzynski, Christoph C.; Dierking, Christoph W.; Zurheide, Florian; Forck, Richard M.; Buck, Udo; Zeuch, Thomas; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2014-09-01

    Water clusters containing fully coordinated water molecules are model systems that mimic the local environment of the condensed phase. Present knowledge about the water cluster size regime in which the transition from the allsurface to the fully solvated water molecules occurs is mainly based on theoretical predictions in lieu of the absence of precisely size resolved experimental measurements. Here, we report size and isomer selective infrared (IR) spectra of (H2O)20 clusters tagged with a sodium atom by employing IR excitation modulated photoionization spectroscopy. The observed absorption patterns in the OH stretching ”fingerprint” region are consistent with the theoretically predicted spectramore » of two structurally distinct isomers: A drop-like cluster with a fully coordinated (interior) water and an edge-sharing pentagonal prism cluster in which all atoms are on the surface. The observed isomers show exceptional stability and are predicted to be nearly isoenergetic.« less

  7. Thermonuclear supernovae: probing magnetic fields by positrons and late-time IR line profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, R.; Hoeflich, P. E-mail: rpenney@g.clemson.edu

    2014-11-01

    We show the importance of γ and positron transport for the formation of late-time spectra in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The goal is to study the imprint of magnetic fields (B) on late-time IR line profiles, particularly the [Fe II] feature at 1.644 μm, which becomes prominent two to three months after the explosion. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass (M {sub Ch}) white dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model that can reproduce the light curves and spectra for a Branch-normal SN Ia. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 10{sup 9} G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We show that positron transport effects must be taken into account for the interpretation of emission features starting at about one to two years after maximum light, depending on the size of B. The [Fe II] line profile and its evolution with time can be understood in terms of the overall energy input by radioactive decay and the transition from a γ-ray to a positron-dominated regime. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 μm can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. At later times, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. After about day 300, the line profile allows one to probe the size of the B-field. The profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B at about day 500. In the presence of a large-scale dipole field, a broad line is produced in M {sub Ch} mass explosions that may appear flat-topped or rounded depending on the inclination at which the SN is observed. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. We note that narrow-line profiles require central {sup 56}Ni as shown in our previous studies. Persistent broad-line, flat-topped profiles require high-density burning, which is the signature of a WD close to M {sub Ch}. Good time coverage is required to

  8. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vener, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Wehmeyer, C.; Sebastiani, D.

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded ?-sheet structure. The 1 ?s NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short {sup +}NH?O{sup ?} bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm{sup ?1}. It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the {sup +}NH?O{sup ?} fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 20002800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is usually not considered in

  9. 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comparison to Reference Methods | Department of Energy Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_lake.pdf (837.29 KB) More Documents & Publications Reductant Utilization in a LNT + SCR System Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx

  10. Characterization of gaseous species in scanning atmospheric rf plasma with transmission infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Seong H.; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kang, Bang-Kwon

    2008-01-15

    A scanning atmospheric radio-frequency (rf) plasma was analyzed with transmission infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The IR analyses were made for the plasmas used for hydrophobic coating deposition and superhydrophobic coating deposition processes. Since the rf plasma was generated in a small open space with a high gas flow rate in ambient air, the density of gas-phase molecules was very high and the plasma-generated reactive species seemed to undergo various reactions in the gas phase. So, the transmission IR spectra of the scanning atmospheric rf plasma were dominated by gas-phase reaction products, rather than plasma-generated intermediate species. In the CH{sub 4}/He plasma used for hydrophobic coating deposition, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and a small amount of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} as well as CO were detected in transmission IR. The intensities of these peaks increased as the rf power increased. The CO formation is due to the activation of oxygen and water in the air. In the CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/He plasma used for deposition of superhydrophobic coatings, C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, CF{sub 3}H, COF{sub 2}, and HF were mainly detected. When the H{sub 2}/CF{sub 4} ratio was {approx}0.5, the consumption of CF{sub 4} was the highest. As the H{sub 2}/CF{sub 4} ratio increased higher, the C{sub 2}F{sub 6} production was suppressed while the CF{sub 3}H peak grew and the formation of CH{sub 4} were detected. In both CH{sub 4}/He and CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/He plasma systems, the undissociated feed gas molecules seem to be highly excited vibrationally and rotationally. The information on plasma-generated reactive species and their reactions was deduced from the distribution of these gas-phase reaction products.

  11. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  12. Ray2008.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ray , University of Florida 1 MINIBOONE ν µ ν e ν e ν µ H. Ray , University of Florida 2 The Notorious LSND Result * E ν =20-52.8 MeV * L =25-35 meters * 3.8σ excess * Different from other oscillation signals * Higher Δm 2 * Smaller mixing angle * Much smaller probability (very small signal) ~0.3% ν µ → ν e P osc =sin 2 2θ sin 2 1.27 Δm 2 L E H. Ray , University of Florida 3 Testing LSND * Want same L/E * Different detection method * Different sources of systematic errors * Test

  13. New insulating antiferromagnetic quaternary iridates MLa10Ir4O24 (M=Sr, Ba)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Qingbiao; Han, Fei; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Han, Tian -Heng; Li, Hao; Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, oxides of Ir4+ have received renewed attention in the condensed matter physics community, as it has been reported that certain iridates have a strongly spin-orbital coupled (SOC) electronic state, Jeff = ½, that defines the electronic and magnetic properties. The canonical example is the Ruddlesden-Popper compound Sr2IrO4, which has been suggested as a potential route to a new class of high temperature superconductor due to the formal analogy between Jeff = ½ and the S = ½ state of the cuprate superconductors. The quest for other iridium oxides that present tests of the underlying SOC physics is underway. Inmore » this spirit, here we report the synthesis and physical properties of two new quaternary tetravalent iridates, MLa10Ir4O24 (M = Sr, Ba). The crystal structure of both compounds features isolated IrO6 octahedra in which the electronic configuration of Ir is d5. As a result, both compounds order antiferromagnetically despite the lack of obvious superexchange pathways, and resistivity measurement shows that SrLa10Ir4O24 is an insulator.« less

  14. THE MID-INFRARED LIGHT CURVE OF NEARBY CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SN 2011dh (PTF 11eon)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helou, George; Surace, Jason; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2013-11-20

    We present Spitzer observations at 3.6 and 4.5 μm of the supernova SN 2011dh (PTF 11eon) in M51 from 18 days to 625 days after explosion. The mid-infrared emission peaks at 24 days after explosion at a few ×10{sup 7} L {sub ☉}, and decays more slowly than the visible-light bolometric luminosity. The infrared color temperature cools for the first 90 days and then is constant. Simple numerical models of a thermal echo can qualitatively reproduce the early behavior. At late times, the mid-IR light curve cannot be explained by a simple thermal echo model, suggesting additional dust heating or line emission mechanisms. We also propose that thermal echoes can serve as effective probes to uncover supernovae in heavily obscured environments, and speculate that under the right conditions, integrating the early epoch of the mid-infrared light curve may constrain the total energy in the shock breakout flash.

  15. Application of External-Cavity Quantum Cascade Infrared Lasers to Nanosecond Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Condensed-Phase Samples Following Pulse Radiolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grills, D.C.; Cook, A.R.; Fujita, E.; George, M.W.; Miller, J.R.; Preses, J.M.; Wishart, J.F.

    2010-06-01

    Pulse radiolysis, utilizing short pulses of high-energy electrons from accelerators, is a powerful method for rapidly generating reduced or oxidized species and other free radicals in solution. Combined with fast time-resolved spectroscopic detection (typically in the ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared), it is invaluable for monitoring the reactivity of species subjected to radiolysis on timescales ranging from picoseconds to seconds. However, it is often difficult to identify the transient intermediates definitively due to a lack of structural information in the spectral bands. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy offers the structural specificity necessary for mechanistic investigations but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis experiments. For example, time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy has only been applied to a handful of gas-phase studies, limited mainly by several technical challenges. We have exploited recent developments in commercial external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) technology to construct a nanosecond TRIR apparatus that has allowed, for the first time, TRIR spectra to be recorded following pulse radiolysis of condensed-phase samples. Near single-shot sensitivity of DeltaOD <1 x 10(-3) has been achieved, with a response time of <20 ns. Using two continuous-wave EC-QCLs, the current apparatus covers a probe region from 1890-2084 cm(-1), and TRIR spectra are acquired on a point-by-point basis by recording transient absorption decay traces at specific IR wavelengths and combining these to generate spectral time slices. The utility of the apparatus has been demonstrated by monitoring the formation and decay of the one-electron reduced form of the CO(2) reduction catalyst, [Re(I)(bpy)(CO)(3)(CH(3)CN)](+), in acetonitrile with nanosecond time resolution following pulse radiolysis. Characteristic red-shifting of the nu(CO) IR bands confirmed that one-electron reduction of the complex took place. The availability of

  16. Planar Hall effect in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}/IrMn films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X. Zou, L. K.

    2014-12-29

    The planar Hall effect of IrMn on an yttrium iron garnet (YIG = Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}) was measured in the magnetic field rotating in the film plane. The magnetic field angular dependence of planar Hall resistance (PHR) was observed in YIG/IrMn bilayer at different temperatures, while the Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12}/IrMn film shows constant PHR for different magnetic field angles at both 10 K and 300 K. This provides evidence that IrMn has interfacial spins which can be led by ferrimagnetic layer in YIG/IrMn structure. A hysteresis can be observed in PHR-magnetic field angle loop of YIG/IrMn film at 10 K, indicative of the irreversible switching of IrMn interfacial spins at low temperature.

  17. X-Ray Detection

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ratio, I I on I off , recorded with plus (+, blue) and minus (-, red) x-ray helicities. This measurement was taken at -5 mA, which corresponds to a current...

  18. Infrared Radiation Filament And Metnod Of Manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward A.

    1998-11-17

    An improved IR radiation source is provided by the invention. A radiation filament has a textured surface produced by seeded ion bombardment of a metal foil which is cut to a serpentine shape and mounted in a windowed housing. Specific ion bombardment texturing techniques tune the surface to maximize emissions in the desired wavelength range and to limit emissions outside that narrow range, particularly at longer wavelengths. A combination of filament surface texture, thickness, material, shape and power circuit feedback control produce wavelength controlled and efficient radiation at much lower power requirements than devices of the prior art.

  19. X-ray Imaging Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microscopy (PEEM), angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), coherent diffraction imaging, x-ray microscopy, micro-tomography, holographic imaging, and x-ray...

  20. X-ray fluorescence mapping

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Microscopy and Imaging: X-ray Fluorescence Mapping Of increasing scientific interest is the detection, quantification and mapping of elemental content of samples, often down...

  1. THE INFRARED COLORS OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casagrande, L.; Asplund, M.; Ramirez, I.; Melendez, J.

    2012-12-10

    Solar infrared colors provide powerful constraints on the stellar effective temperature scale, but they must be measured with both accuracy and precision in order to do so. We fulfill this requirement by using line-depth ratios to derive in a model-independent way the infrared colors of the Sun, and we use the latter to test the zero point of the Casagrande et al. effective temperature scale, confirming its accuracy. Solar colors in the widely used Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) JHK{sub s} and WISE W1-4 systems are provided: (V - J){sub Sun} = 1.198, (V - H){sub Sun} = 1.484, (V - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 1.560, (J - H){sub Sun} = 0.286, (J - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 0.362, (H - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 0.076, (V - W1){sub Sun} = 1.608, (V - W2){sub Sun} = 1.563, (V - W3){sub Sun} = 1.552, and (V - W4){sub Sun} = 1.604. A cross-check of the effective temperatures derived implementing 2MASS or WISE magnitudes in the infrared flux method confirms that the absolute calibration of the two systems agrees within the errors, possibly suggesting a 1% offset between the two, thus validating extant near- and mid-infrared absolute calibrations. While 2MASS magnitudes are usually well suited to derive T{sub eff}, we find that a number of bright, solar-like stars exhibit anomalous WISE colors. In most cases, this effect is spurious and can be attributed to lower-quality measurements, although for a couple of objects (3% {+-} 2% of the total sample) it might be real, and may hint at the presence of warm/hot debris disks.

  2. Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is growing need for the development of electronic devices based on organic polymer materials. Organic field-effect transistors (FETs) are ideal for special applications that require large areas, light weight, and structural flexibility. They also have the advantage of being easy to mass-produce at very low cost. However,

  3. Infrared Sky Imager (IRSI) Instrument Handbook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Infrared Sky Imager Instrument Handbook VR Morris April 2016 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

  4. Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is growing need for the development of electronic devices based on organic polymer materials. Organic field-effect transistors (FETs) are ideal for special applications that require large areas, light weight, and structural flexibility. They also have the advantage of being easy to mass-produce at very low cost. However,

  5. Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is growing need for the development of electronic devices based on organic polymer materials. Organic field-effect transistors (FETs) are ideal for special applications that require large areas, light weight, and structural flexibility. They also have the advantage of being easy to mass-produce at very low cost. However,

  6. Gamma ray camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  7. Gamma ray camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1997-01-21

    A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

  8. GRB 081029: A GAMMA-RAY BURST WITH A MULTI-COMPONENT AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Stephen T.; Sakamoto, Takanori; De Pasquale, Massimiliano; Schady, Patricia; Mao, Jirong; Covino, Stefano; Jin, Zhi-Ping; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Chincarini, Guido; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Antonelli, Angelo; D'Elia, Valerio; Fiore, Fabrizio; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan; Cobb, Bethany E.

    2012-01-20

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 081029, a long-soft burst with a redshift of z = 3.8479. We combine X-ray and optical observations from the Swift X-Ray Telescope and the Swift UltraViolet/Optical Telescope with ground-based optical and infrared data obtained using the REM, ROTSE, and CTIO 1.3 m telescopes to construct a detailed data set extending from 86 s to {approx}100000 s after the BAT trigger. Our data cover a wide energy range from 10 keV to 0.77 eV (1.24 A-16000 A). The X-ray afterglow shows a shallow initial decay followed by a rapid decay starting at about 18000 s. The optical and infrared afterglow, however, shows an uncharacteristic rise at about 3000 s that does not correspond to any feature in the X-ray light curve. Our data are not consistent with synchrotron radiation from a jet interacting with an external medium, a two-component jet, or continuous energy injection from the central engine. We find that the optical light curves can be broadly explained by a collision between two ejecta shells within a two-component jet. A growing number of gamma-ray-burst afterglows are consistent with complex jets, which suggests that some (or all) gamma-ray-burst jets are complex and will require detailed modeling to fully understand them.

  9. A JOINT MODEL OF THE X-RAY AND INFRARED EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUNDS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BLACK HOLES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DENSITY; DISTRIBUTION; ENERGY ...

  10. Invited Article: An integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kühne, P. Schubert, M. Hofmann, T.; Herzinger, C. M. Woollam, J. A.

    2014-07-15

    We report on the development of the first integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument, covering an ultra wide spectral range from 3 cm{sup −1} to 7000 cm{sup −1} (0.1–210 THz or 0.4–870 meV). The instrument comprises four sub-systems, where the magneto-cryostat-transfer sub-system enables the usage of the magneto-cryostat sub-system with the mid-infrared ellipsometer sub-system, and the far-infrared/terahertz ellipsometer sub-system. Both ellipsometer sub-systems can be used as variable angle-of-incidence spectroscopic ellipsometers in reflection or transmission mode, and are equipped with multiple light sources and detectors. The ellipsometer sub-systems are operated in polarizer-sample-rotating-analyzer configuration granting access to the upper left 3 × 3 block of the normalized 4 × 4 Mueller matrix. The closed cycle magneto-cryostat sub-system provides sample temperatures between room temperature and 1.4 K and magnetic fields up to 8 T, enabling the detection of transverse and longitudinal magnetic field-induced birefringence. We discuss theoretical background and practical realization of the integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument, as well as acquisition of optical Hall effect data and the corresponding model analysis procedures. Exemplarily, epitaxial graphene grown on 6H-SiC, a tellurium doped bulk GaAs sample and an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structure are investigated. The selected experimental datasets display the full spectral, magnetic field and temperature range of the instrument and demonstrate data analysis strategies. Effects from free charge carriers in two dimensional confinement and in a volume material, as well as quantum mechanical effects (inter-Landau-level transitions) are observed and discussed exemplarily.

  11. Copper intercalation at the interface of graphene and Ir(111) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sicot, M. Fagot-Revurat, Y.; Kierren, B.; Vasseur, G.; Malterre, D.

    2014-11-10

    We report on the intercalation of a submonolayer of copper at 775?K underneath graphene epitaxially grown on Ir(111) studied by means of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 77?K. Nucleation and growth dynamics of Cu below graphene have been investigated, and, most importantly, the intercalation mechanism has been identified. First, LEED patterns reveal the pseudomorphic growth of Cu on Ir under the topmost graphene layer resulting in a large Cu in-plane lattice parameter expansion of about 6% compared to Cu(111). Second, large-scale STM topographs as a function of Cu coverage show that Cu diffusion on Ir below graphene exhibits a low energy barrier resulting in Cu accumulation at Ir step edges. As a result, the graphene sheet undergoes a strong edges reshaping. Finally, atomically-resolved STM images reveal a damaged graphene sheet at the atomic scale after metal intercalation. Point defects in graphene were shown to be carbon vacancies. According to these results, a Cu penetration path beneath graphene is proposed to occur via metal aided defect formation with no or poor self healing of the graphene sheet. This work illustrates the fact that Cu intercalation is harmful for graphene grown on Ir(111) at the atomic scale.

  12. X-ray beam finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  13. X-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landis, Eric N.; Keane, Denis T.

    2010-12-15

    In this tutorial, we describe X-ray microtomography as a technique to nondestructively characterize material microstructure in three dimensions at a micron level spatial resolution. While commercially available laboratory scale instrumentation is available, we focus our attention on synchrotron-based systems, where we can exploit a high flux, monochromatic X-ray beam to produce high fidelity three-dimensional images. A brief description of the physics and the mathematical analysis behind the technique is followed by example applications to specific materials characterization problems, with a particular focus on the utilization of three-dimensional image processing that can be used to extract a wide range of useful information.

  14. Vortexlike excitations in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeIrIn5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Yongkang; Rosa, P. F. S.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.

    2016-05-05

    Here, we report a systematic study of temperature- and field-dependent charge (ρ) and entropy (S) transport in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeIrIn5. Its large positive thermopower Sxx is typical of Ce-based Kondo lattice systems, and strong electronic correlations play an important role in enhancing the Nernst signal Sxy. By separating the off-diagonal Peltier coefficient αxy from Sxy, we find that αxy becomes positive and greatly enhanced at temperatures well above the bulk Tc. Compared with the nonmagnetic analog LaIrIn5, these results suggest vortexlike excitations in a precursor state to unconventional superconductivity in CeIrIn5. This study sheds light on the similarity ofmore » heavy-fermion and cuprate superconductors and on the possibility of states not characterized by the amplitude of an order parameter.« less

  15. Infrared spectroscopy study of irradiated PVDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chappa, Veronica; Grosso, Mariela del; Garcia Bermudez, Gerardo; Behar, Moni

    2007-10-26

    The effects induced by 1 MeV/amu ion irradiations were compared to those induced by 4-12 MeV/amu irradiations. Structural analysis with infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was carried out on PVDF irradiated using C and He beams with different fluences. From these spectra it was observed, as a function of fluence, an overall destruction of the polymer, amorphization of the crystalline regions and the creation of in-chain unsaturations. The track dimensions were determined using a previously developed Monte Carlo simulation code and these results were compared to a semiempirical model.

  16. Resonator-quantum well infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, K. K. Sun, J.; Olver, K.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Waczynski, A.

    2013-11-11

    We applied a recent electromagnetic model to design the resonator-quantum well infrared photodetector (R-QWIP). In this design, we used an array of rings as diffractive elements to diffract normal incident light into parallel propagation and used the pixel volume as a resonator to intensify the diffracted light. With a proper pixel size, the detector resonates at certain optical wavelengths and thus yields a high quantum efficiency (QE). To test this detector concept, we fabricated a number of R-QWIPs with different quantum well materials and detector geometries. The experimental result agrees satisfactorily with the prediction, and the highest QE achieved is 71%.

  17. Defining the infrared systems for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichle, R.; Andrew, P.; Drevon, J.-M.; Encheva, A.; Janeschitz, G.; Levesy, B.; Martin, A.; Pitcher, C. S.; Pitts, R.; Thomas, D.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.; Counsell, G.; Johnson, D.; Kusama, Y.

    2010-10-15

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will have wide angle viewing systems and a divertor thermography diagnostic, which shall provide infrared coverage of the divertor and large parts of the first wall surfaces with spatial and temporal resolution adequate for operational purposes and higher resolved details of the divertor and other areas for physics investigations. We propose specifications for each system such that they jointly respond to the requirements. Risk analysis driven priorities for future work concern mirror degradation, interfaces with other diagnostics, radiation damage to refractive optics, reflections, and the development of calibration and measurement methods for varying optical and thermal target properties.

  18. Infrared Images of Shock-Heated Tin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig W. McCluskey; Mark D. Wilke; William D. Turley; Gerald D. Stevens; Lynn R. Veeser; Michael Grover

    2004-09-01

    High-resolution, gated infrared images were taken of tin samples shock heated to just below the 505 K melting point. Sample surfaces were either polished or diamond-turned, with grain sizes ranging from about 0.05 to 10 mm. A high explosive in contact with a 2-mm-thick tin sample induced a peak sample stress of 18 GPa. Interferometer data from similarly-driven tin shots indicate that immediately after shock breakout the samples spall near the free (imaged) surface with a scab thickness of about 0.1 mm.

  19. Transition undulator radiation as bright infrared sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.J.

    1995-02-01

    Undulator radiation contains, in addition to the usual component with narrow spectral features, a broad-band component in the low frequency region emitted in the near forward direction, peaked at an angle 1/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the relativistic factor. This component is referred to as the transition undulator radiation, as it is caused by the sudden change in the electron`s longitudinal velocity as it enters and leaves the undulator. The characteristic of the transition undulator radiation are analyzed and compared with the infrared radiation from the usual undulator harmonics and from bending magnets.

  20. Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in Sr2Ir1–xRhxO4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ye, Feng; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina; Wang, Jinchen; Chi, Songxue; Matsuda, Masaaki; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A.; Cao, Gang

    2015-11-23

    We use single-crystal neutron diffraction to determine the crystal structure symmetry and to study the magnetic evolution in the rhodium doped iridates Sr2Ir1–xRhxO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.16). Throughout this doping range, the crystal structure retains a tetragonal symmetry (space group I41/a) with two distinct magnetic Ir sites in the unit cell forming staggered IrO6 rotation. Upon Rh doping, the magnetic order is suppressed and the magnetic moment of Ir4+ is reduced from 0.21 μB/Ir for x = 0 to 0.18 μB/Ir for x = 0.12. As a result, the magnetic structure at x = 0.12 is different from thatmore » of the parent compound while the moments remain in the basal plane.« less

  1. THE MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION LAW IN THE OPHIUCHUS, PERSEUS, AND SERPENS MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Mundy, Lee G.; Lai, Shih-Ping; Evans, Neal J. II

    2009-01-01

    We compute the mid-IR extinction law from 3.6 to 24 {mu}m in three molecular clouds-Ophiuchus, Perseus, and Serpens-by combining data from the 'Cores to Disks' Spitzer Legacy Science program with deep JHK{sub s} imaging. Using a new technique, we are able to calculate the line-of-sight (LOS) extinction law toward each background star in our fields. With these LOS measurements, we create, for the first time, maps of the {chi}{sup 2} deviation of the data from two extinction law models. Because our {chi}{sup 2} maps have the same spatial resolution as our extinction maps, we can directly observe the changing extinction law as a function of the total column density. In the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands, 3.6-8 {mu}m, we see evidence for grain growth. Below A{sub K{sub s}}= 0.5, our extinction law is well fitted by the Weingartner and Draine R{sub V} = 3.1 diffuse interstellar-medium dust model. As the extinction increases, our law gradually flattens, and for A{sub K{sub s}}{>=}1, the data are more consistent with the Weingartner and Draine R{sub V} = 5.5 model that uses larger maximum dust grain sizes. At 24 {mu}m, our extinction law is 2-4 times higher than the values predicted by theoretical dust models, but is more consistent with the observational results of Flaherty et al. Finally, from our {chi}{sup 2} maps we identify a region in Perseus where the IRAC extinction law is anomalously high considering its column density. A steeper near-IR extinction law than the one we have assumed may partially explain the IRAC extinction law in this region.

  2. Measuring galaxy clustering and the evolution of [C II] mean intensity with far-IR line intensity mapping during 0.5 < z < 1.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uzgil, B. D.; Aguirre, J. E.; Lidz, A.; Bradford, C. M.

    2014-10-01

    Infrared fine-structure emission lines from trace metals are powerful diagnostics of the interstellar medium in galaxies. We explore the possibility of studying the redshifted far-IR fine-structure line emission using the three-dimensional (3D) power spectra obtained with an imaging spectrometer. The intensity mapping approach measures the spatio-spectral fluctuations due to line emission from all galaxies, including those below the individual detection threshold. The technique provides 3D measurements of galaxy clustering and moments of the galaxy luminosity function. Furthermore, the linear portion of the power spectrum can be used to measure the total line emission intensity including all sources through cosmic time with redshift information naturally encoded. Total line emission, when compared to the total star formation activity and/or other line intensities, reveals evolution of the interstellar conditions of galaxies in aggregate. As a case study, we consider measurement of [C II] autocorrelation in the 0.5 < z < 1.5 epoch, where interloper lines are minimized, using far-IR/submillimeter balloon-borne and future space-borne instruments with moderate and high sensitivity, respectively. In this context, we compare the intensity mapping approach to blind galaxy surveys based on individual detections. We find that intensity mapping is nearly always the best way to obtain the total line emission because blind, wide-field galaxy surveys lack sufficient depth and deep pencil beams do not observe enough galaxies in the requisite luminosity and redshift bins. Also, intensity mapping is often the most efficient way to measure the power spectrum shape, depending on the details of the luminosity function and the telescope aperture.

  3. Mechanism of Efficient Anti-Markovnikov Olefin Hydroarylation Catalyzed by Homogeneous Ir(III) Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhalla, Gaurav; Bischof, Steven M; Ganesh, Somesh K; Liu, Xiang Y; Jones, C J; Borzenko, Andrey; Tenn, William J; Ess, Daniel H; Hashiguchi, Brian G; Lokare, Kapil S; Leung, Chin Hin; Oxgaard, Jonas; Goddard, William A; Periana, Roy A

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of the hydroarylation reaction between unactivated olefins (ethylene, propylene, and styrene) and benzene catalyzed by [(R)Ir(?-acac-O,O,C{sup 3})-(acac-O,O){sub 2}]{sub 2} and [R-Ir(acac-O,O){sub 2}(L)] (R = acetylacetonato, CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, Ph, or CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph, and L = H{sub 2}O or pyridine) Ir(III) complexes was studied by experimental methods. The system is selective for generating the anti-Markovnikov product of linear alkylarenes (61:39 for benzene + propylene and 98:2 for benzene + styrene). The reaction mechanism was found to follow a rate law with first-order dependence on benzene and catalyst, but a non-linear dependence on olefin. {sup 13}C-labelling studies with CH{sub 3}{sup 13}CH{sub 2}-Ir-Py showed that reversible ?-hydride elimination is facile, but unproductive, giving exclusively saturated alkylarene products. The migration of the {sup 13}C-label from the ? to ?-positions was found to be slower than the CH activation of benzene (and thus formation of ethane and Ph-d{sub 5}-Ir-Py). Kinetic analysis under steady state conditions gave a ratio of the rate constants for CH activation and ?-hydride elimination (k{sub CH}: k{sub ?}) of ~0.5. The comparable magnitude of these rates suggests a common rate determining transition state/intermediate, which has been shown previously with B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Overall, the mechanism of hydroarylation proceeds through a series of pre-equilibrium dissociative steps involving rupture of the dinuclear species or the loss of L from Ph-Ir-L to the solvento, 16-electron species, Ph-Ir(acac-O,O){sub 2}-Sol (where Sol refers to coordinated solvent). This species then undergoes trans to cisisomerization of the acetylacetonato ligand to yield the pseudo octahedral species cis-Ph-Ir-Sol, which is followed by olefin insertion (the regioselective and rate determining step), and then activation of the CH bond of an incoming benzene to generate the product and

  4. Handling collision debris in quad- and dipole-first LHC IR options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Rakhno, I.L.; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    Detailed MARS15 Monte Carlo energy deposition calculations are performed for two main designs of the LHC interaction regions (IR) capable to achieve a luminosity of 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}: a traditional quadrupole-first scheme and the one with a dual-bore inner triplet with separation dipoles placed in front of the quadrupoles. It is shown that with the appropriate design of the Nb3Sn magnets, IR layout and a number of protective measures implemented, both schemes are feasible for the LHC luminosity upgrade up to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}.

  5. Filamentation of IR and UV femtosecond pulses upon focusing in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dergachev, A A; Ionin, Andrei A; Kandidov, V P; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Shlenov, Svyatoslav A

    2013-01-31

    The filamentation of IR and UV laser pulses has been studied numerically and experimentally for different initial beam focusing geometries, and linear electron density profiles along the plasma channel of filaments have been obtained. The results demonstrate that changes in laser beam focusing have a stronger effect on filament and plasma channel parameters for UV radiation than for IR radiation. Focusing causes individual high fluence regions produced by refocusing to merge to form a continuous extended filament with a continuous plasma channel. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  6. First Principles Simulations of the Infrared Spectrum of Liquid Water |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Infrared spectra of liquid water Infrared spectra of liquid water computed using hybrid (solid lines) and semi-local (dotted line) functionals, computed by ab-initio molecular dynamics with the Qbox code. Cui Zhang, UC-Davis. First Principles Simulations of the Infrared Spectrum of Liquid Water PI Name: Giulia Galli PI Email: gagalli@ucdavis.edu Institution: University of California-Davis Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 15 Million

  7. Doped carbon nanostructure field emitter arrays for infrared imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korsah, Kofi [Knoxville, TN; Baylor, Larry R [Farragut, TN; Caughman, John B [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A [Knoxville, TN; Rack, Philip D [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N [Knoxville, TN

    2009-10-27

    An infrared imaging device and method for making infrared detector(s) having at least one anode, at least one cathode with a substrate electrically connected to a plurality of doped carbon nanostructures; and bias circuitry for applying an electric field between the anode and the cathode such that when infrared photons are adsorbed by the nanostructures the emitted field current is modulated. The detectors can be doped with cesium to lower the work function.

  8. Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado pvmrw13_ps3_pvmc_mcwilliams.pdf (1.52 MB) More Documents & Publications US & Japan TG 4 Activities of QA Forum Agenda for the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado Energy Auditor - Single Family 2.0: Interpreting Infrared

  9. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers. p-07_frazee.pdf (499.08 KB) More Documents & Publications 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods Vehicle

  10. IDCS J1426.5+3508: DISCOVERY OF A MASSIVE, INFRARED-SELECTED GALAXY CLUSTER AT z = 1.75

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanford, S. A.; Zeimann, Greg; Brodwin, M.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, C.; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Dey, Arjun; Snyder, Gregory F.

    2012-07-10

    We report the discovery of an IR-selected massive galaxy cluster in the IRAC Deep Cluster Survey (IDCS). We present new data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the W. M. Keck Observatory that spectroscopically confirm IDCS J1426.5+3508 at z = 1.75. Moreover, the cluster is detected in archival Chandra data as an extended X-ray source, comprising 53 counts after the removal of point sources. We calculate an X-ray luminosity of L{sub 0.5-2keV} = (5.4 {+-} 1.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} within r = 60 arcsec ({approx}1 Mpc diameter), which implies M{sub 200,L{sub x}}= (5.3{+-}1.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }. IDCS J1426.5+3508 appears to be an exceptionally massive cluster for its redshift.

  11. Nanosecond Time Resolved and Steady State Infrared Studies of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanosecond Time Resolved and Steady State Infrared Studies of Photoinduced Decomposition of TATB at Ambient and Elevated Pressures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  12. Synchrotron radiation infrared microscopic study of non-bridging...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Synchrotron radiation infrared microscopic study of non-bridging oxygen modes associated with laser-induced breakdown of fused silica Authors: Matthews, M J ; Carr, C W ; ...

  13. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Fourier-Transform Infrared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fourier-Transform Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy Image of FTIR map FTIR mapping capabilities are extremely useful for the quick, nondestructive characterization of heterogeneous ...

  14. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    because it is extremely difficult to perform spectroscopic measurements on a single monolayer of graphene. Infrared measurements can probe the dynamical properties of...

  15. Application Of Airborne Thermal Infrared Imagery To Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Infrared Imagery To Geothermal Exploration Abstract Burlington Northern (BN) conducted TIR surveys using a fixed wing aircraft over 17 different geothermal prospects in...

  16. Near-infrared (JHK) spectroscopy of young stellar and substellar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    7 new objects having masses below the hydrogen-burning limit, and 6 objects with masses ... SPECTRA; HERTZSPRUNG-RUSSELL DIAGRAM; HYDROGEN BURNING; LUMINOSITY; MASS; NEAR INFRARED ...

  17. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    signatures of many-body interactions in graphene and have demonstrated the potential of graphene for novel applications in optoelectronics. Infrared View of Graphene Graphene's...

  18. Electrochemical and infrared studies of the reduction of organic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Electrochemical and infrared studies of the reduction of organic carbonates Citation Details ... Publication Date: 2001-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 821009 Report ...

  19. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown...

  20. A near-infrared 64-pixel superconducting nanowire single photon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; DETECTION; EFFICIENCY; NANOWIRES; NEAR INFRARED RADIATION; ...

  1. * The far-infrared (? > 15 m) is an important

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of water vapor, the maximum mid-to-upper tropospheric cooling also occurs in the far-IR (left panel). * ARM science team research has resulted in enormous improvements in the...

  2. A wide-field near- and mid-infrared Census of young stars in NGC 6334

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willis, S.; Marengo, M.; Allen, L.; Fazio, G. G.; Smith, H. A.; Carey, S.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a study of the rate and efficiency of star formation in the NGC 6334 star-forming region. We obtained observations at J, H, and K{sub s} taken with the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager and combined them with observations taken with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope at wavelengths = 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm. We also analyzed previous observations taken at 24 μm using the Spitzer MIPS camera as part of the MIPSGAL survey. We have produced a point source catalog with >700, 000 entries. We have identified 2283 young stellar object (YSO) candidates, 375 Class I YSOs, and 1908 Class II YSOs using a combination of existing IRAC-based color classification schemes that we have extended and validated to the near-IR for use with warm Spitzer data. We have identified multiple new sites of ongoing star formation activity along filamentary structures extending tens of parsecs beyond the central molecular ridge of NGC 6334. By mapping the extinction, we derived an estimate for the gas mass, 2.2 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}. The heavy concentration of protostars along the dense filamentary structures indicates that NGC 6334 may be undergoing a 'mini-starburst' event with Σ{sub SFR} > 8.2 M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} pc{sup –2} and SFE > 0.10. We have used these estimates to place NGC 6334 in the Kennicutt-Schmidt diagram to help bridge the gap between observations of local low-mass star-forming regions and star formation in other galaxies.

  3. Overview and status of first 25 MW(e) IR-CFB boiler in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavidass, S.; Bakshi, V.K.; Diwakar, K.K.

    1997-12-31

    The Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) internal recirculation CFB (IR-CFB) boiler is unique in design. Worldwide, B and W offers IR-CFB boilers up to 150 MW(e) both reheat and non-reheat, and is pursuing units up to 300 MW(e). This paper discusses an overview and status of the construction, commissioning, initial start-up operation and milestones of the ongoing 25 MW(e) IR-CFB boiler project at Kanoria Chemicals and Industries Ltd., Renukoot, India. This IR-CFB boiler is designed, supplied and installed by Thermax Babcock and Wilcox Ltd. (TBW), a joint venture company of the B and W and Thermax in India. The boiler parameters are, steam flow of 29.2 kg/s (23,420 lbs/hr), 6.4 MPa (925 psig), and 485 C (905 F) with feedwater temperature of 180 C (356 F). The boiler will utilize high-ash content (> 45%), subbituminous coal with a heating value of 3,500 KCal/kg (6,300 Btu/lb). This paper also discusses the various aspects of the boiler design, performance, auxiliary equipment, advantages and initial start-up operating performance.

  4. Update of operating experience of B and W IR-CFB coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belin, F.; Kavidass, S.; Maryamchik, M.; Walker, D.J.; Mandal, A.K.; Price, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    This paper updates the operating experience of two Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) coal-fired, internal recirculation circulating fluidized-bed (IR-CFB) boilers. The first boiler is located at Southern Illinois University (SIU) in Carbondale, Illinois, USA, and is designed for 35 MW{sub th} output for cogeneration application, utilizing high sulfur, low ash Illinois coal. The second boiler is located at Kanoria Chemicals and Industries in Renukoot, India, and is designed for 81 MW{sub th} output for captive power requirement, firing high ash, low sulfur coal. This boiler was supplied by Thermax B and W Ltd., a joint venture company of B and W and Thermax of India. The choice of CFB technology was based on its fuel flexibility, cost effectiveness and environmental benefits for solid fuels. Based on the broad experience in designing utility and industrial boilers for operation worldwide, B and W has developed a cost effective and compact atmospheric pressure IR-CFB boiler. The B and W IR-CFB boiler design is distinctive in its use of U-beam particle separators. Worldwide, B and W offers IF-CFB boilers up to 175 MW{sub th}, both reheat and non-reheat, and is pursuing units up to 350 MW{sub th}. This paper reviews the general description of each IR-CFB boiler, design and performance aspects, as well as overall operating experiences. The boiler availabilities including maintenance aspects and emissions data will be presented.

  5. Nature of the insulating ground state of the5d postperovskite CaIrO?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Sun -Woo; Liu, Chen; Kim, Hyun -Jung; Lee, Jun -Ho; Yao, Yongxin; Ho, Kai -Ming; Cho, Jun -Hyung

    2015-08-26

    In this study, the insulating ground state of the 5d transition metal oxide CaIrO3 has been classified as a Mott-type insulator. Based on a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study with local, semilocal, and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals, we reveal that the Ir t2g states exhibit large splittings and one-dimensional electronic states along the c axis due to a tetragonal crystal field. Our hybrid DFT calculation adequately describes the antiferromagnetic (AFM) order along the c direction via a superexchange interaction between Ir4+ spins. Furthermore, the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) hybridizes the t2g states to open an insulating gap. These results indicate thatmoreCaIrO3 can be represented as a spin-orbit Slater insulator, driven by the interplay between a long-range AFM order and the SOC. Such a Slater mechanism for the gap formation is also demonstrated by the DFT + dynamical mean field theory calculation, where the metal-insulator transition and the paramagnetic to AFM phase transition are concomitant with each other.less

  6. Thermodynamics and superconductivity of Th7(Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Ir)3 system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, James L; Lashley, Jason C; Volz, Heather M; Fisher, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Expanding the temperature range of previous specific-heat measurements on the Th7(Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Ir)3 system, we measure the effect of transition-metal substitution on total entropy (S{sub 298 k}), electronic specific heat ({gamma}), and Debye temperature ({Theta}D). In addition we measure the pressure dependence, up to 10 kbar, of the superconducting transition.

  7. Nature of the insulating ground state of the 5d postperovskite CaIrO3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Sun -Woo; Liu, Chen; Kim, Hyun -Jung; Lee, Jun -Ho; Yao, Yongxin; Ho, Kai -Ming; Cho, Jun -Hyung

    2015-08-26

    In this study, the insulating ground state of the 5d transition metal oxide CaIrO3 has been classified as a Mott-type insulator. Based on a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study with local, semilocal, and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals, we reveal that the Ir t2g states exhibit large splittings and one-dimensional electronic states along the c axis due to a tetragonal crystal field. Our hybrid DFT calculation adequately describes the antiferromagnetic (AFM) order along the c direction via a superexchange interaction between Ir4+ spins. Furthermore, the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) hybridizes the t2g states to open an insulating gap. These results indicate thatmore » CaIrO3 can be represented as a spin-orbit Slater insulator, driven by the interplay between a long-range AFM order and the SOC. Such a Slater mechanism for the gap formation is also demonstrated by the DFT + dynamical mean field theory calculation, where the metal-insulator transition and the paramagnetic to AFM phase transition are concomitant with each other.« less

  8. Temperature dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.; Seinige, H.; Tsoi, M.; Cao, G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.

    2015-05-07

    Temperature-dependent magnetotransport properties of the antiferromagnetic semiconductor Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} are investigated with point-contact devices. The point-contact technique allows to probe very small volumes and, therefore, to look for electronic transport on a microscopic scale. Point-contact measurements with single crystals of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} were intended to see whether the additional local resistance associated with a small contact area between a sharpened Cu tip and the antiferromagnet shows magnetoresistance (MR) such as that seen in bulk crystals. Point-contact measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature revealed large MRs (up to 28%) for modest magnetic fields (250 mT) applied within an IrO{sub 2} (ab) plane with angular dependence showing a crossover from four-fold to two-fold symmetry with an increasing magnetic field. Point contact measurement exhibits distinctive anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in comparison to a bulk experiment, imposing intriguing questions about the mechanism of AMR in this material. Temperature-dependent MR measurements show that the MR falls to zero at the Neel temperature, but the temperature dependence of the MR ratio differs qualitatively from that of the resistivity. This AMR study helps to unveil the entanglement between electronic transport and magnetism in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} while the observed magnetoresistive phenomena can be potentially used to sense the antiferromagnetic order parameter in spintronic applications.

  9. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  10. Ray On | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    On Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ray On Place: ehlovice, Czech Republic Zip: 403 13 Product: Czech developer of PV projects. References: Ray On1 This article is a stub. You...

  11. Comparative Investigation of Benzene Steam Reforming over Spinel Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Donghai; Lebarbier, Vanessa M.; Rousseau, Roger; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Albrecht, Karl O.; Kovarik, Libor; Flake, Matt; Dagle, Robert A.

    2013-06-07

    In a combined experimental and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) study, benzene steam reforming (BSR) over MgAl2O4 supported Rh and Ir catalysts was investigated. Experimentally, it has been found that both highly dispersed Rh and Ir clusters (1-2 nm) on the MgAl2O4 spinel support are stable during the BSR in the temperature range of 700-850°C. Compared to the Ir/MgAl2O4 catalyst, the Rh/MgAl2O4 catalyst is more active with higher benzene turnover frequency and conversion. At typical steam conditions with the steam-to-carbon ratio > 12, the benzene conversion is only a weak function of the H2O concentration in the feed. This suggests that the initial benzene decomposition step rather than the benzene adsorption is most likely the rate-determined step in BSR over supported Rh and Ir catalysts. In order to understand the differences between the two catalysts, we followed with a comparative DFT study of initial benzene decomposition pathways over two representative model systems for each supported metal (Rh and Ir) catalysts. A periodic terrace (111) surface and an amorphous 50-atom metal cluster with a diameter of 1.0 nm were used to represent the two supported model catalysts under low and high dispersion conditions. Our DFT results show that the decreasing catalyst particle size enhances the benzene decomposition on supported Rh catalysts by lowering both C-C and C-H bond scission. The activation barriers of the C-C and the C-H bond scission decrease from 1.60 and 1.61 eV on the Rh(111) surface to 1.34 and 1.26 eV on the Rh50 cluster. For supported Ir catalysts, the decreasing particle size only affects the C-C scission. The activation barrier of the C-C scission of benzene decreases from 1.60 eV on the Ir(111) surface to 1.35 eV on the Ir50 cluster while the barriers of the C-H scission are practically the same. The experimentally measured higher BSR

  12. Soft-x-ray

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soft-x-ray emission, plasma equilibrium, and fluctuation studies on Madison Symmetric Torus C. Xiao Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin and Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada P. Franz Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA Sulla Fusione, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Unita' di Ricerca di Padova, Italy B. E. Chapman and D. Craig Department of Physics, University of

  13. Oxidation of carbynes: Signatures in infrared spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cinquanta, E. E-mail: p.rudolf@rug.nl; Manini, N.; Caramella, L.; Onida, G.; Ravagnan, L.; Milani, P.; Rudolf, P. E-mail: p.rudolf@rug.nl

    2014-06-28

    We report and solidly interpret the infrared spectrum of both pristine and oxidized carbynes embedded in a pure-carbon matrix. The spectra probe separately the effects of oxidation on sp- and on sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon, and provide information on the stability of the different structures in an oxidizing atmosphere. The final products are mostly short end-oxidized carbynes anchored with a double bond to sp{sup 2} fragments, plus an oxidized sp{sup 2} amorphous matrix. Our results have important implications for the realization of carbyne-based nano-electronics devices and highlight the active participation of carbynes in astrochemical reactions where they act as carbon source for the promotion of more complex organic species.

  14. ON THE ANISOTROPY OF NUCLEI MID-INFRARED RADIATION IN NEARBY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Huan; Wang, JunXian; Liu, Teng E-mail: jxw@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-01-20

    In the center of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the dusty torus absorbs the radiation from the central engine and reemits in mid-infrared (MIR). Observations have detected moderate anisotropy in the dust MIR emission, in the way that type 1 AGNs (type1s) are mildly brighter in MIR comparing with type 2 sources (type2s). However, type1s and type2s were found to follow statistically the same tight MIR-hard X-ray correlation, suggesting that the MIR emission is highly isotropic assuming that the hard X-ray radiation is inclination independent. We argue that this discrepancy could be solved considering that the hard X-ray emission in AGNs is also mildly anisotropic, as we recently discovered. To verify this diagram, we compare the subarcsecond 12 μm flux densities of type1s and type2s using the [O IV] λ25.89 μm emission line as an isotropic luminosity indicator. We find that on average type1s are brighter in nuclei 12 μm radiation by a factor of 2.6 ± 0.6 than type2s at given [O IV] λ25.89 μm luminosities, confirming the mild anisotropy of the nuclei 12 μm emission. We show that the anisotropy of the 12 μm emission we detected is in good agreement with radiative transfer models of clumpy tori. The fact that type1s and type2s follow the same tight MIR-hard X-ray correlation instead supports that both the MIR emission and hard X-ray emission in AGNs are mildly anisotropic.

  15. Tunable X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  16. Tunable infrared source employing Raman mixing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.; Herbst, Richard L.

    1980-01-01

    A tunable source of infrared radiation is obtained by irradiating an assemblage of Raman active gaseous atoms or molecules with a high intensity pumping beam of coherent radiation at a pump frequency .omega..sub.p to stimulate the generation of Stokes wave energy at a Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s and to stimulate the Raman resonant mode at the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R within the irradiated assemblage where the pump frequency .omega..sub.p minus the Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s is equal to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R. The stimulated assemblage is irradiated with a tunable source of coherent radiation at a frequency .omega..sub.i to generate the output infrared radiation of the frequency .omega..sub.0 which is related to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R and the input wave .omega..sub.i by the relation .omega..sub.0 =.omega..sub.i .+-..omega..sub.R. In one embodiment the interaction between the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i is collinear and the ratio of the phase velocity mismatch factor .DELTA.k to the electric field exponential gain coefficient T is within the range of 0.1 to 5. In another embodiment the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i have velocity vectors k.sub.p and k.sub.i which cross at an angle to each other to compensate for phase velocity mismatches in the medium. In another embodiment, the Stokes wave energy .omega..sub.s is generated by pump energy .omega..sub.p in a first Raman cell and .omega..sub.s, .omega..sub.i and .omega..sub.p are combined in a second Raman mixing cell to produce the output at .omega..sub.i.

  17. SMB, X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    include X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES), Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS), High Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detection (HERFD) and X-ray Raman Spectroscopy (XRS). ...

  18. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F.; Jones, Roger W.

    1991-12-03

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a material (16, 42) by applying a cooling medium (20, 54) to cool a thin surface layer portion of the material and to transiently generate a temperature differential between the thin surface layer portion and the lower portion of the material sufficient to alter the thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material from the black-body thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material. The altered thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material is detected by a spectrometer/detector (28, 50) while the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of the emitted infrared radiation. The detection is effected prior to the temperature differential propagating into the lower portion of the material to an extent such that the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is no longer sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation, so that the detected altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is indicative of the characteristics relating to the molecular composition of the material.

  19. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros; Staggs, Michael C.

    2006-12-12

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  20. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos; Stavros , Staggs; Michael C.

    2006-03-21

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  1. Multivariate classification of infrared spectra of cell and tissue samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Thomas, Edward V.

    1997-01-01

    Multivariate classification techniques are applied to spectra from cell and tissue samples irradiated with infrared radiation to determine if the samples are normal or abnormal (cancerous). Mid and near infrared radiation can be used for in vivo and in vitro classifications using at least different wavelengths.

  2. Evolution of competing magnetic order in the Jeff=1/2 insulating state of Sr2Ir1-xRuxO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calder, Stuart A.; Kim, Jong-Woo; Cao, Guixin; Cantoni, Claudia; May, Andrew F; Cao, Huibo B.; Aczel, Adam A.; Matsuda, Masaaki; Choi, Yongseong; Haskel, Daniel; Sales, B. C.; Mandrus, David; Lumsden, Mark D.; Christianson, Andrew D.

    2015-10-27

    We investigate the magnetic properties of the series Sr2Ir1-xRuxO4 with neutron, resonant x-ray and magnetization measurements. The results indicate an evolution and coexistence of magnetic structures via a spin flop transition from ab-plane to c-axis collinear order as the 5d Ir4+ ions are replaced with an increasing concentration of 4d Ru4+ ions. The magnetic structures within the ordered regime of the phase diagram (x<0.3) are reported. Despite the changes in magnetic structure no alteration of the Jeff=1/2 ground state is observed. This behavior of Sr2Ir1-xRuxO4 is consistent with electronic phase separation and diverges from a standard scenario of hole doping. The role of lattice alterations with doping on the magnetic and insulating behavior is considered. Our results presented here provide insight into the magnetic insulating states in strong spin-orbit coupled materials and the role perturbations play in altering the behavior.

  3. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erikat, I. A.; Hamad, B. A.

    2013-11-07

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir–C and Ir–Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  4. Infrared non-destructive evaluation method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baleine, Erwan; Erwan, James F; Lee, Ching-Pang; Stinelli, Stephanie

    2014-10-21

    A method of nondestructive evaluation and related system. The method includes arranging a test piece (14) having an internal passage (18) and an external surface (15) and a thermal calibrator (12) within a field of view (42) of an infrared sensor (44); generating a flow (16) of fluid characterized by a fluid temperature; exposing the test piece internal passage (18) and the thermal calibrator (12) to fluid from the flow (16); capturing infrared emission information of the test piece external surface (15) and of the thermal calibrator (12) simultaneously using the infrared sensor (44), wherein the test piece infrared emission information includes emission intensity information, and wherein the thermal calibrator infrared emission information includes a reference emission intensity associated with the fluid temperature; and normalizing the test piece emission intensity information against the reference emission intensity.

  5. Nanocrystalline Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles: Effects of N{sub 2} annealing on microstructure and near-infrared shielding characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jing-Xiao, E-mail: drliu-shi@dlpu.edu.cn [School of Textile and Material Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Material, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577,Japan (Japan); Shi, Fei; Dong, Xiao-Li; Xu, Qiang [School of Textile and Material Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Material, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577,Japan (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    In order to further improve the near-infrared shielding properties of cesium tungsten bronze (Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3}) for solar filter applications, Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles were prepared by solvothermal reaction method and the effects of nitrogen annealing on the microstructure and near-infrared shielding properties of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} were investigated. The obtained Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectrophotometer. The results indicate that nanosheet-like Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles with hexagonal structure began to transform into nanorods after annealed at temperature higher than 600 C. The near-infrared shielding properties of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles could be further improved by N{sub 2} annealing at 500700 C. Particularly, the 500 C-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples in the N{sub 2} atmosphere showed best near-infrared shielding properties. It was suggested that the excellent near-infrared shielding ability of the 500 C-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples is correlated with its minimum O/W atomic ratio and most oxygen vacancies. Highlights: N{sub 2} annealing could further improve the near-infrared (NIR) shielding of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3}. Effects of N{sub 2} annealing on microstructure and NIR shielding of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} were studied. The 500 C-N{sub 2}-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} exhibited minimum O/W ratio and most oxygen vacancies. The 500 C-N{sub 2}-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles exhibited best NIR shielding properties.

  6. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to...

  7. A POPULATION OF z > 2 FAR-INFRARED HERSCHEL-SPIRE-SELECTED STARBURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, C. M.; Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B.; Bethermin, M.; Floc'h, E. le; Magdis, G.; Burgarella, D.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conselice, C. J.; Farrah, D.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Oliver, S. J.; and others

    2012-12-20

    We present spectroscopic observations for a sample of 36 Herschel-SPIRE 250-500 {mu}m selected galaxies (HSGs) at 2 < z < 5 from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey. Redshifts are confirmed as part of a large redshift survey of Herschel-SPIRE-selected sources covering {approx}0.93 deg{sup 2} in six extragalactic legacy fields. Observations were taken with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and the Keck II DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph. Precise astrometry, needed for spectroscopic follow-up, is determined by identification of counterparts at 24 {mu}m or 1.4 GHz using a cross-identification likelihood matching method. Individual source luminosities range from log (L{sub IR}/L{sub Sun }) = 12.5-13.6 (corresponding to star formation rates (SFRs) 500-9000 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function), constituting some of the most intrinsically luminous, distant infrared galaxies discovered thus far. We present both individual and composite rest-frame ultraviolet spectra and infrared spectral energy distributions. The selection of these HSGs is reproducible and well characterized across large areas of the sky in contrast to most z > 2 HyLIRGs in the literature, which are detected serendipitously or via tailored surveys searching only for high-z HyLIRGs; therefore, we can place lower limits on the contribution of HSGs to the cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD) at (7 {+-} 2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} h {sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} at z {approx} 2.5, which is >10% of the estimated total SFRD of the universe from optical surveys. The contribution at z {approx} 4 has a lower limit of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} h {sup 3} Mpc{sup -3}, {approx}>20% of the estimated total SFRD. This highlights the importance of extremely infrared-luminous galaxies with high SFRs to the buildup of stellar mass, even at the earliest epochs.

  8. The first gamma-ray bursts in the universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mesler, R. A.; Pihlström, Y. M.; Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph; Fryer, Chris L.; Lloyd-Ronning, N. M.

    2014-05-20

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the ultimate cosmic lighthouses, capable of illuminating the universe at its earliest epochs. Could such events probe the properties of the first stars at z ∼ 20, the end of the cosmic Dark Ages? Previous studies of Population III (Pop III) GRBs only considered explosions in the diffuse relic H II regions of their progenitors or bursts that are far more energetic than those observed to date. However, the processes that produce GRBs at the highest redshifts likely reset their local environments, creating much more complicated structures than those in which relativistic jets have been modeled so far. These structures can greatly affect the luminosity of the afterglow and hence the redshift at which it can be detected. We have now simulated Pop III GRB afterglows in H II regions, winds, and dense shells ejected by the star during the processes that produce the burst. We find that GRBs with E {sub iso,γ} = 10{sup 51}-10{sup 53} erg will be visible at z ≳ 20 to the next generation of near infrared and radio observatories. In many cases, the environment of the burst, and hence progenitor type, can be inferred from the afterglow light curve. Although some Pop III GRBs are visible to Swift and the Very Large Array now, the optimal strategy for their detection will be future missions like the proposed EXIST and JANUS missions with large survey areas and onboard X-ray and infrared telescopes that can track their near-infrared flux from the moment of the burst, thereby identifying their redshifts.

  9. Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle-deposited nanostructured tungsten films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ungaro, Craig; Shah, Ankit; Kravchenko, Ivan; Hensley, Dale K.; Gray, Stephen K.; Gupta, Mool C.

    2015-02-06

    For this study, nanotextured tungsten thin films were obtained on a stainless steel (SS) substrate using the glancing-angle-deposition (GLAD) method. It was found that the optical absorption and thermal emittance of the SS substrate can be controlled by varying the parameters used during deposition. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations were used to predict the optical absorption and infrared (IR) reflectance spectra of the fabricated samples, and good agreement was found between simulated and measured data. FDTD simulations were also used to predict the effect of changes in the height and periodicity of the nanotextures. These simulations show that good control overmore » the absorption can be achieved by altering the height and periodicity of the nanostructure. These nanostructures were shown to be temperature stable up to 500°C with the addition of a protective HfO2 layer. Finally, applications for this structure are explored, including a promising application for solar thermal energy systems.« less

  10. Localization of polyhydroxybutyrate in sugarcane using Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy and multivariate imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupoi, Jason S.; Smith-Moritz, Andreia; Singh, Seema; McQualter, Richard; Scheller, Henrik V.; Simmons, Blake A.; Henry, Robert J.

    2015-07-10

    Background: Slow-degrading, fossil fuel-derived plastics can have deleterious effects on the environment, especially marine ecosystems. The production of bio-based, biodegradable plastics from or in plants can assist in supplanting those manufactured using fossil fuels. Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is one such biodegradable polyester that has been evaluated as a possible candidate for relinquishing the use of environmentally harmful plastics. Results: PHB, possessing similar properties to polyesters produced from non-renewable sources, has been previously engineered in sugarcane, thereby creating a high-value co-product in addition to the high biomass yield. This manuscript illustrates the coupling of a Fourier-transform infrared microspectrometer, equipped with a focal plane array (FPA) detector, with multivariate imaging to successfully identify and localize PHB aggregates. Principal component analysis imaging facilitated the mining of the abundant quantity of spectral data acquired using the FPA for distinct PHB vibrational modes. PHB was measured in the chloroplasts of mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, acquiescent with previously evaluated plant samples. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the power of IR microspectroscopy to rapidly image plant sections to provide a snapshot of the chemical composition of the cell. While PHB was localized in sugarcane, this method is readily transferable to other value-added co-products in different plants.

  11. Localization of polyhydroxybutyrate in sugarcane using Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy and multivariate imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lupoi, Jason S.; Smith-Moritz, Andreia; Singh, Seema; McQualter, Richard; Scheller, Henrik V.; Simmons, Blake A.; Henry, Robert J.

    2015-07-10

    Background: Slow-degrading, fossil fuel-derived plastics can have deleterious effects on the environment, especially marine ecosystems. The production of bio-based, biodegradable plastics from or in plants can assist in supplanting those manufactured using fossil fuels. Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is one such biodegradable polyester that has been evaluated as a possible candidate for relinquishing the use of environmentally harmful plastics. Results: PHB, possessing similar properties to polyesters produced from non-renewable sources, has been previously engineered in sugarcane, thereby creating a high-value co-product in addition to the high biomass yield. This manuscript illustrates the coupling of a Fourier-transform infrared microspectrometer, equipped with a focalmore » plane array (FPA) detector, with multivariate imaging to successfully identify and localize PHB aggregates. Principal component analysis imaging facilitated the mining of the abundant quantity of spectral data acquired using the FPA for distinct PHB vibrational modes. PHB was measured in the chloroplasts of mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, acquiescent with previously evaluated plant samples. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the power of IR microspectroscopy to rapidly image plant sections to provide a snapshot of the chemical composition of the cell. While PHB was localized in sugarcane, this method is readily transferable to other value-added co-products in different plants.« less

  12. Infrared signature of micro-hydration in the organophosphate sarin: An ab initio study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alam, Todd M.; Pearce, Charles Joseph

    2015-06-28

    The infrared (IR) spectra of micro-hydrated Sarin•(H2O)n clusters containing between one and four explicit waters have been studied using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods. The phosphate group P=O bond vibration region (~1270 to 1290 cm–1) revealed the largest frequency variation with hydration, with a frequency red shift reflecting the direct hydrogen bond formation between the P=O of Sarin and water. Small variations to the P-F stretch (~810 to 815 cm–1) and the C-O-P vibrational modes (~995 to 1004 cm–1) showed that the water interactions with these functional groups were minor, and that the structures of Sarin were notmore » extensively perturbed in the hydrated complexes. Increasing the number of explicit hydration waters produced only small vibrational changes in the lowest free energy complexes. These minor changes were consistent with a single water-phosphate hydrogen bond being the dominant structure, though a second water-phosphate hydrogen bond was observed in some complexes and was identified by an additional red shift of the P=O bond vibration. As a result, the H2O•H2O vibrational modes (~3450 to 3660 cm–1) increased in complexity with higher hydration levels and reflect the extended hydrogen bonding networks formed between the explicit waters in the hydrated Sarin clusters.« less

  13. Uncooled thin film infrared imaging device with aerogel thermal isolation: Deposition and planarization techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A.; Brinker, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sriram, C.S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Bullington, J.A. [AMMPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The authors have successfully integrated a thermally insulating silica aerogel thin film into a new uncooled monolithic thin film infrared (IR) imaging device. Compared to other technologies (bulk ceramic and microbridge), use of an aerogel layer provides superior thermal isolation of the pyroelectric imaging element from the relatively massive heat sinking integrated circuit. This results in significantly higher thermal and temporal resolutions. They have calculated noise equivalent temperature differences of 0.04--0.10 C from a variety of Pb{sub x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PZT) and Pb{sub x}La{sub 1{minus}x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PLZT) pyroelectric imaging elements in monolithic structures. In addition, use of aerogels results in an easier, less expensive fabrication process and a more robust device. Fabrication of these monolithic devices entails sol-gel deposition of the aerogel, sputter deposition of the electrodes, and solution chemistry deposition of the pyroelectric imaging elements. Uniform pyroelectric response is achieved across the device by use of appropriate planarization techniques. These deposition and planarization techniques are described. Characterization of the individual layers and monolithic structure using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Byer-Roundy techniques also is discussed.

  14. Joint spatio-spectral based edge detection for multispectral infrared imagery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Bender, Steven C.; Sharma, Yagya D.; Jang, Woo-Yong; Paskalva, Biliana S.

    2010-06-01

    Image segmentation is one of the most important and difficult tasks in digital image processing. It represents a key stage of automated image analysis and interpretation. Segmentation algorithms for gray-scale images utilize basic properties of intensity values such as discontinuity and similarity. However, it is possible to enhance edge-detection capability by means of using spectral information provided by multispectral (MS) or hyperspectral (HS) imagery. In this paper we consider image segmentation algorithms for multispectral images with particular emphasis on detection of multi-color or multispectral edges. More specifically, we report on an algorithm for joint spatio-spectral (JSS) edge detection. By joint we mean simultaneous utilization of spatial and spectral characteristics of a given MS or HS image. The JSS-based edge-detection approach, termed Spectral Ratio Contrast (SRC) edge-detection algorithm, utilizes the novel concept of matching edge signatures. The edge signature represents a combination of spectral ratios calculated using bands that enhance the spectral contrast between the two materials. In conjunction with a spatial mask, the edge signature give rise to a multispectral operator that can be viewed as a three-dimensional extension of the mask. In the extended mask, the third (spectral) dimension of each hyper-pixel can be chosen independently. The SRC is verified using MS and HS imagery from a quantum-dot in a well infrared (IR) focal plane array, and the Airborne Hyperspectral Imager.

  15. HAWC γ-Ray Observatory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HAWC γ-Ray Observatory HAWC γ-Ray Observatory Investigating the field of high energy physics through experiments that strengthen our fundamental understanding of matter, energy, space, and time. Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664 Email Bruce Carlsten (505) 667-5657 Email HAWC γ-Ray Observatory On August 1, 2013, the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma Ray Observatory formally began operations. HAWC is designed to study the origin of very high-energy cosmic rays and observe the

  16. Bessel spatial profile of a soft x-ray laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tissandier, F.; Sebban, S.; Ribiere, M.; Gautier, J.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Lambert, G.; Goddet, J.-Ph.; Burgy, F.; Valentin, C.; Rousse, A.; Maynard, G.

    2010-12-06

    We report far-field profile measurements of an optical-field-ionized high-order harmonic-seeded soft x-ray laser. We show that the beam transverse profile can be controlled between a regular Gaussian shape and a Bessel profile exhibiting several rings via the infrared laser pump intensity. These experimental data are supported by a complete numerical modeling including a two-dimensional plasma amplifier simulation and a two-level soft x-ray amplification using a Maxwell-Bloch treatment. This model takes into account the experimental high-order harmonic wavefront and intensity before it is numerically amplified.

  17. Platinum-monolayer Electrocatalysts: Palladium Interlayer on IrCo Alloy Core Improves Activity in Oxygen-reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, K.; Chen, W.-F.; Sasaki, K.; Su, D.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Zhou, W.; Izzo, E.L.; Perez-Acosta, C.; Hirunsit, P.; Balbuena, P.B.; Adzic, R.R.

    2010-11-15

    We describe the synthesis and electrocatalytic properties of a new low-Pt electrocatalyst consisting of an IrCo core, a Pd interlayer, and a surface Pt monolayer, emphasizing the interlayer's role in improving electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen-reduction reaction on Pt in HClO{sub 4} solution. We prepared the IrCo alloys by decomposing, at 800 C, hexacyanometalate, KCoIr(CN){sub 6}, adsorbed on the carbon surfaces. The synthesis of Ir{sub 3}Co/C involved heating a mix of metal salts and carbon in hydrogen at 500 C. Thereafter, we placed a palladium and/or platinum monolayer on them via the galvanic displacement of an underpotentially deposited copper monolayer. The electrocatalysts were characterized using structural- and electrochemical-techniques. For PtML/PdML/IrCo/C, we observed a Pt mass activity of 1.18 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and the platinum-group-metals mass of 0.16 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)}. In comparison, without a Pd interlayer, i.e., Pt{sub ML}/IrCo/C, the activities of 0.15 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and 0.036 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)} were considerably lower. We consider that the palladium interlayer plays an essential role in achieving high catalytic activity by adjusting the electronic interaction of the platinum monolayer with the IrCo core, so that it accelerates the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of the intermediates of oxygen reduction. A similar trend was observed for Pt{sub ML}/Pd{sub ML} and Pt{sub ML} deposited on Ir{sub 3}Co/C alloy core. We used density functional theory to interpret the observed phenomena.

  18. C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) at IR wavelengths and the variability of CO abundances among Oort Cloud comets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; Bonev, B. P.; DiSanti, M. A.; Keane, J. V.; Meech, K. J.; Blake, G. A.; Gibb, E. L.

    2014-08-20

    We report production rates, rotational temperatures, and related parameters for gases in C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) using the Near InfraRed SPECtrometer at the Keck Observatory, on six UT dates spanning heliocentric distances (R{sub h} ) that decreased from 1.35 AU to 1.16 AU (pre-perihelion). We quantified nine gaseous species (H{sub 2}O, OH*, CO, CH{sub 4}, HCN, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, NH{sub 3}, and NH{sub 2}) and obtained upper limits for two others (C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO). Compared with organics-normal comets, our results reveal highly enriched CO, (at most) slightly enriched CH{sub 3}OH, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, and HCN, and CH{sub 4} consistent with {sup n}ormal{sup ,} yet depleted, NH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}CO. Rotational temperatures increased from ?50 K to ?70 K with decreasing R{sub h} , following a power law in R{sub h} of 2.0 0.2, while the water production rate increased from 1.0 to 3.9 10{sup 28} molecules s{sup 1}, following a power law in R{sub h} of 4.7 0.9. The ortho-para ratio for H{sub 2}O was 3.01 0.49, corresponding to spin temperatures (T {sub spin}) ? 29 K (at the 1? level). The observed spatial profiles for these emissions showed complex structures, possibly tied to nucleus rotation, although the cadence of our observations limits any definitive conclusions. The retrieved CO abundance in Lovejoy is more than twice the median value for comets in our IR survey, suggesting this comet is enriched in CO. We discuss the enriched value for CO in comet C/2013 R1 in terms of the variability of CO among Oort Cloud comets.

  19. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  20. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  1. Phase transition in bulk single crystals and thin films of VO2 by nanoscale infrared spectroscopy and imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Mengkun; Sternbach, Aaron J.; Wagner, Martin; Slusar, Tetiana V.; Kong, Tai; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Kittiwatanakul, Salinporn; Qazilbash, M. M.; McLeod, Alexander; Fei, Zhe; Abreu, Elsa; Zhang, Jingdi; Goldflam, Michael; Dai, Siyuan; Ni, Guang -Xin; Lu, Jiwei; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; Raschke, Markus B.; Averitt, Richard D.; Wolf, Stuart A.; Kim, Hyun -Tak; Canfield, Paul C.; Basov, D. N.

    2015-06-29

    We have systematically studied a variety of vanadium dioxide (VO2) crystalline forms, including bulk single crystals and oriented thin films, using infrared (IR) near-field spectroscopic imaging techniques. By measuring the IR spectroscopic responses of electrons and phonons in VO2 with sub-grain-size spatial resolution (~20nm), we show that epitaxial strain in VO2 thin films not only triggers spontaneous local phase separations, but leads to intermediate electronic and lattice states that are intrinsically different from those found in bulk. Generalized rules of strain- and symmetry-dependent mesoscopic phase inhomogeneity are also discussed. Furthermore, these results set the stage for a comprehensive understanding of complex energy landscapes that may not be readily determined by macroscopic approaches.

  2. Electronic and chemical structure of an organic light emitter embedded in an inorganic wide-bandgap semiconductor: Photoelectron spectroscopy of layered and composite structures of Ir(BPA) and ZnSe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimamay, Mariel; Mayer, Thomas; Jaegermann, Wolfram; Hadziioannou, Georges

    2015-05-07

    Luminescent organic phases embedded in conductive inorganic matrices are proposed for hybrid organic-inorganic light-emitting diodes. In this configuration, the organic dye acts as the radiative recombination site for charge carriers injected into the inorganic matrix. Our investigation is aimed at finding a material combination where the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the organic dye are situated in between the valence and conduction bands of the inorganic matrix in order to promote electron and hole transfer from the matrix to the dye. Bilayer and composite thin films of zinc selenide (ZnSe) and a red iridium complex (Ir(BPA)) organic light emitter were prepared in situ via UHV thermal evaporation technique. The electronic and atomic structures were studied applying X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies. The measured energy band alignments for the ZnSe/Ir(BPA) bilayer and ZnSe+Ir(BPA) composite reveal that the HOMO and LUMO of the organic dye are positioned in the ZnSe bandgap. For the initial steps of ZnSe deposition on a dye film to form Ir(BPA)/ZnSe bilayers, zinc atoms intercalate into the dye film leaving behind an excess of selenium at the interface that partly reacts with dye molecules. Photoelectron spectroscopy of the composites shows the same species suggesting a similar mechanism. This mechanism leads to composite films with increased content of amorphous phases in the inorganic matrix, thereby affecting its conductivity, as well as to the presence of nonradiative recombination sites provided by the intercalated Zn atoms.

  3. A HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION MID-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF THE NUCLEI AND STAR-FORMING REGIONS IN LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Colina, Luis; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Packham, Christopher; Telesco, Charles M.; Levenson, N. A.; Roche, Patrick F.

    2010-03-01

    We present a high spatial (diffraction-limited) resolution ({approx}0.''3) mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopic study of the nuclei and star-forming regions of four local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) using T-ReCS on the Gemini South telescope. We investigate the spatial variations of the features seen in the N-band spectra of LIRGs on scales of {approx}100 pc, which allow us to resolve their nuclear regions and separate the active galactic nucleus (AGN) emission from that of the star formation (SF). We compare (qualitatively and quantitatively) our Gemini T-ReCS nuclear and integrated spectra of LIRGs with those obtained with Spitzer IRS. Star-forming regions and AGNs show distinct features in the MIR spectra, and we spatially separate these, which is not possible using the Spitzer data. The 9.7 {mu}m silicate absorption feature is weaker in the nuclei of the LIRGs than in the surrounding regions. This is probably due to the either clumpy or compact environment of the central AGN or young, nuclear starburst. We find that the [Ne II]12.81 {mu}m luminosity surface density is tightly and directly correlated with that of Paalpha for the LIRG star-forming regions (slope of 1.00 +- 0.02). Although the 11.3 {mu}m PAH feature shows also a trend with Paalpha, this is not common for all the regions and the slope is significantly lower. We also find that the [Ne II]12.81 {mu}m/Paalpha ratio does not depend on the Paalpha equivalent width (EW), i.e., on the age of the ionizing stellar populations, suggesting that, on the scales probed here, the [Ne II]12.81 {mu}m emission line is a good tracer of the SF activity in LIRGs. On the other hand, the 11.3 {mu}m PAH/Paalpha ratio increases for smaller values of the Paalpha EW (increasing ages), indicating that the 11.3 {mu}m PAH feature can also be excited by older stars than those responsible for the Paalpha emission. Finally, more data are needed in order to address the different physical processes (age of the stellar populations

  4. Improved ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR Radiances Based on CERES Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR Radiances Based on CERES Data D. R. Doelling and M. M. Khaiyer Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction The radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is a quantity of fundamental importance to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Thus, it is necessary to measure the radiation budget components, broadband

  5. An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements C. N. Long, K. Younkin, and K. L. Gaustad Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington J. A. Augustine National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory Surface Radiation Research Branch Boulder, Colorado Introduction A paper by Cess et al. (2000) notes that some clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements they were using from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern

  6. Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

    2004-09-30

    FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

  7. Infrared Thermographic Study of Laser Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohler, Jonathan H.; Chow, Charles T. S.

    1986-07-01

    Pyrotechnic ignition has been studied in the past by making a limited number of discrete temperature-time observations during ignition. Present-day infrared scanning techniques make it possible to record thermal profiles, during ignition, with high spacial and temporal resolution. Data thus obtained can be used with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more precise kinetic models of the ignition process. Ignition has been studied theoretically and experimentally using various thermal methods. It has been shown that the whole process can, ideally, be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the sample pellet behaves like an inert body heated by an external heat source. The second stage is governed by the chemical reaction in the heated volume produced during the first stage. High speed thermographic recording of the temperature distribution in the test sample during laser ignition makes it possible to calculate the heat content at any instant. Thus, one can actually observe laser heating and the onset of self-sustained combustion in the pellet. The experimental apparatus used to make these observations is described. The temperature distributions recorded are shown to be in good agreement with those predicted by heat transfer theory. Heat content values calculated from the observed temperature distributions are used to calculate thermal and kinetic parameters for several samples. These values are found to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  8. Infrared thermographic study of laser ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohler, J.H.; Chow, C.T.S.

    1986-07-21

    Pyrotechnic ignition has been studied in the past by making a limited number of discrete temperature-time observations during ignition. Present-day infrared scanning techniques make it possible to record thermal profiles, during ignition, with high spacial and temporal resolution. Data thus obtained can be used with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more precise kinetic models of the ignition process. Ignition has been studied theoretically and experimentally using various thermal methods. It has been shown that the whole process can, ideally, be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the sample pellet behaves like an inert body heated by an external heat source. The second stage is governed by the chemical reaction in the heated volume produced during the first stage. High speed thermographic recording of the temperature distribution in the test sample during laser ignition makes it possible to calculate the heat content at any instant. Thus, one can actually observe laser heating and the onset of self-sustained combustion in the pellet.

  9. The first photometric analysis of the near contact binary IR Cas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Kai; Hu, S.-M.; Guo, D.-F.; Jiang, Y.-G.; Gao, D.-Y.; Chen, X. E-mail: likai@ynao.ac.cn E-mail: difu@sdu.edu.cn

    2014-11-01

    The first photometric analysis of IR Cas was carried out based on the new observed BVRI light curves. The symmetric light curves and nearly flat secondary minimum indicate that very precise photometric results can be determined. We found that IR Cas is a near contact binary with the primary component filling its Roche lobe. An analysis of the O – C diagram based on all available times of minimum light reveals evidence for a periodic change with a semi-amplitude of 0.0153 days and a period of 39.7 yr superimposed on a secular decrease at a rate of dp/dt = –1.28(± 0.09) × 10{sup –7} days yr{sup –1}. The most reasonable explanation for the periodic change is the light time-travel effect due to a third body. The period decrease may be caused by mass transfer from the primary component to the secondary. With the decreasing period, IR Cas would eventually evolve into a contact system.

  10. NGC 7538 IRS. 1. Interaction of a polarized dust spiral and a molecular outflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, M. C. H.; Hull, Charles L. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Pillai, Thushara [Max Planck Institut fr Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hgel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Zhao, Jun-Hui [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sandell, Gran, E-mail: jzhao@cfa.harvard.edu [SOFIA-USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-12, Building N232, Room 146, PO Box 1, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present dust polarization and CO molecular line images of NGC 7538 IRS 1. We combined data from the Submillimeter Array, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, and the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to make images with ?2.''5 resolution at 230 and 345 GHz. The images show a remarkable spiral pattern in both the dust polarization and molecular outflow. These data dramatically illustrate the interplay between a high infall rate onto IRS 1 and a powerful outflow disrupting the dense, clumpy medium surrounding the star. The images of the dust polarization and the CO outflow presented here provide observational evidence for the exchange of energy and angular momentum between the infall and the outflow. The spiral dust pattern, which rotates through over 180 from IRS 1, may be a clumpy filament wound up by conservation of angular momentum in the infalling material. The redshifted CO emission ridge traces the dust spiral closely through the MM dust cores, several of which may contain protostars. We propose that the CO maps the boundary layer where the outflow is ablating gas from the dense gas in the spiral.

  11. Material properties limiting the performance of CZT gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolotnikov,A.E.; Babalola, S.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S. U.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2009-03-16

    CdZnTe (CZT) nuclear radiation detectors are advanced sensors that utilize innovative technologies developed for wide band-gap semiconductor industry and microelectronics. They open opportunities for new types of room-temperature operating, field deployable instruments that provide accurate identification of potential radiological threats and timely awareness for both the civilian and military communities. Room-temperature radiation detectors are an emerging technology that relies on the use of high-quality CZT crystals whose availability is currently limited by material non-uniformities and the presence of extended defects. To address these issues, which are most critical to CZT sensor developments, we developed X-ray mapping and IR transmission microscopy systems to characterize both CZT crystals and devices. Since a customized system is required for such X-ray measurements, we use synchrotron radiation beams available at BNL's National Synchrotron Light Source. A highly-collimated and high-intensity X-ray beam supports measurements of areas as small as 10 x 10 {micro}m{sup 2}, and allowed us to see fluctuations in collected charge over the entire area of the detector in a reasonable time. The IR microscopy system allows for 3D visualization of Te inclusions and other extended defects. In this paper, we describe the experimental techniques used in our measurements and typical results obtained from CZT samples produced by different suppliers.

  12. Solar X-ray physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bornmann, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on solar X-ray phenomena performed by American scientists during 1987-1990 is reviewed. Major topics discussed include solar images observed during quiescent times, the processes observed during solar flares, and the coronal, interplanetary, and terrestrial phenomena associated with solar X-ray flares. Particular attention is given to the hard X-ray emission observed at the start of the flare, the energy transfer to the soft X-ray emitting plasma, the late resolution of the flare as observed in soft X-ray, and the rate of occurrence of solar flares as a function of time and latitude. Pertinent aspects of nonflaring, coronal X-ray emission and stellar flares are also discussed. 175 refs.

  13. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  14. SYNTH - Gamma Ray Spectrum Synthesizer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-05-18

    SYNTH was designed to synthesize the results of typical gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments. The code allows a user to specify the physical characteristics of a gamma-ray source, the quantity of radionuclides emitting gamma radiation, the source-to-detector distance and the presence and type of any intervening absorbers, the size and type of the gamma-ray detector, and the electronic set-up used to gather the data.

  15. Karen Ray | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Karen Ray About Us Karen Ray - Budget Director for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Karen Ray serves as the Budget Director for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). In this role, she leads EERE's budget development and oversees how the budget is executed. Her team performs these tasks by applying strategic principles and portfolio analysis. The budget formulation culminates in the Congressional Budget Justification and its defense to Appropriation

  16. X-Ray Science Education

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TV Network external link DNA Interactive external link Reciprocal Net external link X-ray Science Courses and Programs Various educational efforts are closely related to the...

  17. Cosmic Ray Shower Generation Utility

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-01-18

    Generates correlated cosmic-ray particle showers at one of three elevations (sea level, 2100m, and 11300m) for use as input transport and detector simulation codes.

  18. Graphene–Metamaterial Photodetectors for Integrated Infrared Sensing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luxmoore, Isaac. J.; Liu, Peter Q.; Li, Penglei; Faist, Jérôme; Nash, Geoffrey R.

    2016-05-31

    We study metamaterial-enhanced graphene photodetectors operating in the mid-IR to THz. The detector element consists of a graphene ribbon embedded within a dual-metal split ring resonator, which acts like a cavity to enhance the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by the graphene ribbon, while the asymmetric metal contacts enable photothermoelectric detection. The detectors we designed for the mid-IR demonstrate peak responsivity (referenced to total power) of ~120 mV/W at 1500 cm-1 and are employed in the spectroscopic evaluation of vibrational resonances, thus demonstrating a key step toward a platform for integrated surface-enhanced sensing.

  19. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared emission spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F.; Jones, Roger W.

    1991-12-24

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a solid material (16, 42) by applying energy from an energy source (20, 70) top a surface region of the solid material sufficient to cause transient heating in a thin surface layer portion of the solid material (16, 42) so as to enable transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion, and by detecting with a spectrometer/detector (28, 58) substantially only the transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion of the solid material. The detected transient thermal emission of infrared radiation is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the solid material of emitted infrared radiation, so as to be indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the solid material.

  20. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Graphene-a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice-has very high conductivity that can be tuned...

  1. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Wednesday, 29 October 2008 00:00 Graphene-a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice-has very high...

  2. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics and Static Normal Mode Analysis: The C-H Region of DMSO as a Case Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  3. Dissecting the Gamma-Ray Background in Search of Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cholis, Ilias; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D.

    2014-02-01

    Several classes of astrophysical sources contribute to the approximately isotropic gamma-ray background measured by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. In this paper, we use Fermi's catalog of gamma-ray sources (along with corresponding source catalogs at infrared and radio wavelengths) to build and constrain a model for the contributions to the extragalactic gamma-ray background from astrophysical sources, including radio galaxies, star-forming galaxies, and blazars. We then combine our model with Fermi's measurement of the gamma-ray background to derive constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section, including contributions from both extragalactic and galactic halos and subhalos. The resulting constraints are competitive with the strongest current constraints from the Galactic Center and dwarf spheroidal galaxies. As Fermi continues to measure the gamma-ray emission from a greater number of astrophysical sources, it will become possible to more tightly constrain the astrophysical contributions to the extragalactic gamma-ray background. We project that with 10 years of data, Fermi's measurement of this background combined with the improved constraints on the astrophysical source contributions will yield a sensitivity to dark matter annihilations that exceeds the strongest current constraints by a factor of ~ 5 - 10.

  4. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Graphene-a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice-has very high conductivity that can be tuned by applying a gate voltage. The charge carriers in graphene can travel ballistically over great distances (~1 micron) without scattering. These unusual electronic properties make graphene a promising candidate for future nanoelectronics. Using infrared spectromicroscopy at ALS Beamline 1.4, a group of researchers from

  5. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Graphene-a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice-has very high conductivity that can be tuned by applying a gate voltage. The charge carriers in graphene can travel ballistically over great distances (~1 micron) without scattering. These unusual electronic properties make graphene a promising candidate for future nanoelectronics. Using infrared spectromicroscopy at ALS Beamline 1.4, a group of researchers from

  6. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Graphene-a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice-has very high conductivity that can be tuned by applying a gate voltage. The charge carriers in graphene can travel ballistically over great distances (~1 micron) without scattering. These unusual electronic properties make graphene a promising candidate for future nanoelectronics. Using infrared spectromicroscopy at ALS Beamline 1.4, a group of researchers from

  7. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Graphene-a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice-has very high conductivity that can be tuned by applying a gate voltage. The charge carriers in graphene can travel ballistically over great distances (~1 micron) without scattering. These unusual electronic properties make graphene a promising candidate for future nanoelectronics. Using infrared spectromicroscopy at ALS Beamline 1.4, a group of researchers from

  8. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Graphene-a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice-has very high conductivity that can be tuned by applying a gate voltage. The charge carriers in graphene can travel ballistically over great distances (~1 micron) without scattering. These unusual electronic properties make graphene a promising candidate for future nanoelectronics. Using infrared spectromicroscopy at ALS Beamline 1.4, a group of researchers from

  9. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Graphene-a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice-has very high conductivity that can be tuned by applying a gate voltage. The charge carriers in graphene can travel ballistically over great distances (~1 micron) without scattering. These unusual electronic properties make graphene a promising candidate for future nanoelectronics. Using infrared spectromicroscopy at ALS Beamline 1.4, a group of researchers from

  10. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Graphene-a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice-has very high conductivity that can be tuned by applying a gate voltage. The charge carriers in graphene can travel ballistically over great distances (~1 micron) without scattering. These unusual electronic properties make graphene a promising candidate for future nanoelectronics. Using infrared spectromicroscopy at ALS Beamline 1.4, a group of researchers from

  11. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Wednesday, 29 October 2008 00:00 Graphene-a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice-has very high conductivity that can be tuned by applying a gate voltage. The charge carriers in graphene can travel ballistically over great distances (~1 micron) without scattering. These unusual electronic properties make graphene a promising candidate for future

  12. Accurate, practical simulation of satellite infrared radiometer spectral data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study's purpose is to determine whether a relatively simple random band model formulation of atmospheric radiation transfer in the infrared region can provide valid simulations of narrow interval satellite-borne infrared sounder system data. Detailed ozonesondes provide the pertinent atmospheric information and sets of calibrated satellite measurements provide the validation. High resolution line-by-line model calculations are included to complete the evaluation.

  13. Design of integration-ready metasurface-based infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogando, Karim Pastoriza, Hernán

    2015-07-28

    We introduce an integration ready design of metamaterial infrared absorber, highly compatible with many kinds of fabrication processes. We present the results of an exhaustive experimental characterization, including an analysis of the effects of single meta-atom geometrical parameters and collective arrangement. We confront the results with the theoretical interpretations proposed in the literature. Based on the results, we develop a set of practical design rules for metamaterial absorbers in the infrared region.

  14. Mid-IR laser action in the H{sub 3} Rydberg molecule and some possible astrophysical implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saykally, Richard J.

    2015-01-22

    Mid-IR lasing has been observed in supersonic plasmas and assigned to d to p transitions in tri-atomic hydrogen Rydberg states. Possible astrophysical implications are discussed.

  15. Ultraviolet and infrared laser-induced fragmentation of free (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters in a molecular beam and (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters inside or on the surface of large (Xe){sub m} clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apatin, V. M.; Lokhman, V. N.; Makarov, G. N. Ogurok, N.-D. D.; Petin, A. N.; Ryabov, E. A.

    2015-02-15

    The fragmentation of free homogeneous (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters in a molecular beam (n ≤ 45 is the average number of molecules in the cluster) and (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters inside or on the surface of large (Xe){sub m} clusters (m ≥ 100 is the average number of atoms in the cluster) by ultraviolet and infrared laser radiations has been studied. These three types of (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters are shown to have different stabilities with respect to fragmentation by both ultraviolet and infrared radiations and completely different dependences of the fragmentation probability on the energy of ultraviolet and infrared radiations. When exposed to ultraviolet radiation, the free (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters fragment at comparatively low fluences (Φ{sub UV} ≤ 0.15 J cm{sup −2}) and the weakest energy dependence of the fragmentation probability is observed for them. A stronger energy dependence of the fragmentation probability is observed for the (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters localized inside (Xe){sub m} clusters, and the strongest dependence is observed for the (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters located on the surface of (Xe){sub m} clusters. When the clusters are exposed to infrared radiation, the homogeneous (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters efficiently fragment at low fluences (Φ{sub IR} ≤ 25 mJ cm{sup −2}), higher fluences (Φ{sub IR} ≈ 75 mJ cm{sup −2}) are needed for the fragmentation of the (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} localized inside (Xe){sub m} clusters, and even higher fluences (Φ{sub IR} ≈ 150 mJ cm{sup −2}) are needed for the fragmentation of the (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters located on the surface of (Xe){sub m} clusters. It has been established that small (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters located on the surface of (Xe){sub m} clusters do not fragment up to fluences Φ{sub IR} ≈ 250 mJ cm{sup −2}. The fragmentation efficiency of (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters is shown to be the same (at the same fluence) when they are excited by both pulsed (τ{sub p}

  16. Femtosecond measurements of near-infrared pulse induced mid-infrared transmission modulation of quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Hong; Liu, Sheng; Lalanne, Elaine; Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Choa, Fow-Sen; Wang, Xiaojun; Johnson, Anthony M.

    2014-05-26

    We temporally resolved the ultrafast mid-infrared transmission modulation of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) using a near-infrared pump/mid-infrared probe technique at room temperature. Two different femtosecond wavelength pumps were used with photon energy above and below the quantum well (QW) bandgap. The shorter wavelength pump modulates the mid-infrared probe transmission through interband transition assisted mechanisms, resulting in a high transmission modulation depth and several nanoseconds recovery lifetime. In contrast, pumping with a photon energy below the QW bandgap induces a smaller transmission modulation depth but much faster (several picoseconds) recovery lifetime, attributed to intersubband transition assisted mechanisms. The latter ultrafast modulation (>60?GHz) could provide a potential way to realize fast QCL based free space optical communication.

  17. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF COMET 73P/SCHWASSMANN-WACHMANN 3 USING THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Whitney, Barbara A.; Wolff, Michael J.; Lisse, Carey M.; Kelley, Michael S.; Polomski, Elisha F.; Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.; Kimes, Robin L.; Harker, David E. E-mail: bwhitney@wisc.edu E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu E-mail: epolomsk@uwec.edu E-mail: Ray.W.Russell@aero.org E-mail: dharker@ucsd.edu

    2011-09-15

    We have used the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) to observe the 5-37 {mu}m thermal emission of comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (SW3), components B and C. We obtained low spectral resolution (R {approx} 100) data over the entire wavelength interval, along with images at 16 and 22 {mu}m. These observations provided an unprecedented opportunity to study nearly pristine material from the surface and what was until recently the interior of an ecliptic comet-the cometary surface having experienced only two prior perihelion passages, and including material that was totally fresh. The spectra were modeled using a variety of mineral types including both amorphous and crystalline components. We find that the degree of silicate crystallinity, {approx}35%, is somewhat lower than most other comets with strong emission features, while its abundance of amorphous carbon is higher. Both suggest that SW3 is among the most chemically primitive solar system objects yet studied in detail, and that it formed earlier or farther from the Sun than the bulk of the comets studied so far. The similar dust compositions of the two fragments suggest that these are not mineralogically heterogeneous, but rather uniform throughout their volumes. The best-fit particle size distribution for SW3B has a form dn/da {approx} a{sup -3.5}, close to that expected for dust in collisional equilibrium, while that for SW3C has dn/da {approx} a{sup -4.0}, as seen mostly in active comets with strong directed jets, such as C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp. The total mass of dust in the comae plus nearby tail, extrapolated from the field of view of the IRS peak-up image arrays, is (3-5) x 10{sup 8} kg for B and (7-9) x 10{sup 8} kg for C. Atomic abundances derived from the spectral models indicate a depletion of O compared to solar photospheric values, despite the inclusion of water ice and gas in the models. Atomic C may be solar or slightly sub-solar, but its abundance is complicated by the potential

  18. THE HAWAII INFRARED PARALLAX PROGRAM. I. ULTRACOOL BINARIES AND THE L/T TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupuy, Trent J.; Liu, Michael C.

    2012-08-01

    We present the first results from our high-precision infrared (IR) astrometry program at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We measure parallaxes for 83 ultracool dwarfs (spectral types M6-T9) in 49 systems, with a median uncertainty of 1.1 mas (2.3%) and as good as 0.7 mas (0.8%). We provide the first parallaxes for 48 objects in 29 systems, and for another 27 objects in 17 systems, we significantly improve upon published results, with a median (best) improvement of 1.7 times (5 times). Three systems show astrometric perturbations indicative of orbital motion; two are known binaries (2MASS J0518-2828AB and 2MASS J1404-3159AB) and one is spectrally peculiar (SDSS J0805+4812). In addition, we present here a large set of Keck adaptive optics imaging that more than triples the number of binaries with L6-T5 components that have both multi-band photometry and distances. Our data enable an unprecedented look at the photometric properties of brown dwarfs as they cool through the L/T transition. Going from Almost-Equal-To L8 to Almost-Equal-To T4.5, flux in the Y and J bands increases by Almost-Equal-To 0.7 mag and Almost-Equal-To 0.5 mag, respectively (the Y- and J-band 'bumps'), while flux in the H, K, and L' bands declines monotonically. This wavelength dependence is consistent with cloud clearing over a narrow range of temperature, since condensate opacity is expected to dominate at 1.0-1.3 {mu}m. Interestingly, despite more than doubling the near-IR census of L/T transition objects, we find a conspicuous paucity of objects on the color-magnitude diagram just blueward of the late-L/early-T sequence. This 'L/T gap' occurs at (J - H){sub MKO} 0.1-0.3 mag, (J - K){sub MKO} = 0.0-0.4 mag, and implies that the last phases of cloud evolution occur rapidly. Finally, we provide a comprehensive update to the absolute magnitudes of ultracool dwarfs as a function of spectral type using a combined sample of 314 objects.

  19. Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescopes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using ...

  20. Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescopes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using...

  1. The Origin of Cosmic Rays

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Blasi, Pasquale [INAF/Arcetri-Italy and Fermilab, Italy

    2010-01-08

    Cosmic Rays reach the Earth from space with energies of up to more than 1020 eV, carrying information on the most powerful particle accelerators that Nature has been able to assemble. Understanding where and how cosmic rays originate has required almost one century of investigations, and, although the last word is not written yet, recent observations and theory seem now to fit together to provide us with a global picture of the origin of cosmic rays of unprecedented clarity. Here we will describe what we learned from recent observations of astrophysical sources (such as supernova remnants and active galaxies) and we will illustrate what these observations tell us about the physics of particle acceleration and transport. We will also discuss the ?end? of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum, which bridges out attention towards the so called ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). At ~1020 eV the gyration scale of cosmic rays in cosmic magnetic fields becomes large enough to allow us to point back to their sources, thereby allowing us to perform ?cosmic ray astronomy?, as confirmed by the recent results obtained with the Pierre Auger Observatory. We will discuss the implications of these observations for the understanding of UHECRs, as well as some questions which will likely remain unanswered and will be the target of the next generation of cosmic ray experiments.

  2. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  3. Examining the infrared variable star population discovered in the Small Magellanic Cloud using the SAGE-SMC survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polsdofer, Elizabeth; Marengo, M.; Seale, J.; Sewiło, M.; Vijh, U. P.; Terrazas, M.; Meixner, M.

    2015-02-01

    We present our study on the infrared variability of point sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We use the data from the Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy Program “Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally Stripped, Low Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud” (SAGE-SMC) and the “Spitzer Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud” (S{sup 3}MC) survey, over three different epochs, separated by several months to 3 years. Variability in the thermal infrared is identified using a combination of Spitzer’s InfraRed Array Camera 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm bands, and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24 μm band. An error-weighted flux difference between each pair of three epochs (“variability index”) is used to assess the variability of each source. A visual source inspection is used to validate the photometry and image quality. Out of ∼2 million sources in the SAGE-SMC catalog, 814 meet our variability criteria. We matched the list of variable star candidates to the catalogs of SMC sources classified with other methods, available in the literature. Carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars make up the majority (61%) of our variable sources, with about a third of all of our sources being classified as extreme AGB stars. We find a small, but significant population of oxygen-rich (O-rich) AGB (8.6%), Red Supergiant (2.8%), and Red Giant Branch (<1%) stars. Other matches to the literature include Cepheid variable stars (8.6%), early type stars (2.8%), Young-stellar objects (5.8%), and background galaxies (1.2%). We found a candidate OH maser star, SSTISAGE1C J005212.88-730852.8, which is a variable O-rich AGB star, and would be the first OH/IR star in the SMC, if confirmed. We measured the infrared variability of a rare RV Tau variable (a post-AGB star) that has recently left the AGB phase. 59 variable stars from our list remain unclassified.

  4. Role of the antiferromagnetic pinning layer on spin wave properties in IrMn/NiFe based spin-valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gubbiotti, G. Tacchi, S.; Del Bianco, L.; Bonfiglioli, E.; Giovannini, L.; Spizzo, F.; Zivieri, R.; Tamisari, M.

    2015-05-07

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) was exploited to study the spin wave properties of spin-valve (SV) type samples basically consisting of two 5 nm-thick NiFe layers (separated by a Cu spacer of 5 nm), differently biased through the interface exchange coupling with an antiferromagnetic IrMn layer. Three samples were investigated: a reference SV sample, without IrMn (reference); one sample with an IrMn underlayer (10 nm thick) coupled to the bottom NiFe film; one sample with IrMn underlayer and overlayer of different thickness (10 nm and 6 nm), coupled to the bottom and top NiFe film, respectively. The exchange coupling with the IrMn, causing the insurgence of the exchange bias effect, allowed the relative orientation of the NiFe magnetization vectors to be controlled by an external magnetic field, as assessed through hysteresis loop measurements by magneto-optic magnetometry. Thus, BLS spectra were acquired by sweeping the magnetic field so as to encompass both the parallel and antiparallel alignment of the NiFe layers. The BLS results, well reproduced by the presented theoretical model, clearly revealed the combined effects on the spin dynamic properties of the dipolar interaction between the two NiFe films and of the interface IrMn/NiFe exchange coupling.

  5. SUBARU AND GEMINI HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION INFRARED 18 {mu}m IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF NEARBY LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Imase, Keisuke; Oi, Nagisa; Ichikawa, Kohei

    2011-05-15

    We present the results of a ground-based, high spatial resolution infrared 18 {mu}m imaging study of nearby luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), using the Subaru 8.2 m and Gemini-South 8.1 m telescopes. The diffraction-limited images routinely achieved with these telescopes in the Q band (17-23 {mu}m) allow us to investigate the detailed spatial distribution of infrared emission in these LIRGs. We then investigate whether the emission surface brightnesses are modest, as observed in starbursts, or are so high that luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs; high emission surface brightness energy sources) are indicated. The sample consists of 18 luminous buried AGN candidates and starburst-classified LIRGs identified in earlier infrared spectroscopy. We find that the infrared 18 {mu}m emission from the buried AGN candidates is generally compact, and the estimated emission surface brightnesses are high, sometimes exceeding the maximum value observed in and theoretically predicted for a starburst phenomenon. The starburst-classified LIRGs usually display spatially extended 18 {mu}m emission and the estimated emission surface brightnesses are modest, within the range sustained by a starburst phenomenon. The general agreement between infrared spectroscopic and imaging energy diagnostic methods suggests that both are useful tools for understanding the hidden energy sources of the dusty LIRG population.

  6. Cationic coordination compound Cs{sub 2}Hg{sub 3}I{sub 8} for IR NLO material: Synthesis, crystal growth and characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathiskumar, S.; Kathiravan, P.; Balakrishnan, T.

    2015-06-24

    Single crystals Cs{sub 2}Hg{sub 3}I{sub 8} of dimensions 5 × 3 × 4   mm{sup 3} were grown by solution growth method at room temperature and structurally characterized by single crystal X – ray diffraction. Cs{sub 2}Hg{sub 3}I{sub 8} compound crystallizes in a noncentrosymmetric space group Cm with the crystal data of a = 7.4415 Å, b = 21.6629 Å, c = 7.6726 Å, α, β = 90°, γ = 108.05° and Z = 2. The grown crystals were characterized by powder X – ray diffraction analysis and the various diffraction planes are indexed. The presence of functional groups was identified qualitatively by Fourier transform infrared and FT – Raman spectral analyses. Ultraviolet – visible spectral analyses shows that the crystal has low UV cut off at 388 nm combined with very good transparency of 98 % in a wide range. The optical band gap was estimated to be 3 eV. Mechanical hardness of the grown crystal Cs{sub 2}Hg{sub 3}I{sub 8} was determined. The dielectric response of the crystal with varying frequencies was studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis shows that the grown crystal has very good thermal stability up to 97.5°C.

  7. A multi-wavelength view of the central kiloparsec region in the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 1614

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrero-Illana, Rubén; Pérez-Torres, Miguel Á.; Alberdi, Antxon; Hernández-García, Lorena; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Colina, Luis; Efstathiou, Andreas; Miralles-Caballero, Daniel; Väisänen, Petri; Packham, Christopher C.; Rajpaul, Vinesh; Zijlstra, Albert A.

    2014-05-10

    The Luminous Infrared Galaxy NGC 1614 hosts a prominent circumnuclear ring of star formation. However, the nature of the dominant emitting mechanism in its central ∼100 pc is still under debate. We present sub-arcsecond angular resolution radio, mid-infrared, Paα, optical, and X-ray observations of NGC 1614, aimed at studying in detail both the circumnuclear ring and the nuclear region. The 8.4 GHz continuum emission traced by the Very Large Array and the Gemini/T-ReCS 8.7 μm emission, as well as the Paα line emission, show remarkable morphological similarities within the star-forming ring, suggesting that the underlying emission mechanisms are tightly related. We used a Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS Paα map of similar resolution to our radio maps to disentangle the thermal free-free and non-thermal synchrotron radio emission, from which we obtained the intrinsic synchrotron power law for each individual region within the central kiloparsec of NGC 1614. The radio ring surrounds a relatively faint, steep-spectrum source at the very center of the galaxy, suggesting that the central source is not powered by an active galactic nucleus (AGN), but rather by a compact (r ≲ 90 pc) starburst (SB). Chandra X-ray data also show that the central kiloparsec region is dominated by SB activity, without requiring the existence of an AGN. We also used publicly available infrared data to model-fit the spectral energy distribution of both the SB ring and a putative AGN in NGC 1614. In summary, we conclude that there is no need to invoke an AGN to explain the observed bolometric properties of the galaxy.

  8. Transition from the infalling envelope to the Keplerian disk around L1551 IRS 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Ti-Lin [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Ho, Paul T. P., E-mail: tlchou@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P. O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-20

    We present combined Submillimeter Array (SMA) +Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) images of the Class I protobinary L1551 IRS 5 in the CS (J = 7-6) line, the submillimeter images of L1551 IRS 5 with the most complete spatial sampling ever achieved (0.''9-36''). The SMA image of L1551 IRS 5 in the 343 GHz dust-continuum emission is also presented, which shows an elongated feature along the northwest to southeast direction (?160 AU 80 AU), perpendicular to the associated radio jets. The combined SMA+ASTE images show that the high-velocity (?1.5 km s{sup 1}) CS emission traces the structure of the dust component and shows a velocity gradient along the major axis, which is reproduced by a geometrically thin Keplerian-disk model with a central stellar mass of ?0.5 M {sub ?}. The low-velocity (?1.3 km s{sup 1}) CS emission shows an extended (?1000 AU) feature that exhibits slight south (blueshifted) to north (redshifted) emission offsets, which is modeled with a rotating and infalling envelope with a conserved angular momentum. The rotational motion of the envelope connects smoothly to the inner Keplerian rotation at a radius of ?64 AU. The infalling velocity of the envelope is ?three times lower than the free-fall velocity toward the central stellar mass of 0.5 M {sub ?}. These results demonstrate transition from the infalling envelope to the Keplerian disk, consistent with the latest theoretical studies of disk formation. We suggest that sizable (r ? 50-200 AU) Keplerian disks are already formed when the protostars are still deeply embedded in the envelopes.

  9. Hand-held, mechanically cooled, radiation detection system for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burks, Morgan Thomas; Eckels, Joel Del

    2010-06-08

    In one embodiment, a radiation detection system is provided including a radiation detector and a first enclosure encapsulating the radiation detector, the first enclosure including a low-emissivity infra-red (IR) reflective coating used to thermally isolate the radiation detector. Additionally, a second enclosure encapsulating the first enclosure is included, the first enclosure being suspension mounted to the second enclosure. Further, a cooler capable of cooling the radiation detector is included. Still yet, a first cooling interface positioned on the second enclosure is included for coupling the cooler and the first enclosure. Furthermore, a second cooling interface positioned on the second enclosure and capable of coupling the first enclosure to a cooler separate from the radiation detection system is included. Other embodiments are also presented.

  10. Multivariate calibration techniques applied to NIRA (near infrared reflectance analysis) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, C.L.

    1991-02-01

    Multivariate calibration techniques can reduce the time required for routine testing and can provide new methods of analysis. Multivariate calibration is commonly used with near infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Two feasibility studies were performed to determine the capability of NIRA, using multivariate calibration techniques, to perform analyses on the types of samples that are routinely analyzed at this laboratory. The first study performed included a variety of samples and indicated that NIRA would be well-suited to perform analyses on selected materials properties such as water content and hydroxyl number on polyol samples, epoxy content on epoxy resins, water content of desiccants, and the amine values of various amine cure agents. A second study was performed to assess the capability of NIRA to perform quantitative analysis of hydroxyl numbers and water contents of hydroxyl-containing materials. Hydroxyl number and water content were selected for determination because these tests are frequently run on polyol materials and the hydroxyl number determination is time consuming. This study pointed out the necessity of obtaining calibration standards identical to the samples being analyzed for each type of polyol or other material being analyzed. Multivariate calibration techniques are frequently used with FTIR data to determine the composition of a large variety of complex mixtures. A literature search indicated many applications of multivariate calibration to FTIR data. Areas identified where quantitation by FTIR would provide a new capability are quantitation of components in epoxy and silicone resins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in oils, and additives to polymers. 19 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Recollimation boundary layers as X-ray sources in young stellar jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gnther, Hans Moritz; Li, Zhi-Yun; Schneider, P. C.

    2014-11-01

    Young stars accrete mass from circumstellar disks and, in many cases, the accretion coincides with a phase of massive outflows, which can be highly collimated. Those jets emit predominantly in the optical and IR wavelength range. However, in several cases, X-ray and UV observations reveal a weak but highly energetic component in those jets. X-rays are observed both from stationary regions close to the star and from knots in the jet several hundred AU from the star. In this article, we show semianalytically that a fast stellar wind that is recollimated by the pressure from a slower, more massive disk wind can have the right properties to power stationary X-ray emission. The size of the shocked regions is compatible with observational constraints. Our calculations support a wind-wind interaction scenario for the high-energy emission near the base of young stellar object jets. For the specific case of DG Tau, a stellar wind with a mass-loss rate of 5 10{sup 10} M {sub ?} yr{sup 1} and a wind speed of 800 km s{sup 1} reproduces the observed X-ray spectrum. We conclude that a stellar wind recollimation shock is a viable scenario to power stationary X-ray emission close to the jet launching point.

  12. Infrared spectroscopy of Mg–CO{sub 2} and Al–CO{sub 2} complexes in helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Brandon J.; Harruff-Miller, Barbara A.; Bunker, Christopher E.; Lewis, William K.

    2015-05-07

    The catalytic reduction of CO{sub 2} to produce hydrocarbon fuels is a topic that has gained significant attention. Development of efficient catalysts is a key enabler to such approaches, and metal-based catalysts have shown promise towards this goal. The development of a fundamental understanding of the interactions between CO{sub 2} molecules and metal atoms is expected to offer insight into the chemistry that occurs at the active site of such catalysts. In the current study, we utilize helium droplet methods to assemble complexes composed of a CO{sub 2} molecule and a Mg or Al atom. High-resolution infrared (IR) spectroscopy and optically selected mass spectrometry are used to probe the structure and binding of the complexes, and the experimental observations are compared with theoretical results determined from ab initio calculations. In both the Mg–CO{sub 2} and Al–CO{sub 2} systems, two IR bands are obtained: one assigned to a linear isomer and the other assigned to a T-shaped isomer. In the case of the Mg–CO{sub 2} complexes, the vibrational frequencies and rotational constants associated with the two isomers are in good agreement with theoretical values. In the case of the Al–CO{sub 2} complexes, the vibrational frequencies agree with theoretical predictions; however, the bands from both structural isomers exhibit significant homogeneous broadening sufficient to completely obscure the rotational structure of the bands. The broadening is consistent with an upper state lifetime of 2.7 ps for the linear isomer and 1.8 ps for the T-shaped isomer. The short lifetime is tentatively attributed to a prompt photo-induced chemical reaction between the CO{sub 2} molecule and the Al atom comprising the complex.

  13. Probing the Cosmic X-ray and MeV Gamma-ray Background Radiation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Probing the Cosmic X-ray and MeV Gamma-ray Background Radiation through the Anisotropy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Probing the Cosmic X-ray and MeV Gamma-ray ...

  14. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals Title: High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses ...

  15. X-Ray Interactions with Matter from the Center for X-Ray Optics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-Ray Interactions with Matter from the Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO) Title: X-Ray Interactions with Matter from the Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO) The primary interactions of ...

  16. REVISITING THE GAMMA-RAY SOURCE 2FGL J1823.8+4312

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.

    2013-02-20

    One of the great challenges of gamma-ray astronomy is identifying the lower energy counterparts to these high-energy sources. Recently, in this journal, Massaro et al. attempted to find the counterpart of 2FGL J1823.8+4312, a gamma-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) of uncertain type from the Second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog. After considering mid-infrared data in the field from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), those authors conclude that the preferred identification of 2FGL J1823.8+4312 is WISE J182352.33+431452.5, despite the fact that the mid-infrared source is undetected at radio energies. They claim that WISE J182352.33+431452.5 constitutes the discovery of a new class of extragalactic X-ray source, either a radio-faint blazar or the prototype of a new class of active galaxy with an enigmatic spectral energy distribution. This conclusion is claimed to be independent of whether or not the WISE source is the actual counterpart to 2FGL J1823.8+4312. Based on a re-analysis of public data in this field and new spectroscopy from Palomar, we conclude that WISE J182352.33+431452.5 is a dust-reddened quasar at z = 0.560, a representative example of a very common extragalactic AGN class. Were WISE J182352.33+431452.5 to be associated with the gamma-ray emission, this would be an unusual and exciting discovery. However, we argue that 2FGL J1823.8+4312 is more likely associated with either WISE J182409.25+431404.7 or, more likely, WISE J182419.04+430949.6, two radio-loud sources in the field. The former is a radio-loud quasar and the latter is an optically variable source with a featureless blue spectrum.

  17. Detectors of Cosmic Rays, Gamma Rays, and Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altamirano, A.; Navarra, G.

    2009-04-30

    We summarize the main features, properties and performances of the typical detectors in use in Cosmic Ray Physics. A brief historical and general introduction will focus on the main classes and requirements of such detectors.

  18. Fiber fed x-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hailey, C.J.; Ziock, K.P.

    1992-06-02

    X-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus is disclosed for detecting the position, energy, and intensity of x-ray/gamma ray radiation comprising scintillation means disposed in the path of such radiation and capable of generating photons in response to such radiation; first photodetection means optically bonded to the scintillation means and capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the intensity, and energy of the radiation detected by the scintillation means; second photodetection means capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the position of the radiation in the radiation pattern; and means for optically coupling the scintillation means to the second photodetection means. The photodetection means are electrically connected to control and storage means which may also be used to screen out noise by rejecting a signal from one photodetection means not synchronized to a signal from the other photodetection means; and also to screen out signals from scattered radiation. 6 figs.

  19. Fiber fed x-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hailey, Charles J.; Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    1992-01-01

    X-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus is disclosed for detecting the position, energy, and intensity of x-ray/gamma ray radiation comprising scintillation means disposed in the path of such radiation and capable of generating photons in response to such radiation; first photodetection means optically bonded to the scintillation means and capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the intensity, and energy of the radiation detected by the scintillation means; second photodetection means capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the position of the radiation in the radiation pattern; and means for optically coupling the scintillation means to the second photodetection means. The photodetection means are electrically connected to control and storage means which may also be used to screen out noise by rejecting a signal from one photodetection means not synchronized to a signal from the other photodetection means; and also to screen out signals from scattered radiation.

  20. New Insulating Antiferromagnetic Quaternary Iridates MLa10Ir4O24...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... reduced vis-a-vis that expected for a J V Kramer's ion. ... effects and super-exchange, while the latter ... and mounted on tips of glass fibers for X-ray diffraction. ...

  1. Nova-like cataclysmic variables in the infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoard, D. W.; Long, Knox S.; Howell, Steve B.; Wachter, Stefanie; Brinkworth, Carolyn S.; Knigge, Christian; Drew, J. E.; Szkody, Paula; Kafka, S.; Belle, Kunegunda; Ciardi, David R.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Van Belle, Gerard T.; Pretorius, M. L.

    2014-05-01

    Nova-like (NL) cataclysmic variables have persistently high mass transfer rates and prominent steady state accretion disks. We present an analysis of infrared observations of 12 NLs obtained from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer All Sky Survey. The presence of an infrared excess at ? ? 3-5 ?m over the expectation of a theoretical steady state accretion disk is ubiquitous in our sample. The strength of the infrared excess is not correlated with orbital period, but shows a statistically significant correlation (but shallow trend) with system inclination that might be partially (but not completely) linked to the increasing view of the cooler outer accretion disk and disk rim at higher inclinations. We discuss the possible origin of the infrared excess in terms of emission from bremsstrahlung or circumbinary dust, with either mechanism facilitated by the mass outflows (e.g., disk wind/corona, accretion stream overflow, and so on) present in NLs. Our comparison of the relative advantages and disadvantages of either mechanism for explaining the observations suggests that the situation is rather ambiguous, largely circumstantial, and in need of stricter observational constraints.

  2. Infrared signature of micro-hydration in the organophosphate sarin: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, Todd M.; Pearce, Charles Joseph

    2015-06-28

    The infrared (IR) spectra of micro-hydrated Sarin(H2O)n clusters containing between one and four explicit waters have been studied using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods. The phosphate group P=O bond vibration region (~1270 to 1290 cm1) revealed the largest frequency variation with hydration, with a frequency red shift reflecting the direct hydrogen bond formation between the P=O of Sarin and water. Small variations to the P-F stretch (~810 to 815 cm1) and the C-O-P vibrational modes (~995 to 1004 cm1) showed that the water interactions with these functional groups were minor, and that the structures of Sarin were not extensively perturbed in the hydrated complexes. Increasing the number of explicit hydration waters produced only small vibrational changes in the lowest free energy complexes. These minor changes were consistent with a single water-phosphate hydrogen bond being the dominant structure, though a second water-phosphate hydrogen bond was observed in some complexes and was identified by an additional red shift of the P=O bond vibration. As a result, the H2OH2O vibrational modes (~3450 to 3660 cm1) increased in complexity with higher hydration levels and reflect the extended hydrogen bonding networks formed between the explicit waters in the hydrated Sarin clusters.

  3. Infrared signature of micro-hydration in the organophosphate sarin: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, Todd M.; Pearce, Charles Joseph

    2015-06-28

    The infrared (IR) spectra of micro-hydrated Sarin•(H2O)n clusters containing between one and four explicit waters have been studied using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods. The phosphate group P=O bond vibration region (~1270 to 1290 cm–1) revealed the largest frequency variation with hydration, with a frequency red shift reflecting the direct hydrogen bond formation between the P=O of Sarin and water. Small variations to the P-F stretch (~810 to 815 cm–1) and the C-O-P vibrational modes (~995 to 1004 cm–1) showed that the water interactions with these functional groups were minor, and that the structures of Sarin were not extensively perturbed in the hydrated complexes. Increasing the number of explicit hydration waters produced only small vibrational changes in the lowest free energy complexes. These minor changes were consistent with a single water-phosphate hydrogen bond being the dominant structure, though a second water-phosphate hydrogen bond was observed in some complexes and was identified by an additional red shift of the P=O bond vibration. As a result, the H2O•H2O vibrational modes (~3450 to 3660 cm–1) increased in complexity with higher hydration levels and reflect the extended hydrogen bonding networks formed between the explicit waters in the hydrated Sarin clusters.

  4. Total reflection infrared spectroscopy of water-ice and frozen aqueous NaCl solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Rachel L.; Searles, Keith; Willard, Jesse A.; Michelsen, Rebecca R. H., E-mail: RMichelsen@rmc.edu [Department of Chemistry, Randolph-Macon College, P.O. Box 5005, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Randolph-Macon College, P.O. Box 5005, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)

    2013-12-28

    Liquid-like and liquid water at and near the surface of water-ice and frozen aqueous sodium chloride films were observed using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). The concentration of NaCl ranged from 0.0001 to 0.01 M and the temperature varied from the melting point of water down to 256 K. The amount of liquid brine at the interface of the frozen films with the germanium ATR crystal increased with salt concentration and temperature. Experimental spectra are compared to reflection spectra calculated for a simplified morphology of a uniform liquid layer between the germanium crystal and the frozen film. This morphology allows for the amount of liquid observed in an experimental spectrum to be converted to the thickness of a homogenous layer with an equivalent amount of liquid. These equivalent thickness ranges from a nanometer for water-ice at 260 K to 170 nm for 0.01 M NaCl close to the melting point. The amounts of brine observed are over an order of magnitude less than the total liquid predicted by equilibrium thermodynamic models, implying that the vast majority of the liquid fraction of frozen solutions may be found in internal inclusions, grain boundaries, and the like. Thus, the amount of liquid and the solutes dissolved in them that are available to react with atmospheric gases on the surfaces of snow and ice are not well described by thermodynamic equilibrium models which assume the liquid phase is located entirely at the surface.

  5. THE 'NESSIE' NEBULA: CLUSTER FORMATION IN A FILAMENTARY INFRARED DARK CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, James M.; Finn, Susanna C.; Chambers, Edward T.; Rathborne, Jill M.; Simon, Robert E-mail: sfinn@bu.ed E-mail: rathborn@das.uchile.c

    2010-08-20

    The 'Nessie' Nebula is a filamentary infrared dark cloud (IRDC) with a large aspect ratio of over 150:1 (1.{sup 0}5 x 0.{sup 0}01 or 80 pc x 0.5 pc at a kinematic distance of 3.1 kpc). Maps of HNC (1-0) emission, a tracer of dense molecular gas, made with the Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra telescope, show an excellent morphological match to the mid-IR extinction. Moreover, because the molecular line emission from the entire nebula has the same radial velocity to within {+-}3.4 km s{sup -1}, the nebula is a single, coherent cloud and not the chance alignment of multiple unrelated clouds along the line of sight. The Nessie Nebula contains a number of compact, dense molecular cores which have a characteristic projected spacing of {approx}4.5 pc along the filament. The theory of gravitationally bound gaseous cylinders predicts the existence of such cores, which, due to the 'sausage' or 'varicose' fluid instability, fragment from the cylinder at a characteristic length scale. If turbulent pressure dominates over thermal pressure in Nessie, then the observed core spacing matches theoretical predictions. We speculate that the formation of high-mass stars and massive star clusters arises from the fragmentation of filamentary IRDCs caused by the 'sausage' fluid instability that leads to the formation of massive, dense molecular cores. The filamentary molecular gas clouds often found near high-mass star-forming regions (e.g., Orion, NGC 6334, etc.) may represent a later stage of IRDC evolution.

  6. NEW ACCURATE MEASUREMENT OF {sup 36}ArH{sup +} AND {sup 38}ArH{sup +} RO-VIBRATIONAL TRANSITIONS BY HIGH RESOLUTION IR ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cueto, M.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.; Doménech, J. L.; Cernicharo, J.; Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.

    2014-03-01

    The protonated argon ion, {sup 36}ArH{sup +}, was recently identified in the Crab Nebula from Herschel spectra. Given the atmospheric opacity at the frequency of its J = 1-0 and J = 2-1 rotational transitions (617.5 and 1234.6 GHz, respectively), and the current lack of appropriate space observatories after the recent end of the Herschel mission, future studies on this molecule will rely on mid-infrared observations. We report on accurate wavenumber measurements of {sup 36}ArH{sup +} and {sup 38}ArH{sup +} rotation-vibration transitions in the v = 1-0 band in the range 4.1-3.7 μm (2450-2715 cm{sup –1}). The wavenumbers of the R(0) transitions of the v = 1-0 band are 2612.50135 ± 0.00033 and 2610.70177 ± 0.00042 cm{sup –1} (±3σ) for {sup 36}ArH{sup +} and {sup 38}ArH{sup +}, respectively. The calculated opacity for a gas thermalized at a temperature of 100 K and with a linewidth of 1 km s{sup –1} of the R(0) line is 1.6 × 10{sup –15} × N({sup 36}ArH{sup +}). For column densities of {sup 36}ArH{sup +} larger than 1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup –2}, significant absorption by the R(0) line can be expected against bright mid-IR sources.

  7. Laser separation of nitrogen isotopes by the IR+UV dissociation of ammonia molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apatin, V M; Klimin, S A; Laptev, V B; Lokhman, V N; Ogurok, D D; Pigul'skii, S V; Ryabov, E A

    2008-08-31

    The separation of nitrogen isotopes is studied upon successive single-photon IR excitation and UV dissociation of ammonia molecules. The excitation selectivity was provided by tuning a CO{sub 2} laser to resonance with {sup 14}NH{sub 3} molecules [the 9R(30) laser line] or with {sup 15}NH{sub 3} molecules [the 9R(10) laser line]. Isotopic mixtures containing 4.8% and 0.37% (natural content) of the {sup 15}NH isotope were investigated. The dependences of the selectivity and the dissociation yield for each isotopic component on the buffer gas pressure (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, Ar) and the ammonia pressure were obtained. In the limit of low NH{sub 3} pressures (0.5-2 Torr), the dissociation selectivity {alpha}(15/14) for {sup 15}N was 17. The selectivity mechanism of the IR+UV dissociation is discussed and the outlook is considered for the development of the nitrogen isotope separation process based on this approach. (laser isotope separation)

  8. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Im ', Lars Bocklage, Guido Meier and Peter Fischer' ' C e ir te r -f o rX a y Optics, Lawrence Berkeley N ational Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Institut fiir A ...

  9. HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINO AND GAMMA-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM TRANS-RELATIVISTIC SUPERNOVA SHOCK BREAKOUTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Gao, Shan; Meszaros, Peter [Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Murase, Kohta; Horiuchi, Shunsaku, E-mail: kzk15@psu.edu [CCAPP and Department of Physics, Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-05-20

    Trans-relativistic shocks that accompany some supernovae (SNe) produce X-ray burst emissions as they break out in the dense circumstellar medium around the progenitors. This phenomenon is sometimes associated with peculiar low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (LL GRBs). Here, we investigate the high-energy neutrino and gamma-ray counterparts of such a class of SNe. Just beyond the shock breakout radius, particle acceleration in the collisionless shock starts to operate in the presence of breakout photons. We show that protons may be accelerated to sufficiently high energies and produce high-energy neutrinos and gamma rays via the photomeson interaction. These neutrinos and gamma rays may be detectable from {approx}< 10 Mpc away by IceCube/KM3Net as multi-TeV transients almost simultaneously with the X-ray breakout, and even from {approx}< 100 Mpc away with follow-up observations by the Cherenkov Telescope Array using a wide-field sky monitor like Swift as a trigger. A statistical technique using a stacking approach could also be possible for the detection, with the aid of the SN optical/infrared counterparts. Such multi-messenger observations offer the possibility to probe the transition of trans-relativistic shocks from radiation-mediated to collisionless ones, and would also constrain the mechanisms of particle acceleration and emission in LL GRBs.

  10. Constraints on dark matter annihilations from diffuse gamma-ray emission in the Galaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavakoli, Maryam; Evoli, Carmelo; Cholis, Ilias; Ullio, Piero E-mail: cholis@fnal.gov E-mail: ullio@sissa.it

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in γ-ray cosmic ray, infrared and radio astronomy have allowed us to develop a significantly better understanding of the galactic medium properties in the last few years. In this work using the DRAGON code, that numerically solves the CR propagation equation and calculating γ-ray emissivities in a 2-dimensional grid enclosing the Galaxy, we study in a self consistent manner models for the galactic diffuse γ-ray emission. Our models are cross-checked to both the available CR and γ-ray data. We address the extend to which dark matter annihilations in the Galaxy can contribute to the diffuse γ-ray flux towards different directions on the sky. Moreover we discuss the impact that astrophysical uncertainties of non DM nature, have on the derived γ-ray limits. Such uncertainties are related to the diffusion properties on the Galaxy, the interstellar gas and the interstellar radiation field energy densities. Light ∼ 10 GeV dark matter annihilating dominantly to hadrons is more strongly constrained by γ-ray observations towards the inner parts of the Galaxy and influenced the most by assumptions of the gas distribution; while TeV scale DM annihilating dominantly to leptons has its tightest constraints from observations towards the galactic center avoiding the galactic disk plane, with the main astrophysical uncertainty being the radiation field energy density. In addition, we present a method of deriving constraints on the dark matter distribution profile from the diffuse γ-ray spectra. These results critically depend on the assumed mass of the dark matter particles and the type of its end annihilation products.

  11. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  12. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syryamkin, V. I. Klestov, S. A.

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  13. SMB, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Absorption Spectroscopy X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a well-established technique for simultaneous local geometric and electronic structure...

  14. SciTech Connect: "gamma ray bursts"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    gamma ray bursts" Find + Advanced Search Term Search Semantic Search Advanced Search All Fields: "gamma ray bursts" Semantic Semantic Term Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data:...

  15. Ray Smith | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ray Smith Ray Smith Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case ...

  16. Dispersion properties and low infrared optical losses in epitaxial AlN on sapphire substrate in the visible and infrared range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soltani, A. Stolz, A.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Rousseau, M.; Bourzgui, N.; De Jaeger, J.-C.; Charrier, J.; Mattalah, M.; Barkad, H. A.; Mortet, V.

    2014-04-28

    Optical waveguiding properties of a thick wurtzite aluminum nitride highly [002]-textured hetero-epitaxial film on (001) basal plane of sapphire substrate are studied. The physical properties of the film are determined by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, microRaman, and photocurrent spectroscopy. The refractive index and the thermo-optic coefficients are determined by m-lines spectroscopy using the classical prism coupling technique. The optical losses of this planar waveguide are also measured in the spectral range of 450–1553 nm. The lower value of optical losses is equal to 0.7 dB/cm at 1553 nm. The optical losses due to the surface scattering are simulated showing that the contribution is the most significant at near infrared wavelength range, whereas the optical losses are due to volume scattering and material absorption in the visible range. The good physical properties and the low optical losses obtained from this planar waveguide are encouraging to achieve a wide bandgap optical guiding platform from these aluminum nitride thin films.

  17. Hard, infrared black coating with very low outgassing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzmenko, P J; Behne, D M; Casserly, T; Boardman, W; Upadhyaya, D; Boinapally, K; Gupta, M; Cao, Y

    2008-06-02

    Infrared astronomical instruments require absorptive coatings on internal surfaces to trap scattered and stray photons. This is typically accomplished with any one of a number of black paints. Although inexpensive and simple to apply, paint has several disadvantages. Painted surfaces can be fragile, prone to shedding particles, and difficult to clean. Most importantly, the vacuum performance is poor. Recently a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process was developed to apply thick (30 {micro}m) diamond-like carbon (DLC) based protective coatings to the interior of oil pipelines. These DLC coatings show much promise as an infrared black for an ultra high vacuum environment. The coatings are very robust with excellent cryogenic adhesion. Their total infrared reflectivity of < 10% at normal incidence approaches that of black paints. We measured outgas rates of <10{sup -12} Torr liter/sec cm{sup 2}, comparable to bare stainless steel.

  18. Blocked impurity band hybrid infrared focal plane arrays for astronomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, D.B.; Seib, D.H.; Stetson, S.B.; Herter, T.; Rowlands, N.; Schoenwald, J.

    1989-02-01

    High-performance infrared hybrid focal plane arrays using 10 x 50 element Si:As Blocked-Impurity-Band (BIB) detectors (cut-off wavelength = 28 ..mu..m) and matching switched MOSFET multiplexers have been developed and characterized for space astronomy. Use of impurity band conduction technology provides detectors which are nuclear radiation hard and free of the many anomalies associated with conventional silicon photoconductive detectors. Emphasis in this paper is on recent advances in detector material quality which have led to significantly improved detector and hybrid characteristics. Results demonstrating increase quantum efficiency (particular at short wavelength infrared), obtained by varying the Blocked-Impurity-Band detector properties (infrared active layer thickness and arsenic doping profile), are summarized. Read noise and dark current for different temperatures have been measured and are also described. The hybrid array performance achieved clearly demonstrates that BIB detectors are well suited for use in astronomical instrumentation.

  19. Noise Reduction Efforts for the ALS Infrared Beamlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarvie, Tom; Andresen, Nord; Baptiste, Ken; Byrd, John; Chin, Mike; Martin, Michael; McKinney, Wayne; Steier, Christoph

    2004-05-12

    The quality of infrared microscopy and spectroscopy data collected at synchrotron based sources is strongly dependent on signal-to-noise. We have successfully identified and suppressed several noise sources affecting Beamlines 1.4.2, 1.4.3, and 1.4.4 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), resulting in a significant increase in the quality of FTIR spectra obtained. In this paper, we present our methods of noise source analysis, the negative effect of noise on the infrared beam quality, and the techniques used to reduce the noise. These include reducing the phase noise in the storage ring radio-frequency (RF) system, installing an active mirror feedback system, analyzing and changing physical mounts to better isolate portions of the beamline optics from low-frequency environmental noise, and modifying the input signals to the main ALS RF system. We also discuss the relationship between electron beam energy oscillations at a point of dispersion and infrared beamline noise.

  20. High speed infrared radiation thermometer, system, and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Markham, James R. (Middlefield, CT)

    2002-01-01

    The high-speed radiation thermometer has an infrared measurement wavelength band that is matched to the infrared wavelength band of near-blackbody emittance of ceramic components and ceramic thermal barrier coatings used in turbine engines. It is comprised of a long wavelength infrared detector, a signal amplifier, an analog-to-digital converter, an optical system to collect radiation from the target, an optical filter, and an integral reference signal to maintain a calibrated response. A megahertz range electronic data acquisition system is connected to the radiation detector to operate on raw data obtained. Because the thermometer operates optimally at 8 to 12 .mu.m, where emittance is near-blackbody for ceramics, interferences to measurements performed in turbine engines are minimized. The method and apparatus are optimized to enable mapping of surface temperatures on fast moving ceramic elements, and the thermometer can provide microsecond response, with inherent self-diagnostic and calibration-correction features.