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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

IR SNOM - Infrared Near-field Nanoimaging | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser. Utilizing a broadly-tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser for...

2

Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR RECEIVED ON FEBRUARY 3, 2009 C O N S P E C T U S Water is ubiquitous in nature, but it exists as pure water infrequently. From the ocean to biology, water molecules interact with a wide variety of dissolved species

Fayer, Michael D.

3

Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Microspectroscopic Census of Single Starch Granules for Octenyl Succinate Ester Modification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy was used to investigate reaction homogeneity of octenyl succinic anhydride modification on waxy maize starch and detect uniformity of blends of modified and native starches. For the first time, the ...

Yanjie Bai; Yong-Cheng Shi; David L. Wetzel

2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

4

In Situ Real-Time Diffuse Reflection Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) Study of Hydrogen Adsorption and Desorption on Ir/SiO2 Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adsorption and desorption of hydrogen on Ir/SiO2 catalyst were studied by using in situ diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) combined with...

Hu, Gengshen; Zhu, Lin; Jia, Aiping; Hu, Xin; Xie, Guanqun; Lu, Jiqing; Luo, Mengfei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Optical Variability of Infrared Power Law-Selected Galaxies & X-ray Sources in the GOODS-South Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the use of optical variability to identify and study Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the GOODS-South field. A sample of 22 mid-infrared power law sources and 102 X-ray sources with optical counterparts in the HST ACS images were selected. Each object is classified with a variability significance value related to the standard deviation of its magnitude in five epochs separated by 45-day intervals. The variability significance is compared to the optical, mid-IR, and X-ray properties of the sources. We find that 26% of all AGN candidates (either X-ray- or mid-IR-selected) are optical variables. The fraction of optical variables increases to 51% when considering sources with soft X-ray band ratios. For the mid-IR AGN candidates which have multiwavelength SEDs, we find optical variability for 64% of those classified with SEDs like Broad Line AGNs. While mostly unobscured AGN appear to have the most significant optical variability, some of the more obscured AGNs are also observed as variables. In particular, we find two mid-IR power law-selected AGN candidates without X-ray emission that display optical variability, confirming their AGN nature.

Alison Klesman; Vicki Sarajedini

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

6

Catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide over Ir/SiO/sub 2/. An in situ infrared and kinetic study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation of CO on a highly dispersed Ir/SiO/sub 2/ catalyst has been studied both in a Pyrex microreactor and by using an in situ infrared cell-reactor. Multiple steady states obtained under conditions of increasing and decreasing CO partial pressure were observed to lead to reaction rate hysteresis. The area under the hysteresis loop is strongly dependent on reaction temperature. This is explained by invoking competitive adsorption between CO and O/sub 2/ as a function of temperature. Self-sustained oscillations were obtained when certain conditions of partial pressure and temperature were met. Quantitative estimates of fluctuations in surface coverage and temperature during these oscillations were 10% and 3K, respectively. CO islands of reactivity were not observed under the conditions of this study. The presence of higher oxidation states of IR could not be unequivocally determined by using infrared spectroscopy. 29 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

Saymeh, R.A.; Gonzalez, R.D.

1986-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

7

Performance of new infrared beamline U12IR at the National Synchrotron Light Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequency limit of 2 cm 1 i.e., 60 GHz or a photon energy of 250 eV . The infrared light from infrared beamline at the NSLS and, with increasing demand for measurement time, has been followed by a series of new infrared ports presently under construction and com- missioning. This also allowed for some

Tanner, David B.

8

MID-INFRARED ATOMIC FINE-STRUCTURE EMISSION-LINE SPECTRA OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: SPITZER/IRS SPECTRA OF THE GOALS SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the data and our analysis of mid-infrared atomic fine-structure emission lines detected in Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph high-resolution spectra of 202 local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). We readily detect emission lines of [S IV], [Ne II], [Ne V], [Ne III], [S III]{sub 18.7{sub ?m}}, [O IV], [Fe II], [S III]{sub 33.5{sub ?m}}, and [Si II]. More than 75% of these galaxies are classified as starburst-dominated sources in the mid-infrared, based on the [Ne V]/[Ne II] line flux ratios and equivalent width of the 6.2 ?m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon feature. We compare ratios of the emission-line fluxes to those predicted from stellar photo-ionization and shock-ionization models to constrain the physical and chemical properties of the gas in the starburst LIRG nuclei. Comparing the [S IV]/[Ne II] and [Ne III]/[Ne II] line ratios to the Starburst99-Mappings III models with an instantaneous burst history, the emission-line ratios suggest that the nuclear starbursts in our LIRGs have ages of 1-4.5 Myr, metallicities of 1-2 Z{sub ?}, and ionization parameters of 2-8 × 10{sup 7} cm s{sup –1}. Based on the [S III]{sub 33.5{sub ?m}}/[S III]{sub 18.7{sub ?m}} ratios, the electron density in LIRG nuclei is typically one to a few hundred cm{sup –3}, with a median electron density of ?300 cm{sup –3}, for those sources above the low density limit for these lines. We also find that strong shocks are likely present in 10 starburst-dominated sources of our sample. A significant fraction of the GOALS sources (80) have resolved neon emission-line profiles (FWHM ?600 km s{sup –1}) and five show clear differences in the velocities of the [Ne III] or [Ne V] emission lines, relative to [Ne II], of more than 200 km s{sup –1}. Furthermore, six starburst and five active galactic nucleus dominated LIRGs show a clear trend of increasing line width with ionization potential, suggesting the possibility of a compact energy source and stratified interstellar medium in their nuclei. We confirm a strong correlation between the sum of the [Ne II]{sub 12.8{sub ?m}} and [Ne III]{sub 15.5{sub ?m}} emission, as well as [S III]{sub 33.5{sub ?m}}, with both the infrared luminosity and the 24 ?m warm dust emission measured from the spectra, consistent with all three lines tracing ongoing star formation. Finally, we find no correlation between the hardness of the radiation field or the emission-line width and the ratio of the total infrared to 8 ?m emission (IR8), a measure of the strength of the starburst and the distance of the LIRGs from the star-forming main sequence. This may be a function of the fact that the infrared luminosity and the mid-infrared fine-structure lines are sensitive to different timescales over the starburst, or that IR8 is more sensitive to the geometry of the region emitting the warm dust than the radiation field producing the H II region emission.

Inami, H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Armus, L.; Stierwalt, S.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Surace, J.; Howell, J.; Marshall, J. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, CA 91125 (United States); Charmandaris, V. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Groves, B. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kewley, L. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Petric, A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MS 320-47, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rich, J. [The Observatories, Carnegie Institute of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Haan, S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Marsfield, NSW 2122 (Australia); Evans, A. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Mazzarella, J.; Lord, S. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Appleton, P. [NASA Herschel Science Center, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Spoon, H. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Frayer, D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Matsuhara, H., E-mail: inami@noao.edu [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); and others

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

9

A Low-Cost Reflectance FT-IR Microscope  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) microscope combines microscopy with infrared (IR) spectroscopic molecular characterization. IR microspectroscopy presents a...

Jansen, J A J; Van Der Maas, J H; Posthuma De Boer, A

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Near Infrared observations of Soft X-ray selected AGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the results of near infrared observations of 19 soft X-ray selected AGN. The goal of the observations was to search for strong, narrow Paschen-alpha or Brackett-gamma emission lines, as a sign of nuclear starbursts. We found Pa-alpha emission in the spectra of 11 sources and Br-gamma in at least five. Strong NIR emission has been found in two sources, CBS 126 and Mkn 766, both objects with strong [OIII]5007 emission, weak FeII emission and wavelength dependent degree of polarization in the optical. Classical Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies do not show exceptionally strong NIR emission lines. We present the results of our study and discuss how our findings fit into an evolutionary scheme of AGN.

D. Grupe; H. -C Thomas

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

11

NEAR-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF THE X-RAY-EMITTING YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE CARINA NEBULA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Great Nebula in Carina (NGC 3372) is the best target to study in detail the process of violent massive star formation and the resulting feedback effects of cloud dispersal and triggered star formation. While the population of massive stars is rather well studied, the associated low-mass stellar population was largely unknown up to now. The near-infrared study in this paper builds on the results of the Chandra Carina Complex Project, that detected 14,368 X-ray sources in the 1.4 deg{sup 2} survey region, an automatic source classification study that classified 10,714 of these X-ray sources as very likely young stars in Carina, and an analysis of the clustering properties of the X-ray-selected Carina members. In order to determine physical properties of the X-ray-selected stars, most of which were previously unstudied, we used HAWK-I at the ESO Very Large Telescope to conduct a very deep near-IR survey with subarcsecond angular resolution, covering an area of about 1280 arcmin{sup 2}. The HAWK-I images reveal more than 600,000 individual infrared sources, whereby objects as faint as J {approx} 23, H {approx} 22, and K{sub s} {approx} 21 are detected at signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) {>=}3. While less than half of the Chandra X-ray sources have counterparts in the Two Micron All Sky Survey catalog, the {approx}5 mag deeper HAWK-I data reveal infrared counterparts to 6636 (=88.8%) of the 7472 Chandra X-ray sources in the HAWK-I field. We analyze near-infrared color-color and color-magnitude diagrams to derive information about the extinctions, infrared excesses (as tracers for circumstellar disks), ages, and masses of the X-ray-selected objects. The near-infrared properties agree well with the results of the automatic X-ray source classification, showing that the remaining contamination in the X-ray-selected sample of Carina members is very low ({approx}<7%). The shape of the K-band luminosity function of the X-ray-selected Carina members agrees well with that derived for the Orion Nebula Cluster, suggesting that, down to the X-ray detection limit around 0.5-1 M{sub sun}, the shape of the initial mass function (IMF) in Carina is consistent with that in Orion (and thus the field IMF). The fraction of stars with near-infrared excesses is rather small, {approx}<10%, but shows considerable variations between individual parts of the complex. The distribution of extinctions for the diskless stars ranges from {approx}1.6 mag to {approx}6.2 mag (central 80th percentile), clearly showing a considerable range of differential extinction between individual stars in the complex.

Preibisch, Thomas [Universitaets-Sternwarte Muenchen, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Scheinerstr. 1, 81679 Muenchen (Germany); Hodgkin, Simon; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, James R. [Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit, Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); King, Robert R. [Astrophysics Group, College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); McCaughrean, Mark J. [European Space Agency, Research and Scientific Support Department, ESTEC, Postbus 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Zinnecker, Hans [Deutsches SOFIA Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Townsley, Leisa; Broos, Patrick [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

THREE NEW GALACTIC CENTER X-RAY SOURCES IDENTIFIED WITH NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have conducted a near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 47 candidate counterparts to X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory near the Galactic center (GC). Though a significant number of these astrometric matches are likely to be spurious, we sought out spectral characteristics of active stars and interacting binaries, such as hot, massive spectral types or emission lines, in order to corroborate the X-ray activity and certify the authenticity of the match. We present three new spectroscopic identifications, including a Be high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) or a ? Cassiopeiae (Cas) system, a symbiotic X-ray binary, and an O-type star of unknown luminosity class. The Be HMXB/? Cas system and the symbiotic X-ray binary are the first of their classes to be spectroscopically identified in the GC region.

DeWitt, Curtis [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Sarajedini, Ata [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sellgren, Kris [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bauer, Franz E., E-mail: curtis.n.dewitt@nasa.gov [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Theoretical study of the magnetic x-ray dichroism of Os, Ir, Pt, and Au impurities in Fe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic structure of the 5d impurities Os, Ir, Pt, and Au in ferromagnetic Fe has been studied by the spin-polarized, relativistic version of the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green’s-function method. This approach simultaneously treats spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling and naturally allows for a theoretical investigation of effects arising from an interplay of both. Here the polarization dependence of x-ray absorption (magnetic x-ray dichroism) is considered. For all the impurities studied, the agreement with recent experimental L2 and L3 absorption spectra is very satisfactory. For Pt in Fe, a decomposition of the spectra into various absorption channels is presented and the applicability of a simplified model is discussed that interprets the spectra in terms of a spin-polarized band structure alone.

H. Ebert and R. Zeller

1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Probing photochemical transformations at TiO{sub 2}/Pt and TiO{sub 2}/Ir interfaces using x-ray absorption spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural transformations at the TiO{sub 2}/Pt and TiO{sub 2}/Ir interfaces during UV-irradiation have been probed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Oxidation by the photogenerated holes results in the intercalation of Pt and Ir into the Titania matrix. The structural transformations observed with Pt and Ir nanoparticles anchored on TiO{sub 2} is different than the clustering of gold atoms observed in the TiO{sub 2}/Au system. Implications of such structural transformations on the photocatalytic activity of semiconductor photocatalyts are discussed.

Lahiri, Debdutta; Subramanian, V.; Bunker, Bruce A.; Kamat, Prashant V. [Synchrotron Radiation Section, Physics Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2006-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

15

POLARIZATION AND VARIATION OF NEAR-INFRARED LIGHT FROM FERMI/LAT {gamma}-RAY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of our follow-up observation program of {gamma}-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Twenty-six blazars and thirty-nine sources unidentified at other wavelengths were targeted at the Infrared Survey Facility 1.4 m telescope equipped with the SIRIUS/SIRPOL imager and polarimeter. H-band magnitudes of the blazars at the epoch of 2010 December-2011 February are presented, which reveal clear flux variation since the Two Micron All Sky Survey observations and can be useful data for variation analyses of these objects in longer periods. We also find that nearly half of the {gamma}-ray blazars are highly (>10%) polarized in near-infrared wavelengths. Combining the polarization and variation properties, most ({approx}90%) of the blazars are clearly distinguished from all other types of objects at high Galactic latitudes. On the other hand, we find only one highly polarized and/or variable object in the fields of unidentified sources. This object is a counterpart of the optical variable source PQV1 J131553.00-073302.0 and the radio source NVSS J131552-073301 and is a promising candidate of new {gamma}-ray blazars. From the measured polarization and variation statistics, we conclude that most of the Fermi/LAT unidentified sources are not likely similar types of objects to the known {gamma}-ray blazars.

Fujiwara, M.; Matsuoka, Y. [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Ienaka, N., E-mail: matsuoka@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Institute of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Absolute measurements of nitric acid by kilometer pathlength FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and their intercomparison with other measurement methods. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of ambient nitric acid (HNO/sub 3/) and ammonia (NH/sub 3/) concentrations were conducted using a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer interfaced to an open-path, multiple-reflection optical system. These measurements provided benchmark data for gaseous HNO/sub 3/ and NH/sub 3/ during a field study, held at Claremont, California, September 11-19, 1985, which compared current analytical methods for determining nitrogenous species concentrations in the atmosphere. Hourly average concentrations of HNO/sub 3/ and NH/sub 3/ are reported, along with the calculated average concentrations for the sampling periods designated for the majority of the other measurement methods.

Winer, A.M.; Tuazon, E.C.; Biermann, H.W.; Wallington, T.J.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Quasi-simultaneous observations of BL Lac object Mrk 501 in X-ray, UV, visible, IR, and radio frequencies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quasi-simultaneous observations of the BL Lac object Mrk 501 were performed for the first time at X-ray, ultraviolet, visible infrared, and radio frequencies. As the BL Lac objects are known to vary in their flux, such a ''quasi-instantaneous'' spectral energy profile is necessary in order to describe properly the energy generation mechanism. The observed spectral slope from the X-ray to UV regions is positive and continuous, but that from the mid-UV to visible light region becomes gradually flat and possibly turns down toward lower frequencies; the optical-radio emission cannot be accounted for by a single power law. Several theoretical models have been considered for the emission mechanism. In some cases quantitative comparison with the data is not practical. However, most of the models are, at least, not inconsistent with the observations. A quantitative comparison has been peformed with the synchroton self-Compton model; the total spectrum is found consistent with this model. The spectrum from visible light to X-ray is consistent with synchrotron radiation or with inverse-Compton scattering by a hot thermal cloud of electrons. The continuity of the spectral slope from X-ray to UV implied by the current data suggests that the previous estimates of the total luminosity of this BL Lac object has been underestimated by a factor of about 3 or 4.

Kondo, Y.; Worrall, D.M.; Mushotzky, R.F.; Hackney, R.L.; Hackney, K.R.H.; Oke, J.B.; Yee, H.K.C.; Neugebauer, G.; Matthews, K.; Feldman, P.A.; Brown, R.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF BLACK HOLE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES: ASSESSING THE NON-STELLAR INFRARED COMPONENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have combined ground-based optical and near-infrared data with Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared data for five black hole (BH) soft X-ray transients (SXTs) in order to determine the levels of near- and mid-infrared emission from sources other than the secondary star. Mid-infrared emission from an accretion disk, circumbinary dust, and/or a jet could act as sources of near-infrared contamination, thereby diluting ellipsoidal variations of the secondary star and affecting determined BH mass estimates. Based on optical to mid-infrared spectral energy distribution modeling of the five SXTs along with the prototype, V616 Mon, we detected mid-infrared excesses in half of the systems, and suggest that the excesses detected from these systems arise from non-thermal synchrotron jets rather than circumbinary dust disks.

Gelino, Dawn M. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gelino, Christopher R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Harrison, Thomas E., E-mail: dawn@ipac.caltech.ed [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

19

Transition-metal (Au, Pt, Ir, Re) bonding to Al,Si,Ge: X-ray-absorption studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report transition-metal (T) L2 and L3 near-edge x-ray-absorption spectroscopy measurements on more than a score of T-X compounds with T=Au, Pt, Ir, and Re and X=Al, Si, and Ge. We correlate the strength of the (2p?5d)-related ‘‘white line’’ feature at these edges to the degree of chemical-bonding-induced 5d-orbital charge transfer in these materials. Similar bonding trends are shown to be present in 1:2:2 compounds involving these T and X elements. Finally, the bonding-induced charge-transfer effects in such T-X compounds are discussed along with the Pauling electronegativity scale. [L. Pauling, The Nature of the Chemical Bond (Cornell University Press, New York, 1960), p. 93.

Y. Jeon, Boyun Qi, F. Lu, and M. Croft

1989-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

ROSAT All-Sky Survey observations of IRAS galaxies; I. Soft X-ray and far-infrared properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 120,000 X-ray sources detected in the RASS II processing of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey are correlated with the 14,315 IRAS galaxies selected from the IRAS Point Source Catalogue: 372 IRAS galaxies show X-ray emission within a distance of 100 arcsec from the infrared position. By inspecting the structure of the X-ray emission in overlays on optical images we quantify the likelihood that the X-rays originate from the IRAS galaxy. For 197 objects the soft X-ray emission is very likely associated with the IRAS galaxy. Their soft X-ray properties are determined and compared with their far-infrared emission. X-ray contour plots overlaid on Palomar Digitized Sky Survey images are given for each of the 372 potential identifications. All images and tables displayed here are also available in electronic form.

Th. Boller; F. Bertoldi; M. Dennefeld; W. Voges

1997-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Infrared Spectrophotometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wavelengths at which radiation is absorbed or emitted by minerals in the IR region can be related to the interatomic vibrations in the molecules or crystals. Infrared measurements, therefore, have definite...

W. M. Tuddenham; J. D. Stephens

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Far-infrared observations of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray burst host galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic phenomena in the Universe; believed to result from the collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars. Even though it has profound consequences for our understanding of their nature and selection biases, little is known about the dust properties of the galaxies hosting GRBs. We present analysis of the far-infrared properties of an unbiased sample of 21 GRB host galaxies (at an average redshift of $z\\,=\\,3.1$) located in the {\\it Herschel} Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS), the {\\it Herschel} Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS), the {\\it Herschel} Fornax Cluster Survey (HeFoCS), the {\\it Herschel} Stripe 82 Survey (HerS) and the {\\it Herschel} Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES), totalling $880$ deg$^2$, or $\\sim 3$\\% of the sky in total. Our sample selection is serendipitous, based only on whether the X-ray position of a GRB lies within a large-scale {\\it Herschel} survey -- therefore our sample can be considered completely unbiased. Using ...

Kohn, Saul A; Bourne, Nathan; Baes, Maarten; Fritz, Jacopo; Cooray, Asantha; De Looze, Ilse; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Dunne, Loretta; Dye, Simon; Eales, Stephen; Furlanetto, Cristina; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Ibar, Edo; Ivison, Rob J; Maddox, Steve J; Scott, Douglas; Smith, Daniel J B; Smith, Matthew W L; Symeonidis, Myrto; Valiante, Elisabetta

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

X-ray absorption studies of the local structure and f-level occupancy in CeIr(1-x)Rh(x)In(5)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CeIr{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x}In{sub 5} series exhibits a range of interesting phenomena, including heavy-fermion superconductivity, non-Fermi liquid behavior, and concomitant antiferromagnetism (AF) and superconductivity (SC). In the low-Rh concentration range (0.1 {ge} x {ge} 0.5), specific heat measurements show a broad anomaly, suggestive of gross phase separation. We have performed x-ray absorption experiments at the Ce L{sub III}, Ir L{sub III}, and Rh K-edges as a function of Rh concentration and temperature. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements indicate that cerium is close to trivalent in this system, with no measurable change with temperature from 20-300 K, consistent with a heavy-fermion material. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements as a function of temperature from all measured edges indicate the local crystal structure of all samples is well ordered, with no gross phase separation observed, even for samples with x = 0.125 and x = 0.25. These results therefore suggest that the anomalous specific heat behavior in the 0.1 {ge} x {ge} 0.5 range have some other explanation, and some possibilities are discussed.

Daniel, M.; Han, S.-W.; Booth, C.H.; Cornelius, A.L.; Pagliuso, P.G.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Infrared spectroscopic, x-ray, and nanoscale characterization of strontium titanate thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) measurements were performed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in the ATR mode with a thallium iodobromide (KRS-5) crystal to measure the frequencies of the v{sub 3} and v{sub 4} phonon absorption bands in thin Sr titanate films deposited on single-crystal Y-Ba Cu oxide (YBCO), La aluminate, Mg oxide, and Sr titanate substrates. The KRS-5 crystal enabled FTIR-ATR measurements at frequencies above 400 cm{sup -1}. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were also made to further characterize the films. The measurements were repeated on single-crystal specimens of Sr titanate and the substrates for comparison. Softening in the frequency of the v{sub 4} transverse optical phonon in the lattice-mismatched films below the established value of 544 cm{sup -1} is indicative of the highly textured, polycrystalline ceramic nature of the films and is consistent with the XRD and AFM results.

Webb, J.D.; Moutinho, H.R.; Kazmerski, L.L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Mueller, C.H.; Rivkin, T.V.; Treece, R.E. [Superconducting Core Technologies, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Dalberth, M.; Rogers, C.T. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Physics

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The Milky Way in Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Milky Way in Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Light 2511 Gamma-Ray Light: What is it? Detecting Very-Ray Light Weaver etal 1977 (also Swift src 5) 2 prob. 7.0x10-1 Note size of car! Very High Energy Gamma is Gamma-Ray Light so useful in Astronomy? X-rays Optical Infrared (IR) Radio Gamma-rays (low energy

Adelaide, University of

26

X-ray and infrared properties of galaxies and AGNs in the 9 square degree Bootes field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the X-ray and infrared properties of galaxies and AGNs in the 9 square degree Bootes field, using data from the Chandra XBootes and Spitzer IRAC Shallow Surveys, as well as optical spectroscopy from the AGES survey. A sample of ~30,000 objects are detected in all four IRAC bands, of which ~2,000 are associated with X-ray sources. We also study X-ray fainter sources using stacking techniques, and find that X-ray fluxes are highest for objects with IRAC colors that are known to be characteristic of AGNs. Because these are shallow, wide-field surveys, they probe the bright end of the AGNluminosity function out to spectroscopic redshifts as high as z=3-4. We can use this multiwavelength dataset to explore the properties and redshift evolution of a large sample of luminous active galaxies.

R. C. Hickox; C. Jones; W. R. Forman; S. S. Murray; M. Brodwin; the Chandra XBootes; Spitzer IRAC Shallow Survey; AGES; NOAO DWFS Teams

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

27

Delayed MeV-GeV Gamma-Ray Photons in Gamma-Ray Bursts: An Effect of Electromagnetic Cascades of Very High Energy Gamma Rays in the Infrared/Microwave Background  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that the electromagnetic cascade of very high energy gamma-rays from gamma-ray bursts in the IR/microwave background will produce delayed MeV-GeV photons. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to study this process. The distance of GB 940217 is estimated to be not less than 120 Mpc using our model, which supports a cosmological origin for this source. We also show that the time delays of gamma-ray photons are inversely proportional to their energy. Our model does not require the presence of intergalactic magnetic fields.

L. X. Cheng; K.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

BROADBAND ESO/VISIR-SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF THE OBSCURED SUPERGIANT X-RAY BINARY IGR J16318-4848  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new class of X-ray binaries has recently been discovered by the high-energy observatory INTEGRAL. It is composed of intrinsically obscured supergiant high-mass X-ray binaries, unveiled by means of multi-wavelength X-ray, optical, near- and mid-infrared observations, in particular, photometric and spectroscopic observations using ESO facilities. However, the fundamental questions about these intriguing sources, namely, their formation, evolution, and the nature of their environment, are still unsolved. Among them, IGR J16318-4848, a compact object orbiting around a supergiant B[e] star, seems to be one of the most extraordinary celestial sources of our Galaxy. We present here new ESO/Very Large Telescope (VLT) VISIR mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopic observations of this source. First, line diagnostics allow us to confirm the presence of absorbing material (dust and cold gas) enshrouding the whole binary system, and to characterize the nature of this material. Second, by fitting broadband near- to mid-infrared spectral energy distribution, including ESO NTT/SofI, VLT/VISIR, and Spitzer data, with a phenomenological model for sgB[e] stars, we show that the star is surrounded by an irradiated rim heated to a temperature of {approx}3800-5500 K, along with a viscous disk component at an inner temperature of {approx}750 K. VISIR data allow us to exclude the spherical geometry for the dust component. This detailed study will allow us in the future to get better constraints on the formation and evolution of such rare and short-living high-mass X-ray binary systems in our Galaxy.

Chaty, S.; Rahoui, F., E-mail: sylvain.chaty@cea.fr, E-mail: frahoui@cfa.harvard.edu [AIM (UMR-E 9005 CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot) Irfu/Service d'Astrophysique, Centre de Saclay, FR-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Near-infrared evolution of brightest cluster galaxies in the most X-ray luminous clusters since z=1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the near infrared evolution of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) from a sample of rich galaxy clusters since z=1. By employing an X-ray selection of Lx>1e44 erg s-1 we limit environmental effects by selecting BCGs in comparably high density regions. We find a positive relationship between X-ray and near-infrared luminosity for BCGs in clusters with Lx>5e44 erg s-1. Applying a correction for this relation we reduce the scatter in the BCG absolute magnitude by a factor of 30%. The near-infrared J-K colour evolution demonstrates that the stellar population in BCGs has been in place since at least z=2 and that we expect a shorter period of star formation than that predicted by current hierarchical merger models. We also confirm that there is a relationship between `blue' J-K colour and the presence of BCG emission lines associated with star formation in cooling flows.

J. P. Stott; A. C. Edge; G. P. Smith; A. M. Swinbank; H. Ebeling

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

30

Chandra X-ray and Gemini near-infrared observations of the eclipsing millisecond pulsar SWIFT J1749.4-2807 in quiescence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on Chandra X-ray and Gemini-North near-infrared K-band observations of the eclipsing accretion-powered millisecond X-ray pulsar SWIFT J1749.4?2807 in quiescence. Using the Chandra observation we derive a source ...

Chakrabarty, Deepto

31

Hollow-core infrared fiber incorporating metal-wire metamaterial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Infrared (IR) light is considered important for short-range wireless communication, thermal sensing, spectroscopy, material processing, medical surgery, astronomy etc. However, IR...

Yan, Min; Mortensen, Niels Asger

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

New Cryogenic Apparatus for FT-IR Spectroscopic Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cryogenic Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, being an effective technique in improving the spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, is utilized in our group....

Kang, Ning; Xu, Yizhuang; Ferraro, J R; Li, Weihong; Weng, Shifu; Xu, Duanfu; Wu, Jinguang; Soloway, R D; Xu, Guangxian

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. Abstract: Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of several...

34

Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

Leonard, F. L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Plasma polymerization of allylalcohol and propargylalcohol: XPS and IR characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Allylalcohol and propargylalcohol, likely to yield oxygen-rich deposits, have been polymerized in a RF plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Infrared (IR) have been used to determine the influence of the applied RF power on the deposited films properties. These characterization techniques show that oxygen-rich polymers are obtained at low power or at high power in post-discharge region. For the films formed from allylalcohol (PAA), oxygen is mainly present as alcohol functions (up to 44% at 20 W in post-discharge region). The proportion of alcohol functions is lower for polypropargylalcohol (PPA) while at higher amount of ketones functions is formed in these polymers.

Fally, F.; Virlet, I.; Riga, J.; Verbist, J.J. [Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix (Belgium)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Evolution of infrared instrumentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emergence of consumer-oriented infrared (IR) imaging devices is discussed. The discussion shows that the industry is presently dwindling because it does not fulfill expanding consumer needs. The features of future imaging devices are pointed out - smaller, easier to use, and easier to maintain. The challenge in the 1980s for the infrared manufacturing industry is to develop new technical innovations, smart IR imagining sensors, and consumer-oriented marketing, and produce a business/competitive industry. (MCW)

Sears, R.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Near-Infrared and X-ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in Numerical Models of Sgr A*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report transient quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) on minute timescales in relativistic, radiative models of the galactic center source Sgr A*. The QPOs result from nonaxisymmetric $m=1$ structure in the accretion flow excited by MHD turbulence. Near-infrared (NIR) and X-ray power spectra show significant peaks at frequencies comparable to the orbital frequency at the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) $f_o$. The excess power is associated with inward propagating magnetic filaments inside the ISCO. The amplitudes of the QPOs are sensitive to the electron distribution function. We argue that transient QPOs appear at a range of frequencies in the neighborhood of $f_o$ and that the power spectra, averaged over long times, likely show a broad bump near $f_o$ rather than distinct, narrow QPO features.

Joshua C. Dolence; Charles F. Gammie; Hotaka Shiokawa; Scott C. Noble

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

38

IR-2003-  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Relations Office Washington, D.C. Media Contact: 202.622.4000 Relations Office Washington, D.C. Media Contact: 202.622.4000 www.IRS.gov/newsroom Public Contact: 800.829.1040 $1 BILLION IN TAX CREDITS ALLOCATED TO CLEAN COAL PROJECTS IR-2006-184, Nov. 30, 2006 WASHINGTON - The Internal Revenue Service announced that it has allocated nearly $1 billion of tax credits to nine planned clean coal projects. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 authorized $1.65 billion in tax credits for clean coal projects. The Act allocated $800 million of credits to integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) projects, $500 million to non-IGCC advanced coal electricity generation projects and $350 million to gasification projects. The $800 million allocated to IGCC projects is required to be allocated in relatively equal amounts among bituminous coal,

39

Advances in X-Ray Chemical Analysis, Japan, 45 (2014) ISSN 0911-7806 Role of Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy in the Forensic Analysis of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopy in the Forensic Analysis of Wakayama Curry Arsenic Poisoning Case Anthony T. TU and Jun KAWAI #12 80523, U. S. A. 606-8501 Role of Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy in the Forensic Analysis of Wakayama-8 X-ray fluorescence analysis was the key scientific evidence for the forensic analysis

Jun, Kawai

40

Frequency selective infrared sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Frequency selective infrared sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

42

Resonant-cavity-enhanced multispectral infrared photodetectors for monolithic integration on silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multispectral infrared (IR) detection has been widely employed for numerous applications including hyperspectral imaging, IR spectroscopy, and target identification. Traditional multispectral detection technology is based ...

Wang, Jianfei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Infrared Jet in 3C31  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the detection of infrared emission from the jet of the nearby FR I radio galaxy 3C 31. The jet was detected with the IRAC instrument on Spitzer at 4.5 micron, 5.8 micron, and 8.0 micron out to 30" (13 kpc) from the nucleus. We measure radio, infrared, optical, and X-ray fluxes in three regions along the jet determined by the infrared and X-ray morphology. Radio through X-ray spectra in these regions demonstrate that the emission can be interpreted as synchrotron emission from a broken power-law distribution of electron energies. We find significant differences in the high energy spectra with increasing distance from the nucleus. Specifically, the high energy slope increases from 0.86 to 1.72 from 1 kpc to 12 kpc along the jet, and the spectral break likewise increases in frequency along the jet from 10-100's of GHz to ~20 THz. Thus the ratio of IR to X-ray flux in the jet increases by at least an order of magnitude with increasing distance from the nucleus. We argue that these changes cannot simply ...

Lanz, Lauranne; Kraft, Ralph P; Birkinshaw, Mark; Lal, Dharam V; Forman, William R; Jones, Christine; Worrall, Diana M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

INFRARED CLASSIFICATION AND LUMINOSITIES FOR DUSTY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THE MOST LUMINOUS QUASARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mid-infrared spectroscopic measurements from the Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) on Spitzer are given for 125 hard X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs; 14-195 keV) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample and for 32 AGNs with black hole masses (BHMs) from reverberation mapping. The 9.7 {mu}m silicate feature in emission or absorption defines an infrared AGN classification describing whether AGNs are observed through dust clouds, indicating that 55% of the BAT AGNs are observed through dust. The mid-infrared dust continuum luminosity is shown to be an excellent indicator of intrinsic AGN luminosity, scaling closely with the hard X-ray luminosity, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m)/L(X) = -0.31 {+-} 0.35, and independent of classification determined from silicate emission or absorption. Dust luminosity scales closely with BHM, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) = (37.2 {+-} 0.5) + 0.87 log BHM for luminosity in erg s{sup -1} and BHM in M{sub Sun }. The 100 most luminous type 1 quasars as measured in {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) are found by comparing Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) optically discovered quasars with photometry at 22 {mu}m from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), scaled to rest frame 7.8 {mu}m using an empirical template determined from IRS spectra. The most luminous SDSS/WISE quasars have the same maximum infrared luminosities for all 1.5 < z < 5, reaching total infrared luminosity L{sub IR} = 10{sup 14.4} L{sub Sun }. Comparing with dust-obscured galaxies from Spitzer and WISE surveys, we find no evidence of hyperluminous obscured quasars whose maximum infrared luminosities exceed the maximum infrared luminosities of optically discovered quasars. Bolometric luminosities L{sub bol} estimated from rest-frame optical or ultraviolet luminosities are compared to L{sub IR}. For the local AGN, the median log L{sub IR}/L{sub bol} = -0.35, consistent with a covering factor of 45% for the absorbing dust clouds. For the SDSS/WISE quasars, the median log L{sub IR}/L{sub bol} = 0.1, with extremes indicating that ultraviolet-derived L{sub bol} can be seriously underestimated even for type 1 quasars.

Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine; Houck, James; Barry, Donald [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Lebouteiller, Vianney, E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, DAPNIA/Service d'Astrophysique, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

Thermal unfolding dynamics of proteins probed by nonlinear infrared spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents spectroscopic approaches to study the thermal unfolding dynamics of proteins. The spectroscopic tool is nonlinear infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the protein amide I band. Among various nonlinear IR ...

Chung, Hoi Sung

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Infrared Thermography Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scientists measuring sample at IR Thermography lab Scientists measuring sample at IR Thermography lab Infrared Thermography Laboratory In the Infrared Thermography Laboratory (IRLab), researchers test the thermal performance of windows and other insulated systems. Test specimens are placed between chambers that simulate different climate conditions, including household room temperature versus extreme winter cold with high exterior wind speed. Using an infrared imaging system, the IRLab produces calibrated quantitative thermal images, or surface temperature maps, of the specimens in heat transfer experiments. This high resolution non-contact surface temperature data help researchers understand details of thermal performance and validate computer simulations of heat and fluid flow, as well as provide a powerful visualization of detailed thermal features in

47

The Radio to Infrared Emission of Very High Redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts: Probing Early Star Formation through Molecular and Atomic Absorption Lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We evaluate the broadband afterglow emission of very high redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using standard relativistic blastwave models with both forward and reverse shock components. For a broad range of parameters, a generic property for GRBs at redshifts $z \\sim$ 5--30 is that the emission peaks in the millimeter to far-infrared bands with milli-Jansky flux levels, first at a few hours after the burst due to the reverse shock, and then again for several days afterwards with somewhat lower flux due to the forward shock. The radio, submillimeter and infrared continuum emission should be readily detectable out to $z \\ga 30$ by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), Extended Very Large Array (EVLA), Square Kilometer Array (SKA) and other facilities. For relatively bright bursts, spectroscopic measurements of molecular and atomic absorption lines due to ambient protostellar gas may be possible. Utilizing models of primordial protostellar clouds, we show that under certain conditions, appreciable absorption may be caused by HD rotational transitions even in metal-free environments. After sufficient metal enrichment, absorption from CO rotational transitions and [OI] fine-structure transitions can also become strong. With appropriate observing strategies in combination with optical telescopes, ALMA and/or SKA may be able to detect such lines, offering a unique probe of physical conditions in individual Pop III and early Pop II star forming regions. We also remark on potential near-infrared absorption features due to electronic transitions of H$_2$.

Susumu Inoue; Kazuyuki Omukai; Benedetta Ciardi

2007-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

48

Obtaining and investigation of Pb1-xMnxTe(Se, S) semimagnetic semiconductor nanolayers sesitive to infrared rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the given work the energy spectrum and wave functions have been theoretically calculated for quantum-sized films of Pb1-xMnxTe (Se,S) semimagnetic semiconductors. The photo-and electroluminescence properties of Pb1-xMnxTe ... Keywords: detector, electroluminescence, energy spectrum, infrared, nanolayer, photoluminescence, semimagnetic semiconductor, sensitive

M. A. Mehrabova; I. R. Nuriyev; R. M. Mamishova; T. I. Kerimova

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

High-resolution X-ray characterization of mid-IR Al0.45Ga0.55As/GaAs Quantum Cascade Laser structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, the X-ray diffraction profiles of Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) structures have been investigated. The examined structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The crystallographic characterization was carried out using high resolution X-ray diffractometer. The information about thickness of individual layers and periodicity of the structures was derived from simulation of diffraction profiles calculated using dynamical diffraction theory. The influence of interface roughness on the shape of satellite peaks was studied. The particular attention has been paid to the analysis of the broadening of satellite peaks. The presented results show that broadening is due to the variation of thickness of individual layers.

J. Kubacka-Traczyk; I. Sankowska; O.H. Seeck; K. Kosiel; M. Bugajski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

LUMINOUS SUPERNOVA-LIKE UV/OPTICAL/INFRARED TRANSIENTS ASSOCIATED WITH ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM METAL-POOR BLUE SUPERGIANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-poor massive stars typically end their lives as blue supergiants (BSGs). Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from such progenitors could have an ultra-long duration of relativistic jets. For example, Population III (Pop III) GRBs at z {approx} 10-20 might be observable as X-ray-rich events with a typical duration of T{sub 90} {approx} 10{sup 4}(1 + z) s. The recent GRB111209A at z = 0.677 has an ultra-long duration of T{sub 90} {approx} 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} s and it has been suggested that its progenitor might have been a metal-poor BSG in the local universe. Here, we suggest that luminous UV/optical/infrared emission is associated with this new class of GRBs from metal-poor BSGs. Before the jet head breaks out of the progenitor envelope, the energy injected by the jet is stored in a hot plasma cocoon, which finally emerges and expands as a baryon-loaded fireball. We show that the photospheric emissions from the cocoon fireball could be intrinsically very bright (L{sub peak} {approx} 10{sup 42}-10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) in UV/optical bands ({epsilon}{sub peak} {approx} 10 eV) with a typical duration of {approx}100 days in the rest frame. Such cocoon emissions from Pop III GRBs might be detectable in infrared bands at {approx}years after Pop III GRBs at up to z {approx} 15 by upcoming facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope. We also suggest that GRB111209A might have been rebrightening in UV/optical bands up to an AB magnitude of {approx}< 26. The cocoon emission from local metal-poor BSGs might have been observed previously as luminous supernovae without GRBs since they can be seen from the off-axis direction of the jet.

Kashiyama, Kazumi; Yajima, Hidenobu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Nakauchi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takashi [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Suwa, Yudai, E-mail: kzk15@psu.edu [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

Hydrothermal Synthesis and Characterization of a Metal–Organic Framework by Thermogravimetric Analysis, Powder X-ray Diffraction, and Infrared Spectroscopy: An Integrative Inorganic Chemistry Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Upper-Division Undergraduate; Inorganic Chemistry; Laboratory Instruction; Gravimetric Analysis; Hydrogen Bonding; IR Spectroscopy; Materials Science; Thermal Analysis ...

Johanna L. Crane; Kelly E. Anderson; Samantha G. Conway

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

52

New Limits to the IR Background: Bounds on Radiative Neutrino Decay and on VMO Contributions to the Dark Matter Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From considering the effect of gamma-gamma interactions on recently observed TeV gamma-ray spectra, improved limits are set to the density of extragalactic infrared (IR) photons which are robust and essentially model-independent. The resulting limits are up to two orders of magnitude more restrictive than direct observations in the 0.025-0.3eV regime. These limits are used to improve constraints on radiative neutrino decay in the mass range above 0.05eV and on Very Massive Objects (VMOs) as providing the dark matter needed to explain galaxy rotation curves.

S. D. Biller; J. Buckley; A. Burdett; J. Bussons Gordo; D. A. Carter-Lewis; D. J. Fegan; J. Findley; J. A. Gaidos; A. M. Hillas; F. Krennrich; R. C. Lamb; R. Lessard; J. E. McEnery; G. Mohanty; J. Quinn; A. J. Rodgers; H. J. Rose; F. Samuelson; G. Sembroski; P. Skelton; T. C. Weekes; J; Zweerink

1998-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

53

Fiber Delivery of mid-IR lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fiber optics for the visible to near infrared (NIR) wavelength regimes (i.e. = 0.42 {mu}m) have proven to be extremely useful for a myriad of applications such as telecommunications, illumination, and sensors because they enable convenient, compact, and remote delivery of laser beams. Similarly, there is a need for fiber optics operating at longer wavelengths. For example, systems operating in the mid-IR regime (i.e., = 314 {mu}m) are being developed to detect trace molecular species with far-reaching applications, such as detecting explosives on surfaces, pollutants in the environment, and biomarkers in the breath of a patient. Furthermore, with the increasing availability of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) which are semiconductor lasers that operate in the mid-IR regime additional uses are rapidly being developed. Here, we describe the development of hollow-core fibers for delivery of high-quality mid-IR laser beams across a broad spectral range.

Kriesel, J.M.; Gat, N.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bledt, Carlos M.; Harrington, James P.

2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

54

30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Atmospheric Monitoring with a LIDAR and an Infra-red Camera at Black Rock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density, the US atmospheric standard model is used so far, and a radio sonde data is also used COLLABORATION 1 Department of Physics, Kinki University 2 Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University 3 for cosmic rays experiment. The aims of atmospheric moni- toring are to calibrate observed energy

55

IR-2003- | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IR-2003- IR-2003- IR-2003- More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: Clean Coal Technology Ushers In New Era in Energy Fact Sheet: Clean Coal Technology Ushers In New Era in Energy...

56

Impact of Infrared, Microwave, and Radio Occultation Satellite Observations on Operational Numerical Weather Prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comparison of the impact of infrared (IR), microwave (MW), and radio occultation (RO) observations on NCEP’s operational global forecast model over the month of March 2013 is presented. Analyses and forecasts with only IR, MW, and RO ...

L. Cucurull; R. A. Anthes

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Scattering IR SNOM | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Raschke at the University of Colorado-Boulder. It is designed to provide spectroscopic infrared vibrational near-field nanoimaging that provides ultrahigh spatial resolution...

58

Infrared Imaging for Inquiry-Based Learning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on detecting long-wavelength infrared (IR) radiation emitted by the subject IR imaging shows temperature distribution instantaneously and heat flow dynamically. As a picture is worth a thousand words an IR camera has great potential in teaching heat transfer which is otherwise invisible. The idea of using IR imaging in teaching was first discussed by Vollmer et al. in 2001.1–3 IR cameras were then too expensive for most schools. Thanks to the growing need of home energy inspection using IR thermography the price of IR cameras has plummeted and they have become easy to use. As of 2011 the price of an entry-level handheld IR camera such as the FLIR I3 has fallen below $900 for educators. A slightly better version FLIR I5 was used to take the IR images in this paper. As easy to use as a digital camera the I5 camera automatically generates IR images of satisfactory quality with a temperature sensitivity of 0.1°C. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how these affordable IR cameras can be used as a visualization inquiry and discovery tool. As the prices of IR cameras continue to drop it is time to give teachers an update about the educational power of this fascinating tool especially in supporting inquiry-based learning.

Charles Xie; Edmund Hazzard

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Reaction properties of NO and CO over an Ir(211) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption and thermal reactivity of NO and CO over an Ir(211) surface were studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and temperature-programed desorption. NO adsorbed on the atop site of the (111) terrace and the bridge site of the (100) step at 273 K. In contrast, CO adsorbed only on the atop site at 273 K, initially on the (111) terrace and then on the (100) step. Both atop NO and bridge NO decomposed to N{sub 2} through the recombination of atomic nitrogen, indicating that the Ir(211) surface provides high NO dissociation activity. When NO and CO were coadsorbed, the preadsorption of atop CO on the terrace sites selectively inhibited the adsorption of atop NO on the terrace sites, while preadsorption of atop CO on the step sites significantly inhibited the adsorption of bridge NO on the step sites. These results indicate that NO may be selectively reduced by CO in the presence of O{sub 2} when Ir(211) is used as the catalyst.

Nakamura, I.; Suzuki, K.; Takahashi, A.; Haneda, M.; Hamada, H.; Fujitani, T. [Research Institute for Innovation in Sustainable Chemistry, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Visualizing infrared phenomena with a webcam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of light (electromagnetic radiation) outside of the visible spectrum is an abstract concept for students in an introductory science class. When students are presented with demonstrations or experiments meant to explore this portion of the spectrum the equipment involved often hides the phenomena. A simple modification to a standard inexpensive web camera (webcam) can take advantage of the sensitivity of the charged-coupled-device (CCD) to the infrared (IR) portion of the spectrum allowing students to visualize many IR phenomena. This note reports how such a modified webcam can be used in lecture demonstrations and laboratory activities to study infrared phenomena including an IR light emitting diode(LED) the IR component of different light sources IR spectroscopy and blackbody radiation. As a final example the modified camera can be employed to view the charcoal under-drawing of a “painting” created for this paper and used in our classroom demonstrations.

N. A. Gross; M. Hersek; A. Bansil

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Temperature-jump 2D IR spectroscopy to study protein conformational dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature-jump (T-jump) two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) is developed, characterized, and applied to the study of protein folding and association. In solution, protein conformational changes span a wide range ...

Jones, Kevin C. (Kevin Chapman)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hydrogen Bond Rearrangements in Water Probed with Temperature-Dependent 2D IR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) of dilute HOD in H2O to investigate hydrogen bond rearrangements in water. The OD stretching frequency is sensitive to its environment, and loss ...

Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

63

Multi-mode two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of peptides and proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, a methodology for understanding structural stability of proteins through multi-mode two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy is developed. The experimental framework for generation of broadband infrared ...

DeFlores, Lauren P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Collective Hydrogen Bond Reorganization in Water Studied with Temperature-Dependent Ultrafast Infrared Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use temperature-dependent ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of dilute HOD in H2O to study the picosecond reorganization of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water. Temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared (2D IR), ...

Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

65

Rational production of veneer by IR-heating of green wood during peeling: Modeling experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-line IR heating system installed on the peeling lathe. Keywords: green wood; heating; infrared; modeling solutions are sought for. Experiments with electric ohmic and microwave heating methods (TorgovnikovRational production of veneer by IR-heating of green wood during peeling: Modeling experiments Anna

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

66

Standoff imaging of chemicals using IR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we report on a standoff spectroscopic technique for identifying chemical residues on surfaces. A hand-held infrared camera was used in conjunction with a wavelength tunable mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) to create hyperspectral image arrays of a target with an explosive residue on its surface. Spectral signatures of the explosive residue (RDX) were extracted from the hyperspectral image arrays and compared with a reference spectrum. Identification of RDX was achieved for residue concentrations of 20 g per cm2 at a distance of 1.5 m, and for 5 g per cm2 at a distance of 15 cm.

Senesac, Larry R [ORNL] [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL] [ORNL; Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Definition: Near Infrared Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Near Infrared Surveys Near Infrared Surveys Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Near Infrared Surveys Near infrared surveys refer to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the region just outside wavelengths detectable by the human eye. Near infrared wavelengths are generally considered to be between approximately 0.75-1.4 micrometers. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Infrared (IR) light is electromagnetic radiation with longer wavelengths than those of visible light, extending from the nominal red edge of the visible spectrum at 700 nanometres (nm) to 1 mm. This range of wavelengths corresponds to a frequency range of approximately 430 THz down to 300 GHz, and includes most of the thermal radiation emitted by objects near room temperature. Infrared light is emitted or absorbed by molecules

68

Mid-Infrared Trace Gas Analysis with Single-Pass Fourier Transform Infrared Hollow Waveguide Gas Sensors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hollow core optical fiber gas sensor has been developed in combination with a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer operating in the spectral range of 4000–500...

Kim, Seong-Soo; Menegazzo, Nicola; Young, Christina; Chan, James; Carter, Chance; Mizaikoff, Boris

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Near-infrared thermal lens spectrometer based on an erbium-doped fiber amplifier and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared thermal lens spectrometer based on an erbium-doped fiber amplifier and an acousto, guanosine, and thymidine is described. © 1997 Optical Society of America Key words: Near infrared, thermal measurements of absorption in the near-IR region has been developed. In this instrument the near-IR excitation

Reid, Scott A.

70

Characterization of Crude Oil Products Using Data Fusion of Process Raman, Infrared, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process Raman, infrared (IR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses are currently being performed in industrial settings for the monitoring of large scale reactions. These...

Dearing, Thomas I; Thompson, Wesley J; Rechsteiner, Carl E; Marquardt, Brian J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Infrared emission spectroscopic study of brucite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both infrared absorption and emission spectroscopy have been used to assign the vibrational bands of brucite. IR absorption bands are observed in the hydroxyl stretching region at 3698 and 3248 cm?1. Low frequency bands are observed at 627, 565 and 440 cm?1. Naturally occurring brucites are contaminated with other magnesium minerals which are easily identified by the infrared spectra. Infrared emission bands are observed at 3686, 3571, 3251 and 2940 cm?1. The intensity of these bands decreases upon thermal treatment corresponding to the dehydration and dehydroxylation of the brucite. Low frequency infrared emission bands are observed at 876, 706, 622 and 559 cm?1. Dehydroxylation of the brucite may be followed by the loss of intensity of the hydroxyl vibrations during thermal treatment. Importantly infrared emission spectroscopy enables the study of the dehydroxylation in situ at the elevated temperatures. Infrared emission also confirms the absorption bands assigned to brucite.

Ray L Frost; J.Theo Kloprogge

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

INFRARED AND ULTRAVIOLET STAR FORMATION IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES IN THE ACCEPT SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) photometry for a sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). The BCGs are from a heterogeneous but uniformly characterized sample, the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT), of X-ray galaxy clusters from the Chandra X-ray telescope archive with published gas temperature, density, and entropy profiles. We use archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), Spitzer Space Telescope, and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) observations to assemble spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and colors for BCGs. We find that while the SEDs of some BCGs follow the expectation of red, dust-free old stellar populations, many exhibit signatures of recent star formation in the form of excess UV or mid-IR emission, or both. We establish a mean near-UV (NUV) to 2MASS K color of 6.59 {+-} 0.34 for quiescent BCGs. We use this mean color to quantify the UV excess associated with star formation in the active BCGs. We use both fits to a template of an evolved stellar population and library of starburst models and mid-IR star formation relations to estimate the obscured star formation rates (SFRs). We show that many of the BCGs in X-ray clusters with low central gas entropy exhibit enhanced UV (38%) and mid-IR emission (43%) from 8 to 160 {mu}m, above that expected from an old stellar population. These excesses are consistent with ongoing star formation activity in the BCG, star formation that appears to be enabled by the presence of high-density, X-ray-emitting intergalactic gas in the core of the cluster of galaxies. This hot, X-ray-emitting gas may provide the enhanced ambient pressure and some of the fuel to trigger star formation. This result is consistent with previous works that showed that BCGs in clusters with low central gas entropies host H{alpha} emission-line nebulae and radio sources, while clusters with high central gas entropy exhibit none of these features. GALEX UV and Spitzer mid-IR measurements combined provide a complete picture of unobscured and obscured star formation occurring in these systems. We present IR and UV photometry and estimated equivalent continuous SFRs for a sample of BCGs.

Hoffer, Aaron S.; Donahue, Megan; Hicks, Amalia [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-2320 (United States); Barthelemy, R. S., E-mail: hofferaa@msu.edu, E-mail: donahue@pa.msu.edu, E-mail: hicksam@msu.edu, E-mail: ramon.s.barthelemy@wmich.edu [Physics Department, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5252 (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Near-Infrared Evidence for a Sudden Temperature Increase in Eta Carinae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims. Eta Car's ultra-violet, optical, and X-ray light curves and its spectrum suggest a physical change in its stellar wind over the last decade. It was proposed that the mass-loss rate decreased by a factor of about 2 in the last 15 years. We complement these recent results by investigating the past evolution and the current state of eta Car in the near-infrared (IR). Methods. We present JHKL photometry of eta Car obtained at SAAO Sutherland from 2004-2013 with the Mk II photometer at the 0.75-m telescope and JHKs photometry with SIRIUS at the 1.4-m IRSF telescope from 2012-2013. The near-IR light curves since 1972 are analyzed. Results. The long-term brightening trends in eta Car's JHKL light curves were discontinuous around the 1998 periastron passage. After 1998, the star shows excess emission above the extrapolated trend from earlier dates, foremost in J and H, and the blueward, cyclical progression in its near-IR colors is accelerated. The near-IR color evolution is strongly correlated with the periast...

Mehner, Andrea; Whitelock, Patricia; Nagayama, Takahiro; Feast, Michael; van Wyk, Francois; de Wit, Willem-Jan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

I\r'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

r' r' ( g-.] ic' fz .; w .fl ! : L ' ..j : i ?- z -2"" . 2,-3X-~ Aw23-t 11, 1949 J c. s. ?.%omic ?zaru ccm3ission 7-t i-~n,~-;ra-& 3&-p.Cz' ;"ica P. ' 3. 30x 3 Eacsrs 17, lIaw York :. , ::; /. 1 httetii OP J xl-. P, 3. 2gp C+~t~Sil;lsXl t ?~~$Tly~lf .t: GA.3 L?wjpnaJiQn Of p-3&7:2-Liop 9.0";:7~+50 s' , -ir ,.,,3 iashlla+im it i3 our da3irs 20 be rslia-T.73 of _"\L:t&?T --:wzk&ili* of the SC1298 ' _ _ Zj31Wf end i~i3sio~~31.3 rsskeri31ii izxLi.c~~t& S' ;az&;-d -D~YX-C.I o-Ada - 451 g3ac SyT,kd jl-J$; 3.xi.da - 2% p3 I :&at a 1 a azqi?L;3 3 - ' T-44 pi3. 3 ,LS oxid-\ 3aqr1.93 aar9 ~z;cc?33a~jr la 5.x0 st?%zl*hl~iao- ::>a of In'se-3' -J*-y chs=iical r9tag;P,sta d.ili::d fn cm2 sxlgtit3sl -.- -n4A..*

75

Near-infrared approaches for cell culture monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigated using near-infrared spectroscopy across the 2.0-2.5 mm spectral region. A system was developed using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer and optical fibers to characterize glucose and lactate absorbance spectra in cell culture media...

Lee, Seung Joon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

NETL: IRS Tax Credit Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solicitations & Business Opportunities IRS Tax Credit Program The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is collaborating with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to evaluate applications for Tax Credits under Section 1307 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, per instruction in the Treasury and IRS Announcement 2010-56, which can be found at: http://www.irs.gov/irb/2010-39_IRB/ar09.html or http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-drop/a-10-56.pdf Specifically, NETL will be evaluating and providing certifications of feasibility for advanced coal and gasification projects consistent with energy policy goals (“DOE certification”). To facilitate the review process, NETL has established this website to receive and respond to questions from prospective applicants regarding the Notices. NETL will post responses to questions or groups of similar questions.

77

FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A. [Spectra-Tech, Inc., Shelton, CT (United States); Williams, G.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Infrared Audit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The infrared audit is a technique of investigation that allows ... a surface. Applications of thermography in the energy fields are very widespread, since through such ... . This chapter describes the application...

Giuliano Dall’O’

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

MODELING MID-INFRARED DIAGNOSTICS OF OBSCURED QUASARS AND STARBURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the link between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and mid-infrared flux using dust radiative transfer calculations of starbursts realized in hydrodynamical simulations. Focusing on the effects of galaxy dust, we evaluate diagnostics commonly used to disentangle AGN and star formation in ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). We examine these quantities as a function of time, viewing angle, dust model, AGN spectrum, and AGN strength in merger simulations representing two possible extremes of the ULIRG population: one is a typical gas-rich merger at z {approx} 0, and the other is characteristic of extremely obscured starbursts at z {approx} 2-4. This highly obscured burst begins star-formation-dominated with significant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission, and ends with a {approx}10{sup 9} yr period of red near-IR colors. At coalescence, when the AGN is most luminous, dust obscures the near-infrared AGN signature, reduces the relative emission from PAHs, and enhances the 9.7 {mu}m absorption by silicate grains. Although generally consistent with previous interpretations, our results imply none of these indicators can unambiguously estimate the AGN luminosity fraction in all cases. Motivated by the simulations, we show that a combination of the extinction feature at 9.7 {mu}m, the PAH strength, and a near-infrared slope can simultaneously constrain the AGN fraction and dust grain distribution for a wide range of obscuration. We find that this indicator, accessible to the James Webb Space Telescope, may estimate the AGN power as tightly as the hard X-ray flux alone, thereby providing a valuable future cross-check and constraint for large samples of distant ULIRGs.

Snyder, Gregory F.; Jonsson, Patrik; Hernquist, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hayward, Christopher C. [Heidelberger Institut fuer Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Sajina, Anna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, 4 Colby Street, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Cox, Thomas J. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Hopkins, Philip F. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, C-208 Hearst Field Annex, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Yan Lin, E-mail: gsnyder@cfa.harvard.edu [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

Near-Infrared Detection of Flow Injection Analysis by Acoustooptic Tunable Filter-Based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-Infrared Detection of Flow Injection Analysis by Acoustooptic Tunable Filter University, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201-1881 The instrumentation development of a near-infrared organic compounds absorb light in the near-infrared region, this AOTF-based near-IR detector can serve

Reid, Scott A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Derivatization Technique to Increase the Spectral Selectivity of Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Infrared Focal Plane Array Imaging: Analysis of Binder Composition in Aged Oil and Tempera Paint  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interpretation of standard Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) on oil-based paint samples often suffers from interfering bands of the different compounds, namely, binder,...

Zumbühl, Stefan; Scherrer, Nadim C; Eggenberger, Urs

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The effect of high temperatures on the mid-to-far-infrared emission and near-infrared reflectance spectra of phyllosilicates and natural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of high temperatures on the mid-to-far-infrared emission and near-infrared reflectance-to-far-IR) emission (100­1400 cm�1 ; 7.1­100 lm) and near-infrared (NIR) reflectance (1.2­2.5 lm) spectra altered or melted. We characterized the effects of high temperatures on the mid-to-far-infrared (mid

Glotch, Timothy D.

83

A Cloud-Patch Technique for Identification and Removal of No-Rain Clouds from Satellite Infrared Imagery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new cloud-patch method for the identification and removal of no-rain cold clouds from infrared (IR) imagery is presented. A cloud patch is defined as a cluster of connected IR imagery pixels that are colder than a given IR brightness ...

Liming Xu; Soroosh Sorooshian; Xiaogang Gao; Hoshin V. Gupta

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Principal component analysis and radiative transfer modelling of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......St, Engomi, 1516 Nicosia, Cyprus The mid-infrared spectra of...ULIRGs is a result of dust and gas reprocessing the optical and...densities (n HS) and assuming a gas-to-dust ratio of 150. The...information in IRS spectra, it is natural to use the PCs as a classification......

P. D. Hurley; S. Oliver; D. Farrah; L. Wang; A. Efstathiou

2012-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

85

NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were prepared by implanting ca. 180 4,4 diethylaminostyryl 2,2 bipyridine (DEAS) Yb(III) complexes on the surface of 12 nm silica nanoparticles. The surface complexes ([DEAS Ln SiO2], Ln =Y,Yb) were characterized using IR, solid state NMR, UV Vis, EXAFS spectroscopies in combination with the preparation and characterization of similar molecular analogues by analytical techniques (IR, solution NMR, UV Vis, X ray crystallography) as well as DFT calculations. Starting from the partial dehydroxylation of the silica at 700 C on high vacuum having 0.8 OH.nm 2, the grafting of Ln(N(SiMe3)2)3 generate ?SiO Ln(N(SiMe3)2)2, which upon thermal step and coordination of the DEAS chromophore yields (?SiO)3Ln(DEAS). Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ligand centered CT fluorescence and life time) in the solid state, consistent with the molecular nature of the surface species. The densely functionalized nanoparticles can be dispersed via ultra-sonication in small ca. 15-20 nm aggregates (1 to 6 elementary particles) that were detected using two photon microscopy imaging at 720 nm excitation, making them promising nano objects for bio imaging.

Lapadula, Giuseppe; Bourdolle, Adrien; Allouche, Florian; Conley, Matthew P.; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W.; Guyot, Yannick; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Copé; ret, Christophe; Maury, Olivier; Andersen, Richard A.

2013-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

86

Quantitative analysis of phosphosilicate glass films on silicon wafers for calibration of x-ray fluorescence spectrometry standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phosphorus and silicon contents of phosphosilicate glass films deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on silicon wafers were determined. These films were prepared for use as x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry standards. The thin films were removed from the wafer by etching with dilute hydrofluoric acid, and the P and Si concentrations in solution were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP). The calculated phosphorus concentration ranged from 2.2 to 12 wt %, with an uncertainty of 2.73 to 10.1 relative percent. Variation between the calculated weight loss (summation of P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and SiO/sub 2/ amounts as determined by ICP) and the measured weight loss (determined gravimetrically) averaged 4.9%. Results from the ICP method, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), dispersive infrared spectroscopy, electron microprobe, and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for the same samples are compared.

Weissman, S.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Infrared floodlight  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An infrared floodlight assembly designed particularly for security purposes and including a heat-conducting housing, a lens secured to the housing to provide a closure therefor, and a floodlight located within (and surrounded by) the housing. The floodlight combines the use of a tungsten halogen light source and dichroic hot and cold mirrors for directing substantially only infrared radiation toward the assembly's forward lens. Visible radiation is absorbed by the housing's interior wall(s) and, optionally, by a filter located between the floodlight and lens. An optional means may be used within the floodlight to reflect all forward radiation back toward the paraboloidal hot mirror or, alternatively, to reflect only visible radiation in this direction. The dichroic hot and cold mirrors preferably each comprise a glass substrate having multiple layers of titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide thereon.

Levin, Robert E. (S. Hamilton, MA); English, George J. (Reading, MA)

1986-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

88

Infrared systems and components III: Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 16, 17, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics presented include infrared signal processing and automatic target recognition, detection of closely spaced objects using radial variance, the U.S. Army FLIR/ATR evolution path, and classifiability of IR target signatures. Also presented are infrared sensors and detectors, spectral agility, Bayesian analysis of signals from closely spaced objects, and enhanced atmospheric models for IR image simulation. Consideration is given to calibration and testing of infrared sensors, electrooptical-detector laser susceptibility testing, the performance of a thermal scene generator, optics and thin films in the infrared, the optical performance of replica beryllium mirrors, a high-speed video data acquisition system, and antireflection coatings for germanium without zinc.

Caswell, R.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

INSTRUMENTATION FOR FAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fourier transform spectrometers developed in three distinct spectral regions in the early 1960s. Pierre Connes and his coworkers in France developed remarkably sophisticated step-scan interferometers that permitted near-infrared spectra to be measured with a resolution of better than 0.0 1 cm{sup {minus}1}. These instruments may be considered the forerunners of the step-scan interferometers made by Bruker, Bio-Rad (Cambridge, MA, USA) and Nicolet although their principal application was in the field of astronomy. Low-resolution rapid-scanning interferometers were developed by Larry Mertz and his colleagues at Block Engineering (Cambridge, MA, USA) for remote sensing. Nonetheless, the FT-IR spectrometers that are so prevalent in chemical laboratories today are direct descendants of these instruments. The interferometers that were developed for far-infrared spectrometry in Gebbie's laboratory ,have had no commercial counterparts for at least 15 years. However, it could be argued that these instruments did as much to demonstrate the power of Fourier transform spectroscopy to the chemical community as any of the instruments developed for mid- and near-infrared spectrometry. Their performance was every bit as good as today's rapid-scanning interferometers. However, the market for these instruments is so small today that it has proved more lucrative to modify rapid-scanning interferometers that were originally designed for mid-infrared spectrometry than to compete with these instruments with slow continuous scan or step-scan interferometers.

GRIFFITHS, P.R.; HOMES, C.

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

90

Non-destructive component separation using infrared radiant energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating a first component and a second component from one another at an adhesive bond interface between the first component and second component. Typically the method involves irradiating the first component with infrared radiation from a source that radiates substantially only short wavelengths until the adhesive bond is destabilized, and then separating the first component and the second component from one another. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is placed inside an enclosure and the assembly is illuminated from an IR source that is external to the enclosure. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is simultaneously irradiated by a multi-planar array of IR sources. Often the IR radiation is unidirectional. In some embodiments the IR radiation is narrow-band short wavelength infrared radiation.

Simandl, Ronald F. (Knoxville, TN); Russell, Steven W. (Knoxville, TN); Holt, Jerrid S. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Infrared pulse characterization using four-wave mixing inside a few cycle pulse filament in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate a four-wave mixing (FWM) technique to measure near- and mid-infrared (IR) laser pulse shapes in time domain. Few cycle 800?nm laser pulses were synchronized with the IR pulse and focused colinearly to generate a plasma filament in air. Second harmonic radiation around 400?nm was generated through FWM, with a yield proportional to the IR pulse intensity. Excellent signal to noise ratio was observed from 2.1??m to 18??m. With proper phase stabilization of the IR beam, this technique is a promising step toward direct electric field sensing of near-IR pulses in air.

Marceau, Claude, E-mail: claude.marceau.2@ulaval.ca; Thomas, Steven; Kassimi, Yacine; Gingras, Guillaume; Witzel, Bernd [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser, Pavillon d'optique-photonique Québec (Québec), Université Laval, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

92

Unpolarized emissivity of thin oil films over anisotropic Gaussian seas in infrared window regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we derive the unpolarized infrared (IR) emissivity of thin oil films over anisotropic Gaussian seas from a refined physical surface spectrum model of damping due to...

Pinel, Nicolas; Bourlier, Christophe; Sergievskaya, Irina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Improved Tropical Cyclone Flight-Level Wind Estimates Using Routine Infrared Satellite Reconnaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new and improved method to estimate the tropical cyclone flight-level winds using globally and routinely available tropical cyclone (TC) information and infrared (IR) satellite imagery is presented. The developmental data set is comprised of ...

John A. Knaff; Scott P. Longmore; Robert T. DeMaria; Debra A. Molenar

94

Flow-Through Fourier Transform Infrared Sensor for Total Hydrocarbons Determination in Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new flow-through Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) sensor for oil in water analysis based on solid-phase spectroscopy on octadecyl (C18) silica particles has been developed. The C18...

Pérez-Palacios, David; Armenta, Sergio; Lendl, Bernhard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Multiple Filtering Strategy for the Automated Detection of Ethanol by Passive Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Digital filtering methods are evaluated for use in the automated detection of ethanol from passive Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) data collected during laboratory and open-air...

Idwasi, Patrick O; Small, Gary W; Combs, Roger J; Knapp, Robert B; Kroutil, Robert T

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 31, NO. 19, OCTOBER 1, 2013 3181 Noise Figure in Near-Infrared Amorphous and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 31, NO. 19, OCTOBER 1, 2013 3181 Noise Figure in Near-Infrared, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--The noise figures (NF) of near-infrared (near-IR) amorphous silicon (a Amorphous and Mid-Infrared Crystalline Silicon Optical Parametric Amplifiers Jichi Ma and Sasan Fathpour

Fathpour, Sasan

97

Structure-property relations in negative permittivity reststrahlen materials for IR metamaterial applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We will present a study of the structure-property relations in Reststrahlen materials that possess a band of negative permittivities in the infrared. It will be shown that sub-micron defects strongly affect the optical response, resulting in significantly diminished permittivities. This work has implications on the use of ionic materials in IR-metamaterials.

Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Shelton, David J. (University of Central Florida); Carroll, James F., III; Boreman, Glenn D. (University of Central Florida); Sinclair, Michael B.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Ginn, James Cleveland, III; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Matias, Vladimir (Los Alamos National Laboratory)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

LOCUSS: THE MID-INFRARED BUTCHER-OEMLER EFFECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the mid-infrared (MIR) properties of galaxies in 30 massive galaxy clusters at 0.02 <= z <= 0.40, using panoramic Spitzer/MIPS 24 mum and near-infrared data, including 27 new observations from the LoCuSS and ACCESS surveys. This is the largest sample of clusters to date with such high-quality and uniform MIR data covering not only the cluster cores, but extending into the infall regions. We use these data to revisit the so-called Butcher-Oemler (BO) effect, measuring the fraction of massive infrared luminous galaxies (K < K* + 1.5, L {sub IR} > 5 x 10{sup 10} L {sub sun}) within r {sub 200}, finding a steady increase in the fraction with redshift from approx3% at z = 0.02 to approx10% by z = 0.30, and an rms cluster-to-cluster scatter about this trend of 0.03. The best-fit redshift evolution model of the form f {sub SF} propor to (1 + z) {sup n} has n = 5.7{sup +2.1} {sub -1.8}, which is stronger redshift evolution than that of L*{sub IR} in both clusters and the field. We find that, statistically, this excess is associated with galaxies found at large cluster-centric radii, specifically r {sub 500} < r < r {sub 200}, implying that the MIR BO effect can be explained by a combination of both the global decline in star formation in the universe since z approx 1 and enhanced star formation in the infall regions of clusters at intermediate redshifts. This picture is supported by a simple infall model based on the Millennium Simulation semianalytic galaxy catalogs, whereby star formation in infalling galaxies is instantaneously quenched upon their first passage through the cluster, in that the observed radial trends of f {sub SF} trace those inferred from the simulations. The observed f {sub SF} values, however, lie systematically above the predictions, suggesting an overall excess of star formation, either due to triggering by environmental processes, or a gradual quenching. We also find that f {sub SF} does not depend on simple indicators of the dynamical state of clusters, including the offset between the brightest cluster galaxy and the peak of the X-ray emission. This is consistent with the picture described above in that most new star formation in clusters occurs in the infall regions, and is thus not sensitive to the details of cluster-cluster mergers in the core regions.

Haines, C. P.; Smith, G. P.; Sanderson, A. J. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Egami, E. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ellis, R. S. [California Institute of Technology, 105-24 Astronomy, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Moran, S. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Merluzzi, P.; Busarello, G. [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, via Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Smith, R. J., E-mail: cph@star.sr.bham.ac.u [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

2009-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

99

Autonomous Observing and Control Systems for PAIRITEL, a 1.3m Infrared Imaging Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Peters Automated Infrared Imaging Telescope (PAIRITEL) is the first meter-class telescope operating as a fully robotic IR imaging system. Dedicated in October 2004, PAIRITEL began regular observations in mid-December 2004 as part of a 1.5 year commissioning period. The system was designed to respond without human intervention to new gamma-ray burst transients: this milestone was finally reached on November 9, 2005 but the telescope had a number of semi-automated sub-10 minute responses throughout early commissioning. When not operating in Target of Opportunity mode, PAIRITEL performs a number of queue scheduled transient monitoring campaigns. To achieve this level of automation, we have developed communicating tools to connect the various sub-systems: an intelligent queue scheduling database, run-time configurable observation sequence software, a data reduction pipeline, and a master state machine which monitors and controls all functions within and affecting the observatory.

J. S. Bloom; Dan L. Starr; Cullen H. Blake; M. F. Skrutskie; Emilio E. Falco

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

Berdahl, P.H.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

102

Infrared Imaging of the Nanometer-Thick Accumulation Layer in Organic Field-Effect Transistors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on infrared (IR) spectro-microscopy of the electronic excitations in nanometer-thick accumulation layers in FET devices based on poly(3-hexylthiophene). IR data allows us to explore the charge injection landscape and uncovers the critical role of the gate insulator in defining relevant length scales. This work demonstrates the unique potential of IR spectroscopy for the investigation of physical phenomena at the nanoscale occurring at the semiconductor-insulator interface in FET devices.

Z. Q. Li; G. M. Wang; N. Sai; D. Moses; M. C. Martin; M. Di Ventra; A. J. Heeger; D. N. Basov

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

103

A COMPARATIVE ASTROCHEMICAL STUDY OF THE HIGH-MASS PROTOSTELLAR OBJECTS NGC 7538 IRS 9 AND IRS 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the results of a spectroscopic study of the high-mass protostellar object NGC 7538 IRS 9 and compare our observations to published data on the nearby object NGC 7538 IRS 1. Both objects originated in the same molecular cloud and appear to be at different points in their evolutionary histories, offering an unusual opportunity to study the temporal evolution of envelope chemistry in objects sharing a presumably identical starting composition. Observations were made with the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph, a sensitive, high spectral resolution (R {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx_equal} 100,000) mid-infrared grating spectrometer. Forty-six individual lines in vibrational modes of the molecules C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, HCN, NH{sub 3}, and CO were detected, including two isotopologues ({sup 13}CO, {sup 12}C{sup 18}O) and one combination mode ({nu}{sub 4} + {nu}{sub 5} C{sub 2}H{sub 2}). Fitting synthetic spectra to the data yielded the Doppler shift, excitation temperature, Doppler b parameter, column density, and covering factor for each molecule observed; we also computed column density upper limits for lines and species not detected, such as HNCO and OCS. We find differences among spectra of the two objects likely attributable to their differing radiation and thermal environments. Temperatures and column densities for the two objects are generally consistent, while the larger line widths toward IRS 9 result in less saturated lines than those toward IRS 1. Finally, we compute an upper limit on the size of the continuum-emitting region ({approx}2000 AU) and use this constraint and our spectroscopy results to construct a schematic model of IRS 9.

Barentine, John C.; Lacy, John H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

High-pressure phase transition and behavior of protons in brucite Mg(OH)2: a high-pressure–temperature study using IR synchrotron radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Infrared absorption spectra of brucite Mg (OH)2...were measured under high pressure and high temperature from 0.1?MPa 25?°C to 16?GPa 360?°C using infrared synchrotron radiation at BL43IR of Spring-8 and a high-...

K. Shinoda; M. Yamakata; T. Nanba; H. Kimura…

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Femtosecond Near-Infrared Laser Desorption of Multilayer Benzene on Pt{111}: A Molecular Newton's Cradle?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Femtosecond Near-Infrared Laser Desorption of Multilayer Benzene on Pt{111}: A Molecular Newton Recently, the intense near-infrared laser desorption of intact benzene molecules has been reported.1 Three, 1999; In Final Form: February 11, 2000 Velocity distributions resulting from the intense, near-IR laser

Levis, Robert J.

106

Electrical Conductivity, Near-Infrared Absorption, and Thermal Lens Spectroscopic Studies of Percolation of Microemulsions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical Conductivity, Near-Infrared Absorption, and Thermal Lens Spectroscopic Studies studied below and above the percolation thresholds by electrical conductivity, near-infrared absorption. In this work the structure of microemulsions was investigated by using the near-IR absorption and thermal lens

Reid, Scott A.

107

IR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on several major projects, including current inspection of welds for an oil and gas pipeline company from Italy, welding and inspection system for the National Spent Nuclear...

108

MODULATION DOMAIN FEATURES FOR DISCRIMINATING INFRARED TARGETS AND BACKGROUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments against actual FLIR approach sequences, we verify that typical IR imagery does indeed possess-looking infrared (FLIR) imagery has been studied extensively. As is well-known, it is an extremely challenging counterparts. In particu- lar, FLIR images frequently exhibit weak signal-to-noise ratio and strong clutter

Havlicek, Joebob

109

FAR-INFRARED FINE-STRUCTURE LINE DIAGNOSTICS OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present Herschel observations of 6 fine-structure lines in 25 ultraluminous infrared galaxies at z < 0.27. The lines, [O III]52 ?m, [N III]57 ?m, [O I]63 ?m, [N II]122 ?m, [O I]145 ?m, and [C II]158 ?m, are mostly single Gaussians with widths <600 km s{sup –1} and luminosities of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} L{sub ?}. There are deficits in the [O I]63/L{sub IR}, [N II]/L{sub IR}, [O I]145/L{sub IR}, and [C II]/L{sub IR} ratios compared to lower luminosity systems. The majority of the line deficits are consistent with dustier H II regions, but part of the [C II] deficit may arise from an additional mechanism, plausibly charged dust grains. This is consistent with some of the [C II] originating from photodissociation regions or the interstellar medium (ISM). We derive relations between far-IR line luminosities and both the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We find that [N II] and both [O I] lines are good tracers of the IR luminosity and star formation rate. In contrast, [C II] is a poor tracer of the IR luminosity and star formation rate, and does not improve as a tracer of either quantity if the [C II] deficit is accounted for. The continuum luminosity densities also correlate with the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We derive ranges for the gas density and ultraviolet radiation intensity of 10{sup 1} < n < 10{sup 2.5} and 10{sup 2.2} < G{sub 0} < 10{sup 3.6}, respectively. These ranges depend on optical type, the importance of star formation, and merger stage. We do not find relationships between far-IR line properties and several other parameters: active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity, merger stage, mid-IR excitation, and SMBH mass. We conclude that these far-IR lines arise from gas heated by starlight, and that they are not strongly influenced by AGN activity.

Farrah, D.; Petty, S. M.; Harris, K. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Lebouteiller, V.; Spoon, H. W. W. [Cornell University, CRSR, Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Bernard-Salas, J.; Pearson, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Rigopoulou, D. [RAL Space, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Smith, H. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); González-Alfonso, E. [Universidad de Alcalá, Departamento de Física y Matemáticas, Campus Universitario, E-28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Clements, D. L. [Physics Department, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Efstathiou, A. [School of Sciences, European University Cyprus, Diogenes Street, Engomi, 1516 Nicosia (Cyprus); Cormier, D. [Institut für theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Afonso, J. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa, Observatório Astronómico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisbon (Portugal); Hurley, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Borys, C. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Verma, A. [Oxford Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, University of Oxford, Keble Rd, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Cooray, A.; Salvatelli, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

Experimental investigation of subcooled flow boiling using synchronized high speed video, infrared thermography, and particle image velocimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subcooled flow boiling of water was experimentally investigated using high-speed video (HSV), infrared (IR) thermography, and particle image velocimetry (PIV) to generate a unique database of synchronized data. HSV allowed ...

Phillips, Bren Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Gold Coating of Glass Tubes for Gas Chromatography/Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy "Light-Pipe" Gas Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sensitivity of gas chromatography/Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (GC/FT-IR) may be significantly improved by use of small bore gold-coated glass gas cells. This note...

Azarraga, L V

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Evaluation of infrared sensors for oil spill response operations. Final report, October 1994-June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During November 1994, the USCO conducted a field evaluation of several commercially available portable infrared (IR) sensors for their ability to detect oil on water at night. The evaluation was conducted over the natural oil seeps off the coast of Santa Barbara, CA. The portable sensors were operated from the open door of a Coast Guard HH-60J helicopter. Sensors evaluated included the Agema Thermovision 1000 and Texas Instruments LOCUSP operating in the long wave IR (LWIR) and the Cincinnati Electronics IRC-160ST and IRRIS-256ST operating in the medium wave IR (MWIR). The installed FLIR 2000 LWIR system provided a baseline reference of current CG IR capabilities.

Hover, G.L.; Plourde, J.V.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Absorption of infra-red radiation by atmospheric molecular cluster-ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protonated water clusters are a common species of atmospheric molecular cluster-ion, produced by cosmic rays throughout the troposphere and stratosphere. Under clear-sky conditions or periods of increased atmospheric ionisation, such as solar proton events, the IR absorption by atmospheric ions may affect climate through the radiative balance. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry in a long path cell, of path length 545m, has been used to detect IR absorption by corona-generated positive molecular cluster-ions. The column concentration of ions in the laboratory spectroscopy experiment was estimated to be ~10^13 m-2; the column concentration of protonated atmospheric ions estimated using a simple model is ~10^14 m-2. Two regions of absorption, at 12.3 and 9.1 um are associated with enhanced ion concentrations. After filtering of the measured spectra to compensate for spurious signals from neutral water vapour and residual carbon dioxide, the strongest absorption region is at 9.5 to 8.8 um (1050 to 1140 cm-1)...

Aplin, K L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

GOODS-HERSCHEL: SEPARATING HIGH-REDSHIFT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND STAR-FORMING GALAXIES USING INFRARED COLOR DIAGNOSTICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have compiled a large sample of 151 high-redshift (z = 0.5-4) galaxies selected at 24 {mu}m (S {sub 24} > 100 {mu}Jy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-infrared spectrum into contributions from star formation and activity in the galactic nuclei. In addition, we have a wealth of photometric data from Spitzer IRAC/MIPS and Herschel PACS/SPIRE. We explore how effective different infrared color combinations are at separating our mid-IR spectroscopically determined active galactic nuclei from our star-forming galaxies. We look in depth at existing IRAC color diagnostics, and we explore new color-color diagnostics combining mid-IR, far-IR, and near-IR photometry, since these combinations provide the most detail about the shape of a source's IR spectrum. An added benefit of using a color that combines far-IR and mid-IR photometry is that it is indicative of the power source driving the IR luminosity. For our data set, the optimal color selections are S {sub 250}/S {sub 24} versus S {sub 8}/S {sub 3.6} and S {sub 100}/S {sub 24} versus S {sub 8}/S {sub 3.6}; both diagnostics have {approx}10% contamination rate in the regions occupied primarily by star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei, respectively. Based on the low contamination rate, these two new IR color-color diagnostics are ideal for estimating both the mid-IR power source of a galaxy when spectroscopy is unavailable and the dominant power source contributing to the IR luminosity. In the absence of far-IR data, we present color diagnostics using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-IR bands which can efficiently select out high-z (z {approx} 2) star-forming galaxies.

Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002 (United States); Charmandaris, Vassilis [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece)] [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece); Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David; Pannella, Maurilio; Aussel, Herve; Dasyra, Kalliopi; Leiton, Roger [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)] [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hwang, Ho Seong [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Scott, Douglas; Magnelli, Benjamin; Popesso, Paola [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Postfach 1312, D-85741, Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Postfach 1312, D-85741, Garching (Germany); Altieri, Bruno; Coia, Daniela; Valtchanov, Ivan [Herschel Science Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Villanueva de la Canada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain)] [Herschel Science Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Villanueva de la Canada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); Dannerbauer, Helmut [Universitaet Wien, Institut fuer Astrophysik, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria)] [Universitaet Wien, Institut fuer Astrophysik, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria); Dickinson, Mark; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Magdis, Georgios [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Reliable Identification of Compton-thick Quasars at z ? 2: Spitzer Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of HDF-oMD49  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many models that seek to explain the origin of the unresolved X-ray background predict that Compton-thick active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are ubiquitous at high redshift. However, few distant Compton-thick AGNs have been reliably identified to date. Here we present Spitzer IRS spectroscopy and 3.6-70 ?m photometry of a -->z = 2.211 optically identified AGN (HDF-oMD49) that is formally undetected in the 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North (CDF-N) survey. The Spitzer IRS spectrum and spectral energy distribution of this object is AGN dominated, and a comparison of the energetics at X-ray wavelengths to those derived from mid-infrared (mid-IR) and optical spectroscopy shows that the AGN is intrinsically luminous ( -->L2–10 keV ? 3 ? 1044 ergs s?1) but heavily absorbed by Compton-thick material ( -->NH 1024 cm?2); i.e., this object is a Compton-thick quasar. Adopting the same approach that we applied to HDF-oMD49, we found a further six objects at -->z ? 2–2.5 in the literature that are also X-ray weak/undetected but have evidence for AGN activity from optical and/or mid-IR spectroscopy, and show that all of these sources are likely to be Compton-thick quasars with 10^{44}"/> -->L2–10 keV > 1044 ergs s?1. On the basis of the definition of Daddi et al., these Compton-thick quasars would be classified as mid-IR excess galaxies, and our study provides the first spectroscopic confirmation of Compton-thick AGN activity in a subsample of these -->z ? 2 mid-IR-bright galaxies. Using the four objects that lie in the CDF-N field, we estimate the space density of reliably identified Compton-thick quasars [ -->? ? (0.7–2.5) ? 10?5 Mpc?3 for 10^{44}"/> -->L2–10 keV > 1044 ergs s?1 objects at -->z ? 2–2.5] and show that Compton-thick accretion was probably as ubiquitous as unobscured accretion in the distant universe.

D. M. Alexander; R.-R. Chary; A. Pope; F. E. Bauer; W. N. Brandt; E. Daddi; M. Dickinson; D. Elbaz; N. A. Reddy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group Sco McWilliams U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consor;um (PVMC) Infrared Thermography Infrared Thermography (IRT) has been demonstrated...

117

An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements C. N. Long, K. Younkin, and K. L. Gaustad Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington J. A. Augustine National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory Surface Radiation Research Branch Boulder, Colorado Introduction A paper by Cess et al. (2000) notes that some clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements they were using from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site exhibited less than Rayleigh magnitude. Remarking that this is a physical impossibility, the obvious conclusion forwarded by the authors was that there was some problem with the ARM SGP diffuse SW data. Shortly thereafter, the problem of infrared (IR) loss from thermopile-based single black detector

118

ILLUMINATING THE DARKEST GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH RADIO OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present X-ray, optical, near-infrared (IR), and radio observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) 110709B and 111215A, as well as optical and near-IR observations of their host galaxies. The combination of X-ray detections and deep optical/near-IR limits establish both bursts as ''dark''. Sub-arcsecond positions enabled by radio detections lead to robust host galaxy associations, with optical detections that indicate z {approx}< 4 (110709B) and z Almost-Equal-To 1.8-2.9 (111215A). We therefore conclude that both bursts are dark due to substantial rest-frame extinction. Using the radio and X-ray data for each burst we find that GRB 110709B requires A{sub V}{sup host}{approx}>5.3 mag and GRB 111215A requires A{sub V}{sup host}{approx}>8.5 mag (assuming z = 2). These are among the largest extinction values inferred for dark bursts to date. The two bursts also exhibit large neutral hydrogen column densities of N{sub H,{sub int}} {approx}> 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (z = 2) as inferred from their X-ray spectra, in agreement with the trend for dark GRBs. Moreover, the inferred values are in agreement with the Galactic A{sub V} -N{sub H} relation, unlike the bulk of the GRB population. Finally, we find that for both bursts the afterglow emission is best explained by a collimated outflow with a total beaming-corrected energy of E{sub {gamma}} + E{sub K} Almost-Equal-To (7-9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg (z = 2) expanding into a wind medium with a high density, M Almost-Equal-To (6-20) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} (n Almost-Equal-To 100-350 cm{sup -3} at Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 17} cm). While the energy release is typical of long GRBs, the inferred density may be indicative of larger mass-loss rates for GRB progenitors in dusty (and hence metal rich) environments. This study establishes the critical role of radio observations in demonstrating the origin and properties of dark GRBs. Observations with the JVLA and ALMA will provide a sample with sub-arcsecond positions and robust host associations that will help to shed light on obscured star formation and the role of metallicity in GRB progenitors.

Zauderer, B. A.; Berger, E.; Margutti, R.; Fong, W.; Laskar, T.; Chornock, R.; Soderberg, A. M. [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Olivares E, F.; Greiner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Perley, D. A.; Horesh, A.; Carpenter, J. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States); Updike, A. C. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Menten, K. M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Nakar, E. [Department of Astrophysics, Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Chandra, P. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Castro-Tirado, A. J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA-CSIC), P.O. Box 03004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Bremer, M. [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique, 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d'Heres (France); and others

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

119

Red Quasars in the Las Campanas Infrared Survey Frank Masci, Carol Lonsdale, Perry Hacking, the LCIR collaboraton...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Red Quasars in the Las Campanas Infrared Survey Frank Masci, Carol Lonsdale, Perry Hacking, the LCIR collaboraton... Summary We propose to search for red quasars in the Las Campanas Infrared (LCIR/near-IR appearence prior to spectroscopic follow- up. Our method will preferentially select red quasars at z>2

Masci, Frank

120

Posters Long-Pathlength Infrared Absorption Measurements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Posters Long-Pathlength Infrared Absorption Measurements in the 8- to 14-µm Atmospheric Window: Self-Broadening Coefficient Data T. J. Kulp (a) and J. Shinn Geophysics and Environmental Research Program Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California Introduction The accurate characterization of the latent infrared (IR) absorption in the atmospheric window regions continues to be an area of research interest for the global climate modeling community. In the window between 8 and 14 µm, this absorption can be attributed primarily to water vapor. It consists of 1) weak lines originating from the edge of the water vapor pure rotational band (at low wavenumbers) and the trailing P-branch of the υ 2 rovibrational band (at the high-wavenumber boundary of the window); and 2) the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

IR LASER BASED CHEMICAL SENSOR FOR THE COOPERATIVE MONITORING PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to investigate the device properties of the quantum cascade laser (QCL), a type of laser invented at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies in the device physics research lab of Dr. Federico Capasso and more specifically to determine the remote sensing capability of this device. The PI and Stevens Institute of Technology collaborated with Dr. Capasso and Bell Laboratories to carry out this research project. The QCL is a unique laser source capable of generating laser radiation in the middle-infrared spectral region that overlaps the most important molecular absorption bands. With appropriate modulation techniques it is possible to use the laser to measure the concentration of many molecules of interest to the remote sensing community. In addition, the mid-IR emission wavelength is well suited to atmospheric transmission as mid-IR experiences much less scattering due to dust and fog. At the onset of this project little was known about several key device performance parameters of this family of lasers and the NNSA supported research enabled them to determine values of several of these characteristics.

Edward A Whitaker

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

122

IR Spectrometer Using 90-degree Off-axis Parabolic Mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A gated spectrometer has been designed for real-time, pulsed infrared (IR) studies at the National Synchrotron Light ource at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A pair of 90-degree, off-axis parabolic mirrors are used to relay the light from an entrance slit to an output IR recording camera. With an initial wavelength range of 1500–4500 nm required, gratings could not be used in the spectrometer because grating orders would overlap. A magnesium oxide prism, placed between these parabolic mirrors, serves as the dispersion element. The spectrometer is doubly telecentric. With proper choice of the air spacing between the prism and the second parabolic mirror, any spectral region of interest within the InSb camera array’s sensitivity region can be recorded. The wavelengths leaving the second parabolic mirror are collimated, thereby relaxing the camera positioning tolerance. To set up the instrument, two different wavelength (visible) lasers are introduced at the entrance slit and made collinear with the optical axis via flip mirrors. After dispersion by the prism, these two laser beams are directed to tick marks located on the outside housing of the gated IR camera. This provides first-order wavelength calibration for the instrument. Light that is reflected off the front prism face is coupled into a high-speed detector to verify steady radiance during the gated spectral imaging. Alignment features include tick marks on the prism and parabolic mirrors. This instrument was designed to complement singlepoint pyrometry, which provides continuous time histories of a small collection of spots from shock-heated targets.

Robert M. Malone, Richard, G. Hacking, Ian J. McKenna, and Daniel H. Dolan

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

123

CHANDRA X-RAY DETECTION OF THE ENIGMATIC FIELD STAR BP Psc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BP Psc is a remarkable emission-line field star that is orbited by a dusty disk and drives a parsec-scale system of jets. We report the detection by the Chandra X-ray Observatory of a weak X-ray point source coincident with the centroids of optical/IR and submillimeter continuum emission at BP Psc. As the star's photosphere is obscured throughout the visible and near-infrared, the Chandra X-ray source likely represents the first detection of BP Psc itself. The X-rays most likely originate with magnetic activity at BP Psc and hence can be attributed either to a stellar corona or to star-disk interactions. The log of the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity, log(L{sub X} /L{sub bol}), lies in the range -5.8 to -4.2. This is smaller than log(L{sub X} /L{sub bol}) ratios typical of low-mass, pre-main sequence stars, but is well within the log(L{sub X} /L{sub bol}) range observed for rapidly rotating (FK Com-type) G giant stars. Hence, the Chandra results favor an exotic model wherein the disk/jet system of BP Psc is the result of its very recently engulfing a companion star or a giant planet, as the primary star ascended the giant branch.

Kastner, Joel H.; Montez, Rodolfo [Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Rodriguez, David; Zuckerman, B.; Perrin, Marshall D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Grosso, Nicolas [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l'Universit, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Forveille, Thierry [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble, Universite Joseph Fourier-CNRS, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France); Graham, James R., E-mail: jhk@cis.rit.ed [Astronomy Department, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

Integration of microfluidics and FT-IR microscopy for label-free study of enzyme kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this article we report on the integration of microfluidics with FT-IR microscopy for the label-free study of enzyme kinetics. The IR compatible microfluidic chip was fabricated by standard photolithography processes using a photopatternable PDMS and infrared transparent materials (Si and CaF2). Chip characterization was performed with an imaging focal plane array (FPA) detector. The enzymatic oxidation of glucose catalyzed by glucose oxidase, which served as a model system, was monitored on-chip in real time in a label-free manner using FT-IR microscopy. The reference FT-IR measurements were carried out using the attenuated total reflection (ATR) accessory. Michaelis–Menten parameters for glucose-oxidase were estimated from the spectral measurements both on-chip and off-chip. The proposed microfluidic approach for enzyme reaction monitoring serves as a novel strategy for FT-IR microscopy allowing for minimal reaction volumes, measurement automation and flexibility in terms of spatial, spectral and temporal data acquisition and offers new opportunities in kinetics studies of various bio(chemical) reactions.

Evgeny Polshin; Bert Verbruggen; Daan Witters; Bert Sels; Dirk De Vos; Bart Nicolaï; Jeroen Lammertyn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Quantum cascade lasers: a versatile source for precise measurements in the mid/far-infrared range  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We provide an overview of recent developments of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), from the mid-infrared (mid-IR) to the far-IR (THz) range, with a special focus on their metrological-grade applications in a number of fields. A special emphasis on the physics of the QCLs allows underlining peculiar effects and device features recently unveiled that pave the way to novel demanding photonics applications.

S Bartalini; M S Vitiello; P De Natale

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Application of Coherent State Approach for the cancellation of Infrared divergences to all orders in LFQED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We sketch an all order proof of cancellation of infrared (IR) divergences in Light Front Quantum Electrodynamics (LFQED) using a coherent state formalism. In this talk, it has been shown that the true IR divergences in fermion self energy are eliminated to all orders in a light-front time-ordered perturbative calculation if one uses coherent state basis instead of the usual Fock basis to calculate the Hamiltonian matrix elements.

More, Jai

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Broadly tunable picosecond IR source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A picosecond traveling-wave parametric device capable of controlled spectral bandwidth and wavelength in the infrared is reported. Intense 1.064 .mu.m picosecond pulses (1) pass through a 4.5 cm long LiNbO.sub.3 optical parametric oscillator crystal (2) set at its degeneracy angle. A broad band emerges, and a simple grating (3) and mirror (4) arrangement is used to inject a selected narrow-band into a 2 cm long LiNbO.sub.3 optical parametric amplifier crystal (5) along a second pump line. Typical input energies at 1.064 .mu.m along both pump lines are 6-8 mJ for the oscillator and 10 mJ for the amplifier. This yields 1 mJ of tunable output in the range 1.98 to 2.38 .mu.m which when down-converted in a 1 cm long CdSe crystal mixer (6) gives 2 .mu.J of tunable radiation over the 14.8 to 18.5 .mu.m region. The bandwidth and wavelength of both the 2 and 16 .mu.m radiation output are controlled solely by the diffraction grating.

Campillo, Anthony J. (Nesconset, NY); Hyer, Ronald C. (Los Alamos, NM); Shapiro, Stanley J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Development of a realistic photonic modeling for the evaluation of infrared reflections in the metallic environment of ITER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In nuclear fusion experiments, the plasma facing components are exposed to high heat fluxes and infrared (IR) imaging diagnostics are routinely used for surveying their surface temperature for preventing damages. However the future use of metallic components in the ITER tokamak adds complications in temperature estimation. Indeed, low and variable emissivity of the observed surface and the multiple reflections of the light coming from hot regions will have to be understood and then taken into account. In this paper, a realistic photonic modeling based on Monte Carlo ray-tracing codes is used to predict the global response of the complete IR survey system. This also includes the complex vessel geometry and the thermal and optical surface properties using the bidirectional reflectivity distribution function that models the photon-material interactions. The first results of this simulation applied to a reference torus are presented and are used as a benchmark to investigate the validity of the global model. Finally the most critical key model parameters in the reflected signals are identified and their contribution is discussed.

Aumeunier, M.-H.; Travere, J.-M. [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-Les-Durance F-13108 (France)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

IR820 Nanoconjugates for Theranostic Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Near-infrared dyes can be used as theranostic agents in cancer management based on their optical imaging and localized hyperthermia capabilities. However, their clinical translatability… (more)

Fernandez-Fernandez, Alicia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Infrared microscope inspection apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface. 4 figs.

Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

1985-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

131

Infrared microscope inspection apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface.

Forman, Steven E. (Framingham, MA); Caunt, James W. (Concord, MA)

1985-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

132

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance July 18, 2012 - 3:46pm Addthis To...

133

Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

134

Molecular Hydrogen in Infrared Cirrus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We combine data from our recent FUSE survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen absorption toward 50 high-latitude AGN with COBE-corrected IRAS 100 micron emission maps to study the correlation of infrared cirrus with H2. A plot of the H2 column density vs. IR cirrus intensity shows the same transition in molecular fraction, f_H2, as seen with total hydrogen column density, N_H. This transition is usually attributed to H2 self-shielding, and it suggests that many diffuse cirrus clouds contain H2 in significant fractions, f_H2 = 1-30%. These clouds cover approximately 50% of the northern sky at latitudes b > 30 degrees, at temperature-corrected 100 micron intensities D_100 > 1.5 MJy/sr. The sheetlike cirrus clouds, with hydrogen densities n_H > 30 cm^-3, may be compressed by dynamical processes at the disk-halo interface, and they are conducive to H2 formation on grain surfaces. Exploiting the correlation between N(H2) and 100 micron intensity, we estimate that cirrus clouds at b > 30 contain approximately 3000 M_sun in H2. Extrapolated over the inner Milky Way, the cirrus may contain 10^7 M_sun of H2 and 10^8 M_sun in total gas mass. If elevated to 100 pc, their gravitational potential energy is ~10^53 erg.

Kristen Gillmon; J. Michael Shull

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

Near infrared detectors for SNAP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near Infrared Detectors for SNAP M. Schubnell a , N. Barron1k × 1k and 2k × 2k) near infrared detectors manufactured byas part of the near infrared R&D e?ort for SNAP (the Super-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Solving the Vela pulsar infrared excess problem Dima Zyuzin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are marked using notations from Shibanov et al. (2003), except of o4 which is detected only with Gemini by about 2 along the X-ray counter-jet direction with PA 130 (Helfand et al. (2001)) marked by the dashed projected onto the counter-jet origin of its PWN (Hester et al. (1995)). The putative near-IR jet feature

137

Processing of formic acid-containing ice by heavy and energetic cosmic ray analogues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formic acid (HCOOH) has been extensively detected in space environments, including interstellar medium (gas and grains), comets and meteorites. Such environments are often subjected to the action of ionizing agents, which may cause changes in the molecular structure, thus leading to formation of new species. Formic acid is a possible precursor of pre-biotic species, such as Glycine (NH2CH2COOH). This work investigates experimentally the physicochemical effects resulting from interaction of heavy and energetic cosmic ray analogues (46MeV 58Ni11+) in H2O:HCOOH (1:1) ice, at 15 K, in ultrahigh vacuum regime, using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry in the mid-infrared region (4000-600 cm-1 or 2.5-12.5 microns). After the bombardment, the sample was slowly heated to room temperature. The results show the dissociation cross-section for the formic acid of 2.4x10^-13 cm2, and half-life due to galactic cosmic rays of 8x10^7 yr. The IR spectra show intense formation of CO and CO2, and small production of more com...

Bergantini, A; Rothard, H; Boduch, P; Andrade, D P P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Application of infrared imaging in ferrocyanide tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes the feasibility of using infrared imaging techniques and scanning equipment to detect potential hot spots within ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. A hot spot is defined as a volumetric region within a waste tank with an excessively warm temperature that is generated by radioactive isotopes. The thermal image of a hot spot was modeled by computer. this model determined the image an IR system must detect. Laboratory and field tests of the imaging system are described, and conclusions based on laboratory and field data are presented. The report shows that infrared imaging is capable of detecting hot spots in ferrocyanide waste tanks with depths of up to 3.94 m (155 in.). The infrared imaging system is a useful technology for initial evaluation and assessment of hot spots in the majority of ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The system will not allow an exact hot spot and temperature determination, but it will provide the necessary information to determine the worst-case hot spot detected in temperature patterns. Ferrocyanide tanks are one type of storage tank on the Watch List. These tanks are identified as priority 1 Hanford Site Tank farm Safety Issues.

Morris, K.L.; Mailhot, R.B. Jr.; McLaren, J.M.; Morris, K.L.

1994-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

139

New Near-Infrared Surface Brightness Fluctuation Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new theoretical models for surface brightness fluctuations in the near-infrared. We show the time evolution of near-infrared brightness fluctuation properties over large age and metallicity ranges, i.e., from 12 Myr to 16 Gyr, and from Z/Zsun=1/50 to Z/Zsun=2.5, for single age, single metallicity stellar populations. All the stellar models are followed from the zero age main sequence to the central carbon ignition for massive stars, or to the end of the thermally pulsing regime of the asymptotic giant branch phase for low and intermediate mass stars. The new models are compared with observed near-infrared fluctuation absolute magnitudes and colours for a sample of Magellanic Cloud star clusters and Fornax Cluster galaxies. For star clusters younger than ~3 Gyr, the predicted near-infrared fluctuation properties are in a satisfactory agreement with observed ones over a wide range of stellar population metallicities. However, for older star clusters, the agreement between the observed and predicted near-IR brightness fluctuations depends on how the surface brightness absolute magnitudes are estimated. The computed set of models are not able to match the observed near-IR fluctuation absolute magnitudes and colours simultaneously. We argue that the observed discrepancies between the predicted and observed properties of old MC superclusters are more likely due to observational reasons.

M. Mouhcine; R. A. Gonzalez; M. C. Liu

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Mid infrared emission of nearby Herbig Ae/Be stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present mid IR spectro-photometric imaging of a sample of eight nearby ($D \\leq 240$pc) Herbig Ae/Be stars. The spectra are dominated by photospheric emission (HR6000), featureless infrared excess emission (T~Cha), broad silicate emission feature (HR5999) and the infrared emission bands (HD 97048, HD 97300, TY~CrA, HD 176386). The spectrum of HD179218 shows both silicate emission and infrared emission bands (IEB). All stars of our sample where the spectrum is entirely dominated by IEB have an extended emission on scales of a few thousand AU ($\\sim 10''$). We verify the derived source extension found with ISOCAM by multi--aperture photometry with ISOPHT and compare our ISOCAM spectral photometry with ISOSWS spectra.

R. Siebenmorgen; T. Prusti; A. Natta; Th. Mueller

2000-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Space Density of Compton-Thick Active Galactic Nucleus and the X-Ray Background  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We constrain the number density and evolution of Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In the local universe, we use the wide-area surveys from the Swift and INTEGRAL satellites, while for high redshifts we explore candidate selections based on a combination of X-ray and mid-infrared (mid-IR) parameters. We find a significantly lower space density of CT AGNs in the local universe than expected from published AGN population synthesis models to explain the X-ray background (XRB). This can be explained by the numerous degeneracies in the parameters of those models; we use the high-energy surveys described here to remove those degeneracies. We show that only direct observations of CT AGNs can currently constrain the number of heavily obscured supermassive black holes. At high redshift, the inclusion of IR-selected CT AGN candidates leads to a much higher space density, implying (1) a different (steeper) evolution for these sources compared to less-obscured AGNs, (2) that the IR selection includes a large number of interlopers, and/or (3) that there is a large number of reflection-dominated AGNs missed in the INTEGRAL and Swift observations. The contribution of CT AGN to the XRB is small, ~9%, with a comparable contribution to the total cosmic accretion, unless reflection-dominated CT AGNs significantly outnumber transmission-dominated CT AGNs, in which case their contribution can be much higher. Using estimates derived here for the accretion luminosity over cosmic time, we estimate the local mass density in supermassive black holes and find a good agreement with available constraints for an accretion efficiency of ~10%. Transmission-dominated CT AGNs contribute only ~8% to total black hole growth.

E. Treister; C. Megan Urry; Shanil Virani

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Cosmology with Cosmic Infrared Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006 #12;Title Here IR/Opt: Direct emission from stars FIR: Processed emission of Opt/IR light by dust IRAC Instrument Team's GTO Survey PI: Peter Eisenhardt (JPL) + ~20 collaborators IRAC Spitzer Bootes

Leka, K. D .

143

LoCuSS: A DYNAMICAL ANALYSIS OF X-RAY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN LOCAL CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a study of the distribution of X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a representative sample of 26 massive clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.30, combining Chandra observations sensitive to X-ray point sources of luminosity L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} at the cluster redshift with extensive and highly complete spectroscopy of cluster members down to {approx}M*{sub K} + 2. In total we identify 48 X-ray AGNs among the cluster members, with luminosities 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41}-1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. Based on these identifications, we estimate that 0.73% {+-} 0.14% of cluster galaxies brighter than M{sub K} = -23.1 (M*{sub K} + 1.5) host an X-ray AGN with L{sub X} > 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. In the stacked caustic diagram that shows (v{sub los} - (v))/{sigma}{sub v} versus r{sub proj}/r{sub 500}, the X-ray AGN appear to preferentially lie along the caustics, suggestive of an infalling population. They also appear to avoid the region with lowest cluster-centric radii and relative velocities (r{sub proj} < 0.4r{sub 500}; |v - (v)|/{sigma}{sub v} < 0.8), which is dominated by the virialized population of galaxies accreted earliest into the clusters. The line-of-sight velocity histogram of the X-ray AGN shows a relatively flat distribution, and is inconsistent with the Gaussian distribution expected for a virialized population at 98.9% confidence. Moreover, the velocity dispersion of the 48 X-ray AGNs is 1.51 times that of the overall cluster population, which is consistent with the {radical}2 ratio expected by simple energetic arguments when comparing infalling versus virialized populations. This kinematic segregation is significant at the 4.66{sigma} level. When splitting the X-ray AGN sample into two according to X-ray or infrared (IR) luminosity, both X-ray bright (L{sub X} > 10{sup 42}) and IR-bright (L{sub TIR} > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} L{sub Sun }) subsamples show higher velocity dispersions than their X-ray dim and IR-dim counterparts at >2{sigma} significance. This is consistent with the nuclear activity responsible for the X-ray and IR emission being slowly shut down as the host galaxies are accreted into the cluster. Overall, our results provide the strongest observational evidence to date that X-ray AGNs found in massive clusters are an infalling population, and that the cluster environment very effectively suppresses radiatively efficient nuclear activity in its member galaxies. These results are consistent with the view that for galaxies to host an X-ray AGN they should be the central galaxy within their dark matter halo and have a ready supply of cold gas.

Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Egami, E. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Sanderson, A. J. R.; Smith, G. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Babul, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 1A1 (Canada); Edge, A. C. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Finoguenov, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Moran, S. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Okabe, N., E-mail: cphaines@as.arizona.edu [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA), P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Infrared imaging: A versatile NDT method for manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The non-contact, non-invasive, highly adaptable nature of infrared technology offers many advantages over traditional non-destructive testing methods such as x-ray and ultrasound. Recent performance improvements accompanied by cost reductions are enabling broader implementation across a wide variety of industries. Most promising for future growth are application specific configurations packaged as integrated modules. Among the many industries that benefit from infrared technology, manufacturing has experienced the greatest gain. Environments including both continuous and batch manufacturing involve many critical thermal processes. Through the use of infrared imaging equipment, these processes can be easily monitored and optimized to ensure product quality and process efficiency.

West, L.M. [FLIR Systems, Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

About EffectiveŽ Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible and IR Wavelength Range  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

"Effective" Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in "Effective" Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible and IR Wavelength Range V. N. Uzhegov, D. M. Kabanov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, and S. M. Sakerin Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Aerosol component of the atmosphere is one of the important factors affecting the radiation budget of the space - atmosphere - underlying surface system in visible and infrared (IR) wavelength ranges. It is extremely important to take into account the contribution of this component into the extinction of solar radiation under cloudless sky conditions. Sometimes it is important to know not only the total value of the aerosol component of extinction, but also to have the possibility to estimate the "effective" height of

146

Mid-infrared integrated waveguide modulators based on silicon-on-lithium-niobate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1364/OPTICA.1.000350 1. INTRODUCTION The mid-infrared (mid-IR) region of the optical spectrum (3­ 8 m Article Vol. 1, No. 5 / November 2014 / Optica 350 #12;and routing elements due to the high index contrast

Fathpour, Sasan

147

Magnetically polarized Ir dopant atoms in superconducting Ba(Fe1?xIrx)2As2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the magnetic polarization of the Ir 5d dopant states in the pnictide superconductor Ba(Fe1?xIrx)2As2 with x=0.027(2) using Ir L3 edge x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS). Despite the fact that doping partially suppresses the antiferromagnetic transition, we find that magnetic order survives around the Ir dopant sites. The Ir states are magnetically polarized with commensurate stripe-like antiferromagnetic order and long correlations lengths, ?mag>2800 and >850 Å, in the ab plane and along the c axis, respectively, driven by their interaction with the Fe spins. This Ir magnetic order persists up to the Néel transition of the majority Fe spins at TN=74(2) K. At 5 K we find that magnetic order coexists microscopically with superconductivity in Ba(Fe1?xIrx)2As2. The energy dependence of the XRMS through the Ir L3 edge shows a non-Lorentzian line shape, which we explain in terms of interference between Ir resonant scattering and Fe nonresonant magnetic scattering.

Dean, M.P.M.; Kim, M.G.; Kreyssig, A.; Kim, J.W.; Liu, X.; Ryan, P.J.; Thaler, A.; Budko, S.L.; Strassheim, W.; Canfield, P.C.; Hill, J.P.; Goldman, A.I.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

Infrared Thermography Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrared Thermography Laboratory Infrared Thermography Laboratory The Infrared Thermography Laboratory (IRLab) conducts detailed laboratory experiments on the thermal performance of windows and other insulated systems. During a typical experiment, a specimen is placed between two environmental chambers that simulate a long, cold night during winter. Besides generating informative thermal images, the experiments collect several types of quantitative data with high spatial resolution that are useful for understanding subtle details in the thermal performance and for validating computer simulations of heat and fluid flows. Thermography experiments in the IRLab use an infrared imager to produce qualitative thermal images, or thermograms, that help provide a visual interpretation of how heat is flowing through the specimen. The infrared thermograms are also taken and postprocessed to extract numerical data to perform quantitative thermography that produces a database of the distribution of surface temperatures on the warm side of various specimen. A traversing system is also used to measure the distribution of air temperatures and velocities near the specimen. Research results are presented at various technical conferences -- see our schedule of upcoming conferences. Technical papers on infrared thermography are available for downloading. The IRLab contains a machine tool shop area that supports fabrication efforts in the Building Technologies Department. Other types of research, such as Non-Destructive Evaluation, are also conducted in the IRLab.

149

The Neon Abundance in the Ejecta of QU Vul From Late-Epoch IR Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present ground-based SpectroCam-10 mid-infrared, MMT optical, and Spitzer Space Telescope IRS mid-infrared spectra taken 7.62, 18.75, and 19.38 years respectively after the outburst of the old classical nova QU Vulpeculae (Nova Vul 1984 #2). The spectra of the ejecta are dominated by forbidden line emission from neon and oxygen. Our analysis shows that neon was, at the first and last epochs respectively, more than 76 and 168 times overabundant by number with respect to hydrogen compared to the solar value. These high lower limits to the neon abundance confirm that QU Vul involved a thermonuclear runaway on an ONeMg white dwarf and approach the yields predicted by models of the nucleosynthesis in such events.

Robert D. Gehrz; Charles E. Woodward; L. Andrew Helton; Elisha F. Polomski; Thomas L. Hayward; James R. Houck; A. Evans; Joachim Krautter; Steven N. Shore; Sumner Starrfield; James Truran; G. J. Schwarz; R. Mark Wagner

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

150

IR-4 Ornamental Horticulture Program Trial Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IR-4 Ornamental Horticulture Program Trial Report Researcher(s): Heiner Lieth, UC Davis PRNumber. The phytotoxicity index values generally averaged less than 2, suggesting very light damage which is probably-4 Ornamental Horticulture Program Trial Report Researcher(s): Heiner Lieth, UC Davis PRNumber

Lieth, J. Heinrich

151

Cosmic IR Backgrounds Ned Wright (UCLA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic IR Backgrounds by Ned Wright (UCLA) http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/intro.html See: · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmolog.htm · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/DIRBE · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CIBR · http

Wright, Edward L. "Ned"

152

Long-Wave Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Wave Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) Long-Wave Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Long-Wave Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Long-Wave Infrared Activity Date 1968 - 1971 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Fumarolic and hot springs activity Notes 8- to 14-micrometer IR imagery has value in delineating the typical arcuate structural patterns References Koenig, J.B.; Gawarecki, S.J.; Austin, C.F. (1 February 1972) Remote sensing survey of the Coso geothermal area, Inyo county, California. Technical publication 1968--1971 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Long-Wave_Infrared_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1968-1971)&oldid=473747"

153

Precise measurement of alpha(K) for the M4 transition from Ir-193(m): A test of internal-conversion theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 10.5-day isomer in Ir-193 decays by a single 80.2-keV M4 transition directly to the ground state of that nucleus. We have measured the total intensity of K x rays relative to 80.2-keV gamma rays for this transition to be 98.7(6). With the K...

Nica, N.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, VE; Raman, S.; Nestor, CW; Trzhaskovskaya, MB.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Dilute magnetism and spin-orbital percolation effects in Sr2Ir1?xRhxO4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have used a combination of resonant magnetic x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy to investigate the properties of the doped spin-orbital Mott insulator Sr2Ir1?xRhxO4 (0.07?x?0.70). We show that Sr2Ir1?xRhxO4 represents a unique model system for the study of dilute magnetism in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling, and provide evidence of a doping-induced change in magnetic structure and a suppression of magnetic order at xc?0.17. We demonstrate that Rh-doping introduces Rh3+/Ir5+ ions which effectively hole-dope this material. We propose that the magnetic phase diagram for this material can be understood in terms of a novel spin-orbital percolation picture.

J. P. Clancy; A. Lupascu; H. Gretarsson; Z. Islam; Y. F. Hu; D. Casa; C. S. Nelson; S. C. LaMarra; G. Cao; Young-June Kim

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes IR remote sensing has located elevated surface temperatures (<12 degrees C above background) near Socorro Peak). A four-year compellation of ASTER satellite IR imaging was used. These images work on a 5-band, TIR processor

156

THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND EXPERIMENT (CIBER): A SOUNDING ROCKET PAYLOAD TO STUDY THE NEAR INFRARED EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER) is a suite of four instruments designed to study the near infrared (IR) background light from above the Earth's atmosphere. The instrument package comprises two imaging telescopes designed to characterize spatial anisotropy in the extragalactic IR background caused by cosmological structure during the epoch of reionization, a low resolution spectrometer to measure the absolute spectrum of the extragalactic IR background, and a narrow band spectrometer optimized to measure the absolute brightness of the zodiacal light foreground. In this paper we describe the design and characterization of the CIBER payload. The detailed mechanical, cryogenic, and electrical design of the system are presented, including all system components common to the four instruments. We present the methods and equipment used to characterize the instruments before and after flight, and give a detailed description of CIBER's flight profile and configurations. CIBER is designed to be recoverable and has flown four times, with modifications to the payload having been informed by analysis of the first flight data. All four instruments performed to specifications during the subsequent flights, and the scientific data from these flights are currently being analyzed.

Zemcov, M.; Bock, J.; Hristov, V.; Levenson, L. R.; Mason, P. [Department of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Arai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T. [Department of Space Astronomy and Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Battle, J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cooray, A. [Center for Cosmology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Keating, B.; Renbarger, T. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Kim, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D. H.; Nam, U. W. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Sullivan, I. [Department of Physics, The University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Suzuki, K., E-mail: zemcov@caltech.edu [Instrument Development Group of Technical Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Variable waveband infrared imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A waveband imager includes an imaging pixel that utilizes photon tunneling with a thermally actuated bimorph structure to convert infrared radiation to visible radiation. Infrared radiation passes through a transparent substrate and is absorbed by a bimorph structure formed with a pixel plate. The absorption generates heat which deflects the bimorph structure and pixel plate towards the substrate and into an evanescent electric field generated by light propagating through the substrate. Penetration of the bimorph structure and pixel plate into the evanescent electric field allows a portion of the visible wavelengths propagating through the substrate to tunnel through the substrate, bimorph structure, and/or pixel plate as visible radiation that is proportional to the intensity of the incident infrared radiation. This converted visible radiation may be superimposed over visible wavelengths passed through the imaging pixel.

Hunter, Scott R.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

158

Infrared source test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Infrared Source Test (IRST) is to demonstrate the ability to track a ground target with an infrared sensor from an airplane. The system is being developed within the Advance Technology Program`s Theater Missile Defense/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) section. The IRST payload consists of an Amber Radiance 1 infrared camera system, a computer, a gimbaled mirror, and a hard disk. The processor is a custom R3000 CPU board made by Risq Modular Systems, Inc. for LLNL. The board has ethernet, SCSI, parallel I/O, and serial ports, a DMA channel, a video (frame buffer) interface, and eight MBytes of main memory. The real-time operating system VxWorks has been ported to the processor. The application code is written in C on a host SUN 4 UNIX workstation. The IRST is the result of a combined effort by physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists.

Ott, L.

1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

PROBING THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM OF z {approx} 1 ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES THROUGH INTERFEROMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF CO AND SPITZER MID-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the relationship between gas, dust, and star formation in a sample of 12 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at high-redshift compared to a similar sample of local galaxies. We present new CO observations and/or Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopy for six 70 {mu}m selected galaxies at z {approx} 1 in order to quantify the properties of the molecular gas reservoir, the contribution of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) to the mid-IR luminosity, and the star formation efficiency (SFE = L{sub IR}/L{sup '}{sub CO}). The mid-IR spectra show strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission, and our spectral decomposition suggests that the AGN makes a minimal contribution (<25%) to the mid-IR luminosity. The 70 {mu}m selected ULIRGs, which we find to be spectroscopic close pairs, are observed to have high SFE, similar to local ULIRGs and high-redshift submillimeter galaxies, consistent with enhanced IR luminosity due to an ongoing major merger. Combined with existing observations of local and high-redshift ULIRGs, we further compare the PAH, IR, and CO luminosities. We show that the ratio L{sub PAH,6.2}/L{sub IR} decreases with increasing IR luminosity for both local and high-redshift galaxies, but the trend for high-redshift galaxies is shifted to higher IR luminosities; the average L{sub PAH,6.2}/L{sub IR} ratio at a given L{sub IR} is {approx}3 times higher at high-redshift. When we normalize by the molecular gas, we find this trend to be uniform for galaxies at all redshifts and that the molecular gas is correlated with the PAH dust emission. The similar trends seen in the [C II] to molecular gas ratios in other studies suggests that PAH emission, like [C II], continues to be a good tracer of photodissociation regions even at high-redshift. Together the CO, PAH, and far-IR fine structure lines should be useful for constraining the interstellar medium conditions in high-redshift galaxies.

Pope, Alexandra; Kirkpatrick, Allison [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Wagg, Jeff [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Frayer, David [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Armus, Lee; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Desai, Vandana [Spitzer Science Center, MS 220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, DAPNIA/Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Dickinson, Mark E., E-mail: pope@astro.umass.edu [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Attenuated Total Reflection Infrared (ATR-IR) Spectroscopy of a Water-in-Oil Emulsion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions are of great interest in many areas including food technology and the oil and gas industry. However, the molecular mechanisms that lead to a stable...

Kiefer, Johannes; Frank, Kerstin; Schuchmann, Heike P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Stimulated dual-band infrared computed tomography: A tool to inspect the aging infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed stimulated dual-band infrared (IR) computed tomography as a tool to inspect the aging infrastructure. The system has the potential to locate and quantify structural damage within airframes and bridge decks. Typically, dual-band IR detection methods improve the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of ten, compared to single-band IR detection methods. They conducted a demonstration at Boeing using a uniform pulsed-heat source to stimulate IR images of hidden defects in the 727 fuselage. The dual-band IR camera and image processing system produced temperature, thermal inertia, and cooling-rate maps. In combination, these maps characterized the defect site, size, depth, thickness and type. The authors quantified the percent metal loss from corrosion above a threshold of 5%, with overall uncertainties of 3%. Also, they conducted a feasibility study of dual-band IR thermal imaging for bridge deck inspections. They determined the sites and relative concrete displacement of 2-in. and 4-in. deep delaminations from thin styrofoam implants in asphalt-covered concrete slabs. They demonstrated the value of dual-band IR computed tomography to quantify structural damage within flash-heated airframes and naturally-heated bridge decks.

Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

162

Impact of IrRu Oxygen Evolution Reaction Catalysts on Pt Nanostructured Thin Films under Start-Up/Shutdown Cycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) methods have been utilized to study the role of oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts in mitigating degradation arising from start-up/shutdown events. Pt nanostructured thin films (NSTF) were coated with a Ru0.1Ir0.9 OER catalyst at loadings ranging from 1 to 10 g/cm2 and submitted to 5,000 potential cycles within a membrane electrode assembly. Analysis of the as-deposited catalyst showed that Ir and Ru coating is primarily metallic, and further evidence is provided to support the previously reported interaction between Ru and the perylene-red support. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to observe the impact of the OER catalysts on Pt dissolution and migration through the membrane. Elemental mapping showed a high percentage of the Ir catalyst was maintained on the NSTF whisker surfaces following testing. The presence of the OER catalysts greatly reduced the smoothing of the Pt NSTF whiskers, which has been correlated with Pt dissolution and losses in electrochemically active surface area. The dissolution of both Ir and Pt led to the formation of IrPt nanoparticle clusters in the membrane close to the cathode, as well as the formation of a Pt band deeper in the membrane.

Cullen, David A [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Atanasoska, Liliana [3M, Industrial Mineral Products Division; Atanasoski, Radoslav [3M, Industrial Mineral Products Division

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Mobile Robotics I: Lab 3 Obstacle Avoidance with IR Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensors Background IR SENSORS INTERFACE The CEENBoT comes equipped with a Left and Right non-contact bumpMobile Robotics I: Lab 3 Obstacle Avoidance with IR Sensors CEENBoTTM Mobile Robotics Platform 1.01 #12;. ( Blank ) #12;Mobile Robotics I ­ Obstacle Avoidance with IR Sensors Purpose

Farritor, Shane

164

Extreme Galactic-Winds and Starburst in IR Mergers and IR QSOs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report -as a part of a long-term study of mergers and IR QSOs- detailed spectroscopic evidences for outflow (OF) and/or Wolf Rayet features in: (i) low velocity OF in the ongoing mergers NGC 4038/39 and IRAS 23128-5919; (ii) extreme velocity OF (EVOF) in the QSOs IRAS 01003-2238 and IRAS 13218+0552; (iii) OF and EVOF in a complete sample of ultra-luminous IR galaxies/QSOs ("The IRAS 1 Jy MKO-KPNO Survey", of 118 objects). We found EVOF in IRAS 11119+3257, 14394+5332, 15130+1958 and 15462-0450. The OF components detected in these objects were mainly associated to starburst processes: i.e., to galactic-winds generated in multiple type II SN explosions and massive stars. The EVOF were detected in objects with strong starburst plus obscured IR QSOs; which suggest that interaction of both processes could generate EVOF. In addition, we analyze the presence of Wolf Rayet features in the large sample of Bright PG-QSOs (Boroson and Green 1992), and nearby mergers and galactic-wind galaxies. We found clear WR features in the Fe II QSOs (type I): PG 1244+026, 1444+407, 1448+273, 1535+547; and in the IR merger Arp 220. HST archive images of IR+BAL QSOs show in practically all of these objects "arc or shell" features probably associated to galactic-winds (i.e., to multiple type II SN explosions) and/or merger processes. Finally, we discuss the presence of extreme starburst and galactic wind as a possible evolutive link between IR merger and IR QSOs; where the relation between mergers and extreme starburst (with powerful galactic-winds) plays in important role, in the evolution of galaxies.

S. Lipari; D. Sanders; R. Terlevich; S. Veilleux; R. Diaz; Y. Taniguchi; W. Zheng; D. Kim; Z. Tsvetanov; G. Carranza; H. Dottori

2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

165

3, 20272058, 2003 Trace gas IR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and on the climate forcing: H2O, CO2, N2O, CH4, CFCs, O3, and CO. The atmospheric abundances obtained from infrared satellite for chemistry and climate applications C. Clerbaux 1 , J. Hadji-Lazaro 1 , S. Turquety 1 gas abundances in the troposphere were obtained from10 sparsely distributed measurement sites

166

Visible Light-Driven Water Oxidation by Ir oxide Clusters Coupledto Single Cr Centers in Mesoporous Silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Visible light-induced water oxidation has been demonstrated at an Ir oxide nanocluster coupled to a single Cr{sup VI} site on the pore surface of MCM-41 mesoporous silica. The photocatalytic unit was assembled by the reaction of surface Cr=O groups with Ir(acac){sub 3} precursor followed by calcination at 300 C and bond formation monitored by FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy. High-resolution Z-contrast electron micrographs of the calcined material combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spot analysis confirmed the occlusion of Ir oxide nanoparticles inside the mesopores. Oxygen evolution of an aqueous suspension of the Ir{sub x}O{sub y}-CrMCM-41 upon visible light irradiation of the Cr{sup VI}-O ligand-to-metal charge-transfer absorption was monitored mass-spectrometrically. Comparison of the product yields for samples with low Cr content (Cr/Si {le} 0.02) and high Cr content (Cr/Si = 0.05) indicates that only isolated Cr centers are capable of extracting electrons from Ir oxide clusters, while di- or polychromate species are not. Water oxidation at a multielectron-transfer catalyst coupled to a single metal center has not been demonstrated before. The ability to drive water oxidation with a single metal center as electron pump offers opportunities for coupling the oxygen-evolving photocatalytic unit to reducing sites in the nanoporous scaffold.

Nakamura, Ryuhei; Frei, Heinz

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

167

Solar Infrared Photometer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A sun photometer which operates at five wavelengths in the near infrared between 1.0 and 4.0 ?m has been developed. The instrument is a manually operated, fitter wheel design and has principal applications for atmospheric aerosol studies. The ...

J. D. Spinhirne; M. G. Strange; L. R. Blaine

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Infrared Thermometer (IRT) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Infrared Thermometer (IRT) is a ground-based radiation pyrometer that provides measurements of the equivalent blackbody brightness temperature of the scene in its field of view. The downwelling version has a narrow field of view for measuring sky temperature and for detecting clouds. The upwelling version has a wide field of view for measuring the narrowband radiating temperature of the ground surface.

VR Morris

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Infrared radiation: Herschel revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The year 2000 marks the 200th anniversary of Herschel’s discovery of infrared radiation. Using a car light in place of the Sun and a liquid crystal sheet instead of thermometers the experiment is an effective classroom demonstration of invisible light.

Erin E. Pursell; Richard Kozlowski

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Infrared Basics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Infrared Basics Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Infrared Basics Author Protherm Published Publisher Not Provided, 2013 DOI Not Provided...

171

Final technical report. In-situ FT-IR monitoring of a black liquor recovery boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project developed and tested advanced Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) instruments for process monitoring of black liquor recovery boilers. The state-of-the-art FT-IR instruments successfully operated in the harsh environment of a black liquor recovery boiler and provided a wealth of real-time process information. Concentrations of multiple gas species were simultaneously monitored in-situ across the combustion flow of the boiler and extractively at the stack. Sensitivity to changes of particulate fume and carryover levels in the process flow were also demonstrated. Boiler set-up and operation is a complex balance of conditions that influence the chemical and physical processes in the combustion flow. Operating parameters include black liquor flow rate, liquor temperature, nozzle pressure, primary air, secondary air, tertiary air, boiler excess oxygen and others. The in-process information provided by the FT-IR monitors can be used as a boiler control tool since species indicative of combustion efficiency (carbon monoxide, methane) and pollutant emissions (sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid and fume) were monitored in real-time and observed to fluctuate as operating conditions were varied. A high priority need of the U.S. industrial boiler market is improved measurement and control technology. The sensor technology demonstrated in this project is applicable to the need of industry.

James Markham; Joseph Cosgrove; David Marran; Jorge Neira; Chad Nelson; Peter Solomon

1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Quantitative nondestructive testing using Infrared Thermography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turbine blade . . . . . . . . . . FLIR TM A320G InfraredTable 1.1: Specifications of the FLIR TM A320G InfraredInfrared Camera: A FLIR TM A320G Infrared camera was used

Manohar, Arun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Mechanical feedback in the molecular ISM of luminous IR galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: Molecular emission lines originating in the nuclei of luminous infra-red galaxies are used to determine the physical properties of the nuclear ISM in these systems. Methods: A large observational database of molecular emission lines is compared with model predictions that include heating by UV and X-ray radiation, mechanical heating, and the effects of cosmic rays. Results: The observed line ratios and model predictions imply a separation of the observedsystems into three groups: XDRs, UV-dominated high-density (n>=10^5 cm-3) PDRs, and lower-density (n=10^4.5 cm-3) PDRs that are dominated by mechanical feedback. Conclusions: The division of the two types of PDRs follows naturally from the evolution of the star formation cycle of these sources, which evolves from deeply embedded young stars, resulting in high-density (n>=10^5 cm-3) PDRs, to a stage where the gas density has decreased (n=10^4.5 cm-3) and mechanical feedback from supernova shocks dominates the heating budget.

A. F. Loenen; M. Spaans; W. A. Baan; R. Meijerink

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Wide-Field Near Infrared Data: Optimal Photometry in Crowded Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present JHK infrared data from the UK Infrared Telescope for a subset of the regions of the MYStIX (Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray) survey. Some of the data were obtained specifically for the MYStIX project, and some as part of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey's Galactic Plane Survey. In most of these fields crowding is a significant issue for aperture photometry, and so we have re-extracted the photometry from the processed images using an optimal extraction technique, and we describe how we adapt the optimal technique to mitigate the effects of crowding.

King, R R; Broos, Patrick S; Getman, Konstantin V; Feigelson, Eric D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

THE MID-INFRARED AND NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET EXCESS EMISSIONS OF QUIESCENT GALAXIES ON THE RED SEQUENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the mid-infrared (IR) and near-ultraviolet (UV) excess emissions of spectroscopically selected quiescent galaxies on the optical red sequence. We use the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-IR and Galaxy Evolution Explorer near-UV data for a spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to study the possible connection between quiescent red-sequence galaxies with and without mid-IR/near-UV excess. Among 648 12 {mu}m detected quiescent red-sequence galaxies without H{alpha} emission, 26% and 55% show near-UV and mid-IR excess emissions, respectively. When we consider only bright (M{sub r} < -21.5) galaxies with an early-type morphology, the fraction of galaxies with recent star formation is still 39%. The quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR and near-UV excess emissions are optically fainter and have slightly smaller D{sub n} 4000 than those without mid-IR and near-UV excess emissions. We also find that mid-IR weighted mean stellar ages of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR excess are larger than those with near-UV excess, and smaller than those without mid-IR and near-UV excess. The environmental dependence of the fraction of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR and near-UV excess seems strong even though the trends of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with near-UV excess differ from those with mid-IR excess. These results indicate that the recent star formation traced by near-UV ({approx}< 1 Gyr) and mid-IR ({approx}< 2 Gyr) excess is not negligible among nearby, quiescent, red, early-type galaxies. We suggest a possible evolutionary scenario of quiescent red-sequence galaxies from quiescent red-sequence galaxies with near-UV excess to those with mid-IR excess to those without near-UV and mid-IR excess.

Ko, Jongwan; Lee, Jong Chul [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ho Seong [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sohn, Young-Jong, E-mail: jwko@kasi.re.kr [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

PAH chemistry and IR emission from circumstellar disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims. The chemistry of, and infrared (IR) emission from, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in disks around Herbig Ae/Be and T Tauri stars are investigated. The equilibrium distribution of the PAHs over all accessible charge/hydrogenation states depends on the size and shape of the PAHs and on the physical properties of the star and surrounding disk. Methods. A chemistry model is created to calculate this equilibrium distribution. Destruction of PAHs by ultraviolet (UV) photons, possibly in multi-photon absorption events, is taken into account. The chemistry model is coupled to a radiative transfer code to provide the physical parameters and to combine the PAH emission with the spectral energy distribution (SED) from the star+disk system. Results. Normally hydrogenated PAHs in Herbig Ae/Be disks account for most of the observed PAH emission, with neutral and positively ionized species contributing in roughly equal amounts. Close to the midplane, the PAHs are more strongly hydrogenated and negatively ionized, but these species do not contribute to the overall emission because of the low UV/optical flux deep inside the disk. PAHs of 50 carbon atoms are destroyed out to 100 AU in the disk's surface layer, and the resulting spatial extent of the emission does not agree well with observations. Rather, PAHs of about 100 carbon atoms or more are predicted to cause most of the observed emission. The emission is extended on a scale similar to that of the size of the disk. Furthermore, the emission from T Tauri disks is much weaker and concentrated more towards the central star than that from Herbig Ae/Be disks. Positively ionized PAHs are predicted to be largely absent in T Tauri disks because of the weaker radiation field.

R. Visser; V. C. Geers; C. P. Dullemond; J. -C. Augereau; K. M. Pontoppidan; E. F. van Dishoeck

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

177

Study of the Effects of Ambient Conditions Upon the Performance of Fan Powered, Infrared Natural Gas Burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation was to characterize the operation of a fan-powered, infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions, develop numerical model to simulate the burner performances, and provide design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance.

Clark Atlanta University

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

178

IR laser-induced protein crystal transformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel method and the associated instrumentation for improving crystalline order (higher resolution of X-ray diffraction and reduced mosaicity) of protein crystals by precisely controlled heating is demonstrated. Crystal transformation is optically controlled by a video system.

Kiefersauer, R.

2014-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l' IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l' w&m PadmmmTuJ tmml' aIs~#l!REm m-t, - 188kwxm BYI alahard 0. cr*rrror cy- r' , ' .~ -' - -' ^ , /' cs< 4. .c :' ; *. .h,- ' (z&&y .' ,/ ;f. .* &J >l a. L \' P" ,,,' ,.' I * :{' \ !' l t ..b c&~ tf ~ , r ,, r. ,* .;;;., k J ;, b $y$' Lrmprrw)rlt&tmxJ- a@. Frqrr at t&i8 raoLli:.y SC\ daummiI~Luualndr8rr~lfCUIf@@?~~oy-~ d )I t rq ,i .* 1 Virium~~bUrlJlOgarspvlr at ma rdutw. (500 p-4 3) i" 1 ) ,ip" 2. rt A8 - u %I* mm 4almpa~&rnbM Itrr+@# vbrp a** -y ;I11 ~*~~*- miw&mmwlrrwrbsr* ~rSthLtL,ort' tar,da*pcr¶.florllj pi &8~wl~cm@n-~ t#barwatla~r~tOf~. hwrl'r#tarr,urueunUr .--,U-L BirLl#a ofmml -vom. pe a ,Tjm-&,, i L) cc (. a 41 IA.9 #y7 /.& r*-rc * &ah&L- '2 , p-

180

Infrared divergence of the resonant Raman-Compton scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The infrared divergence of the resonant Raman-Compton scattering has been studied in collisions of photons on atomic L electrons in the intermediate-momentum-transfer regime. Low-energy continua emitted by Zr atoms, excited, in the vicinity of the K edge, by the monochromatized x rays delivered by the LURE Synchrotron Radiation Facility, have been observed on vary thin targets and compared with the theoretically predicted infrared divergence of the Raman scattering. The characteristic change in shape of these continua has been studied on a wide energy range below the Zr K edge.

J. P. Briand; A. Simionovici; P. Chevallier; P. Indelicato

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CRYSTALLINE SILICATES IN EVOLVED STARS. I. SPITZER/INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH SPECTROSCOPY OF IRAS 16456-3542, 18354-0638, AND 23239+5754  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of three evolved stars: IRAS 16456-3542, 18354-0638, and 23239+5754. The 9.9-37.2 {mu}m Spitzer/IRS high-resolution spectra of these three sources exhibit rich sets of enstatite-dominated crystalline silicate emission features. IRAS 16456-3542 is extremely rich in crystalline silicates, with >90% of its silicate mass in crystalline form, the highest to date ever reported for crystalline silicate sources.

Jiang, B. W.; Zhang, Ke [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)] [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li, Aigen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Lisse, C. M., E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: kzhang@caltech.edu, E-mail: lia@missouri.edu, E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

On the LINER nuclear obscuration, Compton-thickness and the existence of the dusty torus; Clues from Spitzer/IRS spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most of the optically classified low ionisation narrow emission-line regions (LINERs) nuclei host an active galactic nuclei (AGN). However, how they fit into the unified model (UM) of AGN is still an open question. The aims of this work are to study at mid-infrared (mid-IR) (1) the Compton-thick nature of LINERs; and (2) the disappearance of the dusty torus in LINERs predicted from theoretical arguments. We have compiled all the available low spectral resolution mid-IR spectra of LINERs from the IRS/Spitzer (40 LINERs). We have complemented this sample with Spitzer/IRS spectra of PGQSOs, S1s, S2s, and SBs nuclei. We have studied the AGN versus the starburst content in our sample using different indicators: the EW(PAH 6.2um), the strength of the silicate feature at 9.7um, and the steepness of the mid-IR spectra. In 25 out of the 40 LINERs (i.e., 62.5%) the mid-IR spectra are not SB-dominated, similar to the comparison S2 sample (67.7%). The average spectra of both SB-dominated LINERs and S2s are very similar t...

Gonzalez-Martin, O; Marquez, I; Rodríguez-Espinosa, J M; Acosta-Pulido, J A; Ramos-Almeida, C; Dultzin, D; Hernandez-Garcia, L; Ruschel-Dutra, D; Alonso-Herrero, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

On the viability of the PAH model as an explanation of the unidentified infrared emission features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are widely considered as the preferred candidate for the carrier of the unidentified infrared emission bands observed in the interstellar medium and circumstellar envelopes. In this paper we report the result of fitting a variety of non-PAH spectra (silicates, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, coal and even artificial spectra) using the theoretical infrared spectra of PAHs from the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. We show that these non-PAH spectra can be well fitted by PAH mixtures. This suggest that a general match between astronomical spectra and those of PAH mixtures does not necessarily provide definitive support for the PAH hypothesis.

Zhang, Yong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Strengths of Near-Infrared Absorption Features Relevant to Interstellar and Planetary Ices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The abundances of ices in planetary environments have historically been obtained through measurements of near-infrared absorption features (lambda = 1.0-2.5 microns), and near-IR transmission measurements of materials present in the interstellar medium are becoming more common. For transmission measurements, the band strength (or absorption intensity) of an absorption feature must be known in order to determine the column density of an ice component. In the experiments presented here, we have measured the band strengths of the near-IR absorption features for several molecules relevant to the study of interstellar icy grain mantles and icy planetary bodies: CO (carbon monoxide), CO2 (carbon dioxide), C3O2 (carbon suboxide), CH4 (methane), H2O (water), CH3OH (methanol), and NH3 (ammonia). During a vacuum deposition, the sizes of the near-IR features were correlated with that of a studied mid-IR feature whose strength is well known from previous ice studies. These data may be used to determine ice abundances from observed near-IR spectra of interstellar and planetary materials or to predict the sizes of near-IR features in spectral searches for these molecules in astrophysical environments.

P. A. Gerakines; J. J. Bray; A. Davis; C. R. Richey

2005-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

185

Solar collector systems analysis using infrared scanning techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar energy collector systems analysis using thermography is discussed. The research at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) in this area has focused on infrared (IR) scanning techniques and equipment to determine temperature distributions, flow patterns, and air blockages in solar collectors. The results of this extensive study, covering many sites and types of collectors, illustrate the capabilities of IR analysis as an analysis tool and operation and maintenance procedure when applied to large arrays. Infrared analysis of most collector systems showed temperature distributions that indicated balanced flow patterns with both the thermographs and the hand-held unit. In three significant cases, blocked or broken collector arrays, which previously had gone undetected, were discovered. Using this analysis, validation studies of large computer codes could examine collector arrays for flow patterns or blockages that could cause disagreement between actual and predicted performance. Initial operation and balancing of large systems could be accomplished without complicated sensor systems not needed for normal operations. Maintenance personnel could quickly check their systems without climbing onto the roof and without complicated sensor systems.

Eden, A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

High-Field Magnetoresistance of IrO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The monotonic and oscillatory magnetoresistance of IrO2 is reported and found to be consistent with the Fermi-surface model proposed by Graebner.

W. D. Ryden; W. A. Reed; E. S. Greiner

1972-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

The role of the (111) texture on the exchange bias and interlayer coupling effects observed in sputtered NiFe/IrMn/Co trilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic properties of sputtered NiFe/IrMn/Co trilayers grown on different seed layers (Cu or Ta) deposited on Si (100) substrates were investigated by magnetometry and ferromagnetic resonance measurements. Exchange bias effect and magnetic spring behavior have been studied by changing the IrMn thickness. As shown by X-ray diffraction, Ta and Cu seed layers provoke different degrees of (111) fcc-texture that directly affect the exchange bias and indirectly modify the exchange spring coupling behavior. Increasing the IrMn thickness, it was observed that the coupling angle between the Co and NiFe ferromagnetic layers increases for the Cu seed system, but it reduces for the Ta case. The results were explained considering (i) different anisotropies of the Co and IrMn layers induced by the different degree of the (111) texture and (ii) the distinct exchange bias set at the NiFe/IrMn and IrMn/Co interfaces in both systems. The NiFe and Co interlayer coupling angle is strongly correlated with both exchange bias and exchange magnetic spring phenomena. It was also shown that the highest exchange bias field occurs when an unstressed L1{sub 2} IrMn structure is stabilized.

Castro, I. L.; Nascimento, V. P.; Passamani, E. C.; Takeuchi, A. Y.; Larica, C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES 29075-910 (Brazil)] [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES 29075-910 (Brazil); Tafur, M. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, Campus Itabira, Itabira, MG 37500-903 (Brazil)] [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, Campus Itabira, Itabira, MG 37500-903 (Brazil); Pelegrini, F. [Universidade Federal de Goias, Goiania, GO 74001-970 (Brazil)] [Universidade Federal de Goias, Goiania, GO 74001-970 (Brazil)

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

188

Adsorption of carbon monoxide on a smooth palladium electrode: an in-situ infrared spectroscopic study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption of carbon monoxide on a smooth palladium electrode in 1 M HClO/sub 4/ saturated with CO was studied by two in-situ IR reflectance spectroscopic methods: EMIRS (electrochemically modulated infrared reflectance spectroscopy) and LPSIRS (linear potential sweep infrared reflectance spectroscopy). Two types of adsorbed CO, linear and bridged, were identified from the observed IR spectra, the latter being the predominant surface species. The C-O stretching frequency of the linear CO shifts to higher frequencies at more positive potentials with a slope of 48 cm/sup -1//V. The frequency of the bridged CO increases by 63 cm/sup -1/ between -0.5 and 0.9 V(NHE) and its integrated band intensity decreases continuously in the same potential region while the intensity of the linear CO is almost constant up to 0.1 V and then decreases gradually with increasing positive potential. The surface selection rule of the IR reflection absorption spectroscopy was tested for the present system by using the p- and s-polarized light. It was found that only p-polarized light gave the IR spectra of CO adsorbed on the palladium electrode thus proving the selection rule at the electrode/solution interface.

Kunimatsu, K.

1984-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

189

Spontaneous tunneling and near-infrared-induced interconversion between the amino-hydroxy conformers of cytosine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spontaneous and near-infrared/infrared (NIR/IR)-induced interconversions between two amino-hydroxy conformers of monomeric cytosine have been investigated for the compound isolated in a low-temperature argon matrix. Combined use of a laser source (which provides narrowband NIR radiation) and a broadband NIR/IR source of excitation light allowed a detailed investigation of mutual conversions of the two conformers in question. The experiments carried out within the current work demonstrated that upon broadband NIR/IR irradiation (with the IR source of FTIR spectrometer) the population ratio of the two amino-hydroxy conformers changes towards a ratio corresponding to a photostationary state. Evolution of the conformer population ratio towards the photostationary ratio occurred independent of the initial ratio of conformers, which could be prepared by a population shift (in favor of one of the forms) induced by narrowband NIR excitation. Moreover, spontaneous tunneling conversion of the higher-energy conformer into a lower-energy form was observed for cytosine isolated in a low-temperature argon matrix kept in the dark. This process is slow and occurs on a time scale of days. The tunneling process, studied for matrix-isolated cytosine, clearly follows a dispersive type of kinetics rather than the classical monoexponential kinetics.

Reva, Igor; Fausto, Rui [Department of Chemistry, University of Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal); Nowak, Maciej J.; Lapinski, Leszek [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

190

Fuel Cell Manufacturing Diagnostic Techniques: IR Thermography with Reactive Flow through Excitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While design and material considerations for PEMFCs have a large impact on cost, it is also necessary to consider a transition to high volume production of fuel cell systems, including MEA components, to enable economies of scale and reduce per unit cost. One of the critical manufacturing tasks is developing and deploying techniques to provide in?process measurement of fuel cell components for quality control. This effort requires a subsidiary task: The study of the effect of manufacturing defects on performance and durability with the objective to establish validated manufacturing tolerances for fuel cell components. This work focuses on the development of a potential quality control method for gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs). The method consists of infrared (IR) thermography combined with reactive flow through (RFT) excitation. Detection of catalyst loading reduction defects in GDE catalyst layers will be presented.

Manak, A. J.; Ulsh, M.; Bender, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Determining Transition State Geometries in Liquids Using 2D-IR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many properties of chemical reactions are determined by the transition state connecting reactant and product, yet it is difficult to directly obtain any information about these short-lived structures in liquids. We show that two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy can provide direct information about transition states by tracking the transformation of vibrational modes as a molecule crossed a transition state. We successfully monitored a simple chemical reaction, the fluxional rearrangement of Fe(CO)5, in which the exchange of axial and equatorial CO ligands causes an exchange of vibrational energy between the normal modes of the molecule. This energy transfer provides direct evidence regarding the time scale, transition state, and mechanism of the reaction.

Harris, Charles; Cahoon, James F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Harris, Charles B.

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

192

Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organci molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on ?-alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto ?-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

Joan Thomas; Michael Kelley

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

193

Growth of graphene on Ir(111) Johann Coraux1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth of graphene on Ir(111) Johann Coraux1 ,, Alpha T. N'Diaye1 §, Martin Engler1 , Carsten Busse a renewed interest as a route towards high quality graphene prepared in a reproducible manner. Here we employ two growth methods for graphene on Ir(111), namely room temperature adsorption and thermal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

194

Which Oxidation State Leads to O-O Bond Formation in Cp*Ir(bpy)Cl-Catalyzed Water Oxidation, Ir(V), Ir(VI), or Ir(VII)?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Which Oxidation State Leads to O-O Bond Formation in Cp*Ir(bpy)Cl-Catalyzed Water Oxidation, Ir: Density functional calculations are used to revisit the reaction mechanism of water oxidation catalyzed oxidation at higher oxidation state even though it can also promote O-O bond formation. Therefore, [(bpy

Liao, Rongzhen

195

IR Vibration-Rotation Spectra of the Ammonia Molecule  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The IR spectrum of the ammonia inversion vibration-rotation normal mode is obtained using Fourier Transform IR Spectroscopy and analyzed using Maple, to easily obatin the relation between the N-H bond length and the H-N-H bond angle. As expected, the ...

Carl W. David

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Identifying silicate-absorbed ULIRGs at z~1-2 in the Bootes Field using Spitzer/IRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the 16$\\mu$m peakup imager on the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on Spitzer, we present a serendipitous survey of 0.0392 deg$^{2}$ within the area of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey in Bootes. Combining our results with the available Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24$\\mu$m survey of this area, we produce a catalog of 150 16$\\mu$m sources brighter than 0.18 mJy (3$\\sigma$) for which we derive measures or limits on the 16/24$\\mu$m colors. Such colors are especially useful in determining redshifts for sources whose mid infrared spectra contain strong emission or absorption features that characterize these colors as a function of redshift. We find that the 9.7$\\mu$m silicate absorption feature in Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) results in sources brighter at 16$\\mu$m than at 24$\\mu$m at z $\\sim$ 1--1.8 by at least 20%. With a threshold flux ratio of 1.2, restricting our analysis to $>5\\sigma$ detections at 16$\\mu$m, and using a $3\\sigma$ limit on 24$\\mu$m non-detections, the number of silicate-absorbed ULIRG candidates is 36. This defines a strong upper limit of $\\sim$920 sources deg$^{-2}$, on the population of silicate-absorbed ULIRGs at z $\\sim$ 1--1.8. This source count is about half of the total number of sources predicted at z $\\sim$ 1--2 by various phenomenological models. We note that the high 16/24$\\mu$m colors measured cannot be reproduced by any of the mid-IR spectral energy distributions assumed by these models, which points to the strong limitations currently affecting our phenomenological and theoretical understanding of infrared galaxy evolution.

M. M. Kasliwal; V. Charmandaris; D. Weedman; J. R. Houck; E. Le Floc'h; S. J. U. Higdon; L. Armus; H. I. Teplitz

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

197

Astronomy: Green Light for Infrared  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE new branch of astronomy based on the observation of celestial objects in infrared light has received a significant boost ... boost from the Science Research Council in the form of a grant to the infrared astronomy group at Imperial College. Although the grant of just over £27,000 is modest ...

Our Astronomy Correspondent

1969-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

198

The erosion resistance of infrared transparent materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article The erosion resistance of infrared transparent materials E.J. Coad C.S...discussed. erosion resistance|infrared materials|liquid impact...Keywords: erosion resistance; infrared materials; liquid impact...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Lateral conduction infrared photodetector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photodetector for detecting infrared light in a wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m is disclosed. The photodetector has a mesa structure formed from semiconductor layers which include a type-II superlattice formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. Impurity doped regions are formed on sidewalls of the mesa structure to provide for a lateral conduction of photo-generated carriers which can provide an increased carrier mobility and a reduced surface recombination. An optional bias electrode can be used in the photodetector to control and vary a cut-off wavelength or a depletion width therein. The photodetector can be formed as a single-color or multi-color device, and can also be used to form a focal plane array which is compatible with conventional read-out integrated circuits.

Kim, Jin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Carroll, Malcolm S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

A SPITZER IRS SURVEY OF NGC 1333: INSIGHTS INTO DISK EVOLUTION FROM A VERY YOUNG CLUSTER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the {lambda} = 5-36 {mu}m Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of 79 young stellar objects in the very young nearby cluster NGC 1333. NGC 1333's youth enables the study of early protoplanetary disk properties, such as the degree of settling and the formation of gaps and clearings. We construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using our IRS data as well as published photometry and classify our sample into SED classes. Using 'extinction-free' spectral indices, we determine whether the disk, envelope, or photosphere dominates the spectrum. We analyze the dereddened spectra of objects that show disk-dominated emission using spectral indices and properties of silicate features in order to study the vertical and radial structure of protoplanetary disks in NGC 1333. At least nine objects in our sample of NGC 1333 show signs of large (several AU) radial gaps or clearings in their inner disk. Disks with radial gaps in NGC 1333 show more nearly pristine silicate dust than their radially continuous counterparts. We compare properties of disks in NGC 1333 to those in three other well-studied regions, Taurus-Auriga, Ophiuchus, and Chamaeleon I, and find no difference in their degree of sedimentation and dust processing.

Arnold, L. A.; Watson, Dan M.; Kim, K. H.; Manoj, P.; Remming, I.; Sheehan, P.; Forrest, W. J.; Mamajek, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Adame, L.; McClure, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Furlan, E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Mail Stop 264-723, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Espaillat, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ausfeld, K.; Rapson, V. A., E-mail: laa@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu [Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Wednesday, 26 July 2006 00:00 Silicon-based transistors are well-understood,...

202

Forward looking infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

looking infrared Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Forward looking infrared Author Wikipedia Published Publisher Not Provided, 2013 DOI...

203

* The far-infrared (λ > 15 µm) is an important  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

infrared (λ > 15 µm) is an important infrared (λ > 15 µm) is an important component of the overall radiation budget of the Earth, accounting for approximately half of the outgoing infrared radiation to space. * Dominated by the pure rotation band of water vapor, the maximum mid-to-upper tropospheric cooling also occurs in the far-IR (left panel). * ARM science team research has resulted in enormous improvements in the treatment of radiation in climate models (e.g. Tobin et al. 1999; right panel). Tropical atmosphere cooling rates calculated using modern LBLRTM calculations(left panel) and differences between current and early ARM (1995/1996) calculations. At the conclusion of the 1997 SHEBA campaign, some spectral differences between Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) measurements and

204

THE CONTRIBUTION OF STARBURSTS AND NORMAL GALAXIES TO INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AT z < 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a parameterless approach to predict the shape of the infrared (IR) luminosity function (LF) at redshifts z {<=} 2. It requires no tuning and relies on only three observables: (1) the redshift evolution of the stellar mass function for star-forming galaxies, (2) the evolution of the specific star formation rate (sSFR) of main-sequence galaxies, and (3) the double-Gaussian decomposition of the sSFR distribution at fixed stellar mass into a contribution (assumed redshift- and mass-invariant) from main-sequence and starburst activity. This self-consistent and simple framework provides a powerful tool for predicting cosmological observables: observed IR LFs are successfully matched at all z {<=} 2, suggesting a constant or only weakly redshift-dependent contribution (8%-14%) of starbursts to the SFR density. We separate the contributions of main-sequence and starburst activity to the global IR LF at all redshifts. The luminosity threshold above which the starburst component dominates the IR LF rises from log(L{sub IR}/L{sub Sun }) 11.4 to 12.8 over 0 < z < 2, reflecting our assumed (1+z){sup 2.8}-evolution of sSFR in main-sequence galaxies.

Sargent, M. T.; Bethermin, M.; Daddi, E.; Elbaz, D., E-mail: mark.sargent@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DSM/Irfu/Service d'Astrophysique, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

AN EVOLVING COMPACT JET IN THE BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY MAXI J1836-194  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from {approx}10{sup 11} to {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high-energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process.

Russell, D. M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Soria, R.; Slaven-Blair, T.; Curran, P. A. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); O'Brien, K. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Sivakoff, G. R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-181, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Lewis, F. [Faulkes Telescope Project, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd CF37 1DL (United Kingdom); Markoff, S.; Altamirano, D. [Astronomical Institute ''Anton Pannekoek'', University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Homan, J. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Rupen, M. P.; Dhawan, V. [NRAO Domenici Science Operations Center, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Belloni, T. M. [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Cadolle Bel, M. [European Space Agency, European Space Astronomy Centre, ISOC, Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Casella, P. [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Roma (Italy); Corbel, S. [Laboratoire AIM, UMR 7158, CEA/DSM, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Fender, R. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Gallo, E., E-mail: russell@iac.es [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); and others

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

206

IR permittivities for silicides and doped silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complex permittivity for Pt, Pd, Ni, and Ti-silicide films as well as heavily doped p- and n-type silicon were determined by ellipsometry over the energy range 0.031 eV to 4.0 eV. Fits to the Drude model gave bulk plasma and relaxation frequencies. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and four-point probe measurements complemented the optical characterization. Calculations from measured permittivities of waveguide loss and mode confinement suggest that the considered materials are better suited for long-wavelength surface-plasmon-polariton waveguide applications than metal films.

Cleary, J. W.; Peale, R. E.; Smith, C. W.; Ishigami, M. [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Shelton, D. J.; Boreman, G. D. [College of Optics (CREOL), University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Soref, R.; Drehman, A.; Buchwald, W. R. [Sensors Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts 01731 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Low-power low-noise analog circuits for on-focal-plane signal processing of infrared sensors Bedabrata Pain, Sunetra K. Mendis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-power low-noise analog circuits for on-focal-plane signal processing of infrared sensors imager performance are presented. To enable the detection of high background IR images, an in-pixel current-mode background suppression scheme is presented. The background suppression circuit consists

Fossum, Eric R.

208

THE OPTICAL GREEN VALLEY VERSUS MID-INFRARED CANYON IN COMPACT GROUPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compact groups of galaxies provide conditions similar to those experienced by galaxies in the earlier universe. Recent work on compact groups has led to the discovery of a dearth of mid-infrared transition galaxies (MIRTGs) in Infrared Array Camera (3.6-8.0 ?m) color space as well as at intermediate specific star formation rates. However, we find that in compact groups these MIRTGs have already transitioned to the optical ([g–r]) red sequence. We investigate the optical color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of 99 compact groups containing 348 galaxies and compare the optical CMD with mid-infrared (mid-IR) color space for compact group galaxies. Utilizing redshifts available from Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we identified new galaxy members for four groups. By combining optical and mid-IR data, we obtain information on both the dust and the stellar populations in compact group galaxies. We also compare with more isolated galaxies and galaxies in the Coma Cluster, which reveals that, similar to clusters, compact groups are dominated by optically red galaxies. While we find that compact group transition galaxies lie on the optical red sequence, LVL+SINGS mid-IR transition galaxies span the range of optical colors. The dearth of mid-IR transition galaxies in compact groups may be due to a lack of moderately star-forming low mass galaxies; the relative lack of these galaxies could be due to their relatively small gravitational potential wells. This makes them more susceptible to this dynamic environment, thus causing them to more easily lose gas or be accreted by larger members.

Walker, Lisa May; Butterfield, Natalie; Johnson, Kelsey; Zucker, Catherine [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Gallagher, Sarah [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Konstantopoulos, Iraklis [Australian Astronomical Observatory, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Zabludoff, Ann [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis [Laboratory for X-Ray Astrophysics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Charlton, Jane C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Infrared and Raman spectoscopy study, of the corrosion products, on carbon steel and weathering steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared and Raman spectroscopy are two analytical tools which have recently been applied to the study of corrosion products formed on metal surfaces. The two techniques are complementary and give structural information similar to that provided by X-ray and electron diffraction. However, they are unlike X-ray and electron diffraction in that they do not require crystalline solids to provide structural identification. Wheathering steels are an important class of metals which form noncrystalline corrosion products. This report describes infrared and Raman spectra obtained from a weathering steel and compares the spectra to those obtained for carbon steel which had been exposed to the same environment.

Fabis, P.; Brown, T.; Heidersbach, R.; Rockett, T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF NH{sub 3} AND NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} AMORPHOUS ICES IN THE NEAR-INFRARED AND MID-INFRARED REGIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ammonia ice has been detected on different astrophysical media ranging from interstellar medium (ISM) particles to the surface of various icy bodies of our solar system, where nitrogen is also present. We have carried out a detailed study of amorphous NH{sub 3} ice and NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} ice mixtures, based on infrared (IR) spectra in the mid-IR (MIR) and near-IR (NIR) regions, supported by theoretical quantum chemical calculations. Spectra of varying ice thicknesses were obtained and optical constants were calculated for amorphous NH{sub 3} at 15 K and 30 K and for a NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} mixture at 15 K over a 500-7000 cm{sup –1} spectral range. These spectra have improved accuracy over previous data, where available. Moreover, we also obtained absolute values for the band strengths of the more prominent IR features in both spectral regions. Our results indicate that the estimated NH{sub 3} concentration in ISM ices should be scaled upward by ?30%.

Zanchet, Alexandre; Rodríguez-Lazcano, Yamilet; Gálvez, Óscar; Herrero, Víctor J.; Escribano, Rafael; Maté, Belén, E-mail: belen.mate@csic.es [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Application of IR Spectroscopy to the Investigation of Minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditionally, the application of IR spectroscopy in mineralogy is reduced to the determination of wavelengths or frequencies of discrete absorption maxima. These values are brought in correspondence with normal ...

Nikita V. Chukanov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

DWEA Webinar: IRS Guidance for Small Wind Turbines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued Notice 2015-4 providing new performance and quality standards of small wind turbines – defined as having a nameplate capacity of up to 100 kW – in...

213

Gas Analysis with IR-Diode Laser Spectrometers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An IR laser diode spectrometer of modular design with micro-processor control is presented. ... It consists of laser source (vibration decoupled refrigerator with temperature control unit and laser power...

Gerhard Schmidtke; Wolfgang Julius Riedel…

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Gas analysis with IR-diode laser spectrometers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An IR laser diode spectrometer of modular design with micro-processor control is presented. ... It consists of laser source (vibration decoupled refrigerator with temperature control unit and laser power...

Gerhard Schmidtke; Wolfgang Julius Riedel…

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

IR Spectra of Dense Xenon and Argon Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results are presented of experimental studies of IR radiation spectra of dense Xe and Ar shock compressed plasmas. The radiation cutoff is found at the wavelength ??1?mThe experimental data are interpreted...

V. E. Fortov; M. U. Kulish; V. B. Mintsev; J. Ortner…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

US-LHC IR magnet error analysis and compensation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper studies the impact of the insertion-region (IR) magnet field errors on LHC collision performance. Compensation schemes including magnet orientation optimization, body-end compensation, tuning shims, and local nonlinear correction are shown to be highly effective.

Wei, J.; Ptitsin, V.; Pilat, F.; Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Gelfand, N.; Wan, W.; Holt, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

US-LHC IR MAGNET ERROR ANALYSIS AND COMPENSATION.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper studies the impact of the insertion-region (IR) magnet field errors on LHC collision performance. Compensation schemes including magnet orientation optimization, body-end compensation, tuning shims, and local nonlinear correction are shown to be highly effective.

WEI, J.

1998-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

218

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance July 18, 2012 - 3:46pm Addthis To promote economic growth in tribal communities, Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) published new guidance on July 18, 2012, allocating Tribal Economic Development Bonds (TEDBs). The TEDB program was established under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act, and provides Tribes with the authority to issue tax-exempt debt for a wider range of activities to spur job creation and promote economic growth in Indian country. Providing Tribes with the ability to issue tax-exempt debt for a broader scope of activities similar to that available to states and local governments lowers

219

High-power parametric conversion from near-infrared to short-wave infrared  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-power parametric conversion from near-infrared to short-wave infrared Adrien Billat,1,* Steevy.billat@epfl.ch Abstract: We report the design of an all-fiber continuous wave Short-Wave Infrared source capable to output.4370) Nonlinear optics, fibers; (140.3070) Infrared and far-infrared lasers. References and links 1. M. N

Dalang, Robert C.

220

Mid-Infrared Fiber-Coupled QCl-QEPAS Sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An innovative spectroscopic system based on an external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) coupled with a mid-infrared (mid-IR) fiber and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is described. SF6 has been selected as a target gas in demonstration of the system for trace gas sensing. Single mode laser delivery through the prongs of the quartz tuning fork has been obtained employing a hollow waveguide fiber with inner silver–silver iodine (Ag–AgI) coatings and internal core diameter of 300 lm. A detailed design and realization of the QCL fiber coupling and output collimator system allowed almost practically all (99.4 %) of the laser beam to be transmitted through the spectrophone module. The achieved sensitivity of the system is 50 parts per trillion in 1 s, corresponding to a record for QEPAS normalized noise-equivalent absorption 2.7 9 10-10 W cm-1 Hz-1/2.

Spagnolo, V.; Patimisco, P.; Borri, Simone; Scamarcio, G.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Kriesel, J.M.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Gamma ray bursts and afterglow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The origin of GRBs have been a mystery for almost 30 years. Their sources emit a huge amount of energy on short time scales and the process involves extreme relativistic motion with bulk Lorentz factor of at least a few hundred. In the last two years “afterglow ” emission in X-ray optical IR and radio was detected. The afterglow can be measured up to months and even years after the few seconds GRB. We review the theory for the ?-rays emission and the afterglow and show that it is strongly supported by observations. A recent detection of optical emission simultaneous with the GRB well agrees with theoretical predictions and further constrains the free parameters of the models. We discuss the evidence that some of the bursts are jets and discuss the prospects of polarization measurements.

Re’em Sari

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A REDSHIFT SURVEY OF HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED SELECTED STARBURSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR OBSCURED STAR FORMATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present Keck spectroscopic observations and redshifts for a sample of 767 Herschel-SPIRE selected galaxies (HSGs) at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m, taken with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and the Keck II DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph. The redshift distribution of these SPIRE sources from the Herschel Multitiered Extragalactic Survey peaks at z = 0.85, with 731 sources at z < 2 and a tail of sources out to z {approx} 5. We measure more significant disagreement between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts (({Delta}z/(1 + z{sub spec})) = 0.29) than is seen in non-infrared selected samples, likely due to enhanced star formation rates and dust obscuration in infrared-selected galaxies. The infrared data are used to directly measure integrated infrared luminosities and dust temperatures independent of radio or 24 {mu}m flux densities. By probing the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) at its peak, we estimate that the vast majority (72%-83%) of z < 2 Herschel-selected galaxies would drop out of traditional submillimeter surveys at 0.85-1 mm. We find that dust temperature traces infrared luminosity, due in part to the SPIRE wavelength selection biases, and partially from physical effects. As a result, we measure no significant trend in SPIRE color with redshift; if dust temperature were independent of luminosity or redshift, a trend in SPIRE color would be expected. Composite infrared SEDs are constructed as a function of infrared luminosity, showing the increase in dust temperature with luminosity, and subtle change in near-infrared and mid-infrared spectral properties. Moderate evolution in the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation is measured for this partially radio-selected sample, with q{sub IR}{proportional_to}(1 + z){sup -0.30{+-}0.02} at z < 2. We estimate the luminosity function and implied star formation rate density contribution of HSGs at z < 1.6 and find overall agreement with work based on 24 {mu}m extrapolations of the LIRG, ULIRG, and total infrared contributions. This work significantly increased the number of spectroscopically confirmed infrared-luminous galaxies at z >> 0 and demonstrates the growing importance of dusty starbursts for galaxy evolution studies and the build-up of stellar mass throughout cosmic time.

Casey, C. M.; Budynkiewicz, J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bethermin, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu - CNRS - Universite Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bock, J.; Bridge, C. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Burgarella, D. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille - LAM, Universite d'Aix-Marseille and CNRS, UMR7326, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Chapin, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Chapman, S. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Conselice, C. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Cooray, A. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hatziminaoglou, E. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Ivison, R. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); and others

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

224

A large population of mid-infrared selected, obscured active galaxies in the Bootes field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We identify a population of 640 obscured and 839 unobscured AGNs at redshifts 0.7Bootes. We select AGNs on the basis of Spitzer IRAC colors obtained by the IRAC Shallow Survey. Redshifts are obtained from optical spectroscopy or photometric redshift estimators. We classify the IR-selected AGNs as IRAGN 1 (unobscured) and IRAGN 2 (obscured) using a simple criterion based on the observed optical to mid-IR color, with a selection boundary of R-[4.5]=6.1, where R and [4.5] are the Vega magnitudes in the R and IRAC 4.5 micron bands, respectively. We verify this selection using X-ray stacking analyses with data from the Chandra XBootes survey, as well as optical photometry from NDWFS and spectroscopy from MMT/AGES. We show that (1) these sources are indeed AGNs, and (2) the optical/IR color selection separates obscured sources (with average N_H~3x10^22 cm^-2 obtained from X-ray hardness ratios, and optical colors and morphologies typical of galaxies) and unobscured sources (with no X-ray absorption, and quasar colors and morphologies), with a reliability of >~80%. The observed numbers of IRAGNs are comparable to predictions from previous X-ray, optical, and IR luminosity functions, for the given redshifts and IRAC flux limits. We observe a bimodal distribution in R-[4.5] color, suggesting that luminous IR-selected AGNs have either low or significant dust extinction, which may have implications for models of AGN obscuration.

R. C. Hickox; C. Jones; W. R. Forman; S. S. Murray; M. Brodwin; M. J. I. Brown; P. R. Eisenhardt; D. Stern; C. S. Kochanek; D. Eisenstein; R. J. Cool; B. T. Jannuzi; A. Dey; K. Brand; V. Gorjian; N. Caldwell

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

225

AN INFRARED EXCESS IDENTIFIED IN RADIO-LOUD BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If broad absorption line (BAL) quasars represent a high-covering-fraction evolutionary state (even if this is not the sole factor governing the presence of BALs), it is expected that they should show an excess of mid-infrared radiation compared to normal quasars. Some previous studies have suggested that this is not the case. We perform the first analysis of the IR properties of radio-loud BAL quasars, using IR data from WISE and optical (rest-frame ultraviolet) data from SDSS, and compare the BAL quasar sample with a well-matched sample of unabsorbed quasars. We find a statistically significant excess in the mid- to near-infrared luminosities of BAL quasars, particularly at rest-frame wavelengths of 1.5 and 4 {mu}m. Our sample was previously used to show that BALs are observed along many lines of sight toward quasars, but with an overabundance of more edge-on sources, suggesting that orientation factors into the appearance of BALs. The evidence here-of a difference in IR luminosities between BAL quasars and unabsorbed quasars-can be ascribed to evolution. This suggests that a merging of the current BAL paradigms is needed to fully describe the class.

DiPompeo, M. A.; Runnoe, J. C.; Brotherton, M. S.; Myers, A. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy 3905, University of Wyoming, 1000 East University, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy 3905, University of Wyoming, 1000 East University, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

226

INFRARED LUMINOSITIES AND AROMATIC FEATURES IN THE 24 {mu}m FLUX-LIMITED SAMPLE OF 5MUSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study a 24 {mu}m selected sample of 330 galaxies observed with the infrared spectrograph for the 5 mJy Unbiased Spitzer Extragalactic Survey. We estimate accurate total infrared luminosities by combining mid-IR spectroscopy and mid-to-far infrared photometry, and by utilizing new empirical spectral templates from Spitzer data. The infrared luminosities of this sample range mostly from 10{sup 9} L{sub sun} to 10{sup 13.5} L{sub sun}, with 83% in the range 10{sup 10} L{sub sun} < L{sub IR} < 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}. The redshifts range from 0.008 to 4.27, with a median of 0.144. The equivalent widths of the 6.2 {mu}m aromatic feature have a bimodal distribution, probably related to selection effects. We use the 6.2 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon equivalent width (PAH EW) to classify our objects as starburst (SB)-dominated (44%), SB-AGN composite (22%), and active galactic nucleus (AGN)-dominated (34%). The high EW objects (SB-dominated) tend to have steeper mid-IR to far-IR spectral slopes and lower L{sub IR} and redshifts. The low EW objects (AGN-dominated) tend to have less steep spectral slopes and higher L{sub IR} and redshifts. This dichotomy leads to a gross correlation between EW and slope, which does not hold within either group. AGN-dominated sources tend to have lower log(L{sub PAH7.7{sub {mu}m}}/L{sub PAH11.3{sub {mu}m}}) ratios than star-forming galaxies, possibly due to preferential destruction of the smaller aromatics by the AGN. The log(L{sub PAH7.7{sub {mu}m}}/L{sub PAH11.3{sub {mu}m}}) ratios for star-forming galaxies are lower in our sample than the ratios measured from the nuclear spectra of nearby normal galaxies, most probably indicating a difference in the ionization state or grain size distribution between the nuclear regions and the entire galaxy. Finally, we provide a calibration relating the monochromatic continuum or aromatic feature luminosity to L{sub IR} for different types of objects.

Wu Yanling; Helou, George; Shi Yong, E-mail: yanling@ipac.caltech.ed, E-mail: gxh@ipac.caltech.ed, E-mail: yong@ipac.caltech.ed [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

GAMQUEST, a Computer Program to Identify Gamma Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GAMQUEST GAMQUEST A Computer Program to Identify Gamma Rays Edgardo Browne, Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 EBROWNE@LBL.Gov Table of Contents Introduction. Program Access and Output Files. How to Run GAMQUEST. From Individual Accounts. From Guest Account. Gamma-Ray Data. GAMQUEST, a Tool for Applied Research. Searching Strategies. Examples. Neutron Activation Analysis. Gamma-Ray Spectrum Between 100 and 800 keV. Gamma-Ray Spectrum Between 800 and 1600 keV. A List of X Rays and Gamma Rays from the Decay of 192Ir (74 hr). Run GAMQUEST from Guest Account Acknowledgments. References. 1. Introduction. The characteristic energies and intensities of gamma rays emitted by radioactive isotopes are commonly used as fingerprints for isotope

228

Continuous Mid-Infrared Star Formation Rate Indicators: Diagnostics for 0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present continuous, monochromatic star formation rate (SFR) indicators over the mid-infrared wavelength range of 6-70 micron. We use a sample of 58 star forming galaxies (SFGs) in the Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey (SSGSS) at z<0.2, for which there is a rich suite of multi-wavelength photometry and spectroscopy from the ultraviolet through to the infrared. The data from the Spitzer infrared spectrograph (IRS) of these galaxies, which spans 5-40 micron, is anchored to their photometric counterparts. The spectral region between 40-70 micron is interpolated using dust model fits to the IRS spectrum and Spitzer 70 and 160 micron photometry. Since there are no sharp spectral features in this region, we expect these interpolations to be robust. This spectral range is calibrated as a SFR diagnostic using several reference SFR indicators to mitigate potential bias. Our band-specific continuous SFR indicators are found to be consistent with monochromatic calibrations in the local universe, as derived fr...

Battisti, A J; Johnson, B D; Elbaz, D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

X-ray Observations of Mrk 231  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

T. J. Turner

1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

230

Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that it does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.

Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T.; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T.; Schaich, David A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Ab initio Structure Determination of Mg10Ir19B16  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ab initio structure determination of a novel unconventional noncentro-symmetric superconductor Mg{sub 10}Ir{sub 19}B{sub 16} (T{sub c} = 5 K) has been performed using a method that involves a combination of experimental data and calculations. Electron diffraction, X-ray powder diffraction, phase estimation routines, quantum mechanical calculations, high-resolution electron microscopy, and structural chemistry arguments are used. With the strengths of different methods used to eliminate the ambiguities encountered in others, the complete structure, including a very light B atom, has been determined with a high accuracy from impure polycrystalline powder samples, which suggests that the type of analysis described may be used to successfully address other similar intractable problems. The solved structure of Mg{sub 10}Ir{sub 19}B{sub 16} shows a complex nature that irregular coordination environments preclude a conversional description of compact packing of coordination polyhedra; however, it can be easier understood as ordered in an onion-skin-like series of nested polyhedra.

Xu, Qiang [Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands; Klimczuk, T. [Princeton University; Gortenmulder, T. [Universitate Amsterdam; Jansen, J. [Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Cava, R. J. [Princeton University; Zandbergen, H [Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Intrinsic near-infrared spectroscopic markers of breast tumors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycle on the red and near-infrared optical properties of thecancer imaging using near-infrared optical measurements andet al. / Intrinsic near-infrared spectroscopic markers of

Kukreti, Shwayta; Cerussi, Albert; Tromberg, Bruce; Gratton, Enrico

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Millimeter and Near-Infrared Observations of Neptune's Atmospheric Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B Near-Infrared Radiative Transfer Model B.15 Near-Infrared Observations of Neptune’s Clouds with the133 6.2 Near-infrared spectroscopy . . . . . .

Cook, Statia Honora Luszcz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the AKARI near-infrared (NIR; 2.5-5 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 36 (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) at z = 0.01-0.4. We measure the NIR spectral features including the strengths of 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission and hydrogen recombination lines (Br{alpha} and Br{beta}), optical depths at 3.1 and 3.4 {mu}m, and NIR continuum slope. These spectral features are used to identify optically elusive, buried active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that half of the (U)LIRGs optically classified as non-Seyferts show AGN signatures in their NIR spectra. Using a combined sample of (U)LIRGs with NIR spectra in the literature, we measure the contribution of buried AGNs to the infrared luminosity from the spectral energy distribution fitting to the IRAS photometry. The contribution of these buried AGNs to the infrared luminosity is 5%-10%, smaller than the typical AGN contribution of (U)LIRGs including Seyfert galaxies (10%-40%). We show that NIR continuum slopes correlate well with WISE [3.4]-[4.6] colors, which would be useful for identifying a large number of buried AGNs using the WISE data.

Lee, Jong Chul; Lee, Myung Gyoon [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ho Seong [CEA Saclay/Service d'Astrophysique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kim, Minjin; Lee, Joon Hyeop, E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jclee@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: mkim@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: jhl@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

High resolution far-infrared observations of the evolved H II region M16  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

M16 is an evolved, extremely density bounded H II region, which now consists only of a series of ionization fronts at molecular cloud boundaries. The source of ionization is the OB star cluster (NGC 6611) which is about 5 x 10/sup 6/ years old. We used the CFA/UA 102 cm balloon-borne telescope to map this region and detected three far-infrared (far-IR) sources embedded in an extended ridge of emission. Source I is an unresolved far-IR source embedded in a molecular cloud near a sharp ionization front. An H/sub 2/O maser is associated with this source, but no radio continuum emission has been observed. The other two far-IR sources (II and III) are associated with ionized gas-molecular cloud interfaces, with the far-IR radiation arising from dust at the boundary heated by the OB cluster. Source II is located at the southern prominent neutral intrusion with its associated bright rims and dark ''elephant trunk'' globules that delineate the current progress of the ionization front into the neutral material, and Source III arises at the interface of the northern molecular cloud fragment.

McBreen, B.; Fazio, G.G.; Jaffe, D.T.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Thermal Integrity Assessment of Building Envelopes of Experimental Houses Using Infrared Thermography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zero Energy Building Research Alliance, or ZEBRAlliance, is a joint DOE-ORNL-construction industry initiative to develop and demonstrate new energy efficiency technologies for residential buildings, as well as fine-tune and integrate existing technologies, to lower energy costs. Construction of residential envelopes, the diaphragms that separate the inside from outdoors, can have enormous impact on whole-building energy usage. Consequently, post-construction thermal integrity assessment of the building envelopes in the experimental ZEBRAlliance homes is an integral part of the research and development cycle. Nondestructive infrared (IR) thermography provides a relatively easy and quick means of inspecting the experimental homes for thermal bridging, insulation imperfections, moisture penetration, air leakage, etc. Two experimental homes located in Oak Ridge, TN were inspected using IR thermography. The homes are designed with two different envelope systems: (i) Structural Insulated Panels (SIP home) consisting of an insulating foam core sandwiched between oriented strand boards, and (ii) Optimal Value Framing (OVF home) using innovatively spaced wood studs, which are designed to minimize the amount of wood framing, reduce thermal bridging, and lower material costs. IR thermal imaging was performed from both outside and inside of the homes. In this paper, IR images of roof and wall sections of the homes are presented and discussed with respect to identification of areas of thermal bridging and any insulation deficiencies.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Properties of polyacetylene doped with I, Br, IrCl6, and FeCl3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the temperature dependence of the resistivity of polyacetylene doped with I, Br, IrCl6, and FeCl3. The roles of dopant molecule size, doping technique, doping speed, and isomerization state in determining the mechanism of electrical conduction are discussed. Evidence for dopant-induced disorder is presented from x-ray and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies. We suggest that the dopant molecule size determines whether the dopant is dispersed molecularly or whether the dopant molecules aggregate. In addition, we find significant differences in the activation energy, kBT0, between CH(Br)y and CH(I)y, although the characteristic temperature dependence of the resistivity is the same.

E. K. Sichel; M. F. Rubner; S. K. Tripathy

1982-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Al-doped ZnO powdered materials: Al solubility limit and IR absorption properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Al-doped ZnO powder was synthesized via the Pechini route with a doping rate varying from 1 to 4 mol.%. A solubility limit has been estimated under 0.3 mol.% of Al using X-ray diffraction refinements. The incorporation of aluminium into the ZnO lattice was investigated by 27Al NMR, which suggests an extremely low amount of Al in a distribution of sites in ZnO. In order to assess the impact of such a low dopant amount, diffuse reflection experiments were performed for a wavelength range from 200 to 2500 nm. If the effect of doping was negligible for samples prepared at 850 °C, annealing at 1200 °C clearly reveals enhanced IR absorption properties for the doped samples, which are similar whatever be the nominal Al content.

Hélène Serier; Manuel Gaudon; Michel Ménétrier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Thesis for the Degree of Master of Science Development of the Infrared Wide-Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Chang type design in the ray-tracing program. We have accomplished alignment of the two-mirror off on the Schwarzschild-Chang type. Off-axis reflecting telescopes have advantages in infrared comparing with refracting mirrors. We applied the derived surface functions to the surface parameters of the Schwarzschild

Pak, Soojong

240

ARM - Field Campaign - IR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study govCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : IR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study 2010.12.06 - 2010.12.13 Lead Scientist : Kyle Leesman For data sets, see below. Description During December 2010, a prototype LWIR cloud camera system was deployed at the Southern Great Plains Guest Instrument Facility (SGP-GIF). The system consisted of a microbolometer camera (~7-15 ìm) to capture sky imagery, a blackbody calibration source, and a GPS receiver used to estimate atmospheric column water vapor and constrain atmospheric compensation. The camera system collected calibrated sky radiance images co-incident with the SGP Central Facility with the goal of quantitatively assessing its ability

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ALSNews Vol. 312  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Lab, and UC Berkeley have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms, coupling infrared (IR) rays from...

242

Infrared and NMR studies on rhenium(VII) complexes with CMPO and TBP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The infrared and NMR studies have been carried out on Re(VII) (a stand-in for Tc(VII)) complexes with n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and tributyl phosphate (TBP). In the IR study, changes in the absorption bands of the carbonyl and phosphoryl stretching regions were monitored when Re was extracted. The phosphoryl group was also investigated by using a phosphorus NMR. The spectra obtained in the mixed CMPO-TBP system were compared with those obtained in the CMPO or TBP system in order to discuss their bond-structures. It was found that CMPO showed semi-bidentate and bidentate bonding and that TBP could extract HReO[sub 4] in the mixed CMPO-TBP system. The IR and NMR results showed evidence of enhancement in the Re (Tc) extraction in the mixed CMPO-TBP system. 22 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Takeuchi, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Satoru; Yamawaki, Michio (Univ. of Tokyo, Ibaraki (Japan))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Infrared Properties of Cataclysmic Variables from 2MASS Results from the 2nd Incremental Data Release  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because accretion-generated luminosity dominates the radiated energy of most cataclysmic variables, they have been ``traditionally'' observed primarily at short wavelengths. Infrared observations of cataclysmic variables contribute to the understanding of key system components that are expected to radiate at these wavelengths, such as the cool outer disk, accretion stream, and secondary star. We have compiled the J, H, and Ks photometry of all cataclysmic variables located in the sky coverage of the 2 Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) 2nd Incremental Data Release. This data comprises 251 systems with reliably identified near-IR counterparts and S/N > 10 photometry in one or more of the three near-IR bands.

Hoard, D W; Clark, L L; Bowers, T P; Bowers, Timothy P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SHOCKS IN THE L988 CLOUD COMPLEX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have searched the Lynds 988 dark cloud complex for optical (H{alpha} and [S II]) and near-IR (H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m) shocks from protostellar outflows. We find 20 new Herbig-Haro objects and 6 new H{sub 2} shocks (MHO objects), 3 of which are cross detections. Using the morphology in the optical and near-IR, we connect several of these shocks into at least five distinct outflow systems and identify their source protostars from catalogs of infrared sources. Two outflows in the cloud, from IRAS 21014+5001 and IRAS 21007+4951, are in excess of 1 pc in length. The IRAS 21007+4951 outflow has carved a large cavity in the cloud through which background stars can be seen. Also, we have found an optical shock which is the counterflow to the previously discovered ''northwest outflow'' from LkH{alpha} 324SE.

Walawender, J. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Reipurth, B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Bally, J., E-mail: joshw@naoj.org [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Infrared behaviour of the one-loop scattering equations and supergravity integrands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recently introduced ambitwistor string led to a striking proposal for one-loop maximal supergravity amplitudes, localised on the solutions of the ambitwistor one-loop scattering equations. However, these amplitudes have not yet been explicitly analysed due to the apparent complexity of the equations that determine the localisation. In this paper we propose an analytic solution to the four-point one-loop scattering equations in the infrared (IR) regime of the amplitude. Using this solution, we compute the ambitwistor integrand and demonstrate that it correctly reproduces the four-graviton integrand, in the IR regime. This solution qualitatively extends to n points. To conclude, we explain that the ambitwistor one-loop scattering equations actually correspond to the standard Gross & Mende saddle point.

Casali, Eduardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Low Dose IR Creates an Oncogenic Microenvironment by Inducing Premature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction Much of the work addressing ionizing radiation-induced cellular response has been carried out mainly with the traditional cell culture technique involving only one cell type, how cellular response to IR is influenced by the tissue microenvironment remains elusive. By use of a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system to model critical interactions of different cell types with their neighbors and with their environment, we recently showed that low-dose IR-induced extracellular signaling via the tissue environment affects profoundly cellular responses. This proposal aims at determining the response of mammary epithelial cells in a tissue-like setting.

Yuan, Zhi-Min [Harvard School of Public Health

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

247

Astronomy: Bright Future for Infrared  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ALTHOUGH the prediction of what is likely to happen in astronomy in the future is a hazardous undertaking just now, it seems increasingly obvious in ... is a hazardous undertaking just now, it seems increasingly obvious in astronomical circles that infrared astronomy is going to be an important field of investigation during the next few years. ...

Our Astronomy Correspondent

1968-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

248

Infrared emitting device and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An infrared emitting device and method. The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns.

Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Dawson, L. Ralph (Albuquerque, NM); Howard, Arnold J. (Albuquerque, NM); Baucom, Kevin C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Industrial Use of Infrared Inspections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but in the final analysis it comes down to the fact that the industrial management responsible for the operations and production budgets did not, and in many cases, still does not understand the economic benefits to the company that infrared industrial inspections...

Duch, A. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: • Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) • Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) • Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) • Upwelling shortwave (reflected) • Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) • Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

Stoffel, T

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation using spectral imaging. This has been accom- plished with both visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) sunlight-path laser absorption measurements [14]­[16], in-situ visible and near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectral

Lawrence, Rick L.

252

Multiphoton microscopy with near infrared contrast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiphoton microscopy with near infrared contrast agents Siavash Yazdanfar,a, * Chulmin Joo,a Chun limited to the visible spectrum. We introduce a paradigm for MPM of near-infrared NIR fluorescent Engineers. DOI: 10.1117/1.3420209 Keywords: two-photon microscopy; ultrafast fiber lasers; near-infrared

Larson-Prior, Linda

253

Category:Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Wave Infrared page? For detailed information on Long-Wave Infrared as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Long-Wave Infrared Add.png Add a new Long-Wave Infrared...

254

A multimodal framework using audio, visible and infrared imagery for surveillance and security applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a low-cost framework for combining multimodal information (visible, IR and audio signal) for small area surveillance and security applications. The system uses audio and video information to capture different aspects of the environment and infrared imagery is used for low lighting conditions. The visual processing module of the system uses a motion-based approach for detecting objects, and Kalman filter for tracking. Environmental sound is recognised by extracting Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MLCCs) audio features and then classified by Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) technique. Experimental results on some typical sequences show promising results.

Praveen Kumar; Ankush Mittal; Padam Kumar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Crystal structure of brucite-type cobalt hydroxide ?-Co{O(H,D)}2 — neutron diffraction, IR and Raman spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The crystal structure of brucite-type Co(OD)2 (space group P3?ml, Z = 1, a = 317.79(4) pm and c = 464.2(1) pm, RI = 5.89%) has been refined by neutron powder diffraction studies on the basis of 671 observations and 44 reflections. Infrared and Raman spectra of cobalt hydroxide at different degrees of deuteration are presented and assigned to the internal, librational and translational modes. The D?O distance of 252.8 pm and the wavenumbers of the OH and OD stretching modes (3604 and 2665 cm?1, 90 K, mean values of the unit-cell group modes) do not exclude the formation of weak trifurcated hydrogen bonds. The librational and translational vibrations of Eu species are strongly coupled as shown by the respective isotopic shifts. A reassignment of the IR-allowed librations and lattice vibrations of transition metal brucite-type hydroxides is given.

Ch. Mockenhaupt; Th. Zeiske; H.D. Lutz

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Mid-IR FORCAST/SOFIA Observations of M82  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present 75"x75" size maps of M82 at 6.4 micron, 6.6 micron, 7.7 micron, 31.5 micron, and 37.1 micron with a resolution of ~4" that we have obtained with the mid-IR camera FORCAST on SOFIA. We find strong emission from the inner 60" (~1kpc) along the major axis, with the main peak 5" west-southwest of the nucleus and a secondary peak 4" east-northeast of the nucleus. The detailed morphology of the emission differs among the bands, which is likely due to different dust components dominating the continuum emission at short mid-IR wavelengths and long mid-IR wavelengths. We include Spitzer-IRS and Herschel/PACS 70 micron data to fit spectral energy distribution templates at both emission peaks. The best fitting templates have extinctions of A_V = 18 and A_V = 9 toward the main and secondary emission peak and we estimated a color temperature of 68 K at both peaks from the 31 micron and 37 micron measurement. At the emission peaks the estimated dust masses are on the order of 10^{4} M_sun.

Nikola, T; Vacca, W D; Adams, J D; De Buizer, J M; Gull, G E; Henderson, C P; Keller, L D; Morris, M R; Schoenwald, J; Stacey, G; Tielens, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Interference effects in IR photon echo spectroscopy of liquid water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heterodyne-detected transient grating experiments on the OH-stretch mode of HDO dissolved in D{sub 2}O resolve two distinctly different contributions originating from the initially excited OH stretch and the OD stretch which is thermally activated during the OH population relaxation. It is demonstrated that interference of both contributions greatly affects the outcome of IR photon echo experiments.

Yeremenko, Sergey; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A. [Ultrafast Laser and Spectroscopy Laboratory, Materials Science Centre, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Ecological and agricultural applications of synchrotron IR microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological and agricultural applications of synchrotron IR microscopy T.K. Raab a,*, J.P. Vogel b factors to the fungus Erysiphe cichoracearum, a causative agent of powdery mildew disease. Three genes to pro- liferate when environmental conditions and re- sources are optimum. Cellulose, an abundant

259

WEB QUERY STRUCTURE: IMPLICATIONS FOR IR SYSTEM DESIGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WEB QUERY STRUCTURE: IMPLICATIONS FOR IR SYSTEM DESIGN Bernard J. Jansen Computer Science Program Military Academy West Point, New York 10996 Please Cite: Jansen, B. J., Spink, A., & Pfaff, A. 2000. Web in the context of the Web (Jansen, Spink, & Saracevic, 2000; Jansen and Pooch (under review), Lawrence & Giles

Jansen, James

260

Cd doping effects in the heavy-fermion compounds Ce2MIn8 (M=Rh and Ir)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low-temperature magnetic properties of Cd-doped Ce2MIn8 (M=Rh and Ir) single crystals are investigated. Experiments of temperature-dependent magnetic-susceptibility, heat-capacity, and electrical-resistivity measurements revealed that Cd doping enhances the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering temperature from TN=2.8?K (x=0) to TN=4.8?K (x=0.21) for Ce2RhIn8?xCdx and induces long-range AFM ordering with TN=3.8?K (x=0.21) for Ce2IrIn8?xCdx. Additionally, x-ray and neutron magnetic scattering studies showed that Cd-doped samples present below TN a commensurate antiferromagnetic structure with a propagation vector ??=(12,12,0). The resolved magnetic structures for both compounds indicate that the Cd doping tends to rotate the direction of the ordered magnetic moments toward the ab plane. This result suggests that the Cd doping affects the Ce3+ ground-state single-ion anisotropy modifying the crystalline electrical field (CEF) parameters at the Ce3+ site. Indications of CEF evolution induced by Cd doping were also found in the electrical-resistivity measurements. Comparisons between our results and the general effects of Cd doping on the related compounds CeMIn5 (M=Co, Rh, and Ir) confirms the claims that the Cd doping induced electronic tuning is the main effect favoring AFM ordering in these compounds.

C. Adriano; C. Giles; E. M. Bittar; L. N. Coelho; F. de Bergevin; C. Mazzoli; L. Paolasini; W. Ratcliff; R. Bindel; J. W. Lynn; Z. Fisk; P. G. Pagliuso

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

THE SPITZER MID-INFRARED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SURVEY. I. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF OBSCURED CANDIDATES AND NORMAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SELECTED IN THE MID-INFRARED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a program of optical and near-infrared spectroscopic follow-up of candidate active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected in the mid-infrared. This survey selects both normal and obscured AGNs closely matched in luminosity across a wide range, from Seyfert galaxies with bolometric luminosities L {sub bol} ? 10{sup 10} L {sub ?} to highly luminous quasars (L {sub bol} ? 10{sup 14} L {sub ?}), all with redshifts ranging from 0 to 4.3. Samples of candidate AGNs were selected with mid-infrared color cuts at several different 24 ?m flux density limits to ensure a range of luminosities at a given redshift. The survey consists of 786 candidate AGNs and quasars, of which 672 have spectroscopic redshifts and classifications. Of these, 137 (20%) are type 1 AGNs with blue continua, 294 (44%) are type 2 objects with extinctions A{sub V} ?> 5 toward their AGNs, 96 (14%) are AGNs with lower extinctions (A{sub V} ? 1), and 145 (22%) have redshifts, but no clear signs of AGN activity in their spectra. Of the survey objects 50% have L {sub bol} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ?}, in the quasar regime. We present composite spectra for type 2 quasars and objects with no signs of AGN activity in their spectra. We also discuss the mid-infrared—emission-line luminosity correlation and present the results of cross correlations with serendipitous X-ray and radio sources. The results show that: (1) obscured objects dominate the overall AGN population, (2) mid-infrared selected AGN candidates exist which lack AGN signatures in their optical spectra but have AGN-like X-ray or radio counterparts, and (3) X-ray and optical classifications of obscured and unobscured AGNs often differ.

Lacy, M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ridgway, S. E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Gates, E. L. [UCO/Lick Observatory, P.O. Box 85, Mount Hamilton, CA 95140 (United States); Nielsen, D. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Petric, A. O. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sajina, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tuffs University, 212 College Avenue, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Urrutia, T. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Cox Drews, S. [946 Mangrove Avenue 102, Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (United States); Harrison, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Seymour, N. [CSIRO, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Storrie-Lombardi, L. J. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

HerMES: THE FAR-INFRARED EMISSION FROM DUST-OBSCURED GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) are an ultraviolet-faint, infrared-bright galaxy population that reside at z ? 2 and are believed to be in a phase of dusty star-forming and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. We present far-infrared (far-IR) observations of a complete sample of DOGs in the 2 deg{sup 2} of the Cosmic Evolution Survey. The 3077 DOGs have (z) = 1.9 ± 0.3 and are selected from 24 ?m and r {sup +} observations using a color cut of r {sup +} – [24] ? 7.5 (AB mag) and S{sub 24} ? 100 ?Jy. Based on the near-IR spectral energy distributions, 47% are bump DOGs (star formation dominated) and 10% are power-law DOGs (AGN-dominated). We use SPIRE far-IR photometry from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey to calculate the IR luminosity and characteristic dust temperature for the 1572 (51%) DOGs that are detected at 250 ?m (?3?). For the remaining 1505 (49%) that are undetected, we perform a median stacking analysis to probe fainter luminosities. Herschel-detected and undetected DOGs have average luminosities of (2.8 ± 0.4) × 10{sup 12} L{sub ?} and (0.77 ± 0.08) × 10{sup 12} L{sub ?}, and dust temperatures of (33 ± 7) K and (37 ± 5) K, respectively. The IR luminosity function for DOGs with S{sub 24} ? 100 ?Jy is calculated, using far-IR observations and stacking. DOGs contribute 10%-30% to the total star formation rate (SFR) density of the universe at z = 1.5-2.5, dominated by 250 ?m detected and bump DOGs. For comparison, DOGs contribute 30% to the SFR density for all z = 1.5-2.5 galaxies with S{sub 24} ? 100 ?Jy. DOGs have a large scatter about the star formation main sequence and their specific SFRs show that the observed phase of star formation could be responsible for their total observed stellar mass at z ? 2.

Calanog, J. A.; Wardlow, J.; Fu, Hai; Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Assef, R. J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bock, J.; Riechers, D.; Schulz, B. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Casey, C. M. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Farrah, D.; Oliver, S. J.; Roseboom, I. G. [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Ibar, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Kartaltepe, J. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Magdis, G.; Rigopoulou, D. [Department of Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Marchetti, L. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Pérez-Fournon, I. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Scott, Douglas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); and others

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

WATER ABSORPTION FROM GAS VERY NEAR THE MASSIVE PROTOSTAR AFGL 2136 IRS 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present ground-based observations of the ?{sub 1} and ?{sub 3} fundamental bands of H{sub 2}O toward the massive protostar AFGL 2136 IRS 1, identifying absorption features due to 47 different ro-vibrational transitions between 2.468 ?m and 2.561 ?m. Analysis of these features indicates the absorption arises in warm (T = 506 ± 25 K), very dense (n(H{sub 2}) > 5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}) gas, suggesting an origin close to the central protostar. The total column density of warm water is estimated to be N(H{sub 2}O) = (1.02 ± 0.02) × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –2}, giving a relative abundance of N(H{sub 2}O)/N(H{sub 2}) ? 10{sup –4}. Our study represents the first extensive use of water vapor absorption lines in the near infrared, and demonstrates the utility of such observations in deriving physical parameters.

Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Seifahrt, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Richter, M. J. [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

Evaluation of IR techniques for detection of wall thinning in service water piping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Service water piping systems at electric power plants provide cooling for a variety of safety and non-safety related components and systems. Assessing integrity of the service water piping system includes detection and analysis of pipe wall thinning. Conventional inspection techniques usually involve the time-intensive process of ultrasonic thickness measurements, based on a grid system, of the entire pipe length. An alternative to this process may lie in the use of active infrared thermography techniques for detection of thin wall areas in the pipe. The EPRI NDE Center participated in a preliminary evaluation of this technology at Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant. Based on the promising results of the Vermont Yankee activity, the Center worked with Thermal Wave Imaging, Inc. (TWI) in an effort to optimize the IR thermal injection technique for service water piping applications. The primary goals of this effort were to determine the practical depth resolution capabilities of the thermal injection method in carbon steel, and also to minimize the effects of pipe curvature on detection capabilities. Both of these efforts were subject to the constraint that the system be sufficiently portable for use in an electrical power plant, where space and access to the pipe surface is often limited.

Zayicek, P. [EPRI NDE Center, Charlotte, NC (United States); Shepard, S.M. [Thermal Wave Imaging, Inc., Lathrup Village, MI (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Quantitative IR Spectrum and Vibrational Assignments for Glycolaldehyde Vapor: Glycolaldehyde Measurements in Biomass Burning Plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glycolaldehyde (GA, 2-hydroxyethanal, C2H4O2) is a semi-volatile molecule of atmospheric importance, recently proposed as a precursor in the formation of aqueous-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA). There are few methods to measure glycolaldehyde vapor, but infrared spectroscopy has been used successfully. Using vetted protocols we have completed the first assignment of all fundamental vibrational modes and derived quantitative IR absorption band strengths using both neat and pressure-broadened GA vapor. Even though GA is problematic due to its propensity to both dimerize and condense, our intensities agree well with the few previously published values. Using the reference ?10 band Q-branch at 860.51 cm-1, we have also determined GA mixing ratios in biomass burning plumes generated by field and laboratory burns of fuels from the southeastern and southwestern United States, including the first field measurements of glycolaldehyde in smoke. The GA emission factors were anti-correlated with modified combustion efficiency confirming release of GA from smoldering combustion. The GA emission factors (g of GA emitted per kg dry biomass burned on a dry mass basis) had a low dependence on fuel type consistent with the production mechanism being pyrolysis of cellulose. GA was emitted at 0.23 ± 0.13% of CO from field fires and we calculate that it accounts for ~18% of the aqueous-phase SOA precursors that we were able to measure.

Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.; Profeta, Luisa T.; Akagi, Sheryl; Burling, Ian R.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Williams, Stephen D.

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Triggered infrared spectroscopy for investigating metalloprotein chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...light-driven H2 production has been demonstrated...pump-probe IR methods. (b) Gas...site of its production without release...pump-probe IR methods. Studies of...Donato2007Time-resolved methods in biophysics...2006Light-driven hydrogen production by a hybrid...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

Seely, John F. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob [International Radiation Detectors, Inc., Torrance, CA 90505-5243 (United States); Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX (France)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

268

INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY J1023+0038: EVIDENCE FOR THE SHORT-TERM NATURE OF ITS INTERACTING PHASE IN 2000-2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report our multi-band infrared (IR) imaging of the transitional millisecond pulsar system J1023+0038, a rare pulsar binary known to have an accretion disk in 2000-2001. The observations were carried out with ground-based and space telescopes from near-IR to far-IR wavelengths. We detected the source in near-IR JH bands and Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m mid-IR channels. Combined with the previously reported optical spectrum of the source, the IR emission is found to arise from the companion star, with no excess emission detected in the wavelength range. Because our near-IR fluxes are nearly equal to those obtained by the 2MASS all-sky survey in 2000 February, the result indicates that the binary did not contain the accretion disk at the time, whose existence would have raised the near-IR fluxes to twice larger values. Our observations have thus established the short-term nature of the interacting phase seen in 2000-2001: the accretion disk existed for at most 2.5 yr. The binary was not detected by the WISE all-sky survey carried out in 2010 at its 12 and 22 {mu}m bands and our Herschel far-IR imaging at 70 and 160 {mu}m. Depending on the assumed properties of the dust, the resulting flux upper limits provide a constraint of <3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22}-3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} g on the mass of the dust grains that possibly exist as the remnants of the previously seen accretion disk.

Wang, Xuebing; Wang, Zhongxiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Morrell, Nidia [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, La Serena (Chile)] [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, La Serena (Chile)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

269

An UHV apparatus for X-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity in the hard X-ray range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the development of a novel UHV compact reflectometer designed and developed for the investigation of magnetic properties of thin films at the ID12-E.S.R.F. beamline. This new instrument is dedicated to x-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity experiment from thin film or multilayered sample. We present the principles of this versatile and simple instrument. We report also the results of resonant magnetic reflectivity experiments carried out for the Fe/Ir multilayers. This will demonstrate the capability to record either angle or energy dependent measurements at the L edges of Ir simultaneously to the XMCD spectra.

Jaouen, N.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.; Goulon, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Tonnerre, J.M. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP166, F-38042 Grenoble (France)

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

270

THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND INTENSITY AND ANISOTROPIES DURING THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fraction of the extragalactic near-infrared (near-IR) background light involves redshifted photons from the ultraviolet (UV) emission from galaxies present during reionization at redshifts above 6. The absolute intensity and the anisotropies of the near-IR background provide an observational probe of the first-light galaxies and their spatial distribution. We estimate the extragalactic background light intensity during reionization by accounting for the stellar and nebular emission from first-light galaxies. We require the UV photon density from these galaxies to generate a reionization history that is consistent with the optical depth to electron scattering from cosmic microwave background measurements. We also require the bright-end luminosity function (LF) of galaxies in our models to reproduce the measured Lyman-dropout LFs at redshifts of 6-8. The absolute intensity is about 0.1-0.4 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at the peak of its spectrum at {approx}1.1 {mu}m. We also discuss the anisotropy power spectrum of the near-IR background using a halo model to describe the galaxy distribution. We compare our predictions for the anisotropy power spectrum to existing measurements from deep near-IR imaging data from Spitzer/IRAC, Hubble/NICMOS, and AKARI. The predicted rms fluctuations at tens of arcminute angular scales are roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the existing measurements. While strong arguments have been made that the measured fluctuations do not have an origin involving faint low-redshift galaxies, we find that measurements in the literature are also incompatible with galaxies present during the era of reionization. The measured near-IR background anisotropies remain unexplained with an unknown origin.

Cooray, Asantha; Gong Yan; Smidt, Joseph [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Santos, Mario G. [CENTRA, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Lisboa 1049-001 (Portugal)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Infrared emitting device and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns. 8 figs.

Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.; Dawson, L.R.; Howard, A.J.; Baucom, K.C.

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

272

?-ray astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE title on the cover of this book reads Gamma-Ray Astronomy but inside a subtitle, Nuclear Transition Region has been added. This uncertainty as to ... an uneven quality to what is, otherwise, a valuable contribution to this field of astronomy.

R. R. Hillier

1977-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

273

High-speed four-color infrared digital imaging for study in-cylinder processes in a di diesel engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was to investigate in-cylinder events of a direct injection-type diesel engine by using a new high-speed infrared (IR) digital imaging systems for obtaining information that was difficult to achieve by the conventional devices. For this, a new high-speed-dual-spectra infrared digital imaging system was developed to simultaneously capture two geometrically identical (in respective spectral) sets of IR images having discrete digital information in a (64x64) matrix at rates as high as over 1,800 frames/sec each with exposure period as short as 20 usec. At the same time, a new advanced four-color IR imaging system was constructed. The first two sets of spectral data were the radiation from water vapor emission bands to compute the distributions of temperature and specie in the gaseous mixture and the remaining two sets of data were to find the instantaneous temperature distribution over the cylinder surface. More than eight reviewed publications have been produced to report many new findings including: Distributions of Water Vapor and Temperature in a Flame; End Gas Images Prior to Onset of Knock; Effect of MTBE on Diesel Combustion; Impact of Oxygen Enrichment on In-cylinder Reactions; Spectral IR Images of Spray Plume; Residual Gas Distribution; Preflame Reactions in Diesel Combustion; Preflame Reactions in the End Gas of an SI Engine; Postflame Oxidation; and Liquid Fuel Layers during Combustion in an SI Engine. In addition, some computational analysis of diesel combustion was performed using KIVA-II program in order to compare results from the prediction and the measurements made using the new IR imaging diagnostic tool.

Rhee, K.T.

1995-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

274

Crystal coherence length effects on the infrared optical response of MgO thin films.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of crystal coherence length on the infrared optical response of MgO thin films was investigated with regard to Reststrahlen band photon-phonon coupling. Preferentially (001)-oriented sputtered and evaporated ion-beam assisted deposited thin films were prepared on silicon and annealed to vary film microstructure. Film crystalline coherence was characterized by x-ray diffraction line broadening and transmission electron microscopy. The infrared dielectric response revealed a strong dependence of dielectric resonance magnitude on crystalline coherence. Shifts to lower transverse optical phonon frequencies were observed with increased crystalline coherence. Increased optical phonon damping is attributed to increasing granularity and intergrain misorientation.

Boreman, Glenn D. (University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL); Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Shelton, David J. (University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL); Carroll, James F., III; Sinclair, Michael B.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Ginn, James Cleveland, III; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Matias, Vladimir (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Crystal coherence length effects on the infrared optical response of MgO thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of crystal coherence length on the infrared optical response of MgO thin films was investigated with regard to Reststrahlen band photon-phonon coupling. Preferentially (001)-oriented sputtered and evaporated ion-beam assisted deposited thin films were prepared on silicon and annealed to vary film microstructure. Film crystalline coherence was characterized by x-ray diffraction line broadening and transmission electron microscopy. The infrared dielectric response revealed a strong dependence of dielectric resonance magnitude on crystalline coherence. Shifts to lower transverse optical phonon frequencies were observed with increased crystalline coherence. Increased optical phonon damping is attributed to increasing granularity and intergrain misorientation.

Ihlefeld, J. F.; Ginn, J. C.; Rodriguez, M. A.; Kotula, P. G.; Carroll, J. F. III; Clem, P. G.; Sinclair, M. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Shelton, D. J.; Boreman, G. D. [College of Optics and Photonics/CREOL, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Matias, V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

276

Calculation ofZ eff from plasma resistivity in IR-T1 tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We estimatedZ eff in the IR-T1 tokamak through anomaly factor. The IR-T1 tokamak is a small air-core transformer tokamak with circular cross section and with out... ...

M. Mahmoodi Darian; M. Ghoranneviss; M. K. Salem…

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Ir L (I.~ DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ir Ir L (I.~ DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE I.: ~ CONTRACT NO. DE-AC04-83AL18796 1. Vicinity Property i: Completion Report i , . Remedial Actions , cContractor 4,. -~'~ ~for the Uranium Mill Tailings ~~~z ~ Remedial Actions Project - MK-FEROUSON COMPANY *C~Ad PEE *CMIWN>tfIOW VICINITY PROPERTY COMPLETION REPORT AT CA-401 MAYERS STREET BRIDGEVILLE, PA 15017 JUNE 30, 1987 FOR URANIUM MILL TAILINGS REMEDIAL ACTION PROJECT OFFICE ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE, NM BY MK-FERGUSON CC IPANY AND CHEM-NUCLEAR SYSTEMS, INC. MK-Ferguson Company has been granted authorization to perform remedial action under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, Public Law 95-604. Remedial action was done in accordance to the EPA Standards for

278

The starburst phenomenon from the optical/near-IR perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The optical/near-IR stellar continuum carries unique information about the stellar population in a galaxy, its mass function and star-formation history. Star-forming regions display rich emission-line spectra from which we can derive the dust and gas distribution, map velocity fields, metallicities and young massive stars and locate shocks and stellar winds. All this information is very useful in the dissection of the starburst phenomenon. We discuss a few of the advantages and limitations of observations in the optical/near-IR region and focus on some results. Special attention is given to the role of interactions and mergers and observations of the relatively dust-free starburst dwarfs. In the future we expect new and refined diagnostic tools to provide us with more detailed information about the IMF, strength and duration of the burst and its triggering mechanisms.

Nils Bergvall; Thomas Marquart; Göran Östlin; Erik Zackrisson

2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

279

Small-volume, ultrahigh-vacuum-compatible high-pressure reaction cell for combined kinetic and in situ IR spectroscopic measurements on planar model catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the design and performance of a high-pressure reaction cell for simultaneous kinetic and in situ infrared reflection (IR) spectroscopic measurements on model catalysts at elevated pressures, between 10{sup -3} and 10{sup 3} mbars, which can be operated both as batch reactor and as flow reactor with defined gas flow. The cell is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) system, which is used for sample preparation and also contains facilities for sample characterization. Specific for this design is the combination of a small cell volume, which allows kinetic measurements with high sensitivity under batch or continuous flow conditions, the complete isolation of the cell from the UHV part during UHV measurements, continuous temperature control during both UHV and high-pressure operation, and rapid transfer between UHV and high-pressure stage. Gas dosing is performed by a designed gas-handling system, which allows operation as flow reactor with calibrated gas flows at adjustable pressures. To study the kinetics of reactions on the model catalysts, a quadrupole mass spectrometer is connected to the high-pressure cell. IR measurements are possible in situ by polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, which also allows measurements at elevated pressures. The performance of the setup is demonstrated by test measurements on the kinetics for CO oxidation and the CO adsorption on a Au/TiO{sub 2}/Ru(0001) model catalyst film at 1-50 mbar total pressure.

Zhao, Z.; Diemant, T.; Haering, T.; Rauscher, H.; Behm, R.J. [Department Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, University of Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Epitaxial HTS bolometers on silicon for IR detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon wafers have shown promise for the fabrication of photothermal IR detectors (i.e., bolometers) from epitaxial HTS thin films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub (7{minus}{delta})} (YBCO). Conventional IC-grade wafers, ultrathin wafers, and micromachined-silicon membrane windows in conventional wafers, are all suitable, but the latter provides considerable advantage for bolometer performance. The high thermal conductivity and strength of silicon make it ideal for submicron-thick window designs. Epitaxy in the HTS film is advantageous, since it reduces granular disorder, the primary cause of dark noise (resistance-fluctuations) in the detector. Mid-to-far-IR transparency of Si at 90 K is unique among those substrates that support high-quality epitaxial YBCO films. This Si transparency to IR can be used for various improvements in the optical design of these devices. The authors review the thermal and optical advantages of silicon substrates, device fabrication issues, and bolometer modeling. Thermal modeling of membrane bolometers indicates that the steady-state temperature-rise profile is nonuniform, but that this does not degrade the response linearity of the bolometer. Certain size limits and trade-offs in the design, will be important in the final device performance. They also discuss applications to FTIR instruments, and extensions of this technology to arrays including a novel on-chip transform spectrometer design.

Fenner, D.B.; Li, Q.; Hamblen, W.D.; Luo, J.; Hamblen, D.G. [AFR, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States). Superconductivity Group; Budnick, J.I. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mekanisk integration av en IR-detektor i en Stirlingkylare; Mechanical Integration of an IR-detector in a Micro Cooler.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The master thesis “Mechanical Integration of an IR-detector in a Micro Cooler” has been performed at FLIR Systems AB in Danderyd. FLIR Systems is… (more)

Gibson, Camilla

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of Dusty Galactic Nuclei PROEFSCHRIFT ter verkrijging van het doctoraat in de Wiskunde en Natuurwetenschappen aan de Rijksuniversiteit Groningen op

Spoon, Henrik

283

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is...

284

A NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF YOUNG FIELD ULTRACOOL DWARFS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a near-infrared (0.9-2.4 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 73 field ultracool dwarfs having spectroscopic and/or kinematic evidence of youth ( Almost-Equal-To 10-300 Myr). Our sample is composed of 48 low-resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 100) spectra and 41 moderate-resolution spectra (R {approx}> 750-2000). First, we establish a method for spectral typing M5-L7 dwarfs at near-IR wavelengths that is independent of gravity. We find that both visual and index-based classification in the near-IR provides consistent spectral types with optical spectral types, though with a small systematic offset in the case of visual classification at J and K band. Second, we examine features in the spectra of {approx}10 Myr ultracool dwarfs to define a set of gravity-sensitive indices based on FeH, VO, K I, Na I, and H-band continuum shape. We then create an index-based method for classifying the gravities of M6-L5 dwarfs that provides consistent results with gravity classifications from optical spectroscopy. Our index-based classification can distinguish between young and dusty objects. Guided by the resulting classifications, we propose a set of low-gravity spectral standards for the near-IR. Finally, we estimate the ages corresponding to our gravity classifications.

Allers, K. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States); Liu, Michael C., E-mail: k.allers@bucknell.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

The Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Debris Disk Catalog. I. Continuum Analysis of Unresolved Targets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the Spitzer Space Telescope cryogenic mission, Guaranteed Time Observers, Legacy Teams, and General Observers obtained Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of hundreds of debris disk candidates. We calibrated the spectra of 571 candidates, including 64 new IRAS and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) debris disks candidates, modeled their stellar photospheres, and produced a catalog of excess spectra for unresolved debris disks. For 499 targets with IRS excess but without strong spectral features (and a subset of 420 targets with additional MIPS 70 ?m observations), we modeled the IRS (and MIPS data) assuming that the dust thermal emission was well-described using either a one- or two-temperature blackbody model. We calculated the probability for each model and computed the average probability to select among models. We found that the spectral energy distributions for the majority of objects (~66%) were better described using a two-temperature model with warm (T gr ~ 100-500 K) and cold (T gr ~ 50-150 K) dust populations analogous to zodiacal and Kuiper Belt dust, suggesting that planetary systems are common in debris disks and zodiacal dust is common around host stars with ages up to ~1 Gyr. We found that younger stars generally have disks with larger fractional infrared luminosities and higher grain temperatures and that higher-mass stars have disks with higher grain temperatures. We show that the increasing distance of dust around debris disks is inconsistent with self-stirred disk models, expected if these systems possess planets at 30-150 AU. Finally, we illustrate how observations of debris disks may be used to constrain the radial dependence of material in the minimum mass solar nebula.

Christine H. Chen; Tushar Mittal; Marc Kuchner; William J. Forrest; Carey M. Lisse; P. Manoj; Benjamin A. Sargent; Dan M. Watson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

High-sensitivity, and cost-effective system for infrared imaging of concealed objects in dynamic mode.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Novel, cost-efficient, and highly-sensitive IR imaging systems play an important role in homeland security functions. Technical limitations in the areas of sensitivity, contrast ratio, bandwidth and cost continue to constrain imaging capabilities. We have designed and prototyped a compact computer-piloted high sensitivity infrared imaging system. The device consists of infrared optics, cryostat, low-noise pre-amplifier, Analog-to-Digital hardware, feedback electronics, and unique image processing software. Important advantages of the developed system are: (i) Eight electronic channels are available for simultaneous registration of IR and visible images in multiple spectral ranges, (ii) Capability of real-time analysis such as comparing the 'sensed' image with 'reference' images from a database, (iii) High accuracy temperature measurement of multiple points on the image by referencing the radiation intensity from the object to a black body model, (iv) Image generation by real-time integration of images from multiple sensors operating from the visible to the terahertz range. The device was tested with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled, single-pixel HgCdTe detector for imaging in 8-12 microns range. The demonstrated examples of infrared imaging of concealed objects in static and dynamic modes include a hammer (metal head and wooden handle), plastic imitator of handguns hidden under clothes, powder in an envelope, and revealing complex wall structures under decorative plaster.

Gordiyenko, E.; Yefremenko, V.; Pearson, J.; Bader, S.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

287

Ground-based All-sky Mid-infrared and Visible Imagery for Purposes of Characterizing Cloud Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer (ASIVA), a multi-purpose visible and infrared sky imaging and analysis instrument whose primary functionality is to provide radiometrically calibrated imagery in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) atmospheric window. This functionality enables the determination of diurnal hemispherical cloud fraction (HCF) and estimates of sky/cloud temperature from which one can derive estimates of cloud emissivity and cloud height. This paper describes the calibration methods and performance of the ASIVA instrument with particular emphasis on data products being developed for the meteorological community. Data presented here were collected during a field campaign conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility from May 21 to July 27, 2009. The purpose of this campaign was to determine the efficacy of IR technology in providing reliable nighttime HCF data. Significant progress has been made in the analysis of the campaign data over the past several years and the ASIVA has proven to be an excellent instrument for determining HCF as well as several other important cloud properties.

Klebe, Dimitri; Blatherwick, R. D.; Morris, Victor R.

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

288

Kinetics of oxygen reduction at IrO{sub 2}-coated titanium electrode in alkaline solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen reduction is an industrially important electrochemical reaction, for fuel cells, electrochemical caustic concentrators, air depolarized cathodes, metal-air batteries, and oxidant production. Oxygen reduction at IrO{sub 2}-coated titanium electrodes fabricated by thermal decomposition was investigated by employing cyclic voltammetry and rotating-disk electrode techniques. Cyclic voltammetric results indicated that oxygen reduction begins during the Ir(III)/Ir(IV) transition on an IrO{sub 2} electrode. On the basis of measurements using a rotating disk electrode together with polarization curves, Tafel slopes, and stoichiometric number determinations, a mechanism for oxygen reduction on an IrO{sub 2}-coated titanium electrode is proposed.

Chang, C.C.; Wen, T.C. [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hydrothermal synthesis and infrared emissivity property of flower-like SnO{sub 2} particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The flower-like SnO{sub 2} particles are synthesized through a simple hydrothermal process. The microstructure, morphology and the infrared emissivity property of the as-prepared products are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and infrared spectroradio meter (ISM) respectively. The results show that the as-prepared SnO{sub 2} products are all indexed to tetragonal cassiterite phase of SnO{sub 2}. The different molarity ratios of the OH{sup ?} concentration to Sn{sup 4+} concentration ([OH{sup ?}]:[Sn{sup 4+}]) and the polyacrylamide (PAM) lead to the different morphological structures of SnO{sub 2}, which indicates that both the [OH{sup ?}]:[Sn{sup 4+}] and the PAM play an important role in the morphological evolution respectively. The infrared emissivities of the as-prepared SnO{sub 2} products are discussed.

Tian, J. X. [Institute of Photonics and Photon-Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710069 (China) [Institute of Photonics and Photon-Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710069 (China); Beijing Institute of Environmental Features, Beijing, 100854 (China); Zhang, Z. Y., E-mail: zhangzy@nwu.edu.cn [Institute of Photonics and Photon-Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710069 (China); School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710127 (China); Yan, J. F.; Ruan, X. F.; Yun, J. N.; Zhao, W.; Zhai, C. X. [School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710127 (China)] [School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710127 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

SDSS J131339.98+515128.3: A new GravitationallyLensed Quasar Selected Based on Near-infrared Excess  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a new gravitationally lensed quasar, SDSS J131339.98+515128.3, at a redshift of 1:875 with an image separation of 1: 0024. The lensing galaxy is clearly detected in visible-light follow-up observations. We also identify three absorption-line doublets in the spectra of the lensed quasar images, from which we measure the lens redshift to be 0:194. Like several other known lenses, the lensed quasar images have different continuum slopes. This difference is probably the result of reddening and microlensing in the lensing galaxy. The lensed quasar was selected by correlating Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic quasars with Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) sources and choosing quasars that show near-infrared (IR) excess. The near-IR excess can originate, for example, from the contribution of the lensing galaxy at near-IR wavelengths. We show that the near-IR excess technique is indeed an efficient method to identify lensed systems from a large sample of quasars.

Ofek, E.O.; Oguri, M.; Jackson, N.; Inada, N.; Kayo, I.

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

291

Pushing The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational Nano-Spectroscopy: From Monolayer Towards Single molecule sensitivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While scattering-scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) has demonstrated its potential to extend infrared (IR) spectroscopy into the nanometer scale, it has not yet reached its full potential in terms of spectroscopic sensitivity. We combine broadband femtosecond mid-IR excitation with an optimized spectral irradiance of 2 W/cm2/ cm–1 (power/area/bandwidth) and a combination of tip- and substrate enhancement to demonstrate single-monolayer sensitivity with exceptional signal-to-noise ratio. Using interferometric time domain detection, the near-field IR s-SNOM spectral phase directly reflects the molecular vibrational resonances and their intrinsic line shapes. We probe the stretching resonance of 1000 carbonyl groups at 1700 cm–1 in a self-assembled monolayer of 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA) on an evaporated gold substrate with spectroscopic contrast and sensitivity of 100 vibrational oscillators. From these results we provide a roadmap for achieving true single-molecule IR vibrational spectroscopy in s-SNOM by implementing optical antenna resonant enhancement, increased spectral pump power, and improved detection schemes.

Xu, Xiaoji G.; Rang, Matthias; Craig, Ian M.; Rashcke, Markus B.

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

292

Near-infrared sideband generation induced by intense far-infrared radiation in GaAs quantum wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared sideband generation induced by intense far-infrared radiation in GaAs quantum wells J illuminated with near-infrared NIR radiation at frequency nir and intense far-infrared FIR radiation from and quenching of photoluminescence PL .8,9 The nonlinear interaction of FIR and near-infrared NIR radiation

Kono, Junichiro

293

STh3M.6.pdf CLEO:2014 2014 OSA Silicon Chip Based Near-Infrared and Mid-Infrared Optical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STh3M.6.pdf CLEO:2014 © 2014 OSA Silicon Chip Based Near-Infrared and Mid-Infrared Optical near-infrared and mid-infrared with detection limit down to 1ppb. Strip waveguide, slot waveguide and PC-based chip integrated optical absorption spectroscopy devices are compared in near-infrared

Chen, Ray

294

Mass constraints to Sco X-1 from Bowen flourescence and deep near-infrared spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

More than 50 years after the dawn of X-ray astronomy, the dynamical parameters of the prototypical X-ray binary Sco X-1 are still unknown. We combine a Monte Carlo analysis, which includes all the previously known orbital parameters of the system, along with the K-correction to set dynamical constraints to the masses of the compact object (M1near-infrared spectrum of the source to date. There is no evidence of donor star features on it, but we are able to constrain the veiling factor as a function of the spectral type of the secondary star. The combination of both techniques restricts the spectral type of the donor to be later than K4 and luminosity class IV. It also constrains the contribution of the companion light to the infrared emission of Sco X-1 to be lower than 33 percent. This implies ...

Sánchez, D Mata; Casares, J; Steeghs, D; Almeida, C Ramos; Pulido, J A Acosta

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Astronomy: Lowering Sights in the Infrared  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Imperial College, London, into a fully-equipped instrument has now been passed by the Astronomy Policy and Grants Committee of the Science Research Council. In this way an infrared ... Science Research Council. In this way an infrared telescope that is able to do valuable astronomy from a site with good seeing conditions could be available to British astronomers by next ...

Our Astronomy Correspondent

1970-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

296

A CATALOG OF GALACTIC INFRARED CARBON STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We collected almost all of the Galactic infrared carbon stars (IRCSs) from literature published up to the present to organize a catalog of 974 Galactic IRCSs in this paper. Some of their photometric properties in the near-, mid-, and far-infrared are discussed.

Chen, P. S. [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory and Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Yang, X. H., E-mail: iraspsc@yahoo.com.cn, E-mail: yangxh@cqu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Relativistic effects in a phosphorescent Ir(III) complex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compare high field magnetic circular dichroism, absorption, and photoluminescence spectra for Ir(ptz)3 with time-dependent density functional theory. By gradually turning on the relativistic effects we identify several distinct relativistic effects in the spectra of this complex. We show that relativistic effects must be included to accurately predict the low-temperature spectra. This leads to new insights into the low-lying excitations responsible for the observed phosphorescence, and suggests new avenues to improve the performance of organic light emitting diodes.

A. R. G. Smith; M. J. Riley; S.-C. Lo; P. L. Burn; I. R. Gentle; B. J. Powell

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

298

Probing stellar accretion with mid-infrared hydrogen lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we investigate the origin of the mid-infrared (IR) hydrogen recombination lines for a sample of 114 disks in different evolutionary stages (full, transitional and debris disks) collected from the {\\it Spitzer} archive. We focus on the two brighter {H~{\\sc i}} lines observed in the {\\it Spitzer} spectra, the {H~{\\sc i}}(7-6) at 12.37$\\mu$m and the {H~{\\sc i}}(9-7) at 11.32$\\mu$m. We detect the {H~{\\sc i}}(7-6) line in 46 objects, and the {H~{\\sc i}}(9-7) in 11. We compare these lines with the other most common gas line detected in {\\it Spitzer} spectra, the {[Ne~{\\sc iii}]} at 12.81$\\mu$m. We argue that it is unlikely that the {H~{\\sc i}} emission originates from the photoevaporating upper surface layers of the disk, as has been found for the {[Ne~{\\sc iii}]} lines toward low-accreting stars. Using the {H~{\\sc i}}(9-7)/{H~{\\sc i}}(7-6) line ratios we find these gas lines are likely probing gas with hydrogen column densities of 10$^{10}$-10$^{11}$~cm$^{-3}$. The subsample of objects surrounded by ...

Rigliaco, Elisabetta; Duchene, G; Edwards, S; Ardila, D R; Grady, C; Mendigutía, I; Montesinos, B; Mulders, G D; Najita, J R; Carpenter, J; Furlan, E; Gorti, U; Meijerink, R; Meyer, M R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

THE HST EXTREME DEEP FIELD (XDF): COMBINING ALL ACS AND WFC3/IR DATA ON THE HUDF REGION INTO THE DEEPEST FIELD EVER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) combines data from 10 years of observations with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Wide-Field Camera 3 Infra-Red (WFC3/IR) into the deepest image of the sky ever in the optical/near-IR. Since the initial observations of the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) in 2003, numerous surveys and programs, including supernovae follow-up, HUDF09, CANDELS, and HUDF12, have contributed additional imaging data across this region. However, these images have never been combined and made available as one complete ultra-deep image dataset. We combine them now with the XDF program. Our new and improved processing techniques provide higher quality reductions of the total dataset. All WFC3/IR and optical ACS data sets have been fully combined and accurately matched, resulting in the deepest imaging ever taken at these wavelengths, ranging from 29.1 to 30.3 AB mag (5? in a 0.''35 diameter aperture) in 9 filters. The combined image therefore reaches to 31.2 AB mag 5? (32.9 at 1?) for a flat f {sub ?} source. The gains in the optical for the four filters done in the original ACS HUDF correspond to a typical improvement of 0.15 mag, with gains of 0.25 mag in the deepest areas. Such gains are equivalent to adding ?130 to ?240 orbits of ACS data to the HUDF. Improved processing alone results in a typical gain of ?0.1 mag. Our 5? (optical+near-IR) SExtractor catalogs reveal about 14,140 sources in the full field and about 7121 galaxies in the deepest part of the XDF.

Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; Oesch, P. A. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bouwens, R. J.; Labbé, I.; Franx, M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Stiavelli, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van Dokkum, P. G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Trenti, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Carollo, C. M. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Gonzalez, V., E-mail: gdi@ucolick.org [University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Wave Infrared Long-Wave Infrared Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Long-Wave Infrared Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map characteristic minerals associated with hot springs/mineral deposits Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Map surface temperatures Dictionary.png Long-Wave Infrared: Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) refers to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the 8 to 15 µm wavelength range. LWIR surveys are sometimes referred to as "thermal imaging" and can be used to identify relatively warm features

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

FY 2006 Infrared Photonics Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics and optical fiber processing methods for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.

Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Schultz, John F.

2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

302

Definition: Multispectral Thermal Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Infrared Infrared Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Multispectral Thermal Infrared This wavelength range senses heat energy from the Earth's surface. It can be used to sense surface temperature, including anomalies associated with active geothermal or volcanic systems. Both multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing observations are available. This range can also be used to map mineralogy associate with common rock-forming silicates.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_infrared_spectroscopy ↑ http://asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Multispectral_Thermal_Infrared&oldid=601561

303

A MID-INFRARED CENSUS OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for mid-infrared signs of star formation activity in the 1.1 mm sources in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). We have correlated the BGPS catalog with available mid-IR Galactic plane catalogs based on the Spitzer Space Telescope GLIMPSE legacy survey and the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) Galactic plane survey. We find that 44% (3712 of 8358) of the BGPS sources contain at least one mid-IR source, including 2457 of 5067 (49%) within the area where all surveys overlap (10 deg. < l < 65 deg.). Accounting for chance alignments between the BGPS and mid-IR sources, we conservatively estimate that 20% of the BPGS sources within the area where all surveys overlap show signs of active star formation. We separate the BGPS sources into four groups based on their probability of star formation activity. Extended Green Objects and Red MSX Sources make up the highest probability group, while the lowest probability group is comprised of 'starless' BGPS sources which were not matched to any mid-IR sources. The mean 1.1 mm flux of each group increases with increasing probability of active star formation. We also find that the 'starless' BGPS sources are the most compact, while the sources with the highest probability of star formation activity are on average more extended with large skirts of emission. A subsample of 280 BGPS sources with known distances demonstrates that mass and mean H{sub 2} column density also increase with probability of star formation activity.

Dunham, Miranda K. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Robitaille, Thomas P.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, Texas 78712-0259 (United States); Schlingman, Wayne M. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Cyganowski, Claudia J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Urquhart, James, E-mail: miranda.dunham@yale.edu [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

304

Infrared spectroscopy of ionic clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis describes new experiments wherein the infrared vibrational predissociation spectra of a number of mass-selected ionic cluster systems have been obtained and analyzed in the 2600 to 4000 cm{sup {minus}1} region. The species studied include: the hydrated hydronium ions, H{sub 3}O{sup +} (H{sub 2}O){sub 3 {minus}10}, ammoniated ammonium ions, NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub 1 {minus}10} and cluster ions involving both water and ammonia around an ammonium ion core, (mixed clusters) NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub n}(H{sub 2}O){sub m} (n+m=4). In each case, the spectra reveal well resolved structures that can be assigned to transitions arising from the vibrational motions of both the ion core of the clusters and the surrounding neutral solvent molecules. 154 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

Price, J.M. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Molecular-beam epitaxy growth and characterization of mid-infrared quantum cascade laser structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures, used for fabrication of ~9?m quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), is reported. The X-ray diffractometry (XRD) structural characterization, as an integral part of this process, ... Keywords: GaAs/AlGaAs lasers, Intersubband transitions, Mid-infrared, Molecular-beam epitaxy, Quantum cascade laser, Unipolar devices

Kamil Kosiel; Justyna Kubacka-Traczyk; Piotr Karbownik; Anna Szerling; Jan Muszalski; Maciej Bugajski; Przemek Romanowski; Jaros?aw Gaca; Marek Wójcik

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Infrared-Laser Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Surface Studies: SF6 Interaction with Silver Films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Infrared-laser photoacoustic spectroscopy has been applied to surface studies at submonolayer coverage under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. The adsorption of SF6 on silver films at 90 K was investigated. Simultaneous x-ray photoelectron measurements show that 0.1 of a monolayer can be readily detected with the photoacoustic technique. Photoacoustic spectra from submonolayer to multilayer surface coverages have been obtained and show characteristic SF6 vibrational bands.

F. Träger; H. Coufal; T. J. Chuang

1982-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

307

FY 2005 Infrared Photonics Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions. During FY 2005, PNNL’s Infrared Photonics research team made measurable progress exploiting the extraordinary optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to develop miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. We investigated sulfur purification methods that will eventually lead to routine production of optical quality chalcogenide glass. We also discovered a glass degradation phenomenon and our investigation uncovered the underlying surface chemistry mechanism and developed mitigation actions. Key research was performed to understand and control the photomodification properties. This research was then used to demonstrate several essential infrared photonic devices, including LWIR single-mode waveguide devices and waveguide couplers. Optical metrology tools were also developed to characterize optical waveguide structures and LWIR optical components.

Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Bradley M.; Martinez, James E.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Schultz, John F.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Radio--Far infrared correlation in "blue cloud" galaxies with 0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the radio--far infrared (FIR) correlation in "blue cloud" galaxies chosen from the PRism MUltiobject Survey (PRIMUS) up to redshift ($z$) of 1.2 in the XMM-LSS field. We use rest-frame emission at 1.4 GHz in the radio and both monochromatic (at 70$\\mu$m) and bolometric (between $8-1000~\\mu$m) emission in the FIR. To probe the nature of the correlation up to $z\\sim1.2$, where direct detection of blue star-forming galaxies is impossible with current technology, we employ the technique of image stacking at 0.325 and 1.4 GHz in the radio and in six infrared bands, viz. 24, 70, 160, 250, 350 and $500~\\mu$m. For comparison, we also study the correlation for more luminous galaxies that are directly detected. The stacking analysis allows us to probe the radio--FIR correlation for galaxies that are up to 2 orders of magnitude fainter than the ones detected directly. The $k-$correction in the infrared wavebands is obtained by fitting the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) with a composite mid-IR power...

Basu, Aritra; Beelen, Alexandre; Singh, Veeresh; Archana, K N; Sirothia, Sandeep; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

NEAR-INFRARED ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF INFRARED LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER MAGNITUDE-STAR FORMATION RATE RELATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have established a relation between the brightest super star cluster (SSC) magnitude in a galaxy and the host star formation rate (SFR) for the first time in the near-infrared (NIR). The data come from a statistical sample of ?40 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) and starbursts utilizing K-band adaptive optics imaging. While expanding the observed relation to longer wavelengths, less affected by extinction effects, it also pushes to higher SFRs. The relation we find, M{sub K} ? –2.6log SFR, is similar to that derived previously in the optical and at lower SFRs. It does not, however, fit the optical relation with a single optical to NIR color conversion, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. While the relation is broadly consistent with a size-of-sample explanation, we argue physical reasons for the relation are likely as well. In particular, the scatter in the relation is smaller than expected from pure random sampling strongly suggesting physical constraints. We also derive a quantifiable relation tying together cluster-internal effects and host SFR properties to possibly explain the observed brightest SSC magnitude versus SFR dependency.

Randriamanakoto, Z.; Väisänen, P. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, 7935 Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa)] [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, 7935 Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa); Escala, A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)] [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Kankare, E.; Kotilainen, J.; Mattila, S. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, FI-21500 Piikkiö (Finland)] [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, FI-21500 Piikkiö (Finland); Ryder, S., E-mail: zara@saao.ac.za [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Thermal infrared detectors based on MEMS bimorph beams have the potential to exceed the performance of current uncooled thermal infrared cameras both in terms of… (more)

Warren, Clinton Gregory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

High Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging and Raman Spectroscopy. High Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging and Raman...

312

NDE of Concrete Structures Strengthened with FRP Using Infrared Thermography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NDE of Concrete Structures Strengthened with FRP Using Infrared Thermography Monica A. STARNES that infrared thermography is a promising nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method considering testing speed

Entekhabi, Dara

313

Remotely Controlled, Continuous Observations of Infrared Radiance with the CSIRO/ARM Mark II Radiometer at the SGP CART Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Remotely Controlled, Continuous Observations of Remotely Controlled, Continuous Observations of Infrared Radiance with the CSIRO/ARM Mark II Radiometer at the SGP CART Site C. M. R. Platt and R. T. Austin Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado C. M. R. Platt and J. A. Bennett Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization Atmospheric Research Aspendale, Victoria, Australia Abstract The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization/Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (CSIRO/ARM) Program Mark II infrared (IR) filter radiometer operated continuously at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site for a period of five weeks. Data of high quality were obtained by remote operation and data transfer with no evidence of spurious

314

Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Olson. “Observations of gamma-ray bursts of cosmic origin. ”E. Lingenfelter. “Gamma-ray bursts. ” Annual Review of652-654. Waxman, Eli. “Gamma-ray-burst afterglow: supporting

Stahl, Bennett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Near-Infrared Observations of Globular Clusters in NGC 4472, NGC 4594, NGC 3585 and NGC 5813 and Implications for their Ages and Metallicities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present near-infrared photometry of the globular cluster systems of the early-type galaxies NGC 4472, NGC 4594, NGC 3585, and NGC 5813. We combine these near-infrared data, obtained with PANIC at the Magellan Baade 6.5m telescope, with archival optical HST and FORS/VLT data, and use the optical to near-infrared colors to constrain the ages and metallicities of the globular clusters around the target galaxies. For NGC 4472 we have the most extensive near-infrared and optical photometric dataset. These colors show that the NGC 4472 globular cluster system has a broad metallicity distribution and that the clusters are predominantly old (i.e. ages of about 10 Gyr or more). This result agrees well with earlier spectroscopic work on NGC 4472, and is evidence that the combination of optical to near-infrared colors can identify predominantly old systems and distinguish these from systems with a substantial intermediate age component. Based on the smaller sample of combined optical and near-infrared data NGC 4594 and NGC 3585 appear to have predominantly old globular cluster systems, while that of NGC 5813 may have a more significant age spread. We also match our sample of globular clusters with near-infrared and optical photometry to Chandra X-ray source detections in these galaxies, and discuss how the probability that a globular cluster hosts a low-mass X-ray binary depends on metallicity and age.

Maren Hempel; Steve Zepf; Arunav Kundu; Doug Geisler; Thomas J. Maccarone

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

DEEP IR IMAGING OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. III. M13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used the CFHT REDEYE infrared camera to obtain deep J and K' images of four fields in the globular cluster M13. The composite K, J-K color-magnitude diagram (CMD) extends from the upper red giant branch (RGB) to 2 magnitudes below the main sequence turn-off (MSTO). Selected [Fe/H]~ -1.6 isochrones from Bergbusch & VandenBerg (1992, ApJS, 81, 163) and Straniero & Chieffi (1991, ApJS, 76, 525) are transformed onto the near-infrared observational plane, and these suggest an age for M13 in the range 14-16 Gyr. We emphasize that any effort to estimate ages should be considered as tentative given uncertainties in the input physics; however, these uncertainties notwithstanding, comparisons between the near-infrared isochrones indicate that age differences of order +/-2 Gyr should be detectable among metal-poor clusters on the K, J-K plane. Building on this result, we find that the difference in J-K color between the MSTO and the base of the RGB in M13 is the same as in M4, and conclude that these clusters have similar ages. This conclusion is verified by comparing (1) the K brightnesses of the MSTO, and (2) the morphologies of optical CMDs. Finally, we investigate the mass function of main sequence stars in M13 with distances between 3 and 6 core radii from the cluster center. The mass functions in the interval 0.55 and 0.8 solar masses are relatively flat, independent of radius. Optical studies at larger radii have found non-zero mass function indices in this same mass interval, and we attribute this radial variation in mass function morphology to dynamical evolution.

T. J. Davidge; W. E. Harris

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

317

Landau background gauge fixing and the IR properties of Yang-Mills Green functions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We analyze the complete algebraic structure of the background field method for Yang-Mills theory in the Landau gauge and show several structural simplifications within this approach. In particular, we present a new way to study the IR behavior of Green functions in the Landau gauge and show that there exists a unique Green function whose IR behavior controls the IR properties of the gluon and the ghost propagators.

Pietro A. Grassi; Tobias Hurth; Andrea Quadri

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

318

SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers....

319

SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers.

320

Highly Active and Stable MgAl2O4 Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts for Methane Steam Reforming: A Combined Experimental and Abstract: In this work we present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

High Power Operation of the JLab IR FEL Driver Accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of the JLab IR Upgrade FEL at CW powers in excess of 10 kW requires sustained production of high electron beam powers by the driver ERL. This in turn demands attention to numerous issues and effects, including: cathode lifetime; control of beamline and RF system vacuum during high current operation; longitudinal space charge; longitudinal and transverse matching of irregular/large volume phase space distributions; halo management; management of remnant dispersive effects; resistive wall, wake-field, and RF heating of beam vacuum chambers; the beam break up instability; the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (both on beam quality and the performance of laser optics); magnetic component stability and reproducibility; and RF stability and reproducibility. We discuss our experience with these issues and describe the modus vivendi that has evolved during prolonged high current, high power beam and laser operation.

Kevin Beard; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Christopher Gould; Albert Grippo; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; J. Hovater; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Rui Li; Steven Moore; George Neil; Benard Poelker; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Robert Rimmer; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Gwyn Williams; Shukui Zhang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Fuel Cells Catalyst for Start-up and Shutdown Conditions: Electrochemical, XPS, and TEM Evaluation of Sputter-Deposited Ru, Ir, and Ti on Pt-Nano-Structured Thin Film (NSTF) Support  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Minute amounts of Ru, Ir and Ti (2 and 10 g/cm2) sputter-deposited over 3M Pt-coated nano-structured thin film (NSTF) substrate were evaluated as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) environment. The purpose of the study was to explore the suitability of these elements for modifying both the anode and the cathode catalysts in order to lower the overpotential for the oxidation of water during transient conditions. By keeping the electrode potential as close as possible to the thermodynamic potential for OER, other components in the fuel cell, such as platinum, the gas diffusion layer and the bipolar plates, will be less prone to degradation. While Ru and Ir were chosen due to their high OER activity in aqueous environment, Ti was also included due to its ability to stabilize the OER catalysts. The 3M Pt-NSTF was selected as a stable, carbon-free substrate. The surface chemistry and the morphology of OER catalysts on Pt-NSTF were examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The OER catalytic activity of Ru and Ir in PEMs compares well with their behavior in aqueous environment. It was found that Ru is more active than Ir, that Ir is considerably more stable, while the mass activity of both is higher in comparison with similar OER catalyst.

Atanasoski, Radoslav [3M Industrial Mineral Products; Atanasoska, Liliana [3M Industrial Mineral Products; Cullen, David A [ORNL; Vernstrom, George [3M Industrial Mineral Products; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Haugen, Gregory [3M Industrial Mineral Products

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

DNA microarray analyses reveal a post-irradiation differential time-dependent gene expression profile in yeast cells exposed to X-rays and {gamma}-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ionizing radiation (IR) is the most enigmatic of genotoxic stress inducers in our environment that has been around from the eons of time. IR is generally considered harmful, and has been the subject of numerous studies, mostly looking at the DNA damaging effects in cells and the repair mechanisms therein. Moreover, few studies have focused on large-scale identification of cellular responses to IR, and to this end, we describe here an initial study on the transcriptional responses of the unicellular genome model, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain S288C), by cDNA microarray. The effect of two different IR, X-rays, and gamma ({gamma})-rays, was investigated by irradiating the yeast cells cultured in YPD medium with 50 Gy doses of X- and {gamma}-rays, followed by resuspension of the cells in YPD for time-course experiments. The samples were collected for microarray analysis at 20, 40, and 80 min after irradiation. Microarray analysis revealed a time-course transcriptional profile of changed gene expressions. Up-regulated genes belonged to the functional categories mainly related to cell cycle and DNA processing, cell rescue defense and virulence, protein and cell fate, and metabolism (X- and {gamma}-rays). Similarly, for X- and {gamma}-rays, the down-regulated genes belonged to mostly transcription and protein synthesis, cell cycle and DNA processing, control of cellular organization, cell fate, and C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism categories, respectively. This study provides for the first time a snapshot of the genome-wide mRNA expression profiles in X- and {gamma}-ray post-irradiated yeast cells and comparatively interprets/discusses the changed gene functional categories as effects of these two radiations vis-a-vis their energy levels.

Kimura, Shinzo [Laboratory of Environmental Biology, Department of Preventive Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Ishidou, Emi [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Kurita, Sakiko [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Suzuki, Yoshiteru [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Shibato, Junko [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Rakwal, Randeep [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)]. E-mail: rakwal-68@aist.go.jp; Iwahashi, Hitoshi [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

324

Near Infrared Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Near Infrared Surveys Near Infrared Surveys (Redirected from Thermal And-Or Near Infrared) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Near Infrared Surveys Details Activities (18) Areas (14) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 450.0045,000 centUSD 0.45 kUSD 4.5e-4 MUSD 4.5e-7 TUSD / sq. mile Median Estimate (USD): 800.0080,000 centUSD 0.8 kUSD 8.0e-4 MUSD 8.0e-7 TUSD / sq. mile High-End Estimate (USD): 1,350.00135,000 centUSD 1.35 kUSD 0.00135 MUSD 1.35e-6 TUSD / sq. mile

325

Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Print Tuesday, 22 January 2013 00:00 A cold sulfur spring in Germany is the only place where archaea are known to dominate bacteria in a microbial community. How this unique community thrives and the lessons it may hold for understanding global carbon and sulfur cycles are beginning to emerge from research by the University of Regensburg's Christine Moissl-Eichinger and her colleagues, including Advanced Light Source guest Alex Probst. Crucial microbial biochemistry was done at Berkeley Lab by Hoi-Ying Holman, director of the Berkeley Synchrotron Infrared Structural Biology facility, and her staff at the ALS, and by Phylochip inventors Todd DeSantis and Gary Anderson.

326

Synthesis and characterization of infrared quantum dots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on the development of synthetic methods to create application ready quantum dots (QDs) in the infrared for biological imaging and optoelectronic devices. I concentrated primarily on controlling the size ...

Harris, Daniel Kelly

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Applying near-infrared spectroscopy (nirs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigated. A recently developed optical imaging technique called near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) shows promise for being an acceptable alternative to invasive imaging techniques. NIRS measures correlates of neural activity by assessing hemoglobin...

Wruck, Eric Michael

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

328

Investigation of Compositional, Structural, and Dynamical Changes of Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures on a Rat Brain by FT-IR Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An epileptic seizure originating from the activation of a group of neurons at the same time is a sudden onset of symptoms and clinical manifestations caused by an abnormal, excessive, hypersynchronous burst of electrical activity that disrupts brain functions. ... Additionally, we performed deconvolution only in the C–H region covering 3050–2800 cm–1 with 0.7 gamma factor. ... The neural networks (NNs) were first trained using FT-IR spectra of 18 water-soluble proteins whose secondary structures are known from X-ray crystallographic analysis. ...

Sevgi Turker; Gul Ilbay; Mete Severcan; Feride Severcan

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

Uncooled IR photon detection using MEMS micro-structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Generation of free carriers in a semiconductor gives rise to mechanical stress. Photo-induced stress phenomena in MEMS micro-structures can be used in the room temperature detection of infrared photons. Choice of the appropriate semiconductor material for the MEMS micro-structures determines the cutoff wavelength of the uncooled infrared photon detector. The authors have measured the deflection of silicon and indium antimonide micro-structures resulting from a photo-induced stress. The excess charge carriers responsible for the photo-induced stress were produced via photon irradiation from both a diode laser and a black body source. In the case of Si, the photo-induced stress is of opposite direction and about four times larger than the thermal stress. For indium antimonide the direction of stress is the same as due to thermal effects. The photo-induced stress can be distinguished from the thermal stress based on the cut-off wavelength, response speed, and perhaps the direction of the microstructure deflection.

Datskos, P.G.; Rajic, S.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Characteristic evaluation of a near-infrared Fabry-Perot filter for the InfraRed Imaging Magnetograph (IRIM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characteristic evaluation of a near-infrared Fabry-P´erot filter for the InfraRed Imaging solar two-dimensional narrow-band spectro-polarimeter working in the near infrared from 1.0 µm to 1.7 µm, this paper outlines a set of methods to evaluate the near infrared Fabry-P´erot etalon. Two

331

Gamma–ray bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...R. Priest and N. O. Weiss Gamma-ray bursts Martin J. Rees Institute of...Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK Gamma-ray bursts, an enigma for more than 25...gamma-rays|neutron stars| Gamma-ray bursts By Martin J. Rees Institute...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

THE NASA AMES POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC DATABASE: THE COMPUTED SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The astronomical emission features, formerly known as the unidentified infrared bands, are now commonly ascribed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The laboratory experiments and computational modeling done at the NASA Ames Research Center to create a collection of PAH IR spectra relevant to test and refine the PAH hypothesis have been assembled into a spectroscopic database. This database now contains over 800 PAH spectra spanning 2-2000 {mu}m (5000-5 cm{sup -1}). These data are now available on the World Wide Web at www.astrochem.org/pahdb. This paper presents an overview of the computational spectra in the database and the tools developed to analyze and interpret astronomical spectra using the database. A description of the online and offline user tools available on the Web site is also presented.

Bauschlicher, C. W.; Ricca, A. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 230-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Boersma, C.; Mattioda, A. L.; Cami, J.; Peeters, E.; Allamandola, L. J. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Sanchez de Armas, F.; Puerta Saborido, G. [SETI Institute, 515 N. Whisman Road, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Hudgins, D. M., E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.go [NASA Headquarters, MS 3Y28, 300 E St. SW, Washington, DC 20546 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Influence of Chain Dynamics on the Far Infrared Spectrum of Liquid Methanol-Water Mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Far-infrared absorption spectroscopy has been used to study the low frequency ({center_dot} 100 cm{sup -1}) intermolecular modes of methanol in mixtures with water. With the aid of a first principles molecular dynamics simulation on an equivalent system, a detailed understanding about the origin of the low frequency IR modes has been established. The total dipole spectrum from the simulation suggests that the bands appearing in the experimental spectra at approximately 55 cm{sup -1} and 70 cm{sup -1} in methanol and methanol-rich mixtures arise from both fluctuations and torsional motions occurring within the methanol hydrogen-bonded chains. The influence of these modes on both the solvation dynamics and the relaxation mechanisms in the liquid are discussed within the context of recent experimental and theoretical results that have emerged from studies focusing on the short time dynamics in the methanol hydrogen bond network.

Woods, K.N.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL; ,

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

334

Far-infrared spectrum of ice Ih: A first-principles study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dielectric properties of ice Ih in the translational far-infrared region (0–400 cm-1) have been investigated by means of density functional theory methods. We show that interpretation of the experimental data for the absorption coefficient requires a full account of proton disorder, an ab initio description of the electronic response, and a proper treatment of the longitudinal-optical–transverse-optical (LO-TO) splitting. The orientational average for the LO-TO splitting yields a broad range of values, and the average over proton disorder gives rise to a peak at 150 cm-1 in the absorption spectrum of ice Ih. The peak is not present in ice XI, the ferroelectric state with lowest energy. Our study supports the notion that the far-IR dielectric properties of water aggregates are tightly related to local molecular order.

G. Profeta and S. Scandolo

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

335

Variation of the metal-insulator transition and formation of bipolarons by Cd doping in the thiospinel system Cu1-xCdxIr2S4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pseudobinary thiospinel system Cu1-xCdxIr2S4 was investigated by the x-ray-diffraction, electrical resistivity, magnetic-susceptibility, and specific-heat measurements. It was shown that the system exhibits a miscibility-gap behavior for the Cd substitution, however, nearly monophasic samples were obtained by quenching at 1373 K, except for 0.4Cd concentration, the room-temperature electrical conductivity and Pauli susceptibility decrease monotonically, consistent with the hole-filling picture. The first-order metal-insulator transition at about 230 K in the parent compound CuIr2S4 is changed into a second-order transition around 185 K when x?0.25, whereafter the second-order transition disappears at x?0.8. No superconductivity was observed down to 1.8 K. The end-member compound CdIr2S4 is shown as an insulator with a band gap of 0.3 eV. Analysis for the data of magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistivity suggests the formation of bipolarons below 185 K for 0.25

Guanghan Cao; Hideaki Kitazawa; Takehiko Matsumoto; Chunmu Feng

2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Two Semi-Empirical Methods for Determination of Shafranov Shift in IR-T1 Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present two semi-empirical methods for determination of Shafranov shift in IR-T1 tokamak. In the first method, solution of ... on the outer surface of the IR-T1 tokamak chamber and then Shafranov...

A. Salar Elahi; M. Ghoranneviss; A. Rahimi Rad

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

January 31, 2014 EITC Awareness Day: IRS Kicks-Off Tax Season Alerting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Income Workers of Significant Tax Benefit IRS YouTube Video: Earned Income Tax Credit: English | Spanish in launching the Earned Income Tax Credit Awareness Day outreach campaign to ensure that millions of low from the IRS even if they owe no tax. Get the Credit: How to Claim the EITC #12;To get the EITC

Behmer, Spencer T.

338

IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76%  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Document provides an overview of how the IRS and MC Realty Group, its property management firm, achieved a 76% reduction in lighting energy use at an IRS facility parking garage in Kansas City, Missouri. The retrofit resulted in annual energy savings of 2 million kWh, annual cost savings of over $122,000, and a simple payback of 2.5 years.

339

ON THE INTEGRATION OF IR AND Arjen P. de Vries and Annita N. Wilschut  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE INTEGRATION OF IR AND DATABASES Arjen P. de Vries and Annita N. Wilschut Centre,annita}@cs.utwente.nl Abstract: Integration of information retrieval (IR) in database management systems (DBMSs) has proven difficult. Previous attempts to integration suffered from inherent performance problems, or lacked desirable

de Vries, Arjen P.

340

Total Hydrogenation of Furfural and 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural over Supported Pd–Ir Alloy Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Total Hydrogenation of Furfural and 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural over Supported Pd–Ir Alloy Catalyst ... Total hydrogenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural was also possible using Pd–Ir/SiO2 catalyst. ... (8-11) Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are produced from sugars via dehydration and are promising intermediates in biorefinery. ...

Yoshinao Nakagawa; Kana Takada; Masazumi Tamura; Keiichi Tomishige

2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Gamma ray burst positrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The international network of gamma ray burst detectors has provided redundant localizations for six gamma ray bursts with accuracies in the arcminute range. Catalog radio soft X?ray and optical searches have been performed for some of these events. The results of these searches are reviewed. Although radio X?ray and optical candidates are found in the error boxes no clear association between gamma ray bursts and other forms of emission has emerged to date. Optical radio searches are continuing.

K. Hurley

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Gamma ray generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

343

Far-infrared distributions in nearby spiral galaxies NGC2841 and NGC2976 observed with AKARI/FIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Far-infrared (IR) images of the nearby Sb galaxy NGC2841 and the Sc galaxy NGC2976 at wavelengths of 65, 90, 140, and 160 um have been obtained with the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) onboard AKARI. Both galaxies reveal similar morphologies of dust rings. They are, however, significantly different in the dust temperature: a cold (21 K) ring for NGC2841 and a warm (30 K) ring for NGC2976, which presumably reflects the difference in the origin of the ring structure for the different Hubble type of the galaxy. In addition to the dust ring structure, a warm dust component is detected from the central region of NGC2841, which may be attributed to the heating by its Low-Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region nucleus. As for NGC2976, an extended dust component is observed along the minor axis, which shows a distribution somewhat asymmetrical to the galactic disk; this might be associated with the HI bridge in the M81/M82 group that NGC2976 belongs to. By taking advantage of a wealth of the far-IR bands of the FIS, it is demonstrated that the spectral energy distribution of NGC2841 is spatially more variable than that of NGC2976.

H. Kaneda; T. Suzuki; T. Onaka; Y. Doi; M. Kawada; B. -C. Koo; S. Makiuti; T. Nakagawa; Y. Okada; S. Serjeant; H. Shibai; M. Shirahata

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Far- and mid-infrared spectroscopy of complex organic matter of astrochemical interest: coal, heavy petroleum fractions, and asphaltenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The coexistence of a large variety of molecular species (i.e., aromatic, cycloaliphatic and aliphatic) in several astrophysical environments suggests that unidentified IR emission (UIE) occurs from small solid particles containing a mix of aromatic and aliphatic structures (e.g., coal, petroleum, etc.), renewing the astronomical interest on this type of materials. A series of heavy petroleum fractions namely DAE, RAE, BQ-1, and asphaltenes derived from BQ-1 were used together with anthracite coal and bitumen as model compounds in matching the band pattern of the emission features of proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe). All the model materials were examined in the mid-infrared (2.5-16.7 um) and for the first time in the far-infrared (16.7-200 um), and the IR bands were compared with the UIE from PPNe. The best match of the PPNe band pattern is offered by the BQ-1 heavy aromatic oil fraction and by its asphaltenes fraction. Particularly interesting is the ability of BQ-1 to match the band pattern of the aromatic-ali...

Cataldo, F; Manchado, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal, Methylglyoxal, and 2,3-Butanedione (Diacetyl) with Vibrational Assignments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glyoxal, methylglyoxal and 2,3-butanedione (diacetyl) are all known biomass burning effluents and suspected aerosol precursors. Pressure-broadened quantitative infrared spectra of glyoxal, methylglyoxal and diacetyl vapors covering the 520–6500 cm?1 range are reported at 0.11 cm?1 resolution, each with a composite spectrum derived from a minimum of ten different sample pressures for the compound, representing some of the first quantitative data for these analytes. The ordinate corresponds to a 1 meter optical pathlength and a mixing ratio of 1ppmv at 296 K. Many vibrational assignments for methylglyoxal are reported for the first time, as are some near-IR and far-IR bands of glyoxal and diacetyl. To complete the vibrational assignments, the quantitative far-infrared spectra (25 to 600 cm-1) of all three vapors are also reported, methylglyoxal for the first time. Density functional theory and ab initio MP2 theory are used to help assign vibrational modes. Potential bands useful for atmospheric monitoring are discussed.

Profeta, Luisa T.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Stephen D.

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

346

Far-IR and radio thermal continua in solar flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the invention of new far-infrared (FIR) and radio mm and sub-mm instruments (DESIR on SMESE satellite, ESO-ALMA), there is a growing interest in observations and analysis of solar flares in this so far unexplored wavelength region. Two principal radiation mechanisms play a role: the synchrotron emission due to accelerated particle beams moving in the magnetic field and the thermal emission due to the energy deposit in the lower atmospheric layers. In this contribution we explore the time-dependent effects of beams on thermal FIR and radio continua. We show how and where these continua are formed in the presence of time dependent beam heating and non-thermal excitation/ionisation of the chromospheric hydrogen plasma.

Kašparová, J; Karlický, M; Moravec, Z; Varady, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Follow-Up Near-infrared Spectroscopy of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies observed by ISO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present low resolution near-infrared spectroscopy of an unbiased sample of 24 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), selected from samples previously observed spectroscopically in the mid-infrared with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Qualitatively, the near-infrared spectra resemble those of starbursts. Only in one ULIRG, IRAS 04114-5117E, do we find spectroscopic evidence for AGN activity. The spectroscopic classification in the near-infrared is in very good agreement with the mid-infrared one. For a subset of our sample for which extinction corrections can be derived from Pa-alpha and Br-gamma, we find rather high Pa-alpha luminosities, in accordance with the powering source of these galaxies being star formation.[Fe] emission is strong in ULIRGs and may be linked to starburst and superwind activity. Additionally, our sample includes two unusual objects. The first, IRAS F00183-7111, exhibits extreme [Fe] emission and the second, IRAS F23578-5307, is according to our knowledge one of the most luminous infrared galaxies in H2 rotation-vibration emission.

H. Dannerbauer; D. Rigopoulou; D. Lutz; R. Genzel; E. Sturm; A. F. M. Moorwood

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

348

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparisons of IR and ROS for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Kathryn D. Held1, Yvonne L. McCarey1, Laurence Tartier1, Elena V. Rusyn1, Giuseppe Schettino2, Melvyn Folkard2, Kevin M. Prise2, and Barry D. Michael2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114; 2Gray Laboratory Cancer Research Trust, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK Accurate evaluation of the risks associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) is a major challenge for environmental sciences. Studies on the mechanisms of the actions of low doses of IR are needed to help understand possible risks. IR exerts its effects on cells through production of reactive oxidizing species (ROS) such as ·OH, H2O2 and

349

The gas-rich disk of HR 4049: A study of the infrared spectrum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here, we present a summary of our analyses of the mid-and near-infrared spectrum of the unusual evolved binary HR 4049. We f nd that the disk is massive (M > 8 × 10{sup ?3} M{sub ?}), warm and radially extended. We also report some enrichment in {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O and a comparison of observations from Spitzer-IRS to those obtained by ISO-SWS 10 years earlier reveals that the CO{sub 2} f ux has more than doubled in this time, indicating active and ongoing chemical evolution in the circumbinary disk. Given the high column densities of the gas in the disk, we expect that the molecular gas plays a crucial role in the thermal properties of the circumbinary disk by allowing visible light to heat the dust and then trapping the IR photons emitted by the dust. This will result in higher temperatures and a more homogeneous temperature structure in the disk. Finally, we estimate a mass for the primary in HR 4049 which is too low for the star to have experienced a typical evolutionary path.

Malek, Sarah E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Cami, Jan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 Canada and SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94034 (United States)

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

350

Extraction and analysis of pollutant organics from contaminated solids using off-line supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and on-line SFE-infrared spectroscopy. Task 2. Semiannual report, November 1995--March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes activities in the following tasks associated with a project on environmental management technology decontamination and commercialization: A commercialized version of a field-portable instrument for performing supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with on-line Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) detection;pyrolysis of plastic wastes associated with mixtures of radioactive wastes;management and reporting activities; centrifugal membrane filtration with application to tank waste remediation; technology development integration activities associated with remedial action and waste management.

Hawthorne, S.B.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Infrared technology XIII; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 18-20, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present conference on IR technology discusses the past decade's advancements, IR systems' development in Israel, IR systems for scientific and military uses, IR sensor and focal plane designs, and IR instrumentation. Attention is given to IR background suppression, IR technology in solar array production, IR image simulation, a pyroelectric line scanner for remote IR imaging of vehicles, long-path atmospheric transmittance measurements, ICBM sunlit trajectories, U.S. Navy IR focal plane array development, and IR warning systems. Also discussed are an optical processor for scale-invariant target detection in FLIR imaging, crystal growth of optical materials by the gradient solidification method, IR/mm-wave dual mode/common aperture optics, and digital contour enhancements of an IR image.

Spiro, I.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Definition: Forward-Looking Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forward-Looking Infrared Forward-Looking Infrared Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Forward-Looking Infrared Forward Looking InfraRed (FLIR) cameras flown from fixed-wing aircraft measure the amount of energy radiated in the infrared (7.5 - 13 micrometer) to detect detailed information on the land surface temperature distribution that might indicate areas of geothermal activity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Forward looking infrared (FLIR) cameras, typically used on military and civilian aircraft, use an imaging technology that senses infrared radiation. The sensors installed in forward-looking infrared cameras-as well as those of other thermal imaging cameras-use detection of infrared radiation, typically emitted from a heat source, to create a "picture"

353

Influence of c-axis orientation and scandium concentration on infrared active modes of magnetron sputtered Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1?x}N thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Doping of wurtzite aluminium nitride (AlN) with scandium (Sc) significantly enhances the piezoelectric properties of AlN. Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1?x}N thin films with different Sc concentrations (x = 0 to 0.15) were deposited by DC reactive magnetron sputtering. Infrared (IR) absorbance spectroscopy was applied to investigate the Sc concentration dependent shift of the IR active modes E{sub 1}(TO) and A{sub 1}(TO). These results are compared to ab initio simulations, being in excellent agreement with the experimental findings. In addition, IR spectroscopy is established as an economical and fast method to distinguish between thin films with a high degree of c-axis orientation and those exhibiting mixed orientations.

Mayrhofer, P. M.; Bittner, A.; Schmid, U. [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria)] [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Eisenmenger-Sittner, C. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8, 1040 Vienna (Austria)] [Institute of Solid State Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Euchner, H. [Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Vienna University of Technology, Karlsplatz 13, 1040 Vienna (Austria)] [Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Vienna University of Technology, Karlsplatz 13, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

354

Ultraviolet versus infrared: Effects of ablation laser wavelength on the expansion of laser-induced plasma into one-atmosphere argon gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced plasma from an aluminum target in one-atmosphere argon background has been investigated with ablation using nanosecond ultraviolet (UV: 355 nm) or infrared (IR: 1064 nm) laser pulses. Time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy was used as a diagnostics tool to have access to the plasma parameters during its propagation into the background, such as optical emission intensity, electron density, and temperature. The specific feature of nanosecond laser ablation is that the pulse duration is significantly longer than the initiation time of the plasma. Laser-supported absorption wave due to post-ablation absorption of the laser radiation by the vapor plume and the shocked background gas plays a dominant role in the propagation and subsequently the behavior of the plasma. We demonstrate that the difference in absorption rate between UV and IR radiations leads to different propagation behaviors of the plasma produced with these radiations. The consequence is that higher electron density and temperature are observed for UV ablation. While for IR ablation, the plasma is found with lower electron density and temperature in a larger and more homogenous axial profile. The difference is also that for UV ablation, the background gas is principally evacuated by the expansion of the vapor plume as predicted by the standard piston model. While for IR ablation, the background gas is effectively mixed to the ejected vapor at least hundreds of nanoseconds after the initiation of the plasma. Our observations suggest a description by laser-supported combustion wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by UV laser, while that by laser-supported detonation wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by IR laser. Finally, practical consequences of specific expansion behavior for UV or IR ablation are discussed in terms of analytical performance promised by corresponding plasmas for application with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Laye, Fabrice; Yu Jin [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France); Lei Wenqi; Bai Xueshi; Zheng Lijuan; Zeng Heping [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is growing need for the development of electronic devices based on organic polymer materials. Organic field-effect transistors (FETs) are ideal for special applications that require large areas, light weight, and structural flexibility. They also have the advantage of being easy to mass-produce at very low cost. However, even though this class of devices is finding a growing number of applications, electronic processes in organic materials are still not well understood. A group of researchers from the University of California and the ALS has succeeded in probing the intrinsic electronic properties of the charge carriers in organic FETs using infrared spectromicroscopy. The results of their study could help in the future development of sensors, large-area displays, and other plastic electronic components.

356

Near Infrared Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Near Infrared Surveys Near Infrared Surveys Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Near Infrared Surveys Details Activities (18) Areas (14) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 450.0045,000 centUSD 0.45 kUSD 4.5e-4 MUSD 4.5e-7 TUSD / sq. mile Median Estimate (USD): 800.0080,000 centUSD 0.8 kUSD 8.0e-4 MUSD 8.0e-7 TUSD / sq. mile High-End Estimate (USD): 1,350.00135,000 centUSD 1.35 kUSD 0.00135 MUSD 1.35e-6 TUSD / sq. mile Time Required Low-End Estimate: 6 weeks0.115 years

357

24. Cosmic rays 1 24. COSMIC RAYS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrons, protons and helium, as well as carbon, oxygen, iron, and other nuclei synthesized in stars) and the intensity of the cosmic rays with energies below about 10 GeV. In addition, the lower-energy cosmic rays the intensity of any component of the cosmic radiation in the GeV range depends both on the location and time

358

26. Cosmic rays 1 26. COSMIC RAYS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrons, protons and helium, as well as carbon, oxygen, iron, and other nuclei synthesized in stars) and the intensity of the cosmic rays with energies below about 10 GeV. In addition, the lower-energy cosmic rays the intensity of any component of the cosmic radiation in the GeV range depends both on the location and time

359

High efficiency quasi-monochromatic infrared emitter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incandescent radiation sources are widely used as mid-infrared emitters owing to the lack of alternative for compact and low cost sources. A drawback of miniature hot systems such as membranes is their low efficiency, e.g., for battery powered systems. For targeted narrow-band applications such as gas spectroscopy, the efficiency is even lower. In this paper, we introduce design rules valid for very generic membranes demonstrating that their energy efficiency for use as incandescent infrared sources can be increased by two orders of magnitude.

Brucoli, Giovanni; Besbes, Mondher; Benisty, Henri, E-mail: henri.benisty@institutoptique.fr; Greffet, Jean-Jacques [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, UMR 8501, Institut d’Optique, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud 11, 2, Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad [Office National d’Études et de Recherches Aérospatiales, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

360

STUDIES OF THE Be STAR X PERSEI DURING A BRIGHT INFRARED PHASE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present multi-epoch photometric and spectroscopic near-infrared observations of the Be star X Persei in the JHK bands covering the wavelength range 1.08-2.35 {mu}m. Combining results from our earlier studies with the present observations, it is shown that the equivalent widths and line fluxes of the prominent H I and He I lines anti-correlate with the strength of the adjacent continuum. That is, during the span of the observations, the JHK broadband fluxes increase while the emission equivalent width values of the H I and He I lines decrease (the lines under consideration being the Paschen and Brackett lines of hydrogen and the 1.7002 {mu}m and 2.058 {mu}m lines of helium). Such an anti-correlation effect is not commonly observed in Be stars in the optical; in the infrared, this may possibly be the first reported case of such behavior. We examine different mechanisms that could possibly cause it and suggest that it could originate due to a radiatively warped, precessing circumstellar disk. It is also shown that during the course of our studies, X Per evolved to an unprecedented state of high near-IR brightness with J, H, K magnitudes of 5.20, 5.05, and 4.84, respectively.

Mathew, Blesson; Banerjee, D. P. K.; Naik, Sachindra; Ashok, N. M., E-mail: blessonmathew@gmail.com [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangapura, Ahmedabad 380 009, Gujarat (India)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Cluster size effects on sintering, CO adsorption, and implantation in Ir/SiO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of planar model catalysts have been prepared via deposition of Ir{sub n}{sup +} on thermally grown amorphous SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) and ion scattering spectroscopy was used to probe surface structure as a function of cluster size, impact energy, and surface temperature. Deposition of Ir{sub 2} or Ir{sub 10} at low energies and room temperature results in stable clusters forming one- or two-dimensional single layer islands on the oxide surface. Heating the samples to 750 K leads to agglomeration, forming multilayer structures on the surface. Ir{sub 1} deposited under similar conditions sinters into large clusters at room temperature. Deposition at 110 K at least partially stabilizes the Ir atoms with respect to diffusion and sintering. At higher deposition energies, partial implantation into the surface is observed, but this appears to be insufficient to stabilize the clusters against sintering at elevated temperature. At low temperatures, substrate-mediated adsorption of CO is found to be highly efficient, leading to near saturation coverages of CO bound atop the Ir{sub n} clusters. The CO can be removed by careful He{sup +} sputtering. The deposition/binding behavior of Ir{sub n} on SiO{sub 2} is quite different from Ir{sub n}/TiO{sub 2}(110), for which the clusters bind in three-dimensional morphology, starting at Ir{sub 5}. That system also shows substrate-mediated adsorption of CO, but the CO preferentially binds at the periphery of the clusters rather than on top.

Kaden, W. E.; Kunkel, W. A.; Anderson, Scott L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E. RM 2020, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States)

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

HAWC ?-Ray Observatory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(HAWC) Gamma Ray Observatory formally began operations. HAWC is designed to study the origin of very high-energy cosmic rays and observe the most energetic objects in the known...

363

Infrared detection of (H2O)20 isomers of exceptional stability: a drop-like and a face-sharing pentagonal prism cluster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water clusters containing fully coordinated water molecules are model systems that mimic the local environment of the condensed phase. Present knowledge about the water cluster size regime in which the transition from the allsurface to the fully solvated water molecules occurs is mainly based on theoretical predictions in lieu of the absence of precisely size resolved experimental measurements. Here, we report size and isomer selective infrared (IR) spectra of (H2O)20 clusters tagged with a sodium atom by employing IR excitation modulated photoionization spectroscopy. The observed absorption patterns in the OH stretching ”fingerprint” region are consistent with the theoretically predicted spectra of two structurally distinct isomers: A drop-like cluster with a fully coordinated (interior) water and an edge-sharing pentagonal prism cluster in which all atoms are on the surface. The observed isomers show exceptional stability and are predicted to be nearly isoenergetic.

Pradzynski, Christoph C.; Dierking, Christoph W.; Zurheide, Florian; Forck, Richard M.; Buck, Udo; Zeuch, Thomas; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

364

COUNTRY INSTITUTION DATE WEB ADDRESS IRAN University of Art Isfahn 08.03.2007 http://www.aui.ac.ir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COUNTRY INSTITUTION DATE WEB ADDRESS IRAN University of Art Isfahn 08.03.2007 http://www.aui.ac.ir IRAN Isfahn University of Technology 08.03.2007 http://www.iut.ac.ir IRAN The University of Isfahn 15/03/2011 http://www.ui.ac.ir IRAN Shahid Bahonar University of Kermn 06.06.2005 http

Di Pillo, Gianni

365

Ray J. Corey- Biography  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Ray Corey currently serves as the Assistance Manager for Safety and Environment at the DOE Richland Operations office (RL).

366

A Spitzer White Dwarf Infrared Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present mid-infrared photometry of 124 white dwarf stars with Spitzer Space Telescope. Objects were observed simultaneously at 4.5 and 8.0um with sensitivities better than 1 mJy. This data can be used to test models of white dwarf atmospheres in a new wavelength regime, as well as to search for planetary companions and debris disks.

F. Mullally; Mukremin Kilic; William T. Reach; Marc J. Kuchner; Ted von Hippel; Adam Burrows; D. E. Winget

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

367

A brief history of infrared astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Observatory For Infrared Astronomy) is a project funded by NASA and the German Space Agency DLR, to put a 2.5 m telescope into a Boeing 747-SP. SOFIA will have a set of observatory instruments for all astronomers to use, and is due to start flights in 2002......

Helen J Walker

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Infrared Dry-peeling Technology for Tomatoes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are neutralized and then discharged as wastewater. The high salinity of the wastewater from the peeling process, producing less wastewater and preserving product quality. Infrared drypeeling is expected to reduce: rkapoor@energy.state.ca.us Dr. Zhongli Pan University of California, Davis Phone: (510) 5595861

369

SiGeC Near Infrared Photodetectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A near infrared waveguide photodetector in Si-based ternary Si?â??xâ??yGexCy alloy was demonstrated for 0.85~1.06 µm wavelength fiber-optic interconnection system applications. Two sets of detectors with active absorption ...

Li, Baojun

370

FT-IR Spectra of Water in Microporous KBr Pellets and Water's Desorption Kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure and spectra of water adsorbed on microporous (pore size <3 ?m) KBr pellets were investigated, with the use of an infrared absorption technique at 220 < T...

Malhotra, V M; Jasty, S; Mu, R

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Characterization of Diffuse Reflectance FT-IR Spectrometry for Heterogeneous Catalyst Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The characteristics of diffuse reflectance (DR) infrared spectrometry for the study of adsorbed species were investigated. DR spectra of adsorbed CO on supported catalysts with a...

Van Every, Kenneth W; Griffiths, Peter R

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation of Water in Supercritical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation of Water in Supercritical CO2 and the Effect of CaCl2. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation of Water in Supercritical CO2 and the Effect...

373

INFRARED THERMAL IMAGING OF AUTOMOBILES: Identification of Cold Start Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFRARED THERMAL IMAGING OF AUTOMOBILES: Identification of Cold Start Vehicles Angela M. Monateri at the infrared image from an automobile. ·The camera was set up with a FEAT 3000 unit to compare emissions vs

Denver, University of

374

Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Wednesday, 29 October 2008 00:00 Graphene-a single layer...

375

Matching of Infrared Emitters with Textiles For Improved Energy Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the infrared absorptivity of fabrics over the wavelength spectrum of 0.7 to 25 microns (the range of operation of commercial infrared emitters). Since the operating ranges for several system components (detectors, beam splitters and sources) are much narrower...

Carr, W. W.; Williamson, V. A.; Johnson, M. R.; Do, B. T.

376

High-speed four-color infrared digital imaging for studying in-cylinder processes in a DI diesel engine. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was to investigate in-cylinder events of a direct injection-type diesel engine by using a new high-speed infrared (IR) digital imaging systems for obtaining information that was difficult to achieve by the conventional devices. For this, a new high-speed dual-spectra infrared digital imaging system was developed to simultaneously capture two geometrically identical (in respective spectral) sets of IR images having discrete digital information in a (64x64) matrix at rates as high as over 1,800 frames/sec each with exposure period as short as 20 micron sec. At the same time, a new advanced four-color W imaging system was constructed. The first two sets of spectral data were the radiation from water vapor emission bands to compute the distributions of temperature and specie in the gaseous mixture and the remaining two sets of data were to find the instantaneous temperature distribution over the cylinder surface. More than eight reviewed publications have been produced to report many new findings including: Distributions of Water Vapor and Temperature in a Flame; End Gas Images Prior to Onset of Knock; Effect of MTBE on Diesel Combustion; Impact of Oxygen Enrichment on In-cylinder Reactions; Spectral IR Images of Spray Plume; Residual Gas Distribution; Preflame Reactions in Diesel Combustion; Preflame Reactions in the End Gas of an SI Engine; Postflame Oxidation; and Liquid Fuel Layers during Combustion in an SI Engine. In addition, some computational analysis of diesel combustion was performed using KIVA-II program in order to compare results from the prediction and the measurements made using the new IR imaging diagnostic tool.

Rhee, K.T.

1995-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

377

Transmissive infrared frequency selective surfaces and infrared antennas : final report for LDRD 105749.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasmonic structures open up new opportunities in photonic devices, sometimes offering an alternate method to perform a function and sometimes offering capabilities not possible with standard optics. In this LDRD we successfully demonstrated metal coatings on optical surfaces that do not adversely affect the transmission of those surfaces at the design frequency. This technology could be applied as an RF noise blocking layer across an optical aperture or as a method to apply an electric field to an active electro-optic device without affecting optical performance. We also demonstrated thin optical absorbers using similar patterned surfaces. These infrared optical antennas show promise as a method to improve performance in mercury cadmium telluride detectors. Furthermore, these structures could be coupled with other components to lead to direct rectification of infrared radiation. This possibility leads to a new method for infrared detection and energy harvesting of infrared radiation.

Wendt, Joel Robert; Hadley, G. Ronald; Samora, Sally; Loui, Hung; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Davids, Paul; Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Johnson, William Arthur; Peters, David William

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

NEW M, L, AND T DWARF COMPANIONS TO NEARBY STARS FROM THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present 11 candidate late-type companions to nearby stars identified with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Eight of the candidates are likely to be companions based on their common proper motions with the primaries. The remaining three objects are rejected as companions, one of which is a free-floating T7 dwarf. Spectral types are available for five of the companions, which consist of M2V, M8.5V, L5, T8, and T8. Based on their photometry, the unclassified companions are probably two mid-M dwarfs and one late-M/early-L dwarf. One of the T8 companions, WISE J142320.84+011638.0, has already been reported by Pinfield and coworkers. The other T8 companion, ULAS J095047.28+011734.3, was discovered by Burningham and coworkers through the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey, but its companionship has not been previously recognized in the literature. The L5 companion, 2MASS J17430860+8526594, is a new member of a class of L dwarfs that exhibit unusually blue near-IR colors. Among the possible mechanisms that have been previously proposed for the peculiar colors of these L dwarfs, low metallicity does not appear to be a viable explanation for 2MASS J17430860+8526594 since our spectrum of the primary suggests that its metallicity is not significantly subsolar.

Luhman, Kevin L.; Loutrel, Nicholas P.; McCurdy, Nicholas S.; Melso, Nicole D.; Star, Kimberly M.; Terrien, Ryan C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mace, Gregory N.; McLean, Ian S. [UCLA Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Young, Michael D.; Rhode, Katherine L. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Swain West 319, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Davy Kirkpatrick, J., E-mail: kluhman@astro.psu.edu [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Infrared Properties of Close Pairs of Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss spectroscopy and infrared photometry for a complete sample of ~ 800 galaxies in close pairs objectively selected from the CfA2 redshift survey. We use 2MASS to compare near infrared color-color diagrams for our sample with the Nearby Field Galaxy Sample and with a set of IRAS flux-limited pairs from Surace et al. We construct a basic statistical model to explore the physical sources of the substantial differences among these samples. The model explains the spread of near infrared colors and is consistent with a picture where central star formation is triggered by the galaxy-galaxy interaction before a merger occurs. For 160 galaxies we report new, deep JHK photometry within our spectroscopic aperture and we use the combined spectroscopic and photometric data to explore the physical conditions in the central bursts. We find a set of objects with H-K >= 0.45 and with a large F(FIR)/F(H). We interpret the very red H-K colors as evidence for 600-1000 K dust within compact star-forming regions, perhaps similar to super-star clusters identified in individual well-studied interacting galaxies. The galaxies in our sample are candidate ``hidden'' bursts or, possibly, ``hidden'' AGN. Over the entire pair sample, both spectroscopic and photometric data show that the specific star formation rate decreases with the projected separation of the pair. The data suggest that the near infrared color-color diagram is also a function of the projected separation; all of the objects with central near infrared colors indicative of bursts of star formation lie at small projected separation.

Margaret J. Geller; Scott J. Kenyon; Elizabeth J. Barton; Thomas H. Jarrett; Lisa J. Kewley

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

Muon Detection of TeV Gamma Rays from Gamma-Ray Bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of the limited size of the satellite-borne instruments, it has not been possible to observe the flux of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) beyond GeV energy. We here show that it is possible to detect the GRB radiation of TeV energy and above by detecting the muon secondaries produced when the gamma rays shower in Earth's atmosphere. Observation is made possible by the recent commissioning of underground detectors (AMANDA, the Lake Baikal detector, and MILAGRO), which combine a low muon threshold of a few hundred GeV or less, with a large effective area of 103 m2 or more. Observations will not only provide new insights in the origin and characteristics of GRB, but they also will provide quantitative information on the diffuse infrared background.

J. Alvarez-Muñiz; F. Halzen

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Gamma-ray Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relevance of gamma-ray astronomy to the search for the origin of the galactic and, to a lesser extent, the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays has long been recognised. The current renaissance in the TeV gamma-ray field has resulted in a wealth of new data on galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, and almost all the new results in this field were presented at the recent International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC). Here I summarise the 175 papers submitted on the topic of gamma-ray astronomy to the 30th ICRC in Merida, Mexico in July 2007.

Jim Hinton

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

382

Effects of Resonant Helical Field on Plasma Internal Inductance in IR-T1 Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurement of plasma internal inductance is important in tokamak plasma experiments (plasma internal inductance relates to ... on the plasma internal inductance in IR-T1 tokamak. For this purpose, four magnetic ...

A. Salar Elahi; M. Ghoranneviss

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Plasma Magnetic Fluctuations Measurement on the Outer Surface of IR-T1 Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present an experimental investigation of effects of external rotating helical field (RHF) on magnetic field fluctuations around the IR-T1 tokamak chamber. For this purpose, two magnetic ... on th...

A. Salar Elahi; M. Ghoranneviss

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Near-IR Solar Coronal Observations with New-Technology Reflecting Coronographs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emission-line and K-coronal observations in the IR have the significant advantage of reduced sky brightness compared with the visible, while the effects of seeing are also reduced. Moreover, strong lines are a...

Raymond N. Smartt; Serge Koutchmy; Jacques-Clair Noëns

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

B&W IR-CFB: Operating Experience and New Developments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper provides an update on B&W Internal Recirculation (IR) CFB boiler operating experience, new commercial projects, ... of in-furnace heat absorption in higher capacity CFB boilers, a new B&W development is...

M. Maryamchik; D. L. Wietzke

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Interlayer proton transfer in brucite under pressure by polarized IR spectroscopy to 5.3?GPa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to investigate the behaviour of proton in brucite under pressure, polarized IR absorption spectra and ... ) and (110) oriented single crystal of brucite under high pressure were measured by Fourier...?1....

Keiji Shinoda; Nobuyuki Aikawa

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Inexpensive Near-IR Sun Photometer for Measuring Total Column Water Vapor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An inexpensive two-channel near-IR sun photometer for measuring total atmospheric column water vapor (precipitable water) has been developed for use by the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) environmental science ...

David R. Brooks; Forrest M. Mims III; Richard Roettger

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Spectral Broadening of Femtosecond Mid-IR Pulses Coupled Into Quantum Cascade Lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Femtosecond 4.72 ?m Mid-IR pulses are coupled into a pulsed biased, room temperature 4.72 ?m QCL, resulting in 2X spectra broadening of the input pulses.

Liu, Sheng; Cai, Hong; Lalanne, Elaine; Liu, Peter Q; Cheng, Xiaojun; Gmachl, Claire; Johnson, Anthony M

389

Design and Fabrication of Efficient Collimation and Focusing Optics for Mid-IR Quantum Cascade Lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report the design, fabrication, and characterization of germanium aspheric collimating and focusing optics designed for mid-IR QCLs having an emission wavelength of 8.77 microns.

Bernacki, Bruce E.; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

BNL-73700-2005-IR ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PRE-INJECTOR PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BNL-73700-2005-IR ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PRE-INJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT J.2. THE EBIS SOURCE .........................................................................................14 4.2. DEMONSTRATION OF HIGH CURRENT ELECTRON BEAM FORMATION AND PROPAGATION

392

Electrostatic interactions in phospholipid membranes revealed by coherent 2D IR spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organelle in a cell, the membrane sets the information and energy gradients necessary for life. Car- bonyl of the carbonyl absorption can be attributed to electric field fluctuations. 2D IR techniques are femtosecond

Mukamel, Shaul

393

Temperature dependence of IR absorption spectra of water in aromatic hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of the temperature of a medium on the IR absorption spectra of water dissolved in aromatic hydrocarbons was studied. It was found that the ... of the determination of the quantity of dissolved water

Sh. I. Seidov; L. I. Prokhvatilova

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Efficient Synthesis and Properties of Novel Near-Infrared Electrochromic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient Synthesis and Properties of Novel Near-Infrared Electrochromic Anthraquinone Imides@pku.edu.cn Received December 13, 2007 ABSTRACT An efficient synthesis of novel near-infrared electrochromic 6 are electrochromic and absorb intensely in the near-infrared range of 700-1600 nm upon electrochemical reduction

Wan, Xin-hua

395

Near-infrared spectroscopy of HD the barrier to linearity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared spectroscopy of HD 3 above the barrier to linearity BY JENNIFER L. GOTTFRIED, transitions of HC 3 above the barrier to linearity have been observed. A highly sensitive near-infrared-adiabatic and radiative corrections is revealed. Keywords: HD 3 ; near-infrared spectroscopy; barrier to linearity 1

Oka, Takeshi

396

Can Gender Be Predicted from Near-Infrared Face Images?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Can Gender Be Predicted from Near-Infrared Face Images? Arun Ross and Cunjian Chen Lane Department spectrum (VIS). We explore the possibility of predicting gender from face images ac- quired in the near-infrared cross-spectral gender prediction. Keywords: Biometrics, Faces, Gender, Near-Infrared, Cross-Spectral. 1

Ross, Arun Abraham

397

Multicontrast photoacoustic in vivo imaging using near-infrared fluorescent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multicontrast photoacoustic in vivo imaging using near-infrared fluorescent proteins Arie Krumholz1 the application of two spectrally distinct near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFP670 and iRFP720, engineered-tissue PAT, probes absorbing in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral range are desirable. In the NIR optical

Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

398

Near-infrared light scattering by particles in coastal waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared light scattering by particles in coastal waters David Doxaran* , Marcel Babin extend over the near-infrared spectral region to up to 870 nm. The measurements were conducted in three in the near-infrared very closely matched a - spectral dependence, which is expected when the particle size

Babin, Marcel

399

Plant Growth Measurement Techniques Using Near-Infrared  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant Growth Measurement Techniques Using Near-Infrared Imagery Amr Aboelela John Barron Dept, for measuring plant growth for corn seedlings and Caster Oil Bean leaves. A near-infrared camera, which allows to hypothesize where growth might be taking place. Keywords: Near-Infrared Imagery, Corn Seedling stem

Barron, John

400

COMMUNICATIONS Near-infrared femtosecond photoionization/dissociation of cyclic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNICATIONS Near-infrared femtosecond photoionization/dissociation of cyclic aromatic, phenanthrene, and anthracene. The near-infrared ionization process leads to the production of intact molecular of femtoseconds in simple cluster systems.12­15 Here we report the near-infrared 780 nm photoioniza- tion

Levis, Robert J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Illumination Invariant Face Recognition Using Near-Infrared Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Illumination Invariant Face Recognition Using Near-Infrared Images Stan Z. Li, Senior Member, IEEE-user applications. First, we present an active near infrared (NIR) imaging system that is able to produce face groups. Index Terms--Biometrics, face recognition, near infrared (NIR), illumination invariant, local

Fan, Guoliang

402

innovative techniques Near-infrared spiroximetry: noninvasive measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

innovative techniques Near-infrared spiroximetry: noninvasive measurements of venous saturationO2 ) in tissues using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). This method is based on the respiration-induced oscillations of the near-infrared ab- sorption in tissues, and we call it spiroximetry (the prefix spiro means

403

Deep ATLAS radio observations of the CDFS-SWIRE field Ray P. Norris1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Deep ATLAS radio observations of the CDFS-SWIRE field Ray P. Norris1 , José Afonso5 , Phil N, UK #12;2 Abstract We present the first results from the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS to detect highly-obscured, ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z>>1. SWIRE's goal is to trace

Norris, Ray

404

The XMM–Large Scale Structure catalogue – II. X-ray sources and associated multiwavelength data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; 60- 60 arcsec2), obtained via the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) gator cutout service. 7 3 X-RAY DATA PROCESSING The original xamin pipeline used in Paper I has been described in detail by Pacaud......

L. Chiappetti; N. Clerc; F. Pacaud; M. Pierre; A. Guéguen; L. Paioro; M. Polletta; O. Melnyk; A. Elyiv; J. Surdej; L. Faccioli

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Compact IR Quadrupoles for Linear Colliders Based on Rutherford-type Cable  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The upcoming and disrupted beams in the interaction region (IR) of a linear collider are focused by doublets consisting of two small-aperture superconducting quadrupoles. These magnets need an effective compact magnetic shielding to minimize magnetic coupling between the two channels and sufficient temperature margin to withstand radiation-induced heat depositions in the coil. This paper presents conceptual designs of IR quadrupoles for linear colliders based on NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn Rutherford-type cables.

Lopes, M.L.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

HCl Oxidation on IrO2-Based Catalysts: From Fundamentals to Scale-Up  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

HCl Oxidation on IrO2-Based Catalysts: From Fundamentals to Scale-Up ... (ii) Geometric and electronic effects of TiO2-rutile are predicted not to lead to improved HCl oxidation activity for 1 and 2 epilayers of IrO2 over the carrier. ... From a fundamental viewpoint, it would be interesting to assess whether rutile-type oxides exhibit similar Deacon chemistry. ...

Maximilian Moser; Cecilia Mondelli; Amol P. Amrute; Atsushi Tazawa; Detre Teschner; Manfred E. Schuster; Achim Klein-Hoffman; Núria López; Timm Schmidt; Javier Pérez-Ramírez

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

407

High PEMFC performance by applying Ir-V nanoparticles as a cathode catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Very active catalysts Ir-V/C, as a novel suitable cathode catalyst in \\{PEMFCs\\} was synthesized using IrCl3 and NH4VO3 as the Ir and V precursors. By applying the ethylene glycol (EG) method, a well dispersion of Ir-V/C catalysts with mean particle size of 2 nm was obtained. The membrane–electrode assembly (MEA) fabricated with Ir-V nanoparticles exhibited the excellent catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and, reached 517 mW cm?2 at 0.43 V and 210 mW cm?2 at 0.30 V in a real fuel cell environment, H2/O2 and H2/air, respectively. In particular, promising results were obtained based on a low metal (Ir) loading of 0.4 mg cm?2 on the cathode which achieved 100 h durability at a constant current density of 1200 mA cm?2. The electrocatalytic effect related to a change in the electro-catalyst structure was discussed based on the XRD and TEM data. Also, for the first time, the electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques were used to assess the kinetics of oxygen reduction on the produced samples and the enhancement effect of V in-situ of fuel cells.

Jinli Qiao; Bing Li; Daijun Yang; Jianxin Ma

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Nanostructured F doped IrO2 electro-catalyst powders for PEM based water electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fluorine doped iridium oxide (IrO2:F) powders with varying F content ranging from 0 to 20 wt.% has been synthesized by using a modification of the Adams fusion method. The precursors (IrCl4 and NH4F) are mixed with NaNO3 and heated to elevated temperatures to form high surface area nanomaterials as electro-catalysts for PEM based water electrolysis. The catalysts were then coated on a porous Ti substrate and have been studied for the oxygen evolution reaction in PEM based water electrolysis. The IrO2:F with an optimum composition of IrO2:10 wt.% F shows remarkably superior electrochemical activity and chemical stability compared to pure IrO2. The results have also been supported via kinetic studies by conducting rotating disk electrode (RDE) experiments. The RDE studies confirm that the electro-catalysts follow the two electron transfer reaction for electrolysis with calculated activation energy of ?25 kJ mol?1. Single full cell tests conducted also validate the superior electrochemical activity of the 10 wt.% F doped IrO2.

Karan Sandeep Kadakia; Prashanth H. Jampani; Oleg I. Velikokhatnyi; Moni Kanchan Datta; Sung Kyoo Park; Dae Ho Hong; Sung Jae Chung; Prashant N. Kumta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Attenuated degradation of a PEMFC cathode during fuel starvation by using carbon-supported IrO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

IrO2, a water electrolysis catalyst, has been known to be effective in preventing corrosion of the carbon support in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Particulate IrO2 can agglomerate easily, which can decrease substantially the catalytic surface area required for oxygen evolution reaction, causing the loss of catalytic efficiency. Furthermore, agglomerated IrO2 nanoparticles can have an adverse effect on the oxygen reduction reaction by covering the active surface area of the Pt/C cathode catalyst, which is a damaging factor for the intrinsic performance of PEMFC. Carbon-supported iridium oxide, IrO2/C, which can prevent the agglomeration of Ir nanoparticles more effectively, was synthesized to overcome these problems. Compared to the cell with the Pt/C cathode only, the cell with 10 wt.% IrO2 particles and Pt/C cathode showed stronger durability during fuel starvation but the cell performance at normal operation decreased severely by 35%. The cell with the same amount of IrO2 dispersed on a carbon support, 10 wt.% IrO2/C, showed similar durability during fuel starvation maintaining the cell performance comparable to the cell using a Pt/C cathode only. Carbon-supported IrO2, IrO2/C, was more effective than IrO2 particles in both maintaining the intrinsic performance and improving the cell durability during fuel starvation.

Injoon Jang; Imgon Hwang; Yongsug Tak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

AKARI INFRARED CAMERA SURVEY OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC CATALOG  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We performed a near-infrared spectroscopic survey toward an area of {approx}10 deg{sup 2} of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with the infrared satellite AKARI. Observations were carried out as part of the AKARI Large-area Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LSLMC). The slitless multi-object spectroscopic capability of the AKARI/IRC enabled us to obtain low-resolution (R {approx} 20) spectra in 2-5 {mu}m for a large number of point sources in the LMC. As a result of the survey, we extracted about 2000 infrared spectra of point sources. The data are organized as a near-infrared spectroscopic catalog. The catalog includes various infrared objects such as young stellar objects (YSOs), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, supergiants, and so on. It is shown that 97% of the catalog sources have corresponding photometric data in the wavelength range from 1.2 to 11 {mu}m, and 67% of the sources also have photometric data up to 24 {mu}m. The catalog allows us to investigate near-infrared spectral features of sources by comparison with their infrared spectral energy distributions. In addition, it is estimated that about 10% of the catalog sources are observed at more than two different epochs. This enables us to study a spectroscopic variability of sources by using the present catalog. Initial results of source classifications for the LSLMC samples are presented. We classified 659 LSLMC spectra based on their near-infrared spectral features by visual inspection. As a result, it is shown that the present catalog includes 7 YSOs, 160 C-rich AGBs, 8 C-rich AGB candidates, 85 O-rich AGBs, 122 blue and yellow supergiants, 150 red super giants, and 128 unclassified sources. Distributions of the classified sources on the color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are discussed in the text. Continuous wavelength coverage and high spectroscopic sensitivity in 2-5 {mu}m can only be achieved by space observations. This is an unprecedented large-scale spectroscopic survey toward the LMC in the near-infrared. A large number of near-infrared spectral data provided by the survey possess scientific potential that can be applied to various studies. In this paper, we present the details of the spectroscopic survey and the catalog, and discuss its scientific applications.

Shimonishi, Takashi [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, Nada Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Onaka, Takashi; Kato, Daisuke; Sakon, Itsuki [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ita, Yoshifusa [Astronomical Institute, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Kawamura, Akiko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kaneda, Hidehiro, E-mail: shimonishi@penguin.kobe-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Effect of crystal anisotropy on the infrared reflectivity of 6H-SiC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polarized infrared reflectivity spectra of 6H-SiC single crystals under different angles of incidence are reported. A new sharp line in the reststrahl band was observed in the extraordinary ray, whose line shape is dependent on the angle of incidence. It was possible to show that crystal anisotropy of 6H-SiC is the reason for the new line in the reflectivity spectrum. A numerical calculation using a Lorentz oscillator model confirmed this result. Two weak one-phonon absorption lines in the reststrahl-band region for E?c were observed. Furthermore, we found a line at 859 cm-1 in the extraordinary ray and an unusual structure near ?TO in the reststrahl band of parallel c-cut 6H-SiC samples, which could not be explained in terms of the classical Lorentz oscillator model.

F. Engelbrecht and R. Helbig

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Quantum-cascade lasers enable infrared sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) are semiconductor-injection lasers based on intersubband transitions in a multiple-quantum-well heterostructure. They are designed using band-structure engineering and grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The emission wavelength of a QCL is primarily a function of quantum-well thickness--thinner quantum wells lead to shorter wavelengths--and is essentially independent of the material bandgap. Quantum-cascade lasers can be designed to operate at any wavelength from 3.5 m (infrared) to 67 m (terahertz region) and are continuously tunable through ranges of a few inverse centimeters.1, 2, 3 This capability makes them well suited for spectroscopy in the infrared (see Laser Focus World, August 1999, p. 40).

Schultz, John F. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Holography and Infrared Conformality in Two Dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a very brief review of some results from hep-th/0112154 and hep-th/0209191. In holographic renormalization, we studied the RG flow of a 2d N=(4,4) CFT perturbed by a relevant operator, flowing to a conformal fixed point in the IR. Here, the supergravity dual is displayed, and the computation of correlators is discussed. The sample stress-energy correlator given here provides an opportunity to explicitly compare Zamolodchikov's C-function to the proposal for a "holographic C-function".

Marcus Berg

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

414

Infrared Radiation Filament And Metnod Of Manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved IR radiation source is provided by the invention. A radiation filament has a textured surface produced by seeded ion bombardment of a metal foil which is cut to a serpentine shape and mounted in a windowed housing. Specific ion bombardment texturing techniques tune the surface to maximize emissions in the desired wavelength range and to limit emissions outside that narrow range, particularly at longer wavelengths. A combination of filament surface texture, thickness, material, shape and power circuit feedback control produce wavelength controlled and efficient radiation at much lower power requirements than devices of the prior art.

Johnson, Edward A. (Bedford, MA)

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

415

Carbon nanotubes as near infrared laser susceptors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1. Near Infrared radiation and its interaction with materials ................................... 7 2.1.1. Atomic response to photon absorption .............................................................. 10 2.1.2. Electronic absorption processes... absorption, this extinction of the incident light by atoms is called Raleigh scattering. 10 2.1.1. Atomic response to photon absorption The simple first order explanation of the interaction of atoms with photons was made by Einstein. No explicit quantum...

Bahrami, Amir

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

416

Far-infrared attenuation in glasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of quasilocal vibrations on the far-infrared spectra of glasses is investigated under the supposition that the quasilocal vibrations are directly inactive in the attenuation. It is shown that taking into account phonon-quasilocal-vibration coupling and both medium- and short-range structure of the inhomogeneities of a photon-phonon coupling parameter can give rise to an attenuation curve similar to one observed for a-SiO2 and related materials.

Lev I. Deich

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

THE INFRARED COLORS OF THE SUN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar infrared colors provide powerful constraints on the stellar effective temperature scale, but they must be measured with both accuracy and precision in order to do so. We fulfill this requirement by using line-depth ratios to derive in a model-independent way the infrared colors of the Sun, and we use the latter to test the zero point of the Casagrande et al. effective temperature scale, confirming its accuracy. Solar colors in the widely used Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) JHK{sub s} and WISE W1-4 systems are provided: (V - J){sub Sun} = 1.198, (V - H){sub Sun} = 1.484, (V - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 1.560, (J - H){sub Sun} = 0.286, (J - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 0.362, (H - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 0.076, (V - W1){sub Sun} = 1.608, (V - W2){sub Sun} = 1.563, (V - W3){sub Sun} = 1.552, and (V - W4){sub Sun} = 1.604. A cross-check of the effective temperatures derived implementing 2MASS or WISE magnitudes in the infrared flux method confirms that the absolute calibration of the two systems agrees within the errors, possibly suggesting a 1% offset between the two, thus validating extant near- and mid-infrared absolute calibrations. While 2MASS magnitudes are usually well suited to derive T{sub eff}, we find that a number of bright, solar-like stars exhibit anomalous WISE colors. In most cases, this effect is spurious and can be attributed to lower-quality measurements, although for a couple of objects (3% {+-} 2% of the total sample) it might be real, and may hint at the presence of warm/hot debris disks.

Casagrande, L.; Asplund, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia); Ramirez, I. [McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400 Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Melendez, J., E-mail: luca@mso.anu.edu.au [Departamento de Astronomia do IAG/USP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Sao Paulo, 05508-900 SP (Brazil)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

V819 TAU: A RARE WEAK-LINED T TAURI STAR WITH A WEAK INFRARED EXCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use Spitzer data to infer that the small infrared excess of V819 Tau, a weak-lined T Tauri star in Taurus, is real and not attributable to a 'companion' 10'' to the south. We do not confirm the mid-infrared excess in HBC 427 and V410 X-ray 3, which are also non-accreting T Tauri stars in the same region; instead, for the former object, the excess arises from a red companion 9'' to the east. A single-temperature blackbody fit to the continuum excess of V819 Tau implies a dust temperature of 143 K; however, a better fit is achieved when the weak 10 and 20 mum silicate emission features are also included. We infer a disk of sub-mum silicate grains between about 1 AU and several 100 AU with a constant surface density distribution. The mid-infrared excess of V819 Tau can be successfully modeled with dust composed mostly of small amorphous olivine grains at a temperature of 85 K, and most of the excess emission is optically thin. The disk could still be primordial, but gas-poor and therefore short-lived, or already at the debris disk stage, which would make it one of the youngest debris disk systems known.

Furlan, E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Mail Stop 264-767, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Forrest, W. J.; Manoj, P.; Kim, K. H.; Watson, Dan M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Sargent, B. A., E-mail: Elise.Furlan@jpl.nasa.go, E-mail: forrest@pas.rochester.ed, E-mail: manoj@pas.rochester.ed, E-mail: khkim@pas.rochester.ed, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.ed, E-mail: sargent@stsci.ed [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Proto-Model of an Infrared Wide-Field Off-Axis Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a proto-model of an off-axis reflective telescope for infrared wide-field observations based on the design of Schwarzschild-Chang type telescope. With only two mirrors, this design achieves an entrance pupil diameter of 50 mm and an effective focal length of 100 mm. We can apply this design to a mid-infrared telescope with a field of view of 8 deg X 8 deg. In spite of the substantial advantages of off-axis telescopes in the infrared compared to refractive or on-axis reflective telescopes, it is known to be difficult to align the mirrors in off-axis systems because of their asymmetric structures. Off-axis mirrors of our telescope are manufactured at the Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI). We analyze the fabricated mirror surfaces by fitting polynomial functions to the measured data. We accomplish alignment of this two-mirror off-axis system using a ray tracing method. A simple imaging test is performed to compare a pinhole image with a simulated prediction.

Kim, Sanghyuk; Chang, Seunghyuk; Kim, Geon Hee; Yang, Sun Choel; Kim, Myung Sang; Lee, Sungho; Lee, Hanshin; 10.5303/JKAS.2010.43.5.169

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Wednesday, 26 July 2006 00:00 Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is growing need for the development of electronic devices based on organic polymer materials. Organic field-effect transistors (FETs) are ideal for special applications that require large areas, light weight, and structural flexibility. They also have the advantage of being easy to mass-produce at very low cost. However, even though this class of devices is finding a growing number of applications, electronic processes in organic materials are still not well understood. A group of researchers from the University of California and the ALS has succeeded in probing the intrinsic electronic properties of the charge carriers in organic FETs using infrared spectromicroscopy. The results of their study could help in the future development of sensors, large-area displays, and other plastic electronic components.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 3.4.1 Rotated Take-Off Angle Mesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 3.4.2 Rotated Cubed Sphere Mesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 3.4.3 Ray Tube Interpolation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 3.5 Theoretical Model..., the ray parameters are defined as ?1 = ?(declination), ?2 = ?(azimuth), and ?3 = ?(travel-time). (b) Suppose we have a unit cube centered at the source point, then a ray can be traced from the source point through an evenly discretized point on the face...

Jain, Tarun K

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

422

Cosmic Ray Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic ray astronomy attempts to identify and study the sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. It is unique in its reliance on charged particles as the information carriers. While no discrete source of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays has been identified so far, a new generation of detectors is acquiring the huge exposure that is needed at the highest energies, where deflection by magnetic fields is minimized and the background from distant sources is eliminated by pion photoproduction. In this paper, we summarize the status of cosmic ray astronomy, describing the detectors and the analysis techniques.

Paul Sommers; Stefan Westerhoff

2008-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

423

A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75?ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir–C and Ir–Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

Erikat, I. A., E-mail: ihsanas@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Jerash University, Jerash-26150 (Jordan); Hamad, B. A. [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman-11942 (Jordan)] [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman-11942 (Jordan)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

424

CO chemisorption effect on cerium initial and final states in the core level photoelectron spectrum of CeIr  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide (CO) adsorption on the mixed-valence compound CeIr/sub 2/ has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. CO adsorption on this surface is predominantly molecular. They show that changes in the cerium 3d spectrum upon CO chemisorption may be separated into initial- and final-state effects. In the initial state, stabilization of the (Xe)(5d6s)/sup 3/4f/sup 1/ configuration occurs due to an increase in effective nuclear charge on the cerium atom. This leads to a decrease in f/sup 0/ intensity in the recorded spectrum. Increased f-electron repulsion in the final state raises the energy of the f/sup 2/ final-state configuration and causes a 2.2-eV shift to higher binding energy of the 3d/sub 5/2/f/sup 2/ peak. The 0.5-eV binding energy shifts of the 3d/sub 5/2/f/sup 1/ and 3d/sub 3/2/f/sup 1/ peaks along with the 2.2-eV shift of the 3d/sub 5/2/f/sup 2/ peak indicate that the f orbitals are quite sensitive indicators of the surface oxidation state in this compound.

Lindquist, J.M.; Hemminger, J.C.

1987-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

425

Mid-IR Spectra of Type Ia SN 2014J in M82 Spanning the First Four Months  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a time series of 8 - 13 $\\mu$m spectra and photometry for SN 2014J obtained 57, 81, 108, and 137 days after the explosion using CanariCam on the Gran Telescopio Canarias. These mid-IR spectra and their evolution can be understood within the framework of the delayed detonation model and the production of $\\sim$0.6 M$_{\\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni, a value also consistent with the observed brightness, the brightness decline relation, and the $\\gamma$-ray fluxes. The [Co III] line at 11.888 $\\mu$m, which must be emitted predominantly in regions where the density is below the critical value for collisional de-excitation, is particularly useful for evaluating the time evolution of the photosphere and measuring the amount of $^{56}$Ni and, thus, the mass of the ejecta. Late-time line profiles of SN 2014J are rather symmetric and not shifted in the rest frame. We see Argon emission, which provides a unique probe of mixing in the transition layer between incomplete burning and nuclear statistical equilibrium. In t...

Telesco, Charles M; Li, Dan; Álvarez, Carlos; Wright, Christopher M; Barnes, Peter J; Fernández, Sergio; Hough, James H; Levenson, N A; Mariñas, Naibí; Packham, Christopher; Pantin, Eric; Rebolo, Rafael; Roche, Patrick; Zhang, Han

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Gamma Ray Bursts Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma Ray Bursts #12;The Case Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays come from nowhere and disappear with out a trace. Incredibly powerful: A single gamma ray burst is hundreds of times brighter a supernova #12;Who Vela (1960's) Looking for arms testing, found gamma ray bursts Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

427

Ultralow platinum-loading PtPdRu@PtRuIr/C catalyst with excellent CO tolerance and high performance for the methanol oxidation reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalysts of Pd4%Pt10%Ru5%Ir2%/C, Pd4%@Pt10%Ru5%Ir2%/C, Pd4%Pt2%@Pt8%Ru5%Ir2%/C, and Pd4%Pt2%Ru2%@Pt8%Ru3%Ir2%/C were referred to as PDRI, D@PRI, PD@PRI, and PDR...

Yan-Ni Wu; Shi-Jun Liao; Hai-Fu Guo; Xiang-Ying Hao; Zhen-Xing Liang

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Low dose IR stimulation of TGF-β1 in vivo and downstream activation of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IR stimulation of TGF-β1 in vivo and downstream activation of the IR stimulation of TGF-β1 in vivo and downstream activation of the IGF-1-sCLU pro-survival expression axis: A bystander and adaptive survival mechanism in vivo David Boothman University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Abstract Over the past few years our laboratory has elucidated the regulatory mechanisms governing the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) - secretory clusterin (sCLU) expression axis, which can be induced by >2 cGy in vivo and in vitro with the same dose-response kinetics. IGF-1-sCLU expression can be induced by (A) TGF-β1 and (B) IR, but is suppressed by the p53 and Klotho tumor suppressors. Interestingly, there is a substantial difference between the regulatory mechanisms of IGF-1-sCLU induction after TGF-β1 and IR exposures, where p53 suppresses IR responses but does not suppress after

429

WINDS, CLUMPS, AND INTERACTING COSMIC RAYS IN M82  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We construct a family of models for the evolution of energetic particles in the starburst galaxy M82 and compare them to observations to test the calorimeter assumption that all cosmic ray energy is radiated in the starburst region. Assuming constant cosmic ray acceleration efficiency with Milky Way parameters, we calculate the cosmic-ray proton and primary and secondary electron/positron populations as a function of energy. Cosmic rays are injected with Galactic energy distributions and electron-to-proton ratio via Type II supernovae at the observed rate of 0.07 yr{sup -1}. From the cosmic ray spectra, we predict the radio synchrotron and {gamma}-ray spectra. To more accurately model the radio spectrum, we incorporate a multiphase interstellar medium in the starburst region of M82. Our model interstellar medium is highly fragmented with compact dense molecular clouds and dense photoionized gas, both embedded in a hot, low density medium in overall pressure equilibrium. The spectra predicted by this one-zone model are compared to the observed radio and {gamma}-ray spectra of M82. {chi}{sup 2} tests are used with radio and {gamma}-ray observations and a range of model predictions to find the best-fit parameters. The best-fit model yields constraints on key parameters in the starburst zone of M82, including a magnetic field strength of {approx}250 {mu}G and a wind advection speed in the range of 300-700 km s{sup -1}. We find that M82 is a good electron calorimeter but not an ideal cosmic-ray proton calorimeter and discuss the implications of our results for the astrophysics of the far-infrared-radio correlation in starburst galaxies.

Yoast-Hull, Tova M.; Everett, John E.; Zweibel, Ellen G. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI (United States); Gallagher, J. S. III, E-mail: yoasthull@wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A study of Sn addition on bonding arrangement of Se-Te alloys using far infrared transmission spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Far infrared transmission spectra of Se{sub 92}Te{sub 8-x}Sn{sub x} (x = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5) glassy alloys are obtained in the spectral range 50-600 cm{sup -1} at room temperature. The results are interpreted in terms of the vibrations of the isolated molecular units in such a way so as to preserve fourfold and twofold coordination for Sn and chalcogen atoms (Se,Te), respectively. With the addition of Sn, Far-IR spectra shift toward high frequency side and some new bands start appearing. Sn atoms appear to substitute for the selenium atoms in the outrigger sites due to large bond formation probability. Theoretical calculations of bond energy, relative probability of bond formation, force constant, and wave number were also made to justify the result.

Kumar, Rajneesh; Rangra, V. S. [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Summer-Hill, Shimla, H.P. - 171005 (India); Sharma, Parikshit [Department of Physics, Sri Sai University, Palampur, HP (India); Katyal, S. C. [Department of Physics, Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, Noida, U.P. (India); Sharma, Pankaj [Department of Physics, Jaypee University of Information Technology, Waknghat, Solan, H.P. 173215 (India)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts have been detected at photon energies up to tens of GeV. We review some recent developments in the X-ray to GeV photon phenomenology in the light of Swift and Fermi observations, and some of the theoretical models developed to explain them, with a view towards implications for C.T.A.

Peter Mészáros

2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

432

Chest x-Rays  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica.

433

Gamma ray bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The time histories size spectrum spatial distribution and repetition rates of gamma ray bursts are reviewed briefly. Evidence for a neutron star origin for gamma ray bursts may be found in many of these aspects of bursters. New results from optical searches are described. Substantial progress has been made recently in the optical identificaiton of the 1978 November 19 burst.

K. Hurley

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

X-ray beamsplitter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

1987-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

435

X-ray beamsplitter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Stearns, Daniel S. (Mountain View, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the nuclear astrophysics aspects of accreting neutron stars in X-ray binaries. We summarize open astrophysical questions in light of recent observations and their relation to the underlying nuclear physics. Recent progress in the understanding of the nuclear physics, especially of X-ray bursts, is also discussed.

H. Schatz; K. E. Rehm

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Gamma-ray binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations have shown that some compact stellar binaries radiate the highest energy light in the universe. The challenge has been to determine the nature of the compact object and whether the very high energy gamma-rays are ultimately powered by pulsar winds or relativistic jets. Multiwavelength observations have shown that one of the three gamma-ray binaries known so far, PSR B1259-63, is a neutron star binary and that the very energetic gamma-rays from this source and from another gamma-ray binary, LS I +61 303, may be produced by the interaction of pulsar winds with the wind from the companion star. At this time it is an open question whether the third gamma-ray binary, LS 5039, is also powered by a pulsar wind or a microquasar jet, where relativistic particles in collimated jets would boost the energy of the wind from the stellar companion to TeV energies.

I. F. Mirabel

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

438

Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(MeV) spectral range. MEGa-ray Rendering In the mono-energetic gamma-ray (MEGA-ray) device, electrons and laser photons crash head-on, creating a backscatter of gamma...

439

Application of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy to the Study of the Modification of Epoxidized Sunflower Oil by Acrylation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercial sunflower oil was epoxidized at the laboratory-scale. The epoxidized sunflower oil (ESFO) was modified following the acrylation reaction. ...

Irinislimane, Ratiba; Belhaneche-Bensemra, Naima

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Structure and Magnetic Properties of the Pyrochlore Iridate Y2Ir2O7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron powder diraction and inelastic measurements were performed examining the 5d py- rochlore Y2Ir2O7. Temperature dependent measurements were performed between 3.4 K and 290 K, spanning the magnetic transition at 155 K. No sign of any structural or disorder induced phase transition were observed over the entire temperature range. In addition, no sign of magnetic long- range order was observed to within the sensitivity of the instrumentation. These measurements do not rule out long range magnetic order, but the neutron powder diraction structural renements do put an upper bound for the ordered iridium moment of 0.2 B=Ir (for a magnetic structure with wave vector Q 6= 0) or 0.5 B=Ir (for Q = 0).

Shapiro, Max C [Stanford University; Riggs, Scott [Stanford University; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Dela Cruz, Clarina R [ORNL; Chi, Songxue [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Podlesnyak, Andrey A [ORNL; Fisher, Ian R [Stanford University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Microsoft Word - Responses for IRS Notices 2006-24, 25 May 5 2006.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

questions related to: questions related to: IRS Notice 2006-24, Qualifying Advanced Coal Project Program, IRS Notice 2006-25, Qualifying Gasification Program May 5, 2006 DOE is answering questions related only to DOE certifications. Other questions should be directed to the IRS by calling Doug Kim or Kathy Reed at (202) 622-3110, or by faxing the questions to them at (202) 622-4779. 36. Independent Financial Analyst a. Will a duly licensed CPA or CPA firm, which is independent of the applicant under the profession's promulgated rules on independence, meet the definition of "Independent Financial Analyst"? If so, will they still be required to state, in the report, their qualifications and experience that establishes their competence to evaluate project financing?

442

Near-IR [Fe II] emission diagnostics applied to cold disk winds in young stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the emissivity properties of the main near-IR transitions of the Fe+ ion in the conditions prevailing in the inner regions of jets from young stars, based on a simplified 16-level atom model. We present new diagnostic diagrams involving prominent near-IR line ratios that allow us to constrain the electronic density, temperature, and Fe gas phase abundance ratio, independently of the heating process. Comparison with recent near-IR observations of a sample of HH objects indicates gas phase Fe abundances ranging from 15-50 % up to 100 % of the solar value in agreement with the moderate depletions previously derived from optical line ratios or shock models. Hence, it appears that Fe-bearing dust is efficiently destroyed in stellar jets. We then use our Fe+ emissivity model to predict near-IR [Fe II] emission maps for self-similar, cold MHD disk wind models. We show that observations in [Fe II] with AMBER on the VLTI could severely constrain the MHD solution and the inner launch radius of the jet. We also compare theoretical predictions with recent observations in the near-IR [Fe II] lines of the L1551-IRS5 and DG Tau jets. The cold disk wind model reproduces quite well the two velocity components observed at -100 and -300 km/s, although the high velocity component appears overestimated by a factor of 1.5 in the DG Tau jet. However, the model predicts too little emission at intermediate-velocity and insufficient densities. Denser disk winds with stronger heating at the jet base, which have been invoked for optical jets, also appear needed in younger, embedded Class I jet sources.

N. Pesenti; C. Dougados; S. Cabrit; D. O'Brien; P. Garcia; J. Ferreira

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

443

arXiv:0712.2975v1[astro-ph]18Dec2007 X-ray properties of protostars in the Orion Nebula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) data, we study the X-ray properties of stars in different, deep and almost simultaneous UBVI and JHK images taken, respectively, with WFI@2.2m ESO and ISPI@4m, we select a sample of "bona fide" Class II stars and a set of Class III stars with IR emission

444

Resonator-quantum well infrared photodetectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We applied a recent electromagnetic model to design the resonator-quantum well infrared photodetector (R-QWIP). In this design, we used an array of rings as diffractive elements to diffract normal incident light into parallel propagation and used the pixel volume as a resonator to intensify the diffracted light. With a proper pixel size, the detector resonates at certain optical wavelengths and thus yields a high quantum efficiency (QE). To test this detector concept, we fabricated a number of R-QWIPs with different quantum well materials and detector geometries. The experimental result agrees satisfactorily with the prediction, and the highest QE achieved is 71%.

Choi, K. K., E-mail: kwong.k.choi.civ@mail.mil; Sun, J.; Olver, K. [Electro-Optics and Photonics Division, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States)] [Electro-Optics and Photonics Division, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States); Jhabvala, M. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Waczynski, A. [Instrument Systems and Technology Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)] [Instrument Systems and Technology Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

445

An infrared invisibility cloak composed of glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose to implement a nonmetallic low-loss cloak for the infrared range from identical chalcogenide glassresonators. Based on transformation optics for cylindrical objects our approach does not require metamaterial response to be homogeneous and accounts for the discrete nature of elementary responses governed by resonator shape illumination angle and inter-resonator coupling. Air fractions are employed to obtain the desired distribution of the cloak effective parameters. The effect of cloaking is verified by full-wave simulations of the true multiresonator structure. The feasibility of cloak fabrication is demonstrated by prototyping glass grating structures with the dimensions characteristic for the cloak resonators.

Elena Semouchkina; Douglas H. Werner; George B. Semouchkin; Carlo Pantano

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Infrared Images of Shock-Heated Tin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution, gated infrared images were taken of tin samples shock heated to just below the 505 K melting point. Sample surfaces were either polished or diamond-turned, with grain sizes ranging from about 0.05 to 10 mm. A high explosive in contact with a 2-mm-thick tin sample induced a peak sample stress of 18 GPa. Interferometer data from similarly-driven tin shots indicate that immediately after shock breakout the samples spall near the free (imaged) surface with a scab thickness of about 0.1 mm.

Craig W. McCluskey; Mark D. Wilke; William D. Turley; Gerald D. Stevens; Lynn R. Veeser; Michael Grover

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Far-Infrared Absorptivity of Metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple calculation of the far-infrared absorptivity of a strong-coupling metal in the normal state is presented which is valid in the anomalous-skin-effect (ASE) region. The form of the results is compared with that derived by an alternate procedure in a recent letter by the author. A discussion of electron-phonon renormalization effects in the ASE limit is then considered and, in particular, at frequencies below threshold (???D), an effective mass mP** is introduced which incorporates these effects.

H. Scher

1971-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Radial Electric Field and its Influence on Poloidal Magnetic Field Oscillations in the IR-T1 Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radial electric field has been investigated in the edge plasma of IR-T1 tokamak by movable sets of single Langmuir probes....

Hamid Bolourian; Pejman Khorshid; Mahmoud Ghoranneviss…

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Label Free Mid-IR Photothermal Imaging of Bird Brain With Quantum Cascade Laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Label free mid-infrared photothermal imaging on bird brain slices is presented. The Amide-I vibrational band is excited by a quantum cascade laser and an Er:doped fiber measures the...

Mertiri, Alket; Totachawattana, Atcha; Liu, Hui; Hong, Mi K; Gardner, Tim; Sander, Michelle Y; Erramilli, Shyamsunder

450

Mechanism of Efficient Anti-Markovnikov Olefin Hydroarylation Catalyzed by Homogeneous Ir(III) Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanism of the hydroarylation reaction between unactivated olefins (ethylene, propylene, and styrene) and benzene catalyzed by [(R)Ir(?-acac-O,O,C{sup 3})-(acac-O,O){sub 2}]{sub 2} and [R-Ir(acac-O,O){sub 2}(L)] (R = acetylacetonato, CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, Ph, or CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph, and L = H{sub 2}O or pyridine) Ir(III) complexes was studied by experimental methods. The system is selective for generating the anti-Markovnikov product of linear alkylarenes (61:39 for benzene + propylene and 98:2 for benzene + styrene). The reaction mechanism was found to follow a rate law with first-order dependence on benzene and catalyst, but a non-linear dependence on olefin. {sup 13}C-labelling studies with CH{sub 3}{sup 13}CH{sub 2}-Ir-Py showed that reversible ?-hydride elimination is facile, but unproductive, giving exclusively saturated alkylarene products. The migration of the {sup 13}C-label from the ? to ?-positions was found to be slower than the C–H activation of benzene (and thus formation of ethane and Ph-d{sub 5}-Ir-Py). Kinetic analysis under steady state conditions gave a ratio of the rate constants for CH activation and ?-hydride elimination (k{sub CH}: k{sub ?}) of ~0.5. The comparable magnitude of these rates suggests a common rate determining transition state/intermediate, which has been shown previously with B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Overall, the mechanism of hydroarylation proceeds through a series of pre-equilibrium dissociative steps involving rupture of the dinuclear species or the loss of L from Ph-Ir-L to the solvento, 16-electron species, Ph-Ir(acac-O,O){sub 2}-Sol (where Sol refers to coordinated solvent). This species then undergoes trans to cisisomerization of the acetylacetonato ligand to yield the pseudo octahedral species cis-Ph-Ir-Sol, which is followed by olefin insertion (the regioselective and rate determining step), and then activation of the C–H bond of an incoming benzene to generate the product and regenerate the catalyst.

Bhalla, Gaurav; Bischof, Steven M; Ganesh, Somesh K; Liu, Xiang Y; Jones, C J; Borzenko, Andrey; Tenn, William J; Ess, Daniel H; Hashiguchi, Brian G; Lokare, Kapil S; Leung, Chin Hin; Oxgaard, Jonas; Goddard, William A; Periana, Roy A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Application of Infrared Thermography in Building Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol. VI-5-3 Application of Infrared Thermography in Building Energy Efficiency Yongzheng Shi Hongbing Chen Qi Xu Deying Li Zhonghua Wang Xiumu Fang...]. Infrared Technology,2002,01:34-37.(In Chinese) [6] Yangyang Wang. Research on surface temperature of building envelope measured by thermal infrared imager [J]. Hv & Ac, 2006, 02:84-88.(In Chinese) ...

Shi, Y.; Chen, H.; Xu, Q.; I, D.; Wang, Z.; Fang, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Doped carbon nanostructure field emitter arrays for infrared imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An infrared imaging device and method for making infrared detector(s) having at least one anode, at least one cathode with a substrate electrically connected to a plurality of doped carbon nanostructures; and bias circuitry for applying an electric field between the anode and the cathode such that when infrared photons are adsorbed by the nanostructures the emitted field current is modulated. The detectors can be doped with cesium to lower the work function.

Korsah, Kofi (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Baylor, Larry R (Farragut, TN) [Farragut, TN; Caughman, John B (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Rack, Philip D (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

453

X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

009-9473-8 REVIEW X-ray absorption spectroscopy Junko Yano Æand application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, bothX-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-

Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

type: Review X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Junko Yano andPhotosystem II; XAS, X-ray absorption spectroscopy; EXAFS,X-ray absorption fine structure; EPR, electron paramagnetic

Yano, Junko

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

A new, low temperature long-pass cell for mid-infrared to terahertz spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new cell has been designed for accurate spectroscopic measurements in the 80–400 K temperature range with variable path lengths from 3 to more than 141 m. The spectral coverage at these temperatures ranges from the visible to less than 10 cm{sup ?1}, thanks to the use of diamond windows. The design of the cryostat and vacuum setups allows vibration-free operation. The equipment provides temperature homogeneity and pressure control to better than 2% over the 100–400 K and the 0.1–1000 mbar ranges. Remote-controlled opto-mechanical systems enable in situ adjustments as well as changes of the optical path length within half an hour, in order to optimize measurement time in an open user facility. It allows then to meet the specific requirements of high resolution measurements on the Far-Infrared AILES beamline at SOLEIL as well at the LISA facility, in Créteil, in the mid-IR. This new instrument opens up the way for many experiments in the field of high-resolution gas-phase IR spectroscopy, in particular, in quantitative spectroscopy for atmospheric applications: measurements of absorption line parameters (absolute intensities, cross sections, and pressure-induced widths) using Fourier transform spectroscopy. The design and performance of the equipment are briefly presented and illustrated on spectroscopic examples.

Kwabia Tchana, Fridolin; Willaert, Fabrice; Landsheere, Xavier; Flaud, Jean-Marie [LISA, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris-Est Créteil (UPEC) et Université Paris-Diderot (UPD), 61 Avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil Cedex (France)] [LISA, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris-Est Créteil (UPEC) et Université Paris-Diderot (UPD), 61 Avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil Cedex (France); Lago, Leatitia; Chapuis, Mylène; Herbeaux, Christian; Roy, Pascale; Manceron, Laurent [High Vacuum Group and Beamline AILES, Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)] [High Vacuum Group and Beamline AILES, Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

MAPPING THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF DUST EXTINCTION IN NGC 959 USING BROADBAND VISIBLE AND MID-INFRARED FILTERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a method to estimate and map the two-dimensional distribution of dust extinction in the late-type spiral galaxy NGC 959 from the theoretical and observed flux ratio of optical V and mid-IR (MIR) 3.6 {mu}m images. Our method is applicable to both young and old stellar populations for a range of metallicities, and is not restricted to lines of sight toward star-formation (SF) regions. We explore this method using a pixel-based analysis on images of NGC 959 obtained in the V band at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope and at 3.6 {mu}m (L band) with Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera. We present the original and extinction corrected Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) images, as well as optical UBVR images of NGC 959. While the dust lanes are not clearly evident at GALEX resolution, our dust map clearly traces the dust that can be seen silhouetted against the galaxy's disk in the high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of NGC 959. The advantages of our method are (1) it only depends on two relatively common broadband images in the optical V band and in the MIR at 3.6 {mu}m (but adding a near-UV band improves its fidelity); and (2) it is able to map the two-dimensional spatial distribution of dust within a galaxy. This powerful tool could be used to measure the detailed distribution of dust extinction within higher redshift galaxies to be observed with, e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFC3 (optical near-IR) and James Webb Space Telescope (mid-IR), and to distinguish properties of dust within galaxy bulges, spiral arms, and inter-arm regions.

Tamura, K.; Jansen, R. A.; Windhorst, R. A. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)], E-mail: ktamura@asu.edu, E-mail: rolf.jansen@asu.edu, E-mail: rogier.windhorst@asu.edu

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared Spectroscopy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared Spectroscopy Abstract Infrared spectroscopy is particularly good at identifying awide variety of hydrothermally altered minerals with no samplepreparation, and is especially helpful in discrimination amongclay minerals. We have performed several promising pilot studieson geothermal drill core and cuttings that suggest the efficiencyof the technique to sample continuously and provide alterationlogs similar to geophysical logs. We have successfully identifiedlayered silicates, zeolites, opal, calcite, and iron oxides and

458

On the Usage of Near-Infrared Spectral Reconstruction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the advent of near-infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA), there have been numerous attempts to give "traditional" spectroscopic explanations for the successful empirical and...

Kemeny, Gabor J; Wetzel, David L

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Posters Preliminary Analysis of Ground-Based Microwave and Infrared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Posters Preliminary Analysis of Ground-Based Microwave and Infrared Radiance Observations During the Pilot Radiation OBservation Experiment E. R. Westwater, Y. Han, J. H....

460

Infrared Absorption Spectra of ? and ?-Calcium Sulphate Hemihydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... E. G., Trans. Brit. Ceram. Soc., 66, 485 (1967).ASTM E 168–64T General Techniques of Infrared Quantitative Analysis, section 5e.

D. A. BARTRAM

1969-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill...

462

Near infrared laser dyes for the detection of latent fingermarks .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The near infrared region (700 nm – 2000 nm) of the electromagnetic spectrum provides significant potential for fingermark detection. Many ubiquitous commercial surfaces give luminescent… (more)

Chadwick, Scott Richard John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser. Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum...

464

Infrared Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous Solid Water. Infrared Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous Solid Water. Abstract: Reflection-absorption...

465

Detection of Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy. Abstract: Previous work on detection of low-volatility liquid organic (and...

466

MID-INFRARED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON AND H{sub 2} EMISSION AS A PROBE OF PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN EXTREME PHOTODISSOCIATION REGIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mid-infrared (mid-IR) observations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and molecular hydrogen emission are a potentially powerful tool to derive physical properties of dense environments irradiated by intense UV fields. We present new, spatially resolved, Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopy of the high UV field and dense photodissociation region (PDR) around Monoceros R2, the closest ultracompact H II region, revealing the spatial structure of ionized gas, PAHs, and H{sub 2} emissions. Using a PDR model and PAH emission feature fitting algorithm, we build a comprehensive picture of the physical conditions prevailing in the region. We show that the combination of the measurement of PAH ionization fraction and of the ratio between the H{sub 2} 0-0 S(3) and S(2) line intensities, respectively, at 9.7 and 12.3 mum, allows us to derive the fundamental parameters driving the PDR: temperature, density, and UV radiation field when they fall in the ranges T = 250-1500 K, n {sub H} = 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}, and G {sub 0} = 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5}, respectively. These mid-IR spectral tracers thus provide a tool to probe the similar but unresolved UV-illuminated surface of protoplanetary disks or the nuclei of starburst galaxies.

Berne, O.; Goicoechea, J. R. [Centro de AstrobiologIa (CSIC/INTA), Laboratiorio de Astrofisica Molecular, Ctra. de Torrejon a Ajalvir, km 4 28850, Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Fuente, A. [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, Apdo. Correos 112, 28803 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Pilleri, P.; Joblin, C. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, CESR, 9 ave colonel Roche, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); Gonzalez-GarcIa, M. [LUTH, Observatoire de Paris and Universite Paris, 7 place Jansen, 92190 Meudon (France)

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

467