National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for infrared ir rays

  1. Relative Infrared (IR) and Terahertz (THz) Signatures of Common Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sheen, David M.; Atkinson, David A.

    2006-11-13

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has recently recorded the infrared (IR) and far-infrared (sometimes called the terahertz, THz) spectral signatures of four common explosives, in the condensed phase. The signatures of RDX, PETN, TNT and Tetryl were recorded both in the infrared and the THz domains, using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Samples consisted of thin films and were made by depositing and subsequent evaporation of an acetone-explosive mixture. The complete spectrum spanned the range from 4,000 to 8 cm-1 at 2.0 cm-1 spectral resolution. Preliminary results in the infrared agree with those of previous workers, while the THz signatures are one order of magnitude weaker than the strongest IR bands.

  2. Phase-matched generation of coherent soft and hard X-rays using IR lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popmintchev, Tenio V.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Bahabad, Alon; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2013-06-11

    Phase-matched high-order harmonic generation of soft and hard X-rays is accomplished using infrared driving lasers in a high-pressure non-linear medium. The pressure of the non-linear medium is increased to multi-atmospheres and a mid-IR (or higher) laser device provides the driving pulse. Based on this scaling, also a general method for global optimization of the flux of phase-matched high-order harmonic generation at a desired wavelength is designed.

  3. Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR. Many of these species are charged. In the ocean, water interacts with dissolved salts. In biological systems, water interacts with dissolved salts as well as charged amino acids, the zwitterionic head groups

  4. On the Relative Utility of Infrared (IR) versus Terahertz (THz) for Optical Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Gassman, Paul L.; Atkinson, David A.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Williams, Stephen D.

    2007-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has active programs investigating the optical absorption strengths of several types of molecules including toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), microbiological threats such as bacteria, as well as explosives such as RDX, PETN and TNT. While most of our work has centered on the mid-infrared domain (600 to 6,500 cm-1), more recent work has also included work in the far-infrared, also called the terahertz (THz) region (500 to ~8 cm-1). Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, we have been able to compare the relative, and in some cases absolute, IR/THz cross sections of a number of species in the solid and liquid phases. The relative band strengths of a number of species of interest are discussed in terms of both experimental and computational results.

  5. A Constant Spectral Index for Sagittarius A* During Infrared/X-ray Intensity Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. D. Hornstein; K. Matthews; A. M. Ghez; J. R. Lu; M. Morris; E. E. Becklin; M. Rafelski; F. K. Baganoff

    2007-06-12

    We report the first time-series of broadband infrared (IR) color measurements of Sgr A*, the variable emission source associated with the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center. Using the laser and natural guide star AO systems on the Keck II telescope, we imaged Sgr A* in multiple near-infrared broadband filters with a typical cycle time of ~3 min during 4 observing runs (2005-2006), two of which were simultaneous with Chandra X-ray measurements. In spite of the large range of dereddened flux densities for Sgr A* (2-30 mJy), all of our near-IR measurements are consistent with a constant spectral index of alpha = -0.6+-0.2. Furthermore, this value is consistent with the spectral indices observed at X-ray wavelengths during nearly all outbursts; which is consistent with the synchrotron self-Compton model for the production of the X-ray emission. During the coordinated observations, one IR outburst occurs 1 GeV is generated, and it is this high-energy tail that gives rise to the X-ray outbursts. One possible explanation for this type of variation is from the turbulence induced by a magnetorotational instability, in which the outer scale length of the turbulence varies and changes the high-energy cutoff.

  6. X-ray and Near-infrared Studies of a Star-forming Cloud; L1448

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tsujimoto; N. Kobayashi; Y. Tsuboi

    2005-06-27

    We present the results of X-ray and near-infrared (NIR) observations of L1448, a star-forming region in the Perseus cloud complex using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the 4 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. We detect 72 X-ray sources in a ~17 arcmin x 17 arcmin region with a ~68 ks ACIS exposure, for which we conduct follow-up NIR imaging observations in a concentric ~11 arcmin x 11 arcmin region with FLAMINGOS down to m_Ks ~ 17 mag. Twelve X-ray sources have NIR or optical counterparts. By plotting X-ray mean energy versus NIR to X-ray flux ratio, the X-ray sources are clearly separated into two groups. The X-ray spectral and temporal features as well as NIR magnitudes and colors indicate that one group mainly consists of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud and the other of background extragalactic sources. Ten X-ray-emitting YSO candidates are thus newly identified, which are low-mass or brown dwarf mass sources from their NIR magnitudes. In addition, a possible X-ray signal is found from a mid-infrared protostar L1448 IRS 3(A). The lack of detection of this source in our deep NIR images indicates that this source has a very steep spectral slope of > 3.2 in 2--10 micron.

  7. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion (SICWC): Arc Lamp, InfraRed (IR) Thermal Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Sebright, J.

    2007-12-15

    The primary goal of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) betwe1311 UT-Battelle (Contractor) and Caterpillar Inc. (Participant) was to develop the plasma arc lamp (PAL), infrared (IR) thermal processing technology 1.) to enhance surface coating performance by improving the interfacial bond strength between selected coatings and substrates; and 2.) to extend this technology base for transitioning of the arc lamp processing to the industrial Participant. Completion of the following three key technical tasks (described below) was necessary in order to accomplish this goal. First, thermophysical property data sets were successfully determined for composite coatings applied to 1010 steel substrates, with a more limited data set successfully measured for free-standing coatings. These data are necessary for the computer modeling simulations and parametric studies to; A.) simulate PAL IR processing, facilitating the development of the initial processing parameters; and B.) help develop a better understanding of the basic PAL IR fusing process fundamentals, including predicting the influence of melt pool stirring and heat tnmsfar characteristics introduced during plasma arc lamp infrared (IR) processing; Second, a methodology and a set of procedures were successfully developed and the plasma arc lamp (PAL) power profiles were successfully mapped as a function of PAL power level for the ORNL PAL. The latter data also are necessary input for the computer model to accurately simulate PAL processing during process modeling simulations, and to facilitate a better understand of the fusing process fundamentals. Third, several computer modeling codes have been evaluated as to their capabilities and accuracy in being able to capture and simulate convective mixing that may occur during PAL thermal processing. The results from these evaluation efforts are summarized in this report. The intention of this project was to extend the technology base and provide for transitioning of the arc lamp processing to the industrial Participant.

  8. Near-infrared Observations of Be/X-ray Binary Pulsar A0535+262

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naik, Sachindra; Banerjee, D P K; Ashok, N M; Jaiswal, Rajeev R

    2011-01-01

    We present results obtained from an extensive near-infrared spectroscopic and photometric observations of the Be/X-ray binary A0535+262/HDE 245770 at different phases of its ~111 day orbital period. This observation campaign is a part of the monitoring programme of selective Be/X-ray binary systems aimed at understanding the X-ray and near-IR properties at different orbital phases, especially during the periastron passage of the neutron star. The near-IR observations were carried out using the 1.2 m telescope at Mt. Abu IR observatory. Though the source was relatively faint for spectroscopic observations with 1.2 m telescope, we monitored the source during the 2011 February--March giant outburst to primarily investigate whether any drastic changes in the near-IR JHK spectra take place at the periastron passage. Changes of such a striking nature were expected to be detectable in our spectra. Photometric observations of the Be star show a gradual and systematic fading in the JHK light curves since the onset of ...

  9. Cosmogenic Neutrinos from Cosmic Ray Interactions with Extragalactic Infrared Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel De Marco; Todor Stanev; F. W. Stecker

    2005-12-19

    We discuss the production of cosmogenic neutrinos on extragalactic infrared photons in a model of its cosmological evolution. The relative importance of these infrared photons as a target for proton interactions is significant, especially in the case of steep injection spectra of the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. For an E$^{-2.5}$ cosmic ray injection spectrum, for example, the event rate of neutrinos of energy above 1 PeV is more than doubled.

  10. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN ULTRAHIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS AND INFRARED-LUMINOUS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berlind, Andreas A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Farrar, Glennys R.; Zaw, Ingyin [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics and Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2010-06-20

    We confirm the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray (UHECR) horizon established by the Pierre Auger Observatory using the heterogeneous Veron-Cetty-Veron (VCV) catalog of active galactic nuclei by performing a redshift-angle-IR luminosity scan using point-source catalog with redshift (PSCz) galaxies having infrared luminosity greater than 10{sup 10} L{sub sun}. The strongest correlation-for z < 0.016, {psi} = 2.{sup 0}1, and L{sub ir} {>=} 10{sup 10.5} L{sub sun}-arises in fewer than 0.3% of scans with isotropic source directions. When we apply a penalty for using the UHECR energy threshold that was tuned to maximize the correlation with VCV, the significance degrades to 1.1%. Since the PSCz catalog is complete and volume-limited for these parameters, this suggests that the UHECR horizon discovered by the Pierre Auger Observatory is not an artifact of the incompleteness and other idiosyncrasies of the VCV catalog. The strength of the correlation between UHECRs and the nearby highest-IR-luminosity PSCz galaxies is stronger than in about 90% of trials with scrambled luminosity assignments for the PSCz galaxies. If confirmed by future data, this result would indicate that the sources of UHECRs are more strongly associated with luminous IR galaxies than with ordinary, lower IR luminosity galaxies.

  11. An X-ray, IR, and Submillimeter Flare of Sagittarius A*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. P. Marrone; F. K. Baganoff; M. R. Morris; J. M. Moran; A. M. Ghez; S. D. Hornstein; C. D. Dowell; D. J. Munoz; M. W. Bautz; G. R. Ricker; W. N. Brandt; G. P. Garmire; J. R. Lu; K. Matthews; J. -H. Zhao; R. Rao; G. C. Bower

    2008-07-14

    Energetic flares are observed in the Galactic supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* from radio to X-ray wavelengths. On a few occasions, simultaneous flares have been detected in IR and X-ray observations, but clear counterparts at longer wavelengths have not been seen. We present a flare observed over several hours on 2006 July 17 with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the Keck II telescope, the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, and the Submillimeter Array. All telescopes observed strong flare events, but the submillimeter peak is found to occur nearly 100 minutes after the X-ray peak. Submillimeter polarization data show linear polarization in the excess flare emission, increasing from 9% to 17% as the flare passes through its peak, consistent with a transition from optically thick to thin synchrotron emission. The temporal and spectral behavior of the flare require that the energetic electrons responsible for the emission cool faster than expected from their radiative output. This is consistent with adiabatic cooling in an expanding emission region, with X-rays produced through self-Compton scattering, although not consistent with the simplest model of such expansion. We also present a submillimeter flare that followed a bright IR flare on 2005 July 31. Compared to 2006, this event had a larger peak IR flux and similar submillimeter flux, but it lacked measurable X-ray emission. It also showed a shorter delay between the IR and submillimeter peaks. Based on these events we propose a synchrotron and self-Compton model to relate the submillimeter lag and the variable IR/X-ray luminosity ratio.

  12. Optical Variability of Infrared Power Law-Selected Galaxies & X-ray Sources in the GOODS-South Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alison Klesman; Vicki Sarajedini

    2007-05-07

    We investigate the use of optical variability to identify and study Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the GOODS-South field. A sample of 22 mid-infrared power law sources and 102 X-ray sources with optical counterparts in the HST ACS images were selected. Each object is classified with a variability significance value related to the standard deviation of its magnitude in five epochs separated by 45-day intervals. The variability significance is compared to the optical, mid-IR, and X-ray properties of the sources. We find that 26% of all AGN candidates (either X-ray- or mid-IR-selected) are optical variables. The fraction of optical variables increases to 51% when considering sources with soft X-ray band ratios. For the mid-IR AGN candidates which have multiwavelength SEDs, we find optical variability for 64% of those classified with SEDs like Broad Line AGNs. While mostly unobscured AGN appear to have the most significant optical variability, some of the more obscured AGNs are also observed as variables. In particular, we find two mid-IR power law-selected AGN candidates without X-ray emission that display optical variability, confirming their AGN nature.

  13. Infrared Surveys for AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, H E

    2002-01-01

    From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

  14. Infrared Surveys for AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harding E. Smith

    2002-03-06

    From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

  15. Sub-arcsec mid-IR observations of NGC 1614: Nuclear star-formation or an intrinsically X-ray weak AGN?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira-Santaella, M; Alonso-Herrero, A; Usero, A; Díaz-Santos, T; García-Burillo, S; Alberdi, A; Gonzalez-Martin, O; Herrero-Illana, R; Imanishi, M; Levenson, N A; Pérez-Torres, M A; Almeida, C Ramos

    2015-01-01

    We present new mid-infrared N-band spectroscopy and Q-band photometry of the local luminous infrared galaxy NGC1614, one of the most extreme nearby starbursts. We analyze the mid-IR properties of the nucleus (central 150 pc) and four regions of the bright circumnuclear (diameter~600 pc) star-forming (SF) ring of this object. The nucleus differs from the circumnuclear SF ring by having a strong 8-12 micron continuum (low 11.3 micron PAH equivalent width). These characteristics, together with the nuclear X-ray and sub-mm properties, can be explained by an X-ray weak active galactic nucleus (AGN), or by peculiar SF with a short molecular gas depletion time and producing an enhanced radiation field density. In either case, the nuclear luminosity (L(IR) energy output in this object. We also compare three star-formation rate (SFR) tracers (Pa$\\alpha$, 11.3 micron PAH, and 24 micron emissions) at...

  16. OpenIR [Open Infrared] : enhancing environmental monitoring through accessible remote sensing, in Indonesia and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ducao, Arlene (Arlene Brigoli)

    2013-01-01

    As the human landscape changes ever more rapidly, environmental change accelerates. Much environmental information is publicly available as infrared satellite data. However, for the general user, this information is difficult ...

  17. Frying Doughnuts: What can the reprocessing of X-rays to IR tell us about the AGN environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. McKernan; K. E. S. Ford; N. Chang; C. S. Reynolds

    2008-12-04

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) produce vast amounts of high energy radiation deep in their central engines. X-rays either escape the AGN or are absorbed and re-emitted mostly as IR. By studying the dispersion in the ratio of observed mid-IR luminosity to observed 2-10keV X-ray luminosity (R_{ir/x}) in AGN we can investigate the reprocessing material (possibly a torus or donut of dust) in the AGN central engine, independent of model assumptions. We studied the ratio of observed mid-IR and 2-10keV X-ray luminosities in a heterogeneous sample of 245 AGN from the literature. We found that when we removed AGN with prominent jets, ~90% of Type I AGN lay within a very tight dispersion in luminosity ratio (1ir/x}<30). This implies that the AGN central engine is extremely uniform and models of the physical AGN environment (e.g. cloud cover, turbulent disk, opening angle of absorbing structures such as dusty tori) must span a very narrow range of parameters. We also found that the far-IR(100um) to mid-IR (12um) observed luminosity ratio is an effective descriminator between heavily obscured AGN and relatively unobscured AGN.

  18. Near Infrared observations of Soft X-ray selected AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Grupe; H. -C Thomas

    2002-02-21

    We report the results of near infrared observations of 19 soft X-ray selected AGN. The goal of the observations was to search for strong, narrow Paschen-alpha or Brackett-gamma emission lines, as a sign of nuclear starbursts. We found Pa-alpha emission in the spectra of 11 sources and Br-gamma in at least five. Strong NIR emission has been found in two sources, CBS 126 and Mkn 766, both objects with strong [OIII]5007 emission, weak FeII emission and wavelength dependent degree of polarization in the optical. Classical Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies do not show exceptionally strong NIR emission lines. We present the results of our study and discuss how our findings fit into an evolutionary scheme of AGN.

  19. Structure and infrared (IR) assignments for the OLED material: N,N-diphenyl-N,N-bis(1-naphthyl)-1,1-biphenyl-4,4/-diamine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    May 2001 Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are currently under intense investigation for useStructure and infrared (IR) assignments for the OLED material: N,Nº-diphenyl-N,Nº-bis(1-naphthyl)-1 in OLEDs, such as structure and vibrational modes, will help provide experimental probes which are required

  20. In Situ Diffuse Reflectance IR Spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Fast Catalytic Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N Marinkovic; Q Wang; A Frenkel

    2011-12-31

    A new instrument for synchronous in situ investigations of catalytic materials by IR and X-ray absorption spectroscopies was designed and built at the X18A beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides analytical tools for solving structural, electronic and kinetic problems in catalysis science by two complementary methods. Among the features attractive for catalysis research are the broad range of catalytically active elements that can be investigated (starting with Ni and beyond), the wide range of reaction conditions (temperatures up to 873 K, various reactive gases) and time scales (starting from tens of seconds). The results of several representative experiments that illustrate the attractive capabilities of the new set-up are discussed.

  1. Galaxy Evolution, Deep Galaxy Counts and the Near-IR Cosmic Infrared Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Jimenez; A. Kashlinsky

    1998-09-15

    Accurate synthetic models of stellar populations are constructed and used in evolutionary models of stellar populations in forming galaxies. Following their formation, the late type galaxies are assumed to follow the Schmidt law for star formation, while early type galaxies are normalized to the present-day fundamental plane relations assumed to mimic the metallicity variations along their luminosity sequence. We then compute predictions of these models for the observational data at early epochs for various cosmological parameters $\\Omega, \\Omega_\\Lambda$ and $H_0$. We find good match to the metallicity data from the damped $L_\\alpha$ systems and the evolution of the luminosity density out to $z\\simeq 1$. Likewise, our models provide good fits for low values of $\\Omega$ to the deep number counts of galaxies in all bands where data is available; this is done without assuming existence of extra populations of galaxies at high $z$. Our models also match the data on the redshift distribution of galaxy counts in $B$ and $K$ bands. We compute the predicted mean levels and angular distribution of the cosmic infrared background produced from the early evolution of galaxies. The predicted fluxes and fluctuations are still below the current observational limits, but not by a large factor. Finally, we find that the recent detection of the diffuse extragalactic light in the visible bands requires for our models high redshift of galaxy formation, $z_f \\geq$(3-4); otherwise the produced flux of the extragalactic light at optical bands exceeds the current observational limits.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling Backus

    2012-05-14

    In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

  3. Maskelynite formation via solid-state transformation: Evidence of infrared and x-ray anisotropy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaret, Steven J.; Ehm, Lars; Woerner, William R.; Phillips, Brian L.; Nekvasil, Hanna; Wright, Shawn P.; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2015-03-24

    We present optical microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, high-energy X-ray total scattering experiments, and micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy on shocked labradorite from the Lonar Crater, India. We show that maskelynite of shock class 2 is structurally more similar to fused glass than to crystalline plagioclase. However, there are slight but significant differences – preservation of original pre-impact igneous zoning, anisotropy at Infrared wavelengths, X-ray anisotropy, and preservation of some intermediate range order – which are all consistent with a solid-state transformation formation of maskelynite.

  4. THREE NEW GALACTIC CENTER X-RAY SOURCES IDENTIFIED WITH NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeWitt, Curtis; Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Sarajedini, Ata; Sellgren, Kris; Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut; Bauer, Franz E.

    2013-11-01

    We have conducted a near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 47 candidate counterparts to X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory near the Galactic center (GC). Though a significant number of these astrometric matches are likely to be spurious, we sought out spectral characteristics of active stars and interacting binaries, such as hot, massive spectral types or emission lines, in order to corroborate the X-ray activity and certify the authenticity of the match. We present three new spectroscopic identifications, including a Be high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) or a ? Cassiopeiae (Cas) system, a symbiotic X-ray binary, and an O-type star of unknown luminosity class. The Be HMXB/? Cas system and the symbiotic X-ray binary are the first of their classes to be spectroscopically identified in the GC region.

  5. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr?IrO? using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Jaouen, N.; Nicolaou, A.; Yin, W. G.; Rayan Serrao, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ding, H.; et al

    2015-04-28

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr?IrO?, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edgemore »RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.« less

  6. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr?IrO? using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, X. [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Beijing National Lab. for Condensed Matter Physics (BNLCP-CAS); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Dean, M. P. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liu, J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chiuzbaian, S. G. [Sorbonne Univ., Paris (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin (France); Jaouen, N. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin (France); Nicolaou, A. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin (France); Yin, W. G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rayan Serrao, C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ramesh, R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ding, H. [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Beijing National Lab. for Condensed Matter Physics (BNLCP-CAS); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Hill, J. P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-27

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr?IrO?, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edge RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.

  7. X-ray and Near-infrared Studies of a Star-forming Cloud; L1448

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, M; Tsuboi, Y

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of X-ray and near-infrared (NIR) observations of L1448, a star-forming region in the Perseus cloud complex using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the 4 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. We detect 72 X-ray sources in a ~17 arcmin x 17 arcmin region with a ~68 ks ACIS exposure, for which we conduct follow-up NIR imaging observations in a concentric ~11 arcmin x 11 arcmin region with FLAMINGOS down to m_Ks ~ 17 mag. Twelve X-ray sources have NIR or optical counterparts. By plotting X-ray mean energy versus NIR to X-ray flux ratio, the X-ray sources are clearly separated into two groups. The X-ray spectral and temporal features as well as NIR magnitudes and colors indicate that one group mainly consists of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud and the other of background extragalactic sources. Ten X-ray-emitting YSO candidates are thus newly identified, which are low-mass or brown dwarf mass sources from their NIR magnitudes. In addition, a possible X-ray signal is fou...

  8. Near-Infrared and X-Ray Observations of XSS J12270-4859

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saitou, Kei; Ebisawa, Ken; Ishida, Manabu; Mukai, Koji; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Shogo; Gandhi, Poshak

    2011-01-01

    XSS J12270-4859 (J12270) is an enigmatic source of unknown nature. Previous studies revealed that the source has unusual X-ray temporal characteristics, including repetitive short-term flares followed by spectral hardening, non-periodic dips, and dichotomy in activity; i.e. intervals filled with flares and those without. Together with a power-law X-ray spectrum, it is suggested to be a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). In order to better understand the object, we present the results of our near-infrared (NIR) photometry and linear polarimetry observations as well as X-ray spectroscopy observations, which overlap with each other partially in time, taken respectively with the InfraRed Survey Facility (IRSF) and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We detected several simultaneous NIR and X-ray flares for the first time. No significant NIR polarization was obtained. We assembled data taken with IRSF, RXTE, Suzaku, Swift, and other missions in the literature and compared the flare profile and the spectral energy d...

  9. A Chandra Deep X-ray Exposure on the Galactic Plane and Near Infrared Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Ebisawa; A. Paizis; T. J. -L. Couvoisier; P. Dubath; M. Tsujimoto; K. Hamaguchi; V. Beckmann; A. Bamba; A. Senda; M. Ueno; H. Kaneda; Y. Maeda; G. Sato; S. Yamauchi; R. Cutri; E. Nishihara

    2004-07-09

    Using the Chandra ACIS-I instruments, we have carried out a deep X-ray observation on the Galactic plane region at (l,b) ~ (28.5, 0.0), where no discrete X-ray sources have been known previously. We have detected, as well as strong diffuse emission, 274 new point X-ray sources (4 sigma confidence) within two partially overlapping fields (~250 arcmin^2 in total) down to the flux limit ~3 x 10^{-15} $ erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} (2 -- 10 keV) and ~ 7 x 10^{-16} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} (0.5 -- 2 keV). We clearly resolved point sources and the Galactic diffuse emission, and found that ~ 90 % of the flux observed in our field of view originates from diffuse emission. Many point sources are detected either in the soft X-ray band (below 2 keV) or in the hard band (above 2 keV), and only a small number of sources are detected in both energy bands. On the other hand, most soft X-ray sources are considered to be nearby X-ray active stars. We have carried out a follow-up near-infrared (NIR) observation using SOFI at ESO/NTT. Most of the soft X-ray sources were identified, whereas only a small number of hard X-ray sources had counterparts in NIR. Using both X-ray and NIR information, we can efficiently classify the point X-ray sources detected in the Galactic plane. We conclude that most of the hard X-ray sources are background Active Galactic Nuclei seen through the Milky Way, whereas majority of the soft X-ray sources are nearby X-ray active stars.

  10. THE COMPLETE SPECTRUM OF THE NEUTRON STAR X-RAY BINARY 4U 0614+091

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migliari, S.

    We observed the neutron star (NS) ultra-compact X-ray binary 4U 0614+091 quasi-simultaneously in the radio band (Very Large Array), mid-infrared (IR)/IR (Spitzer/Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer and Infrared Array ...

  11. IRS SPECTRA OF TWO ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES AT z = 1.3 B. T. Soifer,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    of the 6.2 m PAH feature indicates that at least 50% of the mid-infrared energy is generated in a starburst et al. 1997; Barger et al. 1998; Hughes et al. 1998; Ivison et al. 1998; Eales et al. 2000; Scott et al. 2002). However, although the energy generation mechanisms of these extremely luminous objects

  12. Andromeda (M31) optical and infrared disk survey. I. Insights in wide-field near-IR surface photometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sick, Jonathan; Courteau, Stéphane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; McDonald, Michael; De Jong, Roelof; Tully, R. Brent

    2014-05-01

    We present wide-field near-infrared J and K{sub s} images of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) taken with WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope as part of the Andromeda Optical and Infrared Disk Survey. This data set allows simultaneous observations of resolved stars and near-infrared (NIR) surface brightness across M31's entire bulge and disk (within R = 22 kpc), permitting a direct test of the stellar composition of near-infrared light in a nearby galaxy. Here we develop NIR observation and reduction methods to recover a uniform surface brightness map across the 3° × 1° disk of M31 with 27 WIRCam fields. Two sky-target nodding strategies are tested, and we find that strictly minimizing sky sampling latency cannot improve background subtraction accuracy to better than 2% of the background level due to spatio-temporal variations in the NIR skyglow. We fully describe our WIRCam reduction pipeline and advocate using flats built from night-sky images over a single night, rather than dome flats that do not capture the WIRCam illumination field. Contamination from scattered light and thermal background in sky flats has a negligible effect on the surface brightness shape compared to the stochastic differences in background shape between sky and galaxy disk fields, which are ?0.3% of the background level. The most dramatic calibration step is the introduction of scalar sky offsets to each image that optimizes surface brightness continuity. Sky offsets reduce the mean surface brightness difference between observation blocks from 1% to <0.1% of the background level, though the absolute background level remains statistically uncertain to 0.15% of the background level. We present our WIRCam reduction pipeline and performance analysis to give specific recommendations for the improvement of NIR wide-field imaging methods.

  13. Spectroscopic infrared near-field microscopy and x-ray reflectivity studies of order and clustering in lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Generosi, J.; Margaritondo, G.; Sanghera, J. S.; Aggarwal, I. D.; Tolk, N. H.; Piston, D. W.; Castellano, A. Congiu; Cricenti, A.

    2006-12-04

    Lipid membranes were studied by infrared scanning near-field optical microscopy at several wavelengths and by x-ray reflectivity. Together with the x-ray data, the optical images indicate the formation of locally ordered multiple bilayers, and the topographical micrographs reveal the presence of islands at the surface, both critically important features for biotechnology and medical applications such as biosensors and gene therapy.

  14. A JOINT MODEL OF THE X-RAY AND INFRARED EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUNDS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    IR LF, the SMBH accretion energy fraction in the IR band, the star formation spectral energy distribution (SED), and the unobscured SMBH SED extinguished with a H I column...

  15. Control of Electron Localization in Deuterium Molecular Ions using an Attosecond Pulse Train and a Many-Cycle Infrared Pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Andreas

    created and dissociated by the combined action of an attosecond pulse train and a many-cycle infrared (IR the combined action of an APT and a many-cycle IR pulse. The APT is synthesized from both the even and odd and a Many-Cycle Infrared Pulse K. P. Singh,1,* F. He,1 P. Ranitovic,1,2,3 W. Cao,1 S. De,1 D. Ray,1 S. Chen

  16. NGC 7538 : Multiwavelength Study of Stellar Cluster Regions associated with IRS 1-3 and IRS 9 sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallick, K K; Tamura, M; Pandey, A K; Dib, S; Ghosh, S K; Sunada, K; Zinchenko, I; Pirogov, L; Tsujimoto, M

    2014-01-01

    We present deep and high-resolution (FWHM ~ 0.4 arcsec) near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations of the NGC 7538 IRS 1-3 region (in JHK bands), and IRS 9 region (in HK bands) using the 8.2m Subaru telescope. The NIR analysis is complemented with GMRT low-frequency observations at 325, 610, and 1280 MHz, molecular line observations of H13CO+ (J=1-0), and archival Chandra X-ray observations. Using the 'J-H/H-K' diagram, 144 Class II and 24 Class I young stellar object (YSO) candidates are identified in the IRS 1-3 region. Further analysis using 'K/H-K' diagram yields 145 and 96 red sources in the IRS 1-3 and IRS 9 regions, respectively. A total of 27 sources are found to have X-ray counterparts. The YSO mass function (MF), constructed using a theoretical mass-luminosity relation, shows peaks at substellar (~0.08-0.18 Msolar) and intermediate (~1-1.78 Msolar) mass ranges for the IRS 1-3 region. The MF can be fitted by a power law in the low mass regime with a slope of Gamma ~ 0.54-0.75, which is much shallower t...

  17. Infrared retina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krishna, Sanjay (Albuquerque, NM); Hayat, Majeed M. (Albuquerque, NM); Tyo, J. Scott (Tucson, AZ); Jang, Woo-Yong (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-12-06

    Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

  18. Chandra Deep X-ray Observation of a Typical Galactic Plane Region and Near-Infrared Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Ebisawa; M. Tsujimoto; A. Paizis; K. Hamaguchi; A. Bamba; R. Cutri; H. Kaneda; Y. Maeda; G. Sato; A. Senda; M. Ueno; S. Yamauchi; V. Beckmann; T. J. -L. Courvoisier; P. Dubath; E. Nishihara

    2005-07-07

    Using the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer Imaging array (ACIS-I), we have carried out a deep hard X-ray observation of the Galactic plane region at (l,b) ~ (28.5, 0.0), where no discrete X-ray source had been reported previously. We have detected 274 new point X-ray sources (4 sigma confidence) as well as strong Galactic diffuse emission within two partially overlapping ACIS-I fields (~250 arcmin^2in total). Sum of all the detected point source fluxes accounts for only ~ 10 % of the total X-ray flux in the field of view. Even hypothesizing a new population of much dimmer and numerous Galactic point sources, the total observed X-ray flux cannot be explained. Therefore, we conclude that X-ray emission from the Galactic plane has truly diffuse origin. Only 26 point sources were detected both in the soft and hard bands, indicating that there are two distinct classes of the X-ray sources distinguished by the spectral hardness ratio. Surface number density of the hard sources is only slightly higher than that measured at the high Galactic latitude regions, indicating that majority of the hard sources are background AGNs. Following up the Chandra observation, we have performed a near-infrared (NIR) survey with SOFI at ESO/NTT. Almost all the soft X-ray sources have been identified in NIR and their spectral types are consistent with main-sequence stars, suggesting most of them are nearby X-ray active stars. On the other hand, only 22 % of the hard sources had NIR counterparts, which are presumably Galactic. From X-ray and NIR spectral study, they are most likely to be quiescent cataclysmic variables. We have also carried out a precise spectral study of the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission excluding the point sources.

  19. THREE-DIMENSIONAL LONGWAVE INFRARED (LWIR) SYNTHETIC IMAGE GENERATION INCORPORATING ANGULAR EMJSSWITY EFFECTS USING RAY-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    . These routines require a sequence of images to evaluate tracking algorithms. The evaluation of sensor performanceTHREE-DIMENSIONAL LONGWAVE INFRARED (LWIR) SYNTHETIC IMAGE GENERATION INCORPORATING ANGULAR Memorial Drive Rochester, New York 14623-0887 ABSTRAO A technique for longwave infrared (LWIR) synthetic

  20. Deep Near Infrared Observations of the X-ray Emitting Class 0 Protostar Candidates in the Orion Molecular Cloud-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tsujimoto; K. Koyama; Y. Tsuboi; G. Chartas; M. Goto; N. Kobayashi; H. Terada; A. T. Tokunaga

    2002-03-09

    We obtained near infrared (NIR) imaging with the Subaru Telescope of the class 0 protostar candidates in the Orion Molecular Cloud-3, two of which were discovered to have X-ray emission by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We found strong evidence for the class~0 nature of the X-ray sources. First, our deep K-band image shows no emission brighter than 19.6 mag from both of these X-ray sources. Since class I protostars or class II T Tauri stars should be easily detected in the NIR with this sensitivity, the lack of K-band detection suggests that they are likely much more obscured than class I protostars. Second, our H2 v=1-0 S(1) image shows a bubble-like feature from one of the X-ray class 0 protostar candidates, which reinforces the idea that this is a class 0 protostar. We also discuss the nature of nine NIR sources found in our deep image based on their colors, spatial coincidence with millimeter cores, and the properties of their X-ray counterparts.

  1. The Chandra COSMOS Legacy survey: optical/IR identifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchesi, S; Elvis, M; Salvato, M; Brusa, M; Comastri, A; Gilli, R; Hasinger, G; Lanzuisi, G; Miyaji, T; Treister, E; Urry, C M; Vignali, C; Zamorani, G; Allevato, V; Cappelluti, N; Cardamone, C; Finoguenov, A; Griffiths, R E; Karim, A; Laigle, C; LaMassa, S M; Jahnke, K; Ranalli, P; Schawinski, K; Schinnerer, E; Silverman, J D; Smolcic, V; Suh, H; Trakhtenbrot, B

    2015-01-01

    We present the catalog of optical and infrared counterparts of the Chandra COSMOS-Legacy Survey, a 4.6 Ms Chandra program on the 2.2 square degrees of the COSMOS field, combination of 56 new overlapping observations obtained in Cycle 14 with the previous C-COSMOS survey. In this Paper we report the i, K, and 3.6 micron identifications of the 2273 X-ray point sources detected in the new Cycle 14 observations. We use the likelihood ratio technique to derive the association of optical/infrared (IR) counterparts for 97% of the X-ray sources. We also update the information for the 1743 sources detected in C-COSMOS, using new K and 3.6 micron information not available when the C-COSMOS analysis was performed. The final catalog contains 4016 X-ray sources, 97% of which have an optical/IR counterpart and a photometric redshift, while 54% of the sources have a spectroscopic redshift. The full catalog, including spectroscopic and photometric redshifts and optical and X-ray properties described here in detail, is availa...

  2. Late time multi wavelength observations of Swift J1644+5734: A luminous optical/IR bump and quiescent X-ray emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levan, A J; Brown, G C; Metzger, B D; Page, K L; Cenko, S B; O'Brien, P T; Lyman, J D; Wiersema, K; Stanway, E R; Fruchter, A S; Perley, D A; Bloom, J S

    2015-01-01

    We present late-time multi-wavelength observations of Swift J1644+57, suggested to be a relativistic tidal disruption flare (TDF). Our observations extend to >4 years from discovery, and show that 1.4 years after outburst the relativistic jet switched-off on a timescale less than tens of days, corresponding to a power-law decay faster than $t^{-70}$. Beyond this point weak X-rays continue to be detected at an approximately constant luminosity of $L_X \\sim 5 \\times 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$, and are marginally inconsistent with a continuing decay of $t^{-5/3}$, similar to that seen prior to the switch-off. Host photometry enables us to infer a black hole mass of $M_{BH}=3 \\times 10^6$ M$_{\\odot}$, consistent with the late time X-ray luminosity arising from sub-Eddington accretion onto the black hole in the form of either an unusually optically faint AGN or a slowly varying phase of the transient. Optical/IR observations show a clear bump in the light curve at timescales of 30-50 days, with a peak magnitude (correc...

  3. The potential for detecting gamma-ray burst afterglows from population III stars with the next generation of infrared telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macpherson, D. [ICRAR, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Coward, D. M. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Zadnik, M. G., E-mail: damien.macpherson@icrar.org [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2013-12-10

    We investigate the detectability of a proposed population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from the collapse of Population III (Pop III) stars. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will be able to observe the late time infrared afterglows. We have developed a new method to calculate their detectability, which takes into account the fundamental initial mass function and formation rates of Pop III stars, from which we find the temporal variability of the afterglows and ultimately the length of time JWST and SPICA can detect them. In the range of plausible Pop III GRB parameters, the afterglows are always detectable by these instruments during the isotropic emission, for a minimum of 55 days and a maximum of 3.7 yr. The average number of detectable afterglows will be 2.96× 10{sup –5} per SPICA field of view (FOV) and 2.78× 10{sup –6} per JWST FOV. These are lower limits, using a pessimistic estimate of Pop III star formation. An optimal observing strategy with SPICA could identify a candidate orphan afterglow in ?1.3 yr, with a 90% probability of confirmation with further detailed observations. A beamed GRB will align with the FOV of the planned GRB detector Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope once every 9 yr. Pop III GRBs will be more easily detected by their isotropic emissions (i.e., orphan afterglows) rather than by their prompt emissions.

  4. Infrared photoconductive PbTe film processing and oxygen sensitization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klingshim, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) thermal detectors and photodetectors have significant applications including thermal imaging, infrared spectroscopy and chemical and biological sensing. In this work we focus on photodetectors, which typically ...

  5. Hidden activity in high-redshift spheroidal galaxies from mid-infrared and X-ray observations in the GOODS-North field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodighiero, G; Civano, F; Comastri, A; Franceschini, A; Mignoli, M; Fritz, J; Vignali, C; Treu, T

    2007-01-01

    We exploit very deep mid-IR (MIR) and X-ray observations by Spitzer and Chandra in the GOODS North to identify signs of hidden (either starburst or AGN) activity in spheroidal galaxies between z~0.3 and 1. Our reference is a complete sample of 168 morphologically classified spheroidal galaxies with z[AB]<22.5 selected from GOODS ACS imaging. Nineteen of these have 24 micron detections in the GOODS catalogue, half of which have an X-ray counterpart in the 2 Ms Chandra catalogue, while about 25% have 1.4 GHz fluxes larger than 40 microJy. Traces of hidden activity in the spheroidal population are also searched for in the deep X-ray images and 14 additional galaxies are detected in X-rays only. The nature of the observed MIR emissions is investigated by modelling their SEDs based on the available multi-wavelength photometry, including X-ray, UV, optical, near-IR, MIR and radio fluxes, and optical spectroscopy. The amount of dust derived from the IR emission observed by Spitzer appears in excess of that expect...

  6. A JOINT MODEL OF X-RAY AND INFRARED BACKGROUNDS. II. COMPTON...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cosmic X-ray background spectrum at 20 keV. Our model predicts that the majority (90%) of luminous and bright CT AGNs (Lsub rest2-10keV > 10sup 44 erg ssup -1 or fsub...

  7. Identification of {gamma} rays from {sup 172}Au and {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au, {sup 168}Ir, and {sup 164}Re

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadinia, B.; Cederwall, B.; Andgren, K.; Baeck, T.; Johnson, A.; Khaplanov, A.; Wyss, R.; Page, R. D.; Grahn, T.; Paul, E. S.; Sandzelius, M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, J.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.

    2009-12-15

    The very neutron deficient odd-odd nucleus {sup 172}Au was studied in reactions of 342 and 348 MeV {sup 78}Kr beams with an isotopically enriched {sup 96}Ru target. The {alpha} decays previously reported for {sup 172}Au were confirmed and the decay chain extended down to {sup 152}Tm through the discovery of a new {alpha}-decaying state in {sup 164}Re[E{sub {alpha}}=5623(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=864{sub -110}{sup +150} ms; b{sub {alpha}}=3(1)%]. Fine structure in these {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au and {sup 168}Ir were identified. A new {alpha}-decaying state was also observed and assigned as the ground state in {sup 172}Au[E{sub {alpha}}=6762(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=22{sub -5}{sup +6} ms]. This decay chain was also correlated down to {sup 152}Tm through previously reported {alpha} decays. Prompt {gamma} rays from excited states in {sup 172}Au have been identified using the recoil-decay tagging technique. The partial level scheme constructed for {sup 172}Au indicates that it has an irregular structure. Possible configurations of the {alpha}-decaying states in {sup 172}Au are discussed in terms of the systematics of nuclei in this region and total Routhian surface calculations.

  8. The hard X-ray emission of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 6240 as observed by NuSTAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puccetti, S; Bauer, F E; Brandt, W N; Fiore, F; Harrison, F A; Luo, B; Stern, D; Urry, C M; Alexander, D M; Annuar, A; Arévalo, P; Balokovi?, M; Boggs, S E; Brightman, M; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Gandhi, P; Hailey, C J; Koss, M J; La Massa, S; Marinucci, A; Ricci, C; Walton, D J; Zappacosta, L; Zhang, W

    2015-01-01

    We present a broad-band (~0.3-70 keV) spectral and temporal analysis of NuSTAR observations of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 6240, combined with archival Chandra, XMM-Newton and BeppoSAX data. NGC 6240 is a galaxy in a relatively early merger state with two distinct nuclei separated by ~1."5. Previous Chandra observations have resolved the two nuclei, showing that they are both active and obscured by Compton-thick material. Although they cannot be resolved by NuSTAR, thanks to the unprecedented quality of the NuSTAR data at energies >10 keV, we clearly detect, for the first time, both the primary and the reflection continuum components. The NuSTAR hard X-ray spectrum is dominated by the primary continuum piercing through an absorbing column density which is mildly optically thick to Compton scattering (tau ~ 1.2, N_H ~ 1.5 x 10^(24) cm^-2). We detect moderate hard X-ray (> 10 keV) flux variability up to 20% on short (15-20 ksec) timescales. The amplitude of the variability is maximum at ~30 keV and is like...

  9. Uncooled infrared imaging using bimaterial microcantilever arrays...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    main figures of merit of the IR imager were found to be comparable to those of uncooled MEMS infrared detectors with substantially higher degree of fabrication complexity. In...

  10. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerwert, Klaus

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy Klaus Gerwert, Lehrstuhl fu¨r Biophysik, Ruhr, Germany Based in part on the previous version of this Encyclopedia of Life Sciences (ELS) article, Fourier Transform IR by Johannes Orphal. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is an experimental technique

  11. Infra-Red Process for Colour Fixation on Fabrics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biau, D.; Raymond, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Infra-red radiations find wide application in industrial processes as heating, drying, stoving and forming. The results are often far better than those from the other techniques: convection oven, gas IR etc . They come from the electric IR specific...

  12. Moving Object Detection and Compression in IR Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Amit

    infrared (IR) sensors. The aim is to use IR image sequences to detect moving objects (humans or vehicles computational power of computing devices attached to the sensor, the algorithms should be computationally simple implemented in C/C++ and their performance has been evaluated the using Hitachi's SH4 platform with software

  13. Infrared Upconversion for Astronomy Robert W. Boyd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Robert W.

    which collects the infrared radiation is designed so as to map each point in the field of view. Infrared radiation of frequency Figure 1. Schematic description of the upconversion process. Infrared radiation of frequency vIR is mixed with an intense laser beam of fre- quency vL in a nonlinear crystal

  14. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ACS IMAGING OF THE GOALS SAMPLE: QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF NEARBY LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES WITH L{sub IR} > 10{sup 11.4} L{sub Sun}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D.-C.; Evans, A. S.; Privon, G. C. E-mail: aevans@virginia.edu; and others

    2013-05-10

    A Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys study of the structural properties of 85 luminous and ultraluminous (L{sub IR} > 10{sup 11.4} L{sub Sun }) infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) sample is presented. Two-dimensional GALFIT analysis has been performed on F814W ''I-band'' images to decompose each galaxy, as appropriate, into bulge, disk, central point-spread function (PSF) and stellar bar components. The fraction of bulge-less disk systems is observed to be higher in LIRGs (35%) than in ULIRGs (20%), with the disk+bulge systems making up the dominant fraction of both LIRGs (55%) and ULIRGs (45%). Further, bulge+disk systems are the dominant late-stage merger galaxy type and are the dominant type for LIRGs and ULIRGs at almost every stage of galaxy-galaxy nuclear separation. The mean I-band host absolute magnitude of the GOALS galaxies is -22.64 {+-} 0.62 mag (1.8{sup +1.4}{sub -0.4} L{sup *}{sub I}), and the mean bulge absolute magnitude in GOALS galaxies is about 1.1 mag fainter than the mean host magnitude. Almost all ULIRGs have bulge magnitudes at the high end (-20.6 to -23.5 mag) of the GOALS bulge magnitude range. Mass ratios in the GOALS binary systems are consistent with most of the galaxies being the result of major mergers, and an examination of the residual-to-host intensity ratios in GOALS binary systems suggests that smaller companions suffer more tidal distortion than the larger companions. We find approximately twice as many bars in GOALS disk+bulge systems (32.8%) than in pure-disk mergers (15.9%) but most of the disk+bulge systems that contain bars are disk-dominated with small bulges. The bar-to-host intensity ratio, bar half-light radius, and bar ellipticity in GOALS galaxies are similar to those found in nearby spiral galaxies. The fraction of stellar bars decreases toward later merger stages and smaller nuclear separations, indicating that bars are destroyed as the merger advances. In contrast, the fraction of nuclear PSFs increases toward later merger stages and is highest in late-stage systems with a single nucleus. Thus, light from an active galactic nucleus or compact nuclear star cluster is more visible at I band as ULIRGs enter their latter stages of evolution. Finally, both GOALS elliptical hosts and nearby Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) ellipticals occupy the same part of the surface brightness versus half-light radius plot (i.e., the {sup K}ormendy Relation{sup )} and have similar slopes, consistent with the possibility that the GOALS galaxies belong to the same parent population as the SDSS ellipticals.

  15. LUMINOUS SUPERNOVA-LIKE UV/OPTICAL/INFRARED TRANSIENTS ASSOCIATED WITH ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM METAL-POOR BLUE SUPERGIANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Yajima, Hidenobu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Nakauchi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takashi [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Suwa, Yudai, E-mail: kzk15@psu.edu [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-06-10

    Metal-poor massive stars typically end their lives as blue supergiants (BSGs). Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from such progenitors could have an ultra-long duration of relativistic jets. For example, Population III (Pop III) GRBs at z {approx} 10-20 might be observable as X-ray-rich events with a typical duration of T{sub 90} {approx} 10{sup 4}(1 + z) s. The recent GRB111209A at z = 0.677 has an ultra-long duration of T{sub 90} {approx} 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} s and it has been suggested that its progenitor might have been a metal-poor BSG in the local universe. Here, we suggest that luminous UV/optical/infrared emission is associated with this new class of GRBs from metal-poor BSGs. Before the jet head breaks out of the progenitor envelope, the energy injected by the jet is stored in a hot plasma cocoon, which finally emerges and expands as a baryon-loaded fireball. We show that the photospheric emissions from the cocoon fireball could be intrinsically very bright (L{sub peak} {approx} 10{sup 42}-10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) in UV/optical bands ({epsilon}{sub peak} {approx} 10 eV) with a typical duration of {approx}100 days in the rest frame. Such cocoon emissions from Pop III GRBs might be detectable in infrared bands at {approx}years after Pop III GRBs at up to z {approx} 15 by upcoming facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope. We also suggest that GRB111209A might have been rebrightening in UV/optical bands up to an AB magnitude of {approx}< 26. The cocoon emission from local metal-poor BSGs might have been observed previously as luminous supernovae without GRBs since they can be seen from the off-axis direction of the jet.

  16. Comparison of junction temperature evaluations in a power IGBT module using an IR camera and three thermo-sensitive electrical parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and electrical methods. The main optical methods are local infrared sensors [3,4], optical fibers [5], infraredComparison of junction temperature evaluations in a power IGBT module using an IR camera and three information of the actual chip temperature distribution. In this paper, we propose to use infrared (IR

  17. New constraints on the Mid-IR EBL from the HESS discovery of VHE gamma rays from 1ES 0229+200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aharonian, F; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Behera, B; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brion, E; Brown, A M; Buhler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Dalton, M; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Atai, A; Domainko, W; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Funk, Seb; Fussling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Jung, I; Katarzynski, K; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhaggl, M; Khelifi, B; Keogh, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Latham, I J; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J P; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, D; Maurin, G; McComb, T J L; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J P; de Ona Wilhelmi, E; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Ranchon, S; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Renaud, M; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schock, F; Schroder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Stawarz, L; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the very high energy (VHE: >100 GeV) gamma-ray emission from the high-frequency peaked BL Lac 1ES 0229+200. METHODS: Observations of 1ES 0229+200 at energies above 580 GeV were performed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) in 2005 and 2006. RESULTS: 1ES 0229+200 is discovered by HESS to be an emitter of VHE photons. A signal is detected at the 6.6 sigma level in the HESS observations (41.8 h live time). The integral flux above 580 GeV is (9.4 +- 1.5 {stat} +- 1.9 {syst}) x 10^{-13} cm^{-2} s^{-1}, corresponding to ~1.8% of the flux observed from the Crab Nebula. The data show no evidence for significant variability on any time scale. The observed spectrum is characterized by a hard power law (Gamma = 2.50 +- 0.19 {stat} +- 0.10 {syst}) from 500 GeV to ~15 TeV. CONCLUSIONS: The high-energy range and hardness of the observed spectrum, coupled with the object's relatively large redshift (z=0.1396), enable the strongest constraints so far on the density of the Extragalactic Backgr...

  18. The AGN content in luminous IR galaxies at z\\sim2 from a global SED analysis including Herschel data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pozzi, F; Gruppioni, C; Feltre, A; Fritz, J; Fadda, D; Andreani, P; Berta, S; Cimatti, A; Delvecchio, I; Lutz, D; Magnelli, B; Maiolino, R; Nordon, R; Popesso, P; Rodighiero, G; Rosario, D; Santini, P; Vaccari, M

    2012-01-01

    We use Herschel-PACS far-infrared data, combined with previous multi-band information and mid-IR spectra, to properly account for the presence of an active nucleus and constrain its energetic contribution in luminous infrared (IR) sources at z\\sim2. The sample is composed of 24 sources in the GOODS-South field, with typical IR luminosity of 10^{12} Lo. Data from the 4 Ms Chandra X-ray imaging in this field are also used to identify and characterize AGN emission. We reproduce the observed spectral energy distribution (SED), decomposed into a host-galaxy and an AGN component. A smooth-torus model for circum-nuclear dust is used to account for the direct and re-processed contribution from the AGN. We confirm that galaxies with typical L_{8-1000um}\\sim10^{12}Lo at z\\sim2 are powered predominantly by star-formation. An AGN component is present in nine objects (\\sim35% of the sample) at the 3sigma confidence level, but its contribution to the 8-1000 um emission accounts for only \\sim5% of the energy budget. The AGN...

  19. IR-laser initiated combustion -- A step toward complete combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laghai, A.; Nabavi, S.H.; Servati, H.B.; Syed, F.

    1996-09-01

    The new global environmental regulations for reducing the engine emissions from both moving and stationary sources, as well as improvement in fuel economy are the major motifs to obtain a perfect combustion process and exhaust aftertreatment methods. Infrared (IR)-Laser initiated combustion provides a very high initial temperature, which produces propagation of a turbulent thermopressure pulse that results in a fast burning and improved combustion. The role of IR is to maximize the heat generation efficiency.

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES WITH MULTIFREQUENCY ARCHIVAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowperthwaite, Philip S.; Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A.; Tosti, G.

    2013-11-01

    Blazars are a highly variable, radio-loud subclass of active galactic nuclei. In order to better understand such objects we must be able to easily identify candidate blazars from the growing population of unidentified sources. Working toward this goal, we attempt to identify new gamma-ray blazar candidates from a sample of 102 previously unidentified sources. These sources are selected from The Astronomer's Telegram and the literature on the basis of non-periodic variability and multi-wavelength behavior. We then attempt to associate these objects to an IR counterpart in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer all-sky survey. We are able to identify 16 candidate sources whose IR colors are consistent with those of the blazar population. Of those, 13 sources have IR colors indicative of being gamma-ray emitting blazar candidates. These sources all possess archival multi-wavelength observations that support their blazar-like nature.

  1. A Calibrated Measurement of the Near-IR Continuum Sky Brightness Using Magellan/FIRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Peter William

    We characterize the near-IR sky background from 308 observations with the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) spectrograph at Magellan. A subset of 105 observations selected to minimize lunar and thermal effects gives ...

  2. Hydrogen Bond Rearrangements in Water Probed with Temperature-Dependent 2D IR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

    We use temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) of dilute HOD in H2O to investigate hydrogen bond rearrangements in water. The OD stretching frequency is sensitive to its environment, and loss ...

  3. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  4. Pressure-sensitive blackbody point radiation induced by infrared diode laser irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Pressure-sensitive blackbody point radiation induced by infrared diode laser irradiation Feng Qin,1, by irradiation of well-matched infrared (IR) lasers upon the Yb3þ ions, ultrabroadband luminescence can

  5. Experiment 6. QUANTINTATIVE ANALYSIS OF XYLENES USING IR SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    with a syringe full of the solvent. Dry the cell. 2. Refill the clean, dry sample cell with solution #1 and run syringe for loading sealed infrared cells. 4. A 0.1 mm sealed IR cell. These cells are kept version of the baseline technique to the unknown and standards. II Sealed Cells. The sealed cells used

  6. Infrared microcalorimetric spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E [ORNL; Senesac, Larry R [ORNL; Rajic, Slobodan [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL; Smith, Barton [ORNL; Datskos, Panos G [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated an infrared (IR) microcalorimetric spectroscopy technique that can be used to detect the presence of trace amounts of target molecules. The chemical detection is accomplished by obtaining the IR photothermal spectra of molecules absorbed on the surface of uncooled thermal micromechanical detectors. IR microcalorimetric spectroscopy requires no chemical specific coatings and the chemical specificity of the presented method is a consequence of the wavelength-specific absorption of IR photons from tunable quantum cascade lasers due to vibrational spectral bands of the analyte. We have obtained IR photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of RDX and a monolayer of 2-mercaptoethanol, over the wavelength region from 6 to 10 m. We found that in this wavelength region both chemicals exhibit a number of photothermal absorption features that are in good agreement with their respective IR spectra.

  7. Spatially Resolved Observations of the Galactic Center Source, IRS 21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, A; Morris, M; Becklin, E E; Cotera, A S; Ressler, M E; Werner, M; Wizinowich, P

    2002-01-01

    We present diffraction-limited 2-25 micron images obtained with the W. M. Keck 10-m telescopes that spatially resolve the cool source, IRS 21, one of a small group of enigmatic objects in the central parsec of our Galaxy that have eluded classification. Modeled as a Gaussian, the azimuthally-averaged intensity profile of IRS 21 has a half-width half-maximum (HWHM) size of 650+/-80 AU at 2.2 microns and an average HWHM size of 1600+/-200 AU at mid-infrared wavelengths. These large apparent sizes imply an extended distribution of dust. The mid-infrared color map indicates that IRS 21 is a self-luminous source rather than an externally heated dust clump as originally suggested. The spectral energy distribution has distinct near- and mid-infrared components. A simple radiative transfer code, which simultaneously fits the near- and mid- infrared photometry and intensity profiles, supports a model in which the near-infrared radiation is scattered and extincted light from an embedded central source, while the mid-in...

  8. The Late-Time Rebrightening of Type Ia SN 2005gj in the Mid-Infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Ori D

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of observations reveal a subset of Type Ia supernovae undergoing circumstellar interaction (SNe Ia-CSM). We present unpublished archival Spitzer Space Telescope data on SNe Ia-CSM 2002ic and 2005gj obtained > 1300 and 500 days post-discovery, respectively. Both SNe show evidence for late-time mid-infrared (mid-IR) emission from warm dust. The dust parameters are most consistent with a pre-existing dust shell that lies beyond the forward-shock radius, most likely radiatively heated by optical and X-ray emission continuously generated by late-time CSM interaction. In the case of SN 2005gj, the mid-IR luminosity more than doubles after 1 year post-discovery. While we are not aware of any late-time optical-wavelength observations at these epochs, we attribute this rebrightening to renewed shock interaction with a dense circumstellar shell.

  9. Infrared Observations of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Elbaz

    1997-11-28

    This short paper reviews some of the results obtained from ISO observations (ISOCAM and ISOPHOT) on galaxy clusters: Chap.1: "Intracluster dust": new evidence for the presence of dust outside galaxies. Chap.2:"Mid-Infrared Emission of Galaxies" origin of the mid-IR emission. Chap.3:"Star Formation in Nearby Clusters" correlation of the 7 and 15 microns fluxes with the SFR. Chap.4:"Star Formation in z=0.2 Galaxy clusters" Study of the mid-IR emission of A1732 and A1689. Chap.5:"Star Formation in z>0.4 Galaxy clusters" Preliminary.

  10. Kinetic, infrared, and X-ray absorption studies of adsorption, desorption, and reactions of thiophene on H-ZSM5 and Co/H-ZSM5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    and Enrique Iglesia*a a Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, 94720 with propane or H2 on H-ZSM5 and Co/H-ZSM5. Infrared spectra showed that thiophene interacts with acidic OH organic deposits. In situ infrared studies during thiophene and thiophene­propane reactions at 773 K on H

  11. Infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, C.C. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    Infrared thermography is a useful tool for the diagnosis of problems in building systems. In instances where a building owner has several large buildings, an investment in a typical $30,000 infrared system may be cost effective. In most instances, however, the rental of an infrared system or the hiring of an infrared consulting service is a cost effective alternative. As can be seen from the several applications presented here, any mechanical problem manifesting itself in an atypical temperature pattern can usually be detected. The two primary savings generated from infrared analysis of building systems are maintenance and energy.

  12. IR Kuiper Belt Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teplitz, V L; Anderson, J D; Rosenbaum, D C; Scalise, R J; Wentzler, P; Teplitz, Vigdor L.; Anderson, John D.; Rosenbaum, Doris; Scalise, Randall J.; Wentzler, Paul

    1999-01-01

    We compute the temperature and IR signal of particles of radius $a$ and albedo $\\alpha$ at heliocentric distance $R$, taking into account the emissivity effect, and give an interpolating formula for the result. We compare with analyses of COBE DIRBE data by others (including recent detection of the cosmic IR background) for various values of heliocentric distance, $R$, particle radius, $a$, and particle albedo, $\\alpha$. We then apply these results to a recently-developed picture of the Kuiper belt as a two-sector disk with a nearby, low-density sector (40IR spectra for various parameter v...

  13. Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom: Crystal structure and magnetic study with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chai, Feng [Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China); Chen, YiPing, E-mail: ypchen007@sina.com [Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); You, ZhuChai; Xia, ZeMin; Ge, SuZhi; Sun, YanQiong; Huang, BiHua [Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China)

    2013-06-01

    Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates, [Co(phen)?]?[CoW??O??]·9H?O 1 (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) and [Fe(phen)?]?[FeW??O??]·H?O·H?O 2, have been synthesized via the hydrothermal technique and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR, XPS, TG analysis, UV–DRS, XRD, thermal-dependent and magnetic-dependent 2D-COS IR (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Crystal structure analysis reveals that the polyanions in compound 1 are linked into 3D supramolecule through hydrogen bonding interactions between lattice water molecules and terminal oxygen atoms of polyanion units, and [Co(phen)?]²? cations distributed in the polyanion framework with many hydrogen bonding interactions. The XPS spectra indicate that all the Co atoms in 1 are +2 oxidation state, the Fe atoms in 2 existing with +2 and +3 mixed oxidation states. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic-dependent synchronous 2D correlation IR spectra of 1 (a), 2 (b) over 0–50 mT in the range of 600–1000 cm?¹, the obvious response indicate two Keggin polyanions skeleton susceptible to applied magnetic field. Highlights: • Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom has been obtained. • Compound 1 forms into 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding between water molecules and polyanions. • Magnetic-dependent 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy was introduced to discuss the magnetism of polyoxometalate.

  14. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Charles C. (Fairfield, OH); Taylor, Larry T. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1986-01-01

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  15. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  16. Time dynamics of photothermal vs optoacoustic response in mid IR nanoscale biospectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tovee, Peter D; Kjoller, Kevin; Allsop, David; Weightman, Peter; Surman, Mark; Siggel-King, Michele R F; Wolski, Andy; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy, a well established tool for chemical analysis of diverse materials, has significant potential in biomedical applications. While the spatial resolution of traditional IR spectroscopy is limited by the wavelength of the IR light to the few micrometres, it has been shown that nanoscale chemical analysis can be obtained by detecting IR induced local heating photothermal response via Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) or local thermomechanical expansion using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). This paper explores the potential of a pulsed ps pulse duration high power free electron laser (FEL) light source for AFM-IR and SThM-IR spectroscopy employing standard AFM and SThM probes. The SThM-IR response was found to have a detrimental strong background signal due to the direct heating of the probe, whereas the AFM IR thermomechanical response allowed to eliminate such a problem for both top down and bottom up illuminations with the FEL IR source. The SThM IR characteristic response time was ap...

  17. Reliable Identification of Compton-thick Quasars at z~2: Spitzer Mid-IR spectroscopy of HDF-oMD49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. M. Alexander; R. R. Chary; A. Pope; F. E. Bauer; W. N. Brandt; E. Daddi; M. Dickinson; D. Elbaz; N. A. Reddy

    2008-07-15

    Many models that seek to explain the origin of the unresolved X-ray background predict that Compton-thick Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) are ubiquitious at high redshift. However, few distant Compton-thick AGNs have been reliably identified to date. Here we present Spitzer-IRS spectroscopy and 3.6-70um photometry of a z=2.2 optically identified AGN (HDF-oMD49) that is formally undetected in the 2Ms Chandra Deep Field-North (CDF-N) survey. The Spitzer-IRS spectrum and spectral energy distribution of this object is AGN dominated, and a comparison of the energetics at X-ray wavelengths to those derived from mid-infrared (mid-IR) and optical spectroscopy shows that the AGN is intrinsically luminous (L_X~3x10^44 erg/s) but heavily absorbed by Compton-thick material (N_H>>10^24 cm^{-2}); i.e., this object is a Compton-thick quasar. Adopting the same approach that we applied to HDF-oMD49, we found a further six objects at z~2-2.5 in the literature that are also X-ray weak/undetected but have evidence for AGN activity from optical and/or mid-IR spectroscopy, and show that all of these sources are also Compton-thick quasars with L_X>10^44 erg/s. On the basis of the definition of Daddi etal. (2007), these Compton-thick quasars would be classified as mid-IR excess galaxies, and our study provides the first spectroscopic confirmation of Compton-thick AGN activity in a subsample of these z~2 mid-IR bright galaxies. Using the four objects that lie in the CDF-N field, we estimate the space-density of Compton-thick quasars [Phi~(0.7-2.5)x10^-5 Mpc^-3 for L_X>10^44 erg/s objects at z~2-2.5] and show that Compton-thick accretion is as ubiquitious as unobscured accretion in the distant Universe.

  18. AEGIS: Infrared Spectroscopy of an Infrared-luminous Lyman Break Galaxy at z = 3.01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, J.-S.; Rigopoulou, D.; Papovich, C.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Ivison, R.; Laird, E. S.; Webb, T.; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Barmby, P.; Chapman, S.; Conselice, C. J.; McLeod, B.; Shu, C. G.; Smith, H. A.; Le Floc'h, E.; Egami, E.; Willmer, C. A. N.; Fazio, G. G.

    2007-05-01

    We report the detection of rest-frame 6.2 and 7.7 ?m emission features arising from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Spitzer IRS spectrum of an infrared-luminous Lyman break galaxy at z = 3.01. This is currently ...

  19. Spitzer Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of HDF-oMD49: Reliable Identification of Compton-thick Quasars at z~2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, D M; Pope, A; Bauer, F E; Brandt, W N; Daddi, E; Dickinson, M; Elbaz, D; Reddy, N A

    2008-01-01

    Many models that seek to explain the origin of the unresolved X-ray background predict that Compton-thick Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) are ubiquitious at high redshift. However, few distant Compton-thick AGNs have been reliably identified to date. Here we present Spitzer-IRS spectroscopy and 3.6-70um photometry of a z=2.2 optically identified AGN (HDF-oMD49) that is formally undetected in the 2Ms Chandra Deep Field-North (CDF-N) survey. The Spitzer-IRS spectrum and spectral energy distribution of this object is AGN dominated, and a comparison of the energetics at X-ray wavelengths to those derived from mid-infrared (mid-IR) and optical spectroscopy shows that the AGN is intrinsically luminous (L_X~3x10^44 erg/s) but heavily absorbed by Compton-thick material (N_H>>10^24 cm^{-2}); i.e., this object is a Compton-thick quasar. Adopting the same approach that we applied to HDF-oMD49, we searched the literature and found a further six objects at z~2-2.5 that are also X-ray weak/undetected but have evidence for AG...

  20. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapadula, Giuseppe; Bourdolle, Adrien; Allouche, Florian; Conley, Matthew P.; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W.; Guyot, Yannick; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Copé; ret, Christophe; Maury, Olivier; Andersen, Richard A.

    2013-01-12

    Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were prepared by implanting ca. 180 4,4 diethylaminostyryl 2,2 bipyridine (DEAS) Yb(III) complexes on the surface of 12 nm silica nanoparticles. The surface complexes ([DEAS Ln SiO2], Ln =Y,Yb) were characterized using IR, solid state NMR, UV Vis, EXAFS spectroscopies in combination with the preparation and characterization of similar molecular analogues by analytical techniques (IR, solution NMR, UV Vis, X ray crystallography) as well as DFT calculations. Starting from the partial dehydroxylation of the silica at 700 C on high vacuum having 0.8 OH.nm 2, the grafting of Ln(N(SiMe3)2)3 generate ?SiO Ln(N(SiMe3)2)2, which upon thermal step and coordination of the DEAS chromophore yields (?SiO)3Ln(DEAS). Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ligand centered CT fluorescence and life time) in the solid state, consistent with the molecular nature of the surface species. The densely functionalized nanoparticles can be dispersed via ultra-sonication in small ca. 15-20 nm aggregates (1 to 6 elementary particles) that were detected using two photon microscopy imaging at 720 nm excitation, making them promising nano objects for bio imaging.

  1. Combined in Situ X-ray absorption and diffuse reflectance infraredspectroscopy: An attractive tool for catalytic investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinkovic, N.S.; Ehrlich, S.; Wang, Q.; Barrio, L.; Khalid, S.; et.al.

    2010-11-24

    Catalysis investigations are often followed in a range of spectroscopic techniques. While diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) can be done on a bench-top instrument, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques, such as extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) require synchrotron light. In order to ensure the same conditions during in situ catalysis for each method, a combined XAS/DRIFTS has been developed at beamline X18A at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. A rapid-scan FTIR spectrometer capable of both mid- and far-infrared measurements is equipped with an arm to redirect the IR beam outside the spectrometer. An in situ reaction chamber, equipped with glassy carbon windows for X-ray light and a KBr window for IR light passage is installed firmly on the arm. The reaction cell can be heated to 600 C and allows passage of gases through the catalyst so that both XAS and DRIFTS techniques can be done simultaneously in controlled environment conditions. Together with a fast-moving monochromator for quick-EXAFS and mass-spectrometric residual gas analysis, this new tool is a powerful method for testing catalytic reactions in real time.

  2. Non-destructive component separation using infrared radiant energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, Ronald F. (Knoxville, TN); Russell, Steven W. (Knoxville, TN); Holt, Jerrid S. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN)

    2011-03-01

    A method for separating a first component and a second component from one another at an adhesive bond interface between the first component and second component. Typically the method involves irradiating the first component with infrared radiation from a source that radiates substantially only short wavelengths until the adhesive bond is destabilized, and then separating the first component and the second component from one another. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is placed inside an enclosure and the assembly is illuminated from an IR source that is external to the enclosure. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is simultaneously irradiated by a multi-planar array of IR sources. Often the IR radiation is unidirectional. In some embodiments the IR radiation is narrow-band short wavelength infrared radiation.

  3. Infrared pulse characterization using four-wave mixing inside a few cycle pulse filament in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marceau, Claude Thomas, Steven; Kassimi, Yacine; Gingras, Guillaume; Witzel, Bernd

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate a four-wave mixing (FWM) technique to measure near- and mid-infrared (IR) laser pulse shapes in time domain. Few cycle 800?nm laser pulses were synchronized with the IR pulse and focused colinearly to generate a plasma filament in air. Second harmonic radiation around 400?nm was generated through FWM, with a yield proportional to the IR pulse intensity. Excellent signal to noise ratio was observed from 2.1??m to 18??m. With proper phase stabilization of the IR beam, this technique is a promising step toward direct electric field sensing of near-IR pulses in air.

  4. A Survey and Analysis of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Spectra of T Tauri Stars in Taurus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Furlan; L. Hartmann; N. Calvet; P. D'Alessio; R. Franco-Hernandez; W. J. Forrest; D. M. Watson; K. I. Uchida; B. Sargent; J. D. Green; L. D. Keller; T. L. Herter

    2006-08-01

    We present mid-infrared spectra of T Tauri stars in the Taurus star-forming region obtained with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). For the first time, the 5-36 micron spectra of a large sample of T Tauri stars belonging to the same star-forming region is studied, revealing details of the mid-infrared excess due to dust in circumstellar disks. We analyze common features and differences in the mid-IR spectra based on disk structure, dust grain properties, and the presence of companions. Our analysis encompasses spectral energy distributions from the optical to the far-infrared, a morphological sequence based on the IRS spectra, and spectral indices in IRS wave bands representative of continuum emission. By comparing the observed spectra to a grid of accretion disk models, we infer some basic disk properties for our sample of T Tauri stars, and find additional evidence for dust settling.

  5. A tale of coupled vibrations in solution told by coherent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, Munira, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    Coherent two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy is used as a tool for investigating the molecular structure and dynamics of coupled vibrations in solution on a picosecond timescale. The strongly coupled asymmetric ...

  6. Arduino Remote Infrared Network Adapter Ren Neff, Thomas Trimborn & Matthias Wbbeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clausen, Michael

    #12;ARINA: Arduino Remote Infrared Network Adapter René Neff, Thomas Trimborn & Matthias Wübbeling photodiode IR diode resistor cables Arduino Mega 2560 Arduino Ethernet Shield breadboard 9 #12;Hardware II 10

  7. IRS-Impersonation SCAMS IRS-Impersonation Telephone Scam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    making the rounds throughout the country. Callers claim to be employees of the IRS, but are not directory (http://whitepages.tufts.edu) as the fraudulent caller appears to be obtaining mobile phone numbers from this directory. This may help reduce your exposure to telephone scams and other unwanted

  8. Application of Infrared Thermography in Building Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Y.; Chen, H.; Xu, Q.; I, D.; Wang, Z.; Fang, X.

    2006-01-01

    of infrared detector according to infrared radiation law. 4TE ??= ?? (1) Where E ? radiometric force, W/m2 ? ? emissivity ? ? the constant of radiation =5.67×10-8 , W/ ? m2?K4? T ? the absolute temperature of the surface , K... OF INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY According to the Planck?s radiation law (equation 1), radiometric force of common object has the biquadratic direct proportion with the absolute temperature of its surface. Infrared ray belongs to the electromagnetic wave, which...

  9. In A Different Light: An Examination of Artifacts Using Affordable Digital Infrared Imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuellar, Samuel Marshall

    2015-04-29

    the use of various filters in front of the camera sensor, allowing only light within the ‘visible’ range to pass. However, by replacing the IR and UV filters with one designed to block light in the visible spectrum, a camera capable of photographing... relying on infrared- sensitive films, the electronic sensors of digital cameras retain sensitivity into ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) areas of the EM spectrum. Manufacturers limit these extended EM spectrum ranges from affecting photographs through...

  10. Autonomous Observing and Control Systems for PAIRITEL, a 1.3m Infrared Imaging Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. S. Bloom; Dan L. Starr; Cullen H. Blake; M. F. Skrutskie; Emilio E. Falco

    2005-11-30

    The Peters Automated Infrared Imaging Telescope (PAIRITEL) is the first meter-class telescope operating as a fully robotic IR imaging system. Dedicated in October 2004, PAIRITEL began regular observations in mid-December 2004 as part of a 1.5 year commissioning period. The system was designed to respond without human intervention to new gamma-ray burst transients: this milestone was finally reached on November 9, 2005 but the telescope had a number of semi-automated sub-10 minute responses throughout early commissioning. When not operating in Target of Opportunity mode, PAIRITEL performs a number of queue scheduled transient monitoring campaigns. To achieve this level of automation, we have developed communicating tools to connect the various sub-systems: an intelligent queue scheduling database, run-time configurable observation sequence software, a data reduction pipeline, and a master state machine which monitors and controls all functions within and affecting the observatory.

  11. A Comparison of Infrared Light Emitting Diodes (IR-LED) versus Infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girard, James W.; Bogin, Gregory E; Mack, John Hunter; Chen, J-Y; Dibble, Rober W

    2005-01-01

    since combustion in lean premixed gas turbines takes placePremixed Gas Turbines”, 26th Symp. (Intern. ) on Combustion,

  12. Derivation of global hyperspectral resolution surface emissivity spectra from advanced infrared sounder radiance measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    Derivation of global hyperspectral resolution surface emissivity spectra from advanced infrared 9 July 2008; published 6 August 2008. [1] The global IR surface emissivity spectra are very. In this study, global IR surface emissivity spectra have been generated by using AIRS radiance measurements from

  13. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  14. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1998-09-22

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

  15. Platinum Monolayer on IrFe Core–Shell Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki K.; Kuttiyiel, K.A.; Su, D.; Adzic, R.R.

    2012-04-19

    We synthesized high activity and stability platinum monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported IrFe core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing. The formation of Ir shells on IrFe solid-solution alloy cores has been verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Pt monolayers were deposited on IrFe core-shell nanoparticles by galvanic replacement of underpotentially deposited Cu adatoms on the Ir shell surfaces. The specific and Pt mass activities for the ORR on the Pt monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalyst are 0.46 mA/cm{sup 2} and 1.1 A/mg{sub Pt}, which are much higher than those on a commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. High durability of Pt{sub ML}/IrFe/C has also been demonstrated by potential cycling tests. These high activity and durability observed can be ascribed to the structural and electronic interaction between the Pt monolayer and the IrFe core-shell nanoparticles.

  16. Summary of CARE-HHH IR’07

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scandale, Walter

    2008-01-01

    We summarize the highlights and main conclusions of the CARE-HHH-APD mini-workshop on the LHC Interaction Region (IR) upgrade “IR’07” held in Frascati from the 7th to the 9th of November 2007.

  17. Laser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    -scattering or in the transmission mode using a variety of sensor probes. In this work we used the infrared (IR) photothermal radioLaser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation A. Mandelis*, M. Munidasa, L. Nicolaides Photothermal and Optoelectronic Diagnostics

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Calculation of infrared and Raman vibration modes of magnesite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattin, Rodolphe

    ORIGINAL PAPER Calculation of infrared and Raman vibration modes of magnesite at high pressure) are used to obtain infrared (IR) and Raman magnesite vibration modes as they vary with pressure up to 50 approaches of vibrations in crystals based on empirical models suffer several drawbacks lead- ing

  19. Planar Array Infrared Emission Spectroscopy Christian Pellerin,*, Isabelle Pelletier,, John F. Rabolt, and D. Bruce Chase|

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    Planar Array Infrared Emission Spectroscopy Christian Pellerin,*, Isabelle Pelletier,, John F-IR) is shown to be a powerful new approach to infrared emission spec- troscopy (IRES). A proof-of-concept study of selected polymers indicates that PA-IRES allows acquisition of emission spectra with a high signal

  20. Infrared emission spectroscopy of CO2 at high temperature. Part I: Experimental setup and source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Infrared emission spectroscopy of CO2 at high temperature. Part I: Experimental setup and source measurement, tube effects, CO2 infrared radiation 1. Introduction The knowledge of very high temperature for instance that the IR emission of the CO2 molecule remains predominant at temperatures as high as 4000 K [1

  1. Journal of the European Ceramic Society 26 (2006) 28612865 Correlation between infrared, THz and microwave dielectric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KuÂ?el, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Journal of the European Ceramic Society 26 (2006) 2861­2865 Correlation between infrared, THz and infrared (IR) reflectivity spectra of orthorhombic microwave (MW) ceramics Bi(Nb1-xVx)O4 (0.002 ) frequency region in the last decade. This tech- nique uses ceramic dielectric resonators and filters

  2. Uncooled Micro-Cantilever Infrared Imager Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panagiotis, Datskos G. [ORNL

    2008-02-05

    We report on the development, fabrication and characterization of microcantilever based uncooled focal plane array (FPA) for infrared imaging. By combining a streamlined design of microcantilever thermal transducers with a highly efficient optical readout, we minimized the fabrication complexity while achieving a competitive level of imaging performance. The microcantilever FPAs were fabricated using a straightforward fabrication process that involved only three photolithographic steps (i.e. three masks). A designed and constructed prototype of an IR imager employed a simple optical readout based on a noncoherent low-power light source. The main figures of merit of the IR imager were found to be comparable to those of uncooled MEMS infrared detectors with substantially higher degree of fabrication complexity. In particular, the NETD and the response time of the implemented MEMS IR detector were measured to be as low as 0.5K and 6 ms, respectively. The potential of the implemented designs can also be concluded from the fact that the constructed prototype enabled IR imaging of close to room temperature objects without the use of any advanced data processing. The most unique and practically valuable feature of the implemented FPAs, however, is their scalability to high resolution formats, such as 2000 x 2000, without progressively growing device complexity and cost. The overall technical objective of the proposed work was to develop uncooled infrared arrays based on micromechanical sensors. Currently used miniature sensors use a number of different readout techniques to accomplish the sensing. The use of optical readout techniques sensing require the deposition of thin coatings on the surface of micromechanical thermal detectors. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is uniquely qualified to perform the required research and development (R&D) services that will assist our ongoing activities. Over the past decade ORNL has developed a number of unique methods and techniques that led to improved sensors using a number of different approaches.

  3. Development of an infrared absorption spectroscope based on linear variable filters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nogueira, Felipe Guimaraes

    2009-05-15

    ).....................................15 7 Schematic of an LVF based detector..............................................................18 8 Diagram of the infrared radiation path in a dispersive infrared spectrometer. Adapted from ("FT-IR vs. Dispersive Infrared " 2002... radiation path as it passes through the LVF and reaches a detector array. Bottom-left: a display of the linear wavelength output characteristic of the LVF. Bottom-right: rendering of the LVF?s physical aspects (JDSU, 2006...

  4. Experimental investigation of subcooled flow boiling using synchronized high speed video, infrared thermography, and particle image velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Bren Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Subcooled flow boiling of water was experimentally investigated using high-speed video (HSV), infrared (IR) thermography, and particle image velocimetry (PIV) to generate a unique database of synchronized data. HSV allowed ...

  5. Infrared light detection using a whispering-gallery-mode optical microcavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jiangang, E-mail: jzhu@seas.wustl.edu, E-mail: ozdemir@seas.wustl.edu, E-mail: yang@seas.wustl.edu; Ozdemir, Sahin Kaya, E-mail: jzhu@seas.wustl.edu, E-mail: ozdemir@seas.wustl.edu, E-mail: yang@seas.wustl.edu; Yang, Lan, E-mail: jzhu@seas.wustl.edu, E-mail: ozdemir@seas.wustl.edu, E-mail: yang@seas.wustl.edu [Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63117 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    We demonstrate a thermal infrared (IR) detector based on an ultra-high-quality-factor (Q) whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microtoroidal silica resonator and investigate its performance to detect IR radiation at 10??m wavelength. The bandwidth and the sensitivity of the detector are dependent on the power of a probe laser and the detuning between the probe laser and the resonance frequency of the resonator. The microtoroid IR sensor achieved a noise-equivalent-power (NEP) of 7.46?nW, corresponding to an IR intensity of 0.095?mW/cm{sup 2}.

  6. GOODS–Herschel: an infrared main sequence for star-forming galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Graham Wallace; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Hwang, H. S.; Dí az-Santos, T.; Magdis, G.; Magnelli, B.; Le Borgne, D.; Galliano, F.; Pannella, M.; Chanial, P.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Daddi, E.

    2011-09-01

    , stellar masses and photometric redshifts. The IR main se- quence is presented in Sect. 4 where the so-called “mid-IR ex- cess problem” is addressed and a solution proposed using the IR8 bolometric correction factor. This parameter, which relies on the same... Spitzer IRS peak-up array A119, page 6 of 26 D. Elbaz et al.: GOODS–Herschel: an infrared main sequence for star-forming galaxies imaging (Teplitz et al. 2011); here again, 16?m catalog fluxes are extracted using IRAC priors. In this study, we make partic...

  7. IR-2003- | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls21, 2012INSPECTION REPORT: DOE/IG-0919IR-2003-

  8. Radio observations of the CDF-South: a possible link between radio emission and star formation in X-ray selected AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Rovilos; A. Georgakakis; I. Georgantopoulos; J. Afonso; A. M. Koekemoer; B. Mobasher; C. Goudis

    2007-03-13

    We explore the nature of the radio emission of X-ray selected AGN by combining deep radio (1.4GHz; 60micro-Jy) and X-ray data with multiwavelength (optical, mid-infrared) observations in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDFS). The fraction of radio detected X-ray sources increases from 9% in the E-CDFS to 14% in the central region of this field, which has deeper X-ray coverage from the 1Ms CDFS. We find evidence that the radio emission of up to 60% of the hard X-ray/radio matched AGN is likely associated with star-formation in the host galaxy. Firstly, the mid-IR (24micron) properties of these sources are consistent with the infrared/radio correlation of starbursts. Secondly, most of them are found in galaxies with blue rest-frame optical colours (U-V), suggesting a young stellar population. On the contrary, X-ray/radio matched AGN which are not detected in the mid-infrared have red U-V colours suggesting their radio emission is associated with AGN activity. We also find no evidence for a population of heavily obscured radio-selected AGN that are not detected in X-rays. Finally, we do no confirm previous claims for a correlation between radio emission and X-ray obscuration. Assuming that the radio continuum measures star-formation, this finding is against models where the dust and gas clouds associated with circumnuclear starbursts are spherically blocking our view to the central engine.

  9. LENS MODELS OF HERSCHEL-SELECTED GALAXIES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-IR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calanog, J. A.; Cooray, A.; Ma, B.; Casey, C. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Fu, Hai [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Van Allen Hall, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Wardlow, J. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Amber, S. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Baker, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Baes, M. [1 Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Bock, J. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bourne, N.; Dye, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Bussmann, R. S. [Department of Astronomy, Space Science Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Chapman, S. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Dannerbauer, H. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); De Zotti, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Dunne, L.; Eales, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-12-20

    We present Keck-Adaptive Optics and Hubble Space Telescope high resolution near-infrared (IR) imaging for 500 ?m bright candidate lensing systems identified by the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey and Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. Out of 87 candidates with near-IR imaging, 15 (?17%) display clear near-IR lensing morphologies. We present near-IR lens models to reconstruct and recover basic rest-frame optical morphological properties of the background galaxies from 12 new systems. Sources with the largest near-IR magnification factors also tend to be the most compact, consistent with the size bias predicted from simulations and previous lensing models for submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). For four new sources that also have high-resolution submillimeter maps, we test for differential lensing between the stellar and dust components and find that the 880 ?m magnification factor (?{sub 880}) is ?1.5 times higher than the near-IR magnification factor (?{sub NIR}), on average. We also find that the stellar emission is ?2 times more extended in size than dust. The rest-frame optical properties of our sample of Herschel-selected lensed SMGs are consistent with those of unlensed SMGs, which suggests that the two populations are similar.

  10. Far-infrared surface emissivity and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Pincus, Robert; Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong

    2014-11-03

    Presently, there are no global measurement constraints on the surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 ?m, even though this surface property in this far-IR region has a direct impact on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and infrared cooling rates where the column precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm. Such dry conditions are common for high-altitude and high-latitude locations, with the potential for modeled climate to be impacted by uncertain surface characteristics. This paper explores the sensitivity of instantaneous OLR and cooling rates to changes in far-IR surface emissivity and how this unconstrained property impacts climate model projections. At high latitudes and altitudes, a 0.05 change in emissivity due to mineralogy and snow grain size can cause a 1.8–2.0 W m?² difference in the instantaneous clear-sky OLR. A variety of radiative transfer techniques have been used to model the far-IR spectral emissivities of surface types defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. Incorporating these far-IR surface emissivities into the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario of the Community Earth System Model leads to discernible changes in the spatial patterns of surface temperature, OLR, and frozen surface extent. The model results differ at high latitudes by as much as 2°K, 10 W m?², and 15%, respectively, after only 25 y of integration. The calculated difference in far-IR emissivity between ocean and sea ice of between 0.1 and 0.2, suggests the potential for a far-IR positive feedback for polar climate change.

  11. Far-infrared surface emissivity and climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Pincus, Robert; Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong

    2014-11-03

    Presently, there are no global measurement constraints on the surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 ?m, even though this surface property in this far-IR region has a direct impact on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and infrared cooling rates where the column precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm. Such dry conditions are common for high-altitude and high-latitude locations, with the potential for modeled climate to be impacted by uncertain surface characteristics. This paper explores the sensitivity of instantaneous OLR and cooling rates to changes in far-IR surface emissivity and how this unconstrained property impacts climate modelmore »projections. At high latitudes and altitudes, a 0.05 change in emissivity due to mineralogy and snow grain size can cause a 1.8–2.0 W m?² difference in the instantaneous clear-sky OLR. A variety of radiative transfer techniques have been used to model the far-IR spectral emissivities of surface types defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. Incorporating these far-IR surface emissivities into the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario of the Community Earth System Model leads to discernible changes in the spatial patterns of surface temperature, OLR, and frozen surface extent. The model results differ at high latitudes by as much as 2°K, 10 W m?², and 15%, respectively, after only 25 y of integration. The calculated difference in far-IR emissivity between ocean and sea ice of between 0.1 and 0.2, suggests the potential for a far-IR positive feedback for polar climate change.« less

  12. ILLUMINATING THE DARKEST GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH RADIO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zauderer, B. A.; Berger, E.; Margutti, R.; Fong, W.; Laskar, T.; Chornock, R.; Soderberg, A. M. [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Olivares E, F.; Greiner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Perley, D. A.; Horesh, A.; Carpenter, J. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States); Updike, A. C. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Menten, K. M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Nakar, E. [Department of Astrophysics, Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Chandra, P. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Castro-Tirado, A. J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA-CSIC), P.O. Box 03004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Bremer, M. [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique, 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d'Heres (France); and others

    2013-04-20

    We present X-ray, optical, near-infrared (IR), and radio observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) 110709B and 111215A, as well as optical and near-IR observations of their host galaxies. The combination of X-ray detections and deep optical/near-IR limits establish both bursts as ''dark''. Sub-arcsecond positions enabled by radio detections lead to robust host galaxy associations, with optical detections that indicate z {approx}< 4 (110709B) and z Almost-Equal-To 1.8-2.9 (111215A). We therefore conclude that both bursts are dark due to substantial rest-frame extinction. Using the radio and X-ray data for each burst we find that GRB 110709B requires A{sub V}{sup host}{approx}>5.3 mag and GRB 111215A requires A{sub V}{sup host}{approx}>8.5 mag (assuming z = 2). These are among the largest extinction values inferred for dark bursts to date. The two bursts also exhibit large neutral hydrogen column densities of N{sub H,{sub int}} {approx}> 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (z = 2) as inferred from their X-ray spectra, in agreement with the trend for dark GRBs. Moreover, the inferred values are in agreement with the Galactic A{sub V} -N{sub H} relation, unlike the bulk of the GRB population. Finally, we find that for both bursts the afterglow emission is best explained by a collimated outflow with a total beaming-corrected energy of E{sub {gamma}} + E{sub K} Almost-Equal-To (7-9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg (z = 2) expanding into a wind medium with a high density, M Almost-Equal-To (6-20) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} (n Almost-Equal-To 100-350 cm{sup -3} at Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 17} cm). While the energy release is typical of long GRBs, the inferred density may be indicative of larger mass-loss rates for GRB progenitors in dusty (and hence metal rich) environments. This study establishes the critical role of radio observations in demonstrating the origin and properties of dark GRBs. Observations with the JVLA and ALMA will provide a sample with sub-arcsecond positions and robust host associations that will help to shed light on obscured star formation and the role of metallicity in GRB progenitors.

  13. Modulated IR radiometry for determining thermal properties and basic characteristics of titanium thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apreutesei, Mihai; Lopes, Claudia; Vaz, Filipe; Macedo, Francisco; Borges, Joel

    2014-07-01

    Titanium thin films of different thicknesses were prepared by direct current magnetron sputtering to study modulated infrared (IR) radiometry as a tool for analyzing film thickness. Thickness was varied by regularly increasing the deposition time, keeping all the other deposition parameters constant. The influence of film thickness on morphological, structural, and electrical properties of the titanium coatings also was investigated. The experimental results revealed a systematic grain growth with increasing film thickness, along with enhanced film crystallinity, which led to increased electrical conductivity. Using the results obtained by modulated IR radiometry, the thickness of each thin film was calculated. These thickness values were then compared with the coating thickness measurements obtained by scanning electron microscopy. The values confirmed the reliability of modulated IR radiometry as an analysis tool for thin films and coatings, and for determining thicknesses in the micrometer range, in particular.

  14. X-ray transient absorption and picosecond IR spectroscopy of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2 ; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) 2 less + Show Author Affiliations (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division) ( Publication Date: 2012-07-27 OSTI...

  15. X-ray transient absorption and picosecond IR spectroscopy of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonfor DirectSciTechConnect Conference:(Journal(Journal2

  16. INFRARED STUDIES OF EPSILON AURIGAE IN ECLIPSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Kloppenborg, Brian K.; Wall, Randall E.; Hopkins, Jeffrey L.; Howell, Steve B.; Hoard, D. W.; Rayner, John; Bus, Schelte; Tokunaga, Alan; Sitko, Michael L.; Bradford, Suellen; Russell, Ray W.; Lynch, David K.; Hammel, Heidi; Whitney, Barbara; Orton, Glenn; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma; Hora, Joseph L.; Hinz, Philip; Hoffmann, William; and others

    2011-11-15

    We report here on a series of medium resolution spectro-photometric observations of the enigmatic long period eclipsing binary epsilon Aurigae, during its eclipse interval of 2009-2011, using near-infrared spectra obtained with SpeX on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), mid-infrared spectra obtained with BASS on AOES and IRTF, MIRSI on IRTF, and MIRAC4 on the MMT, along with mid-infrared photometry using MIRSI on IRTF and MIRAC4 on the MMT, plus 1995-2000 timeframe published photometry and data obtained with Denver's TNTCAM2 at WIRO. The goals of these observations included: (1) comparing eclipse depths with prior eclipse data, (2) confirming the re-appearance of CO absorption bands at and after mid-eclipse, associated with sublimation in the disk, (3) seeking evidence for any mid-infrared solid state spectral features from particles in the disk, and (4) providing evidence that the externally irradiated disk has azimuthal temperature differences. IR eclipse depths appear similar to those observed during the most recent (1983) eclipse, although evidence for post-mid-eclipse disk temperature increase is present, due to F star heated portions of the disk coming into view. Molecular CO absorption returned 57 days after nominal mid-eclipse, but was not detected at mid-eclipse plus 34 days, narrowing the association with differentially heated sub-regions in the disk. Transient He I 10830A absorption was detected at mid-eclipse, persisting for at least 90 days thereafter, providing a diagnostic for the hot central region. The lack of solid-state features in Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph, BASS, and MIRAC spectra to date suggests the dominance of large particles (micron-sized) in the disk. Based on these observations, mid-infrared studies out of eclipse can directly monitor and map the disk thermal changes, and better constrain disk opacity and thermal conductivity.

  17. Infrared Inspection Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, A. B.; Bevers, D. V.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared scanning equipment has been used at Amoco's Texas City refinery since 1971 as an inspection tool. A camera scans the field of view and focuses the infrared radiation on a detector which converts the infrared signal to an electrical signal...

  18. Near-infrared radiation curable multilayer coating systems and methods for applying same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, Mark P; Verdun, Shelley D; Post, Gordon L

    2015-04-28

    Multilayer coating systems, methods of applying and related substrates are disclosed. The coating system may comprise a first coating comprising a near-IR absorber, and a second coating deposited on a least a portion of the first coating. Methods of applying a multilayer coating composition to a substrate may comprise applying a first coating comprising a near-IR absorber, applying a second coating over at least a portion of the first coating and curing the coating with near infrared radiation.

  19. Axion decay and anisotropy of near-IR extragalactic background light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan Gong; Asantha Cooray; Ketron Mitchell-Wynne; Xuelei Chen; Michael Zemcov; Joseph Smidt

    2015-11-05

    The extragalactic background light is expected to be comprised of the cumulative radiation from all galaxies and active galactic nuclei over the cosmic history. In addition to point sources, EBL also contains information from diffuse sources of radiation. An example is the intra-halo light, associated with diffuse stars in dark matter halos resulting from galaxy mergers and tidal interactions, identified based on measurements involving the angular power spectrum of infrared background anisotropies. The angular power spectra of the near-infrared intensities could still contain additional signals and a complete understanding of the nature of the IR background is still lacking in the literature. Here we explore the constraints that can be placed on the decay products associated with particle decays, especially candidate dark matter models involving axions that trace dark matter halos of galaxies. Axions with a mass around a few eV will decay via two photons with wavelengths in the near-IR band, and will leave a signature in the IR background intensity power spectrum. Using recent power spectra measurements from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER), we find that the 0.6 to 1.6 micron power spectra can be explained with an axion mass of around 4 eV and a total axion abundance as a fractional energy density Omega_a~0.05. Such an abundance is comparable to the baryon density of the Universe. The absolute EBL intensity of axion decay photons is slightly below 1 nW m^-2 sr^-1 at near-IR wavelengths, roughly a factor of 10 to 20 below the total integrated light from galaxies. The suggested axion mass and abundance are not ruled out by existing cosmological observations.

  20. Broadly tunable picosecond IR source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campillo, Anthony J. (Nesconset, NY); Hyer, Ronald C. (Los Alamos, NM); Shapiro, Stanley J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01

    A picosecond traveling-wave parametric device capable of controlled spectral bandwidth and wavelength in the infrared is reported. Intense 1.064 .mu.m picosecond pulses (1) pass through a 4.5 cm long LiNbO.sub.3 optical parametric oscillator crystal (2) set at its degeneracy angle. A broad band emerges, and a simple grating (3) and mirror (4) arrangement is used to inject a selected narrow-band into a 2 cm long LiNbO.sub.3 optical parametric amplifier crystal (5) along a second pump line. Typical input energies at 1.064 .mu.m along both pump lines are 6-8 mJ for the oscillator and 10 mJ for the amplifier. This yields 1 mJ of tunable output in the range 1.98 to 2.38 .mu.m which when down-converted in a 1 cm long CdSe crystal mixer (6) gives 2 .mu.J of tunable radiation over the 14.8 to 18.5 .mu.m region. The bandwidth and wavelength of both the 2 and 16 .mu.m radiation output are controlled solely by the diffraction grating.

  1. Broadly tunable picosecond ir source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campillo, A.J.; Hyer, R.C.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1980-04-23

    A picosecond traveling-wave parametric device capable of controlled spectral bandwidth and wavelength in the infrared is reported. Intense 1.064 ..mu..m picosecond pulses (1) pass through a 4.5 cm long LiNbO/sub 3/ optical parametric oscillator crystal (2) set at its degeneracy angle. A broad band emerges, and a simple grating (3) and mirror (4) arrangement is used to inject a selected narrow-band into a 2 cm long LiNbO/sub 3/ optical parametric amplifier crystal (5) along a second pump line. Typical input energies at 1.064 ..mu..m along both pump lines are 6 to 8 mJ for the oscillator and 10 mJ for the amplifier. This yields 1 mJ of tunable output in the range 1.98 to 2.38 ..mu..m which when down-converted in a 1 cm long CdSe crystal mixer (6) gives 2 ..mu..J of tunable radiation over the 14.8 to 18.5 ..mu..m region. The bandwidth and wavelength of both the 2 and 16 ..mu..m radiation output are controlled solely by the diffraction grating.

  2. Origin of the phase transition in IrTe2: structural modulation and local bonding instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Huibo [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL; Yan, Jiaqiang [ORNL; Zhou, Haidong [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Mandrus, D. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL; Chen, Xin [ORNL; Yang, Hui [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2013-01-01

    We used X-ray/neutron diffraction to determine the low temperature (LT) structure of IrTe2. A structural modulation was observed with a wavevector of k =(1/5, 0, 1/5) below Ts285 K, accompanied by a structural transition from a trigonal to a triclinic lattice. We also performed the first principles calculations for high temperature (HT) and LT structures, which elucidate the nature of the phase transition and the LT structure. A local bonding instability associated with the Te 5p states is likely the origin of the structural phase transition in IrTe2.

  3. Infrared Freezing of Euclidean QCD observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul M. Brooks; C. J. Maxwell

    2006-08-22

    We consider the leading one-chain term in a skeleton expansion for QCD observables and show that for energies Q^2>\\Lambda^2, where Q^2=\\Lambda^2 is the Landau pole in the coupling, the skeleton expansion result is equivalent to the standard Borel integral representation, with ambiguities related to infrared (IR) renormalons. For Q^2freezing behaviour, vanishing at Q^2=0. Finiteness at Q^2=\\Lambda^2 implies specific relations between the residues of IR and UV renormalons in the Borel plane. These relations, only one of which has previously been noted (though it remained unexplained) are shown to follow from the continuity of the characteristic function in the skeleton expansion. By considering the compensation of non-perturbative and perturbative ambiguities we are led to a result for the Q^2 dependence of these observables at all Q^2, in which there is a single undetermined non-perturbative parameter, and which involves the skeleton expansion characteristic function. The observables freeze to zero in the infrared. We briefly consider the freezing behaviour of the Minkowskian R_{e+e-} ratio.

  4. Characterization of Infrared Catastrophe by The Carleman Operator and Its Singularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Hirokawa

    2007-09-01

    This paper addresses some mathematical problems arising from the infrared (IR) catastrophe in quantum field theory. IR catastrophe is formulated and studied in operator theory, characterized by the Carleman operator. Non-existence of ground state under IR catastrophe is also investigated with the help of the characterization. The theory presented in this paper is applied to the Hamiltonian of the model describing a non-relativistic electron coupled with a quantum field of phonons or polaritons in the light of mathematics as well as solid state physics.

  5. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface. 4 figs.

  6. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forman, Steven E. (Framingham, MA); Caunt, James W. (Concord, MA)

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface.

  7. Which Oxidation State Leads to O-O Bond Formation in Cp*Ir(bpy)Cl-Catalyzed Water Oxidation, Ir(V), Ir(VI), or Ir(VII)?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Rongzhen

    the catalytic IrIII species. Water oxidation at IrVII has a slightly higher barrier, but it may also contributeWhich Oxidation State Leads to O-O Bond Formation in Cp*Ir(bpy)Cl-Catalyzed Water Oxidation, Ir: Density functional calculations are used to revisit the reaction mechanism of water oxidation catalyzed

  8. Molecular Hydrogen in Infrared Cirrus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristen Gillmon; J. Michael Shull

    2005-07-25

    We combine data from our recent FUSE survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen absorption toward 50 high-latitude AGN with COBE-corrected IRAS 100 micron emission maps to study the correlation of infrared cirrus with H2. A plot of the H2 column density vs. IR cirrus intensity shows the same transition in molecular fraction, f_H2, as seen with total hydrogen column density, N_H. This transition is usually attributed to H2 self-shielding, and it suggests that many diffuse cirrus clouds contain H2 in significant fractions, f_H2 = 1-30%. These clouds cover approximately 50% of the northern sky at latitudes b > 30 degrees, at temperature-corrected 100 micron intensities D_100 > 1.5 MJy/sr. The sheetlike cirrus clouds, with hydrogen densities n_H > 30 cm^-3, may be compressed by dynamical processes at the disk-halo interface, and they are conducive to H2 formation on grain surfaces. Exploiting the correlation between N(H2) and 100 micron intensity, we estimate that cirrus clouds at b > 30 contain approximately 3000 M_sun in H2. Extrapolated over the inner Milky Way, the cirrus may contain 10^7 M_sun of H2 and 10^8 M_sun in total gas mass. If elevated to 100 pc, their gravitational potential energy is ~10^53 erg.

  9. IRS Warns of Pervasive Telephone Scam IRS YouTube Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    as described above), then call and report the incident to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration use fake names and IRS badge numbers. They generally use common names and surnames to identify in the message. Instead, forward the e-mail to phishing@irs.gov. More information on how to report phishing scams

  10. Supplemental Discussion Infrared spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael E.

    Supplemental Discussion Infrared spectroscopy We obtained near infrared reflectance spectra of 26 /~160 (see Supplemental Figure 1). The region between 1.81 and 1.89 µm has residual contamination the 50 Myr time period (see Supplemental Figure 2). doi: 10.1038/nature05619 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

  11. Effective temperatures and radii of planet-hosting stars from IR photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ribas; E. Solano; E. Masana; A. Gimenez

    2003-10-16

    In this paper we present and analyse determinations of effective temperatures of planet-hosting stars using infrared (IR) photometry. One of our goals is the comparison with spectroscopic temperatures to evaluate the presence of systematic effects that could alter the determination of metal abundances. To estimate the stellar temperatures we have followed a new approach based on fitting the observed 2MASS IR photometry with accurately calibrated synthetic photometry. Special care has been put in evaluating all sources of possible errors and incorporating them in the analysis. A comparison of our temperature determinations with spectroscopic temperatures published by different groups reveals the presence of no systematic trends and a scatter compatible with the quoted uncertainties of 0.5-1.3%. This mutual agreement strengthens the results of both the spectroscopic and IR photometry analyses. Comparisons with other photometric temperature calibrations, generally with poorer performances, are also presented. In addition, the method employed of fitting IR photometry naturally yields determinations of the stellar semi-angular diameters, which, when combined with the distances, results in estimations of the stellar radii with remarkable accuracies of ~2-4%. A comparison with the only star in the sample with an empirically determined radius (HD 209458 -- from transit photometry) indicates excellent agreement.

  12. Application of infrared imaging in ferrocyanide tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, K.L.; Mailhot, R.B. Jr.; McLaren, J.M.; Morris, K.L.

    1994-09-28

    This report analyzes the feasibility of using infrared imaging techniques and scanning equipment to detect potential hot spots within ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. A hot spot is defined as a volumetric region within a waste tank with an excessively warm temperature that is generated by radioactive isotopes. The thermal image of a hot spot was modeled by computer. this model determined the image an IR system must detect. Laboratory and field tests of the imaging system are described, and conclusions based on laboratory and field data are presented. The report shows that infrared imaging is capable of detecting hot spots in ferrocyanide waste tanks with depths of up to 3.94 m (155 in.). The infrared imaging system is a useful technology for initial evaluation and assessment of hot spots in the majority of ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The system will not allow an exact hot spot and temperature determination, but it will provide the necessary information to determine the worst-case hot spot detected in temperature patterns. Ferrocyanide tanks are one type of storage tank on the Watch List. These tanks are identified as priority 1 Hanford Site Tank farm Safety Issues.

  13. Spitzer-IRS Sectroscopy of the Prototype Wolf-Rayet star EZ CMa (HD 50896)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P W Morris; P A Crowther; J R Houck

    2004-06-03

    We present mid-infrared Spitzer-IRS spectroscopy of the prototype WN star EZ CMa (HD50896, WN4b). Numerous stellar wind lines of HeII are revealed, plus fine-structure lines of [NeIII] 15.5um and [OIV] 25.9um. We carry out a spectroscopic analysis of HD50896 allowing for line blanketing and clumping, which is compared to the mid-IR observations. We make use of these stellar properties to accurately derive Ne/He=1.2-1.8E-4 and O/He=4.2-4.8E-5 by number, for the first time in an early WN star. In addition, we obtain N/C=40 and N/O=50 by number, values in perfect agreement with current predictions for rotating massive stars at the end of interior hydrogen burning.

  14. Probing the Invisible Universe: The Case for Far-IR/Submillimeter Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Leisawitz; T. Armstrong; D. Benford; A. Blain; K. Borne W. Danchi; N. Evans; J. Gardner; D. Gezari; M. Harwit; A. Kashlinsky; W. Langer; C. Lawrence; P. Lawson; D. Lester; J. Mather; S. H. Moseley; L. Mundy; G. Rieke; S. Rinehart; M. Shao; R. Silverberg; D. Spergel; J. Staguhn; M. Swain; W. Traub; S. Unwin; E. Wright; H. Yorke

    2002-02-04

    The question "How did we get here and what will the future bring?" captures the human imagination and the attention of the National Academy of Science's Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Commitee (AASC). Fulfillment of this "fundamental goal" requires astronomers to have sensitive, high angular and spectral resolution observations in the far-infrared/submillimeter (far-IR/sub-mm) spectral region. With half the luminosity of the universe and vital information about galaxy, star and planet formation, observations in this spectral region require capabilities similar to those currently available or planned at shorter wavelengths. In this paper we summarize the scientific motivation, some mission concepts and technology requirements for far-IR/sub-mm space interferometers that can be developed in the 2010-2020 timeframe.

  15. Curing the UV/IR mixing for field theories with translation-invariant star products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanasa, Adrian; Vitale, Patrizia

    2010-03-15

    The ultraviolet/infrared (UV/IR) mixing of noncommutative field theories has been recently shown to be a generic feature of translation-invariant associative products. In this paper we propose to take into account the quantum corrections of the model to modify in this way the noncommutative action. This idea was already used to cure the UV/IR mixing for theories on Moyal space. We show that in the present framework also, this proposal proves successful for curing the mixing. We achieve this task by explicit calculations of one and higher loops Feynman amplitudes. For the sake of completeness, we compute the form of the new action in the matrix base for the Wick-Voros product.

  16. Precise measurement of alpha(K) for the M4 transition from Ir-193(m): A test of internal-conversion theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nica, N.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, VE; Raman, S.; Nestor, CW; Trzhaskovskaya, MB.

    2004-01-01

    The 10.5-day isomer in Ir-193 decays by a single 80.2-keV M4 transition directly to the ground state of that nucleus. We have measured the total intensity of K x rays relative to 80.2-keV gamma rays for this transition to ...

  17. Gas-Phase IR Spectroscopy of Nucleobases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Vries, MS

    2015-01-01

    ionization spectroscopy of gas phase guanine: Evidence for2007) Imino tautomers of gas-phase guanine from mid-infraredAlkali Metal Cation Size on Gas Phase Conformation. J. Am.

  18. Silicides for infrared surface plasmon resonance biosensors J. W. Cleary1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peale, Robert E.

    Silicides for infrared surface plasmon resonance biosensors J. W. Cleary1 , R. E. Peale1,2 , D, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816, U.S.A. 3 AFRL/RYHC, Sensors on silicon were evaluated as conducting hosts for surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in proposed long-wave IR

  19. Integrated standing-wave transform spectrometer for near infrared optical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, David A. B.

    Integrated standing-wave transform spectrometer for near infrared optical analysis S. R. Bhalotra standing-wave Fourier-transform spectrometer design has been developed for applica- tions in the near IR. Whereas recent development of the standing-wave architecture has been focused on interferometric sensing

  20. Feedback-Driven Evolution of the Far-Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanya Chakrabarti; T. J. Cox; Lars Hernquist; Philip F. Hopkins; Brant Robertson; Tiziana Di Matteo

    2007-01-22

    We calculate infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from simulations of major galaxy mergers and study the effect of AGN and starburst driven feedback on the evolution of the SED as a function of time. We use a self-consistent three-dimensional radiative equilibrium code to calculate the emergent SEDs and to make images. To facilitate a simple description of our findings, we describe our results in reference to an approximate analytic solution for the far-IR SED. We focus mainly on the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) and ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) phases of evolution. We contrast the SEDs of simulations performed with AGN feedback to simulations performed with starburst driven wind feedback. We find that the feedback processes critically determine the evolution of the SED. Changing the source of illumination (whether stellar or AGN) has virtually no impact on the reprocessed far-infrared SED. We find that AGN feedback is particularly effective at dispersing gas and rapidly injecting energy into the ISM. The observational signature of such powerful feedback is a warm SED. In general, simulations performed with starburst driven winds have colder spectra and reprocess more of their emission into the infrared, resulting in higher infrared to bolometric luminosities compared to (otherwise equivalent) simulations performed with AGN feedback. We depict our results in IRAS bands, as well as in Spitzer's MIPS bands, and in Herschel's PACS bands.

  1. Ternary Electrocatalysts for Oxidizing Ethanol to Carbon Dioxide: Making Ir Capable of Splitting C-C bond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Meng; Cullen, David A; Sasaki, Kotaro; Marinkovic, N.; More, Karren Leslie; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2013-01-01

    Splitting the C-C bond is the main obstacle to electroxidation of ethanol (EOR) to CO2. We recently demonstrated that the ternary PtRhSnO2 electrocatalyst can accomplish that reaction at room temperature with Rh having a unique capability to split the C-C bond. In this article we report the finding that Ir can be induced to split the C-C bond as a component of the ternary catalyst. We synthesized, characterized and compared the properties of several ternary electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported nanoparticle (NP) electrocatalysts comprising a SnO2 NP core decorated with multi-metallic nanoislands (MM = PtIr, PtRh, IrRh, PtIrRh) were prepared using a seeded growth approach. An array of characterization techniques were employed to establish the composition and architecture of the synthesized MM /SnO2 NPs, while electrochemical and in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies elucidated trends in activity and the nature of the reaction intermediates and products. Both EOR reactivity and selectivity towards CO2 formation of several of these MM /SnO2/C electrocatalysts are significantly higher compared to conventional Pt/C and Pt/SnO2/C catalysts. We demonstrate that the PtIr/SnO2/C catalyst with high Ir content shows outstanding catalytic property with the most negative EOR onset potential and reasonably good selectivity towards ethanol complete oxidation to CO2. PtRh/SnO2/C catalysts with a moderate Rh content exhibit the highest EOR selectivity, as deduced from infrared studies.

  2. A new mid-infrared map of the BN/KL region using the Keck telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuping, R Y; Bally, J; Morris, Mark; Bally, John

    2004-01-01

    We present a new mid-infrared (12.5micron) map of the BN/KL high-mass star-forming complex in Orion using the LWS instrument at Keck I. Despite poor weather we achieved nearly diffraction-limited images (FWHM = 0.38'') over a roughly 25'' X 25'' region centered on IRc2 down to a flux limit of ~250 mJy. Many of the known infrared (IR) sources in the region break up into smaller sub-components. We have also detected 6 new mid-IR sources. Nearly all of the sources are resolved in our mosaic. The near-IR source ''n'' is slightly elongated in the mid-IR along a NW--SE axis and perfectly bisects the double-peaked radio source ''L''. Source n has been identified as a candidate for powering the large IR luminosity of the BN/KL region (L = 10^5 L_sun). We postulate that the 12 micron emission arises in a circumstellar disk surrounding source n. The morphology of the mid-IR emission and the Orion ''hot core'' (as seen in NH_3 emission), along with the location of water and OH masers, is very suggestive of a bipolar cav...

  3. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, certain urban areas were required to add oxygenates to gasoline in order, violence, health issues and economic costs are beyond the scope of this introduction. In Part II range of the IR region extends from about 780 nm to 1,000 µm, with the relation between energy (E

  4. CANDELS/GOODS-S, CDFS, and ECDFS: photometric redshifts for normal and X-ray-detected galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, Li-Ting; Salvato, Mara; Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Bender, Ralf; Buchner, Johannes; Brightman, Murray; Georgakakis, Antonis; Donley, Jennifer L.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Guo, Yicheng; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Rangel, Cyprian; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S.; Dahlen, Tomas; and others

    2014-11-20

    We present photometric redshifts and associated probability distributions for all detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). This work makes use of the most up-to-date data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) in addition to other data. We also revisit multi-wavelength counterparts for published X-ray sources from the 4 Ms CDFS and 250 ks ECDFS surveys, finding reliable counterparts for 1207 out of 1259 sources (?96%). Data used for photometric redshifts include intermediate-band photometry deblended using the TFIT method, which is used for the first time in this work. Photometric redshifts for X-ray source counterparts are based on a new library of active galactic nuclei/galaxy hybrid templates appropriate for the faint X-ray population in the CDFS. Photometric redshift accuracy for normal galaxies is 0.010 and for X-ray sources is 0.014 and outlier fractions are 4% and 5.2%, respectively. The results within the CANDELS coverage area are even better, as demonstrated both by spectroscopic comparison and by galaxy-pair statistics. Intermediate-band photometry, even if shallow, is valuable when combined with deep broadband photometry. For best accuracy, templates must include emission lines.

  5. THE WISE BLAZAR-LIKE RADIO-LOUD SOURCES: AN ALL-SKY CATALOG OF CANDIDATE ?-RAY BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, H. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Massaro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Masetti, N. [INAF/IASF di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Landoni, M. [INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2014-11-01

    We present a catalog of radio-loud candidate ?-ray emitting blazars with WISE mid-infrared colors similar to the colors of confirmed ?-ray blazars. The catalog is assembled from WISE sources detected in all four WISE filters, with colors compatible with the three-dimensional locus of the WISE ?-ray emitting blazars, and which can be spatially cross-matched with radio sources from one of the three radio surveys: NVSS, FIRST, and/or SUMSS. Our initial WISE selection uses a slightly modified version of previously successful algorithms. We then select only the radio-loud sources using a measure of the radio-to-IR flux, the q {sub 22} parameter, which is analogous to the q {sub 24} parameter known in the literature but which instead uses the WISE band-four flux at 22 ?m. Our final catalog contains 7855 sources classified as BL Lacs, FSRQs, or mixed candidate blazars; 1295 of these sources can be spatially re-associated as confirmed blazars. We describe the properties of the final catalog of WISE blazar-like radio-loud sources and consider possible contaminants. Finally, we discuss why this large catalog of candidate ?-ray emitting blazars represents a new and useful resource to address the problem of finding low-energy counterparts to currently unidentified high-energy sources.

  6. Infrared length scale and extrapolations for the no-core shell model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendt, K A; Papenbrock, T; Sääf, D

    2015-01-01

    We precisely determine the infrared (IR) length scale of the no-core shell model (NCSM). In the NCSM, the $A$-body Hilbert space is truncated by the total energy, and the IR length can be determined by equating the intrinsic kinetic energy of $A$ nucleons in the NCSM space to that of $A$ nucleons in a $3(A-1)$-dimensional hyper-radial well with a Dirichlet boundary condition for the hyper radius. We demonstrate that this procedure indeed yields a very precise IR length by performing large-scale NCSM calculations for $^{6}$Li. We apply our result and perform accurate IR extrapolations for bound states of $^{4}$He, $^{6}$He, $^{6}$Li, $^{7}$Li. We also attempt to extrapolate NCSM results for $^{10}$B and $^{16}$O with bare interactions from chiral effective field theory over tens of MeV.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: IR Thermography...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IR Thermography as a Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Tool for Lithium-Ion Battery Manufacturing Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: IR Thermography as a Non-Destructive...

  8. A deep look at the nuclear region of UGC 5101 through high angular resolution mid-IR data with GTC/CanariCam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martínez-Paredes, M; Aretxaga, I; Almeida, C Ramos; Hernán-Caballero, A; González-Martín, O; Pereira-Santaella, M; Packham, C; Ramos, A Asensio; Díaz-Santos, T; Elitzur, M; Esquej, P; García-Bernete, I; Imanishi, M; Levenson, N A; Espinosa, J M Rodríguez

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the nuclear infrared (IR, 1.6 to 18 $\\mu$m) emission of the ultraluminous IR galaxy UGC 5101 to derive the properties of its active galactic nucleus (AGN) and its obscuring material. We use new mid-IR high angular resolution ($0.3-0.5$ arcsec) imaging using the Si-2 filter ($\\lambda_{C}=8.7\\, \\mu$m) and $7.5-13$ $\\mu$m spectroscopy taken with CanariCam (CC) on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS. We also use archival HST/NICMOS and Subaru/COMICS imaging and Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy. We estimate the near- and mid-IR unresolved nuclear emission by modelling the imaging data with GALFIT. We decompose the Spitzer/IRS and CC spectra using a power-law component, which represents the emission due to dust heated by the AGN, and a starburst component, both affected by foreground extinction. We model the resulting unresolved near- and mid-IR, and the starburst subtracted CC spectrum with the CLUMPY torus models of Nenkova et al. The derived geometrical properties of the torus, including the lar...

  9. Axion decay and anisotropy of near-IR extragalactic background light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Yan; Mitchell-Wynne, Ketron; Chen, Xuelei; Zemcov, Michael; Smidt, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The extragalactic background light is expected to be comprised of the cumulative radiation from all galaxies and active galactic nuclei over the cosmic history. In addition to point sources, EBL also contains information from diffuse sources of radiation. An example is the intra-halo light, associated with diffuse stars in dark matter halos resulting from galaxy mergers and tidal interactions, identified based on measurements involving the angular power spectrum of infrared background anisotropies. The angular power spectra of the near-infrared intensities could still contain additional signals and a complete understanding of the nature of the IR background is still lacking in the literature. Here we explore the constraints that can be placed on the decay products associated with particle decays, especially candidate dark matter models involving axions that trace dark matter halos of galaxies. Axions with a mass around a few eV will decay via two photons with wavelengths in the near-IR band, and will leave a ...

  10. IRS Spectra of Debris Disks in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang-Condell, Hannah; Manoj, P; Watson, Dan; Lisse, Carey M; Nesvold, Erika; Kuchner, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We analyze Spitzer/IRS spectra of 110 B-, A-, F-, and G-type stars with optically thin infrared excess in the Scorpius-Centaurus (ScoCen) OB association. The age of these stars ranges from 11-17 Myr. We fit the infrared excesses observed in these sources by Spitzer/IRS and Spitzer/MIPS to simple dust models according to Mie theory. We find that nearly all the objects in our study can be fit by one or two belts of dust. Dust around lower mass stars appears to be closer in than around higher mass stars, particularly for the warm dust component in the two-belt systems, suggesting mass-dependent evolution of debris disks around young stars. For those objects with stellar companions, all dust distances are consistent with trunction of the debris disk by the binary companion. The gaps between several of the two-belt systems can place limits on the planets that might lie between the belts, potentially constraining the mass and locations of planets that may be forming around these stars.

  11. The chemical instability of Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krizan, J.W., E-mail: jkrizan@princeton.edu; Roudebush, J.H.; Fox, G.M.; Cava, R.J.

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} decomposes rapidly in laboratory air. • The decomposition requires the simultaneous presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. • Decomposition results in a dramatic change in the magnetic properties. • Second 5 K feature in magnetic susceptibility not previously reported. - Abstract: We report that Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3}, which has a layered honeycomb iridium oxide sublattice interleaved by Na planes, decomposes in laboratory air while maintaining the same basic crystal structure. The decomposition reaction was monitored by time-dependent powder X-ray diffraction under different ambient atmospheres, through which it was determined that it occurs only in the simultaneous presence of both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. A hydrated sodium carbonate is the primary decomposition product along with altered Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3}. The diffraction signature of the altered Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} is quite similar to that of the pristine material, which makes the detection of decomposition difficult in a sample handled under ordinary laboratory conditions. The decomposed samples show a significantly decreased magnetic susceptibility and the disappearance of the low temperature antiferromagnetic transition considered to be characteristic of the phase. Samples that have never been exposed to air after synthesis display a previously unreported magnetic transition at 5 K.

  12. Infrared Extraction Change for the NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blednykh,A.; Carr, L.; Coburn, D.; Krinsky, S.

    2009-05-04

    The short- and long-range wakepotentials have been studied for the design of the infrared (IR) extraction chamber with large full aperture: 67mm vertical and 134mm horizontal. The IR-chamber will be installed within a 2.6m long wide-gap bending magnet with 25m bend radius. Due to the large bend radius it is difficult to separate the light from the electron trajectory. The required parameters of the collected IR radiation at the extraction mirror are {approx}50mrad horizontal and {approx}25mrad vertical (full radiation opening angles). If the extraction mirror is seen by the beam, resonant modes are generated in the chamber. In this paper, we present the detailed calculated impedance for the design of the far-IR chamber, and show that placing the extraction mirror in the proper position eliminates the resonances. In this case, the impedance reduces to that of a simple tapered structure, which is acceptable in regard to its impact on the electron beam.

  13. Infrared source test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, L.

    1994-11-15

    The purpose of the Infrared Source Test (IRST) is to demonstrate the ability to track a ground target with an infrared sensor from an airplane. The system is being developed within the Advance Technology Program`s Theater Missile Defense/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) section. The IRST payload consists of an Amber Radiance 1 infrared camera system, a computer, a gimbaled mirror, and a hard disk. The processor is a custom R3000 CPU board made by Risq Modular Systems, Inc. for LLNL. The board has ethernet, SCSI, parallel I/O, and serial ports, a DMA channel, a video (frame buffer) interface, and eight MBytes of main memory. The real-time operating system VxWorks has been ported to the processor. The application code is written in C on a host SUN 4 UNIX workstation. The IRST is the result of a combined effort by physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists.

  14. Modeling the Infrared Emission from the Epsilon Eridani Disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, A; Bendo, G J; Li, Aigen

    2003-01-01

    We model the infrared (IR) emission from the ring-like dust disk around the main-sequence (MS) star Epsilon Eridani, a young analog to our solar system, in terms of a porous dust model previously developed for the extended wedge-shaped disk around the MS star $\\beta$ Pictoris and the sharply truncated ring-like disks around the Herbig Ae/Be stars HR 4796A and HD 141569A. It is shown that the porous dust model with a porosity of $\\simali$90% is also successful in reproducing the IR to submillimeter dust emission spectral energy distribution as well as the 850$\\mum$ flux radial profile of the dust ring around the more evolved MS star Epsilon Eridani. Predictions are made for future {\\it SIRTF} observations which may allow a direct test of the porous dust model.

  15. Mechanical feedback in the molecular ISM of luminous IR galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Loenen; M. Spaans; W. A. Baan; R. Meijerink

    2008-08-20

    Aims: Molecular emission lines originating in the nuclei of luminous infra-red galaxies are used to determine the physical properties of the nuclear ISM in these systems. Methods: A large observational database of molecular emission lines is compared with model predictions that include heating by UV and X-ray radiation, mechanical heating, and the effects of cosmic rays. Results: The observed line ratios and model predictions imply a separation of the observedsystems into three groups: XDRs, UV-dominated high-density (n>=10^5 cm-3) PDRs, and lower-density (n=10^4.5 cm-3) PDRs that are dominated by mechanical feedback. Conclusions: The division of the two types of PDRs follows naturally from the evolution of the star formation cycle of these sources, which evolves from deeply embedded young stars, resulting in high-density (n>=10^5 cm-3) PDRs, to a stage where the gas density has decreased (n=10^4.5 cm-3) and mechanical feedback from supernova shocks dominates the heating budget.

  16. Mid Infrared Spectra of Radio Galaxies and Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Ogle; R. R. J. Antonucci; D. Whysong

    2006-12-15

    Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of 3C radio galaxies and quasars shed new light on the nature of the central engines of AGN. Emission from silicate dust obscuring the central engine can be used to estimate the bolometric luminosity of an AGN. Emission lines from ions such as O IV and Ne V give another indication of the presence or lack of a hidden source of far-UV photons in the nucleus. Radio-loud AGN with relative-to-Eddington luminosity ratios of L/L_Edd jet shocks in the interstellar medium.

  17. Laser Microperforated Biodegradable Microbial Polyhydroxyalkanoate Substrates for Tissue Repair Strategies: An Infrared Microspectroscopy Studey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G Ellis; P Cano; M Jadraque; M Martin; L Lopez; T Nunez; E de la Pena; C Marco; L Garrido

    2011-12-31

    Flexible and biodegradable film substrates prepared by solvent casting from poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBHV) solutions in chloroform were microperforated by ultraviolet laser ablation and subsequently characterized using infrared (IR) microspectroscopy and imaging techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both transmission synchrotron IR microspectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance microspectroscopy measurements demonstrate variations in the polymer at the ablated pore rims, including evidence for changes in chemical structure and crystallinity. SEM results on microperforated PHBHV substrates after cell culture demonstrated that the physical and chemical changes observed in the biomaterial did not hinder cell migration through the pores.

  18. Vacuum ultraviolet and infrared spectra of condensed methyl acetate on cold astrochemical dust analogs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivaraman, B.; Nair, B. G.; Mason, N. J.; Lo, J.-I.; Cheng, B.-M.; Kundu, S.; Davis, D.; Prabhudesai, V.; Krishnakumar, E.; Raja Sekhar, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    Following the recent report of the first identification of methyl acetate (CH{sub 3}COOCH{sub 3}) in the interstellar medium (ISM), we have carried out vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy studies on methyl acetate from 10 K until sublimation in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber simulating astrochemical conditions. We present the first VUV and IR spectra of methyl acetate relevant to ISM conditions. Spectral signatures clearly showed molecular reorientation to have started in the ice by annealing the amorphous ice formed at 10 K. An irreversible phase change from amorphous to crystalline methyl acetate ice was found to occur between 110 K and 120 K.

  19. Synchrotron IR microspectroscopy for protein structure analysis: Potential and questions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced technique to the study of pure protein inherent structure at a cellular level in biological tissues. In this review, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of the newly developed, advancedmore »synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to localize relatively “pure“ protein in the plant tissues and relatively reveal protein inherent structure and protein molecular chemical make-up within intact tissue at cellular and subcellular levels. Several complex protein IR spectra data analytical techniques (Gaussian and Lorentzian multi-component peak modeling, univariate and multivariate analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) are employed to relatively reveal features of protein inherent structure and distinguish protein inherent structure differences between varieties/species and treatments in plant tissues. By using a multi-peak modeling procedure, RELATIVE estimates (but not EXACT determinations) for protein secondary structure analysis can be made for comparison purpose. The issues of pro- and anti-multi-peaking modeling/fitting procedure for relative estimation of protein structure were discussed. By using the PCA and CLA analyses, the plant molecular structure can be qualitatively separate one group from another, statistically, even though the spectral assignments are not known. The synchrotron-based technology provides a new approach for protein structure research in biological tissues at ultraspatial resolutions.« less

  20. PAH chemistry and IR emission from circumstellar disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Visser; V. C. Geers; C. P. Dullemond; J. -C. Augereau; K. M. Pontoppidan; E. F. van Dishoeck

    2007-01-22

    Aims. The chemistry of, and infrared (IR) emission from, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in disks around Herbig Ae/Be and T Tauri stars are investigated. The equilibrium distribution of the PAHs over all accessible charge/hydrogenation states depends on the size and shape of the PAHs and on the physical properties of the star and surrounding disk. Methods. A chemistry model is created to calculate this equilibrium distribution. Destruction of PAHs by ultraviolet (UV) photons, possibly in multi-photon absorption events, is taken into account. The chemistry model is coupled to a radiative transfer code to provide the physical parameters and to combine the PAH emission with the spectral energy distribution (SED) from the star+disk system. Results. Normally hydrogenated PAHs in Herbig Ae/Be disks account for most of the observed PAH emission, with neutral and positively ionized species contributing in roughly equal amounts. Close to the midplane, the PAHs are more strongly hydrogenated and negatively ionized, but these species do not contribute to the overall emission because of the low UV/optical flux deep inside the disk. PAHs of 50 carbon atoms are destroyed out to 100 AU in the disk's surface layer, and the resulting spatial extent of the emission does not agree well with observations. Rather, PAHs of about 100 carbon atoms or more are predicted to cause most of the observed emission. The emission is extended on a scale similar to that of the size of the disk. Furthermore, the emission from T Tauri disks is much weaker and concentrated more towards the central star than that from Herbig Ae/Be disks. Positively ionized PAHs are predicted to be largely absent in T Tauri disks because of the weaker radiation field.

  1. IR-Improved DGLAP-CS Theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ward, B. F. L.

    2008-01-01

    We show that it is possible to improve the infrared aspects of the standard treatment of the DGLAP-CS evolution theory to take into account a large class of higher-order corrections that significantly improve the precision of the theory for any given level of fixed-order calculation of its respective kernels. We illustrate the size of the effects we resum using the moments of the parton distributions.

  2. Study of the Effects of Ambient Conditions Upon the Performance of Fan Powered, Infrared Natural Gas Burners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark Atlanta University

    2002-12-02

    The objective of this investigation was to characterize the operation of a fan-powered, infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions, develop numerical model to simulate the burner performances, and provide design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance.

  3. An empirical determination of the intergalactic background light using near-infrared deep galaxy survey data out to 5 ?m and the gamma-ray opacity of the universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scully, Sean T.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2014-04-01

    We extend our previous model-independent determination of the intergalactic background light, based purely on galaxy survey data, out to a wavelength of 5 ?m. Our approach enables us to constrain the range of photon densities, based on the uncertainties from observationally determined luminosity densities and colors. We further determine a 68% confidence upper and lower limit on the opacity of the universe to ?-rays up to energies of 1.6/(1 + z) TeV. A comparison of our lower limit redshift-dependent opacity curves to the opacity limits derived from the results of both ground-based air Cerenkov telescope and Fermi-LAT observations of PKS 1424+240 allows us to place a new upper limit on the redshift of this source, independent of IBL modeling.

  4. Near infrared surfaceplasmonpolariton with hyperbolic metamaterials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Near infrared surfaceplasmonpolariton with hyperbolic metamaterials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Near infrared surfaceplasmonpolariton with hyperbolic metamaterials....

  5. Infrared floodlight assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wierzbicki, Julian J. (Peabody, MA); Chakrabarti, Kirti B. (Danvers, MA)

    1987-09-22

    An infrared floodlight assembly (10) including a cast aluminum outer housing (11) defining a central chamber (15) therein. A floodlight (14), having a tungsten halogen lamp as the light source, is spacedly positioned within a heat conducting member (43) within chamber (15) such that the floodlight is securedly positioned in an aligned manner relative to the assembly's filter (35) and lens (12) components. The invention also includes venting means (51) to allow air passage between the interior of the member (43) and the adjacent chamber (15), as well as engagement means (85) for engaging a rear surface of the floodlight (14) to retain it firmly against an internal flange of the member (43). A reflector (61), capable of being compressed to allow insertion or removal, is located within the heat conducting member's interior between the floodlight (14) and filter (35) to reflect infrared radiation toward the filter (35) and spaced lens (12).

  6. The far-infrared emission of the radio-loud quasar 3C318

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podigachoski, P; Peletier, R F; Steendam, S

    2015-01-01

    3C318, a radio-loud quasar at z=1.574, is a subgalactic-sized radio source, and a good test-bed for the interplay between black hole and galaxy growth in the high-z Universe. Based on its IRAS, ISO, and SCUBA detections, it has long been considered as one of the most intrinsically luminous (L$_{\\mathrm{IR}}$ > 10$^{13}$ L$_{\\odot}$) infrared sources in the Universe. Recent far-infrared data from the Herschel Space Observatory reveal that most of the flux associated with 3C318 measured with earlier instruments in fact comes from a bright nearby source. Optical imaging and spectroscopy show that this infrared-bright source is a strongly star-forming pair of interacting galaxies at z=0.35. Adding existing Spitzer and SDSS photometry, we perform a spectral energy distribution analysis of the pair, and find that it has a combined infrared luminosity of L$_{\\mathrm{IR}}$ = 1.5 $\\times$ 10$^{12}$ L$_{\\odot}$, comparable to other intermediate-redshift ultra-luminous infrared galaxies studied with Herschel. Isolating ...

  7. R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) and RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd): Crystal structures with nets of Ir atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarema, Maksym [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla i Mefodiya Str, 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine) [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla i Mefodiya Str, 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA), Ueberlandstr. 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Zaremba, Oksana; Gladyshevskii, Roman [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla i Mefodiya Str, 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla i Mefodiya Str, 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Hlukhyy, Viktor, E-mail: viktor.hlukhyy@lrz.tu-muenchen.de [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany)] [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Faessler, Thomas F. [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany)] [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The crystal structures of the new ternary compounds Sm{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} and LaIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} were determined and refined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. They belong to the Ho{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} (oP52, Pmmn) and CeCo{sub 3}B{sub 2} (hP5, P6/mmm) structure types, respectively. The formation of isotypic compounds R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} with R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} with R=Ce, Pr, Nd, was established by powder X-ray diffraction. The RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd) compounds exist only in as-cast samples and decompose during annealing at 800 Degree-Sign C with the formation of R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9}. The structure of Sm{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} contains intersecting, slightly puckered nets of Ir atoms (4{sup 4})(4{sup 3}.6){sub 2}(4.6{sup 2}){sub 2} and (4{sup 4}){sub 2}(4{sup 3}.6){sub 4}(4.6{sup 2}){sub 2} that are perpendicular to [0 1 1] as well as to [0 -1 1] and [0 0 1]. The Ir atoms are surrounded by Ge atoms that form tetrahedra or square pyramids (where the layers intersect). The Sm and additional Ir atoms (in trigonal-planar coordination) are situated in channels along [1 0 0] (short translation vector). In the structure of LaIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} the Ir atoms form planar Kagome nets (3.6.3.6) perpendicular to [0 0 1]. These nets alternate along the short translation vector with layers of La and Ge atoms. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structures contain the nets of Ir atoms as main structural motif: R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} contains intersecting slightly puckered nets of Ir atoms, whereas in the structure of RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} the Ir atoms form planar Kagome nets. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ir-rich ternary germanides R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) and RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd) have been synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} compounds exist only in as-cast samples and decompose during annealing at 800 Degree-Sign C with the formation of R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure of R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} contains intersecting slightly puckered nets of Ir atoms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the structure of RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} the Ir atoms form planar Kagome nets.

  8. Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability and Instrumentation Working Group Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Summary of the Optics,...

  9. Ir-based alloys for ultra-high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T.; George, Easo P.; Bloom, Everett E.

    2006-01-03

    An alloy composition includes, in atomic percent: about 1 to about 10% of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Zr and Hf, balance Ir.

  10. The role of the (111) texture on the exchange bias and interlayer coupling effects observed in sputtered NiFe/IrMn/Co trilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, I. L.; Nascimento, V. P.; Passamani, E. C.; Takeuchi, A. Y.; Larica, C.; Tafur, M.; Pelegrini, F.

    2013-05-28

    Magnetic properties of sputtered NiFe/IrMn/Co trilayers grown on different seed layers (Cu or Ta) deposited on Si (100) substrates were investigated by magnetometry and ferromagnetic resonance measurements. Exchange bias effect and magnetic spring behavior have been studied by changing the IrMn thickness. As shown by X-ray diffraction, Ta and Cu seed layers provoke different degrees of (111) fcc-texture that directly affect the exchange bias and indirectly modify the exchange spring coupling behavior. Increasing the IrMn thickness, it was observed that the coupling angle between the Co and NiFe ferromagnetic layers increases for the Cu seed system, but it reduces for the Ta case. The results were explained considering (i) different anisotropies of the Co and IrMn layers induced by the different degree of the (111) texture and (ii) the distinct exchange bias set at the NiFe/IrMn and IrMn/Co interfaces in both systems. The NiFe and Co interlayer coupling angle is strongly correlated with both exchange bias and exchange magnetic spring phenomena. It was also shown that the highest exchange bias field occurs when an unstressed L1{sub 2} IrMn structure is stabilized.

  11. ON THE VIABILITY OF THE PAH MODEL AS AN EXPLANATION OF THE UNIDENTIFIED INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yong; Kwok, Sun E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are widely considered the preferred candidate for the carrier of the unidentified infrared emission bands observed in the interstellar medium and circumstellar envelopes. In this paper, we report the results of fitting a variety of non-PAH spectra (silicates, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, coal, and even artificial spectra) using the theoretical infrared spectra of PAHs from the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. We show that these non-PAH spectra can be well fitted by PAH mixtures. This suggests that a general match between astronomical spectra and those of PAH mixtures does not necessarily provide definitive support for the PAH hypothesis.

  12. Spitzer IRS Spectra and Envelope Models of Class I Protostars in Taurus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Furlan; M. McClure; N. Calvet; L. Hartmann; P. D'Alessio; W. J. Forrest; D. M. Watson; K. I. Uchida; B. Sargent; J. D. Green; T. L. Herter

    2007-11-26

    We present Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra of 28 Class I protostars in the Taurus star-forming region. The 5 to 36 micron spectra reveal excess emission from the inner regions of the envelope and accretion disk surrounding these predecessors of low-mass stars, as well as absorption features due to silicates and ices. Together with shorter- and longer-wavelength data from the literature, we construct spectral energy distributions and fit envelope models to 22 protostars of our sample, most of which are well-constrained due to the availability of the IRS spectra. We infer that the envelopes of the Class I objects in our sample cover a wide range in parameter space, particularly in density and centrifugal radius, implying different initial conditions for the collapse of protostellar cores.

  13. Water Absorption from Gas Very Near the Massive Protostar AFGL 2136 IRS 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indriolo, Nick; Seifahrt, A; Richter, M J

    2013-01-01

    We present ground-based observations of the nu_1 and nu_3 fundamental bands of H2O toward the massive protostar AFGL 2136 IRS 1, identifying absorption features due to 47 different ro-vibrational transitions between 2.468 micron and 2.561 micron. Analysis of these features indicates the absorption arises in warm (T=506+-25 K), very dense (n(H2)>5*10^9 cm^-3) gas, suggesting an origin close to the central protostar. The total column density of warm water is estimated to be N(H2O)=(1.02+-0.02)*10^19 cm^-2, giving a relative abundance of N(H2O)/N(H2)~10^-4. Our study represents the first extensive use of water vapor absorption lines in the near infrared, and demonstrates the utility of such observations in deriving physical parameters.

  14. Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organci molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan Thomas; Michael Kelley

    2007-06-18

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on ?-alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto ?-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

  15. Comparison of laser-based mitigation of fused silica surface damage using mid- versus far-infrared lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2009-12-16

    Laser induced growth of optical damage can limit component lifetime and therefore operating costs of large-aperture fusion-class laser systems. While far-infrared (IR) lasers have been used previously to treat laser damage on fused silica optics and render it benign, little is known about the effectiveness of less-absorbing mid-IR lasers for this purpose. In this study, they quantitatively compare the effectiveness and efficiency of mid-IR (4.6 {micro}m) versus far-IR (10.6 {micro}m) lasers in mitigating damage growth on fused silica surfaces. The non-linear volumetric heating due to mid-IR laser absorption is analyzed by solving the heat equation numerically, taking into account the temperature-dependent absorption coefficient {alpha}(T) at {lambda} = 4.6 {micro}m, while far-IR laser heating is well-described by a linear analytic approximation to the laser-driven temperature rise. In both cases, the predicted results agree well with surface temperature measurements based on infrared radiometry, as well as sub-surface fictive temperature measurements based on confocal Raman microscopy. Damage mitigation efficiency is assessed using a figure of merit (FOM) relating the crack healing depth to laser power required, under minimally-ablative conditions. Based on their FOM, they show that for cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation with a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation with a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser. This conclusion is corroborated by direct application of each laser system to the mitigation of pulsed laser-induced damage possessing fractures up to 225 {micro}m in depth.

  16. A New DBMS Architecture for DB-IR Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whang, Kyu-Young

    A New DBMS Architecture for DB-IR Integration Kyu-Young Whang Computer Science Department. Nowadays, as there is an increasing need to integrate the DBMS (for structured data) with Information is required. In this talk, we present a new DBMS architecture applica- ble to DB-IR integration, which we call

  17. Modeling IR Radiative Loss from Eppley PSP Pyranometers Frank Vignola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Renewable Energy Laboratory ABSTRACT A method has been developed to estimate IR radiative losses using solar, irradiance, IR, modeling, global, diffuse, PSP 1. INTRODUCTION Since the 1970s, solar radiation data has been Energy Laboratory (NREL) data page3 along with the original global data. Corrections to the PSP

  18. Soft X-ray irradiation of methanol ice: Formation of products as a function of photon energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Juang, K.-J.; Yih, T.-S. [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli City, Taoyuan County 32054, Taiwan (China); Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.za Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Jiménez-Escobar, A., E-mail: aciaravella@astropa.unipa.it [Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir, km 4, Torrejón de Ardoz, E-28850 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-12-01

    Pure methanol ices have been irradiated with monochromatic soft X-rays of 300 and 550 eV close to the 1s resonance edges of C and O, respectively, and with a broadband spectrum (250-1200 eV). The infrared (IR) spectra of the irradiated ices show several new products of astrophysical interest such as CH{sub 2}OH, H{sub 2}CO, CH{sub 4}, HCOOH, HCOCH{sub 2}OH, CH{sub 3}COOH, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and (CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, as well as HCO, CO, and CO{sub 2}. The effect of X-rays is the result of the combined interactions of photons and electrons with the ice. A significant contribution to the formation and growth of new species in the CH{sub 3}OH ice irradiated with X-rays is given by secondary electrons, whose energy distribution depends on the energy of X-ray photons. Within a single experiment, the abundances of the new products increase with the absorbed energy. Monochromatic experiments show that product abundances also increase with the photon energy. However, the abundances per unit energy of newly formed species show a marked decrease in the broadband experiment as compared to irradiations with monochromatic photons, suggesting a possible regulatory role of the energy deposition rate. The number of new molecules produced per absorbed eV in the X-ray experiments has been compared to those obtained with electron and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiments.

  19. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of the series of double perovskites (Ca,Sr){sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bufaiçal, L.; Adriano, C.; Lora-Serrano, R.; Duque, J.G.S.; Mendonça-Ferreira, L.; Rojas-Ayala, C.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.; Bittar, E.M.; Pagliuso, P.G.

    2014-04-01

    Polycrystalline samples of the series of double perovskites Sr{sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} were synthesized. Their structural, electronic and magnetic properties were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity and electrical resistivity experiments. The compounds crystallize in a monoclinic structure and were fitted in space group P2{sub 1}/n, with a significant degree of Fe/Ir cationic disorder. As in Ca{sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} the Sr-based system seems to evolve from an antiferromagnetic ground state for the end members (x=0.0 and x=2.0) to a ferrimagnetic order in the intermediate regions (x?1). Since Mössbauer spectra indicate that Fe valence remains 3+ with doping, this tendency of change in the nature of the microscopic interaction could be attributed to Ir valence changes, induced by La{sup 3+} electrical doping. Upon comparing both Ca and Sr series, Sr{sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} is more structurally homogenous and presents higher magnetization and transition temperatures. Magnetic susceptibility measurements at high temperatures on Sr{sub 1.2}La{sub 0.8}FeIrO{sub 6} indicate a very high ferrimagnetic Curie temperature T{sub C}?700K. For the Sr{sub 2}FeIrO{sub 6} compound, electrical resistivity experiments under applied pressure suggest that this material might be a Mott insulator. - Graphical abstract: The Weiss constant as a function of La doping for the (Ca,Sr){sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} series, indicating changes in Fe–Ir magnetic coupling on both families. - Highlights: • The double perovskite series (Ca,Sr){sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} were synthesized. • Changes in the Fe-Ir magnetic coupling due to La doping on both series. • Evidence of high T{sub C} on Sr{sub 1.2}La{sub 0.8}FeIrO{sub 6}. • Indication of Mott insulator behavior on Sr{sub 2}FeIrO{sub 6}.

  20. Discovery of GeV emission from the direction of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 2146

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Qing-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Yu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Thomas Tam, Pak-Hin, E-mail: xywang@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-10

    Recent detections of high-energy gamma-ray emission from starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253 suggest that starburst galaxies are huge reservoirs of cosmic rays and these cosmic rays convert a significant fraction of their energy into gamma-rays by colliding with the dense interstellar medium. In this paper, we report the search for high-energy gamma-ray emission from several nearby star-forming and starburst galaxies using the 68 month data obtained with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We found a ?5.5? detection of gamma-ray emission above 200 MeV from a source spatially coincident with the location of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 2146. Also taking into account the temporal and spectral properties of the gamma-ray emission, we suggest that the gamma-ray source is likely to be the counterpart of NGC 2146. The gamma-ray luminosity suggests that cosmic rays in NGC 2146 convert most of their energy into secondary pions, so NGC 2146 is a 'proton calorimeter'. It is also found that NGC 2146 obeys the quasi-linear scaling relation between gamma-ray luminosity and total infrared luminosity for star-forming galaxies, strengthening the connection between massive star formation and gamma-ray emission of star-forming galaxies. Possible TeV emission from NGC 2146 is predicted and the implications for high-energy neutrino emission from starburst galaxies are discussed.

  1. Infrared Passbands for Precise Photometry of Variable Stars by Amateur and Professional Astronomers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugene F. Milone; Andrew T. Young

    2008-05-24

    The Infrared spectral region is a rich one for variable star work, especially of cooler stars, but it has been hard to do IR photometry because of high, variable background, and specialized telescopic equipment that is usually required to obtain meaningful data. Typically telescopes with IR detectors have been at high elevations, to minimize water vapor absorption. Nearly all the filters produced for astronomical work at observatories around the world have not been optimized for use at anything other than the highest and driest of observatories. This has made it difficult for amateur astronomers to contribute to this field. Now, however, this is no longer the case. The IAU's Infrared Working Group (IRWG) has designed and tested a set of IR filters less sensitive to water vapor, permitting observations at any site where precise optical photometry can be carried out. Data acquired with these filters can be corrected easily for atmospheric (water vapor) extinction, unlike the situation with the older IR filters. We demonstrate this with data from the University of Calgary's Rothney Astrophysical Observatory.

  2. Infrared-Transparent Visible-Opaque Fabrics for Wearable Personal Thermal Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Jonathan K; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Loomis, James; Xu, Yanfei; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Personal cooling technologies locally control the temperature of an individual rather than a large space, thus providing personal thermal comfort while supplementing cooling loads in thermally regulated environments. This can lead to significant energy and cost savings. In this study, a new approach to personal cooling was developed using an infrared-transparent visible-opaque fabric (ITVOF), which provides passive cooling via the transmission of thermal radiation emitted by the human body directly to the environment. Here, we present a conceptual framework to thermally and optically design an ITVOF. Using a heat transfer model, the fabric was found to require a minimum infrared (IR) transmittance of 0.644 and a maximum IR reflectance of 0.2 to ensure thermal comfort at ambient temperatures as high as 26.1oC (79oF). To meet these requirements, an ITVOF design was developed using synthetic polymer fibers with an intrinsically low IR absorptance. These fibers were then structured to minimize IR reflection via w...

  3. Sensitive Multi-Species Emissions Monitoring: Infrared Laser-Based Detection of Trace-Level Contaminants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steill, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes our development of spectroscopic chemical analysis techniques and spectral modeling for trace-gas measurements of highly-regulated low-concentration species present in flue gas emissions from utility coal boilers such as HCl under conditions of high humidity. Detailed spectral modeling of the spectroscopy of HCl and other important combustion and atmospheric species such as H 2 O, CO 2 , N 2 O, NO 2 , SO 2 , and CH 4 demonstrates that IR-laser spectroscopy is a sensitive multi-component analysis strategy. Experimental measurements from techniques based on IR laser spectroscopy are presented that demonstrate sub-ppm sensitivity levels to these species. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify HCl at ppm levels with extremely high signal-to-noise even under conditions of high relative humidity. Additionally, cavity ring-down IR spectroscopy is used to achieve an extremely high sensitivity to combustion trace gases in this spectral region; ppm level CH 4 is one demonstrated example. The importance of spectral resolution in the sensitivity of a trace-gas measurement is examined by spectral modeling in the mid- and near-IR, and efforts to improve measurement resolution through novel instrument development are described. While previous project reports focused on benefits and complexities of the dual-etalon cavity ring-down infrared spectrometer, here details on steps taken to implement this unique and potentially revolutionary instrument are described. This report also illustrates and critiques the general strategy of IR- laser photodetection of trace gases leading to the conclusion that mid-IR laser spectroscopy techniques provide a promising basis for further instrument development and implementation that will enable cost-effective sensitive detection of multiple key contaminant species simultaneously.

  4. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Dr. Kyle J. Alvine, kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 21C...

  5. Simultaneous multi-beam planar array IR (pair) spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmore, Douglas L.; Rabolt, John F.; Tsao, Mei-Wei

    2005-09-13

    An apparatus and method capable of providing spatially multiplexed IR spectral information simultaneously in real-time for multiple samples or multiple spatial areas of one sample using IR absorption phenomena requires no moving parts or Fourier Transform during operation, and self-compensates for background spectra and degradation of component performance over time. IR spectral information and chemical analysis of the samples is determined by using one or more IR sources, sampling accessories for positioning the samples, optically dispersive elements, a focal plane array (FPA) arranged to detect the dispersed light beams, and a processor and display to control the FPA, and display an IR spectrograph. Fiber-optic coupling can be used to allow remote sensing. Portability, reliability, and ruggedness is enhanced due to the no-moving part construction. Applications include determining time-resolved orientation and characteristics of materials, including polymer monolayers. Orthogonal polarizers may be used to determine certain material characteristics.

  6. NaIrO3—A Pentavalent Post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Bremholm; S Dutton; P Stephens; R Cava

    2011-12-31

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides.

  7. Spatially Resolved Spitzer-IRS Spectral Maps of the Superwind in M82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beirão, P; Lehnert, M D; Guillard, P; Heckman, T; Draine, B; Hollenbach, D; Walter, F; Sheth, K; Smith, J D; Shopbell, P; Boulanger, F; Surace, J; Hoopes, C; Engelbracht, C

    2015-01-01

    We have mapped the superwind/halo region of the nearby starburst galaxy M82 in the mid-infrared with $Spitzer-IRS$. The spectral regions covered include the H$_2 S(1)-S(3)$, [NeII], [NeIII] emission lines and PAH features. We estimate the total warm H$_2$ mass and the kinetic energy of the outflowing warm molecular gas to be between $M_{warm}\\sim5-17\\times10^6$ M$_{\\odot}$ and $E_{K}\\sim6-20\\times10^{53}$ erg. Using the ratios of the 6.2, 7.7 and 11.3 micron PAH features in the IRS spectra, we are able to estimate the average size and ionization state of the small grains in the superwind. There are large variations in the PAH flux ratios throughout the outflow. The 11.3/7.7 and the 6.2/7.7 PAH ratios both vary by more than a factor of five across the wind region. The Northern part of the wind has a significant population of PAH's with smaller 6.2/7.7 ratios than either the starburst disk or the Southern wind, indicating that on average, PAH emitters are larger and more ionized. The warm molecular gas to PAH f...

  8. New algorithms and technologies for the un-supervised reduction of Optical/IR images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit Vandame

    2002-08-12

    This paper presents some of the main aspects of the software library that has been developed for the reduction of optical and infrared images, an integral part of the end-to-end survey system being built to support public imaging surveys at ESO. Some of the highlights of the new library are: unbiased estimates of the background, critical for deep IR observations; efficient and accurate astrometric solutions, using multi-resolution techniques; automatic identification and masking of satellite tracks; weighted co-addition of images; creation of optical/IR mosaics, and appropriate management of multi-chip instruments. These various elements have been integrated into a system using XML technology for setting input parameters, driving the various processes, producing comprehensive history logs and storing the results, binding them to the supporting database and to the web. The system has been extensively tested using deep images as well as images of crowded fields (e.g. globular clusters, LMC), processing at a rate of 0.5 Mega-pixels per second using a DS20E ALPHA computer with two processors. The goal of this presentation is to review some of the main features of this package.

  9. Sonic IR crack detection of aircraft turbine engine blades with multi-frequency ultrasound excitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ding; Han, Xiaoyan; Newaz, Golam

    2014-02-18

    Effectively and accurately detecting cracks or defects in critical engine components, such as turbine engine blades, is very important for aircraft safety. Sonic Infrared (IR) Imaging is such a technology with great potential for these applications. This technology combines ultrasound excitation and IR imaging to identify cracks and flaws in targets. In general, failure of engine components, such as blades, begins with tiny cracks. Since the attenuation of the ultrasound wave propagation in turbine engine blades is small, the efficiency of crack detection in turbine engine blades can be quite high. The authors at Wayne State University have been developing the technology as a reliable tool for the future field use in aircraft engines and engine parts. One part of the development is to use finite element modeling to assist our understanding of effects of different parameters on crack heating while experimentally hard to achieve. The development has been focused with single frequency ultrasound excitation and some results have been presented in a previous conference. We are currently working on multi-frequency excitation models. The study will provide results and insights of the efficiency of different frequency excitation sources to foster the development of the technology for crack detection in aircraft engine components.

  10. Observations of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope II: The IRAS Bright Galaxy Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Armus; V. Charmandaris; J. Bernard-Salas; H. W. W. Spoon; J. A. Marshall; S. J. U Higdon; V. Desai; H. I. Teplitz; L. Hao; D. Devost; B. R. Brandl; Y. Wu; G. C. Sloan; B. T. Soifer; J. R. Houck; T. L. Herter

    2006-10-06

    We present spectra taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on Spitzer covering the 5-38 micron region of the ten Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) found in the IRAS Bright Galaxy Sample. Among the BGS ULIRGs, we find a factor of 50 spread in the rest-frame mid to far-infrared spectral slope. The 9.7 micron silicate optical depths range from less than 0.4 more than 4.2, implying line of sight extinctions of A(V) ~ 8 - 78 mag. There is evidence for water ice and hydrocarbon absorption and C2H2 and HCN absorption features in four and possibly six of the 10 BGS ULIRGs, indicating shielded molecular clouds and a warm, dense ISM. We have detected [NeV] emission in three of the ten BGS ULIRGs, at flux levels of 5-18E-14 erg/cm^2/sec and [NeV] 14.3/[NeII] 12.8 line flux ratios of 0.12-0.85. The remaining BGS ULIRGs have limits on their [NeV]/[NeII] line flux ratios which range from less than 0.15 to less than 0.01. Among the BGS ULIRGs, the AGN fractions implied by either the [NeV]/[NeII] or [OIV]/[NeII] line flux ratios (or their upper limits) are significantly lower than implied by the MIR slope or EQW of the 6.2 micron PAH feature. Fitting the SEDs, we see evidence for hot (T > 300K) dust in five of the BGS ULIRGs, with the fraction of hot dust to total dust luminosity ranging from ~1-23%, before correcting for extinction. When integrated over the IRAC-8, IRS blue peakup, and MIPS-24 filter bandpasses, the IRS spectra imply very blue colors for some ULIRGs at z ~ 1.3. This is most extreme for sources with significant amounts of warm dust and deep silicate absorption.

  11. AN EVOLVING COMPACT JET IN THE BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY MAXI J1836-194

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, D. M.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Soria, R.; Slaven-Blair, T.; Curran, P. A.; O'Brien, K.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Lewis, F.; Markoff, S.; Altamirano, D.; Homan, J.; Rupen, M. P.; Dhawan, V.; Belloni, T. M.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Casella, P.; Corbel, S.; Gallo, E.; and others

    2013-05-10

    We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from {approx}10{sup 11} to {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high-energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process.

  12. Lateral conduction infrared photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Carroll, Malcolm S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-09-20

    A photodetector for detecting infrared light in a wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m is disclosed. The photodetector has a mesa structure formed from semiconductor layers which include a type-II superlattice formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. Impurity doped regions are formed on sidewalls of the mesa structure to provide for a lateral conduction of photo-generated carriers which can provide an increased carrier mobility and a reduced surface recombination. An optional bias electrode can be used in the photodetector to control and vary a cut-off wavelength or a depletion width therein. The photodetector can be formed as a single-color or multi-color device, and can also be used to form a focal plane array which is compatible with conventional read-out integrated circuits.

  13. Heat Loss Measurement Using Infrared Imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seeber, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    Infrared thermography has proven to be an important tool in numerous plant maintenance and energy conservation applications. Quantitative measurement, using infrared imaging instruments, is a powerful new dimension of infrared thermography...

  14. Near-Infrared photometry of carbon stars in the Sagittarius dwarf irregular galaxy and DDO 210

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gullieuszik; M. Rejkuba; M. R. Cioni; H. J. Habing; E. V. Held

    2007-09-06

    We investigate the intermediate-age asymptotic giant branch stellar population of two Local Group dwarf irregular galaxies to characterize their carbon star population in near-infrared (IR). Our work is based on J and K-band SOFI near-IR photometry complemented with optical ground based and HST photometry. We show that near-IR photometry is a very powerful tool for carbon star detection. We recovered two out of three previously-known carbon stars in DDO 210 and discovered six additional objects in this galaxy which have optical and near-IR colors consistent with carbon giants. This brings the total number of bona-fide C-star candidates in DDO 210 to nine. We detected a large population of C-star candidates in SagDIG, 18 of which were previously identified in Demers & Battinelli (2002) and Cook (1987), and six new bona-fide carbon stars. We present their optical and near-IR colors and use their luminosity function to put constraints on the star formation history (SFH) in this dwarf irregular galaxy.

  15. SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN ROTATIONAL EMISSION TOWARDS TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SPITZER INFRARED...

  16. IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Treasury and the IRS published new guidance today allocating Tribal Economic Development Bonds (TEDBs) for Tribes that have projects that are in the final stages of going to the market to receive financing.

  17. DWEA Webinar: IRS Guidance for Small Wind Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued Notice 2015-4 providing new performance and quality standards of small wind turbines – defined as having a nameplate capacity of up to 100 kW – in...

  18. New IRS Rules for Small and Medium Wind Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Small Wind Certification Council (SWCC) will host a webinar on how certification is being used to meet the new Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requirements for small and medium wind turbines...

  19. Free Electron Lasers Seeded by ir Laser Driven High-order Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Juhao; Bolton, Paul R.; /SLAC; Murphy, James B.; /BNL, NSLS; Zhong, Xinming; /Beijing Normal U.

    2007-03-12

    Coherent x-ray production by a seeded free electron laser (FEL) is important for next generation synchrotron light sources. We examine the feasibility and features of FEL emission seeded by a high-order harmonic of an infrared laser (HHG). In addition to the intrinsic FEL chirp, the longitudinal profile and spectral bandwidth of the HHG seed are modified significantly by the FEL interaction well before saturation. This smears out the original attosecond pulselet structure. We introduce criteria for this smearing effect on the pulselet and the stretching effect on the entire pulse. We discuss the noise issue in such a seeded FEL.

  20. A new mid-infrared map of the BN/KL region using the Keck telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Y. Shuping; Mark Morris; John Bally

    2004-04-06

    We present a new mid-infrared (12.5micron) map of the BN/KL high-mass star-forming complex in Orion using the LWS instrument at Keck I. Despite poor weather we achieved nearly diffraction-limited images (FWHM = 0.38'') over a roughly 25'' X 25'' region centered on IRc2 down to a flux limit of ~250 mJy. Many of the known infrared (IR) sources in the region break up into smaller sub-components. We have also detected 6 new mid-IR sources. Nearly all of the sources are resolved in our mosaic. The near-IR source ''n'' is slightly elongated in the mid-IR along a NW--SE axis and perfectly bisects the double-peaked radio source ''L''. Source n has been identified as a candidate for powering the large IR luminosity of the BN/KL region (L = 10^5 L_sun). We postulate that the 12 micron emission arises in a circumstellar disk surrounding source n. The morphology of the mid-IR emission and the Orion ''hot core'' (as seen in NH_3 emission), along with the location of water and OH masers, is very suggestive of a bipolar cavity centered on source n and aligned with the rotation axis of the hypothetical circumstellar disk. IRc2, once thought to be the dominant energy source for the BN/KL region, clearly breaks into 4 sub-sources in our mosaic, as seen previously at 3.8 -- 5.0 micron. The anti-correlation of mid-IR emission and NH_3 emission from the nearby hot core indicates that the IRc2 sources are roughly coincident (or behind) the dense hot core. The nature of IRc2 is not clear: neither self-luminous sources (embedded protostars) nor external heating by source I can be definitively ruled out. We also report the discovery of a new arc-like feature SW of the BN object, and some curious morphology surrounding near-IR source ''t".

  1. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 ?m FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore »data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  2. Mid-infrared tunable metamaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brener, Igal; Miao, Xiaoyu; Shaner, Eric A; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Jun, Young Chul

    2015-04-28

    A mid-infrared tunable metamaterial comprises an array of resonators on a semiconductor substrate having a large dependence of dielectric function on carrier concentration and a semiconductor plasma resonance that lies below the operating range, such as indium antimonide. Voltage biasing of the substrate generates a resonance shift in the metamaterial response that is tunable over a broad operating range. The mid-infrared tunable metamaterials have the potential to become the building blocks of chip based active optical devices in mid-infrared ranges, which can be used for many applications, such as thermal imaging, remote sensing, and environmental monitoring.

  3. ISOCAM Photometry of Narrow-Line X-ray Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Law-Green; A. Zezas; M. J. Ward; C. Boisson

    1998-12-23

    Mid-infrared photometry of the hosts of Narrow-Line X-ray Galaxies at 6 microns and 12 microns has been attempted with ISOCAM. No conclusive detections have been made. This implies that these are quiescent objects with little or no active star-formation. Neither X-ray binaries nor starburst-driven superwinds are consistent explanations for the X-ray emission in these objects. We conclude that these NLXGs are predominantly AGN-powered.

  4. Industrial Use of Infrared Inspections 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duch, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared is and has been an established technology in the military and aerospace fields. However, only relatively recently has this technology found a "use" in the industrial sector. Many reasons exist why the technology has not been used...

  5. The SNAP near infrared detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    it will detect Type Ia supernovæ between z = 1 and 1.7 andphotometry for all supernovæ. HgCdTe technology, with a cut-Keywords: Cosmology, Supernovae, Dark Energy, Near Infrared,

  6. The power of jets: New clues from radio circular polarization and X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcke, Heino

    The power of jets: New clues from radio circular polarization and X-rays Heino Falcke 1 , Thomas. Jets are ubiquitous in accreting black holes. Often ignored, they may be a major contributor be explained by a signi#12;cant syn- chrotron contribution from jets also to their IR-to-X-ray spectrum

  7. What are the galaxies contributing to the Cosmic Infrared Background ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Guiderdoni

    1997-12-29

    Recent optical observations have led to a significant progress in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. However, our view on the deep universe is currently limited to the starlight which directly escapes from high-redshift galaxies, since we so far ignore the fraction of luminosity absorbed by dust and released in the IR/submm wavelength range. A new constraint is set by the possible detection of the Cosmic Infrared Background. We briefly review the observations and use a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation and evolution to predict number counts consistent with the level of the background. It turns out that the predictions fairly accomodate preliminary data at 175 and 850 microns. This suggests that a significant fraction of star/galaxy formation at high z is hidden by dust.

  8. Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

  9. Far-infrared Point Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Guiderdoni

    1999-03-08

    The analysis of the submm anisotropies that will be mapped by the forthcoming MAP and PLANCK satellites requires careful foreground subtraction before measuring CMB fluctuations. Among these, the foreground due to IR/submm thermal radiation from dusty sources was poorly known until recent observational breakthroughs began unveiling the properties of these objects. We hereafter briefly review the observational evidence for a strong evolution of IR/submm sources with respect to the local universe explored by IRAS. We present the basic principles of a new modeling effort where consistent spectral energy distributions of galaxies are implemented into the paradigm of hierarchical clustering with the fashionable semi-analytic approach. This model provides us with specific predictions in IR/submm wavebands, that seem to reproduce the current status of the observations and help assessing the capabilities of forthcoming instruments to pursue the exploration of the deep universe at IR/submm wavelengths. Finally, the ability of the PLANCK High Frequency Instrument all-sky survey to produce a catalogue of dusty sources at submm wavelengths is briefly described.

  10. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  11. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, P. K. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Wang, Kefeng [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Amato, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Khasanov, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Luetkens, H. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Petrovic, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cook, R. M. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Lees, M. R. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Morenzoni, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2014-10-01

    Magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (µSR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field µSR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field µSR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ??² with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.

  12. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, P. K.; Wang, Kefeng; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    Magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (µSR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field µSR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field µSR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ??² with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.

  13. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, P. K.; Wang, Kefeng; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    Magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (µSR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field µSR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field µSR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ??² with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap valuemore »of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.« less

  14. Evolution of mid-infrared galaxy luminosity functions from the entire AKARI NEP-Deep field with new CFHT photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goto, Tomotsugu; Ohyama, Youichi; Malkan, Matthew; Matsuhara, Hideo; Wada, Takehiko; Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Nakagawa, Takao; Buat, Veronique; Burgarella, Denis; Sedgwick, Chris; Toba, Yoshiki; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Marchetti, Lucia; Ma?ek, Katarzyna; Koptelova, Ekaterina; Chao, Dani; Wu, Yi-Han; Pearson, Chris; Takagi, Toshinobu; Lee, Hyung Mok; Serjeant, Stephen; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T; Kim, Seong Jin

    2015-01-01

    We present infrared galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) deep field using recently-obtained, wider CFHT optical/near-IR images. AKARI has obtained deep images in the mid-infrared (IR), covering 0.6 deg$^2$ of the NEP deep field. However, our previous work was limited to the central area of 0.25 deg$^2$ due to the lack of optical coverage of the full AKARI NEP survey. To rectify the situation, we recently obtained CFHT optical and near-IR images over the entire AKARI NEP deep field. These new CFHT images are used to derive accurate photometric redshifts, allowing us to fully exploit the whole AKARI NEP deep field. AKARI's deep, continuous filter coverage in the mid-IR wavelengths (2.4, 3.2, 4.1, 7, 9, 11, 15, 18, and 24$\\mu$m) exists nowhere else, due to filter gaps of other space telescopes. It allows us to estimate restframe 8$\\mu$m and 12$\\mu$m luminosities without using a large extrapolation based on spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting, which was the largest uncer...

  15. The Infrared Camera (IRC) deep survey in the performance verification phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takehiko Wada; Shinki Oyabu; Yoshifusa Ita; Hideo Matsuhara; Chris P. Pearson; Takashi Onaka; Youichi Ohyama; Fumihiko Usui; Naofumi Fujishiro; Daisuke Ishihara; Hirokazu Kataza; Woojung Kim; Toshio Matsumoto; Hiroshi Murakami; Itsuki Sakon; Toshihiko Tanabe; Toshinobu Takagi; Kazunori Uemizu; Munetaka Ueno; Hidenori Watarai

    2007-08-19

    We report the first results of a near- and mid- infrared deep survey with the Infrared Camera (IRC) onboard AKARI in the performance verification phase. Simultaneous observations by the NIR, MIR-S and MIR-L channels of the IRC with effective integration times of 4529, 4908, and 4417 seconds at 3, 7, and 15 micron, covering 86.0, 70.3, and 77.3 arcmin^2 area, detected 955, 298 and 277 sources, respectively. The 5 sigma detection limits of the survey are 6.0, 31.5 and 71.2 micro Jy and the 50% completeness limit are 24.0, 47.5, and 88.1 micro Jy at 3, 7, and 15 micron, respectively. The observation is limited by source confusion at 3 micron. We have confirmed the turnover in the 15 micron differential source counts around 400 micro Jy, previously detected by surveys with the Infrared Space Observatory. The faint end of 15 micron raw source counts agree with the results from the deep surveys in the GOODS fields carried out with the Spitzer IRS peak up imager and the predictions of current galaxy evolution models. These results indicate that deep surveys with comprehensive wavelength coverage at mid-infrared wavelength are very important to investigate the evolution of infrared galaxies at high redshifts.

  16. Far-Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions and Photometric Redshifts of Dusty Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanya Chakrabarti; Christopher F. McKee

    2007-10-22

    We infer the large-scale source parameters of dusty galaxies from their observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using the analytic radiative transfer methodology presented in Chakrabarti & McKee (2005). For local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), we show that the millimeter to far-infrared (FIR) SEDs can be well fit using the standard dust opacity index of 2 when self-consistent radiative transfer solutions are employed, indicating that the cold dust in local ULIRGs can be described by a single grain model. We develop a method for determining photometric redshifts of ULIRGs and sub-mm galaxies from the millimeter-FIR SED; the resulting value of $1+z$ is typically accurate to about 10%. As such, it is comparable to the accuracy of near-IR photometric redshifts and provides a complementary means of deriving redshifts from far-IR data, such as that from the upcoming $\\it{Herschel Space Observatory}$. Since our analytic radiative transfer solution is developed for homogeneous, spherically symmetric, centrally heated, dusty sources, it is relevant for infrared bright galaxies that are primarily powered by compact sources of luminosity that are embedded in a dusty envelope. We discuss how deviations from spherical symmetry may affect the applicability of our solution, and we contrast our self-consistent analytic solution with standard approximations to demonstrate the main differences.

  17. Low Dose IR Creates an Oncogenic Microenvironment by Inducing Premature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2013-04-28

    Introduction Much of the work addressing ionizing radiation-induced cellular response has been carried out mainly with the traditional cell culture technique involving only one cell type, how cellular response to IR is influenced by the tissue microenvironment remains elusive. By use of a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system to model critical interactions of different cell types with their neighbors and with their environment, we recently showed that low-dose IR-induced extracellular signaling via the tissue environment affects profoundly cellular responses. This proposal aims at determining the response of mammary epithelial cells in a tissue-like setting.

  18. Electrically tunable infrared metamaterial devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brener, Igal; Jun, Young Chul

    2015-07-21

    A wavelength-tunable, depletion-type infrared metamaterial optical device is provided. The device includes a thin, highly doped epilayer whose electrical permittivity can become negative at some infrared wavelengths. This highly-doped buried layer optically couples with a metamaterial layer. Changes in the transmission spectrum of the device can be induced via the electrical control of this optical coupling. An embodiment includes a contact layer of semiconductor material that is sufficiently doped for operation as a contact layer and that is effectively transparent to an operating range of infrared wavelengths, a thin, highly doped buried layer of epitaxially grown semiconductor material that overlies the contact layer, and a metallized layer overlying the buried layer and patterned as a resonant metamaterial.

  19. Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T; Schaich, David A

    2011-09-01

    We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that itmore »does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.« less

  20. Infrared Antennas & Frequency Selective Surfaces Glenn D. Boreman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    ... Research focus: Extension of radiofrequency concepts to IR CREOL IR Systems Lab 1989 #12;Research Approach radiation. Incident radiation induces IR-frequency current waves to flow in the arms of the antenna

  1. Coupling mid-infrared light from a photonic crystal waveguide to metallic transmission lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea E-mail: r.hillenbrand@nanogune.eu; Dpto. Electronica y Telecom., E.T.S. Ingeniería Bilbao, UPV Sarriugarte, Paulo; Garcia-Adeva, Angel; Zubia, Joseba; IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao, Bizkaia

    2014-01-06

    We propose and theoretically study a hybrid structure consisting of a photonic crystal waveguide (PhC-wg) and a two-wire metallic transmission line (TL), engineered for efficient transfer of mid-infrared (mid-IR) light between them. An efficiency of 32% is obtained for the coupling from the transverse magnetic (TM) photonic mode to the symmetric mode of the TL, with a predicted intensity enhancement factor of 53 at the transmission line surface. The strong coupling is explained by the small phase velocity mismatch and sufficient spatial overlapping between the modes. This hybrid structure could find applications in highly integrated mid-IR photonic-plasmonic devices for biological and gas sensing, among others.

  2. MS, S and C Stars in the Infrared. Luminosities and Mass Loss Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Guandalini

    2008-02-05

    In this note I present an outline of infrared (IR) photometric AGB properties, based on two samples of Galactic Long Period Variables (C- and S-type respectively). I show the various selection criteria used during the choice of the sources and describe the motivations of observing them at near- and mid-IR wavelengths. I discuss the problems encountered in estimating their luminosity and distance and motivate the methods I choose for this purpose. Properties of the luminosity functions and of the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagrams obtained from the analysis are discussed. Finally, the choices made for estimating of the mass loss rates are described and preliminary results concerning them are shown.

  3. A Near-Infrared Stellar Census of the Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy VII~Zw~403

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regina E. Schulte-Ladbeck; Ulrich Hopp; Laura Greggio; Mary M. Crone

    1999-09-13

    We present near-infrared single-star photometry for the low-metallicity Blue Compact Dwarf galaxy VII~Zw~403. We achieve limiting magnitudes of F110W~$\\approx$~25.5 and F160W~$\\approx$~24.5 using one of the NICMOS cameras with the HST equivalents of the ground-based J and H filters. The data have a high photometric precision (0.1 mag) and are $>95$% complete down to magnitudes of about 23, far deeper than previous ground-based studies in the near-IR. The color-magnitude diagram contains about 1000 point sources. We provide a preliminary transformation of the near-IR photometry into the ground system...

  4. Real time infrared aerosol analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL); Reedy, Gerald T. (Bourbonnais, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL)

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

  5. Investigation of the physical properties of the tetragonal CeMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt) compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ghimire, N. J.; Ronning, F.; Williams, D. J.; Scott, B. L.; Luo, Yongkang; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, E. D.

    2014-12-15

    The synthesis, crystal structure and physical properties studied by means of x-ray diffraction, magnetic, thermal and transport measurements of CeMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt) are reported, along with the electronic structure calculations for LaMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt). These materials adopt a tetragonal crystal structure (space group P4/mmm) comprised of BaAl4 blocks, separated by MAl2 units, stacked along the c-axis. Both CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2 order antiferromagnetically below TN1 = 14 and 16 K, respectively, and undergo a second antiferromagnetic transitition at lower temperature (TN2 = 9 and 14 K, respectively). CePtAl4Si2 orders ferromagnetically below TC = 3 Kmore »with an ordered moment of ?sat = 0.8 ?B for a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the c-axis. Electronic structure calculations reveal quasi-2D character of the Fermi surface.« less

  6. Near-infrared and Mid-infrared Spectroscopy with the Infrared Camera (IRC) for AKARI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youichi Ohyama; Takashi Onaka; Hideo Matsuhara; Takehiko Wada; Woojung Kim; Naofumi Fujishiro; Kazunori Uemizu; Itsuki Sakon; Martin Cohen; Miho Ishigaki; Daisuke Ishihara; Yoshifusa Ita; Hirokazu Kataza; Toshio Matsumoto; Hiroshi Murakami; Shinki Oyabu; Toshihiko Tanabe; Toshinobu Takagi; Munetaka Ueno; Fumio Usui; Hidenori Watarai; Chris P. Pearson; Norihide Takeyama; Tomoyasu Yamamuro; Yuji Ikeda

    2007-08-31

    The Infrared Camera (IRC) is one of the two instruments on board the AKARI satellite. In addition to deep imaging from 1.8-26.5um for the pointed observation mode of the AKARI, it has a spectroscopic capability in its spectral range. By replacing the imaging filters by transmission-type dispersers on the filter wheels, it provides low-resolution (lambda/d_lambda ~ 20-120) spectroscopy with slits or in a wide imaging field-of-view (approximately 10'X10'). The IRC spectroscopic mode is unique in space infrared missions in that it has the capability to perform sensitive wide-field spectroscopic surveys in the near- and mid-infrared wavelength ranges. This paper describes specifications of the IRC spectrograph and its in-orbit performance.

  7. Saving and accessing the old IR literature Donna Harman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiemstra, Djoerd

    there are many scanning projects underway, such as Google books and the Open Library Alliance, these projects library for just us IR folks. The ACM digital library had little interest in what they called the "grey they maintain their library in a proprietary format that would not allow us to insert our own search engine (or

  8. Growth of graphene on Ir(111) Johann Coraux1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a renewed interest as a route towards high quality graphene prepared in a reproducible manner. Here weC) substrate has attracted much interest. Whatever the recent progress in the preparation of grapheneGrowth of graphene on Ir(111) Johann Coraux1 ,, Alpha T. N'Diaye1 §, Martin Engler1 , Carsten Busse

  9. Resources for Chinese-English Cross-Language IR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oard, Doug

    1 Resources for Chinese-English Cross-Language IR Douglas W. Oard College of Library supported in part by DARPA contract N6600197C8540 #12;2 Part I. Introduction Specific evaluation criteria for resource selection and for gap analysis to focus additional search for specific resources that could

  10. Periodic Accretion Instabilities in the Protostar L1634 IRS 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodapp, Klaus W

    2015-01-01

    The small molecular cloud Lynds 1634 contains at least three outflow sources. We found one of these, IRS 7, to be variable with a period of 37.14 +/- 0.04 days and an amplitude of approximately 2 mag in the Ks band. The light curve consists of a quiescent phase with little or no variation, and a rapid outburst phase. During the outburst phase, the rapid brightness variation generates light echoes that propagate into the surrounding molecular cloud, allowing a measurement of the distance to IRS 7 of 404 pc +/- 35 pc. We observed only a marginally significant change in the H - K color during the outburst phase. The K-band spectrum of IRS 7 shows CO bandhead emission but its equivalent width does not change significantly with the phase of the light curve. The H_2 1-0 S(1) line emission does not follow the variability of the continuum flux. We also used the imaging data for a proper motion study of the outflows originating from the IRS 7 and the FIR source IRAS 05173-0555, and confirm that these are indeed distin...

  11. Sr2IrO4: Gateway to cuprate superconductivity?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-06-05

    High temperature superconductivity in cuprates remains a defining challenge in condensed matter physics. Recently, a new set of related compounds based on Ir rather than Cu has been discovered that may be on the verge of superconductivity themselves or be able to shed new light on the underlying interactions responsible for superconductivity in the cuprates.

  12. Testing a model of IR radiative losses Frank Vignola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    losses associated with the pyranometers. High quality data from the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Energy Laboratory (NREL) operates a very high quality solar monitoring station at the Solar Radiation Energy Laboratory ABSTRACT Thermopile pyranometers exhibit IR radiative losses that affect global

  13. Score Region Algebra: Building a Transparent XML-IR Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiemstra, Djoerd

    imple- mented the algebra operators in a prototype system on top of a low-level database kernel algebra framework on top of any low-level physical database engine or existing RDBMS, allowing a more sysScore Region Algebra: Building a Transparent XML-IR Database Vojkan Mihajlovi´c Henk Ernst Blok

  14. Thermo Tracer Infrared Thermal Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    -range area G Environment monitoring Volcano, ecology, vegetation, global warming, pollution G R&D Evaluation is a fixed installation type infrared thermal imaging camera to monitor important facilities Production line monitoring Quality anomalies in production processes G Facility monitoring Anomalies

  15. A Comment on the Infra-Red Problem in the AdS/CFT Correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanno Gottschalk; Horst Thaler

    2007-09-27

    In this note we report on some recent progress in proving the AdS/CFT correspondence for quantum fields using rigorously defined Euclidean path integrals. We also comment on the infra-red problem in the AdS/CFT correspondence and argue that it is different from the usual IR problem in constructive quantum field theory. To illustrate this, a triviality proof based on hypercontractivity estimates is given for the case of an ultra-violet regularized potential of type $:\\phi^4:$. We also give a brief discussion on possible renormalization strategies and the specific problems that arise in this context.

  16. Infrared Dry-peeling Technology for Tomatoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This research will use infrared heating technology for peeling tomatoes. Infrared dry peeling, a device District: 8 Senate District: 5 Application: Nationwide Amount: $324,250 Term: November 1, 2010

  17. Drones, Infrared Imagery, and Body Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, L

    2015-01-01

    afar: The politics of drones and liminal security-scapes.of Communication 8 (2014) Drones, Infrared Imagery, and Body2521 1932–8036/2014FEA0002 Drones, Infrared Imagery, and

  18. Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, T

    2005-07-01

    The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: • Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) • Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) • Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) • Upwelling shortwave (reflected) • Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) • Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

  19. Molecular gas and star formation towards the IR dust bubble S24 and its environs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappa, C E; Firpo, V; Vasquez, J; López-Caraballo, C H; Rubio, M; Vazzano, M M

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the infrared dust bubble S24, and its environs, with the aim of investigating the characteristics of the molecular gas and the interstellar dust linked to them, and analyzing the evolutionary status of the young stellar objects (YSOs) identified there. Using APEX data, we mapped the molecular emission in the CO(2-1), $^{13}$CO(2-1), C$^{18}$O(2-1), and $^{13}$CO(3-2) lines in a region of about 5'x 5' in size around the bubble. The cold dust distribution was analyzed using ATLASGAL and Herschel images. Complementary IR and radio data were also used.The molecular gas linked to the S24 bubble, G341.220-0.213, and G341.217-0.237 has velocities between -48.0 km sec$^{-1}$ and -40.0 km sec$^{-1}$. The gas distribution reveals a shell-like molecular structure of $\\sim$0.8 pc in radius bordering the bubble. A cold dust counterpart of the shell is detected in the LABOCA and Herschel images.The presence of extended emission at 24 $\\mu$m and radio continuum emission inside the b...

  20. A Medium-Resolution Near-Infrared Spectral Library of Late Type Stars: I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentin D. Ivanov; Marcia J. Rieke; Charles W. Engelbracht; Almudena Alonso-Herrero; George H. Rieke; Kevin L. Luhman

    2003-11-26

    We present an empirical infrared spectral library of medium resolution (R~2000-3000) H (1.6 micron) and K (2.2 micron) band spectra of 218 red stars, spanning a range of [Fe/H] from ~-2.2 to ~+0.3. The sample includes Galactic disk stars, bulge stars from Baade's window, and red giants from Galactic globular clusters. We report the values of 19 indices covering 12 spectral features measured from the spectra in the library. Finally, we derive calibrations to estimate the effective temperature, and diagnostic relationships to determine the luminosity classes of individual stars from near-infrared spectra. This paper is part of a larger effort aimed at building a near-IR spectral library to be incorporated in population synthesis models, as well as, at testing synthetic stellar spectra.

  1. INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY J1023+0038: EVIDENCE FOR THE SHORT-TERM NATURE OF ITS INTERACTING PHASE IN 2000-2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xuebing; Wang, Zhongxiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Morrell, Nidia [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, La Serena (Chile)] [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, La Serena (Chile)

    2013-02-20

    We report our multi-band infrared (IR) imaging of the transitional millisecond pulsar system J1023+0038, a rare pulsar binary known to have an accretion disk in 2000-2001. The observations were carried out with ground-based and space telescopes from near-IR to far-IR wavelengths. We detected the source in near-IR JH bands and Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m mid-IR channels. Combined with the previously reported optical spectrum of the source, the IR emission is found to arise from the companion star, with no excess emission detected in the wavelength range. Because our near-IR fluxes are nearly equal to those obtained by the 2MASS all-sky survey in 2000 February, the result indicates that the binary did not contain the accretion disk at the time, whose existence would have raised the near-IR fluxes to twice larger values. Our observations have thus established the short-term nature of the interacting phase seen in 2000-2001: the accretion disk existed for at most 2.5 yr. The binary was not detected by the WISE all-sky survey carried out in 2010 at its 12 and 22 {mu}m bands and our Herschel far-IR imaging at 70 and 160 {mu}m. Depending on the assumed properties of the dust, the resulting flux upper limits provide a constraint of <3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22}-3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} g on the mass of the dust grains that possibly exist as the remnants of the previously seen accretion disk.

  2. The ITER VIS/IR wide angle viewing system: Challenges and on-going R and D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travere, J. M.; Aumeunier, M. H.; Joanny, M.; Jouve, M.; Martin, V.; Moncada, V.; Salasca, S.; Marot, L.; Chabaud, D.; Ferme, J. J.; Bremond, F.; Thonnat, M.

    2011-07-01

    The ITER tokamak is the next generation fusion device which will allow studying burning plasma obtained by a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fusion reaction during hundreds of seconds. ITER vacuum vessel real-time protection will be mandatory during plasma operation to avoid water leaks and critical plasma facing components degradation. The protection system will be based on a wide angle viewing system (WAVS) composed with 18 visible (VIS) and 18 infrared (IR) cameras covering 80 % of the vacuum vessel which will be one of the major imaging systems of ITER. Compared to protection systems routinely used on current tokamaks and based on imaging (VIS and/or IR), new constraints must be taken into account because of their influence on the system performance: the harsh environment (high neutron flux) and the metallic plasma facing components (both first wall and divertor). In this new demanding context, we have achieved three mandatory R and D studies starting from the understanding of the source of signals by using realistic photonic simulation up to real-time processing strategy taken into account first order optical design constraints to define what type of performance could be reached for ITER vacuum vessel protection. (authors)

  3. THE SPITZER MID-INFRARED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SURVEY. I. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF OBSCURED CANDIDATES AND NORMAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SELECTED IN THE MID-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacy, M.; Ridgway, S. E.; Gates, E. L.; Petric, A. O.; Sajina, A.; Urrutia, T.; Cox Drews, S.; Harrison, C.; Seymour, N.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of a program of optical and near-infrared spectroscopic follow-up of candidate active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected in the mid-infrared. This survey selects both normal and obscured AGNs closely matched in luminosity across a wide range, from Seyfert galaxies with bolometric luminosities L {sub bol} ? 10{sup 10} L {sub ?} to highly luminous quasars (L {sub bol} ? 10{sup 14} L {sub ?}), all with redshifts ranging from 0 to 4.3. Samples of candidate AGNs were selected with mid-infrared color cuts at several different 24 ?m flux density limits to ensure a range of luminosities at a given redshift. The survey consists of 786 candidate AGNs and quasars, of which 672 have spectroscopic redshifts and classifications. Of these, 137 (20%) are type 1 AGNs with blue continua, 294 (44%) are type 2 objects with extinctions A{sub V} ?> 5 toward their AGNs, 96 (14%) are AGNs with lower extinctions (A{sub V} ? 1), and 145 (22%) have redshifts, but no clear signs of AGN activity in their spectra. Of the survey objects 50% have L {sub bol} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ?}, in the quasar regime. We present composite spectra for type 2 quasars and objects with no signs of AGN activity in their spectra. We also discuss the mid-infrared—emission-line luminosity correlation and present the results of cross correlations with serendipitous X-ray and radio sources. The results show that: (1) obscured objects dominate the overall AGN population, (2) mid-infrared selected AGN candidates exist which lack AGN signatures in their optical spectra but have AGN-like X-ray or radio counterparts, and (3) X-ray and optical classifications of obscured and unobscured AGNs often differ.

  4. Radiant energy required for infrared neural stimulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Xiaodong; Rajguru, Suhrud; Young, Hunter; Xia, Nan; Stock, Stuart R.; Xiao, Xianghui; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-08-25

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been proposed as an alternative method to electrical stimulation because of its spatial selective stimulation. Independent of the mechanism for INS, to translate the method into a device it is important to determine the energy for stimulation required at the target structure. Custom-designed, flat and angle polished fibers, were used to deliver the photons. By rotating the angle polished fibers, the orientation of the radiation beam in the cochlea could be changed. INS-evoked compound action potentials and single unit responses in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) were recorded. X-ray computed tomography wasmore »used to determine the orientation of the optical fiber. Maximum responses were observed when the radiation beam was directed towards the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), whereas little responses were seen when the beam was directed towards the basilar membrane. The radiant exposure required at the SGNs to evoke compound action potentials (CAPs) or ICC responses was on average 18.9 ± 12.2 or 10.3 ± 4.9 mJ/cm2, respectively. For cochlear INS it has been debated whether the radiation directly stimulates the SGNs or evokes a photoacoustic effect. The results support the view that a direct interaction between neurons and radiation dominates the response to INS.« less

  5. Cosmic Rays, Gamma-Rays, & Neutrinos in the Starburst Nuclei of Arp 220

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M; Zweibel, Ellen G

    2015-01-01

    The cores of Arp 220, the closest ultra-luminous infrared starburst galaxy, provide an opportunity to study interactions of cosmic rays under extreme conditions. In this paper, we model the populations of cosmic rays produced by supernovae in the central molecular zones of both starburst nuclei. We find that ~65 - 100% of cosmic rays are absorbed in these regions due to their huge molecular gas contents, and thus, the nuclei of Arp 220 nearly complete proton calorimeters. As the cosmic ray protons collide with the interstellar medium, they produce secondary electrons that are also contained within the system and radiate synchrotron emission. Using results from chi-squared tests between the model and the observed radio spectral energy distribution, we predict the emergent gamma-ray and high-energy neutrino spectra and find the magnetic field to be at milligauss levels. Because of the extremely intense far-infrared radiation fields, the gamma-ray spectrum steepens significantly at TeV energies due to gamma-gamm...

  6. The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures We...

  7. 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles:...

  8. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of...

  9. Novel Techniques for Single-Pulse Spectrum and Pulsewidth Measurements for an IR-FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leemans, W.P.

    2011-01-01

    ofthe LBL/Stanford diagnostics. FEL Thespectral andtemporalMeasurements for an IR-FEL W.P. Leemans, J.A. Edighoffer, K-Measurements for an IR-FEL* W. P. Leemans, J. A. Edighoffer,

  10. IRS observations of the LMC planetary nebula SMP83

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Bernard-Salas; J. R. Houck; P. W. Morris; G. C. Sloan; S. R. Pottasch; D. J. Barry

    2004-06-07

    The first observations of the infrared spectrum of the LMC planetary nebula SMP83 as observed by the recently launched Spitzer Space Telescope are presented. The high resolution R~600 spectrum shows strong emission lines but no significant continuum. The infrared fine structure lines are used, together with published optical spectra, to derive the electron temperature of the ionized gas for several ions. A correlation between the electron temperature with ionization potential is found. Ionic abundances for the observed infrared ions have been derived and the total neon and sulfur abundances have been determined. These abundances are compared to average LMC abundances of HII regions to better understand the chemical evolution of these elements. The nature of the progenitor star is also discussed.

  11. THE WIRED SURVEY. II. INFRARED EXCESSES IN THE SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debes, John H.; Leisawitz, David T.; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Cohen, Martin

    2011-12-01

    With the launch of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a new era of detecting planetary debris and brown dwarfs (BDs) around white dwarfs (WDs) has begun with the WISE InfraRed Excesses around Degenerates (WIRED) Survey. The WIRED Survey is sensitive to substellar objects and dusty debris around WDs out to distances exceeding 100 pc, well beyond the completeness level of local WDs. In this paper, we present a cross-correlation of the preliminary Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) WD catalog between the WISE, Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and SDSS DR7 photometric catalogs. From {approx}18,000 input targets, there are WISE detections comprising 344 'naked' WDs (detection of the WD photosphere only), 1020 candidate WD+M dwarf binaries, 42 candidate WD+BD systems, 52 candidate WD+dust disk systems, and 69 targets with indeterminate infrared excess. We classified all of the detected targets through spectral energy distribution model fitting of the merged optical, near-IR, and WISE photometry. Some of these detections could be the result of contaminating sources within the large ( Almost-Equal-To 6'') WISE point-spread function; we make a preliminary estimate for the rates of contamination for our WD+BD and WD+disk candidates and provide notes for each target of interest. Each candidate presented here should be confirmed with higher angular resolution infrared imaging or infrared spectroscopy. We also present an overview of the observational characteristics of the detected WDs in the WISE photometric bands, including the relative frequencies of candidate WD+M, WD+BD, and WD+disk systems.

  12. Minisuperspace models as infrared contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojowald, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A direct correspondence of quantum mechanics as a minisuperspace model for a self-interacting scalar quantum-field theory is established by computing, in several models, the infrared contributions to 1-loop effective potentials of Coleman--Weinberg type. A minisuperspace approximation rather than truncation is thereby obtained. By this approximation, the spatial averaging scale of minisuperspace models is identified with an infrared scale (but not a regulator or cut-off) delimiting the modes included in the minisuperspace model. Some versions of the models studied here have discrete space or modifications of the Hamiltonian expected from proposals of loop quantum gravity. They shed light on the question of how minisuperspace models of quantum cosmology can capture features of full quantum gravity. While it is shown that modifications of the Hamiltonian can well be described by minisuperspace truncations, some related phenomena such as signature change, confirmed and clarified here for modified scalar field th...

  13. Multi-channel infrared thermometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulrickson, Michael A. (East Windsor, NJ)

    1986-01-01

    A device for measuring the two-dimensional temperature profile of a surface comprises imaging optics for generating an image of the light radiating from the surface; an infrared detector array having a plurality of detectors; and a light pipe array positioned between the imaging optics and the detector array for sampling, transmitting, and distributing the image over the detector surfaces. The light pipe array includes one light pipe for each detector in the detector array.

  14. Ferroelectric infrared detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lashley, Jason Charles (Sante Fe, NM); Opeil, Cyril P. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Smith, James Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-03-30

    An apparatus and method are provided for sensing infrared radiation. The apparatus includes a sensor element that is positioned in a magnetic field during operation to ensure a .lamda. shaped relationship between specific heat and temperature adjacent the Curie temperature of the ferroelectric material comprising the sensor element. The apparatus is operated by inducing a magnetic field on the ferroelectric material to reduce surface charge on the element during its operation.

  15. In situ infrared spectroscopic and density-functional studies of the cross-linked structure of one-dimensional C{sub 60} polymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takashima, A.; Onoe, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Nishii, T. [Technology Development Center, Electric Power Development Co., Ltd. (J-Power), Chigasaki, Kanagawa 253-0041 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    We have examined the infrared (IR) spectra of electron-beam (EB) irradiated C{sub 60} films, using in situ IR spectroscopy in the temperature range of 60-300 K. The irradiation-time evolution of the IR spectra shows that two highly intense new peaks finally appear around 565 and 1340 cm{sup -1} when the EB-induced C{sub 60} polymerization was saturated. To determine the cross-linked structure of the polymer explicitly, we have compared the IR spectra with theoretical spectra obtained from the cross-linked structure of all C{sub 120} stable isomers derived from the general Stone-Wales (GSW) rearrangement, using first-principles density-functional calculations. Since each C{sub 120} isomer has the same cross-linked structure as that of its corresponding one-dimensional (1D) C{sub 60} polymer, the IR modes obtained from the cross-linked structure of C{sub 120} are close to those obtained from the corresponding 1D polymer. Comparison between the experimental and theoretical IR spectra suggests that the 1D peanut-shaped C{sub 60} polymer has a cross-linked structure roughly similar to that of the P08 peanut-shaped C{sub 120} isomer.

  16. Using FUV to IR Variability to Probe the Star-Disk Connection in the Transitional Disk of GM Aur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingleby, Laura; Calvet, Nuria; Sitko, Michael; Russell, Ray; Champney, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    We analyze 3 epochs of ultraviolet (UV), optical and near-infrared (NIR) observations of the Taurus transitional disk GM Aur using the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX spectrograph. Observations were separated by one week and 3 months in order to study variability over multiple timescales. We calculate accretion rates for each epoch of observations using the STIS spectra and find that those separated by one week had similar accretion rates (~1E-8 solar masses/yr) while the epoch obtained 3 months later had a substantially lower accretion rate (~4E-9 solar masses/yr). We find that the decline in accretion rate is caused by lower densities of material in the accretion flows, as opposed to a lower surface coverage of the accretion columns. During the low accretion rate epoch we also observe lower fluxes at both far UV (FUV) and IR wavelengths, which trace molecular gas and dust in the disk, respectively. We find that this can be explained by a lower dust...

  17. Carbon-Supported IrNi Core-Shell Nanoparticles: Synthesis Characterization and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K Sasaki; K Kuttiyiel; L Barrio; D Su; A Frenkel; N Marinkovic; D Mahajan; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    We synthesized carbon-supported IrNi core-shell nanoparticles by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing in H{sub 2}, and verified the formation of Ir shells on IrNi solid solution alloy cores by various experimental methods. The EXAFS analysis is consistent with the model wherein the IrNi nanoparticles are composed of two-layer Ir shells and IrNi alloy cores. In situ XAS revealed that the Ir shells completely protect Ni atoms in the cores from oxidation or dissolution in an acid electrolyte under elevated potentials. The formation of Ir shell during annealing due to thermal segregation is monitored by time-resolved synchrotron XRD measurements, coupled with Rietveld refinement analyses. The H{sub 2} oxidation activity of the IrNi nanoparticles was found to be higher than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. This is predominantly due to Ni-core-induced Ir shell contraction that makes the surface less reactive for IrOH formation, and the resulting more metallic Ir surface becomes more active for H{sub 2} oxidation. This new class of core-shell nanoparticles appears promising for application as hydrogen anode fuel cell electrocatalysts.

  18. Spitzer SAGE-Spec: Near infrared spectroscopy, dust shells, and cool envelopes in extreme Large Magellanic Cloud asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, R. D. [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Srinivasan, S.; Kemper, F.; Ling, B. [Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 11F of Astronomy-Mathematics Building, NTU/AS, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Volk, K. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    K-band spectra are presented for a sample of 39 Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) SAGE-Spec sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The spectra exhibit characteristics in very good agreement with their positions in the near-infrared—Spitzer color-magnitude diagrams and their properties as deduced from the Spitzer IRS spectra. Specifically, the near-infrared spectra show strong atomic and molecular features representative of oxygen-rich and carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars, respectively. A small subset of stars was chosen from the luminous and red extreme ''tip'' of the color-magnitude diagram. These objects have properties consistent with dusty envelopes but also cool, carbon-rich ''stellar'' cores. Modest amounts of dust mass loss combine with the stellar spectral energy distribution to make these objects appear extreme in their near-infrared and mid-infrared colors. One object in our sample, HV 915, a known post-asymptotic giant branch star of the RV Tau type, exhibits CO 2.3 ?m band head emission consistent with previous work that demonstrates that the object has a circumstellar disk.

  19. An IR study of pure and ion irradiated frozen formamide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John R. Brucato; Giuseppa A. Baratta; Giovanni Strazzulla

    2006-04-28

    Context. The chemical evolution of formamide (HCONH2), a molecule of astrobiological interest that has been tentatively identified in interstellar ices and in cometary coma, has been studied in laboratory under simulated astrophysical conditions such as ion irradiation at low temperature. Aims. To evaluate the abundances of formamide observed in space or in laboratory, the integrated absorbances for all the principal IR features of frozen amorphous pure formamide deposited at 20 K were measured. Further evidence that energetic processing of ices occurring in space is extremely relevant both to astrochemistry and to astrobiology has been found, showing that new molecular species are synthesized by ion irradiation at a low temperature. Methods. Pure formamide were deposited at 20 K and IR transmission spectra measured for different ice thicknesses. The ice thickness was derived by looking at the interference pattern (intensity versus time) of a He-Ne laser beam reflected at an angle of 45 deg by the vacuum-film and film-substrate interfaces. Samples of formamide ice were irradiated with 200 keV H+ ions and IR spectra recorded at different ion fluences. Results. New molecules were synthesized among which are CO, CO2, N2O, isocyanic acid (HNCO), and ammonium cyanate (NH4+OCN-). Some of these species remain stable after warming up to room temperature.

  20. Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A. [and others

    1998-01-01

    Uncooled pyroelectric IR imaging systems, such as night vision goggles, offer important strategic advantages in battlefield scenarios and reconnaissance surveys. Until now, the current technology for fabricating these devices has been limited by low throughput and high cost which ultimately limit the availability of these sensor devices. We have developed and fabricated an alternative design for pyroelectric IR imaging sensors that utilizes a multilayered thin film deposition scheme to create a monolithic thin film imaging element on an active silicon substrate for the first time. This approach combines a thin film pyroelectric imaging element with a thermally insulating SiO{sub 2} aerogel thin film to produce a new type of uncooled IR sensor that offers significantly higher thermal, spatial, and temporal resolutions at a substantially lower cost per unit. This report describes the deposition, characterization and optimization of the aerogel thermal isolation layer and an appropriate pyroelectric imaging element. It also describes the overall integration of these components along with the appropriate planarization, etch stop, adhesion, electrode, and blacking agent thin film layers into a monolithic structure. 19 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Study on the occurrence of spontaneously established perpendicular exchange bias in Co{sub 49}Pt{sub 51}/IrMn bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, C. Y.; Lin, K. F. [Graduate Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jen-Hwa, E-mail: jhhsu@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Saravanan, P. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500058 (India)

    2014-05-07

    In this study, perpendicular exchange bias (PEB) effect in the as-grown Co{sub 49}Pt{sub 51}/IrMn bilayers was demonstrated at room temperature using single-layered Co{sub 49}Pt{sub 51} alloy thin film as ferromagnetic (FM) layer. Several unusual features were observed in this system, viz.,: (i) the PEB was spontaneously established without any external magnetic field treatments, (ii) single-shifted loops were obtained rather than double-shifted ones, and (iii) the spontaneous PEB effect was accompanied by a reduction in perpendicular coercivity, H{sub c?} from 1024 to 632?Oe. The results of x–ray diffraction revealed the formation of IrMn (111) texture. Training effect studies indicate that the PEB effect is stable in this system with less than 5% variation in PEB value within 15 repetitive scans. Significant reduction in the PEB effect was found for the CoPt/IrMn films either grown or subjected to post-annealing under external magnetic field (H{sub ind}). The thickness dependence of PEB effect with respect to the FM and antiferromagnetic layers were also investigated and a largest PEB value of 533?Oe was obtained for the sample grown with 3-nm thick CoPt and 10-nm thick IrMn layers. The results of present study thus establish an opportunity to realize PEB effect in the absence of external field during fabrication.

  2. A NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF YOUNG FIELD ULTRACOOL DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allers, K. N.; Liu, Michael C.

    2013-08-01

    We present a near-infrared (0.9-2.4 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 73 field ultracool dwarfs having spectroscopic and/or kinematic evidence of youth ( Almost-Equal-To 10-300 Myr). Our sample is composed of 48 low-resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 100) spectra and 41 moderate-resolution spectra (R {approx}> 750-2000). First, we establish a method for spectral typing M5-L7 dwarfs at near-IR wavelengths that is independent of gravity. We find that both visual and index-based classification in the near-IR provides consistent spectral types with optical spectral types, though with a small systematic offset in the case of visual classification at J and K band. Second, we examine features in the spectra of {approx}10 Myr ultracool dwarfs to define a set of gravity-sensitive indices based on FeH, VO, K I, Na I, and H-band continuum shape. We then create an index-based method for classifying the gravities of M6-L5 dwarfs that provides consistent results with gravity classifications from optical spectroscopy. Our index-based classification can distinguish between young and dusty objects. Guided by the resulting classifications, we propose a set of low-gravity spectral standards for the near-IR. Finally, we estimate the ages corresponding to our gravity classifications.

  3. Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karr, Thomas J. (Alamo, CA)

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile.

  4. Coherent Raman and Infrared Studies of Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrysostom, Engelene; Vulpanovici, Nicolae; Masiello, Anthony; Barber, Jeffrey B.; Nibler, Joseph W.; Weber, Alfons; Maki, Arthur; Blake, Thomas A.

    2001-07-02

    High resolution (0.001 cm-1) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) was used to observe the Q-branch structure of the IR-inactive n1 symmetric stretching mode of 32S 16O3 and its various 18O isotopomers. The v1 spectrum of 32S 16O3 reveals two intense Q-branch regions in the 1065-1067 cm-1 region, with surprisingly complex vibrational-rotational structure not resolved in earlier studies. Efforts to simulate this with a simple Fermi-resonance model involving v1 and 2v4 do not reproduce the spectral detail nor yield reasonable spectroscopic parameters. A more subtle combination of Fermi resonance and indirect Coriolis interactions with nearby states; 2v4 (l = 0, ? 2), v2+v4 (l = ? 1), 2v2 (l =0) is suspected and a determination of the location of these coupled states by high resolution infrared measurements is underway. At medium resolution (0.125 cm-1), the infrared spectra reveal Q-branch features from which approximate band origins are estimated for the v2, v3, v4 fundamental modes of 32S 18O3, 32S 18O2 16O and 32S 18O 16O2. These and literature data for 32S 16O3 are used to calculate force constants for SO3 and a comparison is made with similar values for SO2 and SO. The frequencies and force constants are in excellent agreement with a recent ab initio calculation by Martin. *In memory of Dr. Nicolae Vulpanovici (1968-2001)

  5. Infra-red signature neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane William (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-10-13

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material that includes a photoluminescent material that generates infrared radiation and generation a by-product of a nuclear reaction due to the activator impinging the receptor material. The method further includes generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect, wherein the light activates the photoluminescent material so as to generate the infrared radiation. Identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the infrared radiation.

  6. Theoretical Investigation of Iridium (II) Sulfides Ir2(?-S)2(PH3)4 AND Ir2(?-S)2(PPh3)4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kritikou, Stella

    2014-02-27

    Density functional theory results of the electronic structure of an iridium sulfide, Ir_(2)S_(2)(PPh_(3))_(4) (2), are presented here, along with a discussion of the reaction mechanism of dihydrogen activation on this sulfide. This Ir (II...

  7. Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of California and the ALS has succeeded in probing the intrinsic electronic properties of the charge carriers in organic FETs using infrared spectromicroscopy. The...

  8. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Window Coatings Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings 1 of 5 An oxygen plasma etcher is used to clean test substrates for window coatings. Image: Pacific Northwest...

  9. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been...

  10. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared...

  11. IR Spectral Bands and Performance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on Openei | Open Energy2010) |OutlookINDEX JumpIR Spectral

  12. The environment of the fast rotating star Achernar - High-resolution thermal infrared imaging with VISIR in BURST mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Kervella; Armando Domiciano De Souza

    2007-10-28

    Context: The geometry of the circumstellar envelopes (CSE) surrounding Be stars is still uncertain, although it is often assumed that they are formed by a disk around the stellar equator and a hot polar wind. Achernar (Alpha Eri) is the nearest Be star, and we recently detected a CSE using near-IR interferometry. Aims: Our initial goal was to constrain the geometry and flux contribution of the CSE of Achernar at distances of a few tens of AU from the star, in the thermal IR domain to complement our near-IR interferometric observations. Methods: We obtained diffraction-limited images of Achernar in the thermal infrared using VISIR at the VLT. In order to freeze the turbulence, we used the BURST mode of this instrument. Results: The images obtained in the PAH1 band show a point-like source located 0.280" north-west of Achernar (projected linear separation of 12.3 AU). Its emission is 1.8 % of the flux of Achernar in this band, but is not detected in the PAH2, SiC and NeII bands. We also provide new thermal IR photometry of Achernar in four bands. Conclusions: Being aligned with the expected azimuth of the equatorial plane of Achernar, the detected source could be a main sequence stellar companion. In this case, it apparent brightness would correspond to an A7V spectral type.

  13. Infrared Fixed Point in the Strong Running Coupling: Unraveling the ?I=1/2 puzzle in K-Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Crewther; Lewis C. Tunstall

    2013-06-19

    In this talk, we present an explanation for the Delta I = 1/2 rule in K-decays based on the premise of an infrared fixed point alpha_IR in the running coupling alpha_s of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) for three light quarks u,d,s. At the fixed point, the quark condensate spontaneously breaks scale and chiral SU(3)_L x SU(3)_R symmetry. Consequently, the low-lying spectrum contains nine Nambu-Goldstone bosons: pi,K,eta and a QCD dilaton sigma. We identify sigma as the f_0(500) resonance and construct a chiral-scale perturbation theory CHPT_sigma for low-energy amplitudes expanded in alpha_s about alpha_IR. The Delta I = 1/2 rule emerges in the leading order of CHPT_sigma through a sigma-pole term K_S --> sigma --> 2 pi, with a K_S-sigma coupling fixed by data on 2 gamma --> 2 pi^0 and K_S --> 2 gamma. We also determine R_IR ~ 5 for the nonperturbative Drell-Yan ratio at alpha_IR.

  14. THE HST EXTREME DEEP FIELD (XDF): COMBINING ALL ACS AND WFC3/IR DATA ON THE HUDF REGION INTO THE DEEPEST FIELD EVER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; Oesch, P. A. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bouwens, R. J.; Labbé, I.; Franx, M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Stiavelli, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van Dokkum, P. G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Trenti, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Carollo, C. M. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Gonzalez, V., E-mail: gdi@ucolick.org [University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) combines data from 10 years of observations with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Wide-Field Camera 3 Infra-Red (WFC3/IR) into the deepest image of the sky ever in the optical/near-IR. Since the initial observations of the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) in 2003, numerous surveys and programs, including supernovae follow-up, HUDF09, CANDELS, and HUDF12, have contributed additional imaging data across this region. However, these images have never been combined and made available as one complete ultra-deep image dataset. We combine them now with the XDF program. Our new and improved processing techniques provide higher quality reductions of the total dataset. All WFC3/IR and optical ACS data sets have been fully combined and accurately matched, resulting in the deepest imaging ever taken at these wavelengths, ranging from 29.1 to 30.3 AB mag (5? in a 0.''35 diameter aperture) in 9 filters. The combined image therefore reaches to 31.2 AB mag 5? (32.9 at 1?) for a flat f {sub ?} source. The gains in the optical for the four filters done in the original ACS HUDF correspond to a typical improvement of 0.15 mag, with gains of 0.25 mag in the deepest areas. Such gains are equivalent to adding ?130 to ?240 orbits of ACS data to the HUDF. Improved processing alone results in a typical gain of ?0.1 mag. Our 5? (optical+near-IR) SExtractor catalogs reveal about 14,140 sources in the full field and about 7121 galaxies in the deepest part of the XDF.

  15. Large exchange bias enhancement in (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co trilayers with ultrathin IrMn thanks to interfacial Cu dusting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinai, G. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, CEA/INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Crocus Technology, 4 Place Robert Schuman, 38054 Grenoble (France); Moritz, J. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS - Université de Lorraine, Bd des Aiguillettes, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Bandiera, S. [Crocus Technology, 4 Place Robert Schuman, 38054 Grenoble (France); Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, CEA/INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-04-21

    The magnitude of exchange bias (H{sub ex}) at room temperature can be significantly enhanced in IrMn/Co and (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co structures thanks to the insertion of an ultrathin Cu dusting layer at the IrMn/Co interface. The combination of trilayer structure and interfacial Cu dusting leads to a three-fold increase in H{sub ex} as compared to the conventional IrMn/Co bilayer structure, with an increased blocking temperature (T{sub B}) and a concave curvature of the temperature dependence H{sub ex}(T), ideal for improved Thermally Assisted-Magnetic Random Access Memory storage layer. This exchange bias enhancement is ascribed to a reduction of the spin frustration at the IrMn/Co interface thanks to interfacial Cu addition.

  16. DUST AROUND R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS. I. SPITZER/INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anibal Garcia-Hernandez, D. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna (Spain); Kameswara Rao, N. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Lambert, David L., E-mail: agarcia@iac.es, E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu [W. J. McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

    2011-09-20

    Spitzer/infrared spectrograph (IRS) spectra from 5 to 37 {mu}m for a complete sample of 31 R Coronae Borealis stars (RCBs) are presented. These spectra are combined with optical and near-infrared photometry of each RCB at maximum light to compile a spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs are fitted with blackbody flux distributions and estimates are made of the ratio of the infrared flux from circumstellar dust to the flux emitted by the star. Comparisons for 29 of the 31 stars are made with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) fluxes from three decades earlier: Spitzer and IRAS fluxes at 12 {mu}m and 25 {mu}m are essentially equal for all but a minority of the sample. For this minority, the IRAS to Spitzer flux ratio exceeds a factor of three. The outliers are suggested to be stars where formation of a dust cloud or dust puff is a rare event. A single puff ejected prior to the IRAS observations may have been reobserved by Spitzer as a cooler puff at a greater distance from the RCB. RCBs which experience more frequent optical declines have, in general, a circumstellar environment containing puffs subtending a larger solid angle at the star and a quasi-constant infrared flux. Yet, the estimated subtended solid angles and the blackbody temperatures of the dust show a systematic evolution to lower solid angles and cooler temperatures in the interval between IRAS and Spitzer. Dust emission by these RCBs and those in the LMC is similar in terms of total 24 {mu}m luminosity and [8.0]-[24.0] color index.

  17. Infrared Colors and Variability of Evolved Stars from COBE DIRBE Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beverly J. Smith

    2003-06-20

    For a complete 12 micron flux-limited sample of 207 IRAS sources, we have extracted light curves in seven infrared bands between 1.25 - 60 microns using the database of the DIRBE instrument on the COBE satellite. Using previous infrared surveys, we filtered these light curves to remove datapoints affected by nearby companions. In the time-averaged DIRBE color-color plots, we find clear segregation of semi-regulars, Mira variables, carbon stars, OH/IR stars, and red giants without circumstellar dust and with little or no visual variation. The DIRBE 1.25 - 25 micron colors become progressively redder and the variability in the DIRBE database increases along the oxygen-rich sequence non-dusty slightly varying red giants -> SRb/Lb -> SRa -> Mira -> OH/IR and the carbon-rich SRb/Lb -> Mira sequence. This supports previous assertions that these are evolutionary sequences involving the continued production and ejection of dust. Carbon stars are redder than oxygen-rich stars for the same variability type, except in the F(12)/F(25) ratio. Of the 28 sources in the sample not previous noted to be variable, 18 are clearly variable in the DIRBE data, with amplitudes of variation of ~0.9 magnitudes at 4.9 microns and ~0.6 magnitudes at 12 microns, consistent with them being very dusty Mira-like variables. The light curves of the semi-regular variable L2 Pup are particularly remarkable. The maxima at 1.25, 2.2, and 3.5 microns occur 10 - 20 days before those at 4.9 and 12 microns, and, at 4.9 and 12 microns, another maximum is seen between the two near-infrared maxima.

  18. INFRARED MOLECULAR STARBURST FINGERPRINTS IN DEEPLY OBSCURED (ULTRA)LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY NUCLEI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    INFRARED MOLECULAR STARBURST FINGERPRINTS IN DEEPLY OBSCURED (ULTRA)LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY NUCLEI: molecules 1. INTRODUCTION One of the holy grails in the study of luminous and ultra- luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) is to elucidate the true nature of the central energy source. (U)LIRGs emit

  19. Phase transition in bulk single crystals and thin films of VO2 by nanoscale infrared spectroscopy and imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Mengkun; Sternbach, Aaron J.; Wagner, Martin; Slusar, Tetiana V.; Kong, Tai; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Kittiwatanakul, Salinporn; Qazilbash, M. M.; McLeod, Alexander; Fei, Zhe; et al

    2015-06-29

    We have systematically studied a variety of vanadium dioxide (VO2) crystalline forms, including bulk single crystals and oriented thin films, using infrared (IR) near-field spectroscopic imaging techniques. By measuring the IR spectroscopic responses of electrons and phonons in VO2 with sub-grain-size spatial resolution (~20nm), we show that epitaxial strain in VO2 thin films not only triggers spontaneous local phase separations, but leads to intermediate electronic and lattice states that are intrinsically different from those found in bulk. Generalized rules of strain- and symmetry-dependent mesoscopic phase inhomogeneity are also discussed. Furthermore, these results set the stage for a comprehensive understanding ofmore »complex energy landscapes that may not be readily determined by macroscopic approaches.« less

  20. The continued optical to mid-infrared evolution of V838 Monocerotis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loebman, S. R.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Schmidt, S. J.; Kowalski, A. F.; Barry, R. K.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Hammel, H. B.; Hawley, S. L.; Szkody, P.; Hebb, L.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W.; Sitko, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    The eruptive variable V838 Monocerotis (V838 Mon) gained notoriety in 2002 when it brightened nine magnitudes in a series of three outbursts and then rapidly evolved into an extremely cool supergiant. We present optical, near-infrared (near-IR), and mid-IR spectroscopic and photometric observations of V838 Mon obtained between 2008 and 2012 at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m, NASA IRTF 3 m, and Gemini South 8 m telescopes. We contemporaneously analyze the optical and IR spectroscopic properties of V838 Mon to arrive at a revised spectral type L3 supergiant and effective temperature T{sub eff}?2000–2200 K. Because there are no existing optical observational data for L supergiants, we speculate that V838 Mon may represent the prototype for L supergiants in this wavelength regime. We find a low level of H? emission present in the system, consistent with interaction between V838 Mon and its B3V binary; however, we cannot rule out a stellar collision as the genesis event, which could result in the observed H? activity. Based upon a two-component blackbody fit to all wavelengths of our data, we conclude that, as of 2009, a shell of ejecta surrounded V838 Mon at a radius of R=263±10 AU with a temperature of T=285±2 K. This result is consistent with IR interferometric observations from the same era and predictions from the Lynch et al. model of the expanding system, which provides a simple framework for understanding this complicated system.

  1. Qualification tests for {sup 192}Ir sealed sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iancso, Georgeta Iliescu, Elena Iancu, Rodica

    2013-12-16

    This paper describes the results of qualification tests for {sup 192}Ir sealed sources, available in Testing and Nuclear Expertise Laboratory of National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering 'Horia Hulubei' (I.F.I.N.-HH), Romania. These sources had to be produced in I.F.I.N.-HH and were tested in order to obtain the authorization from The National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). The sources are used for gammagraphy procedures or in gammadefectoscopy equipments. Tests, measurement methods and equipments used, comply with CNCAN, AIEA and International Quality Standards and regulations. The qualification tests are: 1. Radiological tests and measurements: dose equivalent rate at 1 m; tightness; dose equivalent rate at the surface of the transport and storage container; external unfixed contamination of the container surface. 2. Mechanical and climatic tests: thermal shock; external pressure; mechanic shock; vibrations; boring; thermal conditions for storage and transportation. Passing all tests, it was obtained the Radiological Security Authorization for producing the {sup 192}Ir sealed sources. Now IFIN-HH can meet many demands for this sealed sources, as the only manufacturer in Romania.

  2. An X-ray Imaging Study of the Stellar Population in RCW49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tsujimoto; E. D. Feigelson; L. K. Townsley; P. S. Broos; K. V. Getman; J. Wang; G. P. Garmire; D. Baba; T. Nagayama; M. Tamura; E. B. Churchwell

    2007-05-04

    We present the results of a high-resolution X-ray imaging study of the stellar population in the Galactic massive star-forming region RCW49 and its central OB association Westerlund 2. We obtained a 40 ks X-ray image of a 17'x17' field using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and deep NIR images using the Infrared Survey Facility in a concentric 8'3x8'3 region. We detected 468 X-ray sources and identified optical, NIR, and Spitzer Space Telescope MIR counterparts for 379 of them. The unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity of the X-ray image, enhanced by optical and infrared imaging data, yielded the following results: (1) The central OB association Westerlund 2 is resolved for the first time in the X-ray band. X-ray emission is detected from all spectroscopically-identified early-type stars in this region. (2) Most (86%) X-ray sources with optical or infrared identifications are cluster members in comparison with a control field in the Galactic Plane. (3) A loose constraint (2--5 kpc) for the distance to RCW49 is derived from the mean X-ray luminosity of T Tauri stars. (4) The cluster X-ray population consists of low-mass pre--main-sequence and early-type stars as obtained from X-ray and NIR photometry. About 30 new OB star candidates are identified. (5) We estimate a cluster radius of 6'--7' based on the X-ray surface number density profiles. (6) A large fraction (90%) of cluster members are identified individually using complimentary X-ray and MIR excess emission. (7) The brightest five X-ray sources, two Wolf-Rayet stars and three O stars, have hard thermal spectra.

  3. The Use of Infrared Technology To Detect Heat Loss 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, K.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared refers to electro magnetic energy with a wave length longer than those of visible light. Researchers developed methods to quantify, focus and form real-time images to infrared energy. This spawned the development of infrared Thenrography...

  4. Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stahl, Bennett

    2014-01-01

    Olson. “Observations of gamma-ray bursts of cosmic origin. ”E. Lingenfelter. “Gamma-ray bursts. ” Annual Review of652-654. Waxman, Eli. “Gamma-ray-burst afterglow: supporting

  5. A new architecture as transparent electrodes for solar and IR applications based on photonic structures via soft lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, Ping

    2011-05-15

    Transparent conducting electrodes with the combination of high optical transmission and good electrical conductivity are essential for solar energy harvesting and electric lighting devices. Currently, indium tin oxide (ITO) is used because ITO offers relatively high transparency (>80%) to visible light and low sheet resistance (R{sub s} = 10 ohms/square ({Omega}#2;/?)) for electrical conduction. However, ITO is costly due to limited indium reserves, and it is brittle. These disadvantages have motivated the search for other conducting electrodes with similar or better properties. There has been research on a variety of electrode structures involving carbon nanotube networks, graphene films, nanowire and nanopatterned meshes and grids. Due to their novel characteristics in light manipulation and collection, photonic crystal structures show promise for further improvement. Here, we report on a new architecture consisting of nanoscale high aspect ratio metallic photonic structures as transparent electrodes fabricated via a combination of processes. For (Au) and silver (Ag) structures, the visible light transmission can reach as high as 80%, and the sheet resistance of the structure can be as low as 3.2{Omega}#2;/?. The optical transparency of the high aspect ratio metal structures at visible wavelength range is comparable to that of ITO glass, while their sheet resistance is more than 3 times lower, which indicates a much higher electrical conductivity of the metal structures. Furthermore, the high aspect ratio metal structures have very high infrared (IR) reflection (90%) for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode, which can lead to the development of fabrication of metallic structures as IR filters for heat control applications. Investigations of interdigitated structures based on the high aspect ratio metal electrodes are ongoing to study the feasibility in smart window applications in light transmission modulation.

  6. FY 2005 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Bradley M.; Martinez, James E.; Qiao, Hong; Schultz, John F.

    2005-12-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions. During FY 2005, PNNL’s Infrared Photonics research team made measurable progress exploiting the extraordinary optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to develop miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. We investigated sulfur purification methods that will eventually lead to routine production of optical quality chalcogenide glass. We also discovered a glass degradation phenomenon and our investigation uncovered the underlying surface chemistry mechanism and developed mitigation actions. Key research was performed to understand and control the photomodification properties. This research was then used to demonstrate several essential infrared photonic devices, including LWIR single-mode waveguide devices and waveguide couplers. Optical metrology tools were also developed to characterize optical waveguide structures and LWIR optical components.

  7. Nanowire-based frequency-selective capacitive photodetector for resonant detection of infrared radiation at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandyopadhyay, Saumil, E-mail: saumilb@mit.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    Characteristics of a capacitive infrared photodetector that works at room temperature by registering a change in capacitance upon illumination are reported. If used in an ideal resonant inductor-resistor-capacitor circuit, it can exhibit zero dark current, zero standby power dissipation, infinite detectivity, and infinite light-to-dark contrast ratio. It is also made frequency-selective by employing semiconductor nanowires that selectively absorb photons of energies close to the nanowire's bandgap. Based on measured parameters, the normalized detectivity is estimated to be ?3?×?10{sup 7} Jones for 1.6??m IR wavelength at room temperature.

  8. Gemini-Phoenix infrared high-resolution abundance analysis of five giants in the bulge globular cluster NGC 6553

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Melendez; B. Barbuy; E. Bica; M. Zoccali; S. Ortolani; A. Renzini; V. Hill

    2003-09-20

    A detailed abundance analysis of 5 giants of the metal-rich bulge globular cluster NGC 6553 was carried out using high resolution infrared spectra in the H band, obtained at the Gemini-South 8m telescope. JK photometry collected at ESO and VI photometry from the Hubble Space Telescope are used to derive effective temperatures. The present analysis provides a metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.20 +/- 0.10. An overabundance of oxygen of [O/Fe] = +0.20 is found from IR OH lines.

  9. DNA microarray analyses reveal a post-irradiation differential time-dependent gene expression profile in yeast cells exposed to X-rays and {gamma}-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, Shinzo [Laboratory of Environmental Biology, Department of Preventive Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Ishidou, Emi [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Kurita, Sakiko [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Suzuki, Yoshiteru [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Shibato, Junko [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Rakwal, Randeep [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)]. E-mail: rakwal-68@aist.go.jp; Iwahashi, Hitoshi [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)

    2006-07-21

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is the most enigmatic of genotoxic stress inducers in our environment that has been around from the eons of time. IR is generally considered harmful, and has been the subject of numerous studies, mostly looking at the DNA damaging effects in cells and the repair mechanisms therein. Moreover, few studies have focused on large-scale identification of cellular responses to IR, and to this end, we describe here an initial study on the transcriptional responses of the unicellular genome model, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain S288C), by cDNA microarray. The effect of two different IR, X-rays, and gamma ({gamma})-rays, was investigated by irradiating the yeast cells cultured in YPD medium with 50 Gy doses of X- and {gamma}-rays, followed by resuspension of the cells in YPD for time-course experiments. The samples were collected for microarray analysis at 20, 40, and 80 min after irradiation. Microarray analysis revealed a time-course transcriptional profile of changed gene expressions. Up-regulated genes belonged to the functional categories mainly related to cell cycle and DNA processing, cell rescue defense and virulence, protein and cell fate, and metabolism (X- and {gamma}-rays). Similarly, for X- and {gamma}-rays, the down-regulated genes belonged to mostly transcription and protein synthesis, cell cycle and DNA processing, control of cellular organization, cell fate, and C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism categories, respectively. This study provides for the first time a snapshot of the genome-wide mRNA expression profiles in X- and {gamma}-ray post-irradiated yeast cells and comparatively interprets/discusses the changed gene functional categories as effects of these two radiations vis-a-vis their energy levels.

  10. Asymptotic freedom and IR freezing in QCD: the role of gluon paramagnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. A. Simonov

    2010-11-24

    Paramagnetism of gluons is shown to play the basic role in establishing main properties of QCD: IR freezing and asymptotic freedom (AF). Starting with Polyakov background field approach the first terms of background perturbation theory are calculated and shown to ensure not only the classical result of AF but also IR freezing. For the latter only the confining property of the background is needed, and the effective mass entering the IR freezing logarithms is calculated in good agreement with phenomenology and lattice data.

  11. IR ranking proposal and new beam parameter sets for the LHC upgrade the view of HHH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scandale, Walter

    2007-01-01

    We propose a ranking for the interaction-region (IR) optics based on the presentations and results from the first two days of the LUMI’06 workshop.

  12. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D printed, gynecologic 192Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    equiva- lent to water within the energy range of interest,properties to water at 192 Ir energies to be compatible with

  13. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01

    the fabrication of the MEMS sensors from the readout system,mechanical infrared sensors based on MEMS polymer-ceramicmechanical infrared sensors based on MEMS polymer-ceramic

  14. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01

    C. Vieider, and H. Jakobsen. MEMS-based uncooled infraredin uncooled infrared imaging: A MEMS perspective. Bell Labsstudies of an uncooled MEMS capacitive infrared detector for

  15. Geothermal Exploration with Visible through Long Wave Infrared...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Infrared Imaging Spectrometers Abstract Surface minerals of active geothermal systems have been mapped using visible-short wave infrared and mid wave and long wave imaging...

  16. Discriminating trpzip2 and trpzip4 peptides’ folding landscape using the two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Tianmin; Zhang, Ruiting; Li, Huanhuan; Zhuang, Wei, E-mail: wzhuang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: lijiangy@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China); Yang, Lijiang, E-mail: wzhuang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: lijiangy@pku.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-02-07

    We analyzed, based on the theoretical spectroscopic modeling, how the differences in the folding landscapes of two ?-hairpin peptides trpzip2 and trpzip4 are reflected in their thermal unfolding infrared measurements. The isotope-edited equilibrium FTIR and two dimensional infrared spectra of the two peptides were calculated, using the nonlinear exciton propagation method, at a series of temperatures. The spectra calculations were based on the configuration distributions generated using the GB{sup OBC} implicit solvent MD simulation and the integrated tempering sampling technique. Conformational analysis revealed the different local thermal stabilities for these two peptides, which suggested the different folding landscapes. Our study further suggested that the ellipticities of the isotope peaks in the coherent IR signals are more sensitive to these local stability differences compared with other spectral features such as the peak intensities. Our technique can thus be combined with the relevant experimental measurements to achieve a better understanding of the peptide folding behaviors.

  17. Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruffner, Judith A. (Albuquerque, NM); Bullington, Jeff A. (Albuquerque, NM); Clem, Paul G. (Albuquerque, NM); Warren, William L. (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Tuttle, Bruce A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schwartz, Robert W. (Seneca, SC)

    1999-01-01

    A monolithic infrared detector structure which allows integration of pyroelectric thin films atop low thermal conductivity aerogel thin films. The structure comprises, from bottom to top, a substrate, an aerogel insulating layer, a lower electrode, a pyroelectric layer, and an upper electrode layer capped by a blacking layer. The aerogel can offer thermal conductivity less than that of air, while providing a much stronger monolithic alternative to cantilevered or suspended air-gap structures for pyroelectric thin film pixel arrays. Pb(Zr.sub.0.4 Ti.sub.0.6)O.sub.3 thin films deposited on these structures displayed viable pyroelectric properties, while processed at 550.degree. C.

  18. An X-ray Imaging Study of the Stellar Population in RCW49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, M; Broos, P S; Churchwell, E B; Feigelson, E D; Garmire, G P; Getman, K V; Nagayama, T; Tamura, M; Townsley, L K; Wang, J

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a high-resolution X-ray imaging study of the stellar population in the Galactic massive star-forming region RCW49 and its central OB association Westerlund 2. We obtained a 40 ks X-ray image of a 17'x17' field using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and deep NIR images using the Infrared Survey Facility in a concentric 8'3x8'3 region. We detected 468 X-ray sources and identified optical, NIR, and Spitzer Space Telescope MIR counterparts for 379 of them. The unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity of the X-ray image, enhanced by optical and infrared imaging data, yielded the following results: (1) The central OB association Westerlund 2 is resolved for the first time in the X-ray band. X-ray emission is detected from all spectroscopically-identified early-type stars in this region. (2) Most (86%) X-ray sources with optical or infrared identifications are cluster members in comparison with a control field in the Galactic Plane. (3) A loose constraint (2--5 kpc) for the distance to...

  19. Optical and Infrared Photometry of the Nearby Type Ia Supernovae 1999ee, 2000bh, 2000ca, and 2001ba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Krisciunas; Mark M. Phillips; Nicholas B. Suntzeff; S. E. Persson; Mario Hamuy; Roberto Antezana; Pablo Candia; Alejandro Clocchiatti; Darren L. DePoy; Lisa M. Germany; Luis Gonzalez; Sergio Gonzalez; Wojtek Krzeminski; Jose Maza; Peter E. Nugent; Yulei Qiu; Armin Rest; Miguel Roth; Maximilian Stritzinger; L. -G. Strolger; Ian Thompson; T. B. Williams; Marina Wischnjewsky

    2003-11-18

    We present near infrared photometry of the Type Ia supernova 1999ee; also, optical and infrared photometry of the Type Ia SNe 2000bh, 2000ca, and 2001ba. For SNe 1999ee and 2000bh we present the first-ever SN photometry at 1.035 microns (the Y-band). We present K-corrections which transform the infrared photometry in the observer's frame to the supernova rest frame. Using our infrared K-corrections and stretch factors derived from optical photometry, we construct JHK templates which can be used to determine the apparent magnitudes at maximum if one has some data in the window -12 to +10 d with respect to T(B_max). Following up previous work on the uniformity of V minus IR loci of Type Ia supernovae of mid-range decline rates, we present unreddened loci for slow decliners. We also discuss evidence for a continuous change of color at a given epoch as a function of decline rate.

  20. The gas-rich circumbinary disk of HR 4049. I. A detailed study of the mid-infrared spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malek, S. E.; Cami, J., E-mail: sarahemalek@gmail.com, E-mail: jcami@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the mid-infrared spectrum of the peculiar evolved object HR 4049. The full Spitzer-IRS high-resolution spectrum shows a wealth of emission with prominent features from CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O and possible contributions from HCN and OH. We model the molecular emission and find that it originates from a massive (M ? 8 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ?}), warm (T {sub ex} ? 500 K) and radially extended gas disk that is optically thick at infrared wavelengths. We also report less enrichment in {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O than previously found and a comparison of the Spitzer observations to earlier data obtained by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on board the Infrared Space Observatory reveals that the CO{sub 2} flux has more than doubled in 10 yr time, indicating active and ongoing chemical evolution in the circumbinary disk. If the gas originates from interaction between the stellar wind and the dust, this suggests that the dust could be oxygen-rich in nature. The molecular gas plays a crucial role in the thermal properties of the circumbinary disk by allowing visible light to heat the dust and then trapping the infrared photons emitted by the dust. This results in higher temperatures and a more homogeneous temperature structure in the disk.

  1. Deuteration in infrared dark clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackington, Matias; Pineda, Jaime E; Garay, Guido; Peretto, Nicolas; Traficante, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Much of the dense gas in molecular clouds has a filamentary structure but the detailed structure and evolution of this gas is poorly known. We have observed 54 cores in infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) using N$_2$H$^+$ (1-0) and (3-2) to determine the kinematics of the densest material, where stars will form. We also observed N$_2$D$^+$ (3-2) towards 29 of the brightest peaks to analyse the level of deuteration which is an excellent probe of the quiescent of the early stages of star formation. There were 13 detections of N$_2$D$^+$ (3-2). This is one of the largest samples of IRDCs yet observed in these species. The deuteration ratio in these sources ranges between 0.003 and 0.14. For most of the sources the material traced by N$_2$D$^+$ and N$_2$H$^+$ (3-2) still has significant turbulent motions, however three objects show subthermal N$_2$D$^+$ velocity dispersion. Surprisingly the presence or absence of an embedded 70 $\\mu$m source shows no correlation with the detection of N$_2$D$^+$ (3-2), nor does it correl...

  2. Science and applications of infrared semiconductor nanocrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Scott Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    In this work we study several applications of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) with infrared band gaps. In the first half, we explore the physics of two systems with applications in NC based photovoltaics. The physics of ...

  3. Synthesis and characterization of infrared quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Daniel Kelly

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the development of synthetic methods to create application ready quantum dots (QDs) in the infrared for biological imaging and optoelectronic devices. I concentrated primarily on controlling the size ...

  4. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Concord, TN); Ohriner, Evan Keith (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  5. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Blue, Craig A.; Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2003-12-23

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  6. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Concord, TN); Ohriner, Evan Keith (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  7. Quantitative nondestructive testing using Infrared Thermography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manohar, Arun

    2012-01-01

    Wind Turbine Blade In- spection Tests at UCSD”, Sensors andWind Turbine Blades and Defect Depth Estimation using Infrared Thermography”, SensorsScalea. Wind turbine inspection tests at ucsd. Sensors and

  8. Carbon nanotubes as near infrared laser susceptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Amir

    2011-01-11

    The coupling efficiency of carbon nanotubes with near infrared laser radiation at 940nm wavelength was investigated. Nanotubes treated with different post processing methods were irradiated at different laser power intensities as dry samples...

  9. Mechanism of Homogeneous Ir(III) Catalyzed Regioselective Arylation of Olefins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    . On the basis of this mechanism, we suggest new catalysts expected to have improved activity. Initiation by reduction. Recently, Matsumoto2-4 and Periana5 reported the synthesis of a novel Ir complex, [Ir (turn- over-frequency (TOF) of 10-3 s-1 at 200 °C), but there are also problems with selectivity, cost

  10. Raman and IR spectra of butane: Anharmonic calculations and interpretation of room temperature spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potma, Eric Olaf

    Raman and IR spectra of butane: Anharmonic calculations and interpretation of room temperature-principles anharmonic calculations are carried out for the IR and Raman spectra of the CAH stretch- ing bands in butane.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction n-Butane is of great importance in several disciplines

  11. Monitoring Nonadiabatic Dynamics of the RNA Base Uracil by UV Pump-IR Probe Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, Shaul

    Monitoring Nonadiabatic Dynamics of the RNA Base Uracil by UV Pump-IR Probe Spectroscopy Benjamin P dynamics simulations of the UV pump-IR probe signal of the pyrimidine nucleobase uracil using a novel or visible pump-probe or photoelectron spectroscopy offer a high sub-100 fs temporal resolution.9

  12. NaIrO{sub 3}-A pentavalent post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bremholm, M.; Dutton, S.E.; Stephens, P.W.; Cava, R.J.

    2011-03-15

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3,} was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides. -- Graphical abstract: Sodium iridium(V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions is found to crystallize as the post-perovskite structure and is the first example of a pentavalent ABO{sub 3} post-perovskite. Research highlights: {yields} NaIrO{sub 3} post-perovskite stabilized by pressure. {yields} First example of a pentavalent oxide post-perovskite. {yields} Non-metallic and non-magnetic behavior of NaIrO{sub 3}.

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Thermal equation of state of CaIrO3 post-perovskite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Thomas S.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Thermal equation of state of CaIrO3 post-perovskite Wei Liu · Matthew L. Whitaker-Verlag 2011 Abstract The pressure­volume­temperature (P­V­T) relation of CaIrO3 post-perovskite (ppv for several oxide post-perovskites can be described approximately by the relationship KT0 = 5406.0/ V

  14. Evaluation of Methods to Correct for IR Loss in Eppley PSP Diffuse Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    is proportional to the incident solar radiation. Since both the black and white surfaces radiate approximately the same amount of IR, the measured solar radiation does not significantly suffer from the IR radiation irradiance were uncovered by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program during comparisons between

  15. Gamma ray generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  16. Oxidation preventative capping layer for deep-ultra-violet and soft x-ray multilayers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prisbrey, Shon T.

    2004-07-06

    The invention uses iridium and iridium compounds as a protective capping layer on multilayers having reflectivity in the deep ultra-violet to soft x-ray regime. The iridium compounds can be formed in one of two ways: by direct deposition of the iridium compound from a prepared target or by depositing a thin layer (e.g., 5-50 angstroms) of iridium directly onto an element. The deposition energy of the incoming iridium is sufficient to activate the formation of the desired iridium compound. The compounds of most interest are iridium silicide (IrSi.sub.x) and iridium molybdenide (IrMo.sub.x).

  17. A Radiometric All-Sky Infrared Camera (RASICAM) for DES/CTIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Peter M.; Rogers, Howard; Schindler, Rafe H.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A novel radiometric all-sky infrared camera [RASICAM] has been constructed to allow automated real-time quantitative assessment of night sky conditions for the Dark Energy Camera [DECam] located on the Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The camera is optimized to detect the position, motion and optical depth of thin, high (8-10km) cirrus clouds and contrails by measuring their apparent temperature above the night sky background. The camera system utilizes a novel wide-field equiresolution catadioptic mirror system that provides sky coverage of 2{pi} azimuth and 14-90{sup o} from zenith. Several new technological and design innovations allow the RASICAM system to provide unprecedented cloud detection and IR-based photometricity quantification. The design of the RASICAM system is presented.

  18. The near infrared 12 1 electronic transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, John Paul

    and the other by laser ablation. Boron rod (99.6% purity) with a natural isotopic composition was used of B3 was by ESR [3] followed by IR spectros- copy [4] both in rare gas matrices. A previous publica in the gas phase and analyzed [6]. Ab ini- tio calculations on the ground and excited electronic states of B3

  19. Far- and mid-infrared spectroscopy of complex organic matter of astrochemical interest: coal, heavy petroleum fractions, and asphaltenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cataldo, F; Manchado, A

    2012-01-01

    The coexistence of a large variety of molecular species (i.e., aromatic, cycloaliphatic and aliphatic) in several astrophysical environments suggests that unidentified IR emission (UIE) occurs from small solid particles containing a mix of aromatic and aliphatic structures (e.g., coal, petroleum, etc.), renewing the astronomical interest on this type of materials. A series of heavy petroleum fractions namely DAE, RAE, BQ-1, and asphaltenes derived from BQ-1 were used together with anthracite coal and bitumen as model compounds in matching the band pattern of the emission features of proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe). All the model materials were examined in the mid-infrared (2.5-16.7 um) and for the first time in the far-infrared (16.7-200 um), and the IR bands were compared with the UIE from PPNe. The best match of the PPNe band pattern is offered by the BQ-1 heavy aromatic oil fraction and by its asphaltenes fraction. Particularly interesting is the ability of BQ-1 to match the band pattern of the aromatic-ali...

  20. Warm formaldehyde in the Oph IRS 48 transitional disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Marel, Nienke; Bruderer, Simon; van Kempen, Tim A

    2014-01-01

    Simple molecules like H2CO and CH3OH in protoplanetary disks are the starting point for the production of more complex organic molecules. So far, the observed chemical complexity in disks has been limited due to freeze out of molecules onto grains in the bulk of the cold outer disk. Complex molecules can be studied more directly in transitional disks with large inner holes, as these have a higher potential of detection, through UV heating of the outer disk and the directly exposed midplane at the wall. We use Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Band 9 (~680 GHz) line data of the transitional disk Oph IRS 48, previously shown to have a large dust trap, to search for complex molecules in regions where planetesimals are forming. We report the detection of the H2CO 9(1,8)-8(1,7) line at 674 GHz, which is spatially resolved as a semi-ring at ~60 AU radius centered south from the star. The inferred H2CO abundance is ~10^{-8} derived by combining a physical disk model of the source with a non-LTE exc...

  1. Study of the hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.P.

    1982-08-01

    The reaction of uranium hexafluoride with water has been studied by using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Several different methods for accomplishing this task have been carried out. In addition, interpretatins of the results have been made. These interpretations have been based on literature values for the reactants and for compounds analogous to possible products. It was shown that classical matrix-isolation techniques proved to be unsatisfactory for studying this reaction. Other methods were developed in order to obtain results. They were: (1) the codeposition of pure UF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/O on a cold window at 16/sup 0/K, (2) the codeposition of argon matrix to sample ratios of 10:1 to 2:1 of UF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/O at 16/sup 0/K, and (3) the annealing of the samples produced by (1) and (2) while they were being scanned with FT-IR. 78 refs., 86 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. The AKARI NEP-Deep survey: a mid-infrared source catalogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takagi, T; Goto, T; Hanami, H; Im, M; Ishigaki, T; Lee, H M; Malkan, M; Ohyama, Y; Oyabu, S; Pearson, C P; Serjeant, S; Wada, T; White, G J

    2012-01-01

    We present a new catalogue of mid-IR sources using the AKARI NEP-Deep survey. The InfraRed Camera (IRC) onboard AKARI has a comprehensive mid-IR wavelength coverage with 9 photometric bands at 2 - 24 micron. We utilized all of these bands to cover a nearly circular area adjacent to the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP). We designed the catalogue to include most of sources detected in 7, 9, 11, 15 and 18 micron bands, and found 7284 sources in a 0.67 deg^2 area. From our simulations, we estimate that the catalogue is ~80 per cent complete to 200 micro Jy at 15 - 18 micron, and ~10 per cent of sources are missed, owing to source blending. Star-galaxy separation is conducted using only AKARI photometry, as a result of which 10 per cent of catalogued sources are found to be stars. The number counts at 11, 15, 18, and 24 micron are presented for both stars and galaxies. A drastic increase in the source density is found in between 11 and 15 micron at the flux level of ~300 micro Jy. This is likely due to the redshifted PAH...

  3. Optical-Infrared Properties of Faint 1.3 mm Sources Detected with ALMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Yabe, Kiyoto; Seko, Akifumi; Makiya, Ryu; Akiyama, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    We report optical-infrared (IR) properties of faint 1.3 mm sources (S_1.3mm = 0.2-1.0 mJy) detected with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) field. We searched for optical/IR counterparts of 8 ALMA-detected sources (>=4.0 sigma, the sum of the probability of spurious source contamination is ~1) in a K-band source catalog. Four ALMA sources have K-band counterpart candidates within a 0.4" radius. Comparison between ALMA-detected and undetected K-band sources in the same observing fields shows that ALMA-detected sources tend to be brighter, more massive, and more actively forming stars. While many of the ALMA-identified submillimeter-bright galaxies (SMGs) in previous studies lie above the sequence of star-forming galaxies in stellar mass--star-formation rate plane, our ALMA sources are located in the sequence, suggesting that the ALMA-detected faint sources are more like `normal' star-forming galaxies rather than `classical' SMGs. We found a regio...

  4. Mid-Infrared Source Multiplicity within Hot Molecular Cores traced by Methanol Masers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. N. Longmore; M. G. Burton; V. Minier; A. J. Walsh

    2006-04-12

    We present high resolution, mid-infrared images toward three hot molecular cores signposted by methanol maser emission; G173.49+2.42 (S231, S233IR), G188.95+0.89 (S252, AFGL-5180) and G192.60-0.05 (S255IR). Each of the cores was targeted with Michelle on Gemini North using 5 filters from 7.9 to 18.5 microns. We find each contains both large regions of extended emission and multiple, luminous point sources which, from their extremely red colours (F[18.5]/F[7.9] >= 3), appear to be embedded young stellar objects. The closest angular separations of the point sources in the three regions are 0.79, 1.00 and 3.33 arcseconds corresponding to linear separations of 1,700, 1,800 and 6,000AU respectively. The methanol maser emission is found closest to the brightest MIR point source (within the assumed 1 arcsecond pointing accuracy). Mass and luminosity estimates for the sources range from 3-22 Msol and 50-40,000 Lsol. Assuming the MIR sources are embedded objects and the observed gas mass provides the bulk of the reservoir from which the stars formed, it is difficult to generate the observed distributions for the most massive cluster members from the gas in the cores using a standard form of the IMF.

  5. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grills, David C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Farrington, Jaime A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Layne, Bobby H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Preses, Jack M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bernstein, Herbert J. [Dowling College, Shirley, NY (United States); Wishart, James F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm?¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ?40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ?100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. This new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  6. The gas-rich disk of HR 4049: A study of the infrared spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malek, Sarah E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Cami, Jan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 Canada and SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94034 (United States)

    2014-05-02

    Here, we present a summary of our analyses of the mid-and near-infrared spectrum of the unusual evolved binary HR 4049. We f nd that the disk is massive (M > 8 × 10{sup ?3} M{sub ?}), warm and radially extended. We also report some enrichment in {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O and a comparison of observations from Spitzer-IRS to those obtained by ISO-SWS 10 years earlier reveals that the CO{sub 2} f ux has more than doubled in this time, indicating active and ongoing chemical evolution in the circumbinary disk. Given the high column densities of the gas in the disk, we expect that the molecular gas plays a crucial role in the thermal properties of the circumbinary disk by allowing visible light to heat the dust and then trapping the IR photons emitted by the dust. This will result in higher temperatures and a more homogeneous temperature structure in the disk. Finally, we estimate a mass for the primary in HR 4049 which is too low for the star to have experienced a typical evolutionary path.

  7. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Wishart, James F.

    2015-04-27

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of amore »unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm?¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ~40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ~100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. As a result, this new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.« less

  8. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Wishart, James F.

    2015-04-27

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm?¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ~40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ~100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. As a result, this new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  9. Extraction and analysis of pollutant organics from contaminated solids using off-line supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and on-line SFE-infrared spectroscopy. Task 2. Semiannual report, November 1995--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, S.B.

    1996-04-01

    This document describes activities in the following tasks associated with a project on environmental management technology decontamination and commercialization: A commercialized version of a field-portable instrument for performing supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with on-line Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) detection;pyrolysis of plastic wastes associated with mixtures of radioactive wastes;management and reporting activities; centrifugal membrane filtration with application to tank waste remediation; technology development integration activities associated with remedial action and waste management.

  10. Ultraviolet versus infrared: Effects of ablation laser wavelength on the expansion of laser-induced plasma into one-atmosphere argon gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Laye, Fabrice; Yu Jin [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France); Lei Wenqi; Bai Xueshi; Zheng Lijuan; Zeng Heping [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China)

    2012-03-01

    Laser-induced plasma from an aluminum target in one-atmosphere argon background has been investigated with ablation using nanosecond ultraviolet (UV: 355 nm) or infrared (IR: 1064 nm) laser pulses. Time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy was used as a diagnostics tool to have access to the plasma parameters during its propagation into the background, such as optical emission intensity, electron density, and temperature. The specific feature of nanosecond laser ablation is that the pulse duration is significantly longer than the initiation time of the plasma. Laser-supported absorption wave due to post-ablation absorption of the laser radiation by the vapor plume and the shocked background gas plays a dominant role in the propagation and subsequently the behavior of the plasma. We demonstrate that the difference in absorption rate between UV and IR radiations leads to different propagation behaviors of the plasma produced with these radiations. The consequence is that higher electron density and temperature are observed for UV ablation. While for IR ablation, the plasma is found with lower electron density and temperature in a larger and more homogenous axial profile. The difference is also that for UV ablation, the background gas is principally evacuated by the expansion of the vapor plume as predicted by the standard piston model. While for IR ablation, the background gas is effectively mixed to the ejected vapor at least hundreds of nanoseconds after the initiation of the plasma. Our observations suggest a description by laser-supported combustion wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by UV laser, while that by laser-supported detonation wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by IR laser. Finally, practical consequences of specific expansion behavior for UV or IR ablation are discussed in terms of analytical performance promised by corresponding plasmas for application with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  11. Evolution of Infrared Luminosity functions of Galaxies in the AKARI NEP-Deep field: Revealing the cosmic star formation history hidden by dust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goto, Tomotsugu; Matsuhara, H; Takeuchi, T T; Pearson, C; Wada, T; Nakagawa, T; Ilbert, O; Le Floc'h, E; Oyabu, S; Ohyama, Y; Malkan, M; Lee, H M; Lee, M G; Inami, H; Hwang, N; Hanami, H; Im, M; Imai, K; Ishigaki, T; Serjeant, S; Shim, H

    2010-01-01

    Dust-obscured star-formation becomes much more important with increasing intensity, and increasing redshift. We aim to reveal cosmic star-formation history obscured by dust using deep infrared observation with the AKARI. We construct restframe 8um, 12um, and total infrared (TIR) luminosity functions (LFs) at 0.15NEP-Deep field. A continuous filter coverage in the mid-IR wavelength (2.4, 3.2, 4.1, 7, 9, 11, 15, 18, and 24um) by the AKARI satellite allows us to estimate restframe 8um and 12um luminosities without using a large extrapolation based on a SED fit, which was the largest uncertainty in previous work. We have found that all 8um (0.38infrared luminosity density (Omega_IR), which was obtained by integrating analytic fits to the LFs, we found a good agreement with previous work at z<1.2, and that ...

  12. The water abundance behind interstellar shocks: results from $Herschel$/PACS and $Spitzer$/IRS observations of H$_2$O, CO, and H$_2$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, David A; Güsten, Rolf; Herczeg, Greg J; Kristensen, Lars; Melnick, Gary J; Nisini, Brunella; Ossenkopf, Volker; Tafalla, Mario; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the water abundance in shock-heated molecular gas, making use of $Herschel$ measurements of far-infrared CO and H$_2$O line emissions in combination with $Spitzer$ measurements of mid-IR H$_2$ rotational emissions. We present far-infrared line spectra obtained with $Herschel$'s PACS instrument in range spectroscopy mode towards two positions in the protostellar outflow NGC 2071 and one position each in the supernova remnants W28 and 3C391. These spectra provide unequivocal detections, at one or more positions, of 12 rotational lines of water, 14 rotational lines of CO, 8 rotational lines of OH (4 lambda doublets), and 7 fine-structure transitions of atoms or atomic ions. We first used a simultaneous fit to the CO line fluxes, along with H$_2$ rotational line fluxes measured previously by $Spitzer$, to constrain the temperature and density distribution within the emitting gas; and we then investigated the water abundances implied by the observed H$_2$O line fluxes. The water line fluxes ar...

  13. Infrared curing simulations of liquid composites molding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakouzi, S.; Pancrace, J.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Berthet, F. [Universite de Toulouse (France); INSA, UPS, Mines Albi, ISAE, ICA - Institut Clement Ader, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi cedex 09 (France); Ecole des Mines Albi, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi (France)

    2011-05-04

    Infrared radiation is an effective energy source to cure thermosetting polymers. Its usage is expected to reduce curing time in comparison with thermal heating and mold thermally regulated. In addition, because of the polymerization mechanism and instant on-off control of this power, an improvement in the final properties of the material is also expected. In this paper, we studied the infrared interaction with carbon (or glass) fibers reinforced epoxy matrix, where Liquid resin infusion (LRI) is used to manufacture the composite. Temperature of the composite is a key parameter that affects its mechanical properties and is controlled by the infrared emitters and the exothermic heat released from the polymerization. Radiative heat flux is computed using the in-lab developed software RAYHEAT. Then, the heat flux (or absorbed energy for glass fibers) is exported to the finite element based program COMSOLMULTIPHYSICS where heat balance equation is solved. This equation is coupled with the exothermic heat released during the curing process in order to predict the composite temperature versus time and degree of cure. Numerical simulations will be performed on planar parts (sheet shape) as well as curvilinear shapes. Experimental validations of the infrared curing carbon (glass)-epoxy composite system are presented in this paper Sheet surface temperature distribution are measured thanks to infrared camera. Kinetic parameters were estimated from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experimental data.

  14. Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Tarun K

    2013-12-09

    the idea of modeling ray tubes with an additional ray in the center to facilitate parallelism. The parallel wavefront construction algorithm is applied to wide range of models such as simple synthetic models that enable us to study various aspects...

  15. Conformality or confinement: (IR)relevance of topological excitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poppitz, Erich; /Toronto U.; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-08-26

    What distinguishes two asymptotically-free non-abelian gauge theories on R{sup 4}, one of which is just below the conformal window boundary and confines, while the other is slightly above the boundary and flows to an infrared conformal field theory? In this work, we aim to answer this question for non-supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories with fermions in arbitrary chiral or vectorlike representations. We use the presence or absence of mass gap for gauge fluctuations as an identifier of the infrared behavior. With the present-day understanding of such gauge theories, the mass gap for gauge fluctuations cannot be computed on R{sup 4}. However, recent progress allows its non-perturbative computation on R{sup 3} x S{sup 1} by using either the twisted partition function or deformation theory, for a range of sizes of S{sup 1} depending on the theory. For small number of fermions, N{sub f}, we show that the mass gap increases with increasing radius, due to the non-dilution of monopoles and bions - the topological excitations relevant for confinement on R{sup 3} x S{sup 1}. For sufficiently large N{sub f}, we show that the mass gap decreases with increasing radius. In a class of theories, we claim that the decompactification limit can be taken while remaining within the region of validity of semiclassical techniques, giving the first examples of semiclassically solvable Yang-Mills theories at any size S{sup 1}. For general non-supersymmetric vectorlike or chiral theories, we conjecture that the change in the behavior of the mass gap on R{sup 3} x S{sup 1} as a function of the radius occurs near the lower boundary of the conformal window and give non-perturbative estimates of its value. For vectorlike theories, we compare our estimates of the conformal window with existing lattice results, truncations of the Schwinger-Dyson equations, NSVZ beta function-inspired estimates, and degree of freedom counting criteria. For multi-generation chiral gauge theories, to the best of our knowledge, our estimates of the conformal window are the only known ones.

  16. US-LARP Progress on LHC IR Upgrades Tanaji Sen, John Johnstone, Nikolai Mokhov, FNAL, Batavia, IL 60510

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Tanaji

    of a long-range interaction on the beams. IR DESIGNS Design and construction of next generation IR magnets in determining these parameters. The required field quality is another key input to the magnet designers. An IR to higher luminosity. In the designs to be presented here, we consider the inner triplet magnets

  17. Ray J. Corey- Biography

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ray Corey currently serves as the Assistance Manager for Safety and Environment at the DOE Richland Operations office (RL).

  18. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  19. The role of nuclear activity as the power source of ultraluminous infrared galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nardini, E; Watabe, Y; Salvati, M; Sani, E

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a 5-8 micron spectral analysis performed on the largest sample of local ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) selected so far, consisting of 164 objects up to a redshift of ~0.35. The unprecedented sensitivity of the Infrared Spectrograph onboard Spitzer allowed us to develop an effective diagnostic method to disentangle the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and starburst (SB) contribution to this class of objects. The intrinsic bolometric corrections are estimated for both the components, in order to obtain the relative AGN/SB contribution to the total luminosity of each source. Our main results are the following: 1) The AGN detection rate among local ULIRGs amounts up to 70 per cent, with 113/164 convincing detections within our sample, while the global AGN/SB power balance is ~1/3. 2) A general agreement is found with optical classification; however, among the objects with no spectral signatures of nuclear activity, our IR diagnostics find a subclass of elusive, highly obscured AGN...

  20. Properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in local elliptical galaxies revealed by the Infrared Spectrograph on Spitzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kaneda; T. Onaka; I. Sakon; T. Kitayama; Y. Okada; T. Suzuki

    2008-05-21

    We performed mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of 18 local dusty elliptical galaxies by using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board Spitzer. We have significantly detected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features from 14 out of the 18 galaxies, and thus found that the presence of PAHs is not rare but rather common in dusty elliptical galaxies. Most of these galaxies show an unusually weak 7.7 um emission feature relative to 11.3 um and 17 um emission features. A large fraction of the galaxies also exhibit H2 rotational line and ionic fine-structure line emissions, which have no significant correlation with the PAH emissions. The PAH features are well correlated with the continuum at 35 um, whereas they are not correlated with the continuum at 6 um. We conclude that the PAH emission of the elliptical galaxies is mostly of interstellar origin rather than of stellar origin, and that the unusual PAH interband strength ratios are likely to be due to a large fraction of neutral to ionized PAHs.

  1. THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN TAURUS PROBED BY INFRARED POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Li Di [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 301-429, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Clemens, D. P. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Krco, Marko, E-mail: nchapman@u.northwestern.edu [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2011-11-01

    We present maps of the plane-of-sky magnetic field within two regions of the Taurus molecular cloud: one in the dense core L1495/B213 filament and the other in a diffuse region to the west. The field is measured from the polarization of background starlight seen through the cloud. In total, we measured 287 high-quality near-infrared polarization vectors in these regions. In L1495/B213, the percent polarization increases with column density up to A{sub V} {approx} 9 mag, the limits of our data. The radiative torques model for grain alignment can explain this behavior, but models that invoke turbulence are inconsistent with the data. We also combine our data with published optical and near-infrared polarization measurements in Taurus. Using this large sample, we estimate the strength of the plane-of-sky component of the magnetic field in nine subregions. This estimation is done with two different techniques that use the observed dispersion in polarization angles. Our values range from 5 to 82 {mu}G and tend to be higher in denser regions. In all subregions, the critical index of the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio is sub-unity, implying that Taurus is magnetically supported on large scales ({approx}2 pc). Within the region observed, the B213 filament takes a sharp turn to the north and the direction of the magnetic field also takes a sharp turn, switching from being perpendicular to the filament to becoming parallel. This behavior can be understood if we are observing the rim of a bubble. We argue that it has resulted from a supernova remnant associated with a recently discovered nearby gamma-ray pulsar.

  2. Infrared detection of (H2O)20 isomers of exceptional stability: A drop-like and a face-sharing pentagonal prism cluster

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pradzynski, Christoph C.; Dierking, Christoph W.; Zurheide, Florian; Forck, Richard M.; Buck, Udo; Zeuch, Thomas; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2014-09-01

    Water clusters containing fully coordinated water molecules are model systems that mimic the local environment of the condensed phase. Present knowledge about the water cluster size regime in which the transition from the allsurface to the fully solvated water molecules occurs is mainly based on theoretical predictions in lieu of the absence of precisely size resolved experimental measurements. Here, we report size and isomer selective infrared (IR) spectra of (H2O)20 clusters tagged with a sodium atom by employing IR excitation modulated photoionization spectroscopy. The observed absorption patterns in the OH stretching ”fingerprint” region are consistent with the theoretically predicted spectramore »of two structurally distinct isomers: A drop-like cluster with a fully coordinated (interior) water and an edge-sharing pentagonal prism cluster in which all atoms are on the surface. The observed isomers show exceptional stability and are predicted to be nearly isoenergetic.« less

  3. Infrared detection of (H2O)20 isomers of exceptional stability: a drop-like and a face-sharing pentagonal prism cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pradzynski, Christoph C.; Dierking, Christoph W.; Zurheide, Florian; Forck, Richard M.; Buck, Udo; Zeuch, Thomas; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2014-12-28

    Water clusters containing fully coordinated water molecules are model systems that mimic the local environment of the condensed phase. Present knowledge about the water cluster size regime in which the transition from the allsurface to the fully solvated water molecules occurs is mainly based on theoretical predictions in lieu of the absence of precisely size resolved experimental measurements. Here, we report size and isomer selective infrared (IR) spectra of (H2O)20 clusters tagged with a sodium atom by employing IR excitation modulated photoionization spectroscopy. The observed absorption patterns in the OH stretching ”fingerprint” region are consistent with the theoretically predicted spectra of two structurally distinct isomers: A drop-like cluster with a fully coordinated (interior) water and an edge-sharing pentagonal prism cluster in which all atoms are on the surface. The observed isomers show exceptional stability and are predicted to be nearly isoenergetic.

  4. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THEVorticesInformation| U.S.InfraredInfrared

  5. Mid-IR Fiber-Based Light Sources (~2 to 6.5 microns)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    1 Mid-IR Fiber-Based Light Sources (~2 to 6.5 microns) Prof. Mohammed N. Islam Department) Combustion Monitoring Infr (Cha Cone Penetrometer Contaminated Soil In L SCAPS* truck * (Site

  6. An IR-based Evaluation Framework for Web Search Query Segmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganguly, Niloy

    An IR-based Evaluation Framework for Web Search Query Segmentation Author 1 Author 1 Affiliation Author 1 Address Author 1 Email Author 2 Author 2 Affiliation Author 2 Address Author 2 Email ABSTRACT

  7. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A 15 T, 120 MM BORE IR QUADRUPOLE MAGNET FOR LARP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caspi, S.

    2011-01-01

    is developing a large bore (120 mm) IR quadrupole ( H Q )quadrupole ( H Q ) that extends the bore size from 90 mm to120 mm and pushes the field at the conductor just over 15 T.

  8. Giantically blue-shifted visible light in femtosecond mid-IR filament in fluorides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dormidonov, A E; Chekalin, S V; Kandidov, V P

    2015-01-01

    A giant blue shift of an isolated visible band of supercontinuum was discovered and studied in the single filament regime of Mid-IR femtosecond laser pulse at powers slightly exceeding critical power for self-focusing in fluorides.

  9. While catching estrildids for the Museum's Aviary along the Vaal River ir Acacla veld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    While catching estrildids for the Museum's Aviary along the Vaal River ir Acacla veld at the farm trained'. Well, a staternent like that rnade our irnacirrations run wild. TIrere you are u ith a silall r

  10. FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

    2010-01-01

    This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

  11. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vener, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Wehmeyer, C.; Sebastiani, D.

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)–glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded ?-sheet structure. The 1 ?s NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898–915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short {sup +}N–H?O{sup ?} bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm{sup ?1}. It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the {sup +}N–H?O{sup ?} fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 2000–2800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is usually not considered in spectroscopic studies of peptides and proteins.

  12. Thermonuclear supernovae: probing magnetic fields by positrons and late-time IR line profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, R.; Hoeflich, P., E-mail: phoeflich77@gmail.com, E-mail: rpenney@g.clemson.edu [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32305 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We show the importance of ? and positron transport for the formation of late-time spectra in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The goal is to study the imprint of magnetic fields (B) on late-time IR line profiles, particularly the [Fe II] feature at 1.644 ?m, which becomes prominent two to three months after the explosion. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass (M {sub Ch}) white dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model that can reproduce the light curves and spectra for a Branch-normal SN Ia. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 10{sup 9} G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We show that positron transport effects must be taken into account for the interpretation of emission features starting at about one to two years after maximum light, depending on the size of B. The [Fe II] line profile and its evolution with time can be understood in terms of the overall energy input by radioactive decay and the transition from a ?-ray to a positron-dominated regime. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 ?m can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. At later times, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. After about day 300, the line profile allows one to probe the size of the B-field. The profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B at about day 500. In the presence of a large-scale dipole field, a broad line is produced in M {sub Ch} mass explosions that may appear flat-topped or rounded depending on the inclination at which the SN is observed. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. We note that narrow-line profiles require central {sup 56}Ni as shown in our previous studies. Persistent broad-line, flat-topped profiles require high-density burning, which is the signature of a WD close to M {sub Ch}. Good time coverage is required to separate the effects of optical depth, the size and morphology of B, and the aspect angle of the observer. The spectra require a resolution of about 500 km s{sup –1} and a signal-to-noise ratio of about 20%. Two other strong near-IR spectral features at about 1.5 and 1.8 ?m are used to demonstrate the importance of line blending, which may invalidate a kinematic interpretation of emission lines. Flat-topped line profiles between 300 and 400 days have been observed and reported in the literature. They lend support for M {sub Ch} mass explosions in at least some cases and require magnetic fields equal to or in excess of 10{sup 6} G. We briefly discuss the effects of the size and morphology of B on light curves, as well as limitations. We argue that line profiles are a more direct measurement of B than light curves because they measure both the distribution of {sup 56}Ni and the redistribution of the energy input by positrons rather than the total energy input. Finally, we discuss possible mechanisms for the formation of high B-fields and the limitations of our analysis.

  13. Flavor dependence of normalization constant for an infrared renormalon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taekoon Lee

    2015-02-09

    An ansatz is proposed for the flavor dependence of the normalization constant for the first IR renormalon in heavy quark pole mass.

  14. Estimated IR and phosphorescence emission fluxes for specific Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Red Rectangle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Mulas; G. Malloci; C. Joblin; D. Toublanc

    2005-09-20

    Following the tentative identification of the blue luminescence in the Red Rectangle by Vijh et al. (2005), we compute absolute fluxes for the vibrational IR emission and phosphorescence bands of three small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The calculated IR spectra are compared with available ISO observations. A subset of the emission bands are predicted to be observable using presently available facilities, and can be used for an immediate, independent, discriminating test on their alleged presence in this well-known astronomical object.

  15. DRIVER ACCELERATOR DESIGN FOR THE 10 KW UPGRADE OF THE JEFFERSON LAB IR FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRIVER ACCELERATOR DESIGN FOR THE 10 KW UPGRADE OF THE JEFFERSON LAB IR FEL D. Douglas, S. V, Newport News, VA23606, USA Abstract An upgrade of the Jefferson Lab IR FEL [1] is now un- der construction. It will provide 10 kW output light power in a wavelength range of 2­10 µm. The FEL will be driven by a modest

  16. Materials Chemistry and Physics 100 (2006) 3840 X-ray irradiation induced degradation of cellulose nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    2006-01-01

    Materials Chemistry and Physics 100 (2006) 38­40 X-ray irradiation induced degradation of cellulose the thickness of the cellulose nitrate layer of the commonly used LR 115 solid-state nuclear track detector spectrometry will induce degradation of the cellulose nitrate. For this purpose, Fourier transform infrared

  17. New insulating antiferromagnetic quaternary iridates MLa10Ir4O24 (M=Sr, Ba)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Qingbiao; Han, Fei; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Han, Tian -Heng; Li, Hao; Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, oxides of Ir4+ have received renewed attention in the condensed matter physics community, as it has been reported that certain iridates have a strongly spin-orbital coupled (SOC) electronic state, Jeff = ½, that defines the electronic and magnetic properties. The canonical example is the Ruddlesden-Popper compound Sr2IrO4, which has been suggested as a potential route to a new class of high temperature superconductor due to the formal analogy between Jeff = ½ and the S = ½ state of the cuprate superconductors. The quest for other iridium oxides that present tests of the underlying SOC physics is underway. Inmore »this spirit, here we report the synthesis and physical properties of two new quaternary tetravalent iridates, MLa10Ir4O24 (M = Sr, Ba). The crystal structure of both compounds features isolated IrO6 octahedra in which the electronic configuration of Ir is d5. As a result, both compounds order antiferromagnetically despite the lack of obvious superexchange pathways, and resistivity measurement shows that SrLa10Ir4O24 is an insulator.« less

  18. RESEARCH ARTICLE Infrared thermography investigations in transitional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuccher, Simone

    investigation. The additional advantage of no need for special apparatus, except for the infrared camera, makes IRT well suited for both wind-tunnel and in-flight testing. Practical problems and limitations downstream are responsi- ble for energy losses. In subsonic and transonic flight this type of drag

  19. Matching of Infrared Emitters with Textiles For Improved Energy Utilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, W. W.; Williamson, V. A.; Johnson, M. R.; Do, B. T.

    1994-01-01

    The successful utilization of infrared radiation is dependent on the spectral characteristics of the material being processed and on how well the spectral output of the infrared source matches those of the material being heated. Very little bas been...

  20. Infrared Brightness Temperature of Mars, 1983-2103

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Wright

    2007-03-25

    The predicted infrared brightness temperature of Mars using the 1976 model of Wright is tabulated here for the period 1983 to 2103. This model was developed for far-infrared calibration, and is still being used for JCMT calibration.

  1. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Wednesday, 29 October 2008 00:00 Graphene-a single layer...

  2. Monolithically integrated near-infrared and mid-infrared detector array for spectral imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, A. G. Unil

    detector test results ensure the high quality of material suitable for near-infrared/QWIP dual-band focal. A CTIS records spatial and spectral information by imaging a scene through an optical relay system

  3. Transmissive infrared frequency selective surfaces and infrared antennas : final report for LDRD 105749.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Hadley, G. Ronald; Samora, Sally; Loui, Hung; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Davids, Paul; Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Johnson, William Arthur; Peters, David William

    2009-09-01

    Plasmonic structures open up new opportunities in photonic devices, sometimes offering an alternate method to perform a function and sometimes offering capabilities not possible with standard optics. In this LDRD we successfully demonstrated metal coatings on optical surfaces that do not adversely affect the transmission of those surfaces at the design frequency. This technology could be applied as an RF noise blocking layer across an optical aperture or as a method to apply an electric field to an active electro-optic device without affecting optical performance. We also demonstrated thin optical absorbers using similar patterned surfaces. These infrared optical antennas show promise as a method to improve performance in mercury cadmium telluride detectors. Furthermore, these structures could be coupled with other components to lead to direct rectification of infrared radiation. This possibility leads to a new method for infrared detection and energy harvesting of infrared radiation.

  4. IN SITU INFRARED STUDY OF CATALYTIC DECOMPOSITION OF NO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KHALID ALMUSAITEER; RAM KRISHNAMURTHY; STEVEN S.C. CHUANG

    1998-08-18

    The growing concerns for the environment and increasingly stringent standards for NO emission have presented a major challenge to control NO emissions from electric utility plants and automobiles. Catalytic decomposition of NO is the most attractive approach for the control of NO emission for its simplicity. Successful development of an effective catalyst for NO decomposition will greatly decrease the equipment and operation cost of NO control. Due to lack of understanding of the mechanism of NO decomposition, efforts on the search of an effective catalyst have been unsuccessful. Scientific development of an effective catalyst requires fundamental understanding of the nature of active site, the rate-limiting step, and an approach to prolong the life of the catalyst. Research is proposed to study the reactivity of adsorbates for the direct NO decomposition and to investigate the feasibility of two novel approaches for improving catalyst activity and resistance to sintering. The first approach is the use of silanation to stabilize metal crystallites and supports for Cu-ZSM-5 and promoted Pt catalysts; the second is utilization of oxygen spillover and desorption to enhance NO decomposition activity. An innovative infrared reactor system will be used to observe and determine the dynamic behavior and the reactivity of adsorbates during NO decomposition, oxygen spillover, and silanation. A series of experiments including X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, temperature programmed reaction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy will be used to characterized the catalysts. The information obtained from this study will provide a scientific basis for developing an effective catalyst for the NO decomposition under practical flue gas conditions.

  5. Infrared and visual lunar occultations measurements of stellar diameters and new binary stars detections at the Calar Alto 1.5m telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Fors; A. Richichi; J. Nunez; A. Prades

    2004-02-03

    We present a program of routine lunar occultations, at optical and near-IR wavelengths, recently started at the 1.5m Spanish telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory. Both a CCD and an infrared array detector are used. The program is aimed mainly at the detection and investigation of binary systems, although results in other areas of stellar research are also anticipated. Occultations are reported for a total of 40 stars. Among these, SAO 164567, SAO 78258 and AG+24 788 have been discovered to be binaries, with projected separations as small as 0.006". Furthermore, binarity is suspected in the case of SAO 78119 and SAO 79251. Additionally, the angular diameter of the late-type giant 30 Psc and of the infrared star V349 Gem have been accurately measured, this latter for the first time. We finally evaluate the instrumentation performance in terms of limiting magnitude and angular resolution, and discuss applications to larger telescopes.

  6. Infrared reflectivity spectra of gas-source molecular beam epitaxy grown dilute InN{sub x}As{sub 1-x}/InP (001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talwar, Devki N. [Department of Physics, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 975 Oakland Avenue, 56 Weyandt Hall, Indiana, Pennsylvania 15705-1087 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 975 Oakland Avenue, 56 Weyandt Hall, Indiana, Pennsylvania 15705-1087 (United States); Yang, Tzuen-Rong [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106-11, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106-11, Taiwan (China); Hsiung Lin, Hao; Chuan Feng, Zhe [Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Engineering Material and Advanced Devices National Taiwan University, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Engineering Material and Advanced Devices National Taiwan University, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-04

    Vibrational spectra of gas-source molecular beam epitaxy grown dilute InN{sub x}As{sub 1-x}/InP (001) alloys are obtained using a Fourier-transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. A triply degenerate N{sub As} local vibrational mode of T{sub d}-symmetry is observed near 438 cm{sup -1} corresponding to the In-N bond energy. The analysis of composition dependent infrared reflectivity spectra in InNAs has predicted a two-phonon-mode behavior. In In(Ga)-rich GaInNAs alloys the observed splitting of the N{sub As} local mode into a doublet for the N{sub As}-Ga{sub 1}(In{sub 1})In{sub 3}(Ga{sub 3}) pair-defect of C{sub 3v}-symmetry is consistent with our simulated results based on a sophisticated Green's function theory.

  7. X-ray Properties of Young Stellar Objects in OMC-2 and OMC-3 from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tsujimoto; K. Koyama; Y. Tsuboi; M. Goto; N. Kobayashi

    2001-10-12

    We report X-ray results of the Chandra observation of Orion Molecular Cloud 2 and 3. A deep exposure of \\sim 100 ksec detects \\sim 400 X-ray sources in the field of view of the ACIS array, providing one of the largest X-ray catalogs in a star forming region. Coherent studies of the source detection, time variability, and energy spectra are performed. We classify the X-ray sources into class I, class II, and class III+MS based on the J, H, and K-band colors of their near infrared counterparts and discuss the X-ray properties (temperature, absorption, and time variability) along these evolutionary phases.

  8. Real Time Pedestrian Tracking using Thermal Infrared Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Moral , Pierre

    Real Time Pedestrian Tracking using Thermal Infrared Imagery Jianfu Li 1. Key Laboratory@cqu.edu.cn Abstract--In the study, a real time pedestrian tracking algortithm is presented using thermal infrared imagery. It makes use of the characteristics of pedestrian body regions in infrared images, which is based

  9. Efficient, Stable Infrared Photovoltaics Based on Solution-Cast Colloidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    multijunction solar cells offer the prospect of exceeding 40% efficiency7 through the inclusion of infrared and optimized to this purpose. Organic solar cells have already achieved 6.5% solar conversion efficien- cies.6-bandgap materials. In this context, infrared single-junction solar cells should be optimized for infrared power

  10. Efficient, Stable Infrared Photovoltaics Based on Solution-Cast Colloidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conversion ef- ficiency rather than solar power conversion efficiency. For double- and triple-junction solar-bandgap materials. In this context, infrared single-junction solar cells should be optimized for infrared power in the infrared. As a result, the optimal bandgaps for solar cells in both the single-junction and even the tandem

  11. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Waxman

    2000-04-11

    Ultra-high-energy, >10^19 eV, cosmic-ray and high energy, ~10^14 eV, neutrino production in GRBs is discussed in the light of recent GRB and cosmic-ray observations. Emphasis is put on model predictions that can be tested with operating and planned cosmic-ray and neutrino detectors, and on the prospects of testing for neutrino properties.

  12. Near-infrared Study of the Carina Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchawala, Kaushar; Ojha, Devendra; Ghosh, Swarna Kanti; Nakajima, Yasushi; Tamura, Motohide; Baba, Daisuke; Sato, Shuji; Tsujimoto, Masahiro

    2007-01-01

    We have carried out near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations of the Carina Nebula for an area of ~400 sq. arcmin. including the star clusters Trumpler 14 (Tr 14) and Trumpler 16 (Tr 16). With 10 sigma limiting magnitudes of J ~ 18.5, H ~ 17.5 and K_s ~ 16.5, we identified 544 Class II and 11 Class I young star candidates. We find some 40 previously unknown very red sources with H-K_s > 2, most of which remain undetected at the J band. The red NIR sources are found to be concentrated to the south-east of Tr 16, along the `V' shaped dust lane, where the next generation of stars seems to be forming. In addition, we find indications of ongoing star formation near the three MSX point sources, G287.51-0.49, G287.47-0.54, and G287.63-0.72. A handful of red NIR sources are seen to populate around each of these MSX sources. Apart from this, we identified two hard Chandra X-ray sources near G287.47-0.54, one of which does not have an NIR counterpart and may be associated with a Class I/Class 0 object. The majority of t...

  13. Gamma Ray Bursts Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    Gamma Ray Bursts #12;The Case Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays come from nowhere and disappear with out a trace. Incredibly powerful: A single gamma ray burst is hundreds of times brighter a supernova #12;Who Vela (1960's) Looking for arms testing, found gamma ray bursts Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

  14. Infrared Radiation Filament And Metnod Of Manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward A. (Bedford, MA)

    1998-11-17

    An improved IR radiation source is provided by the invention. A radiation filament has a textured surface produced by seeded ion bombardment of a metal foil which is cut to a serpentine shape and mounted in a windowed housing. Specific ion bombardment texturing techniques tune the surface to maximize emissions in the desired wavelength range and to limit emissions outside that narrow range, particularly at longer wavelengths. A combination of filament surface texture, thickness, material, shape and power circuit feedback control produce wavelength controlled and efficient radiation at much lower power requirements than devices of the prior art.

  15. The Flare Activity of SgrA*; New Coordinated mm to X-Ray Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Eckart; F. K. Baganoff; R. Schoedel; M. Morris; R. Genzel; G. C. Bower; D. Marrone; J. M. Moran; T. Viehmann; M. W. Bautz; W. N. Brandt; G. P. Garmire; T. Ott; S. Trippe; G. R. Ricker; C. Straubmeier; D. A. Roberts; F. Yusef-Zadeh; J. H. Zhao; R. Rao

    2005-12-16

    We report new simultaneous near-infrared/sub-millimeter/X-ray observations of the SgrA* counterpart associated with the massive 3-4x10**6 solar mass black hole at the Galactic Center. The main aim is to investigate the physical processes responsible for the variable emission from SgrA*. The observations have been carried out using the NACO adaptive optics (AO) instrument at the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope and the ACIS-I instrument aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory as well as the Submillimeter Array SMA on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and the Very Large Array in New Mexico. We detected one moderately bright flare event in the X-ray domain and 5 events at infrared wavelengths.

  16. X-ray Detections of Sub-millimetre Galaxies: Active Galactic Nuclei Versus Starburst Contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Seth P; Wang, Danial Q; Williams, Christina C; Scott, Kim S; Yun, Min S; Pope, Alexandra; Lowenthal, James; Aretxaga, Itziar; Hughes, David; Kim, M J; Kim, Sungeun; Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro; Ezawa, Hajime; Kawabe, Ryohei; Oshima, Tai; 10.1093/mnras/stt197

    2013-01-01

    We present a large-scale study of the X-ray properties and near-IR-to-radio SEDs of submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) detected at 1.1mm with the AzTEC instrument across a ~1.2 square degree area of the sky. Combining deep 2-4 Ms Chandra data with Spitzer IRAC/MIPS and VLA data within the GOODS-N/S and COSMOS fields, we find evidence for AGN activity in ~14 percent of 271 AzTEC SMGs, ~28 percent considering only the two GOODS fields. Through X-ray spectral modeling and SED fitting using Monte Carlo Markov Chain techniques to Siebenmorgen et al. (2004) (AGN) and Efstathiou et al. (2000) (starburst) templates, we find that while star formation dominates the IR emission, with SFRs ~100-1000 M_sun/yr, the X-ray emission for most sources is almost exclusively from obscured AGNs, with column densities in excess of 10^23 cm^-2. Only for ~6 percent of our sources do we find an X-ray-derived SFR consistent with NIR-to-radio SED derived SFRs. Inclusion of the X-ray luminosities as a prior to the NIR-to-radio SED effectively...

  17. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr3Ir4Sn13

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, P. K.; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    In this research, magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (µSR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field µSR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field µSR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ??² with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? withmore »a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.« less

  18. GRB 081029: A GAMMA-RAY BURST WITH A MULTI-COMPONENT AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Stephen T.; Sakamoto, Takanori; De Pasquale, Massimiliano; Schady, Patricia; Mao, Jirong; Covino, Stefano; Jin, Zhi-Ping; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Chincarini, Guido; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Antonelli, Angelo; D'Elia, Valerio; Fiore, Fabrizio; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan; Cobb, Bethany E.

    2012-01-20

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 081029, a long-soft burst with a redshift of z = 3.8479. We combine X-ray and optical observations from the Swift X-Ray Telescope and the Swift UltraViolet/Optical Telescope with ground-based optical and infrared data obtained using the REM, ROTSE, and CTIO 1.3 m telescopes to construct a detailed data set extending from 86 s to {approx}100000 s after the BAT trigger. Our data cover a wide energy range from 10 keV to 0.77 eV (1.24 A-16000 A). The X-ray afterglow shows a shallow initial decay followed by a rapid decay starting at about 18000 s. The optical and infrared afterglow, however, shows an uncharacteristic rise at about 3000 s that does not correspond to any feature in the X-ray light curve. Our data are not consistent with synchrotron radiation from a jet interacting with an external medium, a two-component jet, or continuous energy injection from the central engine. We find that the optical light curves can be broadly explained by a collision between two ejecta shells within a two-component jet. A growing number of gamma-ray-burst afterglows are consistent with complex jets, which suggests that some (or all) gamma-ray-burst jets are complex and will require detailed modeling to fully understand them.

  19. Mid-Infrared Plasmonic Biosensing with Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo, Daniel; Janner, Davide; Etezadi, Dordaneh; de Abajo, F Javier García; Pruneri, Valerio; Altug, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is the technique of choice for chemical identification of biomolecules through their vibrational fingerprints. However, infrared light interacts poorly with nanometric size molecules. Here, we exploit the unique electro-optical properties of graphene to demonstrate a high-sensitivity tunable plasmonic biosensor for chemically-specific label-free detection of protein monolayers. The plasmon resonance of nanostructured graphene is dynamically tuned to selectively probe the protein at different frequencies and extract its complex refractive index. Additionally, the extreme spatial light confinement in graphene, up to two orders of magnitude higher than in metals, produces an unprecedentedly high overlap with nanometric biomolecules, enabling superior sensitivity in the detection of their refractive index and vibrational fingerprints. The combination of tunable spectral selectivity and enhanced sensitivity of graphene opens exciting prospects for biosensing.

  20. THE INFRARED COLORS OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casagrande, L.; Asplund, M.; Ramirez, I.; Melendez, J.

    2012-12-10

    Solar infrared colors provide powerful constraints on the stellar effective temperature scale, but they must be measured with both accuracy and precision in order to do so. We fulfill this requirement by using line-depth ratios to derive in a model-independent way the infrared colors of the Sun, and we use the latter to test the zero point of the Casagrande et al. effective temperature scale, confirming its accuracy. Solar colors in the widely used Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) JHK{sub s} and WISE W1-4 systems are provided: (V - J){sub Sun} = 1.198, (V - H){sub Sun} = 1.484, (V - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 1.560, (J - H){sub Sun} = 0.286, (J - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 0.362, (H - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 0.076, (V - W1){sub Sun} = 1.608, (V - W2){sub Sun} = 1.563, (V - W3){sub Sun} = 1.552, and (V - W4){sub Sun} = 1.604. A cross-check of the effective temperatures derived implementing 2MASS or WISE magnitudes in the infrared flux method confirms that the absolute calibration of the two systems agrees within the errors, possibly suggesting a 1% offset between the two, thus validating extant near- and mid-infrared absolute calibrations. While 2MASS magnitudes are usually well suited to derive T{sub eff}, we find that a number of bright, solar-like stars exhibit anomalous WISE colors. In most cases, this effect is spurious and can be attributed to lower-quality measurements, although for a couple of objects (3% {+-} 2% of the total sample) it might be real, and may hint at the presence of warm/hot debris disks.

  1. Chest x-Rays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica.

  2. Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Mészáros

    2012-04-12

    Gamma-ray bursts have been detected at photon energies up to tens of GeV. We review some recent developments in the X-ray to GeV photon phenomenology in the light of Swift and Fermi observations, and some of the theoretical models developed to explain them, with a view towards implications for C.T.A.

  3. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Stearns, Daniel S. (Mountain View, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  4. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  5. Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy on Operating Surface Acoustic Wave Chemical Sensors During Exposure to Gas-Phase Analytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hierlemann, A.; Hill, M.; Ricco, A.J.; Staton, A.W.; Thomas, R.C.

    1999-01-11

    We have developed instrumentation to enable the combination of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor measurements with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopic measurements to understand the response of the SAW sensors with respect to the interfacial chemistry of surface-confined sensing films interacting with gas-phase analytes. Specifically, the instrumentation and software was developed to perform in-situ Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectroscopy (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their chemically modified surfaces with analytes. By probing the surface with IR spectroscopy during gas exposure, it is possible to understand in unprecedented detail the interaction processes between the sorptive SAW coatings and the gaseous analyte molecules. In this report, we provide details of this measurement system, and also demonstrate the utility of these combined measurements by characterizing the SAW and FTIR-ERS responses of organic thin-film sensor coatings interacting with gas-phase analytes.

  6. Handling collision debris in quad- and dipole-first LHC IR options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Rakhno, I.L.; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    Detailed MARS15 Monte Carlo energy deposition calculations are performed for two main designs of the LHC interaction regions (IR) capable to achieve a luminosity of 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}: a traditional quadrupole-first scheme and the one with a dual-bore inner triplet with separation dipoles placed in front of the quadrupoles. It is shown that with the appropriate design of the Nb3Sn magnets, IR layout and a number of protective measures implemented, both schemes are feasible for the LHC luminosity upgrade up to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}.

  7. Mechanism of Efficient Anti-Markovnikov Olefin Hydroarylation Catalyzed by Homogeneous Ir(III) Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhalla, Gaurav; Bischof, Steven M; Ganesh, Somesh K; Liu, Xiang Y; Jones, C J; Borzenko, Andrey; Tenn, William J; Ess, Daniel H; Hashiguchi, Brian G; Lokare, Kapil S; Leung, Chin Hin; Oxgaard, Jonas; Goddard, William A; Periana, Roy A

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of the hydroarylation reaction between unactivated olefins (ethylene, propylene, and styrene) and benzene catalyzed by [(R)Ir(?-acac-O,O,C{sup 3})-(acac-O,O){sub 2}]{sub 2} and [R-Ir(acac-O,O){sub 2}(L)] (R = acetylacetonato, CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, Ph, or CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph, and L = H{sub 2}O or pyridine) Ir(III) complexes was studied by experimental methods. The system is selective for generating the anti-Markovnikov product of linear alkylarenes (61:39 for benzene + propylene and 98:2 for benzene + styrene). The reaction mechanism was found to follow a rate law with first-order dependence on benzene and catalyst, but a non-linear dependence on olefin. {sup 13}C-labelling studies with CH{sub 3}{sup 13}CH{sub 2}-Ir-Py showed that reversible ?-hydride elimination is facile, but unproductive, giving exclusively saturated alkylarene products. The migration of the {sup 13}C-label from the ? to ?-positions was found to be slower than the C–H activation of benzene (and thus formation of ethane and Ph-d{sub 5}-Ir-Py). Kinetic analysis under steady state conditions gave a ratio of the rate constants for CH activation and ?-hydride elimination (k{sub CH}: k{sub ?}) of ~0.5. The comparable magnitude of these rates suggests a common rate determining transition state/intermediate, which has been shown previously with B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Overall, the mechanism of hydroarylation proceeds through a series of pre-equilibrium dissociative steps involving rupture of the dinuclear species or the loss of L from Ph-Ir-L to the solvento, 16-electron species, Ph-Ir(acac-O,O){sub 2}-Sol (where Sol refers to coordinated solvent). This species then undergoes trans to cisisomerization of the acetylacetonato ligand to yield the pseudo octahedral species cis-Ph-Ir-Sol, which is followed by olefin insertion (the regioselective and rate determining step), and then activation of the C–H bond of an incoming benzene to generate the product and regenerate the catalyst.

  8. Filamentation of IR and UV femtosecond pulses upon focusing in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dergachev, A A; Ionin, Andrei A; Kandidov, V P; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Shlenov, Svyatoslav A

    2013-01-31

    The filamentation of IR and UV laser pulses has been studied numerically and experimentally for different initial beam focusing geometries, and linear electron density profiles along the plasma channel of filaments have been obtained. The results demonstrate that changes in laser beam focusing have a stronger effect on filament and plasma channel parameters for UV radiation than for IR radiation. Focusing causes individual high fluence regions produced by refocusing to merge to form a continuous extended filament with a continuous plasma channel. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  9. Invited Article: An integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kühne, P., E-mail: kuehne@huskers.unl.edu; Schubert, M., E-mail: schubert@engr.unl.edu; Hofmann, T., E-mail: thofmann@engr.unl.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Nanohybrid Functional Materials, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Herzinger, C. M., E-mail: cherzinger@jawoollam.com; Woollam, J. A., E-mail: jwoollam@jawoollam.com [J. A. Woollam Co., Inc., 645 M Street, Suite 102, Lincoln, Nebraska 68508-2243 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    We report on the development of the first integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument, covering an ultra wide spectral range from 3 cm{sup ?1} to 7000 cm{sup ?1} (0.1–210 THz or 0.4–870 meV). The instrument comprises four sub-systems, where the magneto-cryostat-transfer sub-system enables the usage of the magneto-cryostat sub-system with the mid-infrared ellipsometer sub-system, and the far-infrared/terahertz ellipsometer sub-system. Both ellipsometer sub-systems can be used as variable angle-of-incidence spectroscopic ellipsometers in reflection or transmission mode, and are equipped with multiple light sources and detectors. The ellipsometer sub-systems are operated in polarizer-sample-rotating-analyzer configuration granting access to the upper left 3 × 3 block of the normalized 4 × 4 Mueller matrix. The closed cycle magneto-cryostat sub-system provides sample temperatures between room temperature and 1.4 K and magnetic fields up to 8 T, enabling the detection of transverse and longitudinal magnetic field-induced birefringence. We discuss theoretical background and practical realization of the integrated mid-infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz optical Hall effect instrument, as well as acquisition of optical Hall effect data and the corresponding model analysis procedures. Exemplarily, epitaxial graphene grown on 6H-SiC, a tellurium doped bulk GaAs sample and an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structure are investigated. The selected experimental datasets display the full spectral, magnetic field and temperature range of the instrument and demonstrate data analysis strategies. Effects from free charge carriers in two dimensional confinement and in a volume material, as well as quantum mechanical effects (inter-Landau-level transitions) are observed and discussed exemplarily.

  10. Gamma Ray Bursts as Probes of the First Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James E. Rhoads

    2001-11-01

    The redshift where the first stars formed is an important and unknown milestone in cosmological structure formation. The evidence linking gamma ray bursts (GRBs) with star formation activity implies that the first GRBs occurred shortly after the first stars formed. Gamma ray bursts and their afterglows may thus offer a unique probe of this epoch, because they are bright from gamma ray to radio wavelengths and should be observable to very high redshift. Indeed, our ongoing near-IR followup programs already have the potential to detect bursts at redshift z ~ 10. In these proceedings, we discuss two distinct ways of using GRBs to probe the earliest star formation. First, direct GRB counts may be used as a proxy for star formation rate measurements. Second, high energy cutoffs in the GeV spectra of gamma ray bursts due to pair production with high redshift optical and ultraviolet background photons contain information on early star formation history. The second method is observationally more demanding, but also more rewarding, because each observed pair creation cutoff in a high redshift GRB spectrum will tell us about the integrated star formation history prior to the GRB redshift.

  11. Heralding efficiency and correlated-mode coupling of near-IR fiber-coupled photon pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Danna

    We report on a systematic experimental study of the heralding efficiency and generation rate of telecom-band infrared photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion and coupled to single-mode optical ...

  12. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  13. Single mode operation with mid-IR hollow fibers in the range 5.1-10.5 m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .2390) Fiber optics, infrared; (140.5965) Semiconductor lasers, quantum cascade. References and links 1. B. Lendl and B. Mizaikoff, Optical Fibers for Mid-infrared Spectrometry, Handbook of Vibrational

  14. A Far-Infrared Spectroscopic Survey of Intermediate Redshift (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdis, Georgios E; Hopwood, R; Huang, J -S; Farrah, D; Pearson, C; Alonso-Herrero, A; Bock, J J; Clements, D; Cooray, A; Griffin, M J; Oliver, S; Fournon, Perez; Riechers, D; Swinyard, B M; Scott, D; Thatte, N; Valtchanov, I; Vaccari, M

    2014-01-01

    We present Herschel far-IR photometry and spectroscopy as well as ground based CO observations of an intermediate redshift (0.21 10^11.5L_sun). With these measurements we trace the dust continuum, far-IR atomic line emission, in particular [CII]\\,157.7microns, as well as the molecular gas of z~0.3 (U)LIRGs and perform a detailed investigation of the interstellar medium of the population. We find that the majority of Herschel-selected intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs have L_CII/L_FIR ratios that are a factor of about 10 higher than that of local ULIRGs and comparable to that of local normal and high-$z$ star forming galaxies. Using our sample to bridge local and high-z [CII] observations, we find that the majority of galaxies at all redshifts and all luminosities follow a L_CII-L_FIR relation with a slope of unity, from which local ULIRGs and high-z AGN dominated sources are clear outliers. We also confirm that the strong anti-correlation between the L_CII/L_FIR ratio and the far-IR color L_60/L_100 observed in...

  15. A Cryogenic Space Telescope for Far-Infrared Astrophysics: A Vision for NASA in the 2020 Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradford, C M; Bolatto, A; Armus, L; Bauer, J; Appleton, P; Cooray, A; Casey, C; Dale, D; Uzgil, B; Aguirre, J; Smith, J D; Sheth, K; Murphy, E J; McKenney, C; Holmes, W; Rizzo, M; Bergin, E; Stacey, G

    2015-01-01

    Many of the transformative processes in the Universe have taken place in regions obscured by dust, and are best studied with far-IR spectroscopy. We present the Cryogenic-Aperture Large Infrared-Submillimeter Telescope Observatory (CALISTO), a 5-meter class, space-borne telescope actively cooled to 4 K, emphasizing moderate-resolution spectroscopy in the crucial 35 to 600 micron band. CALISTO will enable NASA and the world to study the rise of heavy elements in the Universe's first billion years, chart star formation and black hole growth in dust-obscured galaxies through cosmic time, and conduct a census of forming planetary systems in our region of the Galaxy. CALISTO will capitalize on rapid progress in both format and sensitivity of far-IR detectors. Arrays with a total count of a few 100,000 detector pixels will form the heart of a suite of imaging spectrometers in which each detector reaches the photon background limit. This document contains a large overview paper on CALISTO, as well as six 2-3 page sc...

  16. AKARI Observation of the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) Supercluster at z = 0.087: mid-infrared view of transition galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Jongwan; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Kim, Seong Jin; Shim, Hyunjin; Jeon, Yiseul; Hwang, Ho Seong; Willmer, Christopher N A; Malkan, Matthew A; Papovich, Casey; Weiner, Benjamin J; Matsuhara, Hideo; Oyabu, Shinki; Takagi, Toshinobu

    2011-01-01

    We present the mid-infrared (MIR) properties of galaxies within a supercluster in the North Ecliptic Pole region at z?0.087 observed with the AKARI satellite. We use data from the AKARI NEP-Wide (5.4 deg2) IR survey and the CLusters of galaxies EVoLution studies (CLEVL) mission program. We show that near-IR (3 {\\mu}m)-mid- IR (11 {\\mu}m) color can be used as an indicator of the specific star formation rate and the presence of intermediate age stellar populations. From the MIR observations, we find that red-sequence galaxies consist not only of passively evolving red early-type galaxies, but also of 1) "weak-SFG" (disk-dominated star-forming galaxies which have star formation rates lower by \\sim 4 \\times than blue-cloud galaxies), and 2) "intermediate- MXG" (bulge-dominated galaxies showing stronger MIR dust emission than normal red early-type galaxies). Those two populations can be a set of transition galaxies from blue, star-forming, late-type galaxies evolving into red, quiescent, early-type ones. We find t...

  17. Gamma Ray Pulsars: Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J. Thompson

    2001-01-03

    High-energy gamma rays are a valuable tool for studying particle acceleration and radiation in the magnetospheres of energetic pulsars. The six or more pulsars seen by CGRO/EGRET show that: the light curves usually have double-peak structures (suggesting a broad cone of emission); gamma rays are frequently the dominant component of the radiated power; and all the spectra show evidence of a high-energy turnover. Unless a new pulsed component appears at higher energies, progress in gamma-ray pulsar studies will be greatest in the 1-20 GeV range. Ground-based telescopes whose energy ranges extend downward toward 10 GeV should make important measurements of the spectral cutoffs. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now in planning for a launch in 2005, will provide a major advance in sensitivity, energy range, and sky coverage.

  18. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 396, 18251832 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.14704.x Possible effects of pair echoes on gamma-ray burst afterglow emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bing

    2009-01-01

    effects of pair echoes on gamma-ray burst afterglow emission Kohta Murase,1 Bing Zhang,2 Keitaro Takahashi ABSTRACT High-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is widely expected but had been sparsely and can escape from the emission region, they are attenuated by the cosmic infrared background photons

  19. Resonator-quantum well infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, K. K. Sun, J.; Olver, K.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Waczynski, A.

    2013-11-11

    We applied a recent electromagnetic model to design the resonator-quantum well infrared photodetector (R-QWIP). In this design, we used an array of rings as diffractive elements to diffract normal incident light into parallel propagation and used the pixel volume as a resonator to intensify the diffracted light. With a proper pixel size, the detector resonates at certain optical wavelengths and thus yields a high quantum efficiency (QE). To test this detector concept, we fabricated a number of R-QWIPs with different quantum well materials and detector geometries. The experimental result agrees satisfactorily with the prediction, and the highest QE achieved is 71%.

  20. Defining the infrared systems for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichle, R.; Andrew, P.; Drevon, J.-M.; Encheva, A.; Janeschitz, G.; Levesy, B.; Martin, A.; Pitcher, C. S.; Pitts, R.; Thomas, D.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.; Counsell, G.; Johnson, D.; Kusama, Y.

    2010-10-15

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will have wide angle viewing systems and a divertor thermography diagnostic, which shall provide infrared coverage of the divertor and large parts of the first wall surfaces with spatial and temporal resolution adequate for operational purposes and higher resolved details of the divertor and other areas for physics investigations. We propose specifications for each system such that they jointly respond to the requirements. Risk analysis driven priorities for future work concern mirror degradation, interfaces with other diagnostics, radiation damage to refractive optics, reflections, and the development of calibration and measurement methods for varying optical and thermal target properties.

  1. Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedListguided wavesLone StarEnergyInfrared

  2. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THEVorticesInformation| U.S.Infrared Mapping

  3. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THEVorticesInformation| U.S.Infrared

  4. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,ImpactScientificInfluence ofMedia onInfrared Mapping Helps

  5. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,ImpactScientificInfluence ofMedia onInfrared Mapping

  6. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,ImpactScientificInfluence ofMedia onInfrared

  7. NISTIR 8056 http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.8056

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary of Activities for Fiscal Year 2014 #12;#12;NISTIR 8056 Applied and Computational Mathematics Division Summary of Activities for Fiscal Year 2014 Ronald F. Boisvert, Editor Applied and Computational Mathematics Division Information Technology Laboratory http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.8056 April 2015 U

  8. ELSEVIER International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 17 (1996) 285-290 Ir~ernattonatlournalc~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radwin, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    ELSEVIER International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 17 (1996) 285-290 Ir~ernattonatlournalc~ Industrial Ergonomics Short communication A new method for extending the range of conductive polymer sensors measurement instruments are important for providing ergonomics practitioners with a quantitative means

  9. Trans Mountain Response to SFU IR No. 2 Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    Trans Mountain Response to SFU IR No. 2 Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC Trans Mountain Expansion Terminal as well as key civil tasks. Request: (1) Please advise whether Trans Mountain has investigated Way and Burnaby Mountain Parkway either during normal operation of the tank farm, or in the event

  10. Temperature dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.; Seinige, H.; Tsoi, M.; Cao, G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.

    2015-05-07

    Temperature-dependent magnetotransport properties of the antiferromagnetic semiconductor Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} are investigated with point-contact devices. The point-contact technique allows to probe very small volumes and, therefore, to look for electronic transport on a microscopic scale. Point-contact measurements with single crystals of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} were intended to see whether the additional local resistance associated with a small contact area between a sharpened Cu tip and the antiferromagnet shows magnetoresistance (MR) such as that seen in bulk crystals. Point-contact measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature revealed large MRs (up to 28%) for modest magnetic fields (250?mT) applied within an IrO{sub 2} (ab) plane with angular dependence showing a crossover from four-fold to two-fold symmetry with an increasing magnetic field. Point contact measurement exhibits distinctive anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in comparison to a bulk experiment, imposing intriguing questions about the mechanism of AMR in this material. Temperature-dependent MR measurements show that the MR falls to zero at the Neel temperature, but the temperature dependence of the MR ratio differs qualitatively from that of the resistivity. This AMR study helps to unveil the entanglement between electronic transport and magnetism in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} while the observed magnetoresistive phenomena can be potentially used to sense the antiferromagnetic order parameter in spintronic applications.

  11. Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical Exchange Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical ExchangeVed: January 12, 2010 Hydrogen-bonded complexes between phenol and phenylacetylene are studied using ultrafast hydrogen bonding acceptor sites (phenyl or acetylene) that compete for hydrogen bond donors in solution

  12. AutomaticallyExtracted Thesauri for CrossLanguage IR: When Better is Worse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Ralf

    the accuracy of the extracted thesaurus can in fact reduce the performance of an IR system using it to perform et al., 1997) was a corpus­based bilingual term­substitution thesaurus, called EBT (for example this thesaurus (Brown, 1997) was originally developed for use in word­ level alignment in an example

  13. Advantageous GOES IR results for ash mapping at high latitudes: Cleveland eruptions 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bluth, Gregg

    Advantageous GOES IR results for ash mapping at high latitudes: Cleveland eruptions 2001 Yingxin Gu] The February 2001 eruption of Cleveland Volcano, Alaska allowed for comparisons of volcanic ash detection using angle also influences the results. The MODIS and AVHRR data give consistent retrievals of the ash cloud

  14. The mid-IR spectra of 9-ethyl guanine, guanosine, and 2-deoxyguanosine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Vries, Mattanjah S.

    they are blind to species with sub picosecond lifetime excited states. The detection in helium droplets relies. Choi and Miller have observed the keto tautomers in helium droplets, showing their IR frequencies between the R2PI and the helium droplet work is not only in the degree of cooling but also

  15. The system for delivery of IR laser radiaton into high vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abakumova, E V; Krasnov, A A; Muchnoi, N Yu; Pyata, E E

    2015-01-01

    The system for insertion of a laser beam into the vacuum chamber of high-energy storage ring is described. The main part of the system is the high-vacuum viewport for the IR radiation, based on ZnSe or GaAs crystals. The design of the viewports is presented.

  16. Neuroglobin dynamics observed with ultrafast 2D-IR vibrational echo spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Neuroglobin dynamics observed with ultrafast 2D-IR vibrational echo spectroscopy Haruto Ishikawa Contributed by Michael D. Fayer, August 15, 2007 (sent for review July 25, 2007) Neuroglobin (Ngb), a protein energy minimum. myoglobin mutants protein dynamics energy landscape Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a recently

  17. The TIJAH XML-IR system at INEX 2003 Johan List1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiemstra, Djoerd

    its mapping into a query execution strategy. The logical layer exploits probabilistic region algebra components. The logical algebra expressions are mapped into efficient rela- tional algebra expressions over participated with the TIJAH XML-IR retrieval system, a research pro- totype built on top of the Monet

  18. Ion Impacts on Graphene/Ir(111): Interface Channeling, Vacancy Funnels, and a Nanomesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

    simulations we study the production of defects in graphene on Ir(111) under grazing incidence of low energy Xe Koln, Zulpicher Straße 77, 50937 Koln, Germany Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box of Materials Science, University of Ulm, 89081 Ulm, Germany Department of Physics, University of Vienna

  19. Minimizing Energy Consumption in IR-UWB Based Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzelman, Wendi

    Minimizing Energy Consumption in IR-UWB Based Wireless Sensor Networks Tianqi Wang, Wendi communications systems, where transmit power can be flexibly adjusted to minimize the energy consumption [3] [4 Heinzelman and Alireza Seyedi Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester

  20. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Meszaros

    2006-05-30

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, and their origin and mechanism are the focus of intense research and debate. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with the recently launched Swift satellite. The interplay between these observations and theoretical models of the prompt gamma ray burst and its afterglow is reviewed.

  1. Doped carbon nanostructure field emitter arrays for infrared imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korsah, Kofi (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Baylor, Larry R (Farragut, TN) [Farragut, TN; Caughman, John B (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Rack, Philip D (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2009-10-27

    An infrared imaging device and method for making infrared detector(s) having at least one anode, at least one cathode with a substrate electrically connected to a plurality of doped carbon nanostructures; and bias circuitry for applying an electric field between the anode and the cathode such that when infrared photons are adsorbed by the nanostructures the emitted field current is modulated. The detectors can be doped with cesium to lower the work function.

  2. A Source for Ultrafast Continuum Infrared and Terahertz Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen, Poul B.

    A compact and stable method for generating high-intensity linearly polarized continuum mid-IR and terahertz light using ultrafast femtosecond (fs) laser pulses is demonstrated. Continuous light generation from <400cm?1 ...

  3. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy for Process Monitoring and Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, P. R.; Carangelo, M. D.; Carangelo, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses recent applications of FT-IR spectroscopy to measure gas concentrations and temperatures, and particle sizes. Advances in hardware are discussed and results for field tests in pulp and paper and utility boilers are presented....

  4. Gamma ray camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  5. Gamma ray camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1997-01-21

    A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

  6. Comparative Investigation of Benzene Steam Reforming over Spinel Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Donghai; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Rousseau, Roger J.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Albrecht, Karl O.; Kovarik, Libor; Flake, Matthew D.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2013-06-01

    In a combined experimental and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) study, benzene steam reforming (BSR) over MgAl2O4 supported Rh and Ir catalysts was investigated. Experimentally, it has been found that both highly dispersed Rh and Ir clusters (1-2 nm) on the MgAl2O4 spinel support are stable during the BSR in the temperature range of 700-850?C. Compared to the Ir/MgAl2O4 catalyst, the Rh/MgAl2O4 catalyst is more active with higher benzene turnover frequency and conversion. At typical steam conditions with the steam-to-carbon ratio > 12, the benzene conversion is only a weak function of the H2O concentration in the feed. This suggests that the initial benzene decomposition step rather than the benzene adsorption is most likely the rate-determined step in BSR over supported Rh and Ir catalysts. In order to understand the differences between the two catalysts, we followed with a comparative DFT study of initial benzene decomposition pathways over two representative model systems for each supported metal (Rh and Ir) catalysts. A periodic terrace (111) surface and an amorphous 50-atom metal cluster with a diameter of 1.0 nm were used to represent the two supported model catalysts under low and high dispersion conditions. Our DFT results show that the decreasing catalyst particle size enhances the benzene decomposition on supported Rh catalysts by lowering both C-C and C-H bond scission. The activation barriers of the C-C and the C-H bond scission decrease from 1.60 and 1.61 eV on the Rh(111) surface to 1.34 and 1.26 eV on the Rh50 cluster. For supported Ir catalysts, the decreasing particle size only affects the C-C scission. The activation barrier of the C-C scission of benzene decreases from 1.60 eV on the Ir(111) surface to 1.35 eV on the Ir50 cluster while the barriers of the C-H scission are practically the same. The experimentally measured higher BSR activity on the supported highly dispersed Rh catalyst can be rationalized by the thermodynamic limitation for the very first C-C bond scission of benzene on the small Ir50 catalyst. The C-C bond scission of benzene on the small Ir50 catalyst is highly endothermic although the barrier is competitive with the barriers of both the C-C and the C-H bond-breakings on the small Rh50 catalyst. The calculations also imply that, for the supported Rh catalysts the C-C and C-H bond scissions are competitive, independently of the Rh cluster sizes. After the initial dissociation step via either the C-C or the C-H bond scission, the C-H bond breaking seems to be more favorable rather than the C-C bond breaking on the larger Rh terrace surface. This work was financially supported by the United States Department of Energy’s Office of Biomass Program’s. Computing time was granted by a user project at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  7. Constraints on GRB TeV Emission from the GeV Extragalactic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casanova, S; Zhang, B; Zhang, Bing

    2006-01-01

    TeV gamma rays emitted by GRBs are converted into electron-positron pairs via interactions with the extragalactic infrared radiation fields. In turn the pairs produced, whose trajectories are randomized by magnetic fields, will inverse Compton scatter off the cosmic microwave background photons. The beamed TeV gamma ray flux from GRBs is thus transformed into a GeV isotropic gamma ray flux, which contributes to the total extragalactic gamma-ray background emission. Assuming a model for the extragalactic radiation fields, for the GRB redshift distribution and for the GRB luminosity function, we use the measured GeV extragalactic gamma-ray flux to set upper limits on the GRB emission in TeV gamma rays that is predicted in several models.

  8. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near...

  9. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    therefore can provide some of the most interesting information about the electronic properties of a material. In this work, the researchers employed infrared synchrotron radiation...

  10. Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivity of O-Donor Ir(III) Complexes: C-H Activation Studies with Benzene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    with Benzene Gaurav Bhalla, Xiang Yang Liu, Jonas Oxgaard, William A. Goddard, III, and Roy A. Periana. All the R-Ir-Py complexes undergo quantitative, intermolecular CH activation reactions with benzene to benzene to generate a discrete benzene complex, cis-R-Ir-PhH; and (D) rapid C-H cleavage. Kinetic isotope

  11. Big picture Ads Duplicate detection Spam Web IR Size of the web Web Search and Text Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Alexander

    Big picture Ads Duplicate detection Spam Web IR Size of the web Web Search and Text Mining http://www.cc.gatech.edu/~agray/6240spr11 IIR 19: Web Search Basics Alexander Gray Georgia Institute of Technology, College of Computing 2011 Gray: Web Search Basics 1 / 117 #12;Big picture Ads Duplicate detection Spam Web IR Size

  12. Paving the road in virtual spaces IRS Workshop Territoriality of the Commons 29.-30. Sept.2011 Rainer Kuhlen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlen, Rainer

    Paving the road in virtual spaces­ IRS Workshop Territoriality of the Commons 29.-30. Sept.2011 the road in virtual spaces How to materialize rights to immaterial commons #12;Openness ­ Grundprinzip des;Openness ­ Grundprinzip des Handelns in elektronischen Räumen 4 #12;Paving the road in virtual spaces­ IRS

  13. Volume Ray Casting Neslisah Torosdagli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pattanaik, Sumanta N.

    Volume Ray Casting Neslisah Torosdagli #12;Overview · Light Transfer Optical Models · Math behind Direct Volume Ray Casting · Demonstration · Transfer Functions · Details of our Application · References #12;What is Volume Ray Casting? · Volume Ray Casting is construction of 3D volume using stack of 2D

  14. A JOINT MODEL OF THE X-RAY AND INFRARED EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUNDS. I. MODEL

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL Small-scaleCoherent LightNetworks| SciTech

  15. A JOINT MODEL OF X-RAY AND INFRARED BACKGROUNDS. II. COMPTON-THICK ACTIVE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL Small-scaleCoherent LightNetworks| SciTechGALACTIC NUCLEUS

  16. Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on High Energy Delayed Gamma-Rays

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech ConnectExperimentsGAMMA-RAYNp, Pu,a(JournalSciTechFrom

  17. Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on High Energy Delayed Gamma-Rays

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech ConnectExperimentsGAMMA-RAYNp,

  18. X-ray Detection from Bona-fide and Candidate Brown Dwarfs in the Rho Ophiuchi Cloud with Chandra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kensuke Imanishi; Masahiro Tsujimoto; Katsuji Koyama

    2001-08-06

    We present results of an X-ray search from bona-fide and candidate brown dwarfs in the Rho Ophiuchi cloud cores with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The selected areas are two fields near the cloud center and are observed with the ACIS-I array of a 17'x17' size and a ~100 ks exposure. Among 18 bona-fide and candidate brown dwarfs listed by the infrared spectroscopy, we find X-ray emission from 7 sources above 99.9% confidence level. Therefore ~40% of the infrared-selected brown dwarfs in this cloud emit X-rays. For the brightest 4 sources, the X-ray spectra are made and are fitted with a thin-thermal plasma model of a temperature 1-2.5 keV. The X-rays are also time variable with rapid flares from 2 of the brown dwarfs. Assuming 2 keV temperature and using the empirical relation of Av vs. NH, we estimate the X-ray luminosity or its upper limit of the other faint or non-X-ray sources. The X-ray luminosity (Lx) of the X-ray-detected sources is in the range of 0.3-90x10^28 ergs s^-1, while the luminosity ratio of X-ray to bolometric (Lx/Lbol) is 10^-3 - 10^-5, similar to those of low-mass pre-main-sequence and dMe stars. All these results suggest that the X-ray origin of brown dwarfs is the same as low-mass stars; strong magnetic activity at the stellar surface.

  19. The Red Radio Ring: a gravitationally lensed hyperluminous infrared radio galaxy at z=2.553 discovered through citizen science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geach, J E; Verma, A; Marshall, P J; Jackson, N; Belles, P -E; Beswick, R; Baeten, E; Chavez, M; Cornen, C; Cox, B E; Erben, T; Erickson, N J; Garrington, S; Harrison, P A; Harrington, K; Hughes, D H; Ivison, R J; Jordan, C; Lin, Y -T; Leauthaud, A; Lintott, C; Lynn, S; Kapadia, A; Kneib, J -P; Macmillan, C; Makler, M; Miller, G; Montana, A; Mujica, R; Muxlow, T; Narayanan, G; Briain, D O; O'Brien, T; Oguri, M; Paget, E; Parrish, M; Ross, N P; Rozo, E; Rusu, E; Rykoff, E S; Sanchez-Arguelles, D; Simpson, R; Snyder, C; Schloerb, F P; Tecza, M; Van Waerbeke, L; Wilcox, J; Viero, M; Wilson, G W; Yun, M S; Zeballos, M

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a gravitationally lensed hyperluminous infrared galaxy (L_IR~10^13 L_sun) with strong radio emission (L_1.4GHz~10^25 W/Hz) at z=2.553. The source was identified in the citizen science project SpaceWarps through the visual inspection of tens of thousands of iJKs colour composite images of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs), groups and clusters of galaxies and quasars. Appearing as a partial Einstein ring (r_e~3") around an LRG at z=0.2, the galaxy is extremely bright in the sub-millimetre for a cosmological source, with the thermal dust emission approaching 1 Jy at peak. The redshift of the lensed galaxy is determined through the detection of the CO(3-2) molecular emission line with the Large Millimetre Telescope's Redshift Search Receiver and through [OIII] and H-alpha line detections in the near-infrared from Subaru/IRCS. We have resolved the radio emission with high resolution (300-400 mas) eMERLIN L-band and JVLA C-band imaging. These observations are used in combination with the near-...

  20. Two Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift ~2 : Improved Classification and Redshift Determination with Medium-band Infrared Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodney, Steven A; Scolnic, Daniel M; Jones, David O; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Molino, Alberto; McCully, Curtis; Mobasher, Bahram; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Graur, Or; Hayden, Brian; Casertano, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We present two supernovae (SNe) discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), an HST multi-cycle treasury program. We classify both objects as Type Ia SNe and find redshifts of z = 1.80+-0.02 and 2.26 +0.02 -0.10, the latter of which is the highest redshift Type Ia SN yet seen. Using light curve fitting we determine luminosity distances and find that both objects are consistent with a standard Lambda-CDM cosmological model. These SNe were observed using the HST Wide Field Camera 3 infrared detector (WFC3-IR), with imaging in both wide- and medium-band filters. We demonstrate that the classification and redshift estimates are significantly improved by the inclusion of single-epoch medium-band observations. This medium-band imaging approximates a very low resolution spectrum (lambda/delta lambda ~ 100) which can isolate broad spectral absorption features that differentiate Type Ia SNe from their most common core collapse cousins...

  1. Nanocrystalline Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles: Effects of N{sub 2} annealing on microstructure and near-infrared shielding characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jing-Xiao, E-mail: drliu-shi@dlpu.edu.cn [School of Textile and Material Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Material, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577,Japan (Japan); Shi, Fei; Dong, Xiao-Li; Xu, Qiang [School of Textile and Material Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Material, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577,Japan (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    In order to further improve the near-infrared shielding properties of cesium tungsten bronze (Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3}) for solar filter applications, Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles were prepared by solvothermal reaction method and the effects of nitrogen annealing on the microstructure and near-infrared shielding properties of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} were investigated. The obtained Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectrophotometer. The results indicate that nanosheet-like Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles with hexagonal structure began to transform into nanorods after annealed at temperature higher than 600 °C. The near-infrared shielding properties of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles could be further improved by N{sub 2} annealing at 500–700 °C. Particularly, the 500 °C-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples in the N{sub 2} atmosphere showed best near-infrared shielding properties. It was suggested that the excellent near-infrared shielding ability of the 500 °C-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples is correlated with its minimum O/W atomic ratio and most oxygen vacancies. Highlights: • N{sub 2} annealing could further improve the near-infrared (NIR) shielding of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3}. • Effects of N{sub 2} annealing on microstructure and NIR shielding of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} were studied. • The 500 °C-N{sub 2}-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} exhibited minimum O/W ratio and most oxygen vacancies. • The 500 °C-N{sub 2}-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles exhibited best NIR shielding properties.

  2. Platinum-monolayer Electrocatalysts: Palladium Interlayer on IrCo Alloy Core Improves Activity in Oxygen-reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, K.; Chen, W.-F.; Sasaki, K.; Su, D.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Zhou, W.; Izzo, E.L.; Perez-Acosta, C.; Hirunsit, P.; Balbuena, P.B.; Adzic, R.R.

    2010-11-15

    We describe the synthesis and electrocatalytic properties of a new low-Pt electrocatalyst consisting of an IrCo core, a Pd interlayer, and a surface Pt monolayer, emphasizing the interlayer's role in improving electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen-reduction reaction on Pt in HClO{sub 4} solution. We prepared the IrCo alloys by decomposing, at 800 C, hexacyanometalate, KCoIr(CN){sub 6}, adsorbed on the carbon surfaces. The synthesis of Ir{sub 3}Co/C involved heating a mix of metal salts and carbon in hydrogen at 500 C. Thereafter, we placed a palladium and/or platinum monolayer on them via the galvanic displacement of an underpotentially deposited copper monolayer. The electrocatalysts were characterized using structural- and electrochemical-techniques. For PtML/PdML/IrCo/C, we observed a Pt mass activity of 1.18 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and the platinum-group-metals mass of 0.16 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)}. In comparison, without a Pd interlayer, i.e., Pt{sub ML}/IrCo/C, the activities of 0.15 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and 0.036 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)} were considerably lower. We consider that the palladium interlayer plays an essential role in achieving high catalytic activity by adjusting the electronic interaction of the platinum monolayer with the IrCo core, so that it accelerates the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of the intermediates of oxygen reduction. A similar trend was observed for Pt{sub ML}/Pd{sub ML} and Pt{sub ML} deposited on Ir{sub 3}Co/C alloy core. We used density functional theory to interpret the observed phenomena.

  3. MODELING THE INFRARED SPECTRUM OF THE EARTH-MOON SYSTEM: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DETECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF EARTHLIKE EXTRASOLAR PLANETS AND THEIR MOONLIKE COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Tyler D., E-mail: robinson@astro.washington.edu [NASA Astrobiology Institute. (United States)

    2011-11-01

    The Moon maintains large surface temperatures on its illuminated hemisphere and can contribute significant amounts of flux to spatially unresolved thermal infrared (IR) observations of the Earth-Moon system, especially at wavelengths where Earth's atmosphere is absorbing. In this paper we investigate the effects of an unresolved companion on IR observations of Earthlike exoplanets. For an extrasolar twin Earth-Moon system observed at full phase at IR wavelengths, the Moon consistently comprises about 20% of the total signal, approaches 30% of the signal in the 9.6 {mu}m ozone band and the 15 {mu}m carbon dioxide band, makes up as much as 80% of the signal in the 6.3 {mu}m water band, and more than 90% of the signal in the 4.3 {mu}m carbon dioxide band. These excesses translate to inferred brightness temperatures for Earth that are too large by 20-40 K and demonstrate that the presence of undetected satellites can have significant impacts on the spectroscopic characterization of exoplanets. The thermal flux contribution from an airless companion depends strongly on phase, implying that observations of exoplanets should be taken when the star-planet-observer angle (i.e., phase angle) is as large as feasibly possible if contributions from companions are to be minimized. We show that, by differencing IR observations of an Earth twin with a companion taken at both gibbous and crescent phases, Moonlike satellites may be detectable by future exoplanet characterization missions for a wide range of system inclinations.

  4. C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) at IR wavelengths and the variability of CO abundances among Oort Cloud comets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; Bonev, B. P.; DiSanti, M. A.; Keane, J. V.; Meech, K. J.; Blake, G. A.; Gibb, E. L.

    2014-08-20

    We report production rates, rotational temperatures, and related parameters for gases in C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) using the Near InfraRed SPECtrometer at the Keck Observatory, on six UT dates spanning heliocentric distances (R{sub h} ) that decreased from 1.35 AU to 1.16 AU (pre-perihelion). We quantified nine gaseous species (H{sub 2}O, OH*, CO, CH{sub 4}, HCN, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, NH{sub 3}, and NH{sub 2}) and obtained upper limits for two others (C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO). Compared with organics-normal comets, our results reveal highly enriched CO, (at most) slightly enriched CH{sub 3}OH, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, and HCN, and CH{sub 4} consistent with {sup n}ormal{sup ,} yet depleted, NH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}CO. Rotational temperatures increased from ?50 K to ?70 K with decreasing R{sub h} , following a power law in R{sub h} of –2.0 ± 0.2, while the water production rate increased from 1.0 to 3.9 × 10{sup 28} molecules s{sup –1}, following a power law in R{sub h} of –4.7 ± 0.9. The ortho-para ratio for H{sub 2}O was 3.01 ± 0.49, corresponding to spin temperatures (T {sub spin}) ? 29 K (at the 1? level). The observed spatial profiles for these emissions showed complex structures, possibly tied to nucleus rotation, although the cadence of our observations limits any definitive conclusions. The retrieved CO abundance in Lovejoy is more than twice the median value for comets in our IR survey, suggesting this comet is enriched in CO. We discuss the enriched value for CO in comet C/2013 R1 in terms of the variability of CO among Oort Cloud comets.

  5. Optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2013dx associated with GRB 130702A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toy, V L; Silverman, J M; Butler, N R; Cucchiara, A; Watson, A M; Bersier, D; Perley, D A; Margutti, R; Bellm, E; Bloom, J S; Cao, Y; Capone, J I; Clubb, K; Corsi, A; de Diego, J A; Filippenko, A V; Fox, O D; Gal-Yam, A; Gehrels, N; Georgiev, L; González, J J; Kasliwal, M M; Kelly, P L; Kulkarni, S R; Kutyrev, A S; Lee, W H; Prochaska, J X; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Richer, M G; Román, C; Singer, L; Stern, D; Troja, E; Veilleux, S

    2015-01-01

    We present optical and near-infrared light curves and optical spectra of SN 2013dx, associated with the nearby (redshift 0.145) gamma-ray burst GRB 130702A. The prompt isotropic gamma-ray energy released from GRB 130702A is measured to be $E_{\\gamma,\\mathrm{iso}} = 6.4_{-1.0}^{+1.3} \\times 10^{50}$erg (1keV to 10MeV in the rest frame), placing it intermediate between low-luminosity GRBs like GRB 980425/SN 1998bw and the broader cosmological population. We compare the observed $g^{\\prime}r^{\\prime}i^{\\prime}z^{\\prime}$ light curves of SN 2013dx to a SN 1998bw template, finding that SN 2013dx evolves $\\sim20$% faster (steeper rise time), with a comparable peak luminosity. Spectroscopically, SN 2013dx resembles other broad-lined Type Ic supernovae, both associated with (SN 2006aj and SN 1998bw) and lacking (SN 1997ef, SN 2007I, and SN 2010ah) gamma-ray emission, with photospheric velocities around peak of $\\sim$21,000 km s$^{-1}$. We construct a quasi-bolometric ($g^{\\prime}r^{\\prime}i^{\\prime}z^{\\prime}yJH$) li...

  6. Joint spatio-spectral based edge detection for multispectral infrared imagery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Bender, Steven C.; Sharma, Yagya D.; Jang, Woo-Yong; Paskalva, Biliana S.

    2010-06-01

    Image segmentation is one of the most important and difficult tasks in digital image processing. It represents a key stage of automated image analysis and interpretation. Segmentation algorithms for gray-scale images utilize basic properties of intensity values such as discontinuity and similarity. However, it is possible to enhance edge-detection capability by means of using spectral information provided by multispectral (MS) or hyperspectral (HS) imagery. In this paper we consider image segmentation algorithms for multispectral images with particular emphasis on detection of multi-color or multispectral edges. More specifically, we report on an algorithm for joint spatio-spectral (JSS) edge detection. By joint we mean simultaneous utilization of spatial and spectral characteristics of a given MS or HS image. The JSS-based edge-detection approach, termed Spectral Ratio Contrast (SRC) edge-detection algorithm, utilizes the novel concept of matching edge signatures. The edge signature represents a combination of spectral ratios calculated using bands that enhance the spectral contrast between the two materials. In conjunction with a spatial mask, the edge signature give rise to a multispectral operator that can be viewed as a three-dimensional extension of the mask. In the extended mask, the third (spectral) dimension of each hyper-pixel can be chosen independently. The SRC is verified using MS and HS imagery from a quantum-dot in a well infrared (IR) focal plane array, and the Airborne Hyperspectral Imager.

  7. Uncooled thin film infrared imaging device with aerogel thermal isolation: Deposition and planarization techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A.; Brinker, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sriram, C.S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Bullington, J.A. [AMMPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The authors have successfully integrated a thermally insulating silica aerogel thin film into a new uncooled monolithic thin film infrared (IR) imaging device. Compared to other technologies (bulk ceramic and microbridge), use of an aerogel layer provides superior thermal isolation of the pyroelectric imaging element from the relatively massive heat sinking integrated circuit. This results in significantly higher thermal and temporal resolutions. They have calculated noise equivalent temperature differences of 0.04--0.10 C from a variety of Pb{sub x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PZT) and Pb{sub x}La{sub 1{minus}x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PLZT) pyroelectric imaging elements in monolithic structures. In addition, use of aerogels results in an easier, less expensive fabrication process and a more robust device. Fabrication of these monolithic devices entails sol-gel deposition of the aerogel, sputter deposition of the electrodes, and solution chemistry deposition of the pyroelectric imaging elements. Uniform pyroelectric response is achieved across the device by use of appropriate planarization techniques. These deposition and planarization techniques are described. Characterization of the individual layers and monolithic structure using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Byer-Roundy techniques also is discussed.

  8. Localization of polyhydroxybutyrate in sugarcane using Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy and multivariate imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lupoi, Jason S.; Smith-Moritz, Andreia; Singh, Seema; McQualter, Richard; Scheller, Henrik V.; Simmons, Blake A.; Henry, Robert J.

    2015-07-10

    Background: Slow-degrading, fossil fuel-derived plastics can have deleterious effects on the environment, especially marine ecosystems. The production of bio-based, biodegradable plastics from or in plants can assist in supplanting those manufactured using fossil fuels. Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is one such biodegradable polyester that has been evaluated as a possible candidate for relinquishing the use of environmentally harmful plastics. Results: PHB, possessing similar properties to polyesters produced from non-renewable sources, has been previously engineered in sugarcane, thereby creating a high-value co-product in addition to the high biomass yield. This manuscript illustrates the coupling of a Fourier-transform infrared microspectrometer, equipped with a focalmore »plane array (FPA) detector, with multivariate imaging to successfully identify and localize PHB aggregates. Principal component analysis imaging facilitated the mining of the abundant quantity of spectral data acquired using the FPA for distinct PHB vibrational modes. PHB was measured in the chloroplasts of mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, acquiescent with previously evaluated plant samples. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the power of IR microspectroscopy to rapidly image plant sections to provide a snapshot of the chemical composition of the cell. While PHB was localized in sugarcane, this method is readily transferable to other value-added co-products in different plants.« less

  9. Measuring High-Precision Astrometry with the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esplin, T L

    2015-01-01

    The Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope currently offers the greatest potential for high-precision astrometry of faint mid-IR sources across arcminute-scale fields, which would be especially valuable for measuring parallaxes of cold brown dwarfs in the solar neighborhood and proper motions of obscured members of nearby star-forming regions. To more fully realize IRAC's astrometric capabilities, we have sought to minimize the largest sources of uncertainty in astrometry with its 3.6 and 4.5 $\\mu$m bands. By comparing different routines that estimate stellar positions, we have found that Point Response Function (PRF) fitting with the Spitzer Science Center's Astronomical Point Source Extractor produces both the smallest systematic errors from varying intra-pixel sensitivity and the greatest precision in measurements of positions. In addition, self-calibration has been used to derive new 7$^{\\rm th}$ and 8$^{\\rm th}$ order distortion corrections for the 3.6 and 4.5 $\\mu$m arrays of IRAC, ...

  10. Radio, Sub-mm, and X-ray Studies of Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Berger

    2001-12-29

    The study of gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies in the radio, sub-mm, and X-ray wavelength regimes began only recently, in contrast to optical studies. This is mainly due to the long timescale on which the radio afterglow emission decays, and to the intrinsic faintness of radio emission from star-forming galaxies at z~1, as well as source confusion in sub-mm observations; X-ray observations of GRB hosts have simply not been attempted yet. Despite these difficulties, we have recently made the first detections of radio and sub-mm emission from the host galaxies of GRB980703 and GRB010222, respectively, using the VLA and the SCUBA instrument on JCMT. In both cases we find that the inferred star formation rates (~500 solar masses per year) and bolometric luminosities (~few 10^12 solar luminosities) indicate that these galaxies are possibly analogous to the local population of Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) undergoing a starburst. However, there is a modest probability that the observed emission is due to AGN activity rather than star formation, thus requiring observations with Chandra or XMM. The sample of GRB hosts offers a number of unique advantages to the broader question of the evolution of galaxies and star formation from high redshift to the present time since: (i) GRBs trace massive stars, (ii) are detectable to high redshifts, and (iii) have immense dust penetrating power. Therefore, radio/sub-mm/X-ray observations of GRB hosts can potentially provide crucial information both on the nature of the GRB host galaxies, and on the history of star formation.

  11. Visible and Infrared Photometry of Fourteen Kuiper Belt Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, John Keith

    Visible and Infrared Photometry of Fourteen Kuiper Belt Objects John K. Davies Joint Astronomy\\GammaJ colors of 14 Kuiper Belt objects using new infrared (J) data combined, in most cases, with simultaneous. Kuiper Belt objects exhibit a wide range of V\\GammaJ colors but there is no correlation with heliocentric

  12. OIL SPILL SENSOR USING MULTISPECTRAL INFRARED IMAGING VIA 1 MINIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Wotao

    OIL SPILL SENSOR USING MULTISPECTRAL INFRARED IMAGING VIA 1 MINIMIZATION Yingying Li , Wei Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University ABSTRACT Early detection of oil spill events is the key in detecting the early onset of a small-scale oil spill event. Based on an infrared oil-water contrast model

  13. Pressure Calibration by the Infrared Absorption Spectrum of Mineral Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Pressure Calibration by the Infrared Absorption Spectrum of Mineral Oil H. Child, Kenyon College effect is seen in the infrared absorption spectrum of mineral oil. The frequency of two peaks increases as pressure is applied to the mineral oil. At a pressure of about 1 kbar (100 MPa), both peaks are distinct

  14. Fast-Response Infrared Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal Phase Modulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Fast-Response Infrared Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal Phase Modulators Ju-Hyun Lee Yung-Hsun Wu Shin (about 2.3p at k ¼ 1.55 lm under E ¼ 2.5 V=lm) and fast response time ( at an infrared wavelength, say k ¼ 1.55 mm. On the contrary, ferroelectric liquid crystals (FLCs) show very fast

  15. Multivariate classification of infrared spectra of cell and tissue samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Howland D. T. (Albuquerque, NM); Thomas, Edward V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    Multivariate classification techniques are applied to spectra from cell and tissue samples irradiated with infrared radiation to determine if the samples are normal or abnormal (cancerous). Mid and near infrared radiation can be used for in vivo and in vitro classifications using at least different wavelengths.

  16. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos; Stavros (Livermore, CA), Staggs; Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-03-21

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  17. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros (Livermore, CA); Staggs, Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-12-12

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  18. Measurement of Paint Layer Thickness with Photothermal Infrared Radiometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Alfred K.

    Measurement of Paint Layer Thickness with Photothermal Infrared Radiometry P. Dorr, A. K. Louis-physical, optical and geometrical properties of multi-layered samples of paint on a metalic substrate. A special infrared radiometry, paint-#12;lm-thickness is measured using lock-in ampli#12;ers. The phase-di#11;erence

  19. Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fantini, Sergio

    Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer News 25 T he idea of using light to non- invasively detect breast cancer has been revisited in the past of selectively labeling breast tumors may open new opportunities in the optical detection of breast cancer

  20. Cosmic ray recipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franco Ferrari; Ewa Szuszkiewicz

    2006-01-08

    Cosmic rays represent one of the most fascinating research themes in modern astronomy and physics. After almost a century since their discovery, a huge amount of scientific literature has been written on this topic and it is not always easy to extract from it the necessary information for somebody who approaches the subject for the first time. This has been the main motivation for preparing this article, which is a concise and self-contained review for whoever is interested in studying cosmic rays. The priority has been given here to well established facts, which are not at risk to get obsolete in a few years due to the fast progress of the research in this field. Also many data are presented, which are useful to characterize the doses of ionizing radiation delivered to organisms living on the Earth due to cosmic rays. The technical terms which are often encountered in the scientific literature are explained in a separate appendix.

  1. Infrared non-destructive evaluation method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baleine, Erwan; Erwan, James F; Lee, Ching-Pang; Stinelli, Stephanie

    2014-10-21

    A method of nondestructive evaluation and related system. The method includes arranging a test piece (14) having an internal passage (18) and an external surface (15) and a thermal calibrator (12) within a field of view (42) of an infrared sensor (44); generating a flow (16) of fluid characterized by a fluid temperature; exposing the test piece internal passage (18) and the thermal calibrator (12) to fluid from the flow (16); capturing infrared emission information of the test piece external surface (15) and of the thermal calibrator (12) simultaneously using the infrared sensor (44), wherein the test piece infrared emission information includes emission intensity information, and wherein the thermal calibrator infrared emission information includes a reference emission intensity associated with the fluid temperature; and normalizing the test piece emission intensity information against the reference emission intensity.

  2. Mid-Infrared Spectra of Be Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Rinehart; J. R. Houck; J. D. Smith

    1999-10-11

    We present the first medium-resolution ($R\\sim 600$) mid-infrared (8-13.3\\micron) spectra of 11 Be stars. A large number of lines are observed and identified in these spectra, including, as an example, 39 hydrogen recombination lines in the spectrum of $\\gamma$ Cas. In the majority of our spectra, all of the observed lines are attributable to hydrogen recombination. Two of the sources, $\\beta$ Lyr and MWC 349 also show emission from other species. Both of these objects show evidence of [Ne II] emission, and $\\beta$ Lyr also shows evidence of He I emission. We tabulate the effective line strength and line widths for the observed lines, and briefly discuss the physical implications of the observed line series. We also use a simple model of free-free emission to characterize the disks around these sources.

  3. The VVV Templates Project. Towards an Automated Classification of VVV Light-Curves. I. Building a database of stellar variability in the near-infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angeloni, R; Catelan, M; Dékány, I; Gran, F; Alonso-García, J; Hempel, M; Navarrete, C; Andrews, H; Aparicio, A; Beamín, J C; Berger, C; Borissova, J; Peña, C Contreras; Cunial, A; de Grijs, R; Espinoza, N; Eyheramendy, S; Lopes, C E Ferreira; Fiaschi, M; Hajdu, G; Han, J; He?miniak, K G; Hempel, A; Hidalgo, S L; Ita, Y; Jeon, Y -B; Jordán, A; Kwon, J; Lee, J T; Martín, E L; Masetti, N; Matsunaga, N; Milone, A P; Minniti, D; Morelli, L; Murgas, F; Nagayama, T; Navarro, C; Ochner, P; Pérez, P; Pichara, K; Rojas-Arriagada, A; Roquette, J; Saito, R K; Siviero, A; Sohn, J; Sung, H -I; Tamura, M; Tata, R; Tomasella, L; Townsend, B; Whitelock, P

    2014-01-01

    Context. The Vista Variables in the V\\'ia L\\'actea (VVV) ESO Public Survey is a variability survey of the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the disk carried out from 2010 on ESO Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA). VVV will eventually deliver a deep near-IR atlas with photometry and positions in five passbands (ZYJHK_S) and a catalogue of 1-10 million variable point sources - mostly unknown - which require classifications. Aims. The main goal of the VVV Templates Project, that we introduce in this work, is to develop and test the machine-learning algorithms for the automated classification of the VVV light-curves. As VVV is the first massive, multi-epoch survey of stellar variability in the near-infrared, the template light-curves that are required for training the classification algorithms are not available. In the first paper of the series we describe the construction of this comprehensive database of infrared stellar variability. Methods. First we performed a systematic sea...

  4. X-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landis, Eric N.; Keane, Denis T.

    2010-12-15

    In this tutorial, we describe X-ray microtomography as a technique to nondestructively characterize material microstructure in three dimensions at a micron level spatial resolution. While commercially available laboratory scale instrumentation is available, we focus our attention on synchrotron-based systems, where we can exploit a high flux, monochromatic X-ray beam to produce high fidelity three-dimensional images. A brief description of the physics and the mathematical analysis behind the technique is followed by example applications to specific materials characterization problems, with a particular focus on the utilization of three-dimensional image processing that can be used to extract a wide range of useful information.

  5. Tunable infrared source employing Raman mixing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L. (Stanford, CA); Herbst, Richard L. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A tunable source of infrared radiation is obtained by irradiating an assemblage of Raman active gaseous atoms or molecules with a high intensity pumping beam of coherent radiation at a pump frequency .omega..sub.p to stimulate the generation of Stokes wave energy at a Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s and to stimulate the Raman resonant mode at the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R within the irradiated assemblage where the pump frequency .omega..sub.p minus the Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s is equal to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R. The stimulated assemblage is irradiated with a tunable source of coherent radiation at a frequency .omega..sub.i to generate the output infrared radiation of the frequency .omega..sub.0 which is related to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R and the input wave .omega..sub.i by the relation .omega..sub.0 =.omega..sub.i .+-..omega..sub.R. In one embodiment the interaction between the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i is collinear and the ratio of the phase velocity mismatch factor .DELTA.k to the electric field exponential gain coefficient T is within the range of 0.1 to 5. In another embodiment the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i have velocity vectors k.sub.p and k.sub.i which cross at an angle to each other to compensate for phase velocity mismatches in the medium. In another embodiment, the Stokes wave energy .omega..sub.s is generated by pump energy .omega..sub.p in a first Raman cell and .omega..sub.s, .omega..sub.i and .omega..sub.p are combined in a second Raman mixing cell to produce the output at .omega..sub.i.

  6. Recovery of the X-Ray Transient QX Nor (=X1608-52) in Outburst and Quiescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanie Wachter

    1997-04-02

    We present optical and near-IR observations of QX Nor, the counterpart to the recurrent soft X-ray transient X1608-52, after its reappearance following the X-ray outburst in February 1996. The object has been seen only once before, during an X-ray outburst in 1977. Data from 3-5 months after the outburst show the counterpart at a mean magnitude of R=20.2 and variable on timescales of days. A comparison with identical observations in 1995 implies that the object has brightened by at least 1.8 mag in R following the X-ray outburst. We also detected QX Nor in the IR in both quiescence and outburst. A faint source is visible in the J but not the R band in May 1995. These first observations in the quiescent state yield magnitudes and colors consistent with optical emission from a low mass companion in the binary system, as is true in other soft X-ray transients.

  7. Interactions of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays with photons in the galactic center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Kusenko; Jason Schissel; Floyd W. Stecker

    2005-08-04

    Ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays passing through the central region of the Galaxy interact with starlight and the infrared photons. Both nuclei and protons generate secondary fluxes of photons and neutrinos on their passage through the central region. We compute the fluxes of these secondary particles, the observations of which can be used to improve one's understanding of origin and composition of ultrahigh-energy comic rays, especially if the violation of the Greisen--Zatespin--Kuzmin cutoff is confirmed by the future data.

  8. Bessel spatial profile of a soft x-ray laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tissandier, F.; Sebban, S.; Ribiere, M.; Gautier, J.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Lambert, G.; Goddet, J.-Ph.; Burgy, F.; Valentin, C.; Rousse, A. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA Paristech/Ecole Polytechnique/CNRS, UMR 7639, F-91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Nejdl, J.; Mocek, T. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Maynard, G. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, Universite Paris Sud/CNRS, UMR 8578, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2010-12-06

    We report far-field profile measurements of an optical-field-ionized high-order harmonic-seeded soft x-ray laser. We show that the beam transverse profile can be controlled between a regular Gaussian shape and a Bessel profile exhibiting several rings via the infrared laser pump intensity. These experimental data are supported by a complete numerical modeling including a two-dimensional plasma amplifier simulation and a two-level soft x-ray amplification using a Maxwell-Bloch treatment. This model takes into account the experimental high-order harmonic wavefront and intensity before it is numerically amplified.

  9. Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

    2004-09-30

    FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

  10. Ternary rare-earth ruthenium and iridium germanides RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (RE=Y, Gd–Tm, Lu; M=Ru, Ir)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliynyk, Anton O.; Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca

    2013-06-15

    Through arc-melting reactions of the elements and annealing at 800 °C, the ternary rare-earth germanides RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} and RE{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} have been prepared for most of the smaller RE components (RE=Y, Gd–Tm, Lu). In the iridium-containing reactions, the new phases RE{sub 2}IrGe{sub 2} were also generally formed as by-products. Powder X-ray diffraction revealed orthorhombic Hf{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 3}-type structures (space group Cmcm, Z=4) for RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (M=Ru, Ir) and monoclinic Sc{sub 2}CoSi{sub 2}-type structures (space group C2/m, Z=4) for RE{sub 2}IrGe{sub 2}. Full crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction for all members of RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (a=4.2477(6) Å, b=10.7672(16) Å, c=13.894(2) Å for RE=Y; a=4.2610(3)–4.2045(8) Å, b=10.9103(8)–10.561(2) Å, c=14.0263(10)–13.639(3) Å in the progression of RE from Gd to Lu) and for Tb{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (a=4.2937(3) Å, b=10.4868(7) Å, c=14.2373(10) Å). Both structures can be described in terms of CrB- and ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type slabs built from Ge-centred trigonal prisms. However, band structure calculations on Y{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} support an alternative description for RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} based on [M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3}] layers built from linked MGe{sub 4} tetrahedra, which emphasizes the strong M–Ge covalent bonds present. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} generally indicates metallic behaviour but with low-temperature transitions visible for some members (RE=Gd, Tb, Dy) that are probably associated with magnetic ordering of the RE atoms. Anomalously, Y{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} exhibits semiconductor-like behaviour of uncertain origin. Magnetic measurements on Dy{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} reveal antiferromagnetic ordering at 3 K and several unusual field-dependent transitions suggestive of complex spin reorientation processes. - Graphical abstract: RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (M=Ru, Ir) adopts the Hf{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 3}-type structure containing slabs built up from Ge-centred trigonal prisms. - Highlights: • Crystal structures of RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (RE=Y, Gd–Tm, Lu) and Tb{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} were determined. • Strong M–Ge covalent bonds were confirmed by band structure calculations. • Most RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} members except Y{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} exhibit metallic behaviour. • Dy{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} displays unusual field-dependent magnetic transitions.

  11. Light-Like Noncommutativity, Light-Front Quantization and New Light on UV/IR Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Sheikh-Jabbari; A. Tureanu

    2010-10-02

    We revisit the problem of quantizing field theories on noncommutative Moyal spacetime with \\emph{light-like} noncommutativity. To tackle the issues arising from noncommuting and hence nonlocal time, we argue that for this case light-front quantization procedure should be employed. In this appropriate quantization scheme we perform the non-planar loop analysis for the light-like noncommutative field theories. One of the important and peculiar features of light-front quantization is that the UV cutoff of the light-cone Hamiltonian manifests itself as an IR cutoff for the light-cone momentum, $p^+$. Due to this feature, the naive results of covariant quantization for the light-like case allude to the absence of the UV/IR mixing in the light-front quantization. However, by a careful analysis of non-planar loop integrals we show that this is not the case and the UV/IR mixing persists. In addition, we argue in favour of the perturbative unitarity of light-like noncommutative field theories in the light-front quantization scheme.

  12. NGC 7538 IRS. 1. Interaction of a polarized dust spiral and a molecular outflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, M. C. H.; Hull, Charles L. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Pillai, Thushara [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Zhao, Jun-Hui [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sandell, Göran, E-mail: jzhao@cfa.harvard.edu [SOFIA-USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-12, Building N232, Room 146, PO Box 1, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present dust polarization and CO molecular line images of NGC 7538 IRS 1. We combined data from the Submillimeter Array, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, and the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to make images with ?2.''5 resolution at 230 and 345 GHz. The images show a remarkable spiral pattern in both the dust polarization and molecular outflow. These data dramatically illustrate the interplay between a high infall rate onto IRS 1 and a powerful outflow disrupting the dense, clumpy medium surrounding the star. The images of the dust polarization and the CO outflow presented here provide observational evidence for the exchange of energy and angular momentum between the infall and the outflow. The spiral dust pattern, which rotates through over 180° from IRS 1, may be a clumpy filament wound up by conservation of angular momentum in the infalling material. The redshifted CO emission ridge traces the dust spiral closely through the MM dust cores, several of which may contain protostars. We propose that the CO maps the boundary layer where the outflow is ablating gas from the dense gas in the spiral.

  13. Emergent IR dual 2d CFTs in charged AdS5 black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan de Boer; Maria Johnstone; M. M. Sheikh-Jabbari; Joan Simon

    2011-12-20

    We study the possible dynamical emergence of IR conformal invariance describing the low energy excitations of near-extremal R-charged global AdS5 black holes. We find interesting behavior especially when we tune parameters in such a way that the relevant extremal black holes have classically vanishing horizon area, i.e. no classical ground-state entropy, and when we combine the low energy limit with a large N limit of the dual gauge theory. We consider both near-BPS and non-BPS regimes and their near horizon limits, emphasize the differences between the local AdS3 throats emerging in either case, and discuss potential dual IR 2d CFTs for each case. We compare our results with the predictions obtained from the Kerr/CFT correspondence, and obtain a natural quantization for the central charge of the near-BPS emergent IR CFT which we interpret in terms of the open strings stretched between giant gravitons.

  14. Gamma rays from the Galactic Centre region: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Eldik, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, increasingly precise astronomical observations of the Galactic Centre (GC) region at radio, infrared, and X-ray wavelengths laid the foundations to a detailed understanding of the high energy astroparticle physics of this most remarkable location in the Galaxy. Recently, observations of this region in high energy (HE, 10 MeV - 100GeV) and very high energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) gamma rays added important insights to the emerging picture of the Galactic nucleus as a most violent and active region where acceleration of particles to very high energies -- possibly up to a PeV -- and their transport can be studied in great detail. Moreover, the inner Galaxy is believed to host large concentrations of dark matter (DM), and is therefore one of the prime targets for the indirect search for gamma rays from annihilating or decaying dark matter particles. In this article, the current understanding of the gamma-ray emission emanating from the GC is summarised and the results of recent DM searches in HE...

  15. ESO Imaging Survey. Deep Public Survey: Infrared Data for the Chandra Deep Field South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Vandame; L. F. Olsen; H. E. Jorgensen; M. A. T. Groenewegen; M. Schirmer; S. Arnouts; C. Benoist; L. da Costa; R. P. Mignani; C. Rite'; R. Slijkhuis; E. Hatziminaoglou; R. Hook; R. Madejsky; A. Wicenec

    2001-02-19

    This paper presents new J and Ks near-infrared data obtained from observations of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) conducted at the ESO 3.5m New Technology Telescope (NTT). These data were taken as part of the ongoing Deep Public Survey (DPS) being carried out by the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) program, extending the EIS-DEEP survey. Combined these surveys now provide a contiguous coverage over an area of 400 square arcmin in the near-infrared, nearly matching that covered by the deep X-ray observations of Chandra, four times the area of the original EIS-DEEP survey. The paper briefly describes the observations and the new techniques being employed for pipeline processing jittered infrared observations, which include unbiased de-fringing and sky-background subtraction, pixel-based astrometry and stacking and pixel registration based on a multi-resolution decomposition of the images. The astrometric solution is based on a pre-release of the GSC-II catalog and has an accuracy of < 0.15 arcsec. The final images for 12 pointings presented here reach median 5 sigma limiting magnitudes of J_AB~23.4 and K_AB~22.6 as measured within an aperture 2xFWHM. The frame to frame variation of the photometric zero-point is estimated to be <0.09 mag. The data are publicly available in the form of fully calibrated J and Ks pixel maps and source lists extracted for each pointing. These data can be requested through the URL ``http://www.eso.org/eis''.

  16. Visible and infrared photometry of Kuiper Belt objects: searching for evidence of trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheppard, Scott S.

    Visible and infrared photometry of Kuiper Belt objects: searching for evidence of trends Neil Mc. © 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved. Keywords: Kuiper Belt objects; Photometry; Infrared

  17. CsSnI[subscript 3]: Semiconductor or Metal? High Electrical Conductivity and Strong Near-Infrared Photoluminescence from a Single Material. High Hole Mobility and Phase-Transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, In; Song, Jung-Hwan; Im, Jino; Androulakis, John; Malliakas, Christos D.; Li, Hao; Freeman, Arthur J.; Kenney, John T.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G. (NWU); (OmniPV)

    2012-10-29

    CsSnI{sub 3} is an unusual perovskite that undergoes complex displacive and reconstructive phase transitions and exhibits near-infrared emission at room temperature. Experimental and theoretical studies of CsSnI{sub 3} have been limited by the lack of detailed crystal structure characterization and chemical instability. Here we describe the synthesis of pure polymorphic crystals, the preparation of large crack-/bubble-free ingots, the refined single-crystal structures, and temperature-dependent charge transport and optical properties of CsSnI{sub 3}, coupled with ab initio first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In situ temperature-dependent single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies reveal the origin of polymorphous phase transitions of CsSnI{sub 3}. The black orthorhombic form of CsSnI{sub 3} demonstrates one of the largest volumetric thermal expansion coefficients for inorganic solids. Electrical conductivity, Hall effect, and thermopower measurements on it show p-type metallic behavior with low carrier density, despite the optical band gap of 1.3 eV. Hall effect measurements of the black orthorhombic perovskite phase of CsSnI{sub 3} indicate that it is a p-type direct band gap semiconductor with carrier concentration at room temperature of {approx} 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and a hole mobility of {approx} 585 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The hole mobility is one of the highest observed among p-type semiconductors with comparable band gaps. Its powders exhibit a strong room-temperature near-IR emission spectrum at 950 nm. Remarkably, the values of the electrical conductivity and photoluminescence intensity increase with heat treatment. The DFT calculations show that the screened-exchange local density approximation-derived band gap agrees well with the experimentally measured band gap. Calculations of the formation energy of defects strongly suggest that the electrical and light emission properties possibly result from Sn defects in the crystal structure, which arise intrinsically. Thus, although stoichiometric CsSnI{sub 3} is a semiconductor, the material is prone to intrinsic defects associated with Sn vacancies. This creates highly mobile holes which cause the materials to appear metallic.

  18. The first gamma-ray bursts in the universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mesler, R. A.; Pihlström, Y. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fryer, Chris L.; Lloyd-Ronning, N. M. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the ultimate cosmic lighthouses, capable of illuminating the universe at its earliest epochs. Could such events probe the properties of the first stars at z ? 20, the end of the cosmic Dark Ages? Previous studies of Population III (Pop III) GRBs only considered explosions in the diffuse relic H II regions of their progenitors or bursts that are far more energetic than those observed to date. However, the processes that produce GRBs at the highest redshifts likely reset their local environments, creating much more complicated structures than those in which relativistic jets have been modeled so far. These structures can greatly affect the luminosity of the afterglow and hence the redshift at which it can be detected. We have now simulated Pop III GRB afterglows in H II regions, winds, and dense shells ejected by the star during the processes that produce the burst. We find that GRBs with E {sub iso,?} = 10{sup 51}-10{sup 53} erg will be visible at z ? 20 to the next generation of near infrared and radio observatories. In many cases, the environment of the burst, and hence progenitor type, can be inferred from the afterglow light curve. Although some Pop III GRBs are visible to Swift and the Very Large Array now, the optimal strategy for their detection will be future missions like the proposed EXIST and JANUS missions with large survey areas and onboard X-ray and infrared telescopes that can track their near-infrared flux from the moment of the burst, thereby identifying their redshifts.

  19. Gamma ray bursts in their historic context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V

    2004-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts In Their Historic Context Virginia TrimbleMD 20742 USA Abstract. Gamma ray bursts remained essentiallyalso applies to the gamma ray bursts. First, an observation

  20. X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET Center for X-ray Optics and Advanced Light Source Lawrence Electromagnetic Relations Radioactivity and Radiation Protection Useful Formulas CXRO Home | ALS Home | LBL Home in PDF format Data Booklet Authors CXRO Home | ALS Home | LBL Home Privacy and Security Notice Please

  1. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  2. X-ray Emission from the Taffy (VV254) Galaxies and Bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appleton, Philip; Bitsakis, Theodoros; Wang, Junfeng; Peterson, Bradley; Lisenfeld, Ute; Alatalo, Katherine; Guillard, Pierre; Boulanger, Francois; Cluver, Michelle; Gao, Yu; Helou, George; Ogle, Patrick; Struck, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    We present the first X-ray observations of the Taffy galaxies (UGC 12914/5) with the Chandra observatory, and detect soft X-ray emission in the region of the gas-rich, radio-continuum-emitting Taffy bridge. The results are compared to Herschel observations of dust and diffuse [CII] line-emitting gas. The diffuse component of the Taffy bridge has an X-ray luminosity of L(X) (0.5-8keV) =5.4 x 10^39 erg s^-1, which accounts for 19% of the luminosity of the sum for the two galaxies. The total mass in hot gas is (0.8--1.3) x 10^8 M_sun, which is approximately 1% of the total (HI~+~H2) gas mass in the bridge, and ~11% of the mass of warm molecular hydrogen discovered by Spitzer. The soft X-ray and dense CO-emitting gas in the bridge have offset distributions, with the X-rays peaking along the north-western side of the bridge in the region where stronger far-IR dust and diffuse [CII] gas is observed by Herschel. We detect nine Ultra Luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in the system, the brightest of which is found in the ...

  3. Material properties limiting the performance of CZT gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolotnikov,A.E.; Babalola, S.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S. U.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2009-03-16

    CdZnTe (CZT) nuclear radiation detectors are advanced sensors that utilize innovative technologies developed for wide band-gap semiconductor industry and microelectronics. They open opportunities for new types of room-temperature operating, field deployable instruments that provide accurate identification of potential radiological threats and timely awareness for both the civilian and military communities. Room-temperature radiation detectors are an emerging technology that relies on the use of high-quality CZT crystals whose availability is currently limited by material non-uniformities and the presence of extended defects. To address these issues, which are most critical to CZT sensor developments, we developed X-ray mapping and IR transmission microscopy systems to characterize both CZT crystals and devices. Since a customized system is required for such X-ray measurements, we use synchrotron radiation beams available at BNL's National Synchrotron Light Source. A highly-collimated and high-intensity X-ray beam supports measurements of areas as small as 10 x 10 {micro}m{sup 2}, and allowed us to see fluctuations in collected charge over the entire area of the detector in a reasonable time. The IR microscopy system allows for 3D visualization of Te inclusions and other extended defects. In this paper, we describe the experimental techniques used in our measurements and typical results obtained from CZT samples produced by different suppliers.

  4. Gradient flow and IR fixed point in SU(2) with Nf=8 flavors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljami Leino; Tuomas Karavirta; Jarno Rantaharju; Teemu Rantalaiho; Kari Rummukainen; Joni M. Suorsa; Kimmo Tuominen

    2015-11-11

    We study the running of the coupling in SU(2) gauge theory with 8 massless fundamental representation fermion flavours, using the gradient flow method with the Schr\\"odinger functional boundary conditions. Gradient flow allows us to measure robust continuum limit for the step scaling function. The results show a clear indication of infrared fixed point consistent with perturbation theory.

  5. Study of Electrode Surface by IR Spectroscopy X. Zhang and P. N. Ross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Department of Energy to develop high power lithium ion batteries for hybrid electric vehicles and electric of SEI utilizing Infrared Spectroscopy. The basic electrochemistry of lithium ion battery involves only the rocking chair battery. The electrolyte commonly employed in lithium ion batteries is mixture of aprotic

  6. PECULIAR OPTICAL AND IR BEHAVIOUR IN TYPE I SUPERNOVAE, AND THE ORIGIN OF THE 1.2 ABSORPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Wheeler, le. , 1984. In "Supernovae as distance indicators",lR. , 1985. In "Dust in supernovae and supernova remnants",and IR behaviour in type I supernovae, and the origin of the

  7. X-ray afterglows from gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tavani

    1997-03-24

    We consider possible interpretations of the recently detected X- ray afterglow from the gamma-ray burst source GRB 970228. Cosmological and Galactic models of gamma-ray bursts predict different flux and spectral evolution of X-ray afterglows. We show that models based on adiabatic expansion of relativistic forward shocks require very efficient particle energization or post-burst re-acceleration during the expansion. Cooling neutron star models predict a very distinctive spectral and flux evolution that can be tested in current X-ray data.

  8. Tunable X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyce, James R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  9. Galactic cosmic rays and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiener, Juergen [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3 and Universite Paris-Sud, Bat. 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2010-03-01

    The nucleosynthesis of the light elements Li, Be and B by galactic cosmic rays is presented. Observations of cosmic rays and the nuclear reactions responsible for Li, Be and B nucleosynthesis are described, followed by some words on propagation. At the end, some open questions concerning galactic cosmic rays are discussed.

  10. Near-infrared Study of the Carina Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaushar Sanchawala; Wen-Ping Chen; Devendra Ojha; Swarna Kanti Ghosh; Yasushi Nakajima; Motohide Tamura; Daisuke Baba; Shuji Sato; Masahiro Tsujimoto

    2007-06-13

    We have carried out near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations of the Carina Nebula for an area of ~400 sq. arcmin. including the star clusters Trumpler 14 (Tr 14) and Trumpler 16 (Tr 16). With 10 sigma limiting magnitudes of J ~ 18.5, H ~ 17.5 and K_s ~ 16.5, we identified 544 Class II and 11 Class I young star candidates. We find some 40 previously unknown very red sources with H-K_s > 2, most of which remain undetected at the J band. The red NIR sources are found to be concentrated to the south-east of Tr 16, along the `V' shaped dust lane, where the next generation of stars seems to be forming. In addition, we find indications of ongoing star formation near the three MSX point sources, G287.51-0.49, G287.47-0.54, and G287.63-0.72. A handful of red NIR sources are seen to populate around each of these MSX sources. Apart from this, we identified two hard Chandra X-ray sources near G287.47-0.54, one of which does not have an NIR counterpart and may be associated with a Class I/Class 0 object. The majority of the Class II candidates, on the other hand, are seen to be distributed in the directions of the clusters, demarcating different evolutionary stages in this massive star-forming region. A comparison of the color-magnitude diagrams of the clusters with pre-main sequence model tracks shows that the stellar population of these clusters is very young (< 3 Myr). The K_s band luminosity function (KLF) of Tr 14 shows structure at the faint end, including a sharp peak due to the onset of deuterium burning, implying an age of 1-2 Myr for the cluster. The KLF of Tr 16, in contrast, is found to rise smoothly until it turns over. The slopes of the mass functions derived for the clusters are found to be in agreement with the canonical value of the field star initial mass function derived by Salpeter.

  11. Infrared Transmission Spectra for Extrasolar Giant Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Tinetti; M. C. Liang; A. Vidal-Madjar; D. Ehrenreich; A. Lecavelier des Etangs; Y. Yung

    2006-11-06

    Among the hot Jupiters that transit their parent stars known to date, the two best candidates to be observed with transmission spectroscopy in the mid-infrared (MIR) are HD189733b and HD209458b, due to their combined characteristics of planetary density, orbital parameters and parent star distance and brightness. Here we simulate transmission spectra of these two planets during their primary eclipse in the MIR, and we present sensitivity studies of the spectra to the changes of atmospheric thermal properties, molecular abundances and C/O ratios. Our model predicts that the dominant species absorbing in the MIR on hot Jupiters are water vapor and carbon monoxide, and their relative abundances are determined by the C/O ratio. Since the temperature profile plays a secondary role in the transmission spectra of hot Jupiters compared to molecular abundances, future primary eclipse observations in the MIR of those objects might give an insight on EGP atmospheric chemistry. We find here that the absorption features caused by water vapor and carbon monoxide in a cloud-free atmosphere, are deep enough to be observable by the present and future generation of space-based observatories, such as Spitzer Space Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope. We discuss our results in light of the capabilities of these telescopes.

  12. Infrared Thermographic Study of Laser Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohler, Jonathan H.; Chow, Charles T. S.

    1986-07-01

    Pyrotechnic ignition has been studied in the past by making a limited number of discrete temperature-time observations during ignition. Present-day infrared scanning techniques make it possible to record thermal profiles, during ignition, with high spacial and temporal resolution. Data thus obtained can be used with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more precise kinetic models of the ignition process. Ignition has been studied theoretically and experimentally using various thermal methods. It has been shown that the whole process can, ideally, be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the sample pellet behaves like an inert body heated by an external heat source. The second stage is governed by the chemical reaction in the heated volume produced during the first stage. High speed thermographic recording of the temperature distribution in the test sample during laser ignition makes it possible to calculate the heat content at any instant. Thus, one can actually observe laser heating and the onset of self-sustained combustion in the pellet. The experimental apparatus used to make these observations is described. The temperature distributions recorded are shown to be in good agreement with those predicted by heat transfer theory. Heat content values calculated from the observed temperature distributions are used to calculate thermal and kinetic parameters for several samples. These values are found to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  13. Infrared thermographic study of laser ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohler, J.H.; Chow, C.T.S.

    1986-07-21

    Pyrotechnic ignition has been studied in the past by making a limited number of discrete temperature-time observations during ignition. Present-day infrared scanning techniques make it possible to record thermal profiles, during ignition, with high spacial and temporal resolution. Data thus obtained can be used with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more precise kinetic models of the ignition process. Ignition has been studied theoretically and experimentally using various thermal methods. It has been shown that the whole process can, ideally, be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the sample pellet behaves like an inert body heated by an external heat source. The second stage is governed by the chemical reaction in the heated volume produced during the first stage. High speed thermographic recording of the temperature distribution in the test sample during laser ignition makes it possible to calculate the heat content at any instant. Thus, one can actually observe laser heating and the onset of self-sustained combustion in the pellet.

  14. Infrared spectral properties of M giants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, G C; Ramirez, R M; Kraemer, K E; Engelke, C W

    2015-01-01

    We observed a sample of 20 M giants with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Most show absorption structure at 6.6-6.8 um which we identify as water vapor, and in some cases, the absorption extends from 6.4 um into the SiO band at 7.5 um. Variable stars show stronger H2O absorption. While the strength of the SiO fundamental at 8 um increases monotonically from spectral class K0 to K5, the dependence on spectral class weakens in the M giants. As with previously studied samples, the M giants show considerable scatter in SiO band strength within a given spectral class. All of the stars in our sample also show OH band absorption, most noticeably in the 14-17 um region. The OH bands behave much like the SiO bands, increasing in strength in the K giants but showing weaker dependence on spectral class in the M giants, and with considerable scatter. An examination of the photometric properties reveals that the V-K color may be a better indicator of molecular band strength than the spectral class...

  15. Understanding the water emission in the mid- and far-IR from protoplanetary disks around T~Tauri stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonellini, S; Riviere-Marichalar, P; Meijerink, R; Woitke, P; Thi, W -F; Spaans, M; Aresu, G; Lee, G

    2015-01-01

    We investigate which properties of protoplanetary disks around T Tauri stars affect the physics and chemistry in the regions where mid- and far-IR water lines originate and their respective line fluxes. We search for diagnostics for future observations. With the code ProDiMo, we build a series of models exploring a large parameter space, computing rotational and rovibrational transitions of water in nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE). We select a sample of transitions in the mid- IR regime and the fundamental ortho and para water transitions in the far-IR. We investigate the chemistry and the local physical conditions in the line emitting regions. We calculate Spitzer spectra for each model and compare far-IR and mid-IR lines. In addition, we use mid-IR colors to tie the water line predictions to the dust continuum. Parameters affecting the water line fluxes in disks by more than a factor of three are : the disk gas mass, the dust-to-gas mass ratio, the dust maximum grain size, ISM(InterStellarMediu...

  16. THE HAWAII INFRARED PARALLAX PROGRAM. I. ULTRACOOL BINARIES AND THE L/T TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupuy, Trent J.; Liu, Michael C.

    2012-08-01

    We present the first results from our high-precision infrared (IR) astrometry program at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We measure parallaxes for 83 ultracool dwarfs (spectral types M6-T9) in 49 systems, with a median uncertainty of 1.1 mas (2.3%) and as good as 0.7 mas (0.8%). We provide the first parallaxes for 48 objects in 29 systems, and for another 27 objects in 17 systems, we significantly improve upon published results, with a median (best) improvement of 1.7 times (5 times). Three systems show astrometric perturbations indicative of orbital motion; two are known binaries (2MASS J0518-2828AB and 2MASS J1404-3159AB) and one is spectrally peculiar (SDSS J0805+4812). In addition, we present here a large set of Keck adaptive optics imaging that more than triples the number of binaries with L6-T5 components that have both multi-band photometry and distances. Our data enable an unprecedented look at the photometric properties of brown dwarfs as they cool through the L/T transition. Going from Almost-Equal-To L8 to Almost-Equal-To T4.5, flux in the Y and J bands increases by Almost-Equal-To 0.7 mag and Almost-Equal-To 0.5 mag, respectively (the Y- and J-band 'bumps'), while flux in the H, K, and L' bands declines monotonically. This wavelength dependence is consistent with cloud clearing over a narrow range of temperature, since condensate opacity is expected to dominate at 1.0-1.3 {mu}m. Interestingly, despite more than doubling the near-IR census of L/T transition objects, we find a conspicuous paucity of objects on the color-magnitude diagram just blueward of the late-L/early-T sequence. This 'L/T gap' occurs at (J - H){sub MKO} 0.1-0.3 mag, (J - K){sub MKO} = 0.0-0.4 mag, and implies that the last phases of cloud evolution occur rapidly. Finally, we provide a comprehensive update to the absolute magnitudes of ultracool dwarfs as a function of spectral type using a combined sample of 314 objects.

  17. Sweetspot: Near-infrared observations of 13 type Ia supernovae...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of 13 type Ia supernovae from a new NOAO survey probing the nearby smooth Hubble flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sweetspot: Near-infrared observations of 13...

  18. Combustion Control Using Infrared and Visible Light Devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Economics and overall experience have acted against the installation of infrared carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide analyzers on smaller systems for air fuel ratio control. This paper discusses an interesting control signal which can be derived from...

  19. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared emission spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA); Jones, Roger W. (Ames, IA)

    1991-12-24

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a solid material (16, 42) by applying energy from an energy source (20, 70) top a surface region of the solid material sufficient to cause transient heating in a thin surface layer portion of the solid material (16, 42) so as to enable transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion, and by detecting with a spectrometer/detector (28, 58) substantially only the transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion of the solid material. The detected transient thermal emission of infrared radiation is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the solid material of emitted infrared radiation, so as to be indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the solid material.

  20. Characterization of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burghoff, David Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Quantum cascade lasers provide some of the highest output powers available for light in the mid-infrared range (from 3 to 8 m). As many of their applications require portability, designs that have a high wall-plug efficiency ...