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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

MID-INFRARED IRS SPECTROSCOPY OF NGC 7331: A FIRST LOOK AT THE SPITZER INFRARED NEARBY GALAXIES SURVEY (SINGS) LEGACY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MID-INFRARED IRS SPECTROSCOPY OF NGC 7331: A FIRST LOOK AT THE SPITZER INFRARED NEARBY GALAXIES to 38 m using all modules of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). A strong new dust emission feature with standard photodissociation region (PDR) models. Either additional PDR heating or shocks are required

Draine, Bruce T.

2

An infrared study of galactic OH/IR stars. I. An optical/near-IR atlas of the Arecibo sample  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present optical and near-infrared finding charts, accurate astrometry (~1") and single-epoch near-infrared photometry for 371 IRAS sources, 96% of those included in the so-called Arecibo sample of OH/IR stars (Eder et al. 1988; Lewis et al. 1990a; Chengalur et al. 1993). The main photometric properties of the stars in the sample are presented and discussed as well as the problems found during the process of identification of the optical/near-infrared counterparts. In addition, we also identify suitable reference stars in each field to be used for differential photometry purposes in the future. We find that 39% of the sources (144 in number) have no optical counterpart, 8 of them being invisible even at near infrared wavelengths. The relative distribution of sources with and without optical counterpart in the IRAS two-colour diagram and their characteristic near infrared colours are interpreted as the consequence of the increasing thickness of their circumstellar shells. Among the objects not detected at near infrared wavelengths four non-variable sources are proposed to be heavily obscured post-AGB stars which have just very recently left the AGB. Eight additional objects with unusually bright and/or blue near-infrared colours are identified as candidate post-AGB stars and/or proto-planetary nebulae.

F. M. Jiménez-Esteban; L. Agudo-Mérida; D. Engels; P. García-Lario

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

3

Phase-matched generation of coherent soft and hard X-rays using IR lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Phase-matched high-order harmonic generation of soft and hard X-rays is accomplished using infrared driving lasers in a high-pressure non-linear medium. The pressure of the non-linear medium is increased to multi-atmospheres and a mid-IR (or higher) laser device provides the driving pulse. Based on this scaling, also a general method for global optimization of the flux of phase-matched high-order harmonic generation at a desired wavelength is designed.

Popmintchev, Tenio V.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Bahabad, Alon; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

4

Hard X-rays and Fluorescent Iron Emission from the Embedded Infrared Cluster in NGC 2071  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present first results of XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the infrared cluster lying near the NGC 2071 reflection nebula in the Orion B region. This cluster is of interest because it is one of the closest regions known to harbor embedded high-mass stars. We report the discovery of hard X-ray emission from the dense central NGC 2071-IR subgroup which contains at least three high-mass young stellar objects (NGC 2071 IRS-1, IRS-2, and IRS-3). A prominent X-ray source is detected within 1 arcsecond of the infrared source IRS-1, which is thought to drive a powerful bipolar molecular outflow. The X-ray spectrum of this source is quite unusual compared to the optically thin plasma spectra normally observed in young stellar objects (YSOs). The spectrum is characterized by a hard broad-band continuum plus an exceptionally broad emission line at approximately 6.4 keV from neutral or near-neutral iron. The fluorescent Fe line likely originates in cold material near the embedded star (i.e. a disk or envelope) that is irradiated by the hard heavily-absorbed X-ray source.

Stephen L. Skinner; Audrey E. Simmons; Marc Audard; Manuel Guedel

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

5

Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR RECEIVED ON FEBRUARY 3, 2009 C O N S P E C T U S Water is ubiquitous in nature, but it exists as pure water infrequently. From the ocean to biology, water molecules interact with a wide variety of dissolved species

Fayer, Michael D.

6

Infrared Observations of Soft GammaRay Repeaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared Observations of Soft Gamma­Ray Repeaters I. A. Smith Department of Space Physics been found for SGR 0525--66. This paper gives a brief overview of some recent and ongoing infrared observing programs. For a more detailed review article, see Smith (1997) [2]. INFRARED SPECTRA OF SGR 1806

Smith, Ian Andrew

7

X-ray and Near-infrared Studies of a Star-forming Cloud; L1448  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of X-ray and near-infrared (NIR) observations of L1448, a star-forming region in the Perseus cloud complex using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the 4 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. We detect 72 X-ray sources in a ~17 arcmin x 17 arcmin region with a ~68 ks ACIS exposure, for which we conduct follow-up NIR imaging observations in a concentric ~11 arcmin x 11 arcmin region with FLAMINGOS down to m_Ks ~ 17 mag. Twelve X-ray sources have NIR or optical counterparts. By plotting X-ray mean energy versus NIR to X-ray flux ratio, the X-ray sources are clearly separated into two groups. The X-ray spectral and temporal features as well as NIR magnitudes and colors indicate that one group mainly consists of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud and the other of background extragalactic sources. Ten X-ray-emitting YSO candidates are thus newly identified, which are low-mass or brown dwarf mass sources from their NIR magnitudes. In addition, a possible X-ray signal is found from a mid-infrared protostar L1448 IRS 3(A). The lack of detection of this source in our deep NIR images indicates that this source has a very steep spectral slope of > 3.2 in 2--10 micron.

M. Tsujimoto; N. Kobayashi; Y. Tsuboi

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

Optical Variability of Infrared Power Law-Selected Galaxies & X-ray Sources in the GOODS-South Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the use of optical variability to identify and study Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the GOODS-South field. A sample of 22 mid-infrared power law sources and 102 X-ray sources with optical counterparts in the HST ACS images were selected. Each object is classified with a variability significance value related to the standard deviation of its magnitude in five epochs separated by 45-day intervals. The variability significance is compared to the optical, mid-IR, and X-ray properties of the sources. We find that 26% of all AGN candidates (either X-ray- or mid-IR-selected) are optical variables. The fraction of optical variables increases to 51% when considering sources with soft X-ray band ratios. For the mid-IR AGN candidates which have multiwavelength SEDs, we find optical variability for 64% of those classified with SEDs like Broad Line AGNs. While mostly unobscured AGN appear to have the most significant optical variability, some of the more obscured AGNs are also observed as variables. In particular, we find two mid-IR power law-selected AGN candidates without X-ray emission that display optical variability, confirming their AGN nature.

Alison Klesman; Vicki Sarajedini

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

9

Catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide over Ir/SiO/sub 2/. An in situ infrared and kinetic study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation of CO on a highly dispersed Ir/SiO/sub 2/ catalyst has been studied both in a Pyrex microreactor and by using an in situ infrared cell-reactor. Multiple steady states obtained under conditions of increasing and decreasing CO partial pressure were observed to lead to reaction rate hysteresis. The area under the hysteresis loop is strongly dependent on reaction temperature. This is explained by invoking competitive adsorption between CO and O/sub 2/ as a function of temperature. Self-sustained oscillations were obtained when certain conditions of partial pressure and temperature were met. Quantitative estimates of fluctuations in surface coverage and temperature during these oscillations were 10% and 3K, respectively. CO islands of reactivity were not observed under the conditions of this study. The presence of higher oxidation states of IR could not be unequivocally determined by using infrared spectroscopy. 29 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

Saymeh, R.A.; Gonzalez, R.D.

1986-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

10

Performance of new infrared beamline U12IR at the National Synchrotron Light Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequency limit of 2 cm 1 i.e., 60 GHz or a photon energy of 250 eV . The infrared light from infrared beamline at the NSLS and, with increasing demand for measurement time, has been followed by a series of new infrared ports presently under construction and com- missioning. This also allowed for some

Tanner, David B.

11

The determination of Os and Ir by delayed X-ray spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Delayed X-ray spectrometry preceded by fast neutron activation, is a relatively novel application and its capabilities as an analytical tool for the specific determination of Os and Ir in small powdered samples was evaluated. The investigation took the form of a feasibility study which relied heavily on the high sensitivity of the detector used. Detection of the delayed X-rays was achieved with a 100 mm{sup 2} Ge detector whose ability to produce optimum photopeak-to-noise ratios formed the basis exploited in this investigation. Analytical conditions are demonstrated over a range of concentrations for the elements of interest and the potential of the technique for application to the general routine analysis of Os and Ir is discussed. The authors indicate that interferences from the sample matrix can be suppressed to a degree which makes the method almost independent of the matrix. This and other attractive features make the technique a strong rival to conventional activation analysis.

Pillay, A.E.; Mashilo, N. (Univ. of Witwatersrand (South Africa))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Infrared Surveys for AGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

Harding E. Smith

2002-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

13

OpenIR [Open Infrared] : enhancing environmental monitoring through accessible remote sensing, in Indonesia and beyond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the human landscape changes ever more rapidly, environmental change accelerates. Much environmental information is publicly available as infrared satellite data. However, for the general user, this information is difficult ...

Ducao, Arlene (Arlene Brigoli)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

MID-INFRARED ATOMIC FINE-STRUCTURE EMISSION-LINE SPECTRA OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: SPITZER/IRS SPECTRA OF THE GOALS SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the data and our analysis of mid-infrared atomic fine-structure emission lines detected in Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph high-resolution spectra of 202 local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). We readily detect emission lines of [S IV], [Ne II], [Ne V], [Ne III], [S III]{sub 18.7{sub ?m}}, [O IV], [Fe II], [S III]{sub 33.5{sub ?m}}, and [Si II]. More than 75% of these galaxies are classified as starburst-dominated sources in the mid-infrared, based on the [Ne V]/[Ne II] line flux ratios and equivalent width of the 6.2 ?m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon feature. We compare ratios of the emission-line fluxes to those predicted from stellar photo-ionization and shock-ionization models to constrain the physical and chemical properties of the gas in the starburst LIRG nuclei. Comparing the [S IV]/[Ne II] and [Ne III]/[Ne II] line ratios to the Starburst99-Mappings III models with an instantaneous burst history, the emission-line ratios suggest that the nuclear starbursts in our LIRGs have ages of 1-4.5 Myr, metallicities of 1-2 Z{sub ?}, and ionization parameters of 2-8 × 10{sup 7} cm s{sup –1}. Based on the [S III]{sub 33.5{sub ?m}}/[S III]{sub 18.7{sub ?m}} ratios, the electron density in LIRG nuclei is typically one to a few hundred cm{sup –3}, with a median electron density of ?300 cm{sup –3}, for those sources above the low density limit for these lines. We also find that strong shocks are likely present in 10 starburst-dominated sources of our sample. A significant fraction of the GOALS sources (80) have resolved neon emission-line profiles (FWHM ?600 km s{sup –1}) and five show clear differences in the velocities of the [Ne III] or [Ne V] emission lines, relative to [Ne II], of more than 200 km s{sup –1}. Furthermore, six starburst and five active galactic nucleus dominated LIRGs show a clear trend of increasing line width with ionization potential, suggesting the possibility of a compact energy source and stratified interstellar medium in their nuclei. We confirm a strong correlation between the sum of the [Ne II]{sub 12.8{sub ?m}} and [Ne III]{sub 15.5{sub ?m}} emission, as well as [S III]{sub 33.5{sub ?m}}, with both the infrared luminosity and the 24 ?m warm dust emission measured from the spectra, consistent with all three lines tracing ongoing star formation. Finally, we find no correlation between the hardness of the radiation field or the emission-line width and the ratio of the total infrared to 8 ?m emission (IR8), a measure of the strength of the starburst and the distance of the LIRGs from the star-forming main sequence. This may be a function of the fact that the infrared luminosity and the mid-infrared fine-structure lines are sensitive to different timescales over the starburst, or that IR8 is more sensitive to the geometry of the region emitting the warm dust than the radiation field producing the H II region emission.

Inami, H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Armus, L.; Stierwalt, S.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Surace, J.; Howell, J.; Marshall, J. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, CA 91125 (United States); Charmandaris, V. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Groves, B. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kewley, L. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Petric, A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MS 320-47, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rich, J. [The Observatories, Carnegie Institute of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Haan, S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Marsfield, NSW 2122 (Australia); Evans, A. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Mazzarella, J.; Lord, S. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Appleton, P. [NASA Herschel Science Center, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Spoon, H. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Frayer, D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Matsuhara, H., E-mail: inami@noao.edu [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); and others

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

15

Near Infrared observations of Soft X-ray selected AGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the results of near infrared observations of 19 soft X-ray selected AGN. The goal of the observations was to search for strong, narrow Paschen-alpha or Brackett-gamma emission lines, as a sign of nuclear starbursts. We found Pa-alpha emission in the spectra of 11 sources and Br-gamma in at least five. Strong NIR emission has been found in two sources, CBS 126 and Mkn 766, both objects with strong [OIII]5007 emission, weak FeII emission and wavelength dependent degree of polarization in the optical. Classical Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies do not show exceptionally strong NIR emission lines. We present the results of our study and discuss how our findings fit into an evolutionary scheme of AGN.

D. Grupe; H. -C Thomas

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

HOST GALAXIES, CLUSTERING, EDDINGTON RATIOS, AND EVOLUTION OF RADIO, X-RAY, AND INFRARED-SELECTED AGNs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the connection between different classes of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the evolution of their host galaxies, by deriving host galaxy properties, clustering, and Eddington ratios of AGNs selected in the radio, X-ray, and infrared (IR) wavebands. We study a sample of 585 AGNs at 0.25 < z < 0.8 using redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES). We select AGNs with observations in the radio at 1.4 GHz from the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, X-rays from the Chandra XBooetes Survey, and mid-IR from the Spitzer IRAC Shallow Survey. The radio, X-ray, and IR AGN samples show only modest overlap, indicating that to the flux limits of the survey, they represent largely distinct classes of AGNs. We derive host galaxy colors and luminosities, as well as Eddington ratios, for obscured or optically faint AGNs. We also measure the two-point cross-correlation between AGNs and galaxies on scales of 0.3-10 h {sup -1} Mpc, and derive typical dark matter halo masses. We find that: (1) radio AGNs are mainly found in luminous red sequence galaxies, are strongly clustered (with M {sub halo} {approx} 3 x 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M {sub sun}), and have very low Eddington ratios {lambda} {approx}< 10{sup -3}; (2) X-ray-selected AGNs are preferentially found in galaxies that lie in the 'green valley' of color-magnitude space and are clustered similar to the typical AGES galaxies (M {sub halo} {approx} 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M {sub sun}), with 10{sup -3} {approx}< {lambda} {approx}< 1; (3) IR AGNs reside in slightly bluer, slightly less luminous galaxies than X-ray AGNs, are weakly clustered (M {sub halo} {approx}< 10{sup 12} h {sup -1} M {sub sun}), and have {lambda}>10{sup -2}. We interpret these results in terms of a simple model of AGN and galaxy evolution, whereby a 'quasar' phase and the growth of the stellar bulge occurs when a galaxy's dark matter halo reaches a critical mass between {approx}10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13} M {sub sun}. After this event, star formation ceases and AGN accretion shifts from radiatively efficient (optical- and IR-bright) to radiatively inefficient (optically faint, radio-bright) modes.

Hickox, Ryan C.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Brodwin, Mark; Narayan, Ramesh; Kenter, Almus; Caldwell, Nelson; Anderson, Michael E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Jannuzi, Buell T.; Dey, Arjun [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Brown, Michael J. I. [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton 3800, Victoria (Australia); Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gorjian, Varoujan [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cool, Richard J. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States)], E-mail: rhickox@cfa.harvard.edu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

On the role of extinction in failed gamma-ray burst optical/IR afterglows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While all but one Gamma-Ray Bursts observed in the X-ray band showed an X-ray afterglow, about 60 per cent of them have not been detected in the optical band. We demonstrate that in many cases this is not due to adverse observing conditions, or delay in performing the observations. We also show that the optically non-detected afterglows are not affected by particularly large Galactic absorbing columns, since its distribution is similar for both the detected and non-detected burst subclasses. We then investigate the hypothesis that the failure of detecting the optical afterglow is due to absorption at the source location. We find that this is a marginally viable interpretation, but only if the X-ray burst and afterglow emission and the possible optical/UV flash do not destroy the dust responsible for absorption in the optical band. If dust is efficiently destroyed, we are led to conclude that bursts with no detected optical afterglow are intrinsically different. Prompt infrared observations are the key to solve this issue.

D. Lazzati; S. Covino; G. Ghisellini

2001-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

18

NEAR-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF THE X-RAY-EMITTING YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE CARINA NEBULA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Great Nebula in Carina (NGC 3372) is the best target to study in detail the process of violent massive star formation and the resulting feedback effects of cloud dispersal and triggered star formation. While the population of massive stars is rather well studied, the associated low-mass stellar population was largely unknown up to now. The near-infrared study in this paper builds on the results of the Chandra Carina Complex Project, that detected 14,368 X-ray sources in the 1.4 deg{sup 2} survey region, an automatic source classification study that classified 10,714 of these X-ray sources as very likely young stars in Carina, and an analysis of the clustering properties of the X-ray-selected Carina members. In order to determine physical properties of the X-ray-selected stars, most of which were previously unstudied, we used HAWK-I at the ESO Very Large Telescope to conduct a very deep near-IR survey with subarcsecond angular resolution, covering an area of about 1280 arcmin{sup 2}. The HAWK-I images reveal more than 600,000 individual infrared sources, whereby objects as faint as J {approx} 23, H {approx} 22, and K{sub s} {approx} 21 are detected at signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) {>=}3. While less than half of the Chandra X-ray sources have counterparts in the Two Micron All Sky Survey catalog, the {approx}5 mag deeper HAWK-I data reveal infrared counterparts to 6636 (=88.8%) of the 7472 Chandra X-ray sources in the HAWK-I field. We analyze near-infrared color-color and color-magnitude diagrams to derive information about the extinctions, infrared excesses (as tracers for circumstellar disks), ages, and masses of the X-ray-selected objects. The near-infrared properties agree well with the results of the automatic X-ray source classification, showing that the remaining contamination in the X-ray-selected sample of Carina members is very low ({approx}<7%). The shape of the K-band luminosity function of the X-ray-selected Carina members agrees well with that derived for the Orion Nebula Cluster, suggesting that, down to the X-ray detection limit around 0.5-1 M{sub sun}, the shape of the initial mass function (IMF) in Carina is consistent with that in Orion (and thus the field IMF). The fraction of stars with near-infrared excesses is rather small, {approx}<10%, but shows considerable variations between individual parts of the complex. The distribution of extinctions for the diskless stars ranges from {approx}1.6 mag to {approx}6.2 mag (central 80th percentile), clearly showing a considerable range of differential extinction between individual stars in the complex.

Preibisch, Thomas [Universitaets-Sternwarte Muenchen, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Scheinerstr. 1, 81679 Muenchen (Germany); Hodgkin, Simon; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, James R. [Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit, Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); King, Robert R. [Astrophysics Group, College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); McCaughrean, Mark J. [European Space Agency, Research and Scientific Support Department, ESTEC, Postbus 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Zinnecker, Hans [Deutsches SOFIA Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Townsley, Leisa; Broos, Patrick [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

Sterling Backus

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

20

An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. Abstract: Infrared (IR) spectroscopy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Radio, Infrared and X-ray observations of GRS 1915+105  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present multiwavelength observations of the superluminal jet source GRS 1915+105 in 1996 April-May, over which period a variety of phenomena, including radio QPO, strong infrared emission lines and rapid X-ray flickering and outbursts were observed.

R. P. Fender; G. G. Pooley; C. R. Robinson; B. A. Harmon; S. N. Zhang; C. Canosa

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

THREE NEW GALACTIC CENTER X-RAY SOURCES IDENTIFIED WITH NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have conducted a near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 47 candidate counterparts to X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory near the Galactic center (GC). Though a significant number of these astrometric matches are likely to be spurious, we sought out spectral characteristics of active stars and interacting binaries, such as hot, massive spectral types or emission lines, in order to corroborate the X-ray activity and certify the authenticity of the match. We present three new spectroscopic identifications, including a Be high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) or a ? Cassiopeiae (Cas) system, a symbiotic X-ray binary, and an O-type star of unknown luminosity class. The Be HMXB/? Cas system and the symbiotic X-ray binary are the first of their classes to be spectroscopically identified in the GC region.

DeWitt, Curtis [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Sarajedini, Ata [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sellgren, Kris [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bauer, Franz E., E-mail: curtis.n.dewitt@nasa.gov [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Understanding the two-dimensional ionization structure in luminous infrared galaxies. A near-IR integral field spectroscopy perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the 2D excitation structure of the ISM in a sample of LIRGs and Seyferts using near-IR IFS. This study extends to the near-IR the well-known optical and mid-IR emission line diagnostics used to classify activity in galaxies. Based on the spatially resolved spectroscopy of prototypes, we identify in the [FeII]1.64/Br$\\gamma$ - H_2 1-0S(1)/Br$\\gamma$ plane regions dominated by the different heating sources, i.e. AGNs, young MS massive stars, and evolved stars i.e. supernovae. The ISM in LIRGs occupy a wide region in the near-IR diagnostic plane from -0.6 to +1.5 and from -1.2 to +0.8 (in log units) for the [FeII]/Br$\\gamma$ and H_2/Br$\\gamma$ line ratios, respectively. The corresponding median(mode) ratios are +0.18(0.16) and +0.02(-0.04). Seyferts show on average larger values by factors ~2.5 and ~1.4 for the [FeII]/Br$\\gamma$ and H_2/Br$\\gamma$ ratios, respectively. New areas and relations in the near-IR diagnostic plane are defined for the compact, high surface brightness regions dominated by ...

Colina, Luis; Arribas, Santiago; Riffel, Rogerio; Riffel, Rogemar A; Rodriguez-Ardila, Alberto; Pastoriza, Miriani; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Sales, Dinalva

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

X-ray and Near-infrared Studies of a Star-forming Cloud; L1448  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of X-ray and near-infrared (NIR) observations of L1448, a star-forming region in the Perseus cloud complex using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the 4 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. We detect 72 X-ray sources in a ~17 arcmin x 17 arcmin region with a ~68 ks ACIS exposure, for which we conduct follow-up NIR imaging observations in a concentric ~11 arcmin x 11 arcmin region with FLAMINGOS down to m_Ks ~ 17 mag. Twelve X-ray sources have NIR or optical counterparts. By plotting X-ray mean energy versus NIR to X-ray flux ratio, the X-ray sources are clearly separated into two groups. The X-ray spectral and temporal features as well as NIR magnitudes and colors indicate that one group mainly consists of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud and the other of background extragalactic sources. Ten X-ray-emitting YSO candidates are thus newly identified, which are low-mass or brown dwarf mass sources from their NIR magnitudes. In addition, a possible X-ray signal is fou...

Tsujimoto, M; Tsuboi, Y

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

POLARIZATION AND VARIATION OF NEAR-INFRARED LIGHT FROM FERMI/LAT {gamma}-RAY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of our follow-up observation program of {gamma}-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Twenty-six blazars and thirty-nine sources unidentified at other wavelengths were targeted at the Infrared Survey Facility 1.4 m telescope equipped with the SIRIUS/SIRPOL imager and polarimeter. H-band magnitudes of the blazars at the epoch of 2010 December-2011 February are presented, which reveal clear flux variation since the Two Micron All Sky Survey observations and can be useful data for variation analyses of these objects in longer periods. We also find that nearly half of the {gamma}-ray blazars are highly (>10%) polarized in near-infrared wavelengths. Combining the polarization and variation properties, most ({approx}90%) of the blazars are clearly distinguished from all other types of objects at high Galactic latitudes. On the other hand, we find only one highly polarized and/or variable object in the fields of unidentified sources. This object is a counterpart of the optical variable source PQV1 J131553.00-073302.0 and the radio source NVSS J131552-073301 and is a promising candidate of new {gamma}-ray blazars. From the measured polarization and variation statistics, we conclude that most of the Fermi/LAT unidentified sources are not likely similar types of objects to the known {gamma}-ray blazars.

Fujiwara, M.; Matsuoka, Y. [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Ienaka, N., E-mail: matsuoka@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Institute of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF BLACK HOLE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES: ASSESSING THE NON-STELLAR INFRARED COMPONENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have combined ground-based optical and near-infrared data with Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared data for five black hole (BH) soft X-ray transients (SXTs) in order to determine the levels of near- and mid-infrared emission from sources other than the secondary star. Mid-infrared emission from an accretion disk, circumbinary dust, and/or a jet could act as sources of near-infrared contamination, thereby diluting ellipsoidal variations of the secondary star and affecting determined BH mass estimates. Based on optical to mid-infrared spectral energy distribution modeling of the five SXTs along with the prototype, V616 Mon, we detected mid-infrared excesses in half of the systems, and suggest that the excesses detected from these systems arise from non-thermal synchrotron jets rather than circumbinary dust disks.

Gelino, Dawn M. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gelino, Christopher R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Harrison, Thomas E., E-mail: dawn@ipac.caltech.ed [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

27

Cosmic ray modulation of infra-red radiation in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic rays produce charged molecular clusters by ionisation as they pass through the lower atmosphere. Neutral molecular clusters such as dimers and complexes are expected to make a small contribution to the radiative balance, but atmospheric absorption by charged clusters has not hitherto been observed. In an atmospheric experiment, a filter radiometer tuned to the 9.15 um absorption band associated with infra-red absorption of charged molecular clusters was used to monitor changes immediately following events identified by a cosmic ray telescope sensitive to high energy (>400MeV) particles, principally muons. The change in longwave radiation in this absorption band due to charged molecular clusters is 7 mW^m-2. The integrated atmospheric energy change for each event is 2J, representing an amplification factor of 10^10 compared to the 2GeV energy of a typical tropospheric cosmic ray. This absorption is expected to occur continuously and globally.

Aplin, K L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Stratified Quasar Winds: Integrating X-ray and Infrared Views of Broad Absorption Line Quasars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quasars are notable for the luminous power they emit across decades in frequency from the far-infrared through hard X-rays; emission at different frequencies emerges from physical scales ranging from AUs to parsecs. Each wavelength regime thus offers a different line of sight into the central engine and a separate probe of outflowing material. Therefore, obtaining a complete accounting of the physical characteristics and kinetic power of quasar winds requires a panchromatic approach. X-ray and infrared studies are particularly powerful for covering the range of interesting physical scales and ionization states of the outflow. We present a stratified wind picture based on a synthesis of multiwavelength research programs designed to constrain the nature of mass ejection from radio-quiet quasars. This wind comprises three zones: the highly ionized shielding gas, the UV broad absorption line wind, and the cold dusty outflow. The primary launching mechanism for the wind likely varies in each zone. While radiative acceleration on resonance lines dominates for the UV absorbing wind, the shielding gas may instead be driven by magnetic forces. Ultraviolet continuum radiative pressure, perhaps coupled with magnetic launching, accelerates a dusty outflow that obscures the inner broad line region in unification schemes.

S. C. Gallagher; J. E. Everett

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

Analysis of local warm forming of high strength steel using near infrared ray energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The automotive industry has been pressed to satisfy more rigorous fuel efficiency requirements to promote energy conservation, safety features and cost containment. To satisfy this need, high strength steel has been developed and used for many different vehicle parts. The use of high strength steels, however, requires careful analysis and creativity in order to accommodate its relatively high springback behavior. An innovative method, called local warm forming with near infrared ray, has been developed to help promote the use of high strength steels in sheet metal forming. For this method, local regions of the work piece are heated using infrared ray energy, thereby promoting the reduction of springback behavior. In this research, a V-bend test is conducted with DP980. After springback, the bend angles for specimens without local heating are compared to those with local heating. Numerical analysis has been performed using the commercial program, DEFORM-2D. This analysis is carried out with the purpose of understanding how changes to the local stress distribution will affect the springback during the unloading process. The results between experimental and computational approaches are evaluated to assure the accuracy of the simulation. Subsequent numerical simulation studies are performed to explore best practices with respect to thermal boundary conditions, timing, and applicability to the production environment.

Yang, W. H., E-mail: whyang21@hyundai.com [Hyundai Motor Company, 700 Yeompo-ro, Buk-Gu, Ulsan, 683-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K., E-mail: klee@deform.co.kr [Solution Lab, 502, 102, Dunsan-daero 117 beon-gil, Seo-Gu, Daejeon, 302-834 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, E. H., E-mail: mtgs2@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: dyyang@kaist.ac.kr; Yang, D. Y., E-mail: mtgs2@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: dyyang@kaist.ac.kr [KAIST, Science Town291, Daehak-ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

30

IR Hot Wave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

Graham, T. B.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Far-infrared observations of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray burst host galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic phenomena in the Universe; believed to result from the collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars. Even though it has profound consequences for our understanding of their nature and selection biases, little is known about the dust properties of the galaxies hosting GRBs. We present analysis of the far-infrared properties of an unbiased sample of 21 GRB host galaxies (at an average redshift of $z\\,=\\,3.1$) located in the {\\it Herschel} Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS), the {\\it Herschel} Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS), the {\\it Herschel} Fornax Cluster Survey (HeFoCS), the {\\it Herschel} Stripe 82 Survey (HerS) and the {\\it Herschel} Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES), totalling $880$ deg$^2$, or $\\sim 3$\\% of the sky in total. Our sample selection is serendipitous, based only on whether the X-ray position of a GRB lies within a large-scale {\\it Herschel} survey -- therefore our sample can be considered completely unbiased. Using ...

Kohn, Saul A; Bourne, Nathan; Baes, Maarten; Fritz, Jacopo; Cooray, Asantha; De Looze, Ilse; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Dunne, Loretta; Dye, Simon; Eales, Stephen; Furlanetto, Cristina; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Ibar, Edo; Ivison, Rob J; Maddox, Steve J; Scott, Douglas; Smith, Daniel J B; Smith, Matthew W L; Symeonidis, Myrto; Valiante, Elisabetta

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

X-ray absorption studies of the local structure and f-level occupancy in CeIr(1-x)Rh(x)In(5)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CeIr{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x}In{sub 5} series exhibits a range of interesting phenomena, including heavy-fermion superconductivity, non-Fermi liquid behavior, and concomitant antiferromagnetism (AF) and superconductivity (SC). In the low-Rh concentration range (0.1 {ge} x {ge} 0.5), specific heat measurements show a broad anomaly, suggestive of gross phase separation. We have performed x-ray absorption experiments at the Ce L{sub III}, Ir L{sub III}, and Rh K-edges as a function of Rh concentration and temperature. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements indicate that cerium is close to trivalent in this system, with no measurable change with temperature from 20-300 K, consistent with a heavy-fermion material. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements as a function of temperature from all measured edges indicate the local crystal structure of all samples is well ordered, with no gross phase separation observed, even for samples with x = 0.125 and x = 0.25. These results therefore suggest that the anomalous specific heat behavior in the 0.1 {ge} x {ge} 0.5 range have some other explanation, and some possibilities are discussed.

Daniel, M.; Han, S.-W.; Booth, C.H.; Cornelius, A.L.; Pagliuso, P.G.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources: Hunting Gamma-Ray Blazars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the large improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated to low energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of Active Galactic Nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated to the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated to {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; Ajello, M.; Gasparrini, A.Paggi.D.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

34

The Infrared Luminosity of Galaxy Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this study is to quantify the infrared luminosity of clusters as a function of redshift and compare this with the X-ray luminosity. This can potentially constrain the origin of the infrared emission to be intracluster dust and/or dust heated by star formation in the cluster galaxies. We perform a statistical analysis of a large sample of galaxy clusters selected from existing databases and catalogues.We coadd the infrared IRAS and X-ray RASS images in the direction of the selected clusters within successive redshift intervals up to z = 1. We find that the total infrared luminosity is very high and on average 20 times higher than the X-ray luminosity. If all the infrared luminosity is to be attributed to emission from diffuse intracluster dust, then the IR to X-ray ratio implies a dust-to-gas mass abundance of 5e-4. However, the infrared luminosity shows a strong enhancement for 0.1 infrared luminosity that we measure is generated by the ongoing star formation in the member galaxies. From theoretical predictions calibrated on extinction measurements (dust mass abundance equal to 1e-5), we expect only a minor contribution, of a few percent, from intracluster dust.

Martin Giard; Ludovic Montier; Etienne Pointecouteau; Ellen Simmat

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

35

Infrared retina  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

Krishna, Sanjay (Albuquerque, NM); Hayat, Majeed M. (Albuquerque, NM); Tyo, J. Scott (Tucson, AZ); Jang, Woo-Yong (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

X-ray and infrared properties of galaxies and AGNs in the 9 square degree Bootes field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the X-ray and infrared properties of galaxies and AGNs in the 9 square degree Bootes field, using data from the Chandra XBootes and Spitzer IRAC Shallow Surveys, as well as optical spectroscopy from the AGES survey. A sample of ~30,000 objects are detected in all four IRAC bands, of which ~2,000 are associated with X-ray sources. We also study X-ray fainter sources using stacking techniques, and find that X-ray fluxes are highest for objects with IRAC colors that are known to be characteristic of AGNs. Because these are shallow, wide-field surveys, they probe the bright end of the AGNluminosity function out to spectroscopic redshifts as high as z=3-4. We can use this multiwavelength dataset to explore the properties and redshift evolution of a large sample of luminous active galaxies.

R. C. Hickox; C. Jones; W. R. Forman; S. S. Murray; M. Brodwin; the Chandra XBootes; Spitzer IRAC Shallow Survey; AGES; NOAO DWFS Teams

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

37

Direct evidence of a zigzag spin-chain structure in the honeycomb lattice: A neutron and x-ray diffraction investigation of single-crystal Na2IrO3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have combined single crystal neutron and x-ray diffractions to investigate the magnetic and crystal structures of the honeycomb lattice $\\rm Na_2IrO_3$. The system orders magnetically below $18.1(2)$~K with Ir$^{4+}$ ions forming zigzag spin chains within the layered honeycomb network with ordered moment of $\\rm 0.22(1)~\\mu_B$/Ir site. Such a configuration sharply contrasts the N{\\'{e}}el or stripe states proposed in the Kitaev-Heisenberg model. The structure refinement reveals that the Ir atoms form nearly ideal 2D honeycomb lattice while the $\\rm IrO_6$ octahedra experience a trigonal distortion that is critical to the ground state. The results of this study provide much-needed experimental insights into the magnetic and crystal structure crucial to the understanding of the exotic magnetic order and possible topological characteristics in the 5$d$-electron based honeycomb lattice.

Ye, Feng [ORNL; Chi, Songxue [ORNL; Cao, Huibo [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Qi, Tongfei [University of Kentucky; Korneta, O. B. [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Cao, Gang [University of Kentucky

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

4/8/09 10:57 PMThe X-ray Population in the Infrared Cluster in NGC 2071 as Observed by Chandra Page 1 of 2http://cdsads.u-strasbg.fr/abs/2009AAS...21344215S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...21344215S Abstract The infrared cluster near the NGC 2071 reflection nebula in the Orion B cloud is one4/8/09 10:57 PMThe X-ray Population in the Infrared Cluster in NGC 2071 as Observed by Chandra Page) · · Translate This Page Title: The X-ray Population in the Infrared Cluster in NGC 2071 as Observed by Chandra

Guedel, Manuel

39

Near-infrared evolution of brightest cluster galaxies in the most X-ray luminous clusters since z=1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the near infrared evolution of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) from a sample of rich galaxy clusters since z=1. By employing an X-ray selection of Lx>1e44 erg s-1 we limit environmental effects by selecting BCGs in comparably high density regions. We find a positive relationship between X-ray and near-infrared luminosity for BCGs in clusters with Lx>5e44 erg s-1. Applying a correction for this relation we reduce the scatter in the BCG absolute magnitude by a factor of 30%. The near-infrared J-K colour evolution demonstrates that the stellar population in BCGs has been in place since at least z=2 and that we expect a shorter period of star formation than that predicted by current hierarchical merger models. We also confirm that there is a relationship between `blue' J-K colour and the presence of BCG emission lines associated with star formation in cooling flows.

J. P. Stott; A. C. Edge; G. P. Smith; A. M. Swinbank; H. Ebeling

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

40

Chandra X-ray and Gemini near-infrared observations of the eclipsing millisecond pulsar SWIFT J1749.4-2807 in quiescence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on Chandra X-ray and Gemini-North near-infrared K-band observations of the eclipsing accretion-powered millisecond X-ray pulsar SWIFT J1749.4?2807 in quiescence. Using the Chandra observation we derive a source ...

Chakrabarty, Deepto

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

online non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technology for RSW quality monitoring based on infrared (IR) thermography that can be adopted reliably and cost-effectively in...

42

An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. Abstract: Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of several...

43

Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing #12;0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4 and x-ray Ultraviolet Infrared Microwave and radio waves Wavelength in meters (m) Electromagnetic.77 700 red limit 30k0.041 2.48 green500 near-infrared far infrared ultraviolet Thermal Infrare refers

44

Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

Leonard, F. L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Evolution of infrared instrumentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emergence of consumer-oriented infrared (IR) imaging devices is discussed. The discussion shows that the industry is presently dwindling because it does not fulfill expanding consumer needs. The features of future imaging devices are pointed out - smaller, easier to use, and easier to maintain. The challenge in the 1980s for the infrared manufacturing industry is to develop new technical innovations, smart IR imagining sensors, and consumer-oriented marketing, and produce a business/competitive industry. (MCW)

Sears, R.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Near-Infrared and X-ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in Numerical Models of Sgr A*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report transient quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) on minute timescales in relativistic, radiative models of the galactic center source Sgr A*. The QPOs result from nonaxisymmetric $m=1$ structure in the accretion flow excited by MHD turbulence. Near-infrared (NIR) and X-ray power spectra show significant peaks at frequencies comparable to the orbital frequency at the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) $f_o$. The excess power is associated with inward propagating magnetic filaments inside the ISCO. The amplitudes of the QPOs are sensitive to the electron distribution function. We argue that transient QPOs appear at a range of frequencies in the neighborhood of $f_o$ and that the power spectra, averaged over long times, likely show a broad bump near $f_o$ rather than distinct, narrow QPO features.

Joshua C. Dolence; Charles F. Gammie; Hotaka Shiokawa; Scott C. Noble

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

47

Advances in X-Ray Chemical Analysis, Japan, 45 (2014) ISSN 0911-7806 Role of Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy in the Forensic Analysis of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopy in the Forensic Analysis of Wakayama Curry Arsenic Poisoning Case Anthony T. TU and Jun KAWAI #12 80523, U. S. A. 606-8501 Role of Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy in the Forensic Analysis of Wakayama-8 X-ray fluorescence analysis was the key scientific evidence for the forensic analysis

Jun, Kawai

48

Frequency selective infrared sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

Frequency selective infrared sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

50

Zachar and Naik Principles of Infrared Thermography and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zachar and Naik 1 Principles of Infrared Thermography and Application for Assessment details the principles of infrared thermography from the underlying theoretical considerations to the physical constraints involved with performing the test. Infrared (IR) thermography testing may be conducted

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

51

Resonant-cavity-enhanced multispectral infrared photodetectors for monolithic integration on silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multispectral infrared (IR) detection has been widely employed for numerous applications including hyperspectral imaging, IR spectroscopy, and target identification. Traditional multispectral detection technology is based ...

Wang, Jianfei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Infrared Jet in 3C31  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the detection of infrared emission from the jet of the nearby FR I radio galaxy 3C 31. The jet was detected with the IRAC instrument on Spitzer at 4.5 micron, 5.8 micron, and 8.0 micron out to 30" (13 kpc) from the nucleus. We measure radio, infrared, optical, and X-ray fluxes in three regions along the jet determined by the infrared and X-ray morphology. Radio through X-ray spectra in these regions demonstrate that the emission can be interpreted as synchrotron emission from a broken power-law distribution of electron energies. We find significant differences in the high energy spectra with increasing distance from the nucleus. Specifically, the high energy slope increases from 0.86 to 1.72 from 1 kpc to 12 kpc along the jet, and the spectral break likewise increases in frequency along the jet from 10-100's of GHz to ~20 THz. Thus the ratio of IR to X-ray flux in the jet increases by at least an order of magnitude with increasing distance from the nucleus. We argue that these changes cannot simply ...

Lanz, Lauranne; Kraft, Ralph P; Birkinshaw, Mark; Lal, Dharam V; Forman, William R; Jones, Christine; Worrall, Diana M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Near-infrared photoluminescence and ligand K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopies of AnO2Cl42-(An:u, NP, Pu)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used photoluminescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopies to investigate electronic structures and metal-ligand bonding of a series of An02CI/ ' (An = U, Np, Pu) compounds. Specifically, we will discuss time-resolved near-infrared emission spectra of crystalline Cs2U(An)02C14 (An = Np and Pu) both at 23 K and 75 K, as well as chlorine Kedge X-ray absorption spectra ofCs2An02CI4 (An = U, Np).

Wilkerson, Marianne P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berg, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clark, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hobart, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kozimor, Stosh A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

INFRARED CLASSIFICATION AND LUMINOSITIES FOR DUSTY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THE MOST LUMINOUS QUASARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mid-infrared spectroscopic measurements from the Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) on Spitzer are given for 125 hard X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs; 14-195 keV) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample and for 32 AGNs with black hole masses (BHMs) from reverberation mapping. The 9.7 {mu}m silicate feature in emission or absorption defines an infrared AGN classification describing whether AGNs are observed through dust clouds, indicating that 55% of the BAT AGNs are observed through dust. The mid-infrared dust continuum luminosity is shown to be an excellent indicator of intrinsic AGN luminosity, scaling closely with the hard X-ray luminosity, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m)/L(X) = -0.31 {+-} 0.35, and independent of classification determined from silicate emission or absorption. Dust luminosity scales closely with BHM, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) = (37.2 {+-} 0.5) + 0.87 log BHM for luminosity in erg s{sup -1} and BHM in M{sub Sun }. The 100 most luminous type 1 quasars as measured in {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) are found by comparing Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) optically discovered quasars with photometry at 22 {mu}m from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), scaled to rest frame 7.8 {mu}m using an empirical template determined from IRS spectra. The most luminous SDSS/WISE quasars have the same maximum infrared luminosities for all 1.5 < z < 5, reaching total infrared luminosity L{sub IR} = 10{sup 14.4} L{sub Sun }. Comparing with dust-obscured galaxies from Spitzer and WISE surveys, we find no evidence of hyperluminous obscured quasars whose maximum infrared luminosities exceed the maximum infrared luminosities of optically discovered quasars. Bolometric luminosities L{sub bol} estimated from rest-frame optical or ultraviolet luminosities are compared to L{sub IR}. For the local AGN, the median log L{sub IR}/L{sub bol} = -0.35, consistent with a covering factor of 45% for the absorbing dust clouds. For the SDSS/WISE quasars, the median log L{sub IR}/L{sub bol} = 0.1, with extremes indicating that ultraviolet-derived L{sub bol} can be seriously underestimated even for type 1 quasars.

Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine; Houck, James; Barry, Donald [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Lebouteiller, Vianney, E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, DAPNIA/Service d'Astrophysique, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

55

Thermal unfolding dynamics of proteins probed by nonlinear infrared spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents spectroscopic approaches to study the thermal unfolding dynamics of proteins. The spectroscopic tool is nonlinear infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the protein amide I band. Among various nonlinear IR ...

Chung, Hoi Sung

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Radio to Infrared Emission of Very High Redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts: Probing Early Star Formation through Molecular and Atomic Absorption Lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We evaluate the broadband afterglow emission of very high redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using standard relativistic blastwave models with both forward and reverse shock components. For a broad range of parameters, a generic property for GRBs at redshifts $z \\sim$ 5--30 is that the emission peaks in the millimeter to far-infrared bands with milli-Jansky flux levels, first at a few hours after the burst due to the reverse shock, and then again for several days afterwards with somewhat lower flux due to the forward shock. The radio, submillimeter and infrared continuum emission should be readily detectable out to $z \\ga 30$ by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), Extended Very Large Array (EVLA), Square Kilometer Array (SKA) and other facilities. For relatively bright bursts, spectroscopic measurements of molecular and atomic absorption lines due to ambient protostellar gas may be possible. Utilizing models of primordial protostellar clouds, we show that under certain conditions, appreciable absorption may be caused by HD rotational transitions even in metal-free environments. After sufficient metal enrichment, absorption from CO rotational transitions and [OI] fine-structure transitions can also become strong. With appropriate observing strategies in combination with optical telescopes, ALMA and/or SKA may be able to detect such lines, offering a unique probe of physical conditions in individual Pop III and early Pop II star forming regions. We also remark on potential near-infrared absorption features due to electronic transitions of H$_2$.

Susumu Inoue; Kazuyuki Omukai; Benedetta Ciardi

2007-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

57

Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far IR to the UV Lyman Limit for $0 Optical Depth of the Universe to High Energy Gamma-Rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the intergalactic photon density as a function of both energy and redshift for 0 gamma-rays in intergalactic space owing to interactions with low energy photons and the 2.7 K cosmic background radiation. We calculate the optical depth of the universe, tau, for gamma-rays having energies from 4 GeV to 100 TeV emitted by sources at redshifts from ~0 to 5. We also give an analytic fit with numerical coefficients for approximating $\\tau(E_{\\gamma}, z)$. As an example of the application of our results, we calculate the absorbed spectrum of the blazar PKS 2155-304 at z = 0.117 and compare it with the spectrum observed by the H.E.S.S. air Cherenkov gamma-ray telescope array.

F. W. Stecker; M. A. Malkan; S. T. Scully

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

X-RAY AND NEAR-INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF THE OBSCURED ACCRETING PULSAR IGR J18179–1621  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IGR J18179–1621 is an obscured accreting X-ray pulsar discovered by INTEGRAL on 2012 February 29. We report on our 20 ks Chandra-High Energy Transmission Gratings Spectrometer observation of the source performed on 2012 ...

Paizis, A.

59

LUMINOUS SUPERNOVA-LIKE UV/OPTICAL/INFRARED TRANSIENTS ASSOCIATED WITH ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM METAL-POOR BLUE SUPERGIANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-poor massive stars typically end their lives as blue supergiants (BSGs). Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from such progenitors could have an ultra-long duration of relativistic jets. For example, Population III (Pop III) GRBs at z {approx} 10-20 might be observable as X-ray-rich events with a typical duration of T{sub 90} {approx} 10{sup 4}(1 + z) s. The recent GRB111209A at z = 0.677 has an ultra-long duration of T{sub 90} {approx} 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} s and it has been suggested that its progenitor might have been a metal-poor BSG in the local universe. Here, we suggest that luminous UV/optical/infrared emission is associated with this new class of GRBs from metal-poor BSGs. Before the jet head breaks out of the progenitor envelope, the energy injected by the jet is stored in a hot plasma cocoon, which finally emerges and expands as a baryon-loaded fireball. We show that the photospheric emissions from the cocoon fireball could be intrinsically very bright (L{sub peak} {approx} 10{sup 42}-10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) in UV/optical bands ({epsilon}{sub peak} {approx} 10 eV) with a typical duration of {approx}100 days in the rest frame. Such cocoon emissions from Pop III GRBs might be detectable in infrared bands at {approx}years after Pop III GRBs at up to z {approx} 15 by upcoming facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope. We also suggest that GRB111209A might have been rebrightening in UV/optical bands up to an AB magnitude of {approx}< 26. The cocoon emission from local metal-poor BSGs might have been observed previously as luminous supernovae without GRBs since they can be seen from the off-axis direction of the jet.

Kashiyama, Kazumi; Yajima, Hidenobu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Nakauchi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takashi [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Suwa, Yudai, E-mail: kzk15@psu.edu [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

60

New Limits to the IR Background: Bounds on Radiative Neutrino Decay and on VMO Contributions to the Dark Matter Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From considering the effect of gamma-gamma interactions on recently observed TeV gamma-ray spectra, improved limits are set to the density of extragalactic infrared (IR) photons which are robust and essentially model-independent. The resulting limits are up to two orders of magnitude more restrictive than direct observations in the 0.025-0.3eV regime. These limits are used to improve constraints on radiative neutrino decay in the mass range above 0.05eV and on Very Massive Objects (VMOs) as providing the dark matter needed to explain galaxy rotation curves.

S. D. Biller; J. Buckley; A. Burdett; J. Bussons Gordo; D. A. Carter-Lewis; D. J. Fegan; J. Findley; J. A. Gaidos; A. M. Hillas; F. Krennrich; R. C. Lamb; R. Lessard; J. E. McEnery; G. Mohanty; J. Quinn; A. J. Rodgers; H. J. Rose; F. Samuelson; G. Sembroski; P. Skelton; T. C. Weekes; J; Zweerink

1998-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Atmospheric Monitoring with a LIDAR and an Infra-red Camera at Black Rock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density, the US atmospheric standard model is used so far, and a radio sonde data is also used COLLABORATION 1 Department of Physics, Kinki University 2 Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University 3 for cosmic rays experiment. The aims of atmospheric moni- toring are to calibrate observed energy

62

UNVEILING THE NATURE OF IGR J17177–3656 WITH X-RAY, NEAR-INFRARED, AND RADIO OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the first broadband (1-200 keV) simultaneous Chandra-INTEGRAL observations of the recently discovered hard X-ray transient IGR J17177–3656 that took place on 2011 March 22, about two weeks after the source ...

Paizis, A.

63

Infrared fixed point in quantum Einstein gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We performed the renormalization group analysis of the quantum Einstein gravity in the deep infrared regime for different types of extensions of the model. It is shown that an attractive infrared point exists in the broken symmetric phase of the model. It is also shown that due to the Gaussian fixed point the IR critical exponent $\

S. Nagy; J. Krizsan; K. Sailer

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

64

MID-IR LUMINOSITIES AND UV/OPTICAL STAR FORMATION RATES AT z < 1.4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultraviolet (UV) nonionizing continuum and mid-infrared (IR) emission constitute the basis of two widely used star formation (SF) indicators at intermediate and high redshifts. We study 2430 galaxies with z < 1.4 in the Extended Groth Strip with deep MIPS 24 {mu}m observations from FIDEL, spectroscopy from DEEP2, and UV, optical, and near-IR photometry from the AEGIS. The data are coupled with dust-reddened stellar population models and Bayesian spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting to estimate dust-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). In order to probe the dust heating from stellar populations of various ages, the derived SFRs were averaged over various timescales-from 100 Myr for 'current' SFR (corresponding to young stars) to 1-3 Gyr for long-timescale SFRs (corresponding to the light-weighted age of the dominant stellar populations). These SED-based UV/optical SFRs are compared to total IR luminosities extrapolated from 24 {mu}m observations, corresponding to 10-18 {mu}m rest frame. The total IR luminosities are in the range of normal star-forming galaxies and luminous IR galaxies (10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} L{sub sun}). We show that the IR luminosity can be estimated from the UV and optical photometry to within a factor of 2, implying that most z < 1.4 galaxies are not optically thick. We find that for the blue, actively star-forming galaxies the correlation between the IR luminosity and the UV/optical SFR shows a decrease in scatter when going from shorter to longer SFR-averaging timescales. We interpret this as the greater role of intermediate age stellar populations in heating the dust than what is typically assumed. Equivalently, we observe that the IR luminosity is better correlated with dust-corrected optical luminosity than with dust-corrected UV light. We find that this holds over the entire redshift range. Many so-called green valley galaxies are simply dust-obscured actively star-forming galaxies. However, there exist 24 {mu}m detected galaxies, some with L{sub IR}>10{sup 11} L{sub sun}, yet with little current SF. For them a reasonable amount of dust absorption of stellar light (but presumably higher than in nearby early-type galaxies) is sufficient to produce the observed levels of IR, which includes a large contribution from intermediate and old stellar populations. In our sample, which contains very few ultraluminous IR galaxies, optical and X-ray active galactic nuclei do not contribute on average more than {approx}50% to the mid-IR luminosity, and we see no evidence for a large population of 'IR excess' galaxies.

Salim, Samir; Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Michael Rich, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Charlot, Stephane [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Lee, Janice C. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G. [Departamento de AstrofIsica, Facultad de CC. FIsicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Noeske, Kai [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Papovich, Casey; Weiner, Benjamin J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Faber, S. M. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ivison, Rob J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Frayer, David T. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Walton, Josiah M. [University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Chary, Ranga-Ram [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bundy, Kevin [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)], E-mail: samir@noao.edu

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

65

Infrared-Based Screening System Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared-Based Screening System (IBSS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC underperforming or overworking components are identified. These thermal-based systems integrate infrared (IR) sensors or cameras, video images, and vehicle position sensors, and are generically known as infrared

66

Negligible Sample Heating from Synchrotron Infrared Beam Michael C. Martina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Negligible Sample Heating from Synchrotron Infrared Beam Michael C. Martina , Nelly M. Tsvetkovab of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California at Davis, USA Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one can now obtain diffraction-limited spot sizes with high signal intensity in an infrared microscope

67

DISSIPATION MEASUREMENTS IN STEEL SHEETS UNDER CYCLIC LOADING BY USE OF INFRARED MICROTHERMOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the dissipation field determination from infra-red thermography. The protocol is based on a specific differential WORDS: IR thermography, thermoelasticity, dissipation, fatigue properties, surface effect, coating

68

Mid-infrared second-order susceptibility of -quartz and its application to visible-infrared surface sum-frequency spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mid-infrared second-order susceptibility of -quartz and its application to visible-infrared surface to elucidate the nonlinear susceptibility of any material in the mid-infrared region. Crystalline quartz-frequency spectroscopy which are expanding into the mid-IR with the increasing availability of widely tunable infrared

Richmond, Geraldine L.

69

GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

70

Hydrogen Bond Rearrangements in Water Probed with Temperature-Dependent 2D IR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) of dilute HOD in H2O to investigate hydrogen bond rearrangements in water. The OD stretching frequency is sensitive to its environment, and loss ...

Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

71

Collective Hydrogen Bond Reorganization in Water Studied with Temperature-Dependent Ultrafast Infrared Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use temperature-dependent ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of dilute HOD in H2O to study the picosecond reorganization of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water. Temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared (2D IR), ...

Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

72

Multi-mode two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of peptides and proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, a methodology for understanding structural stability of proteins through multi-mode two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy is developed. The experimental framework for generation of broadband infrared ...

DeFlores, Lauren P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Rational production of veneer by IR-heating of green wood during peeling: Modeling experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-line IR heating system installed on the peeling lathe. Keywords: green wood; heating; infrared; modeling solutions are sought for. Experiments with electric ohmic and microwave heating methods (TorgovnikovRational production of veneer by IR-heating of green wood during peeling: Modeling experiments Anna

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

74

Investigation of microstructure, surface morphology, and hardness properties of PtIr films by magnetron sputtering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pt{sub 1-x}Ir{sub x} films with x varying from 22.76 to 63.25 at. % are deposited on (100) Si wafer substrates at 400 deg. C by magnetron sputtering deposition. The effects of the Ir concentration on the microstructure, morphology, and hardness of PtIr films are investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and nanoindentation system. The columnar structures are observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that PtIr films have preferred orientation along Pt(111) when the Ir concentration is below 50.84 at. %. When the Ir content is more than 50.84 at. %, the PtIr film shifts to another preferred orientation, Ir(111). The surface morphology is analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The roughness of the PtIr films decreases with increasing Ir content. The hardness of all the PtIr films is below 20 GPa. The maximum hardness of the PtIr films is about 14.9 GPa when the Ir concentration is 57.9 at. %.

Lee, Chao-Te; Liu, Bo-Heng; Chang, Chun-Ming; Lin, Yu-Wei [Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

THE LATE-TIME REBRIGHTENING OF TYPE Ia SN 2005gj IN THE MID-INFRARED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A growing number of observations reveal a subset of Type Ia supernovae undergoing circumstellar interaction (SNe Ia-CSM). We present unpublished archival Spitzer Space Telescope data on SNe Ia-CSM 2002ic and 2005gj obtained >1300 and 500 days post-discovery, respectively. Both SNe show evidence for late-time mid-infrared (mid-IR) emission from warm dust. The dust parameters are most consistent with a preexisting dust shell that lies beyond the forward-shock radius, most likely radiatively heated by optical and X-ray emission continuously generated by late-time CSM interaction. In the case of SN 2005gj, the mid-IR luminosity more than doubles after 1 yr post-discovery. While we are not aware of any late-time optical-wavelength observations at these epochs, we attribute this rebrightening to renewed shock interaction with a dense circumstellar shell.

Fox, Ori D.; Filippenko, Alexei V., E-mail: ofox@berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

76

Thermal measurements of active semiconductor micro-structures acquired through the substrate using near IR thermoreflectance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, which precludes the use of typical surface thermal characterization techniques. A near infrared microscopy (SThM), or optical techniques such as infrared (IR) microscopy, or thermoreflectance to be able to measure the heating of devices in flip chip bonded integrated circuit's (IC) and other

77

Mid-infrared absorption properties of green wood Anna Dupleix Domingos De Sousa Meneses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL Mid-infrared absorption properties of green wood Anna Dupleix · Domingos De Sousa Meneses and the amount of energy absorbed by green wood under infrared (IR) radiation. This lack of knowledge is a potential barrier to the development of IR heating as an alternative to soaking as a means of warming logs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

78

Near-infrared thermal lens spectrometer based on an erbium-doped fiber amplifier and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared thermal lens spectrometer based on an erbium-doped fiber amplifier and an acousto, guanosine, and thymidine is described. © 1997 Optical Society of America Key words: Near infrared, thermal measurements of absorption in the near-IR region has been developed. In this instrument the near-IR excitation

Reid, Scott A.

79

Mid-Infrared Spectroscopic Diagnostics of Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper I summarize the science motivations, as well as a few mid-infrared spectroscopic methods used to identify the principal mechanisms of energy production in dust enshrouded galactic nuclei. The development of the various techniques is briefly discussed. Emphasis is given to the use of the data which are becoming available with the infrared spectrograph (IRS) on Spitzer, as well as the results which have been obtained by IRS over the past two years.

Vassilis Charmandaris; the Spitzer/IRS Instrument Team

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

80

Automated Spot Weld Inspection using Infrared Thermography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An automated non-contact and non-destructive resistance spot weld inspection system based on infrared (IR) thermography was developed for post-weld applications. During inspection, a weld coupon was heated up by an auxiliary induction heating device from one side of the weld, while the resulting thermal waves on the other side were observed by an IR camera. The IR images were analyzed to extract a thermal signature based on normalized heating time, which was then quantitatively correlated to the spot weld nugget size. The use of normalized instead of absolute IR intensity was found to be useful in minimizing the sensitivity to the unknown surface conditions and environment interference. Application of the IR-based inspection system to different advanced high strength steels, thickness gauges and coatings were discussed.

Chen, Jian [ORNL] [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL] [ORNL; Yu, Zhenzhen [ORNL] [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The European Large Area ISO Survey VI - Discovery of a new hyperluminous infrared galaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the discovery of the first hyperluminous infrared galaxy (HyLIG) in the course of the European Large Area ISO Survey (ELAIS). This object has been detected by ISO at 6.7, 15, and 90 microns, and is found to be a broad-line, radio-quiet quasar at a redshift: z = 1.099. From a detailed multi-component model fit of the spectral energy distribution, we derive a total infrared luminosity: L_IR (1-1000 microns) ~ 1.0 x 10E13 h_65^-2 L_sun (q_0 = 0.5), and discuss the possible existence of a starburst contributing to the far-IR output. Observations to date present no evidence for lens magnification. This galaxy is one of the very few HyLIGs with an X-ray detection. On the basis of its soft X-ray properties, we suggest that this broad-line object may be the face-on analogue of narrow-line, Seyfert-like HyLIGs.

T. Morel; A. Efstathiou; S. Serjeant; I. Marquez; J. Masegosa; P. Heraudeau; C. Surace; A. Verma; S. Oliver; M. Rowan-Robinson; I. Georgantopoulos; D. Farrah; D. M. Alexander; I. Perez-Fournon; C. J. Willott; F. Cabrera-Guerra; E. A. Gonzalez-Solares; A. Cabrera-Lavers; J. I. Gonzalez-Serrano; P. Ciliegi; F. Pozzi; I. Matute; H. Flores

2001-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

82

Hf-irJ  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawanda North - ConsequencesDGwen Hf-irJ

83

Overluminous HNC Line Emission in Arp220, NGC4418 and Mrk231 - Global IR Pumping or XDRs?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We find that the HNC J=3-2 emission is brighter than the HCN 3-2 emission by factors of 1.5 to 2.3 in the ultraluminous mergers Arp220 and Mrk231 and the luminous IR galaxy NGC4418. We furthermore report the detection of HNC J=4-3 in Mrk231. Overluminous HNC emission is unexpected in warm molecular gas in ultraluminous galaxies since I(HNC)>I(HCN) is usually taken as a signature of cold (10 - 20 K) dark clouds. Since the molecular gas of the studied galaxies is warm (T_k > 40 K) we present two alternative explanations to the overluminous HNC: a) HNC excitation is affected by pumping of the rotational levels through the mid-infrared continuum and b) XDRs (X-ray Dominated Regions) influence the abundances of HNC. HNC may become pumped at 21.5 micron brightness temperatures of 50 K, suggesting that HNC-pumping could be common in warm, ultraluminous galaxies with compact IR-nuclei.On the other hand, all three galaxies are either suspected of having buried AGN - or the presence of AGN is clear (Mrk231) - indicating that X-rays may affect the ISM chemistry. We conclude that both the pumping and XDR alternatives imply molecular cloud ensembles distinctly different from those of typical starforming regions in the Galaxy, or the ISM of less extreme starburst galaxies. The HNC molecule shows the potential of becoming an additional important tracer of extreme nuclear environments.

S. Aalto; M. Spaans; M. C. Wiedner; S. Huttemeister

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

85

Spitzer Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of 70um-Selected Distant Luminous Infrared Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present mid-infrared spectroscopy obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope of a sample of 11 optically faint, infrared luminous galaxies selected from a Spitzer MIPS 70um imaging survey of the NDWFS Bootes field. These are the first Spitzer IRS spectra presented of distant 70um-selected sources. All the galaxies lie at redshifts 0.3infrared luminosities of L_IR~ 0.1-17 x 10^12 solar luminosities. Seven of the galaxies exhibit strong emission features attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The average IRS spectrum of these sources is characteristic of classical starburst galaxies, but with much larger infrared luminosities. The PAH luminosities of L(7.7) ~ 0.4 - 7 x 10^11 solar luminosities imply star formation rates of ~ 40 - 720 solar masses per year. Four of the galaxies show deep 9.7um silicate absorption features and no significant PAH emission features (6.2um equivalent widths infrared luminosities and low f70/f24 flux density ratios suggests that these sources have AGN as the dominant origin of their large mid-infrared luminosities, although deeply embedded but luminous starbursts cannot be ruled out. If the absorbed sources are AGN-dominated, a significant fraction of all far-infrared bright, optically faint sources may be dominated by AGN.

Kate Brand; Dan W. Weedman; Vandana Desai; Emeric Le Floc'h; Lee Armus; Arjun Dey; Jim R. Houck; Buell T. Jannuzi; Howard A. Smith; B. T. Soifer

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

MODELING MID-INFRARED DIAGNOSTICS OF OBSCURED QUASARS AND STARBURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the link between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and mid-infrared flux using dust radiative transfer calculations of starbursts realized in hydrodynamical simulations. Focusing on the effects of galaxy dust, we evaluate diagnostics commonly used to disentangle AGN and star formation in ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). We examine these quantities as a function of time, viewing angle, dust model, AGN spectrum, and AGN strength in merger simulations representing two possible extremes of the ULIRG population: one is a typical gas-rich merger at z {approx} 0, and the other is characteristic of extremely obscured starbursts at z {approx} 2-4. This highly obscured burst begins star-formation-dominated with significant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission, and ends with a {approx}10{sup 9} yr period of red near-IR colors. At coalescence, when the AGN is most luminous, dust obscures the near-infrared AGN signature, reduces the relative emission from PAHs, and enhances the 9.7 {mu}m absorption by silicate grains. Although generally consistent with previous interpretations, our results imply none of these indicators can unambiguously estimate the AGN luminosity fraction in all cases. Motivated by the simulations, we show that a combination of the extinction feature at 9.7 {mu}m, the PAH strength, and a near-infrared slope can simultaneously constrain the AGN fraction and dust grain distribution for a wide range of obscuration. We find that this indicator, accessible to the James Webb Space Telescope, may estimate the AGN power as tightly as the hard X-ray flux alone, thereby providing a valuable future cross-check and constraint for large samples of distant ULIRGs.

Snyder, Gregory F.; Jonsson, Patrik; Hernquist, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hayward, Christopher C. [Heidelberger Institut fuer Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Sajina, Anna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, 4 Colby Street, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Cox, Thomas J. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Hopkins, Philip F. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, C-208 Hearst Field Annex, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Yan Lin, E-mail: gsnyder@cfa.harvard.edu [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

Properties of infrared extrapolations in a harmonic oscillator basis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We continue our studies of infrared (ir) and ultraviolet (uv) regulators of no-core shell model calculations. We extend our results that an extrapolation in the ir cutoff with the uv cutoff above the intrinsic uv scale of the interaction is quite successful, not only for the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian but also for expectation values of operators considered long range. The latter results are obtained with Hamiltonians transformed by the similarity renormalization group (SRG) evolution. On the other hand, a suggested extrapolation in the uv cutoff when the ir cutoff is below the intrinsic ir scale is neither robust nor reliable.

Sidney A. Coon; Michael K. G. Kruse

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

88

Widely tunable mid-infrared generation via frequency conversion in semiconductor waveguides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of mid-infrared and far-infrared (IR) radiation using second-order optical nonlinearities is attractive, large optical nonlinearities, large optical damage threshold, and mature fabrication tech- nology [3]. This route has been slow to provide alterna- tive sources of infrared radiation due, in part

89

Near-Infrared Detection of Flow Injection Analysis by Acoustooptic Tunable Filter-Based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-Infrared Detection of Flow Injection Analysis by Acoustooptic Tunable Filter University, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201-1881 The instrumentation development of a near-infrared organic compounds absorb light in the near-infrared region, this AOTF-based near-IR detector can serve

Reid, Scott A.

90

IR DIAGNOSTICS FOR DYNAMIC FAILURE OF MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project explores the thermodynamics of dynamic deformation and failure of materials using high-speed spatially-resolved infrared (IR) measurements of temperature. During deformation mechanical work is converted to different forms of energy depending on the deformation processes. For example, it can be dissipated as heat in purely plastic deformation, stored as strain energy in dislocations in metals and in oriented polymeric molecular structures, and expended during the generation of new surfaces during damage and fracture. The problem of how this work is converted into these various forms is not well understood. In fact, there exists a controversy for the relatively simple case regarding the amount of work dissipated as heat during uniform plastic deformation. The goals of this work are to develop dynamic IR temperature measurement techniques and then apply them to gain a better understanding of the dynamic failure processes in both metals and polymeric composite materials. The experimental results will be compared against predictions of existing constitutive models and guide the development of higher fidelity models if needed.

McElfresh, M; DeTeresa, S

2006-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

91

The effect of high temperatures on the mid-to-far-infrared emission and near-infrared reflectance spectra of phyllosilicates and natural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of high temperatures on the mid-to-far-infrared emission and near-infrared reflectance-to-far-IR) emission (100­1400 cm�1 ; 7.1­100 lm) and near-infrared (NIR) reflectance (1.2­2.5 lm) spectra altered or melted. We characterized the effects of high temperatures on the mid-to-far-infrared (mid

Glotch, Timothy D.

92

Searching for Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates Among the Unidentified INTEGRAL Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The identification of low-energy counterparts for {gamma}-ray sources is one of the biggest challenge in modern {gamma}-ray astronomy. Recently, we developed and successfully applied a new association method to recognize {gamma}-ray blazar candidates that could be possible counterparts for the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources above 100 MeV in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog (2FGL). This method is based on the Infrared (IR) colors of the recent Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. In this letter we applied our new association method to the case of unidentified INTEGRAL sources (UISs) listed in the fourth soft gamma-ray source catalog (4IC). Only 86 UISs out of the 113 can be analyzed, due to the sky coverage of the WISE Preliminary data release. Among these 86 UISs, we found that 18 appear to have a {gamma}-ray blazar candidate within their positional error region. Finally, we analyzed the Swift archival data available for 10 out these 18 {gamma}-ray blazar candidates, and we found that 7 out of 10 are clearly detected in soft X-rays and/or in the optical-ultraviolet band. We cannot confirm the associations between the UISs and the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates due to the discrepancies between the INTEGRAL and the soft X-ray spectra. However, the discovery of the soft X-ray counterparts for the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates adds an important clue to help understand their origin and to confirm their blazar nature.

Massaro, F.; /SLAC; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Tosti, G.; /Perugia U.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

93

Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to us, like reflective ("nearreflective ("near--" infrared (0.7" infrared (0.7 -- 3.03.0 µµm)m) andand near-infrared far infrared ultraviolet Thermal Infrared refers to region o EM spectrum from ~3 - 14 µm.landscape. IMPORTANT: NEARIMPORTANT: NEAR--INFRARED is short enough wavelength toINFRARED is short enough wavelength

94

Cosmic ray modulation of infra-red radiation in the atmosphere This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identified by a cosmic ray telescope sensitive to high-energy (>400 MeV) particles, principally muons experiment, a narrowband thermopile filter radiometer centred on 9.15 µm, an absorption band previously. The integrated atmospheric energy density for each event is 2 Jm-2, representing an amplification factor of 1012

Lockwood, Mike

95

Search for bright stars with infrared excess  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bright stars, stars with visual magnitude smaller than 6.5, can be studied using small telescope. In general, if stars are assumed as black body radiator, then the color in infrared (IR) region is usually equal to zero. Infrared data from IRAS observations at 12 and 25?m (micron) with good flux quality are used to search for bright stars (from Bright Stars Catalogues) with infrared excess. In magnitude scale, stars with IR excess is defined as stars with IR color m{sub 12}?m{sub 25}>0; where m{sub 12}?m{sub 25}?=??2.5log(F{sub 12}/F{sub 25})+1.56, where F{sub 12} and F{sub 25} are flux density in Jansky at 12 and 25?m, respectively. Stars with similar spectral type are expected to have similar color. The existence of infrared excess in the same spectral type indicates the existence of circum-stellar dust, the origin of which is probably due to the remnant of pre main-sequence evolution during star formation or post AGB evolution or due to physical process such as the rotation of those stars.

Raharto, Moedji, E-mail: moedji@as.itb.ac.id [Astronomy Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

96

NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were prepared by implanting ca. 180 4,4 diethylaminostyryl 2,2 bipyridine (DEAS) Yb(III) complexes on the surface of 12 nm silica nanoparticles. The surface complexes ([DEAS Ln SiO2], Ln =Y,Yb) were characterized using IR, solid state NMR, UV Vis, EXAFS spectroscopies in combination with the preparation and characterization of similar molecular analogues by analytical techniques (IR, solution NMR, UV Vis, X ray crystallography) as well as DFT calculations. Starting from the partial dehydroxylation of the silica at 700 C on high vacuum having 0.8 OH.nm 2, the grafting of Ln(N(SiMe3)2)3 generate ?SiO Ln(N(SiMe3)2)2, which upon thermal step and coordination of the DEAS chromophore yields (?SiO)3Ln(DEAS). Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ligand centered CT fluorescence and life time) in the solid state, consistent with the molecular nature of the surface species. The densely functionalized nanoparticles can be dispersed via ultra-sonication in small ca. 15-20 nm aggregates (1 to 6 elementary particles) that were detected using two photon microscopy imaging at 720 nm excitation, making them promising nano objects for bio imaging.

Lapadula, Giuseppe; Bourdolle, Adrien; Allouche, Florian; Conley, Matthew P.; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W.; Guyot, Yannick; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Copé; ret, Christophe; Maury, Olivier; Andersen, Richard A.

2013-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

97

Quantitative analysis of phosphosilicate glass films on silicon wafers for calibration of x-ray fluorescence spectrometry standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phosphorus and silicon contents of phosphosilicate glass films deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on silicon wafers were determined. These films were prepared for use as x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry standards. The thin films were removed from the wafer by etching with dilute hydrofluoric acid, and the P and Si concentrations in solution were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP). The calculated phosphorus concentration ranged from 2.2 to 12 wt %, with an uncertainty of 2.73 to 10.1 relative percent. Variation between the calculated weight loss (summation of P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and SiO/sub 2/ amounts as determined by ICP) and the measured weight loss (determined gravimetrically) averaged 4.9%. Results from the ICP method, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), dispersive infrared spectroscopy, electron microprobe, and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for the same samples are compared.

Weissman, S.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

On the Nature of the Gamma-ray Source 2FGL J1823.8 4312: The Discovery of a New Class of Extragalactic X-ray Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the unsolved mysteries of gamma-ray astronomy concerns the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Recently, using the Second Fermi LAT source catalog (2FGL) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) archive, we discovered that the WISE counterparts of gamma-ray blazars, a class of active galactic nuclei, delineate a region (the WISE Gamma-ray Strip) in the 3-dimensional infrared color space well separated from the locus of the other astronomical objects. Based on this result, we built an association procedure to recognize if there areWISE blazar candidates within the positional uncertainty region of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Here we report on our analysis of 2FGL J1823.8+4312, a gamma-ray active galactic nucleus of uncertain type associated with the X-ray source 1RXS J182418.7+430954 according to the 2FGL, to verify whether it is a blazar. Applying our association method we found two sources with IR colors typical of gamma-ray blazars, located within the 99.9% confidence region of 2FGL J1823.8+4312: WISE J182352.33+431452.5 and WISE J182409.25+431404.7. Then we searched in the Chandra, NVSS and SDSS archival observations for their counterparts. We discovered that WISE J182352.33+431452.5, our preferred gamma-ray blazar candidate according to our WISE association procedure, is detected in the optical and in the X-rays but not in the radio, making it extremely unusual if it is a blazar. Given its enigmatic spectral energy distribution, we considered the possibility that it is a 'radio faint blazar' or the prototype of a new class of extragalactic sources, our conclusion is independent of whether WISE J182352.33+431452.5 is the actual counterpart of 2FGL J1823.8+4312.

Massaro, Francesco

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

99

Non-destructive component separation using infrared radiant energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating a first component and a second component from one another at an adhesive bond interface between the first component and second component. Typically the method involves irradiating the first component with infrared radiation from a source that radiates substantially only short wavelengths until the adhesive bond is destabilized, and then separating the first component and the second component from one another. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is placed inside an enclosure and the assembly is illuminated from an IR source that is external to the enclosure. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is simultaneously irradiated by a multi-planar array of IR sources. Often the IR radiation is unidirectional. In some embodiments the IR radiation is narrow-band short wavelength infrared radiation.

Simandl, Ronald F. (Knoxville, TN); Russell, Steven W. (Knoxville, TN); Holt, Jerrid S. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Infrared systems and components III: Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 16, 17, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics presented include infrared signal processing and automatic target recognition, detection of closely spaced objects using radial variance, the U.S. Army FLIR/ATR evolution path, and classifiability of IR target signatures. Also presented are infrared sensors and detectors, spectral agility, Bayesian analysis of signals from closely spaced objects, and enhanced atmospheric models for IR image simulation. Consideration is given to calibration and testing of infrared sensors, electrooptical-detector laser susceptibility testing, the performance of a thermal scene generator, optics and thin films in the infrared, the optical performance of replica beryllium mirrors, a high-speed video data acquisition system, and antireflection coatings for germanium without zinc.

Caswell, R.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Infrared floodlight  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An infrared floodlight assembly designed particularly for security purposes and including a heat-conducting housing, a lens secured to the housing to provide a closure therefor, and a floodlight located within (and surrounded by) the housing. The floodlight combines the use of a tungsten halogen light source and dichroic hot and cold mirrors for directing substantially only infrared radiation toward the assembly's forward lens. Visible radiation is absorbed by the housing's interior wall(s) and, optionally, by a filter located between the floodlight and lens. An optional means may be used within the floodlight to reflect all forward radiation back toward the paraboloidal hot mirror or, alternatively, to reflect only visible radiation in this direction. The dichroic hot and cold mirrors preferably each comprise a glass substrate having multiple layers of titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide thereon.

Levin, Robert E. (S. Hamilton, MA); English, George J. (Reading, MA)

1986-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

102

Infrared pulse characterization using four-wave mixing inside a few cycle pulse filament in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate a four-wave mixing (FWM) technique to measure near- and mid-infrared (IR) laser pulse shapes in time domain. Few cycle 800?nm laser pulses were synchronized with the IR pulse and focused colinearly to generate a plasma filament in air. Second harmonic radiation around 400?nm was generated through FWM, with a yield proportional to the IR pulse intensity. Excellent signal to noise ratio was observed from 2.1??m to 18??m. With proper phase stabilization of the IR beam, this technique is a promising step toward direct electric field sensing of near-IR pulses in air.

Marceau, Claude, E-mail: claude.marceau.2@ulaval.ca; Thomas, Steven; Kassimi, Yacine; Gingras, Guillaume; Witzel, Bernd [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser, Pavillon d'optique-photonique Québec (Québec), Université Laval, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

103

Tunable Infrared Emission From Printed Colloidal Quantum Dot/Polymer Composite Films on Flexible Substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple and robust device structure for a flexible, multicolor infrared (IR) display is described. The display operates by optical downconversion of AC-driven blue phosphor electroluminescence using different-sized, ...

Panzer, Matthew J.

104

JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 31, NO. 19, OCTOBER 1, 2013 3181 Noise Figure in Near-Infrared Amorphous and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 31, NO. 19, OCTOBER 1, 2013 3181 Noise Figure in Near-Infrared, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--The noise figures (NF) of near-infrared (near-IR) amorphous silicon (a Amorphous and Mid-Infrared Crystalline Silicon Optical Parametric Amplifiers Jichi Ma and Sasan Fathpour

Fathpour, Sasan

105

Structure-property relations in negative permittivity reststrahlen materials for IR metamaterial applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We will present a study of the structure-property relations in Reststrahlen materials that possess a band of negative permittivities in the infrared. It will be shown that sub-micron defects strongly affect the optical response, resulting in significantly diminished permittivities. This work has implications on the use of ionic materials in IR-metamaterials.

Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Shelton, David J. (University of Central Florida); Carroll, James F., III; Boreman, Glenn D. (University of Central Florida); Sinclair, Michael B.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Ginn, James Cleveland, III; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Matias, Vladimir (Los Alamos National Laboratory)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Autonomous Observing and Control Systems for PAIRITEL, a 1.3m Infrared Imaging Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Peters Automated Infrared Imaging Telescope (PAIRITEL) is the first meter-class telescope operating as a fully robotic IR imaging system. Dedicated in October 2004, PAIRITEL began regular observations in mid-December 2004 as part of a 1.5 year commissioning period. The system was designed to respond without human intervention to new gamma-ray burst transients: this milestone was finally reached on November 9, 2005 but the telescope had a number of semi-automated sub-10 minute responses throughout early commissioning. When not operating in Target of Opportunity mode, PAIRITEL performs a number of queue scheduled transient monitoring campaigns. To achieve this level of automation, we have developed communicating tools to connect the various sub-systems: an intelligent queue scheduling database, run-time configurable observation sequence software, a data reduction pipeline, and a master state machine which monitors and controls all functions within and affecting the observatory.

J. S. Bloom; Dan L. Starr; Cullen H. Blake; M. F. Skrutskie; Emilio E. Falco

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Theoretical studies of Ir5Th and Ir5Ce nanoscale precipitates in Ir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimentally, it is known that very small amounts of thorium and/or cerium added to iridium metal form a precipitate, Ir5Th / Ir5Ce, which improves the high temperature mechanical properties of the resulting alloys. We demonstrate that there are low-energy configurations for nano-scale precipitates of these phases in Ir, and that these coherent arrangements may assist in producing improved mechanical properties. One precipitate/matrix orientation gives a particularly low interfacial energy, and a low lattice misfit. Nanolayer precipitates with this orientation are found to be likely to form, with little driving force to coarsen. The predicted morphology of the precipitates and their orientation with the matrix phase provide a potential experiment that could be used to test these predictions.

Morris, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Averill, Frank [ORNL] [ORNL; Cooper, Valentino R [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

Berdahl, P.H.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

109

Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Infrared Imaging of the Nanometer-Thick Accumulation Layer in Organic Field-Effect Transistors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on infrared (IR) spectro-microscopy of the electronic excitations in nanometer-thick accumulation layers in FET devices based on poly(3-hexylthiophene). IR data allows us to explore the charge injection landscape and uncovers the critical role of the gate insulator in defining relevant length scales. This work demonstrates the unique potential of IR spectroscopy for the investigation of physical phenomena at the nanoscale occurring at the semiconductor-insulator interface in FET devices.

Z. Q. Li; G. M. Wang; N. Sai; D. Moses; M. C. Martin; M. Di Ventra; A. J. Heeger; D. N. Basov

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

111

Platinum Monolayer on IrFe Core–Shell Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We synthesized high activity and stability platinum monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported IrFe core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing. The formation of Ir shells on IrFe solid-solution alloy cores has been verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Pt monolayers were deposited on IrFe core-shell nanoparticles by galvanic replacement of underpotentially deposited Cu adatoms on the Ir shell surfaces. The specific and Pt mass activities for the ORR on the Pt monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalyst are 0.46 mA/cm{sup 2} and 1.1 A/mg{sub Pt}, which are much higher than those on a commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. High durability of Pt{sub ML}/IrFe/C has also been demonstrated by potential cycling tests. These high activity and durability observed can be ascribed to the structural and electronic interaction between the Pt monolayer and the IrFe core-shell nanoparticles.

Sasaki K.; Kuttiyiel, K.A.; Su, D.; Adzic, R.R.

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

112

Improved Correction of IR Loss in Diffuse Shortwave Measurements: An ARM Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simple single black detector pyranometers, such as the Eppley Precision Spectral Pyranometer (PSP) used by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, are known to lose energy via infrared (IR) emission to the sky. This is especially a problem when making clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements, which are inherently of low magnitude and suffer the greatest IR loss. Dutton et al. (2001) proposed a technique using information from collocated pyrgeometers to help compensate for this IR loss. The technique uses an empirically derived relationship between the pyrgeometer detector data (and alternatively the detector data plus the difference between the pyrgeometer case and dome temperatures) and the nighttime pyranometer IR loss data. This relationship is then used to apply a correction to the diffuse SW data during daylight hours. We developed an ARM value-added product (VAP) called the SW DIFF CORR 1DUTT VAP to apply the Dutton et al. correction technique to ARM PSP diffuse SW measurements.

Younkin, K; Long, CN

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Spectroscopic Infrared Ellipsometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopic Infrared Ellipsometry: Components, Calibration, and Application #12;CIP-DATA KONINKLIJKE BIBLIOTHEEK, DEN HAAG Boer, Johannes Henricus Wilhelmus Gerardus den Spectroscopic Infrared in Dutch. ISBN 90 386 0017 8 Subject headings: spectroscopy ellipsometry infrared. #12;Spectroscopic

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

114

Spitzer Detection of PAH and Silicate Dust Features in the Mid-Infrared Spectra of z~2 Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the initial results from a Spitzer GO-1 program to obtain low resolution, mid-infrared spectra of infrared luminous galaxies at z~1-2. This paper presents the spectra of eight sources observed with the Spitzer InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS). Of the eight spectra, six have mid-IR spectral features, either emission from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) or silicate absorption. Based on these mid-IR features, the inferred six redshifts are in the range of 1.8-2.6. The remaining two spectra detect only strong continua, thus do not yield redshift information. Strong, multiple PAH emission features are detected in two sources, and weak PAH emission in another two. These data provide direct evidence that PAH molecules are present and directly observable in ULIRGs at z~2. The six sources with measured redshifts are dusty, infrared luminous galaxies at z~2 with estimated $L_{bol} \\sim 10^{13}L_\\odot$. Of the eight sources, two appear starburst dominated; two with only power law continua are probably type I QSOs; and the remaining four are likely composite systems containing a buried AGN and a starburst component. Since half of our sample are optically faint sources with R>25.5mag (Vega), our results demonstrate the potential of using mid-infrared spectroscopy, especially the Aromatic and silicate features produced by dust grains to directly probe optically faint and infrared luminous populations at high redshift.

Lin Yan; R. Chary; L. Armus; H. Teplitz; G. Helou; D. Frayer; D. Fadda; J. Surace; P. Choi

2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

Infrared behavior and gauge artifacts in de Sitter spacetime: The photon field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the infrared (long distance) behavior of the free photon field in de Sitter spacetime. Using a two-parameter family of gauge fixing terms, we show that the infrared (IR) behavior of the two-point function is highly gauge-dependent and ranges from vanishing to growing. This situation is in disagreement with its counterpart in flat spacetime, where the two-point function vanishes in the IR for any choice of the gauge fixing parameters. A criterion to isolate the "physical" part of the two-point function is given and is shown to lead to a well-behaved two-point function in the IR.

Ahmed Youssef

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

Size-dependent infrared properties of MgO nanoparticles with evidence of screening effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Size-dependent infrared properties of MgO nanoparticles with evidence of screening effect Yann June 2012) We have investigated the infrared (IR) absorption properties of MgO nanoparticles (NPs by local heating,5,6 heat assisted magnetic recording,7 enhancement of the extraction of light from LEDs

Boyer, Edmond

117

Femtosecond Near-Infrared Laser Desorption of Multilayer Benzene on Pt{111}: A Molecular Newton's Cradle?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Femtosecond Near-Infrared Laser Desorption of Multilayer Benzene on Pt{111}: A Molecular Newton Recently, the intense near-infrared laser desorption of intact benzene molecules has been reported.1 Three, 1999; In Final Form: February 11, 2000 Velocity distributions resulting from the intense, near-IR laser

Levis, Robert J.

118

Electrical Conductivity, Near-Infrared Absorption, and Thermal Lens Spectroscopic Studies of Percolation of Microemulsions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical Conductivity, Near-Infrared Absorption, and Thermal Lens Spectroscopic Studies studied below and above the percolation thresholds by electrical conductivity, near-infrared absorption. In this work the structure of microemulsions was investigated by using the near-IR absorption and thermal lens

Reid, Scott A.

119

IR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

systems and sensors that make possible the completion of industrial processes, such as welding and inspections in hot cells and other challenging conditions. INL industrial robotic...

120

Your FAFSA and the IRS Data Retrieval Tool What is the IRS Data Retrieval Tool?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Your FAFSA and the IRS Data Retrieval Tool What is the IRS Data Retrieval Tool? The U.S. Department of Education and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) have collaborated to develop a tool that simplifies the completion of the FAFSA application. The IRS Data Retrieval tool allows FAFSA applicants and parents

Moore, Paul A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Mid-infrared spectroscopy of two luminous submillimeter galaxies at z~2.8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have obtained rest frame mid-infrared spectroscopy of two bright submillimeter galaxies. SMMJ02399-0136 at z=2.81 shows a superposition of PAH emission features and a mid-infrared continuum, indicating significant and roughly equal contributions to its bolometric luminosity from star formation and from a Compton-thick AGN. We derive a new redshift of z=2.80 for MMJ154127+6616 from the IRS spectrum and find this object is dominated by starburst PAH emission. The rest frame mid- to far-infrared spectral energy distributions are consistent with these submillimeter galaxies being scaled up versions of local ultraluminous infrared galaxies. The mid-infrared spectra support the scenario that submillimeter galaxies are sites of extreme star formation and represent a key phase in the formation of massive galaxies.

D. Lutz; E. Valiante; E. Sturm; R. Genzel; L. J Tacconi; M. D. Lehnert; A. Sternberg; A. J. Baker

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

122

MODULATION DOMAIN FEATURES FOR DISCRIMINATING INFRARED TARGETS AND BACKGROUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments against actual FLIR approach sequences, we verify that typical IR imagery does indeed possess-looking infrared (FLIR) imagery has been studied extensively. As is well-known, it is an extremely challenging counterparts. In particu- lar, FLIR images frequently exhibit weak signal-to-noise ratio and strong clutter

Havlicek, Joebob

123

FAR-INFRARED FINE-STRUCTURE LINE DIAGNOSTICS OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present Herschel observations of 6 fine-structure lines in 25 ultraluminous infrared galaxies at z < 0.27. The lines, [O III]52 ?m, [N III]57 ?m, [O I]63 ?m, [N II]122 ?m, [O I]145 ?m, and [C II]158 ?m, are mostly single Gaussians with widths <600 km s{sup –1} and luminosities of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} L{sub ?}. There are deficits in the [O I]63/L{sub IR}, [N II]/L{sub IR}, [O I]145/L{sub IR}, and [C II]/L{sub IR} ratios compared to lower luminosity systems. The majority of the line deficits are consistent with dustier H II regions, but part of the [C II] deficit may arise from an additional mechanism, plausibly charged dust grains. This is consistent with some of the [C II] originating from photodissociation regions or the interstellar medium (ISM). We derive relations between far-IR line luminosities and both the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We find that [N II] and both [O I] lines are good tracers of the IR luminosity and star formation rate. In contrast, [C II] is a poor tracer of the IR luminosity and star formation rate, and does not improve as a tracer of either quantity if the [C II] deficit is accounted for. The continuum luminosity densities also correlate with the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We derive ranges for the gas density and ultraviolet radiation intensity of 10{sup 1} < n < 10{sup 2.5} and 10{sup 2.2} < G{sub 0} < 10{sup 3.6}, respectively. These ranges depend on optical type, the importance of star formation, and merger stage. We do not find relationships between far-IR line properties and several other parameters: active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity, merger stage, mid-IR excitation, and SMBH mass. We conclude that these far-IR lines arise from gas heated by starlight, and that they are not strongly influenced by AGN activity.

Farrah, D.; Petty, S. M.; Harris, K. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Lebouteiller, V.; Spoon, H. W. W. [Cornell University, CRSR, Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Bernard-Salas, J.; Pearson, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Rigopoulou, D. [RAL Space, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Smith, H. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); González-Alfonso, E. [Universidad de Alcalá, Departamento de Física y Matemáticas, Campus Universitario, E-28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Clements, D. L. [Physics Department, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Efstathiou, A. [School of Sciences, European University Cyprus, Diogenes Street, Engomi, 1516 Nicosia (Cyprus); Cormier, D. [Institut für theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Afonso, J. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa, Observatório Astronómico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisbon (Portugal); Hurley, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Borys, C. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Verma, A. [Oxford Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, University of Oxford, Keble Rd, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Cooray, A.; Salvatelli, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

Experimental investigation of subcooled flow boiling using synchronized high speed video, infrared thermography, and particle image velocimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subcooled flow boiling of water was experimentally investigated using high-speed video (HSV), infrared (IR) thermography, and particle image velocimetry (PIV) to generate a unique database of synchronized data. HSV allowed ...

Phillips, Bren Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Evaluation of infrared sensors for oil spill response operations. Final report, October 1994-June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During November 1994, the USCO conducted a field evaluation of several commercially available portable infrared (IR) sensors for their ability to detect oil on water at night. The evaluation was conducted over the natural oil seeps off the coast of Santa Barbara, CA. The portable sensors were operated from the open door of a Coast Guard HH-60J helicopter. Sensors evaluated included the Agema Thermovision 1000 and Texas Instruments LOCUSP operating in the long wave IR (LWIR) and the Cincinnati Electronics IRC-160ST and IRRIS-256ST operating in the medium wave IR (MWIR). The installed FLIR 2000 LWIR system provided a baseline reference of current CG IR capabilities.

Hover, G.L.; Plourde, J.V.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Infrared light detection using a whispering-gallery-mode optical microcavity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate a thermal infrared (IR) detector based on an ultra-high-quality-factor (Q) whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microtoroidal silica resonator and investigate its performance to detect IR radiation at 10??m wavelength. The bandwidth and the sensitivity of the detector are dependent on the power of a probe laser and the detuning between the probe laser and the resonance frequency of the resonator. The microtoroid IR sensor achieved a noise-equivalent-power (NEP) of 7.46?nW, corresponding to an IR intensity of 0.095?mW/cm{sup 2}.

Zhu, Jiangang, E-mail: jzhu@seas.wustl.edu, E-mail: ozdemir@seas.wustl.edu, E-mail: yang@seas.wustl.edu; Ozdemir, Sahin Kaya, E-mail: jzhu@seas.wustl.edu, E-mail: ozdemir@seas.wustl.edu, E-mail: yang@seas.wustl.edu; Yang, Lan, E-mail: jzhu@seas.wustl.edu, E-mail: ozdemir@seas.wustl.edu, E-mail: yang@seas.wustl.edu [Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63117 (United States)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

127

IR-2003- | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4InFindingIR-2003- More Documents & Publications

128

Active infrared materials for beam steering.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mid-infrared (mid-IR, 3 {micro}m -12 {micro}m) is a highly desirable spectral range for imaging and environmental sensing. We propose to develop a new class of mid-IR devices, based on plasmonic and metamaterial concepts, that are dynamically controlled by tunable semiconductor plasma resonances. It is well known that any material resonance (phonons, excitons, electron plasma) impacts dielectric properties; our primary challenge is to implement the tuning of a semiconductor plasma resonance with a voltage bias. We have demonstrated passive tuning of both plasmonic and metamaterial structures in the mid-IR using semiconductors plasmas. In the mid-IR, semiconductor carrier densities on the order of 5E17cm{sup -3} to 2E18cm{sup -3} are desirable for tuning effects. Gate control of carrier densities at the high end of this range is at or near the limit of what has been demonstrated in literature for transistor style devices. Combined with the fact that we are exploiting the optical properties of the device layers, rather than electrical, we are entering into interesting territory that has not been significantly explored to date.

Brener, Igal; Reno, John Louis; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Gin, Aaron V.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Miao, Xiaoyu; Barrick, Todd A.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

ILLUMINATING THE DARKEST GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH RADIO OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present X-ray, optical, near-infrared (IR), and radio observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) 110709B and 111215A, as well as optical and near-IR observations of their host galaxies. The combination of X-ray detections and deep optical/near-IR limits establish both bursts as ''dark''. Sub-arcsecond positions enabled by radio detections lead to robust host galaxy associations, with optical detections that indicate z {approx}< 4 (110709B) and z Almost-Equal-To 1.8-2.9 (111215A). We therefore conclude that both bursts are dark due to substantial rest-frame extinction. Using the radio and X-ray data for each burst we find that GRB 110709B requires A{sub V}{sup host}{approx}>5.3 mag and GRB 111215A requires A{sub V}{sup host}{approx}>8.5 mag (assuming z = 2). These are among the largest extinction values inferred for dark bursts to date. The two bursts also exhibit large neutral hydrogen column densities of N{sub H,{sub int}} {approx}> 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (z = 2) as inferred from their X-ray spectra, in agreement with the trend for dark GRBs. Moreover, the inferred values are in agreement with the Galactic A{sub V} -N{sub H} relation, unlike the bulk of the GRB population. Finally, we find that for both bursts the afterglow emission is best explained by a collimated outflow with a total beaming-corrected energy of E{sub {gamma}} + E{sub K} Almost-Equal-To (7-9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg (z = 2) expanding into a wind medium with a high density, M Almost-Equal-To (6-20) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} (n Almost-Equal-To 100-350 cm{sup -3} at Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 17} cm). While the energy release is typical of long GRBs, the inferred density may be indicative of larger mass-loss rates for GRB progenitors in dusty (and hence metal rich) environments. This study establishes the critical role of radio observations in demonstrating the origin and properties of dark GRBs. Observations with the JVLA and ALMA will provide a sample with sub-arcsecond positions and robust host associations that will help to shed light on obscured star formation and the role of metallicity in GRB progenitors.

Zauderer, B. A.; Berger, E.; Margutti, R.; Fong, W.; Laskar, T.; Chornock, R.; Soderberg, A. M. [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Olivares E, F.; Greiner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Perley, D. A.; Horesh, A.; Carpenter, J. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States); Updike, A. C. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Menten, K. M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Nakar, E. [Department of Astrophysics, Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Chandra, P. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Castro-Tirado, A. J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA-CSIC), P.O. Box 03004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Bremer, M. [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique, 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d'Heres (France); and others

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

130

Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group Sco McWilliams U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consor;um (PVMC) Infrared Thermography Infrared Thermography (IRT) has been demonstrated...

131

Role of dipolar correlations in the IR spectra of water and ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report simulated infrared spectra of deuterated water and ice using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics with maximally localized Wannier functions. Experimental features are accurately reproduced within the harmonic approximation. By decomposing the lineshapes in terms of intra and intermolecular dipole correlation functions we find that short-range intermolecular dynamic charge fluctuations associated to hydrogen bonds are prominent over the entire spectral range. Our analysis reveals the origin of several spectral features and identifies network bending modes in the far IR range.

Wei Chen; Manu Sharma; Raffaele Resta; Giulia Galli; Roberto Car

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

132

C2D Spitzer-IRS spectra of disks around T Tauri stars: I. Silicate emission and grain growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared ~5--35 um spectra for 40 solar-mass T Tauri stars and 7 intermediate-mass Herbig Ae stars with circumstellar disks were obtained using the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the c2d IRS survey. This work complements prior spectroscopic studies of silicate infrared emission from disks, which were focused on intermediate-mass stars, with observations of solar-mass stars limited primarily to the 10 um region. The observed 10 and 20 um silicate feature strengths/shapes are consistent with source-to-source variations in grain size. A large fraction of the features are weak and flat, consistent with um-sized grains indicating fast grain growth (from 0.1--1.0 um in radius). In addition, approximately half of the T Tauri star spectra show crystalline silicate features near 28 and 33 um indicating significant processing when compared to interstellar grains. A few sources show large 10-to-20 um ratios and require even larger grains emitting at 20 um than at 10 um. This size difference may arise from the difference in the depth into the disk probed by the two silicate emission bands in disks where dust settling has occurred. The 10 um feature strength vs. shape trend is not correlated with age or Halpha equivalent width, suggesting that some amount of turbulent mixing and regeneration of small grains is occurring. The strength vs. shape trend is related to spectral type, however, with M stars showing significantly flatter 10 um features (larger grain sizes) than A/B stars. The connection between spectral type and grain size is interpreted in terms of the variation in the silicate emission radius as a function of stellar luminosity, but could also be indicative of other spectral-type dependent factors (e.g, X-rays, UV radiation, stellar/disk winds, etc.).

J. E. Kessler-Silacci; J. -C. Augereau; C. P. Dullemond; V. Geers; F. Lahuis; N. J. Evans II; E. F. van Dishoeck; G. A. Blake; A. C. A. Boogert; J. Brown; J. K. Jorgensen; C. Knez; K. M. Pontoppidan

2005-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

133

Red Quasars in the Las Campanas Infrared Survey Frank Masci, Carol Lonsdale, Perry Hacking, the LCIR collaboraton...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Red Quasars in the Las Campanas Infrared Survey Frank Masci, Carol Lonsdale, Perry Hacking, the LCIR collaboraton... Summary We propose to search for red quasars in the Las Campanas Infrared (LCIR/near-IR appearence prior to spectroscopic follow- up. Our method will preferentially select red quasars at z>2

Masci, Frank

134

IEEE JOURNAL OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 27, NO. 12. DECEMBER 1991 2691 Applications of Infrared Free-Electron Lasers: Basic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE JOURNAL OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 27, NO. 12. DECEMBER 1991 2691 Applications of Infrared. Fayer Invited Paper Abstract-Applications of tunable infrared (IR) picosecond (ps) pulses generated- heating are suggested. I. INTRODUCTION REE-ELECTRON lasers (FEL's) have developed Frapidly in the last 15

Fayer, Michael D.

135

Spectral signature of ice clouds in the far-infrared region: Single-scattering calculations and radiative sensitivity study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a parameterization of the bulk scattering properties is developed. The radiative properties of ice cloudsSpectral signature of ice clouds in the far-infrared region: Single-scattering calculations the spectral signature of ice clouds in the far-infrared (far-IR) spectral region from 100 to 667 cmÃ?1 (15

Baum, Bryan A.

136

CHANDRA X-RAY DETECTION OF THE ENIGMATIC FIELD STAR BP Psc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BP Psc is a remarkable emission-line field star that is orbited by a dusty disk and drives a parsec-scale system of jets. We report the detection by the Chandra X-ray Observatory of a weak X-ray point source coincident with the centroids of optical/IR and submillimeter continuum emission at BP Psc. As the star's photosphere is obscured throughout the visible and near-infrared, the Chandra X-ray source likely represents the first detection of BP Psc itself. The X-rays most likely originate with magnetic activity at BP Psc and hence can be attributed either to a stellar corona or to star-disk interactions. The log of the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity, log(L{sub X} /L{sub bol}), lies in the range -5.8 to -4.2. This is smaller than log(L{sub X} /L{sub bol}) ratios typical of low-mass, pre-main sequence stars, but is well within the log(L{sub X} /L{sub bol}) range observed for rapidly rotating (FK Com-type) G giant stars. Hence, the Chandra results favor an exotic model wherein the disk/jet system of BP Psc is the result of its very recently engulfing a companion star or a giant planet, as the primary star ascended the giant branch.

Kastner, Joel H.; Montez, Rodolfo [Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Rodriguez, David; Zuckerman, B.; Perrin, Marshall D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Grosso, Nicolas [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l'Universit, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Forveille, Thierry [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble, Universite Joseph Fourier-CNRS, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France); Graham, James R., E-mail: jhk@cis.rit.ed [Astronomy Department, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

137

Comparing the use of mid-infrared versus far-infrared lasers for mitigating damage growth on fused silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced growth of optical damage can limit component lifetime and, therefore, increase operating costs of large-aperture fusion-class laser systems. While far-infrared (IR) lasers have been used previously to treat laser damage on fused silica optics and render it benign, little is known about the effectiveness of less-absorbing mid-IR lasers for this purpose. In this study, we quantitatively compare the effectiveness and efficiency of mid-IR (4.6 {mu}m) versus far-IR (10.6 {mu}m) lasers in mitigating damage growth on fused silica surfaces. The nonlinear volumetric heating due to mid-IR laser absorption is analyzed by solving the heat equation numerically, taking into account the temperature-dependent absorption coefficient {alpha}(T) at {lambda}=4.6 {mu}m, while far-IR laser heating is well described by a linear analytic approximation to the laser-driven temperature rise. In both cases, the predicted results agree well with surface temperature measurements based on IR radiometry, as well as subsurface fictive temperature measurements based on confocal Raman microscopy. Damage mitigation efficiency is assessed using a figure of merit (FOM) relating the crack healing depth to laser power required, under minimally ablative conditions. Based on our FOM, we show that, for cracks up to at least 500 {mu}m in depth, mitigation with a 4.6 {mu}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation with a 10.6 {mu}m far-IR laser. This conclusion is corroborated by direct application of each laser system to the mitigation of pulsed laser-induced damage possessing fractures up to 225 {mu}m in depth.

Yang, Steven T.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Elhadj, Selim; Cooke, Diane; Guss, Gabriel M.; Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Wegner, Paul J.

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

138

The first infrared beamline at the ALS: Design, construction, and initial commissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first Infrared (IR) Beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), Beamline 1.4, is described. The design of the optical and mechanical systems are discussed, including choices and tradeoffs. The initial commissioning of the beamline is reported. The beamline, while designed primarily for IR microscopy and only initially instrumented for microscopy (with a Nicolet interferometer and microscope), will have the potential for surface science experiments at grazing incidence, and time-resolved visible spectroscopy.

McKinney, W.R.; Hirschmugl, C.J.; Padmore, H.A.; Lauritzen, T.; Andresen, N.; Andronaco, G.; Patton, R.; Fong, M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Application of Coherent State Approach for the cancellation of Infrared divergences to all orders in LFQED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We sketch an all order proof of cancellation of infrared (IR) divergences in Light Front Quantum Electrodynamics (LFQED) using a coherent state formalism. In this talk, it has been shown that the true IR divergences in fermion self energy are eliminated to all orders in a light-front time-ordered perturbative calculation if one uses coherent state basis instead of the usual Fock basis to calculate the Hamiltonian matrix elements.

More, Jai

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Nih-3T3 Fibroblast Studied by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work I present the study of the behaviour response of mouse fibroblasts NIH-3T3 under UVB radiation using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), the preferred method of infrared spectroscopy. FT-IR, in fact, it is convenient to study molecular cell processes because it has the potential to provide the identification of the vibrational modes of some of the major compounds (lipid, proteins and nucleic acids) without being invasive in the biomaterials. The results show that apoptotic process is induced by UVB radiation.

Iovenitti, Marco

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance July 18, 2012 - 3:46pm Addthis To...

142

GaSb substrates with extended IR wavelength for advanced space based applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GaSb substrates have advantages that make them attractive for implementation of a wide range of infrared (IR) detectors with higher operating temperatures for stealth and space based applications. A significant aspect that would enable widespread commercial application of GaSb wafers for very long wavelength IR (VLWIR) applications is the capability for transmissivity beyond 15 m. Due largely to the GaSb (antisite) defect and other point defects in undoped GaSb substrates, intrinsic GaSb is still slightly p-type and strongly absorbs in the VLWIR. This requires backside thinning of the GaSb substrate for IR transmissivity. An extremely low n-type GaSb substrate is preferred to eliminate thinning and provide a substrate solution for backside illuminated VLWIR devices. By providing a more homogeneous radial distribution of the melt solute to suppress GaSb formation and controlling the cooling rate, ultra low doped n:GaSb has been achieved. This study examines the surface properties and IR transmission spectra of ultra low doped GaSb substrates at both room and low temperatures. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), homoepitaxy by MBE, and infrared Fourier transform (FTIR) analysis was implemented to examine material quality. As compared with standard low doped GaSb, the ultra low doped substrates show over 50% transmission and consistent wavelength transparency past 23 m with improved %T at low temperature. Homoepitaxy and AFM results indicate the ultra low doped GaSb has a low thermal desorbtion character and qualified morphology. In summary, improvements in room temperature IR transmission and extended wavelength characteristics have been shown consistently for ultra low doped n:GaSb substrates.

Allen, Lisa P.; Flint, Patrick; Dallas, Gordon; Bakken, Daniel; Blanchat, Kevin; Brown, Gail J.; Vangala, Shivashankar R.; Goodhue, William D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

WATER ICE IN HIGH MASS-LOSS RATE OH/IR STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate water-ice features in spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of high mass-loss rate OH/IR stars. We use a radiative transfer code which can consider multiple components of dust shells to make model calculations for various dust species including water ice in the OH/IR stars. We find that the model SEDs are sensitively dependent on the location of the water-ice dust shell. For two sample stars (OH 127.8+0.0 and OH 26.5+0.6), we compare the detailed model results with the infrared observational data including the spectral data from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). For the two sample stars, we reproduce the crystalline water-ice features (absorption at 3.1 {mu}m and 11.5 {mu}m; emission at 44 and 62 {mu}m) observed by ISO using a separate component of the water-ice dust shell that condensed at about 84-87 K (r {approx} 1500-1800 AU) as well as the silicate dust shell that condensed at about 1000 K (r {approx} 19-25 AU). For a sample of 1533 OH/IR stars, we present infrared two-color diagrams (2CDs) using the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and AKARI data compared with theoretical model results. We find that the theoretical models clearly show the effects of the crystalline water-ice features (absorption at 11.5 {mu}m and emission at 62 {mu}m) on the 2CDs.

Suh, Kyung-Won; Kwon, Young-Joo, E-mail: kwsuh@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

A late, infrared flash from the afterglow of GRB 050319  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the detection of a bright, near-infrared flash from the afterglow of GRB 050319, 6.15 hours after the burst. The IR flash faded rapidly from J=13.12 mag. to J > 15.5 mag. in about 4 minutes. There are no reported simultaneous observations at other wavelengths making it an unique event. We study the implications of its late timing in the context of current theoretical models for GRB afterglows.

Koshy George; Dipankar P. K. Banerjee; Thyagarajan Chandrasekahar; Nagarhalli M. Ashok

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

145

Infrared microscope inspection apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface. 4 figs.

Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

1985-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

146

Infrared microscope inspection apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface.

Forman, Steven E. (Framingham, MA); Caunt, James W. (Concord, MA)

1985-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

147

Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

148

Solving the Vela pulsar infrared excess problem Dima Zyuzin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are marked using notations from Shibanov et al. (2003), except of o4 which is detected only with Gemini by about 2 along the X-ray counter-jet direction with PA 130 (Helfand et al. (2001)) marked by the dashed projected onto the counter-jet origin of its PWN (Hester et al. (1995)). The putative near-IR jet feature

149

Processing of formic acid-containing ice by heavy and energetic cosmic ray analogues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formic acid (HCOOH) has been extensively detected in space environments, including interstellar medium (gas and grains), comets and meteorites. Such environments are often subjected to the action of ionizing agents, which may cause changes in the molecular structure, thus leading to formation of new species. Formic acid is a possible precursor of pre-biotic species, such as Glycine (NH2CH2COOH). This work investigates experimentally the physicochemical effects resulting from interaction of heavy and energetic cosmic ray analogues (46MeV 58Ni11+) in H2O:HCOOH (1:1) ice, at 15 K, in ultrahigh vacuum regime, using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry in the mid-infrared region (4000-600 cm-1 or 2.5-12.5 microns). After the bombardment, the sample was slowly heated to room temperature. The results show the dissociation cross-section for the formic acid of 2.4x10^-13 cm2, and half-life due to galactic cosmic rays of 8x10^7 yr. The IR spectra show intense formation of CO and CO2, and small production of more com...

Bergantini, A; Rothard, H; Boduch, P; Andrade, D P P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Molecular Hydrogen in Infrared Cirrus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We combine data from our recent FUSE survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen absorption toward 50 high-latitude AGN with COBE-corrected IRAS 100 micron emission maps to study the correlation of infrared cirrus with H2. A plot of the H2 column density vs. IR cirrus intensity shows the same transition in molecular fraction, f_H2, as seen with total hydrogen column density, N_H. This transition is usually attributed to H2 self-shielding, and it suggests that many diffuse cirrus clouds contain H2 in significant fractions, f_H2 = 1-30%. These clouds cover approximately 50% of the northern sky at latitudes b > 30 degrees, at temperature-corrected 100 micron intensities D_100 > 1.5 MJy/sr. The sheetlike cirrus clouds, with hydrogen densities n_H > 30 cm^-3, may be compressed by dynamical processes at the disk-halo interface, and they are conducive to H2 formation on grain surfaces. Exploiting the correlation between N(H2) and 100 micron intensity, we estimate that cirrus clouds at b > 30 contain approximately 3000 M_sun in H2. Extrapolated over the inner Milky Way, the cirrus may contain 10^7 M_sun of H2 and 10^8 M_sun in total gas mass. If elevated to 100 pc, their gravitational potential energy is ~10^53 erg.

Kristen Gillmon; J. Michael Shull

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

151

IRS Data Retrieval Tool 2012-2013 FAFSA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 IRS Data Retrieval Tool 2012-2013 FAFSA Financial Aid Office University of California, San Diego #12;2 What is the IRS Data Retrieval Tool? · The IRS Retrieval Tool gives FAFSA applicants and parents the ability to transfer their data from the IRS to the FAFSA · The Retrieval Tool saves time and increases

Russell, Lynn

152

Near infrared detectors for SNAP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near Infrared Detectors for SNAP M. Schubnell a , N. Barron1k × 1k and 2k × 2k) near infrared detectors manufactured byas part of the near infrared R&D e?ort for SNAP (the Super-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Application of infrared imaging in ferrocyanide tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes the feasibility of using infrared imaging techniques and scanning equipment to detect potential hot spots within ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. A hot spot is defined as a volumetric region within a waste tank with an excessively warm temperature that is generated by radioactive isotopes. The thermal image of a hot spot was modeled by computer. this model determined the image an IR system must detect. Laboratory and field tests of the imaging system are described, and conclusions based on laboratory and field data are presented. The report shows that infrared imaging is capable of detecting hot spots in ferrocyanide waste tanks with depths of up to 3.94 m (155 in.). The infrared imaging system is a useful technology for initial evaluation and assessment of hot spots in the majority of ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The system will not allow an exact hot spot and temperature determination, but it will provide the necessary information to determine the worst-case hot spot detected in temperature patterns. Ferrocyanide tanks are one type of storage tank on the Watch List. These tanks are identified as priority 1 Hanford Site Tank farm Safety Issues.

Morris, K.L.; Mailhot, R.B. Jr.; McLaren, J.M.; Morris, K.L.

1994-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

New Near-Infrared Surface Brightness Fluctuation Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new theoretical models for surface brightness fluctuations in the near-infrared. We show the time evolution of near-infrared brightness fluctuation properties over large age and metallicity ranges, i.e., from 12 Myr to 16 Gyr, and from Z/Zsun=1/50 to Z/Zsun=2.5, for single age, single metallicity stellar populations. All the stellar models are followed from the zero age main sequence to the central carbon ignition for massive stars, or to the end of the thermally pulsing regime of the asymptotic giant branch phase for low and intermediate mass stars. The new models are compared with observed near-infrared fluctuation absolute magnitudes and colours for a sample of Magellanic Cloud star clusters and Fornax Cluster galaxies. For star clusters younger than ~3 Gyr, the predicted near-infrared fluctuation properties are in a satisfactory agreement with observed ones over a wide range of stellar population metallicities. However, for older star clusters, the agreement between the observed and predicted near-IR brightness fluctuations depends on how the surface brightness absolute magnitudes are estimated. The computed set of models are not able to match the observed near-IR fluctuation absolute magnitudes and colours simultaneously. We argue that the observed discrepancies between the predicted and observed properties of old MC superclusters are more likely due to observational reasons.

M. Mouhcine; R. A. Gonzalez; M. C. Liu

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

The First Mid-Infrared Spectra of Cool White Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first mid-infrared spectra of two cool white dwarfs obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We also present 3.5-8 micron photometry for 19 cool white dwarfs with 5000K < Teff < 9000K. We perform a detailed model atmosphere analysis of these white dwarfs by fitting their UBVRIJHK and Spitzer photometry with state-of-the-art model atmospheres, and demonstrate that the optical and infrared spectral energy distributions of cool white dwarfs are well reproduced by our grid of models. Our mid-IR photometry and 7.5-14.5 micron spectrum of WD0018-267 are consistent with a Teff = 5720K, pure hydrogen white dwarf model atmosphere. On the other hand, LHS 1126 remains peculiar with significant mid-IR flux deficits in all IRAC bands and a featureless spectrum in the 5.2-7.5 micron range. Even though this deficit is attributed to collision induced absorption (CIA) due to molecular hydrogen, the shape of the deficit cannot be explained with current CIA opacity calculations. The infrared portion of the LHS 1126 spectral energy distribution is best-fit with a power law index of -1.99; identical to a Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum. This argues that the deficit may be due to an unrecognized grey-like opacity source in the infrared.

Mukremin Kilic; Piotr M. Kowalski; Fergal Mullally; William T. Reach; Ted von Hippel

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

156

Cosmology with Cosmic Infrared Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006 #12;Title Here IR/Opt: Direct emission from stars FIR: Processed emission of Opt/IR light by dust IRAC Instrument Team's GTO Survey PI: Peter Eisenhardt (JPL) + ~20 collaborators IRAC Spitzer Bootes

Leka, K. D .

157

Linear dichroism amplification: Adapting a long-known technique for ultrasensitive femtosecond IR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate strong amplification of polarization-sensitive transient IR signals using a pseudo-null crossed polarizer technique first proposed by Keston and Lospalluto [Fed. Proc. 10, 207 (1951)] and applied for nanosecond flash photolysis in the visible by Che et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 224, 145 (1994)]. We adapted the technique to ultrafast pulsed laser spectroscopy in the infrared using photoelastic modulators, which allow us to measure amplified linear dichroism at kilohertz repetition rates. The method was applied to a photoswitch of the N-alkylated Schiff base family in order to demonstrate its potential of strongly enhancing sensitivity and signal to noise in ultrafast transient IR experiments, to simplify spectra and to determine intramolecular transition dipole orientations.

Rehault, Julien; Helbing, Jan [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Zanirato, Vinicio [Dipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Universita di Ferrara, via Fossato di Mortara 17-19, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Olivucci, Massimo [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Siena, via Aldo Moro 2, I-53100 Siena (Italy) and Chemistry Department, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403 (United States)

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

Magnetically polarized Ir dopant atoms in superconducting Ba(Fe1?xIrx)2As2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the magnetic polarization of the Ir 5d dopant states in the pnictide superconductor Ba(Fe1?xIrx)2As2 with x=0.027(2) using Ir L3 edge x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS). Despite the fact that doping partially suppresses the antiferromagnetic transition, we find that magnetic order survives around the Ir dopant sites. The Ir states are magnetically polarized with commensurate stripe-like antiferromagnetic order and long correlations lengths, ?mag>2800 and >850 Å, in the ab plane and along the c axis, respectively, driven by their interaction with the Fe spins. This Ir magnetic order persists up to the Néel transition of the majority Fe spins at TN=74(2) K. At 5 K we find that magnetic order coexists microscopically with superconductivity in Ba(Fe1?xIrx)2As2. The energy dependence of the XRMS through the Ir L3 edge shows a non-Lorentzian line shape, which we explain in terms of interference between Ir resonant scattering and Fe nonresonant magnetic scattering.

Dean, M.P.M.; Kim, M.G.; Kreyssig, A.; Kim, J.W.; Liu, X.; Ryan, P.J.; Thaler, A.; Budko, S.L.; Strassheim, W.; Canfield, P.C.; Hill, J.P.; Goldman, A.I.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

159

Infrared imaging: A versatile NDT method for manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The non-contact, non-invasive, highly adaptable nature of infrared technology offers many advantages over traditional non-destructive testing methods such as x-ray and ultrasound. Recent performance improvements accompanied by cost reductions are enabling broader implementation across a wide variety of industries. Most promising for future growth are application specific configurations packaged as integrated modules. Among the many industries that benefit from infrared technology, manufacturing has experienced the greatest gain. Environments including both continuous and batch manufacturing involve many critical thermal processes. Through the use of infrared imaging equipment, these processes can be easily monitored and optimized to ensure product quality and process efficiency.

West, L.M. [FLIR Systems, Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Mid-infrared integrated waveguide modulators based on silicon-on-lithium-niobate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1364/OPTICA.1.000350 1. INTRODUCTION The mid-infrared (mid-IR) region of the optical spectrum (3­ 8 m Article Vol. 1, No. 5 / November 2014 / Optica 350 #12;and routing elements due to the high index contrast

Fathpour, Sasan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Atomic structure, electrical properties, and infrared range optical properties of diamondlike carbon films containing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and elastic modulus.4 Furthermore, unlike polycrystalline diamond films pre- pared by chemical vapor, infrared (IR) transparent, and chemically inert.3 High-quality DLC films can rival diamond films in terms- tigations have confirmed that ultraviolet (UV) pulsed laser ablation of a high-purity polycrystalline

Wei, Qiuming

162

Feedback-Driven Evolution of the Far-Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from simulations of major galaxy mergers and study the effect of AGN and starburst driven feedback on the evolution of the SED as a function of time. We use a self-consistent three-dimensional radiative equilibrium code to calculate the emergent SEDs and to make images. To facilitate a simple description of our findings, we describe our results in reference to an approximate analytic solution for the far-IR SED. We focus mainly on the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) and ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) phases of evolution. We contrast the SEDs of simulations performed with AGN feedback to simulations performed with starburst driven wind feedback. We find that the feedback processes critically determine the evolution of the SED. Changing the source of illumination (whether stellar or AGN) has virtually no impact on the reprocessed far-infrared SED. We find that AGN feedback is particularly effective at dispersing gas and rapidly injecting energy into the ISM. The observational signature of such powerful feedback is a warm SED. In general, simulations performed with starburst driven winds have colder spectra and reprocess more of their emission into the infrared, resulting in higher infrared to bolometric luminosities compared to (otherwise equivalent) simulations performed with AGN feedback. We depict our results in IRAS bands, as well as in Spitzer's MIPS bands, and in Herschel's PACS bands.

Sukanya Chakrabarti; T. J. Cox; Lars Hernquist; Philip F. Hopkins; Brant Robertson; Tiziana Di Matteo

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

IRS Contribution Limits and OSU Retirement Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact: OTRS requires contributions on total compensation (salary plus benefits) without regardIRS Contribution Limits and OSU Retirement Programs The OSU Defined Contribution Plan (DCP), (for Revenue Code 401(a). The Internal Revenue Code restrictions on employer-paid contributions make

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

164

Cosmic IR Backgrounds Ned Wright (UCLA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic IR Backgrounds by Ned Wright (UCLA) http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/intro.html See: · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmolog.htm · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/DIRBE · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CIBR · http

Wright, Edward L. "Ned"

165

Tycho 2 stars with infrared excess in the MSX Point Source Catalogue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stars of all evolutionary phases have been found to have excess infrared emission due to the presence of circumstellar material. To identify such stars, we have positionally correlated the infrared MSX point source catalogue and the Tycho 2 optical catalogue. A near/mid infrared colour criteria has been developed to select infrared excess stars. The search yielded 1938 excess stars, over half (979) have never previously been detected by IRAS. The excess stars were found to be young objects such as Herbig Ae/Be and Be stars, and evolved objects such as OH/IR and carbon stars. A number of B type excess stars were also discovered whose infrared colours could not be readily explained by known catalogued objects.

A. J. Clarke; R. D. Oudmaijer; S. L Lumsden

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

166

Star-formation histories of local luminous infrared galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the analysis of the integrated spectral energy distribution (SED) from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared and H$\\alpha$ of a sample of 29 local systems and individual galaxies with infrared (IR) luminosities between 10^11 Lsun and 10^11.8 Lsun. We have combined new narrow-band H$\\alpha$+[NII] and broad-band g, r optical imaging taken with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), with archival GALEX, 2MASS, Spitzer, and Herschel data. The SEDs (photometry and integrated H$\\alpha$ flux) have been fitted with a modified version of the MAGPHYS code using stellar population synthesis models for the UV-near-IR range and thermal emission models for the IR emission taking into account the energy balance between the absorbed and re-emitted radiation. From the SED fits we derive the star-formation histories (SFH) of these galaxies. For nearly half of them the star-formation rate appears to be approximately constant during the last few Gyrs. In the other half, the current star-formation rate seems to be enha...

Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Colina, Luis; Miralles-Caballero, Daniel; Pérez-González, Pablo G; Arribas, Santiago; Bellocchi, Enrica; Cazzoli, Sara; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; López, Javier Piqueras

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The infrared environments of masers associated with star formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The near infrared (1-2um) and the thermal infrared (3-25um) trace many of the environments in which masers are thought to reside, including shocks, outflows, accretion disks, and the dense medium near protostars. After a number of recent surveys it has been found that there is a higher detection rate of mid-IR emission towards masers than cm radio continuum emission from UC HII regions, and that the mid-IR emission is actually more closely cospatial to the maser locations. A high percentage of water and methanol masers that are not coincident with the UC HII regions in massive star forming regions are likely to be tracing outflows and extremely young high mass stars before the onset of the UC HII region phase. After a decade of groundwork supporting the hypothesis that linarly distributed class II methanol masers may generally trace accretion disks around young massive stars, compelling evidence is mounting that these masers may generally be associated with outflows instead. Substantiation of this claim comes from recent outflow surveys and high angular resolution mid-IR imaging of the maser environments.

James De Buizer

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

168

CANDELS/GOODS-S, CDFS, ECDFS: Photometric Redshifts For Normal and for X-Ray-Detected Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present photometric redshifts and associated probability distributions for all detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). The work makes use of the most up-to-date data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) in addition to other data. We also revisit multi-wavelength counterparts for published X-ray sources from the 4Ms-CDFS and 250ks-ECDFS surveys, finding reliable counterparts for 1207 out of 1259 sources ($\\sim 96\\%$). Data used for photometric redshifts include intermediate-band photometry deblended using the TFIT method, which is used for the first time in this work. Photometric redshifts for X-ray source counterparts are based on a new library of AGN/galaxy hybrid templates appropriate for the faint X-ray population in the CDFS. Photometric redshift accuracy for normal galaxies is 0.010 and for X-ray sources is 0.014, and outlier fractions are $4\\%$ and $5.4\\%$ respectively. The results within the CANDELS...

Hsu, Li-Ting; Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Bender, Ralf; Buchner, Johannes; Donley, Jennifer L; Kocevski, Dale D; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish P; Rangel, Cyprian; Willner, S P; Brightman, Murray; Georgakakis, Antonis; Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S; Ashby, Matthew L N; Barro, Guillermo; Dahlen, Tomas; Faber, Sandra M; Ferguson, Henry C; Galametz, Audrey; Grazian, Andrea; Grogin, Norman A; Huang, Kuang-Han; Koekemoer, Anton M; Lucas, Ray A; McGrath, Elizabeth; Mobasher, Bahram; Peth, Michael; Rosario, David J; Trump, Jonathan R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Infrared length scale and extrapolations for the no-core shell model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We precisely determine the infrared (IR) length scale of the no-core shell model (NCSM). In the NCSM, the $A$-body Hilbert space is truncated by the total energy, and the IR length can be determined by equating the intrinsic kinetic energy of $A$ nucleons in the NCSM space to that of $A$ nucleons in a $3(A-1)$-dimensional hyper-radial well with a Dirichlet boundary condition for the hyper radius. We demonstrate that this procedure indeed yields a very precise IR length by performing large-scale NCSM calculations for $^{6}$Li. We apply our result and perform accurate IR extrapolations for bound states of $^{4}$He, $^{6}$He, $^{6}$Li, $^{7}$Li. We also attempt to extrapolate NCSM results for $^{10}$B and $^{16}$O with bare interactions from chiral effective field theory over tens of MeV.

Wendt, K A; Papenbrock, T; Sääf, D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND EXPERIMENT (CIBER): A SOUNDING ROCKET PAYLOAD TO STUDY THE NEAR INFRARED EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER) is a suite of four instruments designed to study the near infrared (IR) background light from above the Earth's atmosphere. The instrument package comprises two imaging telescopes designed to characterize spatial anisotropy in the extragalactic IR background caused by cosmological structure during the epoch of reionization, a low resolution spectrometer to measure the absolute spectrum of the extragalactic IR background, and a narrow band spectrometer optimized to measure the absolute brightness of the zodiacal light foreground. In this paper we describe the design and characterization of the CIBER payload. The detailed mechanical, cryogenic, and electrical design of the system are presented, including all system components common to the four instruments. We present the methods and equipment used to characterize the instruments before and after flight, and give a detailed description of CIBER's flight profile and configurations. CIBER is designed to be recoverable and has flown four times, with modifications to the payload having been informed by analysis of the first flight data. All four instruments performed to specifications during the subsequent flights, and the scientific data from these flights are currently being analyzed.

Zemcov, M.; Bock, J.; Hristov, V.; Levenson, L. R.; Mason, P. [Department of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Arai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T. [Department of Space Astronomy and Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Battle, J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cooray, A. [Center for Cosmology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Keating, B.; Renbarger, T. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Kim, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D. H.; Nam, U. W. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Sullivan, I. [Department of Physics, The University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Suzuki, K., E-mail: zemcov@caltech.edu [Instrument Development Group of Technical Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

May 15, 2000 / Vol. 25, No. 10 / OPTICS LETTERS 743 Mid-infrared differencefrequency generation in periodically  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the optical prop- erties of PP KTP in the mid-IR range by DFG.8 KTP has a much higher damage threshold than LiMay 15, 2000 / Vol. 25, No. 10 / OPTICS LETTERS 743 Mid-infrared difference­frequency generation University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel Received January 10, 2000 Tunable mid-infrared radiation 3.45 3.75 mm

Arie, Ady

172

Infrared source test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Infrared Source Test (IRST) is to demonstrate the ability to track a ground target with an infrared sensor from an airplane. The system is being developed within the Advance Technology Program`s Theater Missile Defense/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) section. The IRST payload consists of an Amber Radiance 1 infrared camera system, a computer, a gimbaled mirror, and a hard disk. The processor is a custom R3000 CPU board made by Risq Modular Systems, Inc. for LLNL. The board has ethernet, SCSI, parallel I/O, and serial ports, a DMA channel, a video (frame buffer) interface, and eight MBytes of main memory. The real-time operating system VxWorks has been ported to the processor. The application code is written in C on a host SUN 4 UNIX workstation. The IRST is the result of a combined effort by physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists.

Ott, L.

1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Variable waveband infrared imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A waveband imager includes an imaging pixel that utilizes photon tunneling with a thermally actuated bimorph structure to convert infrared radiation to visible radiation. Infrared radiation passes through a transparent substrate and is absorbed by a bimorph structure formed with a pixel plate. The absorption generates heat which deflects the bimorph structure and pixel plate towards the substrate and into an evanescent electric field generated by light propagating through the substrate. Penetration of the bimorph structure and pixel plate into the evanescent electric field allows a portion of the visible wavelengths propagating through the substrate to tunnel through the substrate, bimorph structure, and/or pixel plate as visible radiation that is proportional to the intensity of the incident infrared radiation. This converted visible radiation may be superimposed over visible wavelengths passed through the imaging pixel.

Hunter, Scott R.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

174

Mobile Robotics I: Lab 3 Obstacle Avoidance with IR Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensors Background IR SENSORS INTERFACE The CEENBoT comes equipped with a Left and Right non-contact bumpMobile Robotics I: Lab 3 Obstacle Avoidance with IR Sensors CEENBoTTM Mobile Robotics Platform 1.01 #12;. ( Blank ) #12;Mobile Robotics I ­ Obstacle Avoidance with IR Sensors Purpose

Farritor, Shane

175

A GENERALIZED POWER-LAW DIAGNOSTIC FOR INFRARED GALAXIES AT z > 1: ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND HOT INTERSTELLAR DUST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I present a generalized power-law (PL) diagnostic which allows one to identify the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in infrared (IR) galaxies at z > 1, down to flux densities at which the extragalactic IR background is mostly resolved. I derive this diagnostic from the analysis of 174 galaxies with S{sub {nu}}(24 {mu}m)>80 {mu}Jy and spectroscopic redshifts z{sub spec} > 1 in the Chandra Deep Field South, for which I study the rest-frame UV/optical/near-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs), after subtracting a hot-dust, PL component with three possible spectral indices {alpha} = 1.3, 2.0, and 3.0. I obtain that 35% of these 24 {mu}m sources are power-law composite galaxies (PLCGs), which I define as those galaxies for which the SED fitting with stellar templates, without any previous PL subtraction, can be rejected with >2{sigma} confidence. Subtracting the PL component from the PLCG SEDs produces stellar mass correction factors <1.5 in >80% of cases. The PLCG incidence is especially high (47%) at 1.0 < z < 1.5. To unveil which PLCGs host AGNs, I conduct a combined analysis of 4 Ms X-ray data, galaxy morphologies, and a graybody modeling of the hot dust. I find that (1) 77% of all the X-ray AGNs in my 24 {mu}m sample at 1.0 < z < 1.5 are recognized by the PLCG criterion; (2) PLCGs with {alpha} = 1.3 or 2.0 have regular morphologies and T{sub dust} {approx}> 1000 K, indicating nuclear activity. Instead, PLCGs with {alpha} = 3.0 are characterized by disturbed galaxy dynamics, and a hot interstellar medium can explain their dust temperatures T{sub dust} {approx} 700-800 K. Overall, my results indicate that the fraction of AGNs among 24 {mu}m sources is between {approx}30% and 52% at 1.0 < z < 1.5.

Caputi, K. I., E-mail: karina@astro.rug.nl [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Visible Light-Driven Water Oxidation by Ir oxide Clusters Coupledto Single Cr Centers in Mesoporous Silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Visible light-induced water oxidation has been demonstrated at an Ir oxide nanocluster coupled to a single Cr{sup VI} site on the pore surface of MCM-41 mesoporous silica. The photocatalytic unit was assembled by the reaction of surface Cr=O groups with Ir(acac){sub 3} precursor followed by calcination at 300 C and bond formation monitored by FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy. High-resolution Z-contrast electron micrographs of the calcined material combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spot analysis confirmed the occlusion of Ir oxide nanoparticles inside the mesopores. Oxygen evolution of an aqueous suspension of the Ir{sub x}O{sub y}-CrMCM-41 upon visible light irradiation of the Cr{sup VI}-O ligand-to-metal charge-transfer absorption was monitored mass-spectrometrically. Comparison of the product yields for samples with low Cr content (Cr/Si {le} 0.02) and high Cr content (Cr/Si = 0.05) indicates that only isolated Cr centers are capable of extracting electrons from Ir oxide clusters, while di- or polychromate species are not. Water oxidation at a multielectron-transfer catalyst coupled to a single metal center has not been demonstrated before. The ability to drive water oxidation with a single metal center as electron pump offers opportunities for coupling the oxygen-evolving photocatalytic unit to reducing sites in the nanoporous scaffold.

Nakamura, Ryuhei; Frei, Heinz

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

177

Extreme Galactic-Winds and Starburst in IR Mergers and IR QSOs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report -as a part of a long-term study of mergers and IR QSOs- detailed spectroscopic evidences for outflow (OF) and/or Wolf Rayet features in: (i) low velocity OF in the ongoing mergers NGC 4038/39 and IRAS 23128-5919; (ii) extreme velocity OF (EVOF) in the QSOs IRAS 01003-2238 and IRAS 13218+0552; (iii) OF and EVOF in a complete sample of ultra-luminous IR galaxies/QSOs ("The IRAS 1 Jy MKO-KPNO Survey", of 118 objects). We found EVOF in IRAS 11119+3257, 14394+5332, 15130+1958 and 15462-0450. The OF components detected in these objects were mainly associated to starburst processes: i.e., to galactic-winds generated in multiple type II SN explosions and massive stars. The EVOF were detected in objects with strong starburst plus obscured IR QSOs; which suggest that interaction of both processes could generate EVOF. In addition, we analyze the presence of Wolf Rayet features in the large sample of Bright PG-QSOs (Boroson and Green 1992), and nearby mergers and galactic-wind galaxies. We found clear WR features in the Fe II QSOs (type I): PG 1244+026, 1444+407, 1448+273, 1535+547; and in the IR merger Arp 220. HST archive images of IR+BAL QSOs show in practically all of these objects "arc or shell" features probably associated to galactic-winds (i.e., to multiple type II SN explosions) and/or merger processes. Finally, we discuss the presence of extreme starburst and galactic wind as a possible evolutive link between IR merger and IR QSOs; where the relation between mergers and extreme starburst (with powerful galactic-winds) plays in important role, in the evolution of galaxies.

S. Lipari; D. Sanders; R. Terlevich; S. Veilleux; R. Diaz; Y. Taniguchi; W. Zheng; D. Kim; Z. Tsvetanov; G. Carranza; H. Dottori

2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

178

Mid Infrared Spectra of Radio Galaxies and Quasars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of 3C radio galaxies and quasars shed new light on the nature of the central engines of AGN. Emission from silicate dust obscuring the central engine can be used to estimate the bolometric luminosity of an AGN. Emission lines from ions such as O IV and Ne V give another indication of the presence or lack of a hidden source of far-UV photons in the nucleus. Radio-loud AGN with relative-to-Eddington luminosity ratios of L/L_Edd hydrogen pure-rotational emission lines are also seen in some mid-IR weak radio galaxies, caused by either merger shocks or jet shocks in the interstellar medium.

Ogle, P M; Whysong, D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Mid Infrared Spectra of Radio Galaxies and Quasars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of 3C radio galaxies and quasars shed new light on the nature of the central engines of AGN. Emission from silicate dust obscuring the central engine can be used to estimate the bolometric luminosity of an AGN. Emission lines from ions such as O IV and Ne V give another indication of the presence or lack of a hidden source of far-UV photons in the nucleus. Radio-loud AGN with relative-to-Eddington luminosity ratios of L/L_Edd hydrogen pure-rotational emission lines are also seen in some mid-IR weak radio galaxies, caused by either merger shocks or jet shocks in the interstellar medium.

P. M. Ogle; R. R. J. Antonucci; D. Whysong

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Infrared Renormalization Group Flow for Heavy Quark Masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A short-distance heavy quark mass depends on two parameters, the renormalization scale mu controlling the absorption of ultraviolet fluctuations into the mass, and a scale R controlling the absorption of infrared fluctuations. 1/R can be thought of as the radius for perturbative corrections that build up the mass beyond its point-like definition in the pole scheme. Treating R as a variable gives a renormalization group equation. We argue that the sign of this anomalous dimension is universal: increasing R to add IR modes decreases m(R). The flow improves the stability of conversions between mass schemes, allowing us to avoid large logs and the renormalon. The flow in R can be used to study IR renormalons without using bubble chains, and we use it to determine the coefficient of the LambdaQCD renormalon ambiguity of the pole mass with a convergent sum-rule.

Andre H. Hoang; Ambar Jain; Ignazio Scimemi; Iain W. Stewart

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Final technical report. In-situ FT-IR monitoring of a black liquor recovery boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project developed and tested advanced Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) instruments for process monitoring of black liquor recovery boilers. The state-of-the-art FT-IR instruments successfully operated in the harsh environment of a black liquor recovery boiler and provided a wealth of real-time process information. Concentrations of multiple gas species were simultaneously monitored in-situ across the combustion flow of the boiler and extractively at the stack. Sensitivity to changes of particulate fume and carryover levels in the process flow were also demonstrated. Boiler set-up and operation is a complex balance of conditions that influence the chemical and physical processes in the combustion flow. Operating parameters include black liquor flow rate, liquor temperature, nozzle pressure, primary air, secondary air, tertiary air, boiler excess oxygen and others. The in-process information provided by the FT-IR monitors can be used as a boiler control tool since species indicative of combustion efficiency (carbon monoxide, methane) and pollutant emissions (sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid and fume) were monitored in real-time and observed to fluctuate as operating conditions were varied. A high priority need of the U.S. industrial boiler market is improved measurement and control technology. The sensor technology demonstrated in this project is applicable to the need of industry.

James Markham; Joseph Cosgrove; David Marran; Jorge Neira; Chad Nelson; Peter Solomon

1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Infrared Thermometer (IRT) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Infrared Thermometer (IRT) is a ground-based radiation pyrometer that provides measurements of the equivalent blackbody brightness temperature of the scene in its field of view. The downwelling version has a narrow field of view for measuring sky temperature and for detecting clouds. The upwelling version has a wide field of view for measuring the narrowband radiating temperature of the ground surface.

VR Morris

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FTIR - 1 Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy FTIR DETERMINATION OF MTBE IN GASOLINE AND ETHANOL FTIR DETERMINATION OF MTBE IN GASOLINE AND ETHANOL IN VODKA AND MOUTHWASH INTRODUCTION As a part has contained MTBE (methyl tert­butyl ether) as its primary oxygenate. However, there has been

Nizkorodov, Sergey

184

Mechanical feedback in the molecular ISM of luminous IR galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: Molecular emission lines originating in the nuclei of luminous infra-red galaxies are used to determine the physical properties of the nuclear ISM in these systems. Methods: A large observational database of molecular emission lines is compared with model predictions that include heating by UV and X-ray radiation, mechanical heating, and the effects of cosmic rays. Results: The observed line ratios and model predictions imply a separation of the observedsystems into three groups: XDRs, UV-dominated high-density (n>=10^5 cm-3) PDRs, and lower-density (n=10^4.5 cm-3) PDRs that are dominated by mechanical feedback. Conclusions: The division of the two types of PDRs follows naturally from the evolution of the star formation cycle of these sources, which evolves from deeply embedded young stars, resulting in high-density (n>=10^5 cm-3) PDRs, to a stage where the gas density has decreased (n=10^4.5 cm-3) and mechanical feedback from supernova shocks dominates the heating budget.

A. F. Loenen; M. Spaans; W. A. Baan; R. Meijerink

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

185

EMERGING INFRARED LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 4 EMERGING INFRARED LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPIC TECHNIQUES FOR GAS ANALYSIS Frank K detection and monitoring of molecular trace gas species in the mid-infrared spectral region be- cause many of the infrared laser source. Well established detection methods include several types of multipass gas absorption

186

Quantitative nondestructive testing using Infrared Thermography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turbine blade . . . . . . . . . . FLIR TM A320G InfraredTable 1.1: Specifications of the FLIR TM A320G InfraredInfrared Camera: A FLIR TM A320G Infrared camera was used

Manohar, Arun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

THE MID-INFRARED AND NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET EXCESS EMISSIONS OF QUIESCENT GALAXIES ON THE RED SEQUENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the mid-infrared (IR) and near-ultraviolet (UV) excess emissions of spectroscopically selected quiescent galaxies on the optical red sequence. We use the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-IR and Galaxy Evolution Explorer near-UV data for a spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to study the possible connection between quiescent red-sequence galaxies with and without mid-IR/near-UV excess. Among 648 12 {mu}m detected quiescent red-sequence galaxies without H{alpha} emission, 26% and 55% show near-UV and mid-IR excess emissions, respectively. When we consider only bright (M{sub r} < -21.5) galaxies with an early-type morphology, the fraction of galaxies with recent star formation is still 39%. The quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR and near-UV excess emissions are optically fainter and have slightly smaller D{sub n} 4000 than those without mid-IR and near-UV excess emissions. We also find that mid-IR weighted mean stellar ages of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR excess are larger than those with near-UV excess, and smaller than those without mid-IR and near-UV excess. The environmental dependence of the fraction of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR and near-UV excess seems strong even though the trends of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with near-UV excess differ from those with mid-IR excess. These results indicate that the recent star formation traced by near-UV ({approx}< 1 Gyr) and mid-IR ({approx}< 2 Gyr) excess is not negligible among nearby, quiescent, red, early-type galaxies. We suggest a possible evolutionary scenario of quiescent red-sequence galaxies from quiescent red-sequence galaxies with near-UV excess to those with mid-IR excess to those without near-UV and mid-IR excess.

Ko, Jongwan; Lee, Jong Chul [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ho Seong [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sohn, Young-Jong, E-mail: jwko@kasi.re.kr [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

188

Improved signal to noise ratio and sensitivity of an infrared imaging video bolometer on large helical device by using an infrared periscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Infrared imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) diagnostic is currently being used in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for studying the localization of radiation structures near the magnetic island and helical divertor X-points during plasma detachment and for 3D tomography. This research demands high signal to noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity to improve the temporal resolution for studying the evolution of radiation structures during plasma detachment and a wide IRVB field of view (FoV) for tomography. Introduction of an infrared periscope allows achievement of a higher SNR and higher sensitivity, which in turn, permits a twofold improvement in the temporal resolution of the diagnostic. Higher SNR along with wide FoV is achieved simultaneously by reducing the separation of the IRVB detector (metal foil) from the bolometer's aperture and the LHD plasma. Altering the distances to meet the aforesaid requirements results in an increased separation between the foil and the IR camera. This leads to a degradation of the diagnostic performance in terms of its sensitivity by 1.5-fold. Using an infrared periscope to image the IRVB foil results in a 7.5-fold increase in the number of IR camera pixels imaging the foil. This improves the IRVB sensitivity which depends on the square root of the number of IR camera pixels being averaged per bolometer channel. Despite the slower f-number (f/# = 1.35) and reduced transmission (?{sub 0} = 89%, due to an increased number of lens elements) for the periscope, the diagnostic with an infrared periscope operational on LHD has improved in terms of sensitivity and SNR by a factor of 1.4 and 4.5, respectively, as compared to the original diagnostic without a periscope (i.e., IRVB foil being directly imaged by the IR camera through conventional optics). The bolometer's field of view has also increased by two times. The paper discusses these improvements in apt details.

Pandya, Shwetang N., E-mail: pandya.shwetang@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Sano, Ryuichi [High Temperature Plasma Physics Research Division, The Graduate University of Advanced Studies, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Peterson, Byron J.; Mukai, Kiyofumi [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Enokuchi, Akito; Takeyama, Norihide [GENESIA Corporation, 3-38-4-601 Shimo-Renjaku, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0013 (Japan)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

The Wide-Field Near Infrared Data: Optimal Photometry in Crowded Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present JHK infrared data from the UK Infrared Telescope for a subset of the regions of the MYStIX (Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray) survey. Some of the data were obtained specifically for the MYStIX project, and some as part of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey's Galactic Plane Survey. In most of these fields crowding is a significant issue for aperture photometry, and so we have re-extracted the photometry from the processed images using an optimal extraction technique, and we describe how we adapt the optimal technique to mitigate the effects of crowding.

King, R R; Broos, Patrick S; Getman, Konstantin V; Feigelson, Eric D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

PAH chemistry and IR emission from circumstellar disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims. The chemistry of, and infrared (IR) emission from, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in disks around Herbig Ae/Be and T Tauri stars are investigated. The equilibrium distribution of the PAHs over all accessible charge/hydrogenation states depends on the size and shape of the PAHs and on the physical properties of the star and surrounding disk. Methods. A chemistry model is created to calculate this equilibrium distribution. Destruction of PAHs by ultraviolet (UV) photons, possibly in multi-photon absorption events, is taken into account. The chemistry model is coupled to a radiative transfer code to provide the physical parameters and to combine the PAH emission with the spectral energy distribution (SED) from the star+disk system. Results. Normally hydrogenated PAHs in Herbig Ae/Be disks account for most of the observed PAH emission, with neutral and positively ionized species contributing in roughly equal amounts. Close to the midplane, the PAHs are more strongly hydrogenated and negatively ionized, but these species do not contribute to the overall emission because of the low UV/optical flux deep inside the disk. PAHs of 50 carbon atoms are destroyed out to 100 AU in the disk's surface layer, and the resulting spatial extent of the emission does not agree well with observations. Rather, PAHs of about 100 carbon atoms or more are predicted to cause most of the observed emission. The emission is extended on a scale similar to that of the size of the disk. Furthermore, the emission from T Tauri disks is much weaker and concentrated more towards the central star than that from Herbig Ae/Be disks. Positively ionized PAHs are predicted to be largely absent in T Tauri disks because of the weaker radiation field.

R. Visser; V. C. Geers; C. P. Dullemond; J. -C. Augereau; K. M. Pontoppidan; E. F. van Dishoeck

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

191

Study of the Effects of Ambient Conditions Upon the Performance of Fan Powered, Infrared Natural Gas Burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation was to characterize the operation of a fan-powered, infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions, develop numerical model to simulate the burner performances, and provide design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance.

Clark Atlanta University

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

192

Ray2008.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor.Tariff Rates FYRay Ray ,

193

Infrared Maximally Abelian Gauge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The confinement scenario in Maximally Abelian gauge (MAG) is based on the concepts of Abelian dominance and of dual superconductivity. Recently, several groups pointed out the possible existence in MAG of ghost and gluon condensates with mass dimension 2, which in turn should influence the infrared behavior of ghost and gluon propagators. We present preliminary results for the first lattice numerical study of the ghost propagator and of ghost condensation for pure SU(2) theory in the MAG.

Tereza Mendes; Attilio Cucchieri; Antonio Mihara

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

On the LINER nuclear obscuration, Compton-thickness and the existence of the dusty torus; Clues from Spitzer/IRS spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most of the optically classified low ionisation narrow emission-line regions (LINERs) nuclei host an active galactic nuclei (AGN). However, how they fit into the unified model (UM) of AGN is still an open question. The aims of this work are to study at mid-infrared (mid-IR) (1) the Compton-thick nature of LINERs; and (2) the disappearance of the dusty torus in LINERs predicted from theoretical arguments. We have compiled all the available low spectral resolution mid-IR spectra of LINERs from the IRS/Spitzer (40 LINERs). We have complemented this sample with Spitzer/IRS spectra of PGQSOs, S1s, S2s, and SBs nuclei. We have studied the AGN versus the starburst content in our sample using different indicators: the EW(PAH 6.2um), the strength of the silicate feature at 9.7um, and the steepness of the mid-IR spectra. In 25 out of the 40 LINERs (i.e., 62.5%) the mid-IR spectra are not SB-dominated, similar to the comparison S2 sample (67.7%). The average spectra of both SB-dominated LINERs and S2s are very similar t...

Gonzalez-Martin, O; Marquez, I; Rodríguez-Espinosa, J M; Acosta-Pulido, J A; Ramos-Almeida, C; Dultzin, D; Hernandez-Garcia, L; Ruschel-Dutra, D; Alonso-Herrero, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

CRYSTALLINE SILICATES IN EVOLVED STARS. I. SPITZER/INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH SPECTROSCOPY OF IRAS 16456-3542, 18354-0638, AND 23239+5754  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of three evolved stars: IRAS 16456-3542, 18354-0638, and 23239+5754. The 9.9-37.2 {mu}m Spitzer/IRS high-resolution spectra of these three sources exhibit rich sets of enstatite-dominated crystalline silicate emission features. IRAS 16456-3542 is extremely rich in crystalline silicates, with >90% of its silicate mass in crystalline form, the highest to date ever reported for crystalline silicate sources.

Jiang, B. W.; Zhang, Ke [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)] [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li, Aigen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Lisse, C. M., E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: kzhang@caltech.edu, E-mail: lia@missouri.edu, E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The Strengths of Near-Infrared Absorption Features Relevant to Interstellar and Planetary Ices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The abundances of ices in planetary environments have historically been obtained through measurements of near-infrared absorption features (lambda = 1.0-2.5 microns), and near-IR transmission measurements of materials present in the interstellar medium are becoming more common. For transmission measurements, the band strength (or absorption intensity) of an absorption feature must be known in order to determine the column density of an ice component. In the experiments presented here, we have measured the band strengths of the near-IR absorption features for several molecules relevant to the study of interstellar icy grain mantles and icy planetary bodies: CO (carbon monoxide), CO2 (carbon dioxide), C3O2 (carbon suboxide), CH4 (methane), H2O (water), CH3OH (methanol), and NH3 (ammonia). During a vacuum deposition, the sizes of the near-IR features were correlated with that of a studied mid-IR feature whose strength is well known from previous ice studies. These data may be used to determine ice abundances from observed near-IR spectra of interstellar and planetary materials or to predict the sizes of near-IR features in spectral searches for these molecules in astrophysical environments.

P. A. Gerakines; J. J. Bray; A. Davis; C. R. Richey

2005-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

197

Relation of SiO maser emission to IR radiation in evolved stars based on the MSX observation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the space MSX observation in bands A(8$\\mu$m), C(12$\\mu$m), D(15$\\mu$m) and E(21$\\mu$m), and the ground SiO maser observation of evolved stars by the Nobeyama 45-m telescope in the v=1 and v=2 J=1-0 transitions, the relation between SiO maser emission and mid-IR continuum radiation is analyzed. The relation between SiO maser emission and the IR radiation in the MSX bands A, C, D and E is all clearly correlated. The SiO maser emission can be explained by a radiative pumping mechanism according to its correlation with infrared radiation in the MSX band A.

B. W. Jiang

2002-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

198

Dual-band infrared capabilities for imaging buried object sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss dual-band infrared (DBIR) capabilities for imaging buried object sizes. We identify physical features affecting thermal contrast needed to distinguish buried object sites from undisturbed sites or surface clutter. Apart from atmospheric transmission and system performance, these features include: object size, shape, and burial depth; ambient soil, disturbed soil and object site thermal diffusivity differences; surface temperature, emissivity, plant-cover, slope, albedo and roughness variations; weather conditions and measurement times. We use good instrumentation to measure the time-varying temperature differences between buried object sites and undisturbed soil sites. We compare near surface soil temperature differences with radiometric infrared (IR) surface temperature differences recorded at 4.7 {plus_minus} 0.4 {mu}m and at 10.6 {plus_minus} 1.0 {mu}m. By producing selective DBIR image ratio maps, we distinguish temperature-difference patterns from surface emissivity effects. We discuss temperature differences between buried object sites, filled hole site (without buried objects), cleared (undisturbed) soil sites, and grass-covered sites (with and without different types of surface clutter). We compare temperature, emissivity-ratio, visible and near-IR reflectance signatures of surface objects, leafy plants and sod. We discuss the physical aspects of environmental, surface and buried target features affecting interpretation of buried targets, surface objects and natural backgrounds.

Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Gorvad, M.R.; Perkins, D.E.; Clark, G.A.; Hernandez, J.E.; Sherwood, R.J.

1993-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

199

Comparison of laser-based mitigation of fused silica surface damage using mid- versus far-infrared lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser induced growth of optical damage can limit component lifetime and therefore operating costs of large-aperture fusion-class laser systems. While far-infrared (IR) lasers have been used previously to treat laser damage on fused silica optics and render it benign, little is known about the effectiveness of less-absorbing mid-IR lasers for this purpose. In this study, they quantitatively compare the effectiveness and efficiency of mid-IR (4.6 {micro}m) versus far-IR (10.6 {micro}m) lasers in mitigating damage growth on fused silica surfaces. The non-linear volumetric heating due to mid-IR laser absorption is analyzed by solving the heat equation numerically, taking into account the temperature-dependent absorption coefficient {alpha}(T) at {lambda} = 4.6 {micro}m, while far-IR laser heating is well-described by a linear analytic approximation to the laser-driven temperature rise. In both cases, the predicted results agree well with surface temperature measurements based on infrared radiometry, as well as sub-surface fictive temperature measurements based on confocal Raman microscopy. Damage mitigation efficiency is assessed using a figure of merit (FOM) relating the crack healing depth to laser power required, under minimally-ablative conditions. Based on their FOM, they show that for cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation with a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation with a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser. This conclusion is corroborated by direct application of each laser system to the mitigation of pulsed laser-induced damage possessing fractures up to 225 {micro}m in depth.

Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

200

Adsorption of carbon monoxide on a smooth palladium electrode: an in-situ infrared spectroscopic study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption of carbon monoxide on a smooth palladium electrode in 1 M HClO/sub 4/ saturated with CO was studied by two in-situ IR reflectance spectroscopic methods: EMIRS (electrochemically modulated infrared reflectance spectroscopy) and LPSIRS (linear potential sweep infrared reflectance spectroscopy). Two types of adsorbed CO, linear and bridged, were identified from the observed IR spectra, the latter being the predominant surface species. The C-O stretching frequency of the linear CO shifts to higher frequencies at more positive potentials with a slope of 48 cm/sup -1//V. The frequency of the bridged CO increases by 63 cm/sup -1/ between -0.5 and 0.9 V(NHE) and its integrated band intensity decreases continuously in the same potential region while the intensity of the linear CO is almost constant up to 0.1 V and then decreases gradually with increasing positive potential. The surface selection rule of the IR reflection absorption spectroscopy was tested for the present system by using the p- and s-polarized light. It was found that only p-polarized light gave the IR spectra of CO adsorbed on the palladium electrode thus proving the selection rule at the electrode/solution interface.

Kunimatsu, K.

1984-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sensitive Multi-Species Emissions Monitoring: Infrared Laser-Based Detection of Trace-Level Contaminants.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes our development of spectroscopic chemical analysis techniques and spectral modeling for trace-gas measurements of highly-regulated low-concentration species present in flue gas emissions from utility coal boilers such as HCl under conditions of high humidity. Detailed spectral modeling of the spectroscopy of HCl and other important combustion and atmospheric species such as H 2 O, CO 2 , N 2 O, NO 2 , SO 2 , and CH 4 demonstrates that IR-laser spectroscopy is a sensitive multi-component analysis strategy. Experimental measurements from techniques based on IR laser spectroscopy are presented that demonstrate sub-ppm sensitivity levels to these species. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify HCl at ppm levels with extremely high signal-to-noise even under conditions of high relative humidity. Additionally, cavity ring-down IR spectroscopy is used to achieve an extremely high sensitivity to combustion trace gases in this spectral region; ppm level CH 4 is one demonstrated example. The importance of spectral resolution in the sensitivity of a trace-gas measurement is examined by spectral modeling in the mid- and near-IR, and efforts to improve measurement resolution through novel instrument development are described. While previous project reports focused on benefits and complexities of the dual-etalon cavity ring-down infrared spectrometer, here details on steps taken to implement this unique and potentially revolutionary instrument are described. This report also illustrates and critiques the general strategy of IR- laser photodetection of trace gases leading to the conclusion that mid-IR laser spectroscopy techniques provide a promising basis for further instrument development and implementation that will enable cost-effective sensitive detection of multiple key contaminant species simultaneously.

Steill, Jeffrey D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Demonstration of dual-band infrared thermal imaging for bridge inspection. Phase II, final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing and implementing methods of effective bridge rehabilitation is a major issue for the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The nation spends $5 billion annually to replace, rehabilitate or construct new bridges. According to the National Bridge Inventory, over 100,000 U.S. bridges are structurally deficient. About 40,000 of these bridges have advanced deck deterioration. The most common causes of serious deck deterioration is delamination. Delaminations result when steel reinforcements within the bridge deck corrode, creating gaps that separate the concrete into layers. A reliable inspection technology, capable of identifying delaminations, would represent a power new tool in bridge maintenance. To date, most bridge inspections rely on human interpretation of surface visual features of chain dragging. These methods are slow, disruptive, unreliable and raise serious safety concerns. Infrared thermal imaging detects subsurface delaminations and surface clutter, which is introduced by foreign material on the roadway. Typically, foreign material which is not always evident on a video tape image, produces a unique IR reflectance background unlike the thermal response of a subsurface delamination. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermal imaging to identify and remove nonthermal IR reflectance backgrounds from foreign material on the roadway. DBIR methods improve the performance of IR thermal imaging by a factor of ten, compared to single-band infrared (SBIR) methods. DBIR thermal imaging allows precise temperature measurement to reliably locate bridge deck delaminations and remove wavelength-dependent emissivity variations due to foreign material on the roadway.

Durbin, P.F.; Del Grande, N.K.; Schaich, P.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fuel Cell Manufacturing Diagnostic Techniques: IR Thermography with Reactive Flow through Excitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While design and material considerations for PEMFCs have a large impact on cost, it is also necessary to consider a transition to high volume production of fuel cell systems, including MEA components, to enable economies of scale and reduce per unit cost. One of the critical manufacturing tasks is developing and deploying techniques to provide in?process measurement of fuel cell components for quality control. This effort requires a subsidiary task: The study of the effect of manufacturing defects on performance and durability with the objective to establish validated manufacturing tolerances for fuel cell components. This work focuses on the development of a potential quality control method for gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs). The method consists of infrared (IR) thermography combined with reactive flow through (RFT) excitation. Detection of catalyst loading reduction defects in GDE catalyst layers will be presented.

Manak, A. J.; Ulsh, M.; Bender, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organci molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on ?-alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto ?-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

Joan Thomas; Michael Kelley

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

Determining Transition State Geometries in Liquids Using 2D-IR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many properties of chemical reactions are determined by the transition state connecting reactant and product, yet it is difficult to directly obtain any information about these short-lived structures in liquids. We show that two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy can provide direct information about transition states by tracking the transformation of vibrational modes as a molecule crossed a transition state. We successfully monitored a simple chemical reaction, the fluxional rearrangement of Fe(CO)5, in which the exchange of axial and equatorial CO ligands causes an exchange of vibrational energy between the normal modes of the molecule. This energy transfer provides direct evidence regarding the time scale, transition state, and mechanism of the reaction.

Harris, Charles; Cahoon, James F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Harris, Charles B.

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hyperluminous Infrared Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

39 galaxies are now known, from follow-up of faint IRAS sources and from submm observations of high redshift AGN, with far infrared luminosities > 10^{13} Lo. 13 of these, which have been found in 60 or 850 mu surveys, form an important unbiased sub-sample. 12 have been found by comparison of 60 mu surveys with quasar or radio-galaxy catalogues, or from infrared surveys with colour selection biased towards AGN, while a further 14 have been found through submm observations of known high redshift AGN. In this paper I argue, on the basis of detailed modelling of the spectral energy distributions of hyperluminous galaxies with accurate radiative transfer models, and from evidence of high gas-mass in several cases, that the bulk of the emission from these galaxies at rest-frame wavelengths >= 50 mu is due to star formation. Even after correction for the effects of lensing, hyperluminous galaxies with emission peaking at rest-frame wavelengths >= 50 mu are therefore undergoing star-formation at rates > 1000 Mo/yr and are strong candidates for being primeval galaxies, in the process of a major episode of star formation.

M. Rowan-Robinson

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

Which Oxidation State Leads to O-O Bond Formation in Cp*Ir(bpy)Cl-Catalyzed Water Oxidation, Ir(V), Ir(VI), or Ir(VII)?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Which Oxidation State Leads to O-O Bond Formation in Cp*Ir(bpy)Cl-Catalyzed Water Oxidation, Ir: Density functional calculations are used to revisit the reaction mechanism of water oxidation catalyzed oxidation at higher oxidation state even though it can also promote O-O bond formation. Therefore, [(bpy

Liao, Rongzhen

208

Growth of graphene on Ir(111) Johann Coraux1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth of graphene on Ir(111) Johann Coraux1 ,, Alpha T. N'Diaye1 §, Martin Engler1 , Carsten Busse a renewed interest as a route towards high quality graphene prepared in a reproducible manner. Here we employ two growth methods for graphene on Ir(111), namely room temperature adsorption and thermal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

209

Simultaneous multi-beam planar array IR (pair) spectroscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method capable of providing spatially multiplexed IR spectral information simultaneously in real-time for multiple samples or multiple spatial areas of one sample using IR absorption phenomena requires no moving parts or Fourier Transform during operation, and self-compensates for background spectra and degradation of component performance over time. IR spectral information and chemical analysis of the samples is determined by using one or more IR sources, sampling accessories for positioning the samples, optically dispersive elements, a focal plane array (FPA) arranged to detect the dispersed light beams, and a processor and display to control the FPA, and display an IR spectrograph. Fiber-optic coupling can be used to allow remote sensing. Portability, reliability, and ruggedness is enhanced due to the no-moving part construction. Applications include determining time-resolved orientation and characteristics of materials, including polymer monolayers. Orthogonal polarizers may be used to determine certain material characteristics.

Elmore, Douglas L.; Rabolt, John F.; Tsao, Mei-Wei

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

210

Identifying silicate-absorbed ULIRGs at z~1-2 in the Bootes Field using Spitzer/IRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the 16$\\mu$m peakup imager on the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on Spitzer, we present a serendipitous survey of 0.0392 deg$^{2}$ within the area of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey in Bootes. Combining our results with the available Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24$\\mu$m survey of this area, we produce a catalog of 150 16$\\mu$m sources brighter than 0.18 mJy (3$\\sigma$) for which we derive measures or limits on the 16/24$\\mu$m colors. Such colors are especially useful in determining redshifts for sources whose mid infrared spectra contain strong emission or absorption features that characterize these colors as a function of redshift. We find that the 9.7$\\mu$m silicate absorption feature in Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) results in sources brighter at 16$\\mu$m than at 24$\\mu$m at z $\\sim$ 1--1.8 by at least 20%. With a threshold flux ratio of 1.2, restricting our analysis to $>5\\sigma$ detections at 16$\\mu$m, and using a $3\\sigma$ limit on 24$\\mu$m non-detections, the number of silicate-absorbed ULIRG candidates is 36. This defines a strong upper limit of $\\sim$920 sources deg$^{-2}$, on the population of silicate-absorbed ULIRGs at z $\\sim$ 1--1.8. This source count is about half of the total number of sources predicted at z $\\sim$ 1--2 by various phenomenological models. We note that the high 16/24$\\mu$m colors measured cannot be reproduced by any of the mid-IR spectral energy distributions assumed by these models, which points to the strong limitations currently affecting our phenomenological and theoretical understanding of infrared galaxy evolution.

M. M. Kasliwal; V. Charmandaris; D. Weedman; J. R. Houck; E. Le Floc'h; S. J. U. Higdon; L. Armus; H. I. Teplitz

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

211

A SPITZER IRS SURVEY OF NGC 1333: INSIGHTS INTO DISK EVOLUTION FROM A VERY YOUNG CLUSTER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the {lambda} = 5-36 {mu}m Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of 79 young stellar objects in the very young nearby cluster NGC 1333. NGC 1333's youth enables the study of early protoplanetary disk properties, such as the degree of settling and the formation of gaps and clearings. We construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using our IRS data as well as published photometry and classify our sample into SED classes. Using 'extinction-free' spectral indices, we determine whether the disk, envelope, or photosphere dominates the spectrum. We analyze the dereddened spectra of objects that show disk-dominated emission using spectral indices and properties of silicate features in order to study the vertical and radial structure of protoplanetary disks in NGC 1333. At least nine objects in our sample of NGC 1333 show signs of large (several AU) radial gaps or clearings in their inner disk. Disks with radial gaps in NGC 1333 show more nearly pristine silicate dust than their radially continuous counterparts. We compare properties of disks in NGC 1333 to those in three other well-studied regions, Taurus-Auriga, Ophiuchus, and Chamaeleon I, and find no difference in their degree of sedimentation and dust processing.

Arnold, L. A.; Watson, Dan M.; Kim, K. H.; Manoj, P.; Remming, I.; Sheehan, P.; Forrest, W. J.; Mamajek, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Adame, L.; McClure, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Furlan, E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Mail Stop 264-723, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Espaillat, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ausfeld, K.; Rapson, V. A., E-mail: laa@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu [Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Sonic IR crack detection of aircraft turbine engine blades with multi-frequency ultrasound excitations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effectively and accurately detecting cracks or defects in critical engine components, such as turbine engine blades, is very important for aircraft safety. Sonic Infrared (IR) Imaging is such a technology with great potential for these applications. This technology combines ultrasound excitation and IR imaging to identify cracks and flaws in targets. In general, failure of engine components, such as blades, begins with tiny cracks. Since the attenuation of the ultrasound wave propagation in turbine engine blades is small, the efficiency of crack detection in turbine engine blades can be quite high. The authors at Wayne State University have been developing the technology as a reliable tool for the future field use in aircraft engines and engine parts. One part of the development is to use finite element modeling to assist our understanding of effects of different parameters on crack heating while experimentally hard to achieve. The development has been focused with single frequency ultrasound excitation and some results have been presented in a previous conference. We are currently working on multi-frequency excitation models. The study will provide results and insights of the efficiency of different frequency excitation sources to foster the development of the technology for crack detection in aircraft engine components.

Zhang, Ding; Han, Xiaoyan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Newaz, Golam [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

213

Cyclohexene Photo-oxidation over Vanadia Catalyst Analyzed by Time Resolved ATR-FT-IR Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vanadia was incorporated in the 3-dimensional mesoporous material TUD-1 with a loading of 2percent w/w vanadia. The performance in the selective photo-oxidation of liquid cyclohexene was investigated using ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy. Under continuous illumination at 458 nm a significant amount of product, i.e. cyclohexenone, was identified. This demonstrates for the first time that hydroxylated vanadia centers in mesoporous materials can be activated by visible light to induce oxidation reactions. Using the rapid scan method, a strong perturbation of the vanadyl environment could be observed in the selective oxidation process induced by a 458 nm laser pulse of 480 ms duration. This is proposed to be caused by interaction of the catalytic centre with a cyclohexenyl hydroperoxide intermediate. The restoration of the vanadyl environment could be kinetically correlated to the rate of formation of cyclohexenone, and is explained by molecular rearrangement and dissociation of the peroxide to ketone and water. The ketone diffuses away from the active center and ATR infrared probing zone, resulting in a decreasing ketone signal on the tens of seconds time scale after initiation of the photoreaction. This study demonstrates the high potential of time resolved ATR FT-IR spectroscopy for mechanistic studies of liquid phase reactions by monitoring not only intermediates and products, but by correlating the temporal behavior of these species to molecular changes of the vanadyl catalytic site.

Frei, Heinz; Mul, Guido; Wasylenko, Walter; Hamdy, M. Sameh; Frei, Heinz

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

214

Synchrotron infrared confocal microscope: Application to infrared 3D spectral imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synchrotron infrared confocal microscope: Application to infrared 3D spectral imaging F Jamme1, 2 coupled to an infrared microscope allows imaging at the so-called diffraction limit. Thus, numerous infrared beamlines around the world have been developed for infrared chemical imaging. Infrared microscopes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

215

Can infrared gravitons screen $?$?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been suggested that infrared gravitons in de Sitter space may lead to a secular screening of the effective cosmological constant. This seems to clash with the naive expectation that the curvature scalar should stay constant due to the Heisenberg equation of motion. Here, we show that the tadpole correction to the local expansion rate, which has been used in earlier analyses as an indicator of a decaying effective $\\Lambda$, is not gauge invariant. On the other hand, we construct a gauge invariant operator which measures the renormalized curvature scalar smeared over an arbitrary window function, and we find that there is no secular screening of this quantity (to any given order in perturbation theory).

Jaume Garriga; Takahiro Tanaka

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

216

Lateral conduction infrared photodetector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photodetector for detecting infrared light in a wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m is disclosed. The photodetector has a mesa structure formed from semiconductor layers which include a type-II superlattice formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. Impurity doped regions are formed on sidewalls of the mesa structure to provide for a lateral conduction of photo-generated carriers which can provide an increased carrier mobility and a reduced surface recombination. An optional bias electrode can be used in the photodetector to control and vary a cut-off wavelength or a depletion width therein. The photodetector can be formed as a single-color or multi-color device, and can also be used to form a focal plane array which is compatible with conventional read-out integrated circuits.

Kim, Jin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Carroll, Malcolm S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

217

Asymptotics of the Infrared  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We follow recent formulations of dimensionally reduced loop operators for quantum field theories and exact representations of probabilistic lattice dynamics to identify a new scheme for the evaluation of partition function zeroes, allowing for the explicit analysis of quantum critical phenomena. This new approach gives partition function zeroes from a factored quantum loop operator basis and, as we show, constitutes an effective mapping of the renormalization group $\\beta$-function onto the noncommuting local operator basis of a countably finite Hilbert space. The Vafa-Witten theorem for CP-violation and related complex action problems of Euclidean Field theories are discussed, following recent treatments, and are shown to be natural consequences of the analyticity of the limiting distribution of these zeroes, and properties of vacuum regimes governed by a dominant quantum fluctuation in the vicinity of a renormalization group equation fixed point in the infrared.

P. R. Crompton

2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

218

AN EVOLVING COMPACT JET IN THE BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY MAXI J1836-194  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from {approx}10{sup 11} to {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high-energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process.

Russell, D. M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Soria, R.; Slaven-Blair, T.; Curran, P. A. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); O'Brien, K. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Sivakoff, G. R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-181, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Lewis, F. [Faulkes Telescope Project, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd CF37 1DL (United Kingdom); Markoff, S.; Altamirano, D. [Astronomical Institute ''Anton Pannekoek'', University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Homan, J. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Rupen, M. P.; Dhawan, V. [NRAO Domenici Science Operations Center, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Belloni, T. M. [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Cadolle Bel, M. [European Space Agency, European Space Astronomy Centre, ISOC, Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Casella, P. [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Roma (Italy); Corbel, S. [Laboratoire AIM, UMR 7158, CEA/DSM, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Fender, R. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Gallo, E., E-mail: russell@iac.es [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); and others

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

219

A Novel Spectroscopic Ellipsometer in the Infrared  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Novel Spectroscopic Ellipsometer in the Infrared Proefschrift ter verkrijging van de graad van-Charles A novel spectroscopic ellipsometer in the infrared / by Jean-Charles Cigal. ­ Eindhoven : Technische / infraroodspectroscopie / siliciumoxide / botweefsel Subject headings: ellipsometers / infrared spectroscopy / silicon

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

220

The Unidentified InfraRed Features after ISO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) has provided the first complete mid-IR spectra for a wide range of objects. Almost all of these spectra are dominated by the well-known infrared emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, and 11.2 $\\mu$m, the so-called Unidentified Infra-Red (UIR) features. Besides the major features, there is an array of minor features and broad plateaux stretching from 3 to 20 $\\mu$m which reveal subtle details of conditions in the emission zones and properties of the carriers. Generally attributed to the vibrational relaxation of UV-pumped Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon molecules (PAHs) containing some 50--100 C-atoms, these UIR spectra are a treasure trove of information. The ISO spectra have, for the first time, allowed a systematic analysis of the spectral characteristics of the UIR features in a wide variety of environments. The peak positions, profiles, and relative strengths of the major features vary from source to source and spatially within sources. These specific profiles are not unique to certain object types but can occur within each individual source. Here, we review ISO and recent ground-based observations and assess some of their implications.

E. Peeters; L. J. Allamandola; D. M. Hudgins; S. Hony; A. G. G. M. Tielens

2003-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hollow core and other infrared waveguides for instrumentation in intense radiation environments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this LDRD was to study the effect of steady-state neutron and gamma irradiation on the transmission of waveguides designed to operate well in the near- or mid-IR region of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this context, near-IR refers to the region between 1.3 {mu}m and about 2.4 {mu}m, and mid-IR between 3.0 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m. Such radiation environments could exist in nuclear power plants or nuclear weapons. Pulsed and steady-state radiation effects had been extensively studied on silica-based optical fibers because they have been the most readily available, most widely used in communications and sensing, and the least expensive. However, silica-based fibers do not transmit well beyond about 1.8 {mu}m and they are virtually opaque in the mid-IR. The mid-IR, as defined above, and beyond, is where vibrational spectroscopy is carried out. This type of sensing is one important application of infrared optical fibers.

Weiss, Jonathan David

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Wednesday, 26 July 2006 00:00 Silicon-based transistors are well-understood,...

223

Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Print Tuesday, 22 January 2013 00:00 A cold sulfur...

224

IR permittivities for silicides and doped silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complex permittivity for Pt, Pd, Ni, and Ti-silicide films as well as heavily doped p- and n-type silicon were determined by ellipsometry over the energy range 0.031 eV to 4.0 eV. Fits to the Drude model gave bulk plasma and relaxation frequencies. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and four-point probe measurements complemented the optical characterization. Calculations from measured permittivities of waveguide loss and mode confinement suggest that the considered materials are better suited for long-wavelength surface-plasmon-polariton waveguide applications than metal films.

Cleary, J. W.; Peale, R. E.; Smith, C. W.; Ishigami, M. [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Shelton, D. J.; Boreman, G. D. [College of Optics (CREOL), University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Soref, R.; Drehman, A.; Buchwald, W. R. [Sensors Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts 01731 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Low-power low-noise analog circuits for on-focal-plane signal processing of infrared sensors Bedabrata Pain, Sunetra K. Mendis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-power low-noise analog circuits for on-focal-plane signal processing of infrared sensors imager performance are presented. To enable the detection of high background IR images, an in-pixel current-mode background suppression scheme is presented. The background suppression circuit consists

Fossum, Eric R.

226

THE OPTICAL GREEN VALLEY VERSUS MID-INFRARED CANYON IN COMPACT GROUPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compact groups of galaxies provide conditions similar to those experienced by galaxies in the earlier universe. Recent work on compact groups has led to the discovery of a dearth of mid-infrared transition galaxies (MIRTGs) in Infrared Array Camera (3.6-8.0 ?m) color space as well as at intermediate specific star formation rates. However, we find that in compact groups these MIRTGs have already transitioned to the optical ([g–r]) red sequence. We investigate the optical color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of 99 compact groups containing 348 galaxies and compare the optical CMD with mid-infrared (mid-IR) color space for compact group galaxies. Utilizing redshifts available from Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we identified new galaxy members for four groups. By combining optical and mid-IR data, we obtain information on both the dust and the stellar populations in compact group galaxies. We also compare with more isolated galaxies and galaxies in the Coma Cluster, which reveals that, similar to clusters, compact groups are dominated by optically red galaxies. While we find that compact group transition galaxies lie on the optical red sequence, LVL+SINGS mid-IR transition galaxies span the range of optical colors. The dearth of mid-IR transition galaxies in compact groups may be due to a lack of moderately star-forming low mass galaxies; the relative lack of these galaxies could be due to their relatively small gravitational potential wells. This makes them more susceptible to this dynamic environment, thus causing them to more easily lose gas or be accreted by larger members.

Walker, Lisa May; Butterfield, Natalie; Johnson, Kelsey; Zucker, Catherine [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Gallagher, Sarah [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Konstantopoulos, Iraklis [Australian Astronomical Observatory, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Zabludoff, Ann [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis [Laboratory for X-Ray Astrophysics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Charlton, Jane C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Design of high efficiency Mid IR QCL lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The proposed research is a study of designing high-efficiency Mid-IR quantum cascade lasers (QCL). This thesis explores "injector-less" designs for achieving lower voltage defects and improving wall plug efficiencies through ...

Hsu, Allen Long

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF NH{sub 3} AND NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} AMORPHOUS ICES IN THE NEAR-INFRARED AND MID-INFRARED REGIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ammonia ice has been detected on different astrophysical media ranging from interstellar medium (ISM) particles to the surface of various icy bodies of our solar system, where nitrogen is also present. We have carried out a detailed study of amorphous NH{sub 3} ice and NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} ice mixtures, based on infrared (IR) spectra in the mid-IR (MIR) and near-IR (NIR) regions, supported by theoretical quantum chemical calculations. Spectra of varying ice thicknesses were obtained and optical constants were calculated for amorphous NH{sub 3} at 15 K and 30 K and for a NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} mixture at 15 K over a 500-7000 cm{sup –1} spectral range. These spectra have improved accuracy over previous data, where available. Moreover, we also obtained absolute values for the band strengths of the more prominent IR features in both spectral regions. Our results indicate that the estimated NH{sub 3} concentration in ISM ices should be scaled upward by ?30%.

Zanchet, Alexandre; Rodríguez-Lazcano, Yamilet; Gálvez, Óscar; Herrero, Víctor J.; Escribano, Rafael; Maté, Belén, E-mail: belen.mate@csic.es [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Environment on few Mpc scales of Infrared Luminous Galaxies at Redshifts z~1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the environment of infrared luminous galaxies (L$_{IR}$[8-1000 $\\mu $m$] >10^{11}$L$_{\\sun}$). We focus on the redshift range 0.7 $\\leq$ z $\\leq$ 1, where these galaxies dominate the star formation activity and play a significant role in galaxy evolution. We employ MIPS 24$\\mu$m data to identify infrared galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). We use a local density indicator to probe the environment on few Mpc scales and a group member catalog, both of which make use of the DEEP2 spectroscopic redshift catalog, to quantify the environment of these galaxies. We find that the local environment of LIRGs and ULIRGs is intermediate between that of blue and red galaxies. LIRGs and ULIRGs avoid underdense environments and inhabit local environments that are more dense on average than those of other DEEP2 galaxies at similar redshifts. However, when the comparison sample of the non-IR DEEP2 galaxies is restricted to have the same range of stellar mass, color, or luminosity as the IR--galaxies, there is no longer any significant difference in environment; the IR-galaxies follow the same trends in the color-environment and luminosity-environment relations observed at z$\\sim$1. We also find that about 30% of the LIRGs and ULIRGs belong to groups, associated with a minimum dark matter halo of 6$\\times10^{12}$M$_{\\odot}$h$^{-1}$. The group members constitute 20 % of the sources responsible for the IR star formation rate density and comoving energy density at z$\\sim$1.

D. Marcillac; G. H. Rieke; C. Papovich; C. N. A. Willmer; B. J. Weiner; A. L. Coil; M. C. Cooper; B. F. Gerke; J. Woo; J. A. Newman; A. Georgakakis; E. S. Laird; K. Nandra; G. G. Fazio; J. -S. Huang; D. C. Koo

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The SNAP near infrared detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it will detect Type Ia supernovæ between z = 1 and 1.7 andphotometry for all supernovæ. HgCdTe technology, with a cut-Keywords: Cosmology, Supernovae, Dark Energy, Near Infrared,

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Industrial Use of Infrared Inspections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared is and has been an established technology in the military and aerospace fields. However, only relatively recently has this technology found a "use" in the industrial sector. Many reasons exist why the technology has not been used...

Duch, A. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A large population of mid-infrared selected, obscured active galaxies in the Bootes field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We identify a population of 640 obscured and 839 unobscured AGNs at redshifts 0.7Bootes. We select AGNs on the basis of Spitzer IRAC colors obtained by the IRAC Shallow Survey. Redshifts are obtained from optical spectroscopy or photometric redshift estimators. We classify the IR-selected AGNs as IRAGN 1 (unobscured) and IRAGN 2 (obscured) using a simple criterion based on the observed optical to mid-IR color, with a selection boundary of R-[4.5]=6.1, where R and [4.5] are the Vega magnitudes in the R and IRAC 4.5 micron bands, respectively. We verify this selection using X-ray stacking analyses with data from the Chandra XBootes survey, as well as optical photometry from NDWFS and spectroscopy from MMT/AGES. We show that (1) these sources are indeed AGNs, and (2) the optical/IR color selection separates obscured sources (with average N_H~3x10^22 cm^-2 obtained from X-ray hardness ratios, and optical colors and morphologies typical of galaxies) and unobscured sources (with no X-ray absorption, and quasar colors and morphologies), with a reliability of >~80%. The observed numbers of IRAGNs are comparable to predictions from previous X-ray, optical, and IR luminosity functions, for the given redshifts and IRAC flux limits. We observe a bimodal distribution in R-[4.5] color, suggesting that luminous IR-selected AGNs have either low or significant dust extinction, which may have implications for models of AGN obscuration.

R. C. Hickox; C. Jones; W. R. Forman; S. S. Murray; M. Brodwin; M. J. I. Brown; P. R. Eisenhardt; D. Stern; C. S. Kochanek; D. Eisenstein; R. J. Cool; B. T. Jannuzi; A. Dey; K. Brand; V. Gorjian; N. Caldwell

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

233

Far-infrared Point Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The analysis of the submm anisotropies that will be mapped by the forthcoming MAP and PLANCK satellites requires careful foreground subtraction before measuring CMB fluctuations. Among these, the foreground due to IR/submm thermal radiation from dusty sources was poorly known until recent observational breakthroughs began unveiling the properties of these objects. We hereafter briefly review the observational evidence for a strong evolution of IR/submm sources with respect to the local universe explored by IRAS. We present the basic principles of a new modeling effort where consistent spectral energy distributions of galaxies are implemented into the paradigm of hierarchical clustering with the fashionable semi-analytic approach. This model provides us with specific predictions in IR/submm wavebands, that seem to reproduce the current status of the observations and help assessing the capabilities of forthcoming instruments to pursue the exploration of the deep universe at IR/submm wavelengths. Finally, the ability of the PLANCK High Frequency Instrument all-sky survey to produce a catalogue of dusty sources at submm wavelengths is briefly described.

B. Guiderdoni

1999-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

Mid-Infrared Fiber-Coupled QCl-QEPAS Sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An innovative spectroscopic system based on an external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) coupled with a mid-infrared (mid-IR) fiber and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is described. SF6 has been selected as a target gas in demonstration of the system for trace gas sensing. Single mode laser delivery through the prongs of the quartz tuning fork has been obtained employing a hollow waveguide fiber with inner silver–silver iodine (Ag–AgI) coatings and internal core diameter of 300 lm. A detailed design and realization of the QCL fiber coupling and output collimator system allowed almost practically all (99.4 %) of the laser beam to be transmitted through the spectrophone module. The achieved sensitivity of the system is 50 parts per trillion in 1 s, corresponding to a record for QEPAS normalized noise-equivalent absorption 2.7 9 10-10 W cm-1 Hz-1/2.

Spagnolo, V.; Patimisco, P.; Borri, Simone; Scamarcio, G.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Kriesel, J.M.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

What are the galaxies contributing to the Cosmic Infrared Background ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent optical observations have led to a significant progress in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. However, our view on the deep universe is currently limited to the starlight which directly escapes from high-redshift galaxies, since we so far ignore the fraction of luminosity absorbed by dust and released in the IR/submm wavelength range. A new constraint is set by the possible detection of the Cosmic Infrared Background. We briefly review the observations and use a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation and evolution to predict number counts consistent with the level of the background. It turns out that the predictions fairly accomodate preliminary data at 175 and 850 microns. This suggests that a significant fraction of star/galaxy formation at high z is hidden by dust.

B. Guiderdoni

1997-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

236

Infrared behavior of gluon and ghost propagators from asymmetric lattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a numerical study of the lattice Landau gluon and ghost propagators in three-dimensional pure SU(2) gauge theory. Data have been obtained using asymmetric lattices (V = 20^2 X 40, 20^2 X 60, 8^2 X 64, 8^2 X 140, 12^2 X 140 and 16^2 X 140) for the lattice coupling beta = 3.4, in the scaling region. We find that the gluon (respectively ghost) propagator is suppressed (respec. enhanced) at small momenta in the limit of large lattice volume V. By comparing these results with data obtained using symmetric lattices (V = 60^3 and 140^3), we find that both propagators suffer from systematic effects in the infrared region (p \\lesssim 650 MeV). In particular, the gluon (respec. ghost) propagator is less IR-suppressed (respec. enhanced) than in the symmetric case. We discuss possible implications of the use of asymmetric lattices.

Attilio Cucchieri; Tereza Mendes

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

237

Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

YET ANOTHER INFRARED ARCHIVE: RELEASE OF THE INFRARED TELESCOPE IN SPACE (IRTS) ARCHIVE DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 YET ANOTHER INFRARED ARCHIVE: RELEASE OF THE INFRARED TELESCOPE IN SPACE (IRTS) ARCHIVE DATA I the near- and mid-infrared low resolu- tion spectral catalogues of point sources, and image maps in #12;ve wavelength bands in the far-infrared. The point source catalogues contains over 14 000 (near-infrared

Yamamura, Issei

239

HIGH-RESOLUTION MID-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES D. Farrah,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

infrared emission. This initially provoked heated debate between a ``starburst'' camp and an ``activeHIGH-RESOLUTION MID-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES D. Farrah,1 J. Bernard, 10Y37 m spectra of 53 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), taken using the Infrared Spectrograph

Galis, Frietson

240

High-power parametric conversion from near-infrared to short-wave infrared  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-power parametric conversion from near-infrared to short-wave infrared Adrien Billat,1,* Steevy.billat@epfl.ch Abstract: We report the design of an all-fiber continuous wave Short-Wave Infrared source capable to output.4370) Nonlinear optics, fibers; (140.3070) Infrared and far-infrared lasers. References and links 1. M. N

Dalang, Robert C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

X-ray Observations of Mrk 231  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

T. J. Turner

1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

242

Dusty Infrared Galaxies: Sources of the Cosmic Infrared Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) in 1996, together with recent cosmological surveys from the mid-infrared to the millimeter have revolutionized our view of star formation at high redshifts. It has become clear, in the last decade, that a population of galaxies that radiate most of their power in the far-infrared (the so-called ``infrared galaxies'') contributes an important part of the whole galaxy build-up in the Universe. Since 1996, detailed (and often painful) investigations of the high-redshift infrared galaxies have resulted in the spectacular progress covered in this review. We outline the nature of the sources of the CIB including their star-formation rate, stellar and total mass, morphology, metallicity and clustering properties. We discuss their contribution to the stellar content of the Universe and their origin in the framework of the hierarchical growth of structures. We finally discuss open questions for a scenario of their evolution up to the present-day galaxies.

Guilaine Lagache; Jean-Loup Puget; Herve Dole

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

A REDSHIFT SURVEY OF HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED SELECTED STARBURSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR OBSCURED STAR FORMATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present Keck spectroscopic observations and redshifts for a sample of 767 Herschel-SPIRE selected galaxies (HSGs) at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m, taken with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and the Keck II DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph. The redshift distribution of these SPIRE sources from the Herschel Multitiered Extragalactic Survey peaks at z = 0.85, with 731 sources at z < 2 and a tail of sources out to z {approx} 5. We measure more significant disagreement between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts (({Delta}z/(1 + z{sub spec})) = 0.29) than is seen in non-infrared selected samples, likely due to enhanced star formation rates and dust obscuration in infrared-selected galaxies. The infrared data are used to directly measure integrated infrared luminosities and dust temperatures independent of radio or 24 {mu}m flux densities. By probing the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) at its peak, we estimate that the vast majority (72%-83%) of z < 2 Herschel-selected galaxies would drop out of traditional submillimeter surveys at 0.85-1 mm. We find that dust temperature traces infrared luminosity, due in part to the SPIRE wavelength selection biases, and partially from physical effects. As a result, we measure no significant trend in SPIRE color with redshift; if dust temperature were independent of luminosity or redshift, a trend in SPIRE color would be expected. Composite infrared SEDs are constructed as a function of infrared luminosity, showing the increase in dust temperature with luminosity, and subtle change in near-infrared and mid-infrared spectral properties. Moderate evolution in the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation is measured for this partially radio-selected sample, with q{sub IR}{proportional_to}(1 + z){sup -0.30{+-}0.02} at z < 2. We estimate the luminosity function and implied star formation rate density contribution of HSGs at z < 1.6 and find overall agreement with work based on 24 {mu}m extrapolations of the LIRG, ULIRG, and total infrared contributions. This work significantly increased the number of spectroscopically confirmed infrared-luminous galaxies at z >> 0 and demonstrates the growing importance of dusty starbursts for galaxy evolution studies and the build-up of stellar mass throughout cosmic time.

Casey, C. M.; Budynkiewicz, J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bethermin, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu - CNRS - Universite Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bock, J.; Bridge, C. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Burgarella, D. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille - LAM, Universite d'Aix-Marseille and CNRS, UMR7326, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Chapin, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Chapman, S. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Conselice, C. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Cooray, A. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hatziminaoglou, E. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Ivison, R. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); and others

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

244

INFRARED LUMINOSITIES AND AROMATIC FEATURES IN THE 24 {mu}m FLUX-LIMITED SAMPLE OF 5MUSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study a 24 {mu}m selected sample of 330 galaxies observed with the infrared spectrograph for the 5 mJy Unbiased Spitzer Extragalactic Survey. We estimate accurate total infrared luminosities by combining mid-IR spectroscopy and mid-to-far infrared photometry, and by utilizing new empirical spectral templates from Spitzer data. The infrared luminosities of this sample range mostly from 10{sup 9} L{sub sun} to 10{sup 13.5} L{sub sun}, with 83% in the range 10{sup 10} L{sub sun} < L{sub IR} < 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}. The redshifts range from 0.008 to 4.27, with a median of 0.144. The equivalent widths of the 6.2 {mu}m aromatic feature have a bimodal distribution, probably related to selection effects. We use the 6.2 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon equivalent width (PAH EW) to classify our objects as starburst (SB)-dominated (44%), SB-AGN composite (22%), and active galactic nucleus (AGN)-dominated (34%). The high EW objects (SB-dominated) tend to have steeper mid-IR to far-IR spectral slopes and lower L{sub IR} and redshifts. The low EW objects (AGN-dominated) tend to have less steep spectral slopes and higher L{sub IR} and redshifts. This dichotomy leads to a gross correlation between EW and slope, which does not hold within either group. AGN-dominated sources tend to have lower log(L{sub PAH7.7{sub {mu}m}}/L{sub PAH11.3{sub {mu}m}}) ratios than star-forming galaxies, possibly due to preferential destruction of the smaller aromatics by the AGN. The log(L{sub PAH7.7{sub {mu}m}}/L{sub PAH11.3{sub {mu}m}}) ratios for star-forming galaxies are lower in our sample than the ratios measured from the nuclear spectra of nearby normal galaxies, most probably indicating a difference in the ionization state or grain size distribution between the nuclear regions and the entire galaxy. Finally, we provide a calibration relating the monochromatic continuum or aromatic feature luminosity to L{sub IR} for different types of objects.

Wu Yanling; Helou, George; Shi Yong, E-mail: yanling@ipac.caltech.ed, E-mail: gxh@ipac.caltech.ed, E-mail: yong@ipac.caltech.ed [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

AN INFRARED EXCESS IDENTIFIED IN RADIO-LOUD BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If broad absorption line (BAL) quasars represent a high-covering-fraction evolutionary state (even if this is not the sole factor governing the presence of BALs), it is expected that they should show an excess of mid-infrared radiation compared to normal quasars. Some previous studies have suggested that this is not the case. We perform the first analysis of the IR properties of radio-loud BAL quasars, using IR data from WISE and optical (rest-frame ultraviolet) data from SDSS, and compare the BAL quasar sample with a well-matched sample of unabsorbed quasars. We find a statistically significant excess in the mid- to near-infrared luminosities of BAL quasars, particularly at rest-frame wavelengths of 1.5 and 4 {mu}m. Our sample was previously used to show that BALs are observed along many lines of sight toward quasars, but with an overabundance of more edge-on sources, suggesting that orientation factors into the appearance of BALs. The evidence here-of a difference in IR luminosities between BAL quasars and unabsorbed quasars-can be ascribed to evolution. This suggests that a merging of the current BAL paradigms is needed to fully describe the class.

DiPompeo, M. A.; Runnoe, J. C.; Brotherton, M. S.; Myers, A. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy 3905, University of Wyoming, 1000 East University, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy 3905, University of Wyoming, 1000 East University, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

246

Indus-2 X-ray lithography beamline for X-ray optics and material science applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray lithography is an ideal technique by which high aspect ratio and high spatial resolution micro/nano structures are fabricated using X-rays from synchrotron radiation source. The technique has been used for fabricating optics (X-ray, visible and infrared), sensors and actuators, fluidics and photonics. A beamline for X-ray lithography is operational on Indus-2. The beamline offers wide lithographic window from 1-40keV photon energy and wide beam for producing microstructures in polymers upto size ?100mm × 100mm. X-ray exposures are possible in air, vacuum and He gas environment. The air based exposures enables the X-ray irradiation of resist for lithography and also irradiation of biological and liquid samples.

Dhamgaye, V. P., E-mail: vishal@rrcat.gov.in; Lodha, G. S., E-mail: vishal@rrcat.gov.in [Indus Synchrotrons Utilisation Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

247

arXiv:astro-ph/0612563v119Dec2006 Hard X-rays and Fluorescent Iron Emission from the Embedded  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results of XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the infrared cluster lying near the NGC 2071 reflection nebula winds. One of the closest regions known to contain young high-mass stars is the infrared cluster near (Anthony-Twarog 1982; Brown et al. 1994). Near-infrared observations by Lada et al. (1991) revealed more

Guedel, Manuel

248

Near infrared detectors for SNAP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large format (1k x 1k and 2k x 2k) near infrared detectors manufactured by Rockwell Scientific Center and Raytheon Vision Systems are characterized as part of the near infrared R&D effort for SNAP (the Super-Nova/Acceleration Probe). These are hybridized HgCdTe focal plane arrays with a sharp high wavelength cut-off at 1.7 um. This cut-off provides a sufficiently deep reach in redshift while it allows at the same time low dark current operation of the passively cooled detectors at 140 K. Here the baseline SNAP near infrared system is briefly described and the science driven requirements for the near infrared detectors are summarized. A few results obtained during the testing of engineering grade near infrared devices procured for the SNAP project are highlighted. In particular some recent measurements that target correlated noise between adjacent detector pixels due to capacitive coupling and the response uniformity within individual detector pixels are discussed.

Schubnell, M.; Barron, N.; Bebek, C.; Brown, M.G.; Borysow, M.; Cole, D.; Figer, D.; Lorenzon, W.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Seshadri, S.; Smith, R.; Tarle, G.

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

249

Continuous Mid-Infrared Star Formation Rate Indicators: Diagnostics for 0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present continuous, monochromatic star formation rate (SFR) indicators over the mid-infrared wavelength range of 6-70 micron. We use a sample of 58 star forming galaxies (SFGs) in the Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey (SSGSS) at z<0.2, for which there is a rich suite of multi-wavelength photometry and spectroscopy from the ultraviolet through to the infrared. The data from the Spitzer infrared spectrograph (IRS) of these galaxies, which spans 5-40 micron, is anchored to their photometric counterparts. The spectral region between 40-70 micron is interpolated using dust model fits to the IRS spectrum and Spitzer 70 and 160 micron photometry. Since there are no sharp spectral features in this region, we expect these interpolations to be robust. This spectral range is calibrated as a SFR diagnostic using several reference SFR indicators to mitigate potential bias. Our band-specific continuous SFR indicators are found to be consistent with monochromatic calibrations in the local universe, as derived fr...

Battisti, A J; Johnson, B D; Elbaz, D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Germanium blocked impurity band far infrared detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been of interest to scientist since the eighteenth century when Sir William Herschel discovered the infrared as he measured temperatures in the sun's spectrum and found that there was energy beyond the red. In the late nineteenth century, Thomas Edison established himself as the first infrared astronomer to look beyond the solar system when he observed the star Arcturus in the infrared. Significant advances in infrared technology and physics, long since Edison's time, have resulted in many scientific developments, such as the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) which was launched in 1983, semiconductor infrared detectors for materials characterization, military equipment such as night-vision goggles and infrared surveillance equipment. It is now planned that cooled semiconductor infrared detectors will play a major role in the ''Star Wars'' nuclear defense scheme proposed by the Reagan administration.

Rossington, C.S.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Optical constants of silicon carbide for astrophysical applications. II. Extending optical functions from IR to UV using single-crystal absorption spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory measurements of unpolarized and polarized absorption spectra of various samples and crystal stuctures of silicon carbide (SiC) are presented from 1200--35,000 cm$^{-1}$ ($\\lambda \\sim$ 8--0.28 $\\mu$m) and used to improve the accuracy of optical functions ($n$ and $k$) from the infrared (IR) to the ultraviolet (UV). Comparison with previous $\\lambda \\sim$ 6--20 $\\mu$m thin-film spectra constrains the thickness of the films and verifies that recent IR reflectivity data provide correct values for $k$ in the IR region. We extract $n$ and $k$ needed for radiative transfer models using a new ``difference method'', which utilizes transmission spectra measured from two SiC single-crystals with different thicknesses. This method is ideal for near-IR to visible regions where absorbance and reflectance are low and can be applied to any material. Comparing our results with previous UV measurements of SiC, we distinguish between chemical and structural effects at high frequency. We find that for all spectral re...

Hofmeister, A M; Goncharov, A F; Speck, A K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that it does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.

Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T.; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T.; Schaich, David A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Infrared extrapolations for atomic nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harmonic oscillator model-space truncations introduce systematic errors to the calculation of binding energies and other observables. We identify the relevant infrared scaling variable and give values for this nucleus-dependent quantity. We consider isotopes of oxygen computed with the coupled-cluster method from chiral nucleon-nucleon interactions at next-to-next-to-leading order and show that the infrared component of the error is sufficiently understood to permit controlled extrapolations. By employing oscillator spaces with relatively large frequencies, well above the energy minimum, the ultraviolet corrections can be suppressed while infrared extrapolations over tens of MeVs are accurate for ground-state energies. However, robust uncertainty quantification for extrapolated quantities that fully accounts for systematic errors is not yet developed.

R. J. Furnstahl; G. Hagen; T. Papenbrock; K. A. Wendt

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

High resolution far-infrared observations of the evolved H II region M16  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

M16 is an evolved, extremely density bounded H II region, which now consists only of a series of ionization fronts at molecular cloud boundaries. The source of ionization is the OB star cluster (NGC 6611) which is about 5 x 10/sup 6/ years old. We used the CFA/UA 102 cm balloon-borne telescope to map this region and detected three far-infrared (far-IR) sources embedded in an extended ridge of emission. Source I is an unresolved far-IR source embedded in a molecular cloud near a sharp ionization front. An H/sub 2/O maser is associated with this source, but no radio continuum emission has been observed. The other two far-IR sources (II and III) are associated with ionized gas-molecular cloud interfaces, with the far-IR radiation arising from dust at the boundary heated by the OB cluster. Source II is located at the southern prominent neutral intrusion with its associated bright rims and dark ''elephant trunk'' globules that delineate the current progress of the ionization front into the neutral material, and Source III arises at the interface of the northern molecular cloud fragment.

McBreen, B.; Fazio, G.G.; Jaffe, D.T.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

anomalous x-ray pulsars: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

256

anomalous x-ray scattering: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

257

analyzing x-ray pulsar: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

258

anomalous small-angle x-ray: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

259

anomalous surface x-ray: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

260

anomalous x-ray diffraction: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

anomalous x-ray pulsar: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

262

SPITZER SPECTROSCOPY OF INFRARED-LUMINOUS GALAXIES: DIAGNOSTICS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND STAR FORMATION AND CONTRIBUTION TO TOTAL INFRARED LUMINOSITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph to study the nature of star-formation and supermassive black hole accretion for a sample of 65 IR-luminous galaxies at 0.02 < z < 0.6 with F(24 {mu}m) > 1.2 mJy. The MIR spectra cover wavelengths 5-38 {mu}m, spanning the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features and important atomic diagnostic lines. Our sample of galaxies corresponds to a range of total IR luminosity, L{sub IR} = L(8-1000 {mu}m) = 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} L{sub Sun} (median L{sub IR} of 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }). We divide our sample into a subsample of galaxies with Spitzer Infrared Array Camera 3.6-8.0 {mu}m colors indicative of warm dust heated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN; IRAGN) and those galaxies whose colors indicate star-formation processes (non-IRAGN). Compared to the non-IRAGN, the IRAGN show smaller PAH emission equivalent widths, which we attribute to an increase in mid-IR continuum from the AGN. We find that in both the IRAGN and star-forming samples, the luminosity in the PAH features correlates strongly with [Ne II] {lambda}12.8 {mu}m emission line, from which we conclude that the PAH luminosity directly traces the instantaneous star-formation rate (SFR) in both the IRAGN and star-forming galaxies. We compare the ratio of PAH luminosity to the total IR luminosity, and we show that for most IRAGN star-formation accounts for 10%-50% of the total IR luminosity. We also find no measurable difference between the PAH luminosity ratios of L{sub 11.3}/L{sub 7.7} and L{sub 6.2}/L{sub 7.7} for the IRAGN and non-IRAGN, suggesting that AGN do not significantly excite or destroy PAH molecules on galaxy-wide scales. Interestingly, a small subset of galaxies (8 of 65 galaxies) show a strong excess of [O IV] {lambda}25.9 {mu}m emission compared to their PAH emission, which indicates the presence of heavily-obscured AGN, including 3 galaxies that are not otherwise selected as IRAGN. The low PAH emission and low [Ne II] emission of the IRAGN and [O IV]-excess objects imply the IR luminosity of these objects is dominated by processes associated with the AGN. Because these galaxies lie in the ''green valley'' of the optical color-magnitude relation and have low implied SFRs, we argue their hosts have declining SFRs and these objects will transition to the red sequence unless some process restarts their star-formation.

Shipley, Heath V.; Papovich, Casey [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Rieke, George H.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Weiner, Benjamin [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Dey, Arjun [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ, 85719 (United States); Moustakas, John, E-mail: heath.shipley@tamu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the AKARI near-infrared (NIR; 2.5-5 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 36 (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) at z = 0.01-0.4. We measure the NIR spectral features including the strengths of 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission and hydrogen recombination lines (Br{alpha} and Br{beta}), optical depths at 3.1 and 3.4 {mu}m, and NIR continuum slope. These spectral features are used to identify optically elusive, buried active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that half of the (U)LIRGs optically classified as non-Seyferts show AGN signatures in their NIR spectra. Using a combined sample of (U)LIRGs with NIR spectra in the literature, we measure the contribution of buried AGNs to the infrared luminosity from the spectral energy distribution fitting to the IRAS photometry. The contribution of these buried AGNs to the infrared luminosity is 5%-10%, smaller than the typical AGN contribution of (U)LIRGs including Seyfert galaxies (10%-40%). We show that NIR continuum slopes correlate well with WISE [3.4]-[4.6] colors, which would be useful for identifying a large number of buried AGNs using the WISE data.

Lee, Jong Chul; Lee, Myung Gyoon [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ho Seong [CEA Saclay/Service d'Astrophysique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kim, Minjin; Lee, Joon Hyeop, E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jclee@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: mkim@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: jhl@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Low Dose IR Creates an Oncogenic Microenvironment by Inducing Premature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction Much of the work addressing ionizing radiation-induced cellular response has been carried out mainly with the traditional cell culture technique involving only one cell type, how cellular response to IR is influenced by the tissue microenvironment remains elusive. By use of a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system to model critical interactions of different cell types with their neighbors and with their environment, we recently showed that low-dose IR-induced extracellular signaling via the tissue environment affects profoundly cellular responses. This proposal aims at determining the response of mammary epithelial cells in a tissue-like setting.

Yuan, Zhi-Min [Harvard School of Public Health

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

265

Infrared and NMR studies on rhenium(VII) complexes with CMPO and TBP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The infrared and NMR studies have been carried out on Re(VII) (a stand-in for Tc(VII)) complexes with n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and tributyl phosphate (TBP). In the IR study, changes in the absorption bands of the carbonyl and phosphoryl stretching regions were monitored when Re was extracted. The phosphoryl group was also investigated by using a phosphorus NMR. The spectra obtained in the mixed CMPO-TBP system were compared with those obtained in the CMPO or TBP system in order to discuss their bond-structures. It was found that CMPO showed semi-bidentate and bidentate bonding and that TBP could extract HReO[sub 4] in the mixed CMPO-TBP system. The IR and NMR results showed evidence of enhancement in the Re (Tc) extraction in the mixed CMPO-TBP system. 22 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Takeuchi, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Satoru; Yamawaki, Michio (Univ. of Tokyo, Ibaraki (Japan))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Coupling mid-infrared light from a photonic crystal waveguide to metallic transmission lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose and theoretically study a hybrid structure consisting of a photonic crystal waveguide (PhC-wg) and a two-wire metallic transmission line (TL), engineered for efficient transfer of mid-infrared (mid-IR) light between them. An efficiency of 32% is obtained for the coupling from the transverse magnetic (TM) photonic mode to the symmetric mode of the TL, with a predicted intensity enhancement factor of 53 at the transmission line surface. The strong coupling is explained by the small phase velocity mismatch and sufficient spatial overlapping between the modes. This hybrid structure could find applications in highly integrated mid-IR photonic-plasmonic devices for biological and gas sensing, among others.

Blanco-Redondo, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.blanco@tecnalia.com, E-mail: r.hillenbrand@nanogune.eu [ICT-European Software Institute Division, Tecnalia, Ibaizabal Bidea, Ed. 202, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia (Spain) [ICT-European Software Institute Division, Tecnalia, Ibaizabal Bidea, Ed. 202, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia (Spain); Dpto. Electronica y Telecom., E.T.S. Ingeniería Bilbao, UPV/EHU, Alda. Urquijo, 48103 Bilbao, Bizkaia (Spain); Sarriugarte, Paulo [Nanooptics Group, CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, 20018 Donostia–San Sebastian, Gipuzkoa (Spain)] [Nanooptics Group, CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, 20018 Donostia–San Sebastian, Gipuzkoa (Spain); Garcia-Adeva, Angel [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, E.T.S. Ingeniería de Bilbao, UPV-EHU, Alda. Urquijo, 48103 Bilbao, Bizkaia (Spain)] [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, E.T.S. Ingeniería de Bilbao, UPV-EHU, Alda. Urquijo, 48103 Bilbao, Bizkaia (Spain); Zubia, Joseba [Dpto. Electronica y Telecom., E.T.S. Ingeniería Bilbao, UPV/EHU, Alda. Urquijo, 48103 Bilbao, Bizkaia (Spain)] [Dpto. Electronica y Telecom., E.T.S. Ingeniería Bilbao, UPV/EHU, Alda. Urquijo, 48103 Bilbao, Bizkaia (Spain); Hillenbrand, Rainer, E-mail: andrea.blanco@tecnalia.com, E-mail: r.hillenbrand@nanogune.eu [Nanooptics Group, CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, 20018 Donostia–San Sebastian, Gipuzkoa (Spain) [Nanooptics Group, CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, 20018 Donostia–San Sebastian, Gipuzkoa (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao, Bizkaia (Spain)

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

267

Infrared Properties of Cataclysmic Variables from 2MASS Results from the 2nd Incremental Data Release  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because accretion-generated luminosity dominates the radiated energy of most cataclysmic variables, they have been ``traditionally'' observed primarily at short wavelengths. Infrared observations of cataclysmic variables contribute to the understanding of key system components that are expected to radiate at these wavelengths, such as the cool outer disk, accretion stream, and secondary star. We have compiled the J, H, and Ks photometry of all cataclysmic variables located in the sky coverage of the 2 Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) 2nd Incremental Data Release. This data comprises 251 systems with reliably identified near-IR counterparts and S/N > 10 photometry in one or more of the three near-IR bands.

Hoard, D W; Clark, L L; Bowers, T P; Bowers, Timothy P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SHOCKS IN THE L988 CLOUD COMPLEX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have searched the Lynds 988 dark cloud complex for optical (H{alpha} and [S II]) and near-IR (H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m) shocks from protostellar outflows. We find 20 new Herbig-Haro objects and 6 new H{sub 2} shocks (MHO objects), 3 of which are cross detections. Using the morphology in the optical and near-IR, we connect several of these shocks into at least five distinct outflow systems and identify their source protostars from catalogs of infrared sources. Two outflows in the cloud, from IRAS 21014+5001 and IRAS 21007+4951, are in excess of 1 pc in length. The IRAS 21007+4951 outflow has carved a large cavity in the cloud through which background stars can be seen. Also, we have found an optical shock which is the counterflow to the previously discovered ''northwest outflow'' from LkH{alpha} 324SE.

Walawender, J. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Reipurth, B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Bally, J., E-mail: joshw@naoj.org [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

MS, S and C Stars in the Infrared. Luminosities and Mass Loss Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this note I present an outline of infrared (IR) photometric AGB properties, based on two samples of Galactic Long Period Variables (C- and S-type respectively). I show the various selection criteria used during the choice of the sources and describe the motivations of observing them at near- and mid-IR wavelengths. I discuss the problems encountered in estimating their luminosity and distance and motivate the methods I choose for this purpose. Properties of the luminosity functions and of the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagrams obtained from the analysis are discussed. Finally, the choices made for estimating of the mass loss rates are described and preliminary results concerning them are shown.

R. Guandalini

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

270

Infrared behaviour of the one-loop scattering equations and supergravity integrands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recently introduced ambitwistor string led to a striking proposal for one-loop maximal supergravity amplitudes, localised on the solutions of the ambitwistor one-loop scattering equations. However, these amplitudes have not yet been explicitly analysed due to the apparent complexity of the equations that determine the localisation. In this paper we propose an analytic solution to the four-point one-loop scattering equations in the infrared (IR) regime of the amplitude. Using this solution, we compute the ambitwistor integrand and demonstrate that it correctly reproduces the four-graviton integrand, in the IR regime. This solution qualitatively extends to n points. To conclude, we explain that the ambitwistor one-loop scattering equations actually correspond to the standard Gross & Mende saddle point.

Casali, Eduardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Intrinsic near-infrared spectroscopic markers of breast tumors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycle on the red and near-infrared optical properties of thecancer imaging using near-infrared optical measurements andet al. / Intrinsic near-infrared spectroscopic markers of

Kukreti, Shwayta; Cerussi, Albert; Tromberg, Bruce; Gratton, Enrico

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Millimeter and Near-Infrared Observations of Neptune's Atmospheric Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B Near-Infrared Radiative Transfer Model B.15 Near-Infrared Observations of Neptune’s Clouds with the133 6.2 Near-infrared spectroscopy . . . . . .

Cook, Statia Honora Luszcz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

artworks ir microspectroscopy: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 submitted papers In Situ Infrared Microspectroscopy of ;850 Million-Year-Old Geosciences Websites Summary: , Santa...

274

INFRARED VARIABILITY OF EVOLVED PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: EVIDENCE FOR SCALE HEIGHT VARIATIONS IN THE INNER DISK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a multi-wavelength multi-epoch survey of five evolved protoplanetary disks in the IC 348 cluster that show significant infrared variability. Using 3-8 {mu}m and 24 {mu}m photometry along with 5-40 {mu}m spectroscopy from the Spitzer Space Telescope, as well as ground-based 0.8-5 {mu}m spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, and near-infrared photometry, covering timescales of days to years, we examine the variability in the disk, stellar, and accretion flux. We find substantial variations (10%-60%) at all infrared wavelengths on timescales of weeks to months for all of these young stellar objects. This behavior is not unique when compared to other cluster members and is consistent with changes in the structure of the inner disk, most likely scale height fluctuations on a dynamical timescale. Previous observations, along with our near-infrared photometry, indicate that the stellar fluxes are relatively constant; stellar variability does not appear to drive the large changes in the infrared fluxes. Based on our near-infrared spectroscopy of the Pa{beta} and Br{gamma} lines we find that the accretion rates are variable in most of the evolved disks but the overall rates are probably too small to cause the infrared variability. We discuss other possible physical causes for the variability, including the influence of a companion, magnetic fields threading the disk, and X-ray flares.

Flaherty, K. M.; Rieke, G. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Muzerolle, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD, 21218 (United States); Gutermuth, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Balog, Z. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Herbst, W. [Department of Astronomy, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Megeath, S. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Kun, M., E-mail: kflaherty@as.arizona.edu [Konkoly Observatory, Konkoly Thege ut 15-17, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

Infrared emitting device and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An infrared emitting device and method. The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns.

Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Dawson, L. Ralph (Albuquerque, NM); Howard, Arnold J. (Albuquerque, NM); Baucom, Kevin C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Infrared Catastrophe for Nelson's Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We mathematically study the infrared catastrophe for the Hamiltonian of Nelson's model when it has the external potential in a general class. For the model, we prove the pull-through formula on ground states in operator theory first. Based on this formula, we show both non-existence of any ground state and divergence of the total number of soft bosons.

Masao Hirokawa

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

277

Quantitative nondestructive testing using Infrared Thermography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steady, and selective heating scenarios. Infrared Physics &heating thermography and lock-in ther- mography to quantitative nondestructive evaluations. Infraredheating is very difficult to achieve in a practical scenario. The Infrared

Manohar, Arun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ecological and agricultural applications of synchrotron IR microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological and agricultural applications of synchrotron IR microscopy T.K. Raab a,*, J.P. Vogel b factors to the fungus Erysiphe cichoracearum, a causative agent of powdery mildew disease. Three genes to pro- liferate when environmental conditions and re- sources are optimum. Cellulose, an abundant

279

Mid-IR FORCAST/SOFIA Observations of M82  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present 75"x75" size maps of M82 at 6.4 micron, 6.6 micron, 7.7 micron, 31.5 micron, and 37.1 micron with a resolution of ~4" that we have obtained with the mid-IR camera FORCAST on SOFIA. We find strong emission from the inner 60" (~1kpc) along the major axis, with the main peak 5" west-southwest of the nucleus and a secondary peak 4" east-northeast of the nucleus. The detailed morphology of the emission differs among the bands, which is likely due to different dust components dominating the continuum emission at short mid-IR wavelengths and long mid-IR wavelengths. We include Spitzer-IRS and Herschel/PACS 70 micron data to fit spectral energy distribution templates at both emission peaks. The best fitting templates have extinctions of A_V = 18 and A_V = 9 toward the main and secondary emission peak and we estimated a color temperature of 68 K at both peaks from the 31 micron and 37 micron measurement. At the emission peaks the estimated dust masses are on the order of 10^{4} M_sun.

Nikola, T; Vacca, W D; Adams, J D; De Buizer, J M; Gull, G E; Henderson, C P; Keller, L D; Morris, M R; Schoenwald, J; Stacey, G; Tielens, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Imaging Local Chemical Microstructure of Germinated Wheat with Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spatial resolution enabled by in situ Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy as predicted from our earlier report in Spectroscopy (1) is applied to localized chemical analysis in this vital biological process of seed germination. Germination includes several different biochemical and structural processes. Ultimately, the entire seed is consumed in sustaining the new life that results after sprouting and growth (2-4). Alpha amylase production is the standard evidence for detection of sprouted (germinated) wheat at harvest. Moist preharvest conditions can cause devastating losses and render the harvested wheat unfit for flour production. Dormancy of dry seeds following harvest retards sprouting under proper storage.

Koc,H.; Wetzel, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

Eckels, Joel Del (Livermore, CA); Klunder, Gregory L. (Oakland, CA)

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

282

Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: • Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) • Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) • Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) • Upwelling shortwave (reflected) • Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) • Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

Stoffel, T

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Using Infrared Sensors to Follow an Infrared Beam Scott Sobieski, Thomas Richards, David Peacock,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Infrared Sensors to Follow an Infrared Beam Scott Sobieski, Thomas Richards, David Peacock, Computer Science Department The second robot follows the infrared beam from the first robot. These sensors infrared sensors produce a value between 0 and 255 depending on their distance from the emitting beam

Kay, Jennifer S.

284

YET ANOTHER INFRARED ARCHIVE: RELEASE OF THE INFRARED TELESCOPE IN SPACE (IRTS) ARCHIVE DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 YET ANOTHER INFRARED ARCHIVE: RELEASE OF THE INFRARED TELESCOPE IN SPACE (IRTS) ARCHIVE DATA I from 1.4 to 700 µm. Presently the archive includes the near- and mid-infrared low resolu- tion spectral catalogues of point sources, and image maps in five wavelength bands in the far-infrared. The point source

Yamamura, Issei

285

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation using spectral imaging. This has been accom- plished with both visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) sunlight-path laser absorption measurements [14]­[16], in-situ visible and near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectral

Lawrence, Rick L.

286

Chapter VIII Automated Overlay of Infrared  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

166 Chapter VIII Automated Overlay of Infrared and Visual Medical Images G. Schaefer Aston written permission of IGI Global is prohibited. AbstrAct Medical infrared imaging captures the temperature a useful diagnostic visualisation for the clinician. #12;167 Automated Overlay of Infrared and Visual

Hopgood, Adrian

287

Satellite Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Tec / Satellite Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft L. M. McMillin D. Q. Wark J. M. Siomkajlo P. G. Abel A. Werbowetzki. E. Bittner C. M. Hayden #12;UDC 551.507.362.2:551.508.2:551.501.7:535-1 Physics Infrared radiation

288

Infrared Catastrophe for Nelson's Model Masao Hirokawa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared Catastrophe for Nelson's Model Masao Hirokawa Department of Mathematics, Okayama University, 700­8530 Okayama, Japan Abstract We study the infrared catastrophe for Nelson's Hamiltonian general conditions. 1 Introduction The purpose of this study is to investigate the infrared catastrophe

289

Multiphoton microscopy with near infrared contrast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiphoton microscopy with near infrared contrast agents Siavash Yazdanfar,a, * Chulmin Joo,a Chun limited to the visible spectrum. We introduce a paradigm for MPM of near-infrared NIR fluorescent Engineers. DOI: 10.1117/1.3420209 Keywords: two-photon microscopy; ultrafast fiber lasers; near-infrared

Larson-Prior, Linda

290

THE SPITZER MID-INFRARED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SURVEY. I. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF OBSCURED CANDIDATES AND NORMAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SELECTED IN THE MID-INFRARED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a program of optical and near-infrared spectroscopic follow-up of candidate active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected in the mid-infrared. This survey selects both normal and obscured AGNs closely matched in luminosity across a wide range, from Seyfert galaxies with bolometric luminosities L {sub bol} ? 10{sup 10} L {sub ?} to highly luminous quasars (L {sub bol} ? 10{sup 14} L {sub ?}), all with redshifts ranging from 0 to 4.3. Samples of candidate AGNs were selected with mid-infrared color cuts at several different 24 ?m flux density limits to ensure a range of luminosities at a given redshift. The survey consists of 786 candidate AGNs and quasars, of which 672 have spectroscopic redshifts and classifications. Of these, 137 (20%) are type 1 AGNs with blue continua, 294 (44%) are type 2 objects with extinctions A{sub V} ?> 5 toward their AGNs, 96 (14%) are AGNs with lower extinctions (A{sub V} ? 1), and 145 (22%) have redshifts, but no clear signs of AGN activity in their spectra. Of the survey objects 50% have L {sub bol} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ?}, in the quasar regime. We present composite spectra for type 2 quasars and objects with no signs of AGN activity in their spectra. We also discuss the mid-infrared—emission-line luminosity correlation and present the results of cross correlations with serendipitous X-ray and radio sources. The results show that: (1) obscured objects dominate the overall AGN population, (2) mid-infrared selected AGN candidates exist which lack AGN signatures in their optical spectra but have AGN-like X-ray or radio counterparts, and (3) X-ray and optical classifications of obscured and unobscured AGNs often differ.

Lacy, M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ridgway, S. E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Gates, E. L. [UCO/Lick Observatory, P.O. Box 85, Mount Hamilton, CA 95140 (United States); Nielsen, D. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Petric, A. O. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sajina, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tuffs University, 212 College Avenue, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Urrutia, T. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Cox Drews, S. [946 Mangrove Avenue 102, Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (United States); Harrison, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Seymour, N. [CSIRO, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Storrie-Lombardi, L. J. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Vacuum-UV to IR supercontinuum in hydrogen-filled photonic crystal fiber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although supercontinuum sources are readily available for the visible and near infrared, and recently also for the mid-IR, many areas of biology, chemistry and physics would benefit greatly from the availability of compact, stable and spectrally bright deep ultraviolet (DUV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) supercontinuum sources. Such sources have however not yet been developed. Here we report the generation of a bright supercontinuum, spanning more than three octaves from 124 nm to beyond 1200 nm, in hydrogen-filled kagom\\'e-style hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (kagom\\'e-PCF). Few-{\\mu}J, 30 fs pump pulses at wavelength 805 nm are launched into the fiber, where they undergo self-compression via the Raman-enhanced Kerr effect. Modeling indicates that before reaching a minimum sub-cycle pulse duration of ~1 fs, much less than one period of molecular vibration (8 fs), nonlinear reshaping of the pulse envelope, accentuated by self-steepening and shock formation, creates an ultrashort feature that causes impulsi...

Belli, Federico; Chang, Wonkeun; Travers, John C; Russell, Philip St J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

WATER ABSORPTION FROM GAS VERY NEAR THE MASSIVE PROTOSTAR AFGL 2136 IRS 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present ground-based observations of the ?{sub 1} and ?{sub 3} fundamental bands of H{sub 2}O toward the massive protostar AFGL 2136 IRS 1, identifying absorption features due to 47 different ro-vibrational transitions between 2.468 ?m and 2.561 ?m. Analysis of these features indicates the absorption arises in warm (T = 506 ± 25 K), very dense (n(H{sub 2}) > 5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}) gas, suggesting an origin close to the central protostar. The total column density of warm water is estimated to be N(H{sub 2}O) = (1.02 ± 0.02) × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –2}, giving a relative abundance of N(H{sub 2}O)/N(H{sub 2}) ? 10{sup –4}. Our study represents the first extensive use of water vapor absorption lines in the near infrared, and demonstrates the utility of such observations in deriving physical parameters.

Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Seifahrt, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Richter, M. J. [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

293

INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY J1023+0038: EVIDENCE FOR THE SHORT-TERM NATURE OF ITS INTERACTING PHASE IN 2000-2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report our multi-band infrared (IR) imaging of the transitional millisecond pulsar system J1023+0038, a rare pulsar binary known to have an accretion disk in 2000-2001. The observations were carried out with ground-based and space telescopes from near-IR to far-IR wavelengths. We detected the source in near-IR JH bands and Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m mid-IR channels. Combined with the previously reported optical spectrum of the source, the IR emission is found to arise from the companion star, with no excess emission detected in the wavelength range. Because our near-IR fluxes are nearly equal to those obtained by the 2MASS all-sky survey in 2000 February, the result indicates that the binary did not contain the accretion disk at the time, whose existence would have raised the near-IR fluxes to twice larger values. Our observations have thus established the short-term nature of the interacting phase seen in 2000-2001: the accretion disk existed for at most 2.5 yr. The binary was not detected by the WISE all-sky survey carried out in 2010 at its 12 and 22 {mu}m bands and our Herschel far-IR imaging at 70 and 160 {mu}m. Depending on the assumed properties of the dust, the resulting flux upper limits provide a constraint of <3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22}-3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} g on the mass of the dust grains that possibly exist as the remnants of the previously seen accretion disk.

Wang, Xuebing; Wang, Zhongxiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Morrell, Nidia [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, La Serena (Chile)] [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, La Serena (Chile)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

294

Highlights: Optical/NIR Spectroscopy of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reviews the results from recent optical and near-infrared spectroscopic studies of ultraluminous infrared galaxies.

S. Veilleux

1999-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

295

The nearby eclipsing stellar system delta Velorum - I. Origin of the infrared excess from VISIR and NACO imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Context: The triple stellar system delta Vel system presents a significant infrared excess, whose origin is still being debated. A large infrared bow shock has been discovered using Spitzer/MIPS observations. Although it appears as a significant contributor to the measured IR excess, the possibility exists that a circumstellar IR excess is present around the stars of the system. - Aims: The objective of the present VISIR and NACO observations is to identify whether one of the stars of the delta Vel system presents a circumstellar photometric excess in the thermal IR domain and to quantify it. - Methods: We observed delta Vel using the imaging modes of the ESO/VLT instruments VISIR (in BURST mode) and NACO to resolve the A-B system (0.6" separation) and obtain the photometry of each star. We also obtained one NACO photometry epoch precisely at the primary (annular) eclipse of delta Vel Aa by Ab. - Results: Our photometric measurements with NACO (2.17 mic), complemented by the existing visible photometry allowed us to reconstruct the spectral energy distribution of the three stars. We then compared the VISIR photometry (8.6-12.8 mic) to the expected photospheric emission from the three stars at the corresponding wavelengths. - Conclusions: We can exclude the presence of a circumstellar thermal infrared excess around delta Vel A or B down to a few percent level. This supports the conclusions of Gaspar et al. (2008) that the IR excess of delta Vel has an interstellar origin, although a cold circumstellar disk could still be present. In addition, we derive the spectral types of the three stars Aa, Ab, and B (respectively A2IV, A4V and F8V), and we estimate the age of the system around 400-500 Myr.

Pierre Kervella; Frédéric Thévenin; Monika Petr-Gotzens

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

296

THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND INTENSITY AND ANISOTROPIES DURING THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fraction of the extragalactic near-infrared (near-IR) background light involves redshifted photons from the ultraviolet (UV) emission from galaxies present during reionization at redshifts above 6. The absolute intensity and the anisotropies of the near-IR background provide an observational probe of the first-light galaxies and their spatial distribution. We estimate the extragalactic background light intensity during reionization by accounting for the stellar and nebular emission from first-light galaxies. We require the UV photon density from these galaxies to generate a reionization history that is consistent with the optical depth to electron scattering from cosmic microwave background measurements. We also require the bright-end luminosity function (LF) of galaxies in our models to reproduce the measured Lyman-dropout LFs at redshifts of 6-8. The absolute intensity is about 0.1-0.4 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at the peak of its spectrum at {approx}1.1 {mu}m. We also discuss the anisotropy power spectrum of the near-IR background using a halo model to describe the galaxy distribution. We compare our predictions for the anisotropy power spectrum to existing measurements from deep near-IR imaging data from Spitzer/IRAC, Hubble/NICMOS, and AKARI. The predicted rms fluctuations at tens of arcminute angular scales are roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the existing measurements. While strong arguments have been made that the measured fluctuations do not have an origin involving faint low-redshift galaxies, we find that measurements in the literature are also incompatible with galaxies present during the era of reionization. The measured near-IR background anisotropies remain unexplained with an unknown origin.

Cooray, Asantha; Gong Yan; Smidt, Joseph [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Santos, Mario G. [CENTRA, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Lisboa 1049-001 (Portugal)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly technical progress report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-94MT94011 during the period September 1, 1996 to December 31, 1996 which covers the nineth quarter of the project. The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of a fan powered infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. The fan powered infrared burner is a technology introduced more recently in the residential and commercial markets. It is a surface combustor that elevates the temperature of the burner head to a radiant condition. A variety of metallic and ceramic materials are used for the burner heads. It has been demonstrated that infrared burners produce low CO and NO{sub x} emissions in a controlled geometric space. As the environmental regulations become more stringent, infrared burners are receiving increasing interests.

Bai, T.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Multi-channel infrared thermometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for measuring the two-dimensional temperature profile of a surface comprises imaging optics for generating an image of the light radiating from the surface; an infrared detector array having a plurality of detectors; and a light pipe array positioned between the imaging optics and the detector array for sampling, transmitting, and distributing the image over the detector surfaces. The light pipe array includes one light pipe for each detector in the detector array.

Ulrickson, Michael A. (East Windsor, NJ)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Ferroelectric infrared detector and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are provided for sensing infrared radiation. The apparatus includes a sensor element that is positioned in a magnetic field during operation to ensure a .lamda. shaped relationship between specific heat and temperature adjacent the Curie temperature of the ferroelectric material comprising the sensor element. The apparatus is operated by inducing a magnetic field on the ferroelectric material to reduce surface charge on the element during its operation.

Lashley, Jason Charles (Sante Fe, NM); Opeil, Cyril P. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Smith, James Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

High-speed four-color infrared digital imaging for study in-cylinder processes in a di diesel engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was to investigate in-cylinder events of a direct injection-type diesel engine by using a new high-speed infrared (IR) digital imaging systems for obtaining information that was difficult to achieve by the conventional devices. For this, a new high-speed-dual-spectra infrared digital imaging system was developed to simultaneously capture two geometrically identical (in respective spectral) sets of IR images having discrete digital information in a (64x64) matrix at rates as high as over 1,800 frames/sec each with exposure period as short as 20 usec. At the same time, a new advanced four-color IR imaging system was constructed. The first two sets of spectral data were the radiation from water vapor emission bands to compute the distributions of temperature and specie in the gaseous mixture and the remaining two sets of data were to find the instantaneous temperature distribution over the cylinder surface. More than eight reviewed publications have been produced to report many new findings including: Distributions of Water Vapor and Temperature in a Flame; End Gas Images Prior to Onset of Knock; Effect of MTBE on Diesel Combustion; Impact of Oxygen Enrichment on In-cylinder Reactions; Spectral IR Images of Spray Plume; Residual Gas Distribution; Preflame Reactions in Diesel Combustion; Preflame Reactions in the End Gas of an SI Engine; Postflame Oxidation; and Liquid Fuel Layers during Combustion in an SI Engine. In addition, some computational analysis of diesel combustion was performed using KIVA-II program in order to compare results from the prediction and the measurements made using the new IR imaging diagnostic tool.

Rhee, K.T.

1995-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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301

ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL/INFRARED COLOR SEQUENCES ALONG THE TIDAL RING/ARM OF Arp 107  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We construct UV/optical/IR spectral energy distributions for 29 star forming regions in the interacting galaxy Arp 107, using GALEX UV, Sloan Digitized Sky Survey optical, and Spitzer infrared images. In an earlier study utilizing only the Spitzer data, we found a sequence in the mid-infrared colors of star-forming knots along the strong tidal arm in this system. In the current study, we find sequences in the UV/optical colors along the tidal arm that mirror those in the mid-infrared, with blue UV/optical colors found for regions that are red in the mid-infrared, and vice versa. With single-burst stellar population synthesis models, we find a sequence in the average stellar age along this arm, with younger stars preferentially located further out in the arm. Models that allow two populations of different ages and dust attenuations suggest that there may be both a young component and an older population present in these regions. Thus the observed color sequences may be better interpreted as a sequence in the relative proportion of young and old stars along the arm, with a larger fraction of young stars near the end. Comparison with star forming regions in other interacting galaxies shows that the Arp 107 regions are relatively quiescent, with less intense star formation than in many other systems.

Lapham, Ryen C.; Smith, Beverly J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States); Struck, Curtis, E-mail: rlapham@nmt.edu, E-mail: smithbj@etsu.edu, E-mail: curt@iastate.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Infrared emitting device and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns. 8 figs.

Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.; Dawson, L.R.; Howard, A.J.; Baucom, K.C.

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles:...

304

The Role of Ir in Ternary Rh-Based Catalysts for Syngas Conversion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ir in Ternary Rh-Based Catalysts for Syngas Conversion to C2+ Oxygenates. The Role of Ir in Ternary Rh-Based Catalysts for Syngas Conversion to C2+ Oxygenates. Abstract: Transition...

305

GRB optical and IR rapid follow-up with the 2 m Liverpool Robotic Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Liverpool Telescope, owned and operated by Liverpool John Moores University and situated at Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, is the first 2-m, fully instrumented robotic telescope. We plan to use the LT in conjunction with Gamma Ray Observatories (HETE-2, INTEGRAL, Swift) to study GRB physics. A special over-ride mode will enable observations commencing less than a minute after the GRB alert, including optical and near infrared imaging and spectroscopy. These observations, together with systematic monitoring of the burst through the afterglow, will help to unravel the nature of prompt optical flashes, short bursts, optically dark bursts, redshift distribution, GRB - supernova connection and other questions related to the GRB phenomenon. In particular, the combination of aperture, instrumentation and rapid automated response makes the Liverpool Telescope excellently suited to the investigation of optically dark bursts and currently optically unstudied short bursts.

A. Gomboc; M. F. Bode; D. Carter; C. G. Mundell; A. M. Newsam; R. J. Smith; I. A. Steele

2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

306

IR OPTICS MEASUREMENT WITH LINEAR COUPLING'S ACTION-ANGLE PARAMETERIZATION.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A parameterization of linear coupling in action-angle coordinates is convenient for analytical calculations and interpretation of turn-by-turn (TBT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. We demonstrate how to use this parameterization to extract the twiss and coupling parameters in interaction regions (IRs), using BPMs on each side of the long IR drift region. The example of TBT BPM analysis was acquired at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), using an AC dipole to excite a single eigenmode. Besides the full treatment, a fast estimate of beta*, the beta function at the interaction point (IP), is provided, along with the phase advance between these BPMs. We also calculate and measure the waist of the beta function and the local optics.

LUO, Y.; BAI, M.; PILAT, R.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

307

Crystal coherence length effects on the infrared optical response of MgO thin films.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of crystal coherence length on the infrared optical response of MgO thin films was investigated with regard to Reststrahlen band photon-phonon coupling. Preferentially (001)-oriented sputtered and evaporated ion-beam assisted deposited thin films were prepared on silicon and annealed to vary film microstructure. Film crystalline coherence was characterized by x-ray diffraction line broadening and transmission electron microscopy. The infrared dielectric response revealed a strong dependence of dielectric resonance magnitude on crystalline coherence. Shifts to lower transverse optical phonon frequencies were observed with increased crystalline coherence. Increased optical phonon damping is attributed to increasing granularity and intergrain misorientation.

Boreman, Glenn D. (University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL); Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Shelton, David J. (University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL); Carroll, James F., III; Sinclair, Michael B.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Ginn, James Cleveland, III; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Matias, Vladimir (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncooled pyroelectric IR imaging systems, such as night vision goggles, offer important strategic advantages in battlefield scenarios and reconnaissance surveys. Until now, the current technology for fabricating these devices has been limited by low throughput and high cost which ultimately limit the availability of these sensor devices. We have developed and fabricated an alternative design for pyroelectric IR imaging sensors that utilizes a multilayered thin film deposition scheme to create a monolithic thin film imaging element on an active silicon substrate for the first time. This approach combines a thin film pyroelectric imaging element with a thermally insulating SiO{sub 2} aerogel thin film to produce a new type of uncooled IR sensor that offers significantly higher thermal, spatial, and temporal resolutions at a substantially lower cost per unit. This report describes the deposition, characterization and optimization of the aerogel thermal isolation layer and an appropriate pyroelectric imaging element. It also describes the overall integration of these components along with the appropriate planarization, etch stop, adhesion, electrode, and blacking agent thin film layers into a monolithic structure. 19 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A. [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Mekanisk integration av en IR-detektor i en Stirlingkylare; Mechanical Integration of an IR-detector in a Micro Cooler.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The master thesis “Mechanical Integration of an IR-detector in a Micro Cooler” has been performed at FLIR Systems AB in Danderyd. FLIR Systems is… (more)

Gibson, Camilla

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

RAPID INFRARED VARIABILITY OF THREE RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES: A VIEW FROM THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using newly released data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, we report the discovery of rapid infrared variability in three radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) selected from the 23 sources in the sample of Yuan et al. J0849+5108 and J0948+0022 clearly show intraday variability, while J1505+0326 has a longer measurable timescale within 180 days. Their variability amplitudes, corrected for measurement errors, are {approx}0.1-0.2 mag. The detection of intraday variability restricts the size of the infrared-emitting region to {approx}10{sup -3} pc, significantly smaller than the scale of the torus but consistent with the base of a jet. The three variable sources are exceptionally radio-loud, have the highest radio brightness temperature among the whole sample, and all show detected {gamma}-ray emission in Fermi/LAT observations. Their spectral energy distributions resemble those of low-energy-peaked blazars, with a synchrotron peak around infrared wavelengths. This result strongly confirms the view that at least some radio-loud NLS1s are blazars with a relativistic jet close to our line of sight. The beamed synchrotron emission from the jet contributes significantly to and probably dominates the spectra in the infrared and even optical bands.

Jiang Ning; Zhou Hongyan; Wang Tinggui; Dong Xiaobo; Jiang Peng [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Yuan Weimin [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Ji Tuo; Tian Qiguo, E-mail: jnac@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Polar Research Institute of China, 451 Jinqiao Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200136 (China)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

311

A near-infrared shock wave in the 2006 outburst of recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared spectra are presented for the recent 2006 outburst of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi (RS Oph).We report the rare detection of an infrared shock wave as the nova ejecta plows into the pre-existing wind of the secondary in the RS Oph system consisting of a white dwarf (WD) primary and a red giant secondary. The evolution of the shock is traced through a free expansion stage to a decelerative phase. The behavior of the shock velocity with time is found to be broadly consistent with current shock models. The present observations also imply that the WD in the RS Oph system has a high mass indicating that it could be a potential SNIa candidate. We also discuss the results from a recent study showing that the near-IR continuum from the recent RS Oph eruption does not originate in an expanding fireball. However, the present work shows that the IR line emission does have an origin in an expanding shock wave.

Ramkrishna Das; Dipankar P. K. Banerjee; Nagarhalli M. Ashok

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

312

Wide-angle ITER-prototype tangential infrared and visible viewing system for DIII-D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An imaging system with a wide-angle tangential view of the full poloidal cross-section of the tokamak in simultaneous infrared and visible light has been installed on DIII-D. The optical train includes three polished stainless steel mirrors in vacuum, which view the tokamak through an aperture in the first mirror, similar to the design concept proposed for ITER. A dichroic beam splitter outside the vacuum separates visible and infrared (IR) light. Spatial calibration is accomplished by warping a CAD-rendered image to align with landmarks in a data image. The IR camera provides scrape-off layer heat flux profile deposition features in diverted and inner-wall-limited plasmas, such as heat flux reduction in pumped radiative divertor shots. Demonstration of the system to date includes observation of fast-ion losses to the outer wall during neutral beam injection, and shows reduced peak wall heat loading with disruption mitigation by injection of a massive gas puff.

Lasnier, C. J., E-mail: lasnier@LLNL.gov; Allen, S. L.; Ellis, R. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; McLean, A. G.; Meyer, W. H.; Morris, K.; Seppala, L. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Crabtree, K. [College of Optics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Star Formation Activity in the Long, Filamentary Infrared Dark Cloud G53.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present star formation activity in the infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G53.2, a remarkable IRDC located at Galactic coordinates $(l,b)\\sim(53^{\\circ}.2,\\,0^{\\circ}.0)$ based on the census of young stellar object (YSO) candidates. IRDC G53.2 was previously identified as several IRDCs in mid-IR images, but it is in fact a long ($\\gtrsim$45 pc) cloud, well consistent with a CO cloud at $v\\sim23$ \\kms\\ (or at $d\\sim$1.7 kpc). We present a point-source catalog of IRDC G53.2 that contains $\\sim$370 sources from our photometry of the {\\it Spitzer} MIPS 24 \\um\\ data and Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire Catalog. The classification of the identified sources based on their spectral index and control field analysis to remove field star contamination reveals that IRDC G53.2 is an active star-forming region with $\\sim$300 YSO candidates. We compare the YSO classification based on spectral index, mid-IR colors, and the wavelength range used, which results in consistent classification, except for flat-s...

Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Davis, Christopher J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A complete census of silicate features in the mid-infrared spectra of active galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a comprehensive study of the silicate features at 9.7 and 18 micron of a sample of almost 800 active galactic nuclei (AGN) with available spectra from the Spitzer InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS). We measure the strength of the silicate feature at 9.7 micron, S9.7, before and after subtracting the host galaxy emission from the IRS spectra. The numbers of type 1 and 2 AGN with the feature in emission increase by 20 and 50%, respectively, once the host galaxy is removed, while 35% of objects with the feature originally in absorption exhibit it in even deeper absorption. The peak of S9.7, lambda_peak, has a bimodal distribution when the feature is in emission, with about 65% of the cases showing lambda_peak > 10.2 micron. Silicates can appear in emission in objects with mid-infrared (MIR) luminosity spanning over six orders of magnitude. The derived distributions of the strength of the silicate features at 9.7 and 18 micron provide a solid test bed for modeling the dust distribution in AGN. Clumpiness is n...

Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Feltre, Anna; Piñol-Ferrer, Nuria

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF YOUNG FIELD ULTRACOOL DWARFS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a near-infrared (0.9-2.4 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 73 field ultracool dwarfs having spectroscopic and/or kinematic evidence of youth ( Almost-Equal-To 10-300 Myr). Our sample is composed of 48 low-resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 100) spectra and 41 moderate-resolution spectra (R {approx}> 750-2000). First, we establish a method for spectral typing M5-L7 dwarfs at near-IR wavelengths that is independent of gravity. We find that both visual and index-based classification in the near-IR provides consistent spectral types with optical spectral types, though with a small systematic offset in the case of visual classification at J and K band. Second, we examine features in the spectra of {approx}10 Myr ultracool dwarfs to define a set of gravity-sensitive indices based on FeH, VO, K I, Na I, and H-band continuum shape. We then create an index-based method for classifying the gravities of M6-L5 dwarfs that provides consistent results with gravity classifications from optical spectroscopy. Our index-based classification can distinguish between young and dusty objects. Guided by the resulting classifications, we propose a set of low-gravity spectral standards for the near-IR. Finally, we estimate the ages corresponding to our gravity classifications.

Allers, K. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States); Liu, Michael C., E-mail: k.allers@bucknell.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile.

Karr, Thomas J. (Alamo, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile. 9 figs.

Karr, T.J.

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Infrared Basics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429IndianaProfessional JumpInfoSpi IncInfrared

319

The first Swift X-ray Flash: The faint afterglow of XRF 050215B  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the discovery of XRF 050215B and its afterglow. The burst was detected by the Swift BAT during the check-out phase and observations with the X-ray telescope began approximately 30 minutes after the burst. These observations found a faint, slowly fading X-ray afterglow near the centre of the error box as reported by the BAT. Infrared data, obtained at UKIRT after 10 hours also revealed a very faint K-band afterglow. The afterglow appear unusual since it is very faint, especially in the infrared with K>20 only 9 hours post burst. The X-ray and infrared lightcurves exhibit a slow, monotonic decay with alpha=0.8 and no evidence for steepening associated with the jet break to 10 days post burst. We discuss possible explanations for the faintness and slow decay in the context of present models for the production of X-ray Flashes.

Levan, A J; Tanvir, N R; Page, K L; Rol, E; Zhang, B; Goad, M R; O'Brien, P T; Priddey, R S; Bersier, D; Burrows, D N; Chapman, R; Fruchter, A S; Giommi, P; Gehrels, N; Hughes, M A; Pak, S; Simpson, C; Tagliaferri, G; Vardoulaki, E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Infra-red signature neutron detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material that includes a photoluminescent material that generates infrared radiation and generation a by-product of a nuclear reaction due to the activator impinging the receptor material. The method further includes generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect, wherein the light activates the photoluminescent material so as to generate the infrared radiation. Identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the infrared radiation.

Bell, Zane William (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is...

322

Infrared regularization with vector mesons and baryons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We extend the method of infrared regularization to spin-1 fields coupled to baryons. As an application, we discuss the axial form factor of the nucleon.

P. C. Bruns; Ulf-G. Meißner

2008-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

323

High-sensitivity, and cost-effective system for infrared imaging of concealed objects in dynamic mode.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Novel, cost-efficient, and highly-sensitive IR imaging systems play an important role in homeland security functions. Technical limitations in the areas of sensitivity, contrast ratio, bandwidth and cost continue to constrain imaging capabilities. We have designed and prototyped a compact computer-piloted high sensitivity infrared imaging system. The device consists of infrared optics, cryostat, low-noise pre-amplifier, Analog-to-Digital hardware, feedback electronics, and unique image processing software. Important advantages of the developed system are: (i) Eight electronic channels are available for simultaneous registration of IR and visible images in multiple spectral ranges, (ii) Capability of real-time analysis such as comparing the 'sensed' image with 'reference' images from a database, (iii) High accuracy temperature measurement of multiple points on the image by referencing the radiation intensity from the object to a black body model, (iv) Image generation by real-time integration of images from multiple sensors operating from the visible to the terahertz range. The device was tested with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled, single-pixel HgCdTe detector for imaging in 8-12 microns range. The demonstrated examples of infrared imaging of concealed objects in static and dynamic modes include a hammer (metal head and wooden handle), plastic imitator of handguns hidden under clothes, powder in an envelope, and revealing complex wall structures under decorative plaster.

Gordiyenko, E.; Yefremenko, V.; Pearson, J.; Bader, S.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

324

Ground-based All-sky Mid-infrared and Visible Imagery for Purposes of Characterizing Cloud Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer (ASIVA), a multi-purpose visible and infrared sky imaging and analysis instrument whose primary functionality is to provide radiometrically calibrated imagery in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) atmospheric window. This functionality enables the determination of diurnal hemispherical cloud fraction (HCF) and estimates of sky/cloud temperature from which one can derive estimates of cloud emissivity and cloud height. This paper describes the calibration methods and performance of the ASIVA instrument with particular emphasis on data products being developed for the meteorological community. Data presented here were collected during a field campaign conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility from May 21 to July 27, 2009. The purpose of this campaign was to determine the efficacy of IR technology in providing reliable nighttime HCF data. Significant progress has been made in the analysis of the campaign data over the past several years and the ASIVA has proven to be an excellent instrument for determining HCF as well as several other important cloud properties.

Klebe, Dimitri; Blatherwick, R. D.; Morris, Victor R.

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

325

Hydrothermal synthesis and infrared emissivity property of flower-like SnO{sub 2} particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The flower-like SnO{sub 2} particles are synthesized through a simple hydrothermal process. The microstructure, morphology and the infrared emissivity property of the as-prepared products are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and infrared spectroradio meter (ISM) respectively. The results show that the as-prepared SnO{sub 2} products are all indexed to tetragonal cassiterite phase of SnO{sub 2}. The different molarity ratios of the OH{sup ?} concentration to Sn{sup 4+} concentration ([OH{sup ?}]:[Sn{sup 4+}]) and the polyacrylamide (PAM) lead to the different morphological structures of SnO{sub 2}, which indicates that both the [OH{sup ?}]:[Sn{sup 4+}] and the PAM play an important role in the morphological evolution respectively. The infrared emissivities of the as-prepared SnO{sub 2} products are discussed.

Tian, J. X. [Institute of Photonics and Photon-Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710069 (China) [Institute of Photonics and Photon-Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710069 (China); Beijing Institute of Environmental Features, Beijing, 100854 (China); Zhang, Z. Y., E-mail: zhangzy@nwu.edu.cn [Institute of Photonics and Photon-Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710069 (China); School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710127 (China); Yan, J. F.; Ruan, X. F.; Yun, J. N.; Zhao, W.; Zhai, C. X. [School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710127 (China)] [School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710127 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

The nuclear and extended infrared emission of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 2992 and the interacting system Arp 245  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present subarcsecond resolution infrared (IR) imaging and mid-IR spectroscopic observations of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy NGC 2992, obtained with the Gemini North Telescope and the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC). The N-band image reveals faint extended emission out to ~3 kpc, and the PAH features detected in the GTC/CanariCam 7.5-13 micron spectrum indicate that the bulk of this extended emission is dust heated by star formation. We also report arcsecond resolution MIR and far-IR imaging of the interacting system Arp 245, taken with the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory. Using these data, we obtain nuclear fluxes using different methods and find that we can only recover the nuclear fluxes obtained from the subarcsecond data at 20-25 micron, where the AGN emission dominates. We fitted the nuclear IR spectral energy distribution of NGC 2992, including the GTC/CanariCam nuclear spectrum (~50 pc), with clumpy torus models. We then used the best-fitting torus model to decompose the Spitzer/...

García-Bernete, I; Acosta-Pulido, J A; Alonso-Herrero, A; Sánchez-Portal, M; Castillo, M; Pereira-Santaella, M; Esquej, P; González-Martín, O; Díaz-Santos, T; Roche, P; Fisher, S; Povi?, M; García, A M Pérez; Valtchanov, I; Packham, C; Levenson, N A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Pushing The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational Nano-Spectroscopy: From Monolayer Towards Single molecule sensitivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While scattering-scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) has demonstrated its potential to extend infrared (IR) spectroscopy into the nanometer scale, it has not yet reached its full potential in terms of spectroscopic sensitivity. We combine broadband femtosecond mid-IR excitation with an optimized spectral irradiance of 2 W/cm2/ cm–1 (power/area/bandwidth) and a combination of tip- and substrate enhancement to demonstrate single-monolayer sensitivity with exceptional signal-to-noise ratio. Using interferometric time domain detection, the near-field IR s-SNOM spectral phase directly reflects the molecular vibrational resonances and their intrinsic line shapes. We probe the stretching resonance of 1000 carbonyl groups at 1700 cm–1 in a self-assembled monolayer of 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA) on an evaporated gold substrate with spectroscopic contrast and sensitivity of 100 vibrational oscillators. From these results we provide a roadmap for achieving true single-molecule IR vibrational spectroscopy in s-SNOM by implementing optical antenna resonant enhancement, increased spectral pump power, and improved detection schemes.

Xu, Xiaoji G.; Rang, Matthias; Craig, Ian M.; Rashcke, Markus B.

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

328

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4InFindingIR-2003- More Documents &Department of

329

ARM - Field Campaign - IR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3,CloudgovCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study ARM Data

330

IR Spectral Bands and Performance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName HousingIIIDrive LtdINDEX Jump to:IPN IncubadoraIR

331

Infrared Colors and Variability of Evolved Stars from COBE DIRBE Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For a complete 12 micron flux-limited sample of 207 IRAS sources, we have extracted light curves in seven infrared bands between 1.25 - 60 microns using the database of the DIRBE instrument on the COBE satellite. Using previous infrared surveys, we filtered these light curves to remove datapoints affected by nearby companions. In the time-averaged DIRBE color-color plots, we find clear segregation of semi-regulars, Mira variables, carbon stars, OH/IR stars, and red giants without circumstellar dust and with little or no visual variation. The DIRBE 1.25 - 25 micron colors become progressively redder and the variability in the DIRBE database increases along the oxygen-rich sequence non-dusty slightly varying red giants -> SRb/Lb -> SRa -> Mira -> OH/IR and the carbon-rich SRb/Lb -> Mira sequence. This supports previous assertions that these are evolutionary sequences involving the continued production and ejection of dust. Carbon stars are redder than oxygen-rich stars for the same variability type, except in the F(12)/F(25) ratio. Of the 28 sources in the sample not previous noted to be variable, 18 are clearly variable in the DIRBE data, with amplitudes of variation of ~0.9 magnitudes at 4.9 microns and ~0.6 magnitudes at 12 microns, consistent with them being very dusty Mira-like variables. The light curves of the semi-regular variable L2 Pup are particularly remarkable. The maxima at 1.25, 2.2, and 3.5 microns occur 10 - 20 days before those at 4.9 and 12 microns, and, at 4.9 and 12 microns, another maximum is seen between the two near-infrared maxima.

Beverly J. Smith

2003-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

332

THE HST EXTREME DEEP FIELD (XDF): COMBINING ALL ACS AND WFC3/IR DATA ON THE HUDF REGION INTO THE DEEPEST FIELD EVER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) combines data from 10 years of observations with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Wide-Field Camera 3 Infra-Red (WFC3/IR) into the deepest image of the sky ever in the optical/near-IR. Since the initial observations of the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) in 2003, numerous surveys and programs, including supernovae follow-up, HUDF09, CANDELS, and HUDF12, have contributed additional imaging data across this region. However, these images have never been combined and made available as one complete ultra-deep image dataset. We combine them now with the XDF program. Our new and improved processing techniques provide higher quality reductions of the total dataset. All WFC3/IR and optical ACS data sets have been fully combined and accurately matched, resulting in the deepest imaging ever taken at these wavelengths, ranging from 29.1 to 30.3 AB mag (5? in a 0.''35 diameter aperture) in 9 filters. The combined image therefore reaches to 31.2 AB mag 5? (32.9 at 1?) for a flat f {sub ?} source. The gains in the optical for the four filters done in the original ACS HUDF correspond to a typical improvement of 0.15 mag, with gains of 0.25 mag in the deepest areas. Such gains are equivalent to adding ?130 to ?240 orbits of ACS data to the HUDF. Improved processing alone results in a typical gain of ?0.1 mag. Our 5? (optical+near-IR) SExtractor catalogs reveal about 14,140 sources in the full field and about 7121 galaxies in the deepest part of the XDF.

Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; Oesch, P. A. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bouwens, R. J.; Labbé, I.; Franx, M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Stiavelli, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van Dokkum, P. G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Trenti, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Carollo, C. M. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Gonzalez, V., E-mail: gdi@ucolick.org [University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Mass constraints to Sco X-1 from Bowen flourescence and deep near-infrared spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

More than 50 years after the dawn of X-ray astronomy, the dynamical parameters of the prototypical X-ray binary Sco X-1 are still unknown. We combine a Monte Carlo analysis, which includes all the previously known orbital parameters of the system, along with the K-correction to set dynamical constraints to the masses of the compact object (M1near-infrared spectrum of the source to date. There is no evidence of donor star features on it, but we are able to constrain the veiling factor as a function of the spectral type of the secondary star. The combination of both techniques restricts the spectral type of the donor to be later than K4 and luminosity class IV. It also constrains the contribution of the companion light to the infrared emission of Sco X-1 to be lower than 33 percent. This implies ...

Sánchez, D Mata; Casares, J; Steeghs, D; Almeida, C Ramos; Pulido, J A Acosta

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Probing stellar accretion with mid-infrared hydrogen lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we investigate the origin of the mid-infrared (IR) hydrogen recombination lines for a sample of 114 disks in different evolutionary stages (full, transitional and debris disks) collected from the {\\it Spitzer} archive. We focus on the two brighter {H~{\\sc i}} lines observed in the {\\it Spitzer} spectra, the {H~{\\sc i}}(7-6) at 12.37$\\mu$m and the {H~{\\sc i}}(9-7) at 11.32$\\mu$m. We detect the {H~{\\sc i}}(7-6) line in 46 objects, and the {H~{\\sc i}}(9-7) in 11. We compare these lines with the other most common gas line detected in {\\it Spitzer} spectra, the {[Ne~{\\sc iii}]} at 12.81$\\mu$m. We argue that it is unlikely that the {H~{\\sc i}} emission originates from the photoevaporating upper surface layers of the disk, as has been found for the {[Ne~{\\sc iii}]} lines toward low-accreting stars. Using the {H~{\\sc i}}(9-7)/{H~{\\sc i}}(7-6) line ratios we find these gas lines are likely probing gas with hydrogen column densities of 10$^{10}$-10$^{11}$~cm$^{-3}$. The subsample of objects surrounded by ...

Rigliaco, Elisabetta; Duchene, G; Edwards, S; Ardila, D R; Grady, C; Mendigutía, I; Montesinos, B; Mulders, G D; Najita, J R; Carpenter, J; Furlan, E; Gorti, U; Meijerink, R; Meyer, M R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Near-infrared sideband generation induced by intense far-infrared radiation in GaAs quantum wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared sideband generation induced by intense far-infrared radiation in GaAs quantum wells J illuminated with near-infrared NIR radiation at frequency nir and intense far-infrared FIR radiation from and quenching of photoluminescence PL .8,9 The nonlinear interaction of FIR and near-infrared NIR radiation

Kono, Junichiro

336

STh3M.6.pdf CLEO:2014 2014 OSA Silicon Chip Based Near-Infrared and Mid-Infrared Optical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STh3M.6.pdf CLEO:2014 © 2014 OSA Silicon Chip Based Near-Infrared and Mid-Infrared Optical near-infrared and mid-infrared with detection limit down to 1ppb. Strip waveguide, slot waveguide and PC-based chip integrated optical absorption spectroscopy devices are compared in near-infrared

Chen, Ray

337

A CATALOG OF GALACTIC INFRARED CARBON STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We collected almost all of the Galactic infrared carbon stars (IRCSs) from literature published up to the present to organize a catalog of 974 Galactic IRCSs in this paper. Some of their photometric properties in the near-, mid-, and far-infrared are discussed.

Chen, P. S. [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory and Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Yang, X. H., E-mail: iraspsc@yahoo.com.cn, E-mail: yangxh@cqu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Infrared spectroscopy of ionic clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis describes new experiments wherein the infrared vibrational predissociation spectra of a number of mass-selected ionic cluster systems have been obtained and analyzed in the 2600 to 4000 cm{sup {minus}1} region. The species studied include: the hydrated hydronium ions, H{sub 3}O{sup +} (H{sub 2}O){sub 3 {minus}10}, ammoniated ammonium ions, NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub 1 {minus}10} and cluster ions involving both water and ammonia around an ammonium ion core, (mixed clusters) NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub n}(H{sub 2}O){sub m} (n+m=4). In each case, the spectra reveal well resolved structures that can be assigned to transitions arising from the vibrational motions of both the ion core of the clusters and the surrounding neutral solvent molecules. 154 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

Price, J.M. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Qualification tests for {sup 192}Ir sealed sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of qualification tests for {sup 192}Ir sealed sources, available in Testing and Nuclear Expertise Laboratory of National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering 'Horia Hulubei' (I.F.I.N.-HH), Romania. These sources had to be produced in I.F.I.N.-HH and were tested in order to obtain the authorization from The National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). The sources are used for gammagraphy procedures or in gammadefectoscopy equipments. Tests, measurement methods and equipments used, comply with CNCAN, AIEA and International Quality Standards and regulations. The qualification tests are: 1. Radiological tests and measurements: dose equivalent rate at 1 m; tightness; dose equivalent rate at the surface of the transport and storage container; external unfixed contamination of the container surface. 2. Mechanical and climatic tests: thermal shock; external pressure; mechanic shock; vibrations; boring; thermal conditions for storage and transportation. Passing all tests, it was obtained the Radiological Security Authorization for producing the {sup 192}Ir sealed sources. Now IFIN-HH can meet many demands for this sealed sources, as the only manufacturer in Romania.

Iancso, Georgeta, E-mail: georgetaiancso@yahoo.com; Iliescu, Elena, E-mail: georgetaiancso@yahoo.com; Iancu, Rodica, E-mail: georgetaiancso@yahoo.com [National Institute of R and D for Physics and Nuclear Engineering Horia Hulubei, Magurele (Romania)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

340

Automated High-Pressure Titration System with In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fully automated titration system with infrared detection was developed for investigating interfacial chemistry at high pressures. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure fluid generation and delivery system coupled to a high-pressure cell with infrared optics. A manifold of electronically actuated valves is used to direct pressurized fluids into the cell. Precise reagent additions to the pressurized cell are made with calibrated tubing loops that are filled with reagent and placed in-line with the cell and a syringe pump. The cell’s infrared optics facilitate both transmission and attenuated total reflection (ATR) measurements to monitor bulk-fluid composition and solid-surface phenomena such as adsorption, desorption, complexation, dissolution, and precipitation. Switching between the two measurement modes is accomplished with moveable mirrors that direct radiation from a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer into the cell along transmission or ATR light paths. The versatility of the high-pressure IR titration system is demonstrated with three case studies. First, we titrated water into supercritical CO2 (scCO2) to generate an infrared calibration curve and determine the solubility of water in CO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar. Next, we characterized the partitioning of water between a montmorillonite clay and scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar. Transmission-mode spectra were used to quantify changes in the clay’s sorbed water concentration as a function of scCO2 hydration, and ATR measurements provided insights into competitive residency of water and CO2 on the clay surface and in the interlayer. Finally, we demonstrated how time-dependent studies can be conducted with the system by monitoring the carbonation reaction of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) in water-bearing scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar. Immediately after water dissolved in the scCO2, a thin film of adsorbed water formed on the mineral surface, and the film thickness increased with time as the forsterite began to dissolve. However, after approximately 2.5 hours, the trend reversed, and a carbonate precipitate began to form on the forsterite surface, exposing dramatic chemical changes in the thin-water film. Collectively, these applications illustrate how the high-pressure IR titration system can provide molecular-level information about the interactions between variably wet scCO2 and minerals relevant to underground storage of CO2 (geologic carbon sequestration). The apparatus could also be utilized to study high-pressure interfacial chemistry in other areas such as catalysis, polymerization, food processing, and oil and gas recovery.

Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth, Pascale; Schaef, Herbert T.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Loring, John S.

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Automated high-pressure titration system with in situ infrared spectroscopic detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fully automated titration system with infrared detection was developed for investigating interfacial chemistry at high pressures. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure fluid generation and delivery system coupled to a high-pressure cell with infrared optics. A manifold of electronically actuated valves is used to direct pressurized fluids into the cell. Precise reagent additions to the pressurized cell are made with calibrated tubing loops that are filled with reagent and placed in-line with the cell and a syringe pump. The cell's infrared optics facilitate both transmission and attenuated total reflection (ATR) measurements to monitor bulk-fluid composition and solid-surface phenomena such as adsorption, desorption, complexation, dissolution, and precipitation. Switching between the two measurement modes is accomplished with moveable mirrors that direct the light path of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer into the cell along transmission or ATR light paths. The versatility of the high-pressure IR titration system was demonstrated with three case studies. First, we titrated water into supercritical CO{sub 2} (scCO{sub 2}) to generate an infrared calibration curve and determine the solubility of water in CO{sub 2} at 50?°C and 90 bar. Next, we characterized the partitioning of water between a montmorillonite clay and scCO{sub 2} at 50?°C and 90 bar. Transmission-mode spectra were used to quantify changes in the clay's sorbed water concentration as a function of scCO{sub 2} hydration, and ATR measurements provided insights into competitive residency of water and CO{sub 2} on the clay surface and in the interlayer. Finally, we demonstrated how time-dependent studies can be conducted with the system by monitoring the carbonation reaction of forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) in water-bearing scCO{sub 2} at 50?°C and 90 bar. Immediately after water dissolved in the scCO{sub 2}, a thin film of adsorbed water formed on the mineral surface, and the film thickness increased with time as the forsterite began to dissolve. However, after approximately 2.5 h, the trend reversed, and a carbonate precipitate began to form on the forsterite surface, exposing dramatic chemical changes in the thin-water film. Collectively, these applications illustrate how the high-pressure IR titration system can provide molecular-level information about the interactions between variably wet scCO{sub 2} and minerals relevant to underground storage of CO{sub 2} (geologic carbon sequestration). The apparatus could also be utilized to study high-pressure interfacial chemistry in other areas such as catalysis, polymerization, food processing, and oil and gas recovery.

Thompson, Christopher J., E-mail: chris.thompson@pnnl.gov; Martin, Paul F.; Chen, Jeffrey; Schaef, Herbert T.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Loring, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Benezeth, Pascale [Géosciences Environnement Toulouse (GET), CNRS-Université de Toulouse, 31400 Toulouse (France)] [Géosciences Environnement Toulouse (GET), CNRS-Université de Toulouse, 31400 Toulouse (France)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

FY 2006 Infrared Photonics Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics and optical fiber processing methods for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.

Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Schultz, John F.

2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Olson. “Observations of gamma-ray bursts of cosmic origin. ”E. Lingenfelter. “Gamma-ray bursts. ” Annual Review of652-654. Waxman, Eli. “Gamma-ray-burst afterglow: supporting

Stahl, Bennett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

NEAR-INFRARED ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF INFRARED LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER MAGNITUDE-STAR FORMATION RATE RELATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have established a relation between the brightest super star cluster (SSC) magnitude in a galaxy and the host star formation rate (SFR) for the first time in the near-infrared (NIR). The data come from a statistical sample of ?40 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) and starbursts utilizing K-band adaptive optics imaging. While expanding the observed relation to longer wavelengths, less affected by extinction effects, it also pushes to higher SFRs. The relation we find, M{sub K} ? –2.6log SFR, is similar to that derived previously in the optical and at lower SFRs. It does not, however, fit the optical relation with a single optical to NIR color conversion, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. While the relation is broadly consistent with a size-of-sample explanation, we argue physical reasons for the relation are likely as well. In particular, the scatter in the relation is smaller than expected from pure random sampling strongly suggesting physical constraints. We also derive a quantifiable relation tying together cluster-internal effects and host SFR properties to possibly explain the observed brightest SSC magnitude versus SFR dependency.

Randriamanakoto, Z.; Väisänen, P. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, 7935 Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa)] [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, 7935 Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa); Escala, A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)] [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Kankare, E.; Kotilainen, J.; Mattila, S. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, FI-21500 Piikkiö (Finland)] [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, FI-21500 Piikkiö (Finland); Ryder, S., E-mail: zara@saao.ac.za [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in response to heating cause by infrared light. In order to70 Heating and cooling of infrared source as measured withto detect the heating and cooling of the infrared source,

Warren, Clinton Gregory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

OPTICAL DIFFERENCE FREQUENCY GENERATION OF FAR INFRARED RADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absorption on Far-Infrared Generation IV. V. Comparison withIII CHAPTER IV. PHASE MATCHED FAR-INFRARED GENERATION BY THE1970). CHAPTER IV. PHASE MATCHED FAR-INFRARED GENERATION BY

Morris, J.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Infrared Thermography Measurements of Window Thermal Test Specimen Surface Temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared Thermography Measurements of Window Thermal Test Specimen Surface Temperatures Brent T Temperatures of Window Specimens: Infrared Thermography Laboratory Measurements Brent T. Griffith1 , Howdy and cold sides, respectively. Surface temperature maps were compiled using an infrared thermographic system

348

Radio--Far infrared correlation in "blue cloud" galaxies with 0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the radio--far infrared (FIR) correlation in "blue cloud" galaxies chosen from the PRism MUltiobject Survey (PRIMUS) up to redshift ($z$) of 1.2 in the XMM-LSS field. We use rest-frame emission at 1.4 GHz in the radio and both monochromatic (at 70$\\mu$m) and bolometric (between $8-1000~\\mu$m) emission in the FIR. To probe the nature of the correlation up to $z\\sim1.2$, where direct detection of blue star-forming galaxies is impossible with current technology, we employ the technique of image stacking at 0.325 and 1.4 GHz in the radio and in six infrared bands, viz. 24, 70, 160, 250, 350 and $500~\\mu$m. For comparison, we also study the correlation for more luminous galaxies that are directly detected. The stacking analysis allows us to probe the radio--FIR correlation for galaxies that are up to 2 orders of magnitude fainter than the ones detected directly. The $k-$correction in the infrared wavebands is obtained by fitting the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) with a composite mid-IR power...

Basu, Aritra; Beelen, Alexandre; Singh, Veeresh; Archana, K N; Sirothia, Sandeep; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Nanowire-based frequency-selective capacitive photodetector for resonant detection of infrared radiation at room temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characteristics of a capacitive infrared photodetector that works at room temperature by registering a change in capacitance upon illumination are reported. If used in an ideal resonant inductor-resistor-capacitor circuit, it can exhibit zero dark current, zero standby power dissipation, infinite detectivity, and infinite light-to-dark contrast ratio. It is also made frequency-selective by employing semiconductor nanowires that selectively absorb photons of energies close to the nanowire's bandgap. Based on measured parameters, the normalized detectivity is estimated to be ?3?×?10{sup 7} Jones for 1.6??m IR wavelength at room temperature.

Bandyopadhyay, Saumil, E-mail: saumilb@mit.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

350

A new architecture as transparent electrodes for solar and IR applications based on photonic structures via soft lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transparent conducting electrodes with the combination of high optical transmission and good electrical conductivity are essential for solar energy harvesting and electric lighting devices. Currently, indium tin oxide (ITO) is used because ITO offers relatively high transparency (>80%) to visible light and low sheet resistance (R{sub s} = 10 ohms/square ({Omega}#2;/?)) for electrical conduction. However, ITO is costly due to limited indium reserves, and it is brittle. These disadvantages have motivated the search for other conducting electrodes with similar or better properties. There has been research on a variety of electrode structures involving carbon nanotube networks, graphene films, nanowire and nanopatterned meshes and grids. Due to their novel characteristics in light manipulation and collection, photonic crystal structures show promise for further improvement. Here, we report on a new architecture consisting of nanoscale high aspect ratio metallic photonic structures as transparent electrodes fabricated via a combination of processes. For (Au) and silver (Ag) structures, the visible light transmission can reach as high as 80%, and the sheet resistance of the structure can be as low as 3.2{Omega}#2;/?. The optical transparency of the high aspect ratio metal structures at visible wavelength range is comparable to that of ITO glass, while their sheet resistance is more than 3 times lower, which indicates a much higher electrical conductivity of the metal structures. Furthermore, the high aspect ratio metal structures have very high infrared (IR) reflection (90%) for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode, which can lead to the development of fabrication of metallic structures as IR filters for heat control applications. Investigations of interdigitated structures based on the high aspect ratio metal electrodes are ongoing to study the feasibility in smart window applications in light transmission modulation.

Kuang, Ping

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

High Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging and Raman Spectroscopy. High Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging and Raman...

352

atmospheric infrared sounder: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR Li, Jun 4 Ozone Profile Retrieval from an Advanced Infrared Sounder:...

353

Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Thermal infrared detectors based on MEMS bimorph beams have the potential to exceed the performance of current uncooled thermal infrared cameras both in terms of… (more)

Warren, Clinton Gregory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Automated High-Pressure Titration System with In Situ Infrared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High-Pressure Titration System with In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Detection. Automated High-Pressure Titration System with In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Detection. Abstract: A...

355

Analysis of Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared Spectrum and Assignment of Vibrational Fundamentals of Analysis of Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared...

356

Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado...

357

Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-PhaseGlyoxal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal,Methylglyoxal, and 2,3-Butanedione (Diacetyl) with Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal,Methylglyoxal,...

358

NDE of Concrete Structures Strengthened with FRP Using Infrared Thermography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NDE of Concrete Structures Strengthened with FRP Using Infrared Thermography Monica A. STARNES that infrared thermography is a promising nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method considering testing speed

Entekhabi, Dara

359

Discriminating trpzip2 and trpzip4 peptides’ folding landscape using the two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy: A simulation study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyzed, based on the theoretical spectroscopic modeling, how the differences in the folding landscapes of two ?-hairpin peptides trpzip2 and trpzip4 are reflected in their thermal unfolding infrared measurements. The isotope-edited equilibrium FTIR and two dimensional infrared spectra of the two peptides were calculated, using the nonlinear exciton propagation method, at a series of temperatures. The spectra calculations were based on the configuration distributions generated using the GB{sup OBC} implicit solvent MD simulation and the integrated tempering sampling technique. Conformational analysis revealed the different local thermal stabilities for these two peptides, which suggested the different folding landscapes. Our study further suggested that the ellipticities of the isotope peaks in the coherent IR signals are more sensitive to these local stability differences compared with other spectral features such as the peak intensities. Our technique can thus be combined with the relevant experimental measurements to achieve a better understanding of the peptide folding behaviors.

Wu, Tianmin; Zhang, Ruiting; Li, Huanhuan; Zhuang, Wei, E-mail: wzhuang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: lijiangy@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China); Yang, Lijiang, E-mail: wzhuang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: lijiangy@pku.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

ISO and the Cosmic Infrared Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISO observed, for the first time to such a high sensitivity level, the mid- and far-infrared universe. A Number of deep surveys were performed to probe the cosmological evolution of galaxies. In this review, I discuss and summarize results of mid-infrared ISOCAM and far-infrared ISOPHOT surveys, and show how our vision of the extragalactic infrared universe has become more accurate. In particular, ISO allowed us to resolve into sources a significant fraction of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) in the mid-infrared, and to probe a fainter population in the far-infrared with the detection of the CIB fluctuations. Together with other wavelength data sets, the nature of ISO galaxies is now in the process of being understood. I also show that the high quality of the ISO data put strong constraints on the scenarios of galaxy evolution. This induced a burst in the development of models, yielding to a more coherent picture of galaxy evolution. I finally emphasize the potential of the ISO data archive in the field of observational cosmology, and describe the next steps, in particular the forthcoming cosmological surveys to be carried out by SIRTF.

Herve Dole

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Influence of Particle Size on Infrared Reflectance Spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reflectance spectra of solids are influenced by the absorption coefficient as well as the particle size and morphology. In the infrared, spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: in general, the upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from surface scattering, which are rays that have reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks result from either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated into the sample or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signal reflected from solids usually encompasses all these effects which include dependencies on particle size, morphology and sample density. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size of the sample. The bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and then sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions: 0-45, 45-90, 90-180, 180-250, 250-500, and >500 microns. The directional-hemispherical spectra were recorded using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere to measure the reflectance for all of the particle-size fractions. We have studied both organic and inorganic materials, but this paper focuses on inorganic salts, NaNO3 in particular. Our studies clearly show that particle size has an enormous influence on the measured reflectance spectra for bulk materials and that successful identification requires sufficient representative reflectance data so as to include the particle size(s) of interest. Origins of the effects are discussed.

Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Richardson, Robert L.

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

362

SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers....

363

Highly Active and Stable MgAl2O4 Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts for Methane Steam Reforming: A Combined Experimental and Abstract: In this work we present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of...

364

Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part II. High dose rate {sup 192}Ir sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper discussed the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources. Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the {sup 192}Ir sources were completed with several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose measurements of the surface dose distributions and characteristic depth dose curves were completed in-phantom. Results: Theoretical dose distributions and depth dose curves were generated for each applicator and agreed well with the measured values. A method of output verification was created that allows users to determine the applicator-specific dose to water at the treatment surface based on a measured air-kerma rate. Conclusions: The novel output verification methods described in this work will reduce uncertainties in dose delivery for treatments with these kinds of surface applicators, ultimately improving patient care.

Fulkerson, Regina K., E-mail: rmkenned@gmail.com; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Multi-Messenger Astronomy: Cosmic Rays, Gamma-Rays, and Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although cosmic rays were discovered a century ago, we do not know where or how they are accelerated. There is a realistic hope that the oldest problem in astronomy will be solved soon by ambitious experimentation: air shower arrays of 10,000 kilometer-square area, arrays of air Cerenkov telescopes and kilometer- scale neutrino observatories. Their predecessors are producing science. We will review the highlights: - Cosmic rays: the highest energy particles and the GZK cutoff, the search for cosmic accelerators and the the Cygnus region, top-down mechanisms: photons versus protons? - TeV-energy gamma rays: blazars, how molecular clouds may have revealed proton beams, first hints of the diffuse infrared background? - Neutrinos: first results and proof of concept for technologies to construct kilometer-scale observatories.

F. Halzen

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

366

THE NUCLEAR INFRARED EMISSION OF LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present high-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) imaging, nuclear spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and archival Spitzer spectra for 22 low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs; L{sub bol} {approx}< 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}). Infrared (IR) observations may advance our understanding of the accretion flows in LLAGNs, the fate of the obscuring torus at low accretion rates, and, perhaps, the star formation histories of these objects. However, while comprehensively studied in higher-luminosity Seyferts and quasars, the nuclear IR properties of LLAGNs have not yet been well determined. We separate the present LLAGN sample into three categories depending on their Eddington ratio and radio emission, finding different IR characteristics for each class. (1) At the low-luminosity, low-Eddington-ratio (log L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} < -4.6) end of the sample, we identify 'host-dominated' galaxies with strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bands that may indicate active (circum-)nuclear star formation. (2) Some very radio-loud objects are also present at these low Eddington ratios. The IR emission in these nuclei is dominated by synchrotron radiation, and some are likely to be unobscured type 2 AGNs that genuinely lack a broad-line region. (3) At higher Eddington ratios, strong, compact nuclear sources are visible in the MIR images. The nuclear SEDs of these galaxies are diverse; some resemble typical Seyfert nuclei, while others lack a well-defined MIR 'dust bump'. Strong silicate emission is present in many of these objects. We speculate that this, together with high ratios of silicate strength to hydrogen column density, could suggest optically thin dust and low dust-to-gas ratios, in accordance with model predictions that LLAGNs do not host a Seyfert-like obscuring torus. We anticipate that detailed modeling of the new data and SEDs in terms of accretion disk, jet, radiatively inefficient accretion flow, and torus components will provide further insights into the nuclear structures and processes of LLAGNs.

Mason, R. E. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Lopez-Rodriguez, E.; Packham, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Alonso-Herrero, A. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-UC, Avenida de los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain); Levenson, N. A.; Radomski, J. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, c/o AURA, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Ramos Almeida, C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea, s/n, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Colina, L. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC/INTA), Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, Crta de Torrejon a Ajalvir, km 4, 28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Elitzur, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Aretxaga, I. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Roche, P. F. [Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, DWB, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Oi, N. [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

DEEP IR IMAGING OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. III. M13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used the CFHT REDEYE infrared camera to obtain deep J and K' images of four fields in the globular cluster M13. The composite K, J-K color-magnitude diagram (CMD) extends from the upper red giant branch (RGB) to 2 magnitudes below the main sequence turn-off (MSTO). Selected [Fe/H]~ -1.6 isochrones from Bergbusch & VandenBerg (1992, ApJS, 81, 163) and Straniero & Chieffi (1991, ApJS, 76, 525) are transformed onto the near-infrared observational plane, and these suggest an age for M13 in the range 14-16 Gyr. We emphasize that any effort to estimate ages should be considered as tentative given uncertainties in the input physics; however, these uncertainties notwithstanding, comparisons between the near-infrared isochrones indicate that age differences of order +/-2 Gyr should be detectable among metal-poor clusters on the K, J-K plane. Building on this result, we find that the difference in J-K color between the MSTO and the base of the RGB in M13 is the same as in M4, and conclude that these clusters have similar ages. This conclusion is verified by comparing (1) the K brightnesses of the MSTO, and (2) the morphologies of optical CMDs. Finally, we investigate the mass function of main sequence stars in M13 with distances between 3 and 6 core radii from the cluster center. The mass functions in the interval 0.55 and 0.8 solar masses are relatively flat, independent of radius. Optical studies at larger radii have found non-zero mass function indices in this same mass interval, and we attribute this radial variation in mass function morphology to dynamical evolution.

T. J. Davidge; W. E. Harris

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

368

Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A monolithic infrared detector structure which allows integration of pyroelectric thin films atop low thermal conductivity aerogel thin films. The structure comprises, from bottom to top, a substrate, an aerogel insulating layer, a lower electrode, a pyroelectric layer, and an upper electrode layer capped by a blacking layer. The aerogel can offer thermal conductivity less than that of air, while providing a much stronger monolithic alternative to cantilevered or suspended air-gap structures for pyroelectric thin film pixel arrays. Pb(Zr.sub.0.4 Ti.sub.0.6)O.sub.3 thin films deposited on these structures displayed viable pyroelectric properties, while processed at 550.degree. C.

Ruffner, Judith A. (Albuquerque, NM); Bullington, Jeff A. (Albuquerque, NM); Clem, Paul G. (Albuquerque, NM); Warren, William L. (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Tuttle, Bruce A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schwartz, Robert W. (Seneca, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Near-Infrared Observations of Globular Clusters in NGC 4472, NGC 4594, NGC 3585 and NGC 5813 and Implications for their Ages and Metallicities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present near-infrared photometry of the globular cluster systems of the early-type galaxies NGC 4472, NGC 4594, NGC 3585, and NGC 5813. We combine these near-infrared data, obtained with PANIC at the Magellan Baade 6.5m telescope, with archival optical HST and FORS/VLT data, and use the optical to near-infrared colors to constrain the ages and metallicities of the globular clusters around the target galaxies. For NGC 4472 we have the most extensive near-infrared and optical photometric dataset. These colors show that the NGC 4472 globular cluster system has a broad metallicity distribution and that the clusters are predominantly old (i.e. ages of about 10 Gyr or more). This result agrees well with earlier spectroscopic work on NGC 4472, and is evidence that the combination of optical to near-infrared colors can identify predominantly old systems and distinguish these from systems with a substantial intermediate age component. Based on the smaller sample of combined optical and near-infrared data NGC 4594 and NGC 3585 appear to have predominantly old globular cluster systems, while that of NGC 5813 may have a more significant age spread. We also match our sample of globular clusters with near-infrared and optical photometry to Chandra X-ray source detections in these galaxies, and discuss how the probability that a globular cluster hosts a low-mass X-ray binary depends on metallicity and age.

Maren Hempel; Steve Zepf; Arunav Kundu; Doug Geisler; Thomas J. Maccarone

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

370

SMB, Small Angle X-Ray Scattering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,#2446Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

371

SMB, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,#2446Small Angle X-Ray

372

SMB, X-ray Emission Spectroscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,#2446Small Angle X-RayEmission

373

Uncooled IR photon detection using MEMS micro-structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Generation of free carriers in a semiconductor gives rise to mechanical stress. Photo-induced stress phenomena in MEMS micro-structures can be used in the room temperature detection of infrared photons. Choice of the appropriate semiconductor material for the MEMS micro-structures determines the cutoff wavelength of the uncooled infrared photon detector. The authors have measured the deflection of silicon and indium antimonide micro-structures resulting from a photo-induced stress. The excess charge carriers responsible for the photo-induced stress were produced via photon irradiation from both a diode laser and a black body source. In the case of Si, the photo-induced stress is of opposite direction and about four times larger than the thermal stress. For indium antimonide the direction of stress is the same as due to thermal effects. The photo-induced stress can be distinguished from the thermal stress based on the cut-off wavelength, response speed, and perhaps the direction of the microstructure deflection.

Datskos, P.G.; Rajic, S.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Gamma ray generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

375

The near infrared 12 1 electronic transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The near infrared 12 A00 2 X2 A0 1 electronic transition of B3 in a neon matrix Anton Batalov, Jan applying a double reflection technique. The light beam reflects from the metal surface of the substrate

Maier, John Paul

376

Science and applications of infrared semiconductor nanocrystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we study several applications of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) with infrared band gaps. In the first half, we explore the physics of two systems with applications in NC based photovoltaics. The physics of ...

Geyer, Scott Mitchell

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Rapid infrared heating of a surface  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

Sikka, Vinod K.; Blue, Craig A.; Ohriner, Evan Keith

2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Synthesis and characterization of infrared quantum dots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on the development of synthetic methods to create application ready quantum dots (QDs) in the infrared for biological imaging and optoelectronic devices. I concentrated primarily on controlling the size ...

Harris, Daniel Kelly

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Infrared Evolution Equations: Method and Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is a brief review on composing and solving Infrared Evolution Equations. They can be used in order to calculate amplitudes of high-energy reactions in different kinematic regions in the double-logarithmic approximation.

B. I. Ermolaev; M. Greco; S. I. Troyan

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

380

Infrared limit in external field scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scattering of electrons/positrons by external classical electromagnetic wave packet is considered in infrared limit. In this limit the scattering operator exists and produces physical effects, although the scattering cross-section is trivial.

Andrzej Herdegen

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Applying near-infrared spectroscopy (nirs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigated. A recently developed optical imaging technique called near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) shows promise for being an acceptable alternative to invasive imaging techniques. NIRS measures correlates of neural activity by assessing hemoglobin...

Wruck, Eric Michael

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

382

Rapid infrared heating of a surface  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Concord, TN); Ohriner, Evan Keith (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Rapid infrared heating of a surface  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Concord, TN); Ohriner, Evan Keith (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Uncooled infrared photon detector and multicolor infrared detection using microoptomechanical sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods for infrared detection are described. An optomechanical photon detector includes a semiconductor material and is based on measurement of a photoinduced lattice strain. A multicolor infrared sensor includes a stack of frequency specific optomechanical detectors. The stack can include one, or more, of the optomechanical photon detectors that function based on the measurement of photoinduced lattice strain. The systems and methods provide advantages in that rapid, sensitive multicolor infrared imaging can be performed without the need for a cooling subsystem.

Datskos, Panagiotis G. (Knoxville, TN); Rajic, Solobodan (Knoxville, TN); Datskou, Irene C. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Infrared Issues in Graviton Higgs Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the one-loop infrared behaviour of the effective potential in minimally coupled graviton Higgs theory in Minkowski background. The gravitational analogue of one loop Coleman Weinberg effective potential turns out to be complex, the imaginary part indicating an infrared instability. This instability is traced to a tachyonic pole in the graviton propagator for constant Higgs fields. Physical implications of this behaviour are studied. We also discuss physical differences between gauge theories coupled to Higgs fields and graviton Higgs theory.

Srijit Bhattacharjee; Parthasarathi Majumdar

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Principles of X-ray Navigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray navigation is a new concept in satellite navigation in which orientation, position and time are measured by observing stellar emissions in x-ray wavelengths. X-ray navigation offers the opportunity for a single instrument to be used to measure these parameters autonomously. Furthermore, this concept is not limited to missions in close proximity to the earth. X-ray navigation can be used on a variety of missions from satellites in low earth orbit to spacecraft on interplanetary missions. In 1997 the Unconventional Stellar Aspect Experiment (USA) will be launched as part of the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS). USA will provide the first platform for real-time experimentation in the field of x-ray navigation and also serves as an excellent case study for the design and manufacturing of space qualified systems in small, autonomous groups. Current techniques for determining the orientation of a satellite rely on observations of the earth, sun and stars in infrared, visible or ultraviolet wavelengths. It is possible to use x-ray imaging devices to provide arcsecond level measurement of attitude based on star patterns in the x-ray sky. This technique is explored with a simple simulation. Collimated x-ray detectors can be used on spinning satellites to provide a cheap and reliable measure of orientation. This is demonstrated using observations of the Crab Pulsar taken by the high Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-1) in 1977. A single instrument concept is shown to be effective, but dependent on an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity and thus susceptible to errors in that estimate. A star scanner based on a differential measurement from two x-ray detectors eliminates the need for an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity. A first order model and a second order model of the two star scanner concepts are considered. Many of the stars that emit in the x-ray regime are also x-ray pulsars with frequency stability approaching a part in 10{sup 9}. By observing these pulsations, a satellite can keep accurate time autonomously. They have demonstrated the acquisition and tracking of the Crab nebula pulsar by simulating the operation of a phase-locked loop.

Hanson, John Eric; /SLAC

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

387

Infrared finite coupling in Sudakov resummation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New arguments are presented to emphasize the interest of the infrared finite coupling approach to power corrections in the context of Sudakov resummation. The more regular infrared behavior of some peculiar combinations of Sudakov anomalous dimensions, free of Landau singularities at large Nf, is pointed out. A general conflict between the infrared finite coupling and infrared renormalon approaches to power corrections is explained, and a possible resolution is proposed, which makes use of the arbitrariness of the choice of exponentiated constant terms. A simple ansatz for a 'universal' non-perturbative Sudakov effective coupling at large Nf follows naturally from these considerations. In this last version, a new result is presented: the striking emergence of an infrared finite perturbative effective coupling in the Drell-Yan process at large Nf (at odds with the infrared renormalon argument) within the framework of Sudakov resummation for eikonal cross sections of Laenen, Sterman and Vogelsang. Some suggestions for phenomenology at finite Nf, alternative to the shape function approach, are given.

Georges Grunberg

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

388

Infrared spectroscopic diagnostics for Active Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared spectroscopy in the mid- and far-infrared provides powerful diagnostics for studying the emission regions in active galaxies. The large variety of ionic fine structure lines can probe gas conditions in a variety of physical conditions, from highly ionized gas excited by photons originated by black hole accretion to gas photoionized by young stellar systems. The critical density and the ionization potential of these transitions allow to fully cover the density-ionization parameter space. Some examples of line ratios diagrams using both mid-infrared and far-infrared ionic fine structure lines are presented. The upcoming space observatory Herschel will be able to observe the far-infrared spectra of large samples of local active galaxies. Based on the observed near-to-far infrared emission line spectrum of the template galaxy NGC1068, are presented the predictions for the line fluxes expected for galaxies at high redshift. To observe spectroscopically large samples of distant galaxies, we will have to wait fot the future space missions, like SPICA and, ultimately, FIRI.

Luigi Spinoglio

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

389

A Comparison of LSA, WordNet and PMI-IR for Predicting User Click Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparison of LSA, WordNet and PMI-IR for Predicting User Click Behavior Ishwinder Kaur. This paper discusses a comparison of three semantic systems--LSA, WordNet and PMI-IR--to evaluate their performance in predicting the link that people would select given an information goal and a webpage. PMI

Hornof, Anthony

390

Ion Impacts on Graphene/Ir(111): Interface Channeling, Vacancy Funnels, and a Nanomesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion Impacts on Graphene/Ir(111): Interface Channeling, Vacancy Funnels, and a Nanomesh Sebastian simulations we study the production of defects in graphene on Ir(111) under grazing incidence of low energy Xe ions. We demonstrate that the ions are channeled in between graphene and the substrate, giving rise

Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

391

ON THE INTEGRATION OF IR AND Arjen P. de Vries and Annita N. Wilschut  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE INTEGRATION OF IR AND DATABASES Arjen P. de Vries and Annita N. Wilschut Centre,annita}@cs.utwente.nl Abstract: Integration of information retrieval (IR) in database management systems (DBMSs) has proven difficult. Previous attempts to integration suffered from inherent performance problems, or lacked desirable

de Vries, Arjen P.

392

The Influence of Chain Dynamics on the Far Infrared Spectrum of Liquid Methanol-Water Mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Far-infrared absorption spectroscopy has been used to study the low frequency ({center_dot} 100 cm{sup -1}) intermolecular modes of methanol in mixtures with water. With the aid of a first principles molecular dynamics simulation on an equivalent system, a detailed understanding about the origin of the low frequency IR modes has been established. The total dipole spectrum from the simulation suggests that the bands appearing in the experimental spectra at approximately 55 cm{sup -1} and 70 cm{sup -1} in methanol and methanol-rich mixtures arise from both fluctuations and torsional motions occurring within the methanol hydrogen-bonded chains. The influence of these modes on both the solvation dynamics and the relaxation mechanisms in the liquid are discussed within the context of recent experimental and theoretical results that have emerged from studies focusing on the short time dynamics in the methanol hydrogen bond network.

Woods, K.N.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL; ,

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

The development of in-situ calibration method for divertor IR thermography in ITER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the development of the calibration method of the emissivity in IR light on the divertor plate in ITER divertor IR thermography system, the laboratory experiments have been performed by using IR instruments. The calibration of the IR camera was performed by the plane black body in the temperature of 100–600 degC. The radiances of the tungsten heated by 280 degC were measured by the IR camera without filter (2.5–5.1 ?m) and with filter (2.95 ?m, 4.67 ?m). The preliminary data of the scattered light of the laser of 3.34 ?m that injected into the tungsten were acquired.

Takeuchi, M.; Sugie, T.; Ogawa, H.; Takeyama, S.; Itami, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

394

A STUDY OF HEATING AND COOLING OF THE ISM IN NGC 1097 WITH HERSCHEL-PACS AND SPITZER-IRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NGC 1097 is a nearby Seyfert 1 galaxy with a bright circumnuclear starburst ring, a strong large-scale bar, and an active nucleus. We present a detailed study of the spatial variation of the far-infrared (FIR) [C II]158 {mu}m and [O I]63 {mu}m lines and mid-infrared H{sub 2} emission lines as tracers of gas cooling, and of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands as tracers of the photoelectric heating, using Herschel-PACS and Spitzer-IRS infrared spectral maps. We focus on the nucleus and the ring, and two star-forming regions (Enuc N and Enuc S). We estimated a photoelectric gas heating efficiency ([C II]158 {mu}m+[O I]63 {mu}m)/PAH in the ring about 50% lower than in Enuc N and S. The average 11.3/7.7 {mu}m PAH ratio is also lower in the ring, which may suggest a larger fraction of ionized PAHs, but no clear correlation with [C II]158 {mu}m/PAH(5.5-14 {mu}m) is found. PAHs in the ring are responsible for a factor of two more [C II]158 {mu}m and [O I]63 {mu}m emission per unit mass than PAHs in the Enuc S. spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling indicates that at most 25% of the FIR power in the ring and Enuc S can come from high-intensity photodissociation regions (PDRs), in which case G{sub 0} {approx} 10{sup 2.3} and n{sub H} {approx} 10{sup 3.5} cm{sup -3} in the ring. For these values of G{sub 0} and n{sub H}, PDR models cannot reproduce the observed H{sub 2} emission. Much of the H{sub 2} emission in the starburst ring could come from warm regions in the diffuse interstellar medium that are heated by turbulent dissipation or shocks.

Beirao, P.; Armus, L. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Helou, G. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Appleton, P. N. [NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Smith, J.-D. T.; Croxall, K. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mail Drop 111, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Murphy, E. J. [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Dale, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wolfire, M. G.; Bolatto, A. D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Sandstrom, K. M.; Groves, B.; Schinnerer, E.; Rix, H.-W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Brandl, B. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Crocker, A. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Hinz, J. L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kennicutt, R. C., E-mail: pedro@ipac.caltech.edu [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); and others

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Characteristic evaluation of a near-infrared Fabry-Perot filter for the InfraRed Imaging Magnetograph (IRIM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characteristic evaluation of a near-infrared Fabry-P´erot filter for the InfraRed Imaging solar two-dimensional narrow-band spectro-polarimeter working in the near infrared from 1.0 µm to 1.7 µm, this paper outlines a set of methods to evaluate the near infrared Fabry-P´erot etalon. Two

396

A TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA AT REDSHIFT 1.55 IN HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE INFRARED OBSERVATIONS FROM CANDELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) at redshift z = 1.55 with the infrared detector of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3-IR) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This object was discovered in CANDELS imaging data of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and followed as part of the CANDELS+CLASH Supernova project, comprising the SN search components from those two HST multi-cycle treasury programs. This is the highest redshift SN Ia with direct spectroscopic evidence for classification. It is also the first SN Ia at z > 1 found and followed in the infrared, providing a full light curve in rest-frame optical bands. The classification and redshift are securely defined from a combination of multi-band and multi-epoch photometry of the SN, ground-based spectroscopy of the host galaxy, and WFC3-IR grism spectroscopy of both the SN and host. This object is the first of a projected sample at z > 1.5 that will be discovered by the CANDELS and CLASH programs. The full CANDELS+CLASH SN Ia sample will enable unique tests for evolutionary effects that could arise due to differences in SN Ia progenitor systems as a function of redshift. This high-z sample will also allow measurement of the SN Ia rate out to z Almost-Equal-To 2, providing a complementary constraint on SN Ia progenitor models.

Rodney, Steven A.; Riess, Adam G.; Jones, David O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Casertano, Stefano; Grogin, Norman A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Strolger, Louis-Gregory [Department of Physics, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Hjorth, Jens; Frederiksen, Teddy F. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard/Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Faber, S. M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 92064 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Garnavich, Peter; Hayden, Brian [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Graur, Or [Department of Astrophysics, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); and others

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

Far-infrared distributions in nearby spiral galaxies NGC2841 and NGC2976 observed with AKARI/FIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Far-infrared (IR) images of the nearby Sb galaxy NGC2841 and the Sc galaxy NGC2976 at wavelengths of 65, 90, 140, and 160 um have been obtained with the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) onboard AKARI. Both galaxies reveal similar morphologies of dust rings. They are, however, significantly different in the dust temperature: a cold (21 K) ring for NGC2841 and a warm (30 K) ring for NGC2976, which presumably reflects the difference in the origin of the ring structure for the different Hubble type of the galaxy. In addition to the dust ring structure, a warm dust component is detected from the central region of NGC2841, which may be attributed to the heating by its Low-Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region nucleus. As for NGC2976, an extended dust component is observed along the minor axis, which shows a distribution somewhat asymmetrical to the galactic disk; this might be associated with the HI bridge in the M81/M82 group that NGC2976 belongs to. By taking advantage of a wealth of the far-IR bands of the FIS, it is demonstrated that the spectral energy distribution of NGC2841 is spatially more variable than that of NGC2976.

H. Kaneda; T. Suzuki; T. Onaka; Y. Doi; M. Kawada; B. -C. Koo; S. Makiuti; T. Nakagawa; Y. Okada; S. Serjeant; H. Shibai; M. Shirahata

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal, Methylglyoxal, and 2,3-Butanedione (Diacetyl) with Vibrational Assignments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glyoxal, methylglyoxal and 2,3-butanedione (diacetyl) are all known biomass burning effluents and suspected aerosol precursors. Pressure-broadened quantitative infrared spectra of glyoxal, methylglyoxal and diacetyl vapors covering the 520–6500 cm?1 range are reported at 0.11 cm?1 resolution, each with a composite spectrum derived from a minimum of ten different sample pressures for the compound, representing some of the first quantitative data for these analytes. The ordinate corresponds to a 1 meter optical pathlength and a mixing ratio of 1ppmv at 296 K. Many vibrational assignments for methylglyoxal are reported for the first time, as are some near-IR and far-IR bands of glyoxal and diacetyl. To complete the vibrational assignments, the quantitative far-infrared spectra (25 to 600 cm-1) of all three vapors are also reported, methylglyoxal for the first time. Density functional theory and ab initio MP2 theory are used to help assign vibrational modes. Potential bands useful for atmospheric monitoring are discussed.

Profeta, Luisa T.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Stephen D.

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

399

Far- and mid-infrared spectroscopy of complex organic matter of astrochemical interest: coal, heavy petroleum fractions, and asphaltenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The coexistence of a large variety of molecular species (i.e., aromatic, cycloaliphatic and aliphatic) in several astrophysical environments suggests that unidentified IR emission (UIE) occurs from small solid particles containing a mix of aromatic and aliphatic structures (e.g., coal, petroleum, etc.), renewing the astronomical interest on this type of materials. A series of heavy petroleum fractions namely DAE, RAE, BQ-1, and asphaltenes derived from BQ-1 were used together with anthracite coal and bitumen as model compounds in matching the band pattern of the emission features of proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe). All the model materials were examined in the mid-infrared (2.5-16.7 um) and for the first time in the far-infrared (16.7-200 um), and the IR bands were compared with the UIE from PPNe. The best match of the PPNe band pattern is offered by the BQ-1 heavy aromatic oil fraction and by its asphaltenes fraction. Particularly interesting is the ability of BQ-1 to match the band pattern of the aromatic-ali...

Cataldo, F; Manchado, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Infrared technology XIII; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 18-20, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present conference on IR technology discusses the past decade's advancements, IR systems' development in Israel, IR systems for scientific and military uses, IR sensor and focal plane designs, and IR instrumentation. Attention is given to IR background suppression, IR technology in solar array production, IR image simulation, a pyroelectric line scanner for remote IR imaging of vehicles, long-path atmospheric transmittance measurements, ICBM sunlit trajectories, U.S. Navy IR focal plane array development, and IR warning systems. Also discussed are an optical processor for scale-invariant target detection in FLIR imaging, crystal growth of optical materials by the gradient solidification method, IR/mm-wave dual mode/common aperture optics, and digital contour enhancements of an IR image.

Spiro, I.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Optical Emission from Gamma-ray Quasars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present photometric observations of six radio-loud quasars that were detected by the COMPTEL gamma-ray telescope. The data encompasses seven wavebands in the optical and near-infrared. After correction for Galactic extinction, we find a wide range in optical slopes. Two sources are as blue as optically-selected quasars, and are likely to be dominated by the accretion disc emission, while three others show colours consistent with a red synchrotron component. We discuss the properties of the COMPTEL sample of quasars, as well as the implications our observations have for multi-wavelength modelling of gamma-ray quasars.

Matthew Whiting; Petra Majewski; Rachel Webster

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

24. Cosmic rays 1 24. COSMIC RAYS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrons, protons and helium, as well as carbon, oxygen, iron, and other nuclei synthesized in stars) and the intensity of the cosmic rays with energies below about 10 GeV. In addition, the lower-energy cosmic rays the intensity of any component of the cosmic radiation in the GeV range depends both on the location and time

403

26. Cosmic rays 1 26. COSMIC RAYS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrons, protons and helium, as well as carbon, oxygen, iron, and other nuclei synthesized in stars) and the intensity of the cosmic rays with energies below about 10 GeV. In addition, the lower-energy cosmic rays the intensity of any component of the cosmic radiation in the GeV range depends both on the location and time

404

Study of the hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction of uranium hexafluoride with water has been studied by using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Several different methods for accomplishing this task have been carried out. In addition, interpretatins of the results have been made. These interpretations have been based on literature values for the reactants and for compounds analogous to possible products. It was shown that classical matrix-isolation techniques proved to be unsatisfactory for studying this reaction. Other methods were developed in order to obtain results. They were: (1) the codeposition of pure UF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/O on a cold window at 16/sup 0/K, (2) the codeposition of argon matrix to sample ratios of 10:1 to 2:1 of UF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/O at 16/sup 0/K, and (3) the annealing of the samples produced by (1) and (2) while they were being scanned with FT-IR. 78 refs., 86 figs., 7 tabs.

Anderson, S.P.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

CITIUS: An infrared-extreme ultraviolet light source for fundamental and applied ultrafast science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the main features of CITIUS, a new light source for ultrafast science, generating tunable, intense, femtosecond pulses in the spectral range from infrared to extreme ultraviolet (XUV). The XUV pulses (about 10{sup 5}-10{sup 8} photons/pulse in the range 14-80 eV) are produced by laser-induced high-order harmonic generation in gas. This radiation is monochromatized by a time-preserving monochromator, also allowing one to work with high-resolution bandwidth selection. The tunable IR-UV pulses (10{sup 12}-10{sup 15} photons/pulse in the range 0.4-5.6 eV) are generated by an optical parametric amplifier, which is driven by a fraction of the same laser pulse that generates high order harmonics. The IR-UV and XUV pulses follow different optical paths and are eventually recombined on the sample for pump-probe experiments. We also present the results of two pump-probe experiments: with the first one, we fully characterized the temporal duration of harmonic pulses in the time-preserving configuration; with the second one, we demonstrated the possibility of using CITIUS for selective investigation of the ultra-fast dynamics of different elements in a magnetic compound.

Grazioli, C.; Gauthier, D.; Ivanov, R.; De Ninno, G. [Laboratory of Quantum Optics, University of Nova Gorica, Nova Gorica (Slovenia) [Laboratory of Quantum Optics, University of Nova Gorica, Nova Gorica (Slovenia); Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy)] [Italy; Callegari, C.; Spezzani, C. [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy)] [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Ciavardini, A. [Sapienza University, Rome (Italy)] [Sapienza University, Rome (Italy); Coreno, M. [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy) [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas (CNR-IMIP), Montelibretti, Roma (Italy); Frassetto, F.; Miotti, P.; Poletto, L. [Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies (CNR-IFN), Padova (Italy)] [Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies (CNR-IFN), Padova (Italy); Golob, D. [Kontrolni Sistemi d.o.o., Sežana (Slovenia)] [Kontrolni Sistemi d.o.o., Sežana (Slovenia); Kivimäki, A. [Institute of Materials Manufacturing (CNR-IOM), TASC Laboratory, Trieste (Italy)] [Institute of Materials Manufacturing (CNR-IOM), TASC Laboratory, Trieste (Italy); Mahieu, B. [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy) [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Service des Photons Atomes et Molécules, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, Bâtiment 522, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bu?ar, B.; Merhar, M. [Laboratory of Mechanical Processing Technologies, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Laboratory of Mechanical Processing Technologies, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Polo, E. [Institute of Organic Synthesis and Photoreactivity (CNR-ISOF), Ferrara (Italy)] [Institute of Organic Synthesis and Photoreactivity (CNR-ISOF), Ferrara (Italy); Ressel, B. [Laboratory of Quantum Optics, University of Nova Gorica, Nova Gorica (Slovenia)] [Laboratory of Quantum Optics, University of Nova Gorica, Nova Gorica (Slovenia)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

The gas-rich disk of HR 4049: A study of the infrared spectrum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here, we present a summary of our analyses of the mid-and near-infrared spectrum of the unusual evolved binary HR 4049. We f nd that the disk is massive (M > 8 × 10{sup ?3} M{sub ?}), warm and radially extended. We also report some enrichment in {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O and a comparison of observations from Spitzer-IRS to those obtained by ISO-SWS 10 years earlier reveals that the CO{sub 2} f ux has more than doubled in this time, indicating active and ongoing chemical evolution in the circumbinary disk. Given the high column densities of the gas in the disk, we expect that the molecular gas plays a crucial role in the thermal properties of the circumbinary disk by allowing visible light to heat the dust and then trapping the IR photons emitted by the dust. This will result in higher temperatures and a more homogeneous temperature structure in the disk. Finally, we estimate a mass for the primary in HR 4049 which is too low for the star to have experienced a typical evolutionary path.

Malek, Sarah E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Cami, Jan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 Canada and SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94034 (United States)

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

407

MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION MAPPING OF INFRARED DARK CLOUDS. II. THE STRUCTURE OF MASSIVE STARLESS CORES AND CLUMPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop the mid-infrared extinction (MIREX) mapping technique of Butler and Tan (Paper I), presenting a new method to correct for the Galactic foreground emission based on observed saturation in independent cores. Using Spitzer GLIMPSE 8 {mu}m images, this allows us to accurately probe mass surface densities, {Sigma}, up to {approx_equal} 0.5 g cm{sup -2} with 2'' resolution and mitigate one of the main sources of uncertainty associated with Galactic MIREX mapping. We then characterize the structure of 42 massive starless and early-stage cores and their surrounding clumps, selected from 10 infrared dark clouds, measuring {Sigma}{sub cl}(r) from the core/clump centers. We first assess the properties of the core/clump at a scale where the total enclosed mass as projected on the sky is M{sub cl} = 60 M{sub Sun }. We find that these objects have a mean radius of R{sub cl} {approx_equal} 0.1 pc, mean {Sigma}{sub cl} = 0.3 g cm{sup -} and, if fitted by a power-law (PL) density profile {rho}{sub cl}{proportional_to}r{sup -k{sub {rho}}{sub ,}{sub c}{sub l}}, a mean value of k{sub {rho},cl} = 1.1. If we assume a core is embedded in each clump and subtract the surrounding clump envelope to derive the core properties, then we find a mean core density PL index of k{sub {rho},c} = 1.6. We repeat this analysis as a function of radius and derive the best-fitting PL plus uniform clump envelope model for each of the 42 core/clumps. The cores have typical masses of M{sub c} {approx} 100 M{sub Sun} and {Sigma}-bar{sub c} {approx} 0.1 g cm{sup -2}, and are embedded in clumps with comparable mass surface densities. We also consider Bonnor-Ebert density models, but these do not fit the observed {Sigma} profiles as well as PLs. We conclude that massive starless cores exist and are well described by singular polytropic spheres. Their relatively low values of {Sigma} and the fact that they are IR dark may imply that their fragmentation is inhibited by magnetic fields rather than radiative heating. Comparing to massive star-forming cores and clumps, there is tentative evidence for an evolution toward higher densities and steeper density profiles as star formation proceeds.

Butler, Michael J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Tan, Jonathan C. [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

Interaction of far-infrared and mid-infrared laser transitions in the ammonia laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mid-infrared laser emission in ammonia is usually observed on a P(J + 2) transition when a CO/sub 2/ laser is used to optically pump a near resonant R(J) absorption feature. However, by generating simultaneous FIR ammonia laser emission in the same optical cavity, mid-infrared emission is obtained exclusively on the P(J) transition.

Nelson, L.Y.; Buchwald, M.I.; Jones, C.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Follow-Up Near-infrared Spectroscopy of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies observed by ISO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present low resolution near-infrared spectroscopy of an unbiased sample of 24 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), selected from samples previously observed spectroscopically in the mid-infrared with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Qualitatively, the near-infrared spectra resemble those of starbursts. Only in one ULIRG, IRAS 04114-5117E, do we find spectroscopic evidence for AGN activity. The spectroscopic classification in the near-infrared is in very good agreement with the mid-infrared one. For a subset of our sample for which extinction corrections can be derived from Pa-alpha and Br-gamma, we find rather high Pa-alpha luminosities, in accordance with the powering source of these galaxies being star formation.[Fe] emission is strong in ULIRGs and may be linked to starburst and superwind activity. Additionally, our sample includes two unusual objects. The first, IRAS F00183-7111, exhibits extreme [Fe] emission and the second, IRAS F23578-5307, is according to our knowledge one of the most luminous infrared galaxies in H2 rotation-vibration emission.

H. Dannerbauer; D. Rigopoulou; D. Lutz; R. Genzel; E. Sturm; A. F. M. Moorwood

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

410

Extraction and analysis of pollutant organics from contaminated solids using off-line supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and on-line SFE-infrared spectroscopy. Task 2. Semiannual report, November 1995--March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes activities in the following tasks associated with a project on environmental management technology decontamination and commercialization: A commercialized version of a field-portable instrument for performing supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with on-line Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) detection;pyrolysis of plastic wastes associated with mixtures of radioactive wastes;management and reporting activities; centrifugal membrane filtration with application to tank waste remediation; technology development integration activities associated with remedial action and waste management.

Hawthorne, S.B.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena 144147 (2005) 259269 Soft X-ray spectromicroscopy of biological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the case of electron beam based techniques; radiation damage in the case of electron microscopy; lack. This requires a source of bright, continu- ouslytunablesoftX-rays(50­2000 eV),andthussynchrotron radiation spatial reso- lution in the case of IR, NMR and optical techniques; inabil- ity to couple to wet specimens

Hitchcock, Adam P.

412

Infrared curing simulations of liquid composites molding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared radiation is an effective energy source to cure thermosetting polymers. Its usage is expected to reduce curing time in comparison with thermal heating and mold thermally regulated. In addition, because of the polymerization mechanism and instant on-off control of this power, an improvement in the final properties of the material is also expected. In this paper, we studied the infrared interaction with carbon (or glass) fibers reinforced epoxy matrix, where Liquid resin infusion (LRI) is used to manufacture the composite. Temperature of the composite is a key parameter that affects its mechanical properties and is controlled by the infrared emitters and the exothermic heat released from the polymerization. Radiative heat flux is computed using the in-lab developed software RAYHEAT. Then, the heat flux (or absorbed energy for glass fibers) is exported to the finite element based program COMSOLMULTIPHYSICS where heat balance equation is solved. This equation is coupled with the exothermic heat released during the curing process in order to predict the composite temperature versus time and degree of cure. Numerical simulations will be performed on planar parts (sheet shape) as well as curvilinear shapes. Experimental validations of the infrared curing carbon (glass)-epoxy composite system are presented in this paper Sheet surface temperature distribution are measured thanks to infrared camera. Kinetic parameters were estimated from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experimental data.

Nakouzi, S.; Pancrace, J.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Berthet, F. [Universite de Toulouse (France); INSA, UPS, Mines Albi, ISAE, ICA - Institut Clement Ader, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi cedex 09 (France); Ecole des Mines Albi, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi (France)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

413

Ray J. Corey- Biography  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Ray Corey currently serves as the Assistance Manager for Safety and Environment at the DOE Richland Operations office (RL).

414

Stretching and bending with flexible FT-IR process monitors, probes and software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FT-IR process analyzers continue to gain recognition for reliable and accurate on-line analyses on a broad variety of processes around the world. When fast analyses are required, on-line FT-IR analyzers offer speed and specificity for many applications. The use of FT-IR spectroscopy, either in the Mid-IR region or Near IR region offers fundamental advantages over other technologies. These advantages make calibrations exceptionally stable for an analyzer over time and offer improved ease of calibration transfer between similar analyzers. Spectral region selection criteria are reviewed, to help define when to use the Mid-IR region or the Near-IR region (or even when to use parts of both) for a given sample stream. New fiber optic sampling probes for transmission, attenuated total reflection, diffuse reflection and web sensing have solved nagging problems. What many process analyzer specialists are discovering is that new probes are becoming available each month, offering newer process tolerance (can tolerate higher temp or pressure) or even new sampling approaches altogether. This paper describes on-line applications in pharmaceuticals, specialty chemicals, polymer production and refinery production which demonstrate the range of techniques used to appropriately optimize the on-line analyzer. In addition, calibration transfer issues will be discussed, demonstrating the importance of the software tools to help sort out the causes for cal errors (spectral contamination, etc.).

Peters, D.C. [KVB/Analect, Utica, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Cluster size effects on sintering, CO adsorption, and implantation in Ir/SiO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of planar model catalysts have been prepared via deposition of Ir{sub n}{sup +} on thermally grown amorphous SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) and ion scattering spectroscopy was used to probe surface structure as a function of cluster size, impact energy, and surface temperature. Deposition of Ir{sub 2} or Ir{sub 10} at low energies and room temperature results in stable clusters forming one- or two-dimensional single layer islands on the oxide surface. Heating the samples to 750 K leads to agglomeration, forming multilayer structures on the surface. Ir{sub 1} deposited under similar conditions sinters into large clusters at room temperature. Deposition at 110 K at least partially stabilizes the Ir atoms with respect to diffusion and sintering. At higher deposition energies, partial implantation into the surface is observed, but this appears to be insufficient to stabilize the clusters against sintering at elevated temperature. At low temperatures, substrate-mediated adsorption of CO is found to be highly efficient, leading to near saturation coverages of CO bound atop the Ir{sub n} clusters. The CO can be removed by careful He{sup +} sputtering. The deposition/binding behavior of Ir{sub n} on SiO{sub 2} is quite different from Ir{sub n}/TiO{sub 2}(110), for which the clusters bind in three-dimensional morphology, starting at Ir{sub 5}. That system also shows substrate-mediated adsorption of CO, but the CO preferentially binds at the periphery of the clusters rather than on top.

Kaden, W. E.; Kunkel, W. A.; Anderson, Scott L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E. RM 2020, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States)

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

416

Infrared instability from nonlinear QCD evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the Balitsky-Kovchegov (BK) equation as an explicit example, we show that nonlinear QCD evolution leads to an instability in the propagation toward the infrared of the gluon transverse momentum distribution, if one starts with a state with an infrared cut-off. This effect takes the mathematical form of rapidly moving traveling wave solutions of the BK equation, which we investigate by numerical simulations. These traveling wave solutions are different from those governing the transition to saturation, which propagate towards the ultraviolet. The infrared wave speed, formally infinite for the leading order QCD kernel, is determined by higher order corrections. This mechanism could play a role in the rapid decrease of the mean free path in the Color Glass Condensate scenario for heavy ion collisions.

R. Enberg; R. Peschanski

2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

417

Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

COUNTRY INSTITUTION DATE WEB ADDRESS IRAN University of Art Isfahn 08.03.2007 http://www.aui.ac.ir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COUNTRY INSTITUTION DATE WEB ADDRESS IRAN University of Art Isfahn 08.03.2007 http://www.aui.ac.ir IRAN Isfahn University of Technology 08.03.2007 http://www.iut.ac.ir IRAN The University of Isfahn 15/03/2011 http://www.ui.ac.ir IRAN Shahid Bahonar University of Kermn 06.06.2005 http

Di Pillo, Gianni

419

X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET Center for X-ray Optics and Advanced Light Source Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Introduction X-Ray Properties of Elements Electron Binding Energies X-Ray Levels of Few Electron Ions Now Available Order X-Ray Data Booklet http://xdb.lbl.gov/ (1 of 3) [2

Meagher, Mary

420

Spitzer Observations of V838 Monocerotis: Detection of a Rare Infrared Light Echo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present Spitzer observations of the unusual variable V838 Monocerotis. Extended emission is detected around the object at 24, 70 and 160um. The extended infrared emission is strongly correlated spatially with the HST optical light echo images taken at a similar epoch. We attribute this diffuse nebulosity to be from an infrared light echo caused by reprocessed thermal emission from dust heated by the outward-propagating radiation from the 2002 eruption. The detection of an IR light echo provides an opportunity to estimate the mass in dust of the echo material and hence constrain its origin. We estimate the dust mass of the light echo to be on the order of a solar mass - thereby implying the total gas plus dust mass to be considerably more - too massive for the echo material to be the ejecta from previous outburst/mass-losing events. This is therefore suggestive that a significant fraction of the matter seen through the light echo is interstellar in origin. Unresolved emission at 24 and 70um is also seen at the position of the central star possibly indicating the presence of hot dust freshly condensed in the outburst ejecta.

D. P. K. Banerjee; K. Y. L. Su; K. A. Misselt; N. M. Ashok

2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

STUDIES OF THE Be STAR X PERSEI DURING A BRIGHT INFRARED PHASE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present multi-epoch photometric and spectroscopic near-infrared observations of the Be star X Persei in the JHK bands covering the wavelength range 1.08-2.35 {mu}m. Combining results from our earlier studies with the present observations, it is shown that the equivalent widths and line fluxes of the prominent H I and He I lines anti-correlate with the strength of the adjacent continuum. That is, during the span of the observations, the JHK broadband fluxes increase while the emission equivalent width values of the H I and He I lines decrease (the lines under consideration being the Paschen and Brackett lines of hydrogen and the 1.7002 {mu}m and 2.058 {mu}m lines of helium). Such an anti-correlation effect is not commonly observed in Be stars in the optical; in the infrared, this may possibly be the first reported case of such behavior. We examine different mechanisms that could possibly cause it and suggest that it could originate due to a radiatively warped, precessing circumstellar disk. It is also shown that during the course of our studies, X Per evolved to an unprecedented state of high near-IR brightness with J, H, K magnitudes of 5.20, 5.05, and 4.84, respectively.

Mathew, Blesson; Banerjee, D. P. K.; Naik, Sachindra; Ashok, N. M., E-mail: blessonmathew@gmail.com [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangapura, Ahmedabad 380 009, Gujarat (India)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Near Infrared Observations of the novae V2491 Cygni and V597 Puppis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results obtained from near-infrared JHK spectroscopic observations of novae V2491 Cyg and V597 Pup in the early declining phases of their 2007 and 2008 outbursts respectively. In both objects, the spectra displayed emission lines of HI, OI, HeI and NI. In V597 Pup, the HeI lines were found to strengthen rapidly with time. Based on the observed spectral characteristics, both objects are classified as He/N novae. We have investigated the possibility of V2491 Cyg being a recurrent nova as has been suggested. By studying the temporal evolution of the line widths in V2491 Cyg it appears unlikely that the binary companion is a giant star with heavy wind as in recurrent novae of the RS Oph type. Significant deviations from that of recombination case B conditions are observed in the strengths of the HI lines. This indicates that the HI lines, in both novae, are optically thick during the span of our observations. The slope of the continuum spectra in both cases was found to have a \\lambda^-(3-3.5) dependence which deviates from a Rayleigh-Jeans spectral distribution. Both novae were detected in the post-outburst super-soft X-ray phase; V2491 Cyg being very bright in X-rays has been the target of several observations. We discuss and correlate our infrared observations with the observed X-ray properties of these novae.

Sachindra Naik; D. P. K. Banerjee; N. M. Ashok

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

423

High efficiency quasi-monochromatic infrared emitter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incandescent radiation sources are widely used as mid-infrared emitters owing to the lack of alternative for compact and low cost sources. A drawback of miniature hot systems such as membranes is their low efficiency, e.g., for battery powered systems. For targeted narrow-band applications such as gas spectroscopy, the efficiency is even lower. In this paper, we introduce design rules valid for very generic membranes demonstrating that their energy efficiency for use as incandescent infrared sources can be increased by two orders of magnitude.

Brucoli, Giovanni; Besbes, Mondher; Benisty, Henri, E-mail: henri.benisty@institutoptique.fr; Greffet, Jean-Jacques [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, UMR 8501, Institut d’Optique, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud 11, 2, Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad [Office National d’Études et de Recherches Aérospatiales, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

424

Gamma-ray Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relevance of gamma-ray astronomy to the search for the origin of the galactic and, to a lesser extent, the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays has long been recognised. The current renaissance in the TeV gamma-ray field has resulted in a wealth of new data on galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, and almost all the new results in this field were presented at the recent International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC). Here I summarise the 175 papers submitted on the topic of gamma-ray astronomy to the 30th ICRC in Merida, Mexico in July 2007.

Jim Hinton

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

425

Gamma-ray waveguides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed an approach for gamma-ray optics using layered structures acting as planar waveguides. Experiments demonstrating channeling of 122 keV gamma rays in two prototype waveguides validate the feasibility of this technology. Gamma-ray waveguides allow one to control the direction of radiation up to a few MeV. The waveguides are conceptually similar to polycapillary optics, but can function at higher gamma-ray energies. Optics comprised of these waveguides will be able to collect radiation from small solid angles or concentrate radiation into small area detectors. Gamma-ray waveguides may find applications in medical imaging and treatment, astrophysics, and homeland security.

Tournear, D. M.; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Akhadov, E. A.; Chen, A. T.; Pendleton, S. J.; Williamson, T. L.; Cha, K. C.; Epstein, R. I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

426

Infrared detection of (H2O)20 isomers of exceptional stability: a drop-like and a face-sharing pentagonal prism cluster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water clusters containing fully coordinated water molecules are model systems that mimic the local environment of the condensed phase. Present knowledge about the water cluster size regime in which the transition from the allsurface to the fully solvated water molecules occurs is mainly based on theoretical predictions in lieu of the absence of precisely size resolved experimental measurements. Here, we report size and isomer selective infrared (IR) spectra of (H2O)20 clusters tagged with a sodium atom by employing IR excitation modulated photoionization spectroscopy. The observed absorption patterns in the OH stretching ”fingerprint” region are consistent with the theoretically predicted spectra of two structurally distinct isomers: A drop-like cluster with a fully coordinated (interior) water and an edge-sharing pentagonal prism cluster in which all atoms are on the surface. The observed isomers show exceptional stability and are predicted to be nearly isoenergetic.

Pradzynski, Christoph C.; Dierking, Christoph W.; Zurheide, Florian; Forck, Richard M.; Buck, Udo; Zeuch, Thomas; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

427

High-speed four-color infrared digital imaging for studying in-cylinder processes in a DI diesel engine. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was to investigate in-cylinder events of a direct injection-type diesel engine by using a new high-speed infrared (IR) digital imaging systems for obtaining information that was difficult to achieve by the conventional devices. For this, a new high-speed dual-spectra infrared digital imaging system was developed to simultaneously capture two geometrically identical (in respective spectral) sets of IR images having discrete digital information in a (64x64) matrix at rates as high as over 1,800 frames/sec each with exposure period as short as 20 micron sec. At the same time, a new advanced four-color W imaging system was constructed. The first two sets of spectral data were the radiation from water vapor emission bands to compute the distributions of temperature and specie in the gaseous mixture and the remaining two sets of data were to find the instantaneous temperature distribution over the cylinder surface. More than eight reviewed publications have been produced to report many new findings including: Distributions of Water Vapor and Temperature in a Flame; End Gas Images Prior to Onset of Knock; Effect of MTBE on Diesel Combustion; Impact of Oxygen Enrichment on In-cylinder Reactions; Spectral IR Images of Spray Plume; Residual Gas Distribution; Preflame Reactions in Diesel Combustion; Preflame Reactions in the End Gas of an SI Engine; Postflame Oxidation; and Liquid Fuel Layers during Combustion in an SI Engine. In addition, some computational analysis of diesel combustion was performed using KIVA-II program in order to compare results from the prediction and the measurements made using the new IR imaging diagnostic tool.

Rhee, K.T.

1995-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

428

Design and Fabrication of Efficient Collimation and Focusing Optics for Mid-IR Quantum Cascade Lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report the design, fabrication, and characterization of germanium aspheric collimating and focusing optics designed for mid-IR QCLs having an emission wavelength of 8.77 microns.

Bernacki, Bruce E.; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Investigating the cross-compatibility of IR-controlled active shutter glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D HDTVs by several consumer electronics manufacturers (including Samsung, Panasonic, Sony, LG, Sharp to that used for IR remote controls used for TVs and other consumer electronics. In some cases an RF (radio

430

FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Deep ATLAS radio observations of the CDFS-SWIRE field Ray P. Norris1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Deep ATLAS radio observations of the CDFS-SWIRE field Ray P. Norris1 , José Afonso5 , Phil N, UK #12;2 Abstract We present the first results from the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS to detect highly-obscured, ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z>>1. SWIRE's goal is to trace

Norris, Ray

432

Quantitative Compositional Mapping of Core-Shell Polymer Microspheres by Soft X-ray Spectromicroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the radiation damage caused by the high-energy electron beams.17-19 Recently, analytical soft X-ray microscopy- troscopies used for polymer studies, such as infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance, can easily cannot always be sure whether features observed by electron (or optical) microscopy arise from chemical

Hitchcock, Adam P.

433

Infrared Quantum Dots** By Edward H. Sargent*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and treat disease, harness new forms of energy, and visualize threats to our safety and environment depend of the telecommunications wave- length band spans 1200±1700 nm.[1] It is of interest to unite, in a single monolithic±10 cm; solar and thermal photovoltaics for energy conversion; and infrared sensing and imaging based

434

Infrared Scales and Factorization in QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective field theory methods are used to study factorization of the deep inelastic scattering cross-section. The cross-section is shown to factor in QCD, even though it does not factor in perturbation theory for some choices of the infrared regulator. Messenger modes are not required in soft-collinear effective theory for deep inelastic scattering as x -> 1.

Aneesh V. Manohar

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

435

Infrared Dry-peeling Technology for Tomatoes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are neutralized and then discharged as wastewater. The high salinity of the wastewater from the peeling process, producing less wastewater and preserving product quality. Infrared drypeeling is expected to reduce: rkapoor@energy.state.ca.us Dr. Zhongli Pan University of California, Davis Phone: (510) 5595861

436

SiGeC Near Infrared Photodetectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A near infrared waveguide photodetector in Si-based ternary Si?â??xâ??yGexCy alloy was demonstrated for 0.85~1.06 µm wavelength fiber-optic interconnection system applications. Two sets of detectors with active absorption ...

Li, Baojun

437

A Spitzer White Dwarf Infrared Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present mid-infrared photometry of 124 white dwarf stars with Spitzer Space Telescope. Objects were observed simultaneously at 4.5 and 8.0um with sensitivities better than 1 mJy. This data can be used to test models of white dwarf atmospheres in a new wavelength regime, as well as to search for planetary companions and debris disks.

F. Mullally; Mukremin Kilic; William T. Reach; Marc J. Kuchner; Ted von Hippel; Adam Burrows; D. E. Winget

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

438

NEW M, L, AND T DWARF COMPANIONS TO NEARBY STARS FROM THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present 11 candidate late-type companions to nearby stars identified with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Eight of the candidates are likely to be companions based on their common proper motions with the primaries. The remaining three objects are rejected as companions, one of which is a free-floating T7 dwarf. Spectral types are available for five of the companions, which consist of M2V, M8.5V, L5, T8, and T8. Based on their photometry, the unclassified companions are probably two mid-M dwarfs and one late-M/early-L dwarf. One of the T8 companions, WISE J142320.84+011638.0, has already been reported by Pinfield and coworkers. The other T8 companion, ULAS J095047.28+011734.3, was discovered by Burningham and coworkers through the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey, but its companionship has not been previously recognized in the literature. The L5 companion, 2MASS J17430860+8526594, is a new member of a class of L dwarfs that exhibit unusually blue near-IR colors. Among the possible mechanisms that have been previously proposed for the peculiar colors of these L dwarfs, low metallicity does not appear to be a viable explanation for 2MASS J17430860+8526594 since our spectrum of the primary suggests that its metallicity is not significantly subsolar.

Luhman, Kevin L.; Loutrel, Nicholas P.; McCurdy, Nicholas S.; Melso, Nicole D.; Star, Kimberly M.; Terrien, Ryan C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mace, Gregory N.; McLean, Ian S. [UCLA Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Young, Michael D.; Rhode, Katherine L. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Swain West 319, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Davy Kirkpatrick, J., E-mail: kluhman@astro.psu.edu [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

INFRARED THERMAL IMAGING OF AUTOMOBILES: Identification of Cold Start Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFRARED THERMAL IMAGING OF AUTOMOBILES: Identification of Cold Start Vehicles Angela M. Monateri at the infrared image from an automobile. ·The camera was set up with a FEAT 3000 unit to compare emissions vs

Denver, University of

440

Study of ice cloud properties using infrared spectral data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research presented in this thesis involves the study of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties using both hyperspectral and narrowband infrared spectral data. First, ice cloud models are developed for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding...

Garrett, Kevin James

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infrared ir rays" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Matching of Infrared Emitters with Textiles For Improved Energy Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the infrared absorptivity of fabrics over the wavelength spectrum of 0.7 to 25 microns (the range of operation of commercial infrared emitters). Since the operating ranges for several system components (detectors, beam splitters and sources) are much narrower...

Carr, W. W.; Williamson, V. A.; Johnson, M. R.; Do, B. T.

442

Infrared Brightness Temperature of Mars, 1983-2103  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The predicted infrared brightness temperature of Mars using the 1976 model of Wright is tabulated here for the period 1983 to 2103. This model was developed for far-infrared calibration, and is still being used for JCMT calibration.

E. L. Wright

2007-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

443

Polarization- and Azimuth-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Water...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Azimuth-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Water on TiO2(110): Anisotropy and the Hydrogen-Bonding Network. Polarization- and Azimuth-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Water on...

444

Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Wednesday, 29 October 2008 00:00 Graphene-a single layer...

445

Strain-balanced Si/SiGe type-II superlattices for near-infrared photodetection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strain balanced silicon-silicon germanium type-II superlattice p-i-n photodetectors grown on a silicon germanium relaxed buffer layer are shown to exhibit an absorption band that extends beyond 0.7?eV (??=?1.77??m) with dark current densities of 27??A cm{sup ?2}. Simulations of the absorption edge, which are based on x-ray diffraction characterization, low observed dark current densities, and low dislocation densities, are consistent with fully strained heterostructures. Potential applications for devices made from this heterostructure design could include integrated silicon detectors, or low-noise absorption regions for infrared-extended silicon based avalanche photodiodes.

Ali, Dyan; Richardson, Christopher J. K., E-mail: richardson@lps.umd.edu [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, University of Maryland, 8050 Greenmead Dr., College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

446

Transmissive infrared frequency selective surfaces and infrared antennas : final report for LDRD 105749.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasmonic structures open up new opportunities in photonic devices, sometimes offering an alternate method to perform a function and sometimes offering capabilities not possible with standard optics. In this LDRD we successfully demonstrated metal coatings on optical surfaces that do not adversely affect the transmission of those surfaces at the design frequency. This technology could be applied as an RF noise blocking layer across an optical aperture or as a method to apply an electric field to an active electro-optic device without affecting optical performance. We also demonstrated thin optical absorbers using similar patterned surfaces. These infrared optical antennas show promise as a method to improve performance in mercury cadmium telluride detectors. Furthermore, these structures could be coupled with other components to lead to direct rectification of infrared radiation. This possibility leads to a new method for infrared detection and energy harvesting of infrared radiation.

Wendt, Joel Robert; Hadley, G. Ronald; Samora, Sally; Loui, Hung; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Davids, Paul; Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Johnson, William Arthur; Peters, David William

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Infrared Properties of Close Pairs of Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss spectroscopy and infrared photometry for a complete sample of ~ 800 galaxies in close pairs objectively selected from the CfA2 redshift survey. We use 2MASS to compare near infrared color-color diagrams for our sample with the Nearby Field Galaxy Sample and with a set of IRAS flux-limited pairs from Surace et al. We construct a basic statistical model to explore the physical sources of the substantial differences among these samples. The model explains the spread of near infrared colors and is consistent with a picture where central star formation is triggered by the galaxy-galaxy interaction before a merger occurs. For 160 galaxies we report new, deep JHK photometry within our spectroscopic aperture and we use the combined spectroscopic and photometric data to explore the physical conditions in the central bursts. We find a set of objects with H-K >= 0.45 and with a large F(FIR)/F(H). We interpret the very red H-K colors as evidence for 600-1000 K dust within compact star-forming regions, perhaps similar to super-star clusters identified in individual well-studied interacting galaxies. The galaxies in our sample are candidate ``hidden'' bursts or, possibly, ``hidden'' AGN. Over the entire pair sample, both spectroscopic and photometric data show that the specific star formation rate decreases with the projected separation of the pair. The data suggest that the near infrared color-color diagram is also a function of the projected separation; all of the objects with central near infrared colors indicative of bursts of star formation lie at small projected separation.

Margaret J. Geller; Scott J. Kenyon; Elizabeth J. Barton; Thomas H. Jarrett; Lisa J. Kewley

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

448

Application of External-Cavity Quantum Cascade Infrared Lasers to Nanosecond Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Condensed-Phase Samples Following Pulse Radiolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulse radiolysis, utilizing short pulses of high-energy electrons from accelerators, is a powerful method for rapidly generating reduced or oxidized species and other free radicals in solution. Combined with fast time-resolved spectroscopic detection (typically in the ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared), it is invaluable for monitoring the reactivity of species subjected to radiolysis on timescales ranging from picoseconds to seconds. However, it is often difficult to identify the transient intermediates definitively due to a lack of structural information in the spectral bands. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy offers the structural specificity necessary for mechanistic investigations but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis experiments. For example, time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy has only been applied to a handful of gas-phase studies, limited mainly by several technical challenges. We have exploited recent developments in commercial external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) technology to construct a nanosecond TRIR apparatus that has allowed, for the first time, TRIR spectra to be recorded following pulse radiolysis of condensed-phase samples. Near single-shot sensitivity of DeltaOD <1 x 10(-3) has been achieved, with a response time of <20 ns. Using two continuous-wave EC-QCLs, the current apparatus covers a probe region from 1890-2084 cm(-1), and TRIR spectra are acquired on a point-by-point basis by recording transient absorption decay traces at specific IR wavelengths and combining these to generate spectral time slices. The utility of the apparatus has been demonstrated by monitoring the formation and decay of the one-electron reduced form of the CO(2) reduction catalyst, [Re(I)(bpy)(CO)(3)(CH(3)CN)](+), in acetonitrile with nanosecond time resolution following pulse radiolysis. Characteristic red-shifting of the nu(CO) IR bands confirmed that one-electron reduction of the complex took place. The availability of TRIR detection with high sensitivity opens up a wide range of mechanistic pulse radiolysis investigations that were previously difficult or impossible to perform with transient UV/visible detection.

Grills, D.C.; Cook, A.R.; Fujita, E.; George, M.W.; Miller, J.R.; Preses, J.M.; Wishart, J.F.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Efficient Synthesis and Properties of Novel Near-Infrared Electrochromic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient Synthesis and Properties of Novel Near-Infrared Electrochromic Anthraquinone Imides@pku.edu.cn Received December 13, 2007 ABSTRACT An efficient synthesis of novel near-infrared electrochromic 6 are electrochromic and absorb intensely in the near-infrared range of 700-1600 nm upon electrochemical reduction

Wan, Xin-hua

450

Visible and near infrared reflectances measured from laboratory ice clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visible and near infrared reflectances measured from laboratory ice clouds Brian Barkey* and K. N present laboratory results of the 0:68 m visible (VIS) and 1:617 m near infrared (NIR) reflectances for the remote sensing of thin cirrus clouds on the basis of visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) channels

Liou, K. N.

451

Infrared regular representation of the three dimensional massless Nelson model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared regular representation of the three dimensional massless Nelson model J#19;ozsef L this Gaussian measure space. KEYWORDS: Nelson's scalar #12;eld model, infrared regular representation, ground] of a spinless electron coupled to a scalar massless Bose #12;eld is infrared divergent in 3 space dimensions

452

Infrared modulation spectroscopy of interfaces in amorphous silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared modulation spectroscopy of interfaces in amorphous silicon solar cells Kai Zhu a,1 , E Solar, Toano, VA 23168, USA Abstract We report infrared depletion modulation spectra for near an infrared modulation spectroscopy technique that probes the optical spectra of dopants and defects

Schiff, Eric A.

453

Molecular basis of infrared detection by Elena O. Gracheva1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, snakes detect infrared signals through a mechanism involving radiant heating of the pit organ, ratherARTICLES Molecular basis of infrared detection by snakes Elena O. Gracheva1 *, Nicholas T. Ingolia2 system for detecting infrared radiation, enabling them to generate a `thermal image' of predators or prey

Newman, Eric A.

454

Infrared Temperature Sensing of Mechanically Loaded Specimens: Thermal Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, not the instantaneous effect of heating within a single loading cycle. KEY WORDS--Infrared, temperature measurement, meInfrared Temperature Sensing of Mechanically Loaded Specimens: Thermal Analysis by Y. Rabin and D. Rittel ABSTRACT--Infrared temperature-sensing techniques have the major advantages of virtually

Rabin, Yoed

455

Near-infrared spectroscopy of HD the barrier to linearity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared spectroscopy of HD 3 above the barrier to linearity BY JENNIFER L. GOTTFRIED, transitions of HC 3 above the barrier to linearity have been observed. A highly sensitive near-infrared-adiabatic and radiative corrections is revealed. Keywords: HD 3 ; near-infrared spectroscopy; barrier to linearity 1

Oka, Takeshi

456

Can Gender Be Predicted from Near-Infrared Face Images?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Can Gender Be Predicted from Near-Infrared Face Images? Arun Ross and Cunjian Chen Lane Department spectrum (VIS). We explore the possibility of predicting gender from face images ac- quired in the near-infrared cross-spectral gender prediction. Keywords: Biometrics, Faces, Gender, Near-Infrared, Cross-Spectral. 1

Ross, Arun Abraham

457