National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for infrared energy radiated

  1. Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, T

    2005-07-01

    The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: • Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) • Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) • Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) • Upwelling shortwave (reflected) • Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) • Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

  2. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  3. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1998-09-22

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

  4. High speed infrared radiation thermometer, system, and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Markham, James R. (Middlefield, CT)

    2002-01-01

    The high-speed radiation thermometer has an infrared measurement wavelength band that is matched to the infrared wavelength band of near-blackbody emittance of ceramic components and ceramic thermal barrier coatings used in turbine engines. It is comprised of a long wavelength infrared detector, a signal amplifier, an analog-to-digital converter, an optical system to collect radiation from the target, an optical filter, and an integral reference signal to maintain a calibrated response. A megahertz range electronic data acquisition system is connected to the radiation detector to operate on raw data obtained. Because the thermometer operates optimally at 8 to 12 .mu.m, where emittance is near-blackbody for ceramics, interferences to measurements performed in turbine engines are minimized. The method and apparatus are optimized to enable mapping of surface temperatures on fast moving ceramic elements, and the thermometer can provide microsecond response, with inherent self-diagnostic and calibration-correction features.

  5. Infrared Radiation Filament And Metnod Of Manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward A. (Bedford, MA)

    1998-11-17

    An improved IR radiation source is provided by the invention. A radiation filament has a textured surface produced by seeded ion bombardment of a metal foil which is cut to a serpentine shape and mounted in a windowed housing. Specific ion bombardment texturing techniques tune the surface to maximize emissions in the desired wavelength range and to limit emissions outside that narrow range, particularly at longer wavelengths. A combination of filament surface texture, thickness, material, shape and power circuit feedback control produce wavelength controlled and efficient radiation at much lower power requirements than devices of the prior art.

  6. Radiant energy required for infrared neural stimulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Xiaodong; Rajguru, Suhrud; Young, Hunter; Xia, Nan; Stock, Stuart R.; Xiao, Xianghui; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-08-25

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been proposed as an alternative method to electrical stimulation because of its spatial selective stimulation. Independent of the mechanism for INS, to translate the method into a device it is important to determine the energy for stimulation required at the target structure. Custom-designed, flat and angle polished fibers, were used to deliver the photons. By rotating the angle polished fibers, the orientation of the radiation beam in the cochlea could be changed. INS-evoked compound action potentials and single unit responses in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) were recorded. X-ray computed tomography wasmore »used to determine the orientation of the optical fiber. Maximum responses were observed when the radiation beam was directed towards the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), whereas little responses were seen when the beam was directed towards the basilar membrane. The radiant exposure required at the SGNs to evoke compound action potentials (CAPs) or ICC responses was on average 18.9 ± 12.2 or 10.3 ± 4.9 mJ/cm2, respectively. For cochlear INS it has been debated whether the radiation directly stimulates the SGNs or evokes a photoacoustic effect. The results support the view that a direct interaction between neurons and radiation dominates the response to INS.« less

  7. Application of Infrared Thermography in Building Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Y.; Chen, H.; Xu, Q.; I, D.; Wang, Z.; Fang, X.

    2006-01-01

    of infrared detector according to infrared radiation law. 4TE ??= ?? (1) Where E ? radiometric force, W/m2 ? ? emissivity ? ? the constant of radiation =5.67×10-8 , W/ ? m2?K4? T ? the absolute temperature of the surface , K... OF INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY According to the Planck?s radiation law (equation 1), radiometric force of common object has the biquadratic direct proportion with the absolute temperature of its surface. Infrared ray belongs to the electromagnetic wave, which...

  8. TESLA-FEL 2006-04 Far-Infrared Transition and Diffraction Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TESLA-FEL 2006-04 Far-Infrared Transition and Diffraction Radiation Part II: The THz Beamline at the VUV-FEL Linac Sara Casalbuoni1 , Bernhard Schmidt1 , Peter Schm¨user1,2 , Bernd Steffen1,2 1 Deutsches-Electron Laser (VUV-FEL) at DESY has recently been up- graded to a maximum electron energy of 700 MeV, allowing

  9. Pressure-sensitive blackbody point radiation induced by infrared diode laser irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Pressure-sensitive blackbody point radiation induced by infrared diode laser irradiation Feng Qin,1, by irradiation of well-matched infrared (IR) lasers upon the Yb3þ ions, ultrabroadband luminescence can

  10. Matching of Infrared Emitters with Textiles For Improved Energy Utilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, W. W.; Williamson, V. A.; Johnson, M. R.; Do, B. T.

    1994-01-01

    The successful utilization of infrared radiation is dependent on the spectral characteristics of the material being processed and on how well the spectral output of the infrared source matches those of the material being heated. Very little bas been...

  11. Pulsed mid-infrared radiation from spectral broadening in laser wakefield simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, W.; Palastro, J. P.; Antonsen, T. M. [IREAP, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)] [IREAP, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Spectral red-shifting of high power laser pulses propagating through underdense plasma can be a source of ultrashort mid-infrared (MIR) radiation. During propagation, a high power laser pulse drives large amplitude plasma waves, depleting the pulse energy. At the same time, the large amplitude plasma wave provides a dynamic dielectric response that leads to spectral shifting. The loss of laser pulse energy and the approximate conservation of laser pulse action imply that spectral red-shifts accompany the depletion. In this paper, we investigate, through simulation, the parametric dependence of MIR generation on pulse energy, initial pulse duration, and plasma density.

  12. Tunable ultrasonic phononic crystal controlled by infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Ezekiel; Neogi, Arup, E-mail: zhmwang@gmail.com, E-mail: arup@unt.edu [Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); University of North Texas, Department of Physics, Denton, Texas 76201 (United States); Reyes, Delfino [University of North Texas, Department of Physics, Denton, Texas 76201 (United States); Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Toluca 50120 (Mexico); Rojas, Miguel Mayorga [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Toluca 50120 (Mexico); Krokhin, Arkadii [University of North Texas, Department of Physics, Denton, Texas 76201 (United States); Wang, Zhiming, E-mail: zhmwang@gmail.com, E-mail: arup@unt.edu [Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2014-10-06

    A tunable phononic crystal based ultrasonic filter was designed by stimulating the phase of the polymeric material embedded in a periodic structure using infrared radiation. The acoustic filter can be tuned remotely using thermal stimulation induced by the infrared radiation. The filter is composed of steel cylinder scatterers arranged periodically in a background of bulk poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) polymer hydrogel. The lattice structure creates forbidden bands for certain sets of mechanical waves that cause it to behave as an ultrasonic filter. Since the bandstructure is determined by not only the arrangement of the scatterers but also the physical properties of the materials composing the scatterers and background, modulating either the arrangement or physical properties will alter the effect of the crystal on propagating mechanical waves. Here, the physical properties of the filter are varied by inducing changes in the polymer hydrogel using an electromagnetic thermal stimulus. With particular focus on the k{sub 00}-wave, the transmission of ultrasonic wave changes by as much as 20 dBm, and band widths by 22% for select bands.

  13. A DEDICATED INFRARED SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCE AT W. Barry, A. Biocca, J. M. Byrd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A DEDICATED INFRARED SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCE AT THE ALS * W. Barry, A. Biocca, J. M. Byrd , W ring dedicated to and optimized for the production of synchrotron radiation over the infrared]. This paper describes ideas for the design of a storage ring dedicated to and optimized for the production

  14. Energy harvesting devices for harvesting energy from terahertz electromagnetic radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novack, Steven D.; Kotter, Dale K.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2012-10-09

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  15. Feedback-Driven Evolution of the Far-Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanya Chakrabarti; T. J. Cox; Lars Hernquist; Philip F. Hopkins; Brant Robertson; Tiziana Di Matteo

    2007-01-22

    We calculate infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from simulations of major galaxy mergers and study the effect of AGN and starburst driven feedback on the evolution of the SED as a function of time. We use a self-consistent three-dimensional radiative equilibrium code to calculate the emergent SEDs and to make images. To facilitate a simple description of our findings, we describe our results in reference to an approximate analytic solution for the far-IR SED. We focus mainly on the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) and ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) phases of evolution. We contrast the SEDs of simulations performed with AGN feedback to simulations performed with starburst driven wind feedback. We find that the feedback processes critically determine the evolution of the SED. Changing the source of illumination (whether stellar or AGN) has virtually no impact on the reprocessed far-infrared SED. We find that AGN feedback is particularly effective at dispersing gas and rapidly injecting energy into the ISM. The observational signature of such powerful feedback is a warm SED. In general, simulations performed with starburst driven winds have colder spectra and reprocess more of their emission into the infrared, resulting in higher infrared to bolometric luminosities compared to (otherwise equivalent) simulations performed with AGN feedback. We depict our results in IRAS bands, as well as in Spitzer's MIPS bands, and in Herschel's PACS bands.

  16. Infrared Basics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt.Infinifuel Biodiesel JumpInfotility Jump

  17. Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    hydro- gen [10]. The authors suggested that “infrared radiation is contributing the activation energy

  18. Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedListguided wavesLone StarEnergyInfrared

  19. All-electric detection of the Stokes parameters of infrared and terahertz radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    All-electric detection of the Stokes parameters of infrared and terahertz radiation S.D. Ganichev-electric detection of the laser radiation polarization state describing by the Stokes parameters. The method is based acknowledged! #12;Objectives The detection of the ellipticity is a powerful technique for analyzing the optical

  20. USE OF INFRARED RADIATION IN THE STUDY OF FISH BEHAVIOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 000° K. (high -temperature tungsten lamp) . Relative emission from sun. #12;#12;The Eye of experimental facilities - ·^ Figure 4. Distribution of fingerling Pacific salmon (O^. kisutch) under ordinary room lighting 9 Figure 5. Distribution of fingerling Pacific salmon (O. kisutch) with infrared

  1. Non-destructive component separation using infrared radiant energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, Ronald F. (Knoxville, TN); Russell, Steven W. (Knoxville, TN); Holt, Jerrid S. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN)

    2011-03-01

    A method for separating a first component and a second component from one another at an adhesive bond interface between the first component and second component. Typically the method involves irradiating the first component with infrared radiation from a source that radiates substantially only short wavelengths until the adhesive bond is destabilized, and then separating the first component and the second component from one another. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is placed inside an enclosure and the assembly is illuminated from an IR source that is external to the enclosure. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is simultaneously irradiated by a multi-planar array of IR sources. Often the IR radiation is unidirectional. In some embodiments the IR radiation is narrow-band short wavelength infrared radiation.

  2. Radiation augmentation energy storage system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christe, K.O.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes a method of converting radiation energy into chemical energy to produce a high-performance propellant. It comprises: photolytically converting oxygen to ozone; storing and stabilizing the ozone in liquid oxygen to form an ozone/liquid oxygen solution; and combusting the ozone/liquid oxygen solution with hydrogen.

  3. Author's personal copy Thermal radiators with embedded pulsating heat pipes: Infra-red thermography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandekar, Sameer

    Author's personal copy Thermal radiators with embedded pulsating heat pipes: Infra-red thermography December 2010 Accepted 9 January 2011 Available online 18 January 2011 Keywords: Pulsating heat pipes t With the aim of exploring potential applications of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP), for space/terrestrial sectors

  4. Structures, systems and methods for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novack, Steven D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Columbia, MO)

    2011-12-06

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  5. Method of using infrared radiation for assembling a first component with a second component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whitson, Barry G. (Corryton, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A method of assembling a first component for assembly with a second component involves a heating device which includes an enclosure having a cavity for inserting a first component. An array of infrared energy generators is disposed within the enclosure. At least a portion of the first component is inserted into the cavity, exposed to infrared energy and thereby heated to a temperature wherein the portion of the first component is sufficiently softened and/or expanded for assembly with a second component.

  6. Method and apparatus for reducing radiation exposure through the use of infrared data transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Austin, Frank S. (Schaghticoke, NY); Hance, Albert B. (Schenectady, NY)

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for transmitting information, for exae, dosimetry data from a hazardous environment such as a radioactive area to a remote relatively safe location. A radiation detector senses the radiation and generates an electrical signal which is fed as a binary coded decimal signal to an infrared transmitter having a microprocessor. The microprocessor formats the detected information into digits of data and modulates a 40 kHz oscillator, the output of which is fed to and intensity modulates one or more infrared emitting diodes. The infrared signal from the diodes is transmitted to a portable hand-held infrared receiver remote from the hazardous environment. The receiver includes an infrared sensitive diode which decodes the data and generates an electrical signal which is coupled to a microcomputer. The microcomputer synchronizes itself to the transmitter, reads the digits of data as they are received, sums the digits and compares the sum with a checksum signal generated and transmitted from the transmitter. If a match of the checksum signals exists, the received data is displayed, otherwise it is described and the receiver conditions itself for the next transmission of data.

  7. Modelling the Spectral Energy Distribution of Compact Luminous Infrared Galaxies: Constraints from High Frequency Radio Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. R. Prouton; A. Bressan; M. Clemens; A. Franceschini; G. L. Granato; L. Silva

    2004-03-24

    We have performed 23 GHz VLA observations of 7 compact, luminous infrared galaxies, selected to have evidence of starburst activity. New and published multi-frequency data are combined to obtain the spectral energy distributions of all 7 galaxies from the near-infrared to the radio (at 1.4 GHz). These SEDs are compared with new models, for dust enshrouded galaxies, which account for both starburst and AGN components. In all 7 galaxies the starburst provides the dominant contribution to the infrared luminosity; in 4 sources no contribution from an AGN is required. Although AGN may contribute up to 50 percent of the total far--infrared emission, the starbursts always dominate in the radio. The SEDs of most of our sources are best fit with a very high optical depth of (>=50) at 1 micron. The scatter in the far-infrared/radio correlation, found among luminous IRAS sources, is due mainly to the different evolutionary status of their starburst components. The short time-scale of the star formation process amplifies the delay between the far-infrared and radio emission. This becomes more evident at low radio frequencies (below about 1 GHz) where synchrotron radiation is the dominant process. In the far-infrared (at wavelengths shorter than 100 micron) an additional source of scatter is provided by AGN, where present. AGN may be detected in the near-infrared by the absence of the knee, typical of stellar photospheres. However, near-infrared data alone cannot constrain the level at which AGN contribute because the interpretation of their observed properties, in this wave-band, depends strongly on model parameters.

  8. Radiation interchange modeling for active infrared proximity sensor design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piper, James Clarice

    1999-01-01

    . This research focuses on information gathered using active optical proximity sensors in the reflectance sensing mode. The portion of energy reflected to a given sensor in combination with the known location of the source and sensor elements provide the basic...

  9. Near-infrared radiation curable multilayer coating systems and methods for applying same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, Mark P; Verdun, Shelley D; Post, Gordon L

    2015-04-28

    Multilayer coating systems, methods of applying and related substrates are disclosed. The coating system may comprise a first coating comprising a near-IR absorber, and a second coating deposited on a least a portion of the first coating. Methods of applying a multilayer coating composition to a substrate may comprise applying a first coating comprising a near-IR absorber, applying a second coating over at least a portion of the first coating and curing the coating with near infrared radiation.

  10. Apparatus for generating coherent infrared energy of selected wavelength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stevens, Charles G. (Danville, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A tunable source (11) of coherent infrared energy includes a heat pipe (12) having an intermediate region (24) at which cesium (22) is heated to vaporizing temperature and end regions (27, 28) at which the vapor is condensed and returned to the intermediate region (24) for reheating and recirculation. Optical pumping light (43) is directed along the axis of the heat pipe (12) through a first end window (17) to stimulate emission of coherent infrared energy which is transmitted out through an opposite end window (18). A porous walled tubulation (44) extends along the axis of the heat pipe (12) and defines a region (46) in which cesium vapor is further heated to a temperature sufficient to dissociate cesium dimers which would decrease efficiency by absorbing pump light (43). Efficient generation of any desired infrared wavelength is realized by varying the wavelength of the pump light (43).

  11. Far-Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions and Photometric Redshifts of Dusty Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanya Chakrabarti; Christopher F. McKee

    2007-10-22

    We infer the large-scale source parameters of dusty galaxies from their observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using the analytic radiative transfer methodology presented in Chakrabarti & McKee (2005). For local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), we show that the millimeter to far-infrared (FIR) SEDs can be well fit using the standard dust opacity index of 2 when self-consistent radiative transfer solutions are employed, indicating that the cold dust in local ULIRGs can be described by a single grain model. We develop a method for determining photometric redshifts of ULIRGs and sub-mm galaxies from the millimeter-FIR SED; the resulting value of $1+z$ is typically accurate to about 10%. As such, it is comparable to the accuracy of near-IR photometric redshifts and provides a complementary means of deriving redshifts from far-IR data, such as that from the upcoming $\\it{Herschel Space Observatory}$. Since our analytic radiative transfer solution is developed for homogeneous, spherically symmetric, centrally heated, dusty sources, it is relevant for infrared bright galaxies that are primarily powered by compact sources of luminosity that are embedded in a dusty envelope. We discuss how deviations from spherical symmetry may affect the applicability of our solution, and we contrast our self-consistent analytic solution with standard approximations to demonstrate the main differences.

  12. Shifting of infrared radiation using rotational raman resonances in diatomic molecular gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1980-01-01

    A device for shifting the frequency of infrared radiation from a CO.sub.2 laser by stimulated Raman scattering in either H.sub.2 or D.sub.2. The device of the preferred embodiment comprises an H.sub.2 Raman laser having dichroic mirrors which are reflective for 16 .mu.m radiation and transmittive for 10 .mu.m, disposed at opposite ends of an interaction cell. The interaction cell contains a diatomic molecular gas, e.g., H.sub.2, D.sub.2, T.sub.2, HD, HT, DT and a capillary waveguide disposed within the cell. A liquid nitrogen jacket is provided around the capillary waveguide for the purpose of cooling. In another embodiment the input CO.sub.2 radiation is circularly polarized using a Fresnel rhomb .lambda./4 plate and applied to an interaction cell of much longer length for single pass operation.

  13. Terahertz and Infrared Uncooled Detector Based on a Microcantilever as a Radiation Pressure Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gennady P. Berman; Boris M. Chernobrod; Alan R. Bishop; Vyacheslav N. Gorshkov

    2007-03-05

    We consider a far infrared (terahertz), room-temperature detector based on a microcantilever sensor of the radiation pressure. This system has a significantly higher sensitivity than existing uncooled detectors in the far infrared (terahertz) spectral region. The significant enhancement of sensitivity is due the combination non-absorption detection method and high quality optical microcavity. Our theoretical analysis of the detector sensitivity and numerical simulations demonstrate that the narrowband heterodyne detector with the band width 30 MHz has a minimal measurable intensity by three orders of magnitude less than conventional uncooled detectors. In the case of the broadband detector, the noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) is 7.6 mK, which is significantly smaller than for conventional uncooled thermal detectors.

  14. Electroweak Radiative Corrections at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansgar Denner

    2001-10-11

    For energies far above the electroweak scale, large electroweak radiative corrections occur that grow logarithmically with energy and can easily reach several tens of per cent in the TeV range. Recent work on these corrections is reviewed.

  15. Forward looking infrared | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprint Ventures JumpIndiana: EnergyWind Farm Jump

  16. ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Dark Energy, Type Ia supernovae, radiative

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Oklahoma Univ. of Oklahoma 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Dark Energy, Type Ia supernovae, radiative transfer, Dark Energy, Type Ia supernovae, radiative transfer, The...

  17. Effect of pulse intensity distributions on fragment internal energy in the infrared multiphoton dissociation of vinyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effect of pulse intensity distributions on fragment internal energy in the infrared multiphoton the rovibra- tional energy distributions of fragmentsl formed in the infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD energies of the frag- ment can be well characterized in terms of a Boltzmann distribution with a single

  18. Performance and energy costs associated with scaling infrared heater arrays for warming field plots from 1 to 100 m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimball B. A.; Lewin K.; Conley, M. M.

    2012-04-01

    To study the likely effects of global warming on open-field vegetation, hexagonal arrays of infrared heaters are currently being used for low-stature (<1 m) plants in small ({le}3 m) plots. To address larger ecosystem scales, herein we show that excellent uniformity of the warming can be achieved using nested hexagonal and rectangular arrays. Energy costs depend on the overall efficiency (useable infrared energy on the plot per electrical energy in), which varies with the radiometric efficiency (infrared radiation out per electrical energy in) of the individual heaters and with the geometric efficiency (fraction of thermal radiation that falls on useable plot area) associated with the arrangement of the heaters in an array. Overall efficiency would be about 26% at 4 ms{sup -1} wind speed for a single hexagonal array over a 3-m-diameter plot and 67% for a 199-hexagon honeycomb array over a 100-m-diameter plot, thereby resulting in an economy of scale.

  19. Radiator Labs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    growing energy storage demand. The Polymer Ionic Liquid (PIL) rechargeable lithium battery has four times the energy density of a conventional lithium-ion battery. Learn...

  20. Radiation, Matter and Energy What is light?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy

    Radiation, Matter and Energy #12;What is light? #12;Light is an electromagnetic wave #12;Light is an electromagnetic wave #12;#12;Light is also a particle Photons: "pieces" of light, each with precise wavelength the visible spectrum, blue light has higher energy than red light Within the electromagnetic spectrum, X

  1. Method and apparatus for coherent imaging of infrared energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Donald P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A coherent camera system performs ranging, spectroscopy, and thermal imaging. Local oscillator radiation is combined with target scene radiation to enable heterodyne detection by the coherent camera's two-dimensional photodetector array. Versatility enables deployment of the system in either a passive mode (where no laser energy is actively transmitted toward the target scene) or an active mode (where a transmitting laser is used to actively illuminate the target scene). The two-dimensional photodetector array eliminates the need to mechanically scan the detector. Each element of the photodetector array produces an intermediate frequency signal that is amplified, filtered, and rectified by the coherent camera's integrated circuitry. By spectroscopic examination of the frequency components of each pixel of the detector array, a high-resolution, three-dimensional or holographic image of the target scene is produced for applications such as air pollution studies, atmospheric disturbance monitoring, and military weapons targeting.

  2. Method and apparatus for coherent imaging of infrared energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, D.P.

    1998-05-12

    A coherent camera system performs ranging, spectroscopy, and thermal imaging. Local oscillator radiation is combined with target scene radiation to enable heterodyne detection by the coherent camera`s two-dimensional photodetector array. Versatility enables deployment of the system in either a passive mode (where no laser energy is actively transmitted toward the target scene) or an active mode (where a transmitting laser is used to actively illuminate the target scene). The two-dimensional photodetector array eliminates the need to mechanically scan the detector. Each element of the photodetector array produces an intermediate frequency signal that is amplified, filtered, and rectified by the coherent camera`s integrated circuitry. By spectroscopic examination of the frequency components of each pixel of the detector array, a high-resolution, three-dimensional or holographic image of the target scene is produced for applications such as air pollution studies, atmospheric disturbance monitoring, and military weapons targeting. 8 figs.

  3. Sandia Energy - Radiation Effects Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &WaterNewPhotoionizationPowerRadar Friendly

  4. Radiative energy loss and radiative p_T-broadening of high-energy partons in QCD matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    I give a self-contained review on radiative p_T-broadening and radiative energy loss of high-energy partons in QCD matter. The typical p_T^2 of high-energy partons receives a double logarithmic correction due to the recoiling effect of medium-induced gluon radiation. Such a double logarithmic term, averaged over the path length of the partons, can be taken as the radiative correction to the jet quenching parameter qhat and hence contributes to radiative energy loss. This has also been confirmed by detailed calculations of energy loss by radiating two gluons.

  5. Part 1. Energy and Mass Solar Radiation and the Seasons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Youmin

    Part 1. Energy and Mass Chapter 2. Solar Radiation and the Seasons #12;Introduction Solar Radiation radiation = 10 m peak #12;#12;The Solar Constant Energy intensity decreases in proportion to the distance of the Earth's Seasons Orbital alignment to the Sun = seasonal variations in solar energy Revolution

  6. Infrared Solar Energy Harvesting using Nano-Rectennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayed, Islam E Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Rectennas formed from nanodipole antennas terminated by plasmonic metal-insulator-metal (MIM) travelling wave transmission line rectifiers are developed for ambient thermal energy harvesting at 30 THz. The transmission lines are formed from two strips coupled either vertically or laterally. A systematic design approach is presented, that shows how different components can be integrated with each other with maximum radiation receiving nantenna efficiency, maximum coupling efficiency between nantenna and rectifier, and maximum MIM diode rectifier efficiency. The tunneling current of the rectifier is calculated using the transfer matrix method (TMM) and the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF). The figures of merit of the rectifier are analyzed, and the effect of the metals and insulator choices on these merits is investigated. A detailed parametric study of the coupled strips plasmonic transmission lines is presented and thoroughly discussed. The overall efficiencies of the proposed travelling wave rectennas ...

  7. Canopy radiation transmission for an energy balance snowmelt model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    January 2012. [1] To better estimate the radiation energy within and beneath the forest canopy for energy the energy balance and snowmelt beneath the forest canopy. Parsimony in terms of model complexity and dataCanopy radiation transmission for an energy balance snowmelt model Vinod Mahat1 and David G

  8. Infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, C.C. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    Infrared thermography is a useful tool for the diagnosis of problems in building systems. In instances where a building owner has several large buildings, an investment in a typical $30,000 infrared system may be cost effective. In most instances, however, the rental of an infrared system or the hiring of an infrared consulting service is a cost effective alternative. As can be seen from the several applications presented here, any mechanical problem manifesting itself in an atypical temperature pattern can usually be detected. The two primary savings generated from infrared analysis of building systems are maintenance and energy.

  9. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Instrument of Energy (DoE). Objectives · Provide Improved Methods for Radiometer Calibrations · Develop a Solar Energy Resources · Offer Unique Training Methods for Solar Monitoring Network Design, Operation

  10. Focusing monochromators for high energy synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suortti, P. )

    1992-01-01

    Bent crystals are introduced as monochromators for high energy synchrotron radiation. The reflectivity of the crystal can be calculated reliably from a model where the bent crystal is approximated by a stack of lamellas, which have a gradually changing angle of reflection. The reflectivity curves of a 4 mm thick, asymmetrically cut ({chi}=9.5{degree}) Si(220) crystal are measured using 150 keV radiation and varying the bending radius from 25 to 140 m. The width of the reflectivity curve is up to 50 times the Darwin width of the reflection, and the maximum reflectivity exceeds 80%. The crystal is used as a monochromator in Compton scattering measurements. The source is on the focusing circle, so that the resolution is limited essentially by the detector/analyzer. A wide bandpass, sharply focused beam is attained when the source is outside the focusing circle in the transmission geometry. In a test experiment. 10{sup 12} photons on an area of 2 mm{sup 2} was observed. The energy band was about 4 keV centered at 40 keV. A powder diffraction pattern of a few reflections of interest was recorded by an intrinsic Ge detector, and this demonstrated that a structural transition can be followed at intervals of a few milliseconds.

  11. Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) is the database of occupational radiation exposures for all monitored DOE employees, contractors,...

  12. Louisiana Nuclear Energy and Radiation Control Law (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation of nuclear energy safety, permitting and radiation safety and control in Louisiana. The Department operates...

  13. Category:Near Infrared Surveys | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to: navigation,GroundNear Infrared Surveys Jump to:

  14. Nanowire-based frequency-selective capacitive photodetector for resonant detection of infrared radiation at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandyopadhyay, Saumil, E-mail: saumilb@mit.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    Characteristics of a capacitive infrared photodetector that works at room temperature by registering a change in capacitance upon illumination are reported. If used in an ideal resonant inductor-resistor-capacitor circuit, it can exhibit zero dark current, zero standby power dissipation, infinite detectivity, and infinite light-to-dark contrast ratio. It is also made frequency-selective by employing semiconductor nanowires that selectively absorb photons of energies close to the nanowire's bandgap. Based on measured parameters, the normalized detectivity is estimated to be ?3?×?10{sup 7} Jones for 1.6??m IR wavelength at room temperature.

  15. A Far-Infrared Observational Test of the Directional Dependence in Radiative Grain Alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaillancourt, John E

    2015-01-01

    The alignment of interstellar dust grains with magnetic fields provides a key method for measuring the strength and morphology of the fields. In turn, this provides a means to study the role of magnetic fields from diffuse gas to dense star-forming regions. The physical mechanism for aligning the grains has been a long-term subject of study and debate. The theory of radiative torques, in which an anisotropic radiation field imparts sufficient torques to align the grains while simultaneously spinning them to high rotational velocities, has passed a number of observational tests. Here we use archival polarization data in dense regions of the Orion molecular cloud (OMC-1) at 100, 350, and $850\\,\\mu$m to test the prediction that the alignment efficiency is dependent upon the relative orientations of the magnetic field and radiation anisotropy. We find that the expected polarization signal, with a 180-degree period, exists at all wavelengths out to radii of 1.5 arcminutes centered on the BNKL object in OMC-1. The ...

  16. Energy Department radiation rhetoric, actions at odds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-03-07

    Only months after Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary pledged that DOE would [open quotes]come clean[close quotes] about past radiation abuses, the department is refusing to release individual exposure records of former workers at its heavily contaminated Fernald uranium plant. At the same time O'Leary was flying around the country to tout a new era of openness at the department, top DOE officials in January told attorneys representing the Fernald workers that individual exposure records would not be forthcoming. While agreeing to provide general health data, DOE specifically refused to disclose the names of the workers involved or their specific exposure histories at the plant, citing privacy concerns. The workers' attorneys contend the privacy concerns are spurious since every former Fernald worker contacted about possible overexposure has waived the privacy privilege and authorized DOE to release his or her records. The attorneys also note that DOE under the Bush administration released worker exposure information related to its Hanford, Wash., plant after the government and outside attorneys agreed to a protective order that assured privacy rights were not violated. The Fernald workers' attorneys maintain DOE is refusing to disclose the names of the workers to ensure that no additional workers are contacted by the attorneys and told about their possible overexposure - and the pending litigation seeking compensation for the alleged injuries. And as DOE remains silent, the attorneys say, the former Fernald workers are going without medical treatment for any possible radiation-related ailments they may have suffered as a result of working at the plant.

  17. Chopping of Near- and Mid-Infrared Radiation Using a Curled Electrostatic MEMS Actuator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dausch, David; Goodwin, Scott; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Andresen, B. F. and Fulop, G. F.

    2003-04-01

    An electrostatic MEMS actuator known as the ''Artificial Eyelid'' can be used as a micromechanical chopper for IR detectors. The actuator structure consists of a curled polymer/metal film stack which is microfabricated and released from an IR transparent substrate. These flexible film actuators can act as IR choppers, providing transmission of radiation to the sensor elements when open (curled) and reflection when closed (uncurled). Arrays of actuators were fabricated on ITO-coated glass substrates and ranged in size from 4 x 4 mm to 7.5 x 15 mm with individual elements ranging from 250 to 500 microns on a side.

  18. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared emission spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA); Jones, Roger W. (Ames, IA)

    1991-12-24

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a solid material (16, 42) by applying energy from an energy source (20, 70) top a surface region of the solid material sufficient to cause transient heating in a thin surface layer portion of the solid material (16, 42) so as to enable transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion, and by detecting with a spectrometer/detector (28, 58) substantially only the transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion of the solid material. The detected transient thermal emission of infrared radiation is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the solid material of emitted infrared radiation, so as to be indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the solid material.

  19. Energy Diagnoses of Nine Infrared Luminous Galaxies Based on 3--4 Micron Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masatoshi Imanishi; C. C. Dudley

    2000-08-23

    The energy sources of nine infrared luminous galaxies (IRLGs) are diagnosed based on their ground-based 3--4 $\\mu$m spectra. Both the equivalent width of the 3.3 $\\mu$m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission feature and the 3.3 $\\mu$m PAH to far-infrared luminosity ratio ($L_{3.3}/L_{\\rm FIR}$) are analyzed. Assuming nuclear compact starburst activity in these sources produces the 3.3 $\\mu$m PAH emission as strongly as that in starburst galaxies with lower far-infrared luminosities, the followings results are found: For six IRLGs, both the observed equivalent widths and the $L_{3.3}/L_{\\rm FIR}$ ratios are too small to explain the bulk of their far-infrared luminosities by compact starburst activity, indicating that active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity is a dominant energy source. For the other three IRLGs, while the 3.3 $\\mu$m PAH equivalent widths are within the range of starburst galaxies, the $L_{3.3}/L_{\\rm FIR}$ ratios after correction for screen dust extinction are a factor of $\\sim$3 smaller. The uncertainty in the dust extinction correction factor and in the scatter of the intrinsic $L_{3.3}/L_{\\rm FIR}$ ratios for starburst galaxies do not allow a determination of the ultimate energy sources for these three IRLGs.

  20. Infrared imaging systems for the ferrocyanide waste tanks at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mailhot, R.B.; Morris, K.L.

    1993-02-01

    The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State has 24 radioactive storage tanks containing ferrocyanide. There is a concern that these tanks could become explosive. Infrared imaging was investigated as a method to determine if high-heat areas (i.e., hot spots'') exist in the tanks. A hot spot is defined as a volumetric region within a waste tank with an excessively warm [220[degrees]C (428[degrees]F)] temperature that is generated by radioactive isotopes. The thermal image of a hot spot was modeled by computer. This model determined the temperature variation an infrared system must detect. Laboratory and field tests of the imaging system are described and conclusions based on the laboratory data are presented. The report describes the system's capabilities and limitations. The infrared imaging system is able to detect the surface image of the modeled hot spot in most of the ferrocyanide tanks.

  1. Infrared Inspection Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, A. B.; Bevers, D. V.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared scanning equipment has been used at Amoco's Texas City refinery since 1971 as an inspection tool. A camera scans the field of view and focuses the infrared radiation on a detector which converts the infrared signal to an electrical signal...

  2. Infrared imaging systems for the ferrocyanide waste tanks at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mailhot, R.B.; Morris, K.L.

    1993-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in Washington State has 24 radioactive storage tanks containing ferrocyanide. There is a concern that these tanks could become explosive. Infrared imaging was investigated as a method to determine if high-heat areas (i.e., ``hot spots``) exist in the tanks. A hot spot is defined as a volumetric region within a waste tank with an excessively warm [220{degrees}C (428{degrees}F)] temperature that is generated by radioactive isotopes. The thermal image of a hot spot was modeled by computer. This model determined the temperature variation an infrared system must detect. Laboratory and field tests of the imaging system are described and conclusions based on the laboratory data are presented. The report describes the system`s capabilities and limitations. The infrared imaging system is able to detect the surface image of the modeled hot spot in most of the ferrocyanide tanks.

  3. Far-Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Embedded Protostars and Dusty Galaxies: I. Theory for Spherical Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanya Chakrabarti; Christopher F. McKee

    2005-06-27

    We present analytic radiative transfer solutions for the spectra of unresolved, spherically symmetric, centrally heated, dusty sources. We find that the dust thermal spectrum possesses scaling relations that provide a natural classification for a broad range of sources, from low-mass protostars to dusty galaxies. In particular, we find that, given our assumptions, spectral energy distributions (SEDs) can be characterized by two distance-independent parameters, the luminosity-to-mass ratio, $L/M$, and the surface density, $\\Sigma$, for a set of two functions, namely, the density profile and the opacity curve. The goal is to use SEDs as a diagnostic tool in inferring the large-scale physical conditions in protostellar and extragalactic sources, and ultimately, evolutionary parameters. Our approach obviates the need to use SED templates in the millimeter to far-infrared region of the spectrum; this is a common practice in the extragalactic community that relies on observed correlations established at low redshift that may not necessarily extend to high redshift. Further, we demarcate the limited region of parameter space in which density profiles can be inferred from the SED, which is of particular import in the protostellar community as competing theories of star formation are characterized by different density profiles. The functionality of our model is unique in that in provides for a self-consistent analytic solution that we have validated by comparison with a well-tested radiative transfer code (DUSTY) to find excellent agreement with numerical results over a parameter space that spans low-mass protostars to ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGS).

  4. Efficient wireless non-radiative mid-range energy transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficient wireless non-radiative mid-range energy transfer Aristeidis Karalis a,*, J.D. Joannopoulos b , Marin Soljacic´ b a Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts-range wireless energy transfer. Ó 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Wireless energy; Wireless

  5. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  6. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of2 FederalEnergyDuctsDurable Low1

  7. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice ofof Energy BradofDianaNatural Gas fromOn-SystemFrancisAn

  8. Compton Scattered Transition Radiation from Very High Energy Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. L. Cherry; G. L. Case

    2002-06-04

    X-ray transition radiation can be used to measure the Lorentz factor of relativistic particles. At energies approaching gamma = E/mc^2 = 10^5, transition radiation detectors (TRDs) can be optimized by using thick (sim 5 - 10 mil) foils with large (5-10 mm) spacings. This implies X-ray energies >100 keV and the use of scintillators as the X-ray detectors. Compton scattering of the X-rays out of the particle beam then becomes an important effect. We discuss the design of very high energy detectors, the use of metal radiator foils rather than the standard plastic foils, inorganic scintillators for detecting Compton scattered transition radiation, and the application to the ACCESS cosmic ray experiment.

  9. the ? infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies. II. Framework, strategy, and first result

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J. T.; Griffith, R. L.; Sigurdsson, S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Povich, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, 3801 West Temple Avenue, Pomona, CA 91768 (United States); Mullan, B. [Blue Marble Space Institution of Science, P.O. Box 85561, Seattle, WA 98145-1561 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We describe the framework and strategy of the ? infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies, which will use the wide-field infrared surveys of WISE and Spitzer to search for these civilizations' waste heat. We develop a formalism for translating mid-infrared photometry into quantitative upper limits on extraterrestrial energy supplies. We discuss the likely sources of false positives, how dust can and will contaminate our search, and prospects for distinguishing dust from alien waste heat. We argue that galaxy-spanning civilizations may be easier to distinguish from natural sources than circumstellar civilizations (i.e., Dyson spheres), although GAIA will significantly improve our capability to identify the latter. We present a zeroth order null result of our search based on the WISE all-sky catalog: we show, for the first time, that Kardashev Type III civilizations (as Kardashev originally defined them) are very rare in the local universe. More sophisticated searches can extend our methodology to smaller waste heat luminosities, and potentially entirely rule out (or detect) both Kardashev Type III civilizations and new physics that allows for unlimited 'free' energy generation.

  10. INFRARED RADIATIVE COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul

    2011-01-01

    s employed to deliver coal - derived liquids to the domesticMultiphase Flow of Gas-Liquid and Gas-Coal Slurry Mixturesd k s a p (C]-C s ) Bulk-liquid to coal p a r t i c l e k r

  11. Transmissive infrared frequency selective surfaces and infrared antennas : final report for LDRD 105749.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Hadley, G. Ronald; Samora, Sally; Loui, Hung; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Davids, Paul; Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Johnson, William Arthur; Peters, David William

    2009-09-01

    Plasmonic structures open up new opportunities in photonic devices, sometimes offering an alternate method to perform a function and sometimes offering capabilities not possible with standard optics. In this LDRD we successfully demonstrated metal coatings on optical surfaces that do not adversely affect the transmission of those surfaces at the design frequency. This technology could be applied as an RF noise blocking layer across an optical aperture or as a method to apply an electric field to an active electro-optic device without affecting optical performance. We also demonstrated thin optical absorbers using similar patterned surfaces. These infrared optical antennas show promise as a method to improve performance in mercury cadmium telluride detectors. Furthermore, these structures could be coupled with other components to lead to direct rectification of infrared radiation. This possibility leads to a new method for infrared detection and energy harvesting of infrared radiation.

  12. THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF THE CARINA NEBULA FROM FAR-INFRARED TO RADIO WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salatino, M.; De Bernardis, P.; Masi, S. [Physics Department, Sapienza Universita di Roma, p.le Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Polenta, G., E-mail: maria.salatino@roma1.infn.it [ASI Science Data Center, ESRIN, via G. Galilei, I-00044, Frascati (Italy)

    2012-03-20

    Multi-wavelength observations are necessary for understanding the physical properties of astrophysical sources. In this paper, we use observations in the far-infrared to radio range to derive the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the Carina nebula. To do this, we carefully subtract the irregularly varying diffuse emission from the Galactic plane, which can be of the order of 10% of the nebula flux at these wavelengths. We find that the far-infrared SED can be modeled as emission from a dust population with a single temperature T{sub d} = (34.5{sup +2.0}{sub -1.8}) K and with a spectral index of emissivity {alpha} = -1.37{sup +0.09}{sub -0.08}. We also find a total infrared luminosity of the nebula of (7.4{sup +2.5}{sub -1.4}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} L{sub Sun} and, assuming a single temperature of the dust, a mass of the dust of (9500{sup +4600}{sub -3500}) M{sub Sun }.

  13. Infrared Upconversion for Astronomy Robert W. Boyd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Robert W.

    which collects the infrared radiation is designed so as to map each point in the field of view. Infrared radiation of frequency Figure 1. Schematic description of the upconversion process. Infrared radiation of frequency vIR is mixed with an intense laser beam of fre- quency vL in a nonlinear crystal

  14. The ? infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies. I. Background and justification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J. T.; Mullan, B.; Sigurdsson, S.; Povich, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    We motivate the ? infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies. We discuss some philosophical difficulties of the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), and how communication SETI circumvents them. We review 'Dysonian SETI', the search for artifacts of alien civilizations, and find that it is highly complementary to traditional communication SETI; the two together might succeed where either one alone has not. We discuss the argument of Hart that spacefaring life in the Milky Way should be either galaxy-spanning or non-existent, and examine a portion of his argument that we call the 'monocultural fallacy'. We discuss some rebuttals to Hart that invoke sustainability and predict long Galaxy colonization timescales. We find that the maximum Galaxy colonization timescale is actually much shorter than previous work has found (<10{sup 9} yr), and that many 'sustainability' counter-arguments to Hart's thesis suffer from the monocultural fallacy. We extend Hart's argument to alien energy supplies and argue that detectably large energy supplies can plausibly be expected to exist because life has the potential for exponential growth until checked by resources or other limitations, and intelligence implies the ability to overcome such limitations. As such, if Hart's thesis is correct, then searches for large alien civilizations in other galaxies may be fruitful; if it is incorrect, then searches for civilizations within the Milky Way are more likely to succeed than Hart argued. We review some past Dysonian SETI efforts and discuss the promise of new mid-infrared surveys, such as that of WISE.

  15. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: Modeling results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarkadoula, E.; Devanathan, R.; Weber, W. J.; Seaton, M. A.; Todorov, I. T.; Nordlund, K.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K.

    2014-02-28

    Zirconia is viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as an inert nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1–0.5?MeV energies with account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely isolated from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution, and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  16. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.; Seaton, Michael; Todorov, Ilian; Nordlund, Kai; Dove, Martin T.; Trachenko, Kostya

    2014-02-28

    Zirconia has been viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and was consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as a nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with the account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely disjoint from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  17. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarkadoula, Evangelia; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J; Seaton, M; Todorov, I T; Nordlund, Kai; Dove, Martin T; Trachenko, Kostya

    2014-01-01

    Zirconia is viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as an inert nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with account of electronic energy losses. We nd that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely isolated from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  18. Comments on "On Stored Energies and Radiation Q"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capek, Miloslav

    2015-01-01

    The commented paper claims to provide a new expression for an energy stored around a general radiator. The major purpose of this comment is to show that the claim is unjustified. Alongside with this issue, it is pointed out that some of the core formulas of the commented paper are not completely correct, and that their correct form has in fact been derived elsewhere, though for the purpose of evaluating the quality factor QZ and not the stored energies.

  19. Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014Department ofWindOPEN

  20. Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergy Managing853926 NewsORMAT NEVADAEnergy Innovation andWelcome The

  1. Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRDEnergyTurbine bladesJune 22, 2015BoydLearncovers

  2. Radiative energy loss in an anisotropic quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Pradip; Dutt-Mazumder, Abhee K.

    2011-04-15

    We calculate radiative energy loss of heavy and light quarks in an anisotropic medium (static) in a first-order opacity expansion. Such an anisotropy can result from the initial rapid longitudinal expansion of the matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Significant dependency of the energy loss on the anisotropy parameter {xi} and the direction of propagation of the partons with respect to the anisotropy axis is found. It is shown that the introduction of early-time momentum-space anisotropy can enhance the fractional energy loss in the direction of the anisotropy, whereas it decreases when the parton propagates perpendicular to the direction of the anisotropy.

  3. Energy Distribution for Non-commutative Radiating Schwarzschild Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Radinschi; F. Rahaman; U. F. Mondal

    2012-07-22

    The aim of this article is the calculation of the energy-momentum for a non-commutative radiating Schwarzschild black hole in order to obtain the expressions for energy. We make the calculations with the Einstein and M\\oller prescriptions. We show that the expressions for energy in both the prescriptions depend on the mass $M$, $\\theta$ parameter and radial coordinate. We make some comparisons between the results. Our results show that the Einstein prescription is a more powerful concept than the M\\oller prescription.

  4. Harvesting the Sun's Energy Through Heat as Well as Light | U...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    new approach to harvesting solar energy, developed by MIT researchers, could improve efficiency by using sunlight to heat a high-temperature material whose infrared radiation would...

  5. Impact of Friction and Scale-Dependent Initial Stress on Radiated Energy-Moment Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bruce E.

    . Shaw Lamont­Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York, USA The radiated energy coming271 Impact of Friction and Scale-Dependent Initial Stress on Radiated Energy-Moment Scaling Bruce E of elucidat- ing their radiated energy-moment scaling. We find, contrary to expectations, that apparent stress

  6. Radiative Energy Loss in Small and Large Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolbe, Isobel

    2015-01-01

    We use perturbative quantum chromodynamics to compute the corrections to the energy loss of a hard particle due to short separation distances between the creation of the particle and the in-medium scattering center that stimulates bremsstrahlung radiation. The result has several surprising features. The correction 1) does not go to zero for large path lengths; 2) breaks color triviality; 3) is formally zero in the large formation time approximation, but numerically dominates at large ~100 GeV parent parton energies out to long ~3 fm paths. Although motivated by the recent shocking evidence of collectivity in small systems, 1) and 3) mean our result has critically important implications for \\emph{all} energy loss model comparisons to data. In particular, 3) shows that a large fraction of the gluons radiated do not have a formation time that is large compared to the Debye screening length of the medium, violating a core approximation used in the derivations of all pQCD-based radiative energy loss formulae.

  7. Transparent, near-infrared organic photovoltaic solar cells for window and energy-scavenging applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunt, Richard R.

    We fabricate near-infrared absorbing organic photovoltaics that are highly transparent to visible light. By optimizing near-infrared optical-interference, we demonstrate power efficiencies of 1.3±0.1% with simultaneous ...

  8. Low-energy magnetic radiation: Deviations from GOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frauendorf, S.; Schwengner, R.; Wimmer, K.

    2014-10-15

    A pronounced spike at low energy in the strength function for magnetic radiation (LEMAR) is found by means of Shell Model calculations, which explains the experimentally observed enhancement of the dipole strength. LEMAR originates from statistical low-energy M1-transitions between many excited complex states. Re-coupling of the proton and neutron high-j orbitals generates the strong magnetic radiation. LEMAR is closely related to Magnetic Rotation. LEMAR is predicted for nuclides participating in the r-process of element synthesis and is expected to change the reaction rates. An exponential decrease of the strength function and a power law for the size distribution of the B(M1) values are found, which strongly deviate from the ones of the GOE of random matrices, which is commonly used to represent complex compound states.

  9. Infrared curing simulations of liquid composites molding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakouzi, S.; Pancrace, J.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Berthet, F. [Universite de Toulouse (France); INSA, UPS, Mines Albi, ISAE, ICA - Institut Clement Ader, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi cedex 09 (France); Ecole des Mines Albi, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi (France)

    2011-05-04

    Infrared radiation is an effective energy source to cure thermosetting polymers. Its usage is expected to reduce curing time in comparison with thermal heating and mold thermally regulated. In addition, because of the polymerization mechanism and instant on-off control of this power, an improvement in the final properties of the material is also expected. In this paper, we studied the infrared interaction with carbon (or glass) fibers reinforced epoxy matrix, where Liquid resin infusion (LRI) is used to manufacture the composite. Temperature of the composite is a key parameter that affects its mechanical properties and is controlled by the infrared emitters and the exothermic heat released from the polymerization. Radiative heat flux is computed using the in-lab developed software RAYHEAT. Then, the heat flux (or absorbed energy for glass fibers) is exported to the finite element based program COMSOLMULTIPHYSICS where heat balance equation is solved. This equation is coupled with the exothermic heat released during the curing process in order to predict the composite temperature versus time and degree of cure. Numerical simulations will be performed on planar parts (sheet shape) as well as curvilinear shapes. Experimental validations of the infrared curing carbon (glass)-epoxy composite system are presented in this paper Sheet surface temperature distribution are measured thanks to infrared camera. Kinetic parameters were estimated from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experimental data.

  10. The \\^G Infrared Search for Extraterrestrial Civilizations with Large Energy Supplies. II. Framework, Strategy, and First Result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, J T; Sigurðsson, S; Povich, M S; Mullan, B

    2014-01-01

    We describe the framework and strategy of the \\^G infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies, which will use the wide-field infrared surveys of WISE and Spitzer to search for these civilizations' waste heat. We develop a formalism for translating mid-infrared photometry into quantitative upper limits on extraterrestrial energy supplies. We discuss the likely sources of false positives, how dust can and will contaminate our search, and prospects for distinguishing dust from alien waste heat. We argue that galaxy-spanning civilizations may be easier to distinguish from natural sources than circumstellar civilizations (i.e., Dyson spheres), although Gaia will significantly improve our capability to identify the latter. We present a "zeroth order" null result of our search based on the WISE all-sky catalog: we show, for the first time, that Kardashev Type III civilizations (as Kardashev originally defined them) are very rare in the local universe. More sophisticated searches can...

  11. Thermodynamics of dark energy interacting with dark matter and radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mubasher Jamil; Emmanuel N. Saridakis; M. R. Setare

    2010-07-18

    We investigate the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics, in the cosmological scenario where dark energy interacts with both dark matter and radiation. Calculating separately the entropy variation for each fluid component and for the apparent horizon itself, we show that the generalized second law is always and generally valid, independently of the specific interaction form, of the fluids equation-of-state parameters and of the background geometry.

  12. Order Module--RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS GUIDE | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHighOffice|Order Module--DOE OrderOrderRADIATION

  13. Resonant nature of intrinsic defect energy levels in PbTe revealed by infrared photoreflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Bingpo; Cai, Chunfeng; Jin, Shuqiang; Ye, Zhenyu; Wu, Huizhen, E-mail: hzwu@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Qi, Zhen [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2014-07-14

    Step-scan Fourier-transform infrared photoreflectance and modulated photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the optical transitions of the epitaxial PbTe thin film grown by molecular beam epitaxy on BaF{sub 2} (111) substrate in the vicinity of energy gap of lead telluride at 77?K. It is found that the intrinsic defect energy levels in the electronic structure are of resonant nature. The Te-vacancy energy level is located above the conduction band minimum by 29.1?meV. Another defect (V{sub X}) energy level situated below valance band maximum by 18.1?meV is also revealed. Whether it is associated with the Pb vacancy is still not clear. It might also be related to the misfit dislocations stemming from the lattice mismatch between PbTe and BaF{sub 2} substrate. The experimental results support the theory prediction (N. J. Parada and G. W. Pratt, Jr., Phys. Rev. Lett. 22, 180 (1969), N. J. Parada, Phys. Rev. B 3, 2042 (1971)) and are consistent with the reported Hall experimental results (G. Bauer, H. Burkhard, H. Heinrich, and A. Lopez-Otero, J. Appl. Phys. 47, 1721 (1976)).

  14. CRAD, NNSA - Radiation Protection (RP) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About UsEnergy MarketingAsset Score00.4| Department of Energy FederalRadiation

  15. Bondi-Sachs energy-momentum and the energy of gravitational radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Maluf; J. F. da Rocha Neto; S. C. Ulhoa

    2015-07-03

    We construct the gravitational energy-momentum of the Bondi-Sachs space-time, in the famework of the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity (TEGR). The Bondi-Sachs line element describes gravitational radiation in the asymptotic region of the space-time, and is determined by the mass aspect and by two functions, $c$ and $d$, that yield the news functions, which are interpreted as the radiating degrees of freedom of the gravitational field. The standard expression for the Bondi-Sachs energy-momentum is constructed in terms of the mass aspect only. The expression that we obtain in the context of the TEGR is given by the standard expression, which represents the gravitational energy of the source, plus a new term that is determined by the two functions $c$ and $d$. We interpret this new term as the energy of gravitational radiation.

  16. Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baugher, Elizabeth

    2012-02-14

    for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST...

  17. PPPL-3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC-426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    including dimensional changes. Although radiation resistant refractive optics functioned well for the TFTR projected heating of the reflective optics themselves to several hundred degrees Celsius. Tests of beryllium. The periscope system is to be used for internal inspection of the vacuum vessel, imaging the plasma and divertor

  18. PPPL3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    including dimensional changes. Although radiation resistant refractive optics functioned well for the TFTR projected heating of the reflective optics themselves to several hundred degrees Celsius. Tests of beryllium. The periscope system is to be used for internal inspection of the vacuum vessel, imaging the plasma and divertor

  19. Radiating Gravitational Collapse with an Initial Inhomogeneous Energy Density Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Pinheiro; R. Chan

    2014-06-01

    A new model is proposed to a collapsing star consisting of an initial inhomogeneous energy density and anisotropic pressure fluid with shear, radial heat flow and outgoing radiation. In previous papers one of us has always assumed an initial star with homogeneous energy density. The aim of this work is to generalize the previous models by introducing an initial inhomogeneous energy density and compare it to the initial homogeneous energy density collapse model. We will show the differences between these models in the evolution of all physical quantities that characterizes the gravitational collapse. The behavior of the energy density, pressure, mass, luminosity and the effective adiabatic index is analyzed. The pressure of the star, at the beginning of the collapse, is isotropic but due to the presence of the shear the pressure becomes more and more anisotropic. The black hole is never formed because the apparent horizon formation condition is never satisfied, in contrast of the previous model where a black hole is formed. An observer at infinity sees a radial point source radiating exponentially until reaches the time of maximum luminosity and suddenly the star turns off. In contrast of the former model where the luminosity also increases exponentially, reaching a maximum and after it decreases until the formation of the black hole. The effective adiabatic index is always positive without any discontinuity in contrast of the former model where there is a discontinuity around the time of maximum luminosity. The collapse is about three thousand times slower than in the case where the energy density is initially homogeneous.

  20. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN ULTRAHIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS AND INFRARED-LUMINOUS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berlind, Andreas A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Farrar, Glennys R.; Zaw, Ingyin [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics and Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2010-06-20

    We confirm the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray (UHECR) horizon established by the Pierre Auger Observatory using the heterogeneous Veron-Cetty-Veron (VCV) catalog of active galactic nuclei by performing a redshift-angle-IR luminosity scan using point-source catalog with redshift (PSCz) galaxies having infrared luminosity greater than 10{sup 10} L{sub sun}. The strongest correlation-for z < 0.016, {psi} = 2.{sup 0}1, and L{sub ir} {>=} 10{sup 10.5} L{sub sun}-arises in fewer than 0.3% of scans with isotropic source directions. When we apply a penalty for using the UHECR energy threshold that was tuned to maximize the correlation with VCV, the significance degrades to 1.1%. Since the PSCz catalog is complete and volume-limited for these parameters, this suggests that the UHECR horizon discovered by the Pierre Auger Observatory is not an artifact of the incompleteness and other idiosyncrasies of the VCV catalog. The strength of the correlation between UHECRs and the nearby highest-IR-luminosity PSCz galaxies is stronger than in about 90% of trials with scrambled luminosity assignments for the PSCz galaxies. If confirmed by future data, this result would indicate that the sources of UHECRs are more strongly associated with luminous IR galaxies than with ordinary, lower IR luminosity galaxies.

  1. Lateral transport and far-infrared radiation of electrons in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As/GaAs heterostructures with the double tunnel-coupled quantum wells in a high electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baidus, N. V.; Belevskii, P. A.; Biriukov, A. A.; Vainberg, V. V.; Vinoslavskii, M. N.; Ikonnikov, A. V.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Pylypchuk, A. S.; Poroshin, V. N.

    2010-11-15

    It is shown that the far-infrared radiation of electrons in the selectively doped heterostructures with double tunnel-coupled quantum wells in high lateral electric fields strongly depends on the level of doping of the wells. At a high impurity concentration in a narrow well, higher than (1-2) x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}, the radiation is caused only by indirect intrasubband electron transitions. At a lower concentration, along with the indirect transitions, the direct intersubband transitions also contribute to the radiation. These transitions become possible in high electric fields due to the real-space electron transfer between the quantum wells.

  2. Thermophotovoltaic conversion using selective infrared line emitters and large band gap photovoltaic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandhorst, Jr., Henry W. (Auburn, AL); Chen, Zheng (Auburn, AL)

    2000-01-01

    Efficient thermophotovoltaic conversion can be performed using photovoltaic devices with a band gap in the 0.75-1.4 electron volt range, and selective infrared emitters chosen from among the rare earth oxides which are thermally stimulated to emit infrared radiation whose energy very largely corresponds to the aforementioned band gap. It is possible to use thermovoltaic devices operating at relatively high temperatures, up to about 300.degree. C., without seriously impairing the efficiency of energy conversion.

  3. Heat Loss Measurement Using Infrared Imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seeber, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    Infrared thermography has proven to be an important tool in numerous plant maintenance and energy conservation applications. Quantitative measurement, using infrared imaging instruments, is a powerful new dimension of infrared thermography...

  4. 12th North America Bangla Literature and Culture Convention 2010 (NABLCC10) EFFECT OF SOLAR RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahar, Sultana Nurun

    scatters and burns part of the incoming particles. However, the visible and near-infrared solar radiation penetrate through the earth's atmosphere. Solar Radiation in the Atmosphere and Grrenhouse Effect The solar a fine energy balance for thousands of years. It radiates back in to space the same amount of solar

  5. The far-infrared--submm spectral energy distribution of high-redshift quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert S. Priddey; Richard G. McMahon

    2001-04-10

    We combine submm photometric data of z>4 quasars, to obtain a mean far-infrared (FIR) (rest-frame) spectral energy distribution (SED) of thermal emission from dust, parameterised by a single temperature (T) and power-law emissivity index (beta). Best-fit values are T=41+/-5K, beta=1.95+/-0.3. The redshift spread of this set of quasars is exploited to allow us to sample the SED at a greater number of rest wavelengths than is possible for a single object. This parameterisation is of use to any study that extrapolates from a flux at a single submm wavelength, for example to infer dust masses and FIR luminosities. We then interpret the submm component as arising from dust heated by star-formation in the quasar's host galaxy, and investigate a simple scheme of AGN--host coevolution, in which the timescale for formation of the host galaxy is c.0.5-1.0Gyr, with star formation proceeding at a constant rate c.1000Msol/yr. The luminous quasar phase occurs towards the end of the star-forming period, just before the galaxy's reservoir of cold gas is depleted. Given the youth of the Universe at z=4 (1.6Gyr), the coexistence of a massive black hole and a luminous starburst can be a powerful constraint on models of quasar host-galaxy formation.

  6. SEAB Letter on Low-Level Radiation Research | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) transmitted a letter to the Department regarding its perspective on how DOE should pursue research on low-level radiation. SEAB recommends...

  7. Infra-red signature neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane William (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-10-13

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material that includes a photoluminescent material that generates infrared radiation and generation a by-product of a nuclear reaction due to the activator impinging the receptor material. The method further includes generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect, wherein the light activates the photoluminescent material so as to generate the infrared radiation. Identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the infrared radiation.

  8. Energy of gravitational radiation in plane-symmetric space-times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hayward

    2008-05-19

    Gravitational radiation in plane-symmetric space-times can be encoded in a complex potential, satisfying a non-linear wave equation. An effective energy tensor for the radiation is given, taking a scalar-field form in terms of the potential, entering the field equations in the same way as the matter energy tensor. It reduces to the Isaacson energy tensor in the linearized, high-frequency approximation. An energy conservation equation is derived for a quasi-local energy, essentially the Hawking energy. A transverse pressure exerted by interacting low-frequency gravitational radiation is predicted.

  9. Changes induced in a ZnS:Cr-based electroluminescent waveguide structure by intrinsic near-infrared laser radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlasenko, N. A. Oleksenko, P. F.; Mukhlyo, M. A.; Veligura, L. I.

    2013-08-15

    The causes of changes that occur in a thin-film electroluminescent metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal waveguide structure based on ZnS:Cr (Cr concentration of {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}) upon lasing ({lambda} Almost-Equal-To 2.6 {mu}m) and that induce lasing cessation are studied. It is established that lasing ceases because of light-scattering inhomogeneities formed in the structure and, hence, optical losses enhance. The origin of the inhomogeneities and the causes of their formation are clarified by studying the surface topology and the crystal structure of constituent layers of the samples before and after lasing. The studies are performed by means of atomic force microscopy and X-ray radiography. It is shown that a substantial increase in the sizes of grains on the surface of the structure is the manifestation of changes induced in the ZnS:Cr film by recrystallization. Recrystallization is initiated by local heating by absorbed laser radiation in existing Cr clusters and quickened by a strong electric field (>1 MV cm{sup -1}). The changes observed in the ZnS:Cr film are as follows: the textured growth of ZnS crystallites, an increase in the content of Cr clusters, and the appearance of some CrS and a rather high ZnO content. Some ways for improving the stability of lasing in the ZnS:Cr-based waveguide structures are proposed.

  10. Proling of Differentially Expressed Genes Induced by High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    epithelial cell lines irradiated with low doses of high linear energy transfer radiation and treatedPro®ling of Differentially Expressed Genes Induced by High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation in Breast Epithelial Cells Debasish Roy,* Gloria Calaf, and Tom K. Hei Center for Radiological Research

  11. Applied Radiation and Isotopes 64 (2006) 6062 Weak energy dependence of EBT gafchromic film dose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    2006-01-01

    Applied Radiation and Isotopes 64 (2006) 60­62 Weak energy dependence of EBT gafchromic film dose to megavoltage X-rays. The film is auto-developing and sensitive, it provides accurate dose assessment of low; Gafchromic EBT; Radiation dosimetry; Energy dependence; Dose response 1. Introduction In medical radiotherapy

  12. Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prieto, Germán A.

    Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic March 2010; accepted 9 April 2010; published 31 August 2010. [1] The seismic coda consists of scattered of radiated wave energy. We apply an empirical Green's function (EGF) method to the seismic coda in order

  13. Tunable infrared source employing Raman mixing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L. (Stanford, CA); Herbst, Richard L. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A tunable source of infrared radiation is obtained by irradiating an assemblage of Raman active gaseous atoms or molecules with a high intensity pumping beam of coherent radiation at a pump frequency .omega..sub.p to stimulate the generation of Stokes wave energy at a Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s and to stimulate the Raman resonant mode at the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R within the irradiated assemblage where the pump frequency .omega..sub.p minus the Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s is equal to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R. The stimulated assemblage is irradiated with a tunable source of coherent radiation at a frequency .omega..sub.i to generate the output infrared radiation of the frequency .omega..sub.0 which is related to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R and the input wave .omega..sub.i by the relation .omega..sub.0 =.omega..sub.i .+-..omega..sub.R. In one embodiment the interaction between the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i is collinear and the ratio of the phase velocity mismatch factor .DELTA.k to the electric field exponential gain coefficient T is within the range of 0.1 to 5. In another embodiment the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i have velocity vectors k.sub.p and k.sub.i which cross at an angle to each other to compensate for phase velocity mismatches in the medium. In another embodiment, the Stokes wave energy .omega..sub.s is generated by pump energy .omega..sub.p in a first Raman cell and .omega..sub.s, .omega..sub.i and .omega..sub.p are combined in a second Raman mixing cell to produce the output at .omega..sub.i.

  14. Simulation of MGI Efficiency for Plasma Energy Conversion into Ar Radiation in JET and Implications for ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulation of MGI Efficiency for Plasma Energy Conversion into Ar Radiation in JET and Implications for ITER

  15. The European Solar Radiation Atlas 1 Page J., M. Albuisson, L. Wald, 2001. The European solar radiation atlas: a valuable digital tool. Solar Energy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : solar water heaters, passive solar buildings, photovoltaic cells and biomass production. In each caseThe European Solar Radiation Atlas 1 Page J., M. Albuisson, L. Wald, 2001. The European solar radiation atlas: a valuable digital tool. Solar Energy, 71, 81-83, 2001.1 The European Solar Radiation Atlas

  16. Energy levels and far-infrared spectra of oval-shaped nanorings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutiérrez, W.; García, L. F.; Mikhailov, I. D.

    2014-05-15

    The evolution of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillation of low-lying states and far infrared spectrum associated to variation of the path curvature for electron motion along nanorings with centerlines in a form of a set of Cassini ovals, whose shape is changed continuously from a single elongated loop to two separated loops is theoretically investigated.

  17. Introduction to meteorological measurements and data handling for solar energy applications. Task IV. Development of an isolation handbook and instrument package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-01

    The following are covered: the Sun and its radiation, solar radiation and atmospheric interaction, solar radiation measurement methods, spectral irradiance measurements of natural sources, the measurement of infrared radiation, the measurement of circumsolar radiation, some empirical properties of solar radiation and related parameters, duration of sunshine, and meteorological variables related to solar energy. Included in appendices are manufacturers and distributors of solar radiation measuring instruments and an approximate method for quality control of solar radiation instruments. (MHR)

  18. Efficient weakly-radiative wireless energy transfer: An EIT-like approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of renewable energy, energy storage and management, etc. In particular, there is a substantial recent interest [1­5] in enabling efficient and safe wireless energy transfer, motivated by the increased 0003Efficient weakly-radiative wireless energy transfer: An EIT-like approach Rafif E. Hamam

  19. The Use of Infrared Technology To Detect Heat Loss 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, K.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared refers to electro magnetic energy with a wave length longer than those of visible light. Researchers developed methods to quantify, focus and form real-time images to infrared energy. This spawned the development of infrared Thenrography...

  20. The relationship between atmospheric convective radiative effect and net1 energy transport in the tropical warm pool2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    of the atmospheric cloud radiative effect in determining the magnitude of hor- izontal export of energy, they increase the re- quirement for the atmosphere to export energy from convective regions. Over the warmest that the increased energy export is supplied by the radiative heating from convection. The net cloud radiative effect

  1. Thermal heat radiation, near-field energy density and near-field radiative heat transfer of coated materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svend-Age Biehs

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the thermal radiation and thermal near-field energy density of a metal-coated semi-infinite body for different substrates. We show that the surface polariton coupling within the metal coating leads to an enhancement of the TM-mode part of the thermal near-field energy density when a polar substrate is used. In this case the result obtained for a free standing metal film is retrieved. In contrast, in the case of a metal substrate there is no enhancement in the TM-mode part, as can also be explained within the framework of surface plasmon coupling within the coating. Finally, we discuss the influence of the enhanced thermal energy density on the near-field radiative heat transfer between a simple semi-infinite and a coated semi-infinite body for different material combinations.

  2. Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karr, Thomas J. (Alamo, CA)

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile.

  3. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Shan Zhang [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043 (China); Hong Xueren [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Wang Hongyu [Department of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China); Shanghai Bright-Tech Information Technology Co. Ltd, Shanghai 200136 (China)

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  4. Radiative lifetime and energy of the low-energy isomeric level in $^{229}$Th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tkalya, E V; Jeet, Justin; Hudson, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the range of the radiative lifetime and energy of the anomalous, low-energy $3/2^+(7.8 \\pm 0.5$ eV) state in the $^{229}$Th nucleus. Our phenomenological calculations are based on the available experimental data for the intensities of $M1$ and $E2$ transitions between excited levels of the $^{229}$Th nucleus in the $K^{\\pi}[Nn_Z\\Lambda]=5/2^+[633]$ and $3/2^+[631]$ rotational bands. We also discuss the influence of certain branching coefficients, which affect the currently accepted measured energy of the isomeric state. From this work, we establish a favored region where the transition lifetime and energy should lie at roughly the 90% confidence level. We also suggest new nuclear physics measurements, which would significantly reduce the ambiguity in the present data.

  5. Stress-energy tensor of a radiating sphere inclosing black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciek Wielgus; Marek A. Abramowicz

    2015-01-07

    We consider a uniformly luminous radiating sphere and a static black hole located in the center of that sphere. We give analytic formulas for radiation stress-energy tensor components in such a configuration, for the observer located at an arbitrary distance from the static black hole horizon.

  6. Complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilski, P; D'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2006-01-01

    This report outlines the research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterization of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators and the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities under the auspices of the COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry (CONRAD) project funded by the European Commission.

  7. radiation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    27, 2015

    A U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) helicopter may be seen flying at low altitudes around...

  8. Efficient weakly-radiative wireless energy transfer: An EIT-like approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamam, Rafif E.

    Inspired by a quantum interference phenomenon known in the atomic physics community as electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), we propose an efficient weakly radiative wireless energy transfer scheme between two ...

  9. A path to practical Solar Pumped Lasers via Radiative Energy Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reusswig, Philip D.

    The optical conversion of incoherent solar radiation into a bright, coherent laser beam enables the application of nonlinear optics to solar energy conversion and storage. Here, we present an architecture for solar pumped ...

  10. ENERGY-SPECIFIC SOLAR RADIATION DATA FROM MSG: CURRENT STATUS OF THE HELIOSAT-3 PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    ENERGY-SPECIFIC SOLAR RADIATION DATA FROM MSG: CURRENT STATUS OF THE HELIOSAT-3 PROJECT Marion Solar energy technologies such as photovoltaics, solar thermal power plants, passive solar heating and operating of solar energy systems and as basis data set for electricity load forecasting. Both long term

  11. Noninvasive emittance and energy spread monitor using optical synchrotron radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorito, R.

    We propose a design for a minimally perturbing diagnostic minichicane, which utilizes optical synchrotron radiation (OSR) generated from magnetic bends in the chicane, to measure the rms horizontal and vertical beam sizes, ...

  12. On an Improvement of the Planck radiation Energy Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Saa

    2006-07-18

    The probability distribution function for thermodynamics and econophysics is obtained by solving an equilibrium equation. This approach is different from the common one of optimizing the entropy of the system or obtaining the state of maximum probability, which usually obtains as a result the Boltzmann distribution. The Gamma distribution is proposed as a better equation to describe the blackbody radiation in substitution of Planck's radiation equation. Also, a new form of entropy is proposed, that maintains the correct relation with the Clausius' formula.

  13. Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear EnergyTransfer Ionizing Radiation Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocke, David M.

    Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear EnergyTransfer Ionizing Radiation Purpose: The effect of low doses of low ^ linear energy transfer (photon) ionizing radiation (LDIR, and pathway. Conclusions: These results show for the first time that low doses of radiation have an identifi

  14. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 565 (2006) 650656 Semiconductor high-energy radiation scintillation detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luryi, Serge

    2006-01-01

    -energy radiation scintillation detector A. Kastalskya , S. Luryia,Ã, B. Spivakb a University at Stony Brook, ECE scintillation-type detector in which high-energy radiation generates electron­hole pairs in a direct semiconductor scintillator combines the best properties of currently existing radiation detectors and can

  15. ELEG620: Solar Electric Systems University of Delaware, ECE Spring 2008 C. Honsberg Solar Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honsberg, Christiana

    at high photon energies. · Water vapor, CO2, absorb in infra-red. ­ Clouds, other local variation its spectral irradiance ­ Calculate properties of black body radiation: Max temperature, total power · Outline ­ Properties of radiation: Summary of equations, terms, concepts ­ Solar Spectrum ­ Terrestrial

  16. Assessment of P and S wave energy radiated from very small shear-tensile seismic events in a deep South African mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    Assessment of P and S wave energy radiated from very small shear-tensile seismic events in a deep. Citation: Kwiatek, G., and Y. Ben-Zion (2013), Assessment of P and S wave energy radiated from very small of radiated seismic energy in S and P phases and derive ratios of S-to-P radiated energy (ES/EP) of 539

  17. Non-contact pumping of light emitters via non-radiative energy transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Achermann, Marc (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-01-05

    A light emitting device is disclosed including a primary light source having a defined emission photon energy output, and, a light emitting material situated near to said primary light source, said light emitting material having an absorption onset equal to or less in photon energy than the emission photon energy output of the primary light source whereby non-radiative energy transfer from said primary light source to said light emitting material can occur yielding light emission from said light emitting material.

  18. Radiative parton energy loss in expanding quark-gluon plasma with magnetic monopoles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Zakharov

    2014-12-19

    We study radiative parton energy loss in an expanding quark-gluon plasma with magnetic monopoles. We find that for realistic number density of thermal monopoles obtained in lattice simulations parton rescatterings on monopoles can considerably enhance energy loss for plasma produced in $AA$ collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. However, contrary to previous expectations, monopoles do not lead to the surface dominance of energy loss.

  19. The Evolving Interstellar Medium of Star Forming Galaxies Since z=2 as Probed by Their Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdis, Georgios E; Bethermin, M; Sargent, M; Elbaz, D; Pannella, M; Dickinson, M; Dannerbauer, H; Da Cunha, E; Walter, F; Rigopoulou, D; Charmandaris, V; Hwang, H -S; Kartaltepe, J

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the mid-infrared to millimeter wavelengths for individual galaxies and for stacked ensembles at 0.5, which is proportional to the dust mass weighted luminosity (LIR/Mdust), and the primary parameter defining the shape of the SED, is equivalent to SFE/Z. For MS galaxies we measure this quantity, , showing that it does not depend significantly on either the stellar mass or the sSFR. This is explained as a simple consequence of the existing correlations between SFR-M*, M*-Z and Mgas-SFR. Instead, we show that (or LIR/Mdust) does evolve, with MS galaxies having harder radiation fields and thus warmer temperatures as redshift increases from z=0 to 2, a trend which can also be understood based on the redshift evolution of the M*-Z and SFR-M* relations. These results motivate the construction of a universal set of SED templates for MS galaxies which vary as a function of redshift with only one parameter, .

  20. US Department of Energy standardized radiation safety training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trinoskey, P.A.

    1997-02-01

    The following working groups were formed under the direction of a radiological training coordinator: managers, supervisors, DOE auditors, ALARA engineers/schedulers/planners, radiological control personnel, radiation-generating device operators, emergency responders, visitors, Pu facilities, U facilities, tritium facilities, accelerator facilities, biomedical researchers. General courses for these groups are available, now or soon, in the form of handbooks.

  1. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A solid state radiative heat pump (10, 50, 70) operable at room temperature (300.degree. K.) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of charge carriers as compared to thermal equilibrium. In one form of the invention (10, 70) an infrared semiconductor photodiode (21, 71) is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention (50), a homogeneous semiconductor (51) is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation through the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-reflection layer (19) is coated into the active surface (13) of the semiconductor (11), the anti-reflection layer (19) having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor (11). In the second method, a passive layer (75) is spaced from the active surface (73) of the semiconductor (71) by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler (91) with a paraboloid reflecting surface (92) is in contact with the active surface (13, 53) of the semiconductor (11, 51), the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  2. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1984-09-28

    A solid state radiative heat pump operable at room temperature (300 K) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of change carriers as compared equilibrium. In one form of the invention an infrared semiconductor photodiode is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention, a homogenous semiconductor is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-refection layer is coated into the active surface of the semiconductor, the anti-reflection layer having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor. In the second method, a passive layer is speaced trom the active surface of the semiconductor by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler with a paraboloid reflecting surface surface is in contact with the active surface of the semiconductor, the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  3. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer James R. Munroe1, a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer James R. Munroe1, a) and Bruce R of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from

  4. Radiative return capabilities of a high-energy, high-luminositye+e-collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Karliner, Marek; Low, Matthew; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-08-14

    An electron-positron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy ECM can collect events at all lower energies through initial-state radiation (ISR or radiative return). We explore the capabilities for radiative return studies by a proposed high-luminosity collider at ECM = 250 or 90 GeV, to fill in gaps left by lower-energy colliders such as PEP, PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. These capabilities are compared with those of the lower-energy e+e- colliders as well as hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some examples of accessible questions in dark photon searches and heavy flavor spectroscopy are given.

  5. Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

  6. Improved energy efficiency by use of the new ultraviolet light radiation paint curing process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosset, A.M.; Su, W.-F.A.

    1984-08-01

    In product finishing lines, ultraviolet radiation curing of paints on prefabricated structures is more energy efficient than curing by natural gas fired ovens, and could eliminate solvent emission. The replacement of a conventional natural gas fired oven by an ultraviolet radiation curing line for paint curing could save quadrillions of joules per year for each finishing line. In this program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Programs, two photoinduced polymerizations, via free radical or cationic mechanisms, were considered in the formulation of UV curable paints. The spectral output of radiation sources was chosen so as to complement the absorption spectra of pigments and photoactive agents; thus highly pigmented thick films could be cured fully by UV radiation. One coat enamels, topcoats, and primers have been developed which can be applied on three dimensional objects by spraying and can be cured by passing through a tunnel containing UV lamps.

  7. Instantaneous x-ray radiation energy from laser produced polystyrene plasmas for shock ignition conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, Wanli; Wei, Huiyue; Li, Zhichao; Yi, Rongqing; Zhu, Tuo; Song, Tianmin; Huang, Chengwu; Yang, Jiamin [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Laser target energy coupling mechanism is crucial in the shock ignition (SI) scheme, and x-ray radiation energy is a non-negligible portion of the laser produced plasma energy. To evaluate the x-ray radiation energy amount at conditions relevant to SI scheme, instantaneous x-ray radiation energy is investigated experimentally with continuum phase plates smoothed lasers irradiating layer polystyrene targets. Comparative laser pulses without and with shock spike are employed. With the measured x-ray angular distribution, full space x-ray radiation energy and conversion efficiency are observed. Instantaneous scaling law of x-ray conversion efficiency is obtained as a function of laser intensity and time. It should be pointed out that the scaling law is available for any laser pulse shape and intensity, with which irradiates polystyrene planar target with intensity from 2 × 10{sup 14} to 1.8 × 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Numerical analysis of the laser energy transformation is performed, and the simulation results agree with the experimental data.

  8. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energyDepartment of EnergyEnergyPotential Health

  9. RadTracker: Optical Imaging of High Energy Radiation Tracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, S P; Lowry, M E; Comaskey, B J; Heebner, J E; Kallman, J S; Richards, J B

    2007-03-02

    This project examined the possibility of extending the recently demonstrated radoptic detection approach to gamma imaging. Model simulations of the light scattering process predicted that expected signal levels were small and likely below the detection limit of large area, room-temperature detectors. A series of experiments using pulsed x-ray excitation, modulated gamma excitation and optical pump-probe methods confirmed those theoretical predictions. At present the technique does not appear to provide a viable approach to volumetric radiation detection; however, in principal, orders of magnitude improvement in the SNR can result by using designer materials to concentrate and localize the radiation-absorption induced charge, simultaneously confining the optical mode to increase 'fill' factor and overlap of the probe beam with the affected regions, and employing high speed gated imaging detectors to measure the scattered signal.

  10. A limited assessment and characterization of the solar radiation energy resources in the Caribbean region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulstrom, R.L.

    1988-02-01

    The objective of our work was to produce a preliminary assessment and characterization of the Caribbean region (Barbados, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Jamaica, and Panama) solar radiation energy resources. Such information will be used to estimate the performance of, and identify the most promising applications of, solar heat technologies in the Caribbean region. We expect the solar radiation resources in the Caribbean region to be very location specific. Sunny areas will have an annual direct-beam resource of about 3,000 kWhm/sup /minus 2// and a global solar radiation resource of about 2,500 kWhm/sup /minus 2//. Cloud-covered areas will have annual solar radiation resources of about 1,500 kWhm/sup /minus 2/ for both the direct-beam and the global solar radiation. Monthly levels of solar radiaion will vary markedly, ranging from an average of 9 to 3 kWhm/sup /minus 2//day/sup /minus 1// for the direct-beam and from an average of 7 to 4 kWhm/sup /minus 2//day/sup /minus 1// for the global solar radiation. The Caribbean region is comparable to the Great Plains region of the US, in terms of annual solar radiation resources; however, thorough ''prospecting'' is required to avoid areas having very low amounts of solar radiation.

  11. Diabat L., Blanc Ph., Wald L., Solar radiation climate in Africa. Solar Energy, 76, 733-744, 2004. SOLAR RADIATION CLIMATE IN AFRICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Diabaté L., Blanc Ph., Wald L., Solar radiation climate in Africa. Solar Energy, 76, 733-744, 2004 is very useful for preliminary assessment and modeling of solar energy systems. Following the approach: clearness index, atmosphere optics, clustering, interpolation, map, solar energy systems Nomenclature: (KTd

  12. FAQS Reference Guide -Radiation Protection | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order 13514ConstructionWeaponTraining FAQS ReferenceRadiation

  13. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Xin -Hu; Ye, Yun -Xiu; Chen, Jian -Ping; Lu, Hai -Jiang; Zhu, Peng -Jia; Jiang, Feng -Jian

    2015-07-17

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed for $^{12}C$ elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio $\\frac{\\Delta p}{p}$ and $^{12}C$ elastic cross section are compared without and with radiation energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for $^{12}C$ elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment.

  14. Polylogarithmic representation of radiative and thermodynamic properties of thermal radiation in a given spectral range: II. Real-body radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2015-01-01

    The general analytical expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of a real-body are obtained in a finite range of frequencies at different temperatures. The frequency dependence of the spectral emissivity is represented as a power series. The Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, and total emissivity are expressed in terms of the polylogarithm functions. The general expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions are applied for the study of thermal radiation of liquid and solid zirconium carbide. These functions are calculated using experimental data for the frequency dependence of the normal spectral emissivity in the visible-near infrared range at the melting (freezing) point. The gaps between the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of liquid and solid zirconium carbide are observed. The g...

  15. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    therefore can provide some of the most interesting information about the electronic properties of a material. In this work, the researchers employed infrared synchrotron radiation...

  16. ON THE KINETIC ENERGY AND RADIATIVE EFFICIENCY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS Nicole M. Lloyd-Ronning1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bing

    ON THE KINETIC ENERGY AND RADIATIVE EFFICIENCY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS Nicole M. Lloyd-Ronning1 of 17 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) during the afterglow phase and ac- counting for radiative losses, we the implications of these results for the GRB radiation and jet models. Subject headinggs: gamma rays: bursts

  17. Human radiation experiments associated with the US Department of Energy and its predecessors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-07-01

    This document contains a listing, description, and selected references for documented human radiation experiments sponsored, supported, or performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessors, including the US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), and the Off ice of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD). The list represents work completed by DOE`s Off ice of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE) through June 1995. The experiment list is available on the Internet via a Home Page on the World Wide Web (http://www.ohre.doe.gov). The Home Page also includes the full text of Human Radiation Experiments. The Department of Energy Roadmap to the Story and the Records (DOE/EH-0445), published in February 1995, to which this publication is a supplement. This list includes experiments released at Secretary O`Leary`s June 1994 press conference, as well as additional studies identified during the 12 months that followed. Cross-references are provided for experiments originally released at the press conference; for experiments released as part of The DOE Roadmap; and for experiments published in the 1986 congressional report entitled American Nuclear Guinea Pigs: Three Decades of Radiation Experiments on US Citizens. An appendix of radiation terms is also provided.

  18. AEGIS: Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of MIPS 70 ?m-selected Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symeonidis, M.; Rigopoulou, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Davis, M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Barmby, P.; Egami, E.; Fazio, G. G.; Le Floc'h, E.; Rieke, G.; Willner, S. P.; Wilson, Graham Wallace

    2007-05-01

    We present 0.5-160 ?m spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies, detected at 70 ?m with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS), using broadband imaging data from Spitzer and ground-based telescopes. ...

  19. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |InformationThe2009) | Open Energy Information

  20. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (2009) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |InformationThe2009) | Open Energy

  1. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |InformationThe2009) | Open Energy2008) | Open

  2. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  3. Chapter 1.12: Solar Radiation Resource Assessment for Renewable Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter addresses measurements, modeling, and databases of solar energy potential that may serve as fuel for solar energy conversion systems. Developing innovative designs for capturing and converting solar radiation is only one part of the equation for solar system deployment. Identifying, locating, and prospecting for the appropriate quantity and quality of solar resources to fuel these systems is critical to system designers, investors, financial backers, utilities, governments, and owner/operators. This chapter addresses the fundamentals and state of the art for measuring, modeling, and applying solar radiation resource data to meet decision-making needs.

  4. Radiation and spin separation of high energy positrons by bent crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bashmakov, Y.A.

    1995-09-01

    The channeling of ultrahigh energy positrons both in bent and straight crystals can serve as an effective source of hard photons. The presence in the channel of the strong inhomogeneous electrical field gives rise to a number of interesting peculiarities of the motion of the channeling particles. The radiative separation of particles depending on spin orientation with respect to the plane of motion and radiative polarization can make it possible to obtain by means of bent crystals a positron beam with a degree of polarization about 10 to 20{percent}. Because of availability of the ultrahigh energy positron beams such experiments can be carried out nowadays. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Carbon nanotubes as near infrared laser susceptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Amir

    2011-01-11

    The coupling efficiency of carbon nanotubes with near infrared laser radiation at 940nm wavelength was investigated. Nanotubes treated with different post processing methods were irradiated at different laser power intensities as dry samples...

  6. DOE Comments - Radiation Protection (Atomic Energy Act) | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pState Efficiency,Energy News Media-Energy Whirlpool's Page

  7. Infrared floodlight assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wierzbicki, Julian J. (Peabody, MA); Chakrabarti, Kirti B. (Danvers, MA)

    1987-09-22

    An infrared floodlight assembly (10) including a cast aluminum outer housing (11) defining a central chamber (15) therein. A floodlight (14), having a tungsten halogen lamp as the light source, is spacedly positioned within a heat conducting member (43) within chamber (15) such that the floodlight is securedly positioned in an aligned manner relative to the assembly's filter (35) and lens (12) components. The invention also includes venting means (51) to allow air passage between the interior of the member (43) and the adjacent chamber (15), as well as engagement means (85) for engaging a rear surface of the floodlight (14) to retain it firmly against an internal flange of the member (43). A reflector (61), capable of being compressed to allow insertion or removal, is located within the heat conducting member's interior between the floodlight (14) and filter (35) to reflect infrared radiation toward the filter (35) and spaced lens (12).

  8. INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR ENERGY RADIATION ANNUAL REPORT 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAFETYLABORATORY I. Papazoglou Energy Technologies & Environmental Impacts A. Stubos Transport Phenomena in Porous Consequence Assessment of Electrical Generation Systems I. Kollas SYSTEMS RELIABILITY & INDUSTRIAL Plasma in Tokamak Machines N. Tsois PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY N. Tsois Thermal Solar Collectors & Systems

  9. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munroe, James R.; Sutherland, Bruce R.

    2014-09-15

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%–3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  10. Presentation: Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energyDepartmentNEA-2011-03Presentation: DOEJCESR:

  11. The SNAP near infrared detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    it will detect Type Ia supernovæ between z = 1 and 1.7 andphotometry for all supernovæ. HgCdTe technology, with a cut-Keywords: Cosmology, Supernovae, Dark Energy, Near Infrared,

  12. Energy, cost, and CO 2 emission comparison between radiant wall panel systems and radiator systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milorad Boji?; Dragan Cvetkovi?; Marko Mileti?; Jovan Maleševi?; Harry Boyer

    2012-12-18

    The main goal of this paper is to evaluate the possibility of application or replacement of radiators with low-temperature radiant panels. This paper shows the comparison results of operations of 4 space heating systems: the low-temperature radiant panel system without any additional thermal insulation of external walls (PH-WOI), the low-temperature radiant panel system with additional thermal insulation of external walls (PH-WI), the radiator system without any additional thermal insulation of external walls (the classical heating system) (RH-WOI), and the radiator system with additional thermal insulation of external walls (RH-WI). The operation of each system is simulated by software EnergyPlus. The investigation shows that the PH-WI gives the best results. The RH-WOI has the largest energy consumption, and the largest pollutant emission. However, the PH-WI requires the highest investment.

  13. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared (Dudley-Murphy & Nash, 2003) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |InformationThe

  14. Long-Wave Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon: EnergyLloyd, NewBranch Capital

  15. Comparison of low-energy radiation effects in polyethylene and cellulose Jussi Polvi, Kai Nordlund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    Comparison of low-energy radiation effects in polyethylene and cellulose Jussi Polvi, Kai Nordlund, for a carbon atom in polyethylene chain, and for one of the carbon atoms in cellulose chain. Our analysis shows and on average slightly higher for the carbon atoms in the polyethylene chain than for the target carbon atom

  16. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 75 (2003) 307312 Extreme radiation hardness and light-weighted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    2003-01-01

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 75 (2003) 307­312 Extreme radiation hardness and light-weighted thin-film indium phosphide solar cell and its computer simulation Guohua Lia, *, Qingfen Yanga+ -i-p+ InP solar cell is developed. The total thickness of its epitaxial layer is only 0.22 mm

  17. Laboratory-Based Maximum Slip Rates in Earthquake Rupture Zones and Radiated Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Laboratory-Based Maximum Slip Rates in Earthquake Rupture Zones and Radiated Energy by A. McGarr, J. B. Fletcher, M. Boettcher, N. Beeler, and J. Boatwright Abstract Laboratory stick-slip friction and the maximum slip rate. From laboratory results, the maximum slip rate for any crustal earthquake, as well

  18. Stress drops and radiated energies of aftershocks of the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abercrombie, Rachel E.

    Stress drops and radiated energies of aftershocks of the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake December 2000; revised 11 May 2003; accepted 25 June 2003; published 28 November 2003. [1] We study stress estimate static and dynamic stress drops from the source time functions and compare them to well

  19. SRNL Deploys Innovative Radiation Mapping Device | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummaryDIST OFMEAG, Dalton System:Energy 3 atOffice of72 I N S P EThe

  20. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CITES WASHINGTON GROUP INTERNATIONAL, INC. FOR RADIATION

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEveryCustomerD= DOE/RG-0067

  1. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department of Energy TheAnneliseAnnova

  2. Fiber-Optic Environmental Radiation Dosimeter - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) | SciTechSubmitted MoreTrafficFerrinEnergy Storage Energy

  3. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ AutomationTexas/WindEnergy Information 1968-1971) Jump

  4. Occupational Radiation Exposures at the Department of Energy | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailable forSiteWeatherization FundingFunding andof

  5. Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHighOffice|Order Module--DOE OrderOrder

  6. Letter on Low-Level Radiation Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014 | InternationalLand and

  7. Enhancing the energy of terahertz radiation from plasma produced by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jahangiri, Fazel [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashida, Masaki; Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nagashima, Takeshi; Hangyo, Masanori [Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2013-05-13

    Terahertz (THz) radiation from atomic clusters illuminated by intense femtosecond laser pulses is investigated. By studying the angular distribution, polarization properties and energy dependence of THz waves, we aim to obtain a proper understanding of the mechanism of THz generation. The properties of THz waves measured in this study differ from those predicted by previously proposed mechanisms. To interpret these properties qualitatively, we propose that the radiation is generated by time-varying quadrupoles, which are produced by the ponderomotive force of the laser pulse.

  8. Scenarios of Future Socio-Economics, Energy, Land Use, and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Moss, Richard H.; Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.; Kopp, Roberrt; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Patel, Pralit L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Wise, Marshall A.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2013-04-13

    This chapter explores uncertainty in future scenarios of energy, land use, emissions and radiative forcing that span the range in the literature for radiative forcing, but also consider uncertainty in two other dimensions, challenges to mitigation and challenges to adaptation. We develop a set of six scenarios that we explore in detail including the underlying the context in which they are set, assumptions that drive the scenarios, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), used to produce quantified implications for those assumptions, and results for the global energy and land-use systems as well as emissions, concentrations and radiative forcing. We also describe the history of scenario development and the present state of development of this branch of climate change research. We discuss the implications of alternative social, economic, demographic, and technology development possibilities, as well as potential stabilization regimes for the supply of and demand for energy, the choice of energy technologies, and prices of energy and agricultural commodities. Land use and land cover will also be discussed with the emphasis on the interaction between the demand for bioenergy and crops, crop yields, crop prices, and policy settings to limit greenhouse gas emissions.

  9. Multivariate classification of infrared spectra of cell and tissue samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Howland D. T. (Albuquerque, NM); Thomas, Edward V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    Multivariate classification techniques are applied to spectra from cell and tissue samples irradiated with infrared radiation to determine if the samples are normal or abnormal (cancerous). Mid and near infrared radiation can be used for in vivo and in vitro classifications using at least different wavelengths.

  10. Japan Program: Radiation Effects Research Foundation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRDEnergy CopyrightsRoom 1E-245 1000 IndependenceBackground: The

  11. Reporting Occupational Radiation Exposure Data | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidentialThis 3-DMarchLLC Open Annual Report I. Basic

  12. Robot Reworked to Analyze Radiation in Japan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy Materials Center atRobertRobertRobot

  13. Deflection of High-Energy Cosmic Radiation Ions using a Bent Crystal Shield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M B H Breese

    2007-05-09

    A bent crystal shield which is capable of deflecting cosmic radiation ions of all atomic numbers away from spacecraft using the ion channeling effect is described. Its effect on the transmitted angular distribution of heavy, high-energy ions is characterized using Monte Carlo channeling simulations. Ions up to an energy limit set by the bent crystal curvature radius are deflected by the full curvature angle. A bent crystal shield with a 1 x 1 cm2 surface area capable of deflecting such ions with energies up to 100 GeV/nucleon is fabricated in which the lattice planes across the entrance surface are uniformly aligned.

  14. Infrared retina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krishna, Sanjay (Albuquerque, NM); Hayat, Majeed M. (Albuquerque, NM); Tyo, J. Scott (Tucson, AZ); Jang, Woo-Yong (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-12-06

    Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

  15. Giant Photoresponsivity of Mid-Infrared Hyperbolic Metamaterials in the Quantum Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Pai-Yen; Sakhdari, Maryam; Alù, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We explore broadband, wide-angle mid-infrared rectification based on nanopatterned hyperbolic metamaterials (HMM), composed of two dissimilar metals separated by a sub-nanometer tunnel barrier. The exotic slow-light modes supported by such periodically trenched HMMs efficiently trap incident radiation in massively parallel metal-insulator-metal tunnel junctions supporting ultrafast optical rectification induced by photon-assisted tunneling. This leads to highly efficient photon-to-electron conversion, orders of magnitude larger than conventional rectennas. Our results promise an impact on infrared energy harvesters and plasmonic photodetectors.

  16. INFRARED MOLECULAR STARBURST FINGERPRINTS IN DEEPLY OBSCURED (ULTRA)LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY NUCLEI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    INFRARED MOLECULAR STARBURST FINGERPRINTS IN DEEPLY OBSCURED (ULTRA)LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY NUCLEI: molecules 1. INTRODUCTION One of the holy grails in the study of luminous and ultra- luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) is to elucidate the true nature of the central energy source. (U)LIRGs emit

  17. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Cr-like Co IV and Ni V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, K M; Karpuškien?, R; Keenan, F P; Kisielius, R; Stancalie, V

    2015-01-01

    We report calculations of energy levels and radiative rates ($A$-values) for transitions in Cr-like Co IV and Ni V. The quasi-relativistic Hartree-Fock (QRHF) code is adopted for calculating the data although GRASP (general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package) and flexible atomic code (FAC) have also been employed for comparison purposes. No radiative rates are available in the literature to compare with our results, but our calculated energies are in close agreement with those compiled by NIST for a majority of the levels. However, there are discrepancies for a few levels of up to 3\\%. The $A$-values are listed for all significantly contributing E1, E2 and M1 transitions, and the corresponding lifetimes reported, although unfortunately no previous theoretical or experimental results exist to compare with our data.

  18. Efficient weakly-radiative wireless energy transfer: An EIT-like approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamam, Rafif E. [Center for Materials Science and Engineering and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)], E-mail: rafif@mit.edu; Karalis, Aristeidis; Joannopoulos, J.D.; Soljacic, Marin [Center for Materials Science and Engineering and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Inspired by a quantum interference phenomenon known in the atomic physics community as electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), we propose an efficient weakly radiative wireless energy transfer scheme between two identical classical resonant objects, strongly coupled to an intermediate classical resonant object of substantially different properties, but with the same resonance frequency. The transfer mechanism essentially makes use of the adiabatic evolution of an instantaneous (so called 'dark') eigenstate of the coupled 3-object system. Our analysis is based on temporal coupled mode theory (CMT), and is general enough to be valid for various possible sorts of coupling, including the resonant inductive coupling on which witricity-type wireless energy transfer is based. We show that in certain parameter regimes of interest, this scheme can be more efficient, and/or less radiative than other, more conventional approaches. A concrete example of wireless energy transfer between capacitively-loaded metallic loops is illustrated at the beginning, as a motivation for the more general case. We also explore the performance of the currently proposed EIT-like scheme, in terms of improving efficiency and reducing radiation, as the relevant parameters of the system are varied.

  19. TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Emily B.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

  20. A new correlation between solar energy radiation and some atmospheric parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumas, Antonio; Bonnici, Maurizio; Madonia, Mauro; Trancossi, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The energy balance for an atmospheric layer near the soil is evaluated. By integrating it over the whole day period a linear relationship between the global daily solar radiation incident on a horizontal surface and the product of the sunshine hours at clear sky with the maximum temperature variation in the day is achieved. The results show a comparable accuracy with some well recognized solar energy models such as the \\ang-Prescott one, at least for Mediterranean climatic area. Validation of the result has been performed using old dataset which are almost contemporary and relative to the same sites with the ones used for comparison.

  1. Yang-Mills condensate dark energy coupled with matter and radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Zhang; T. Y. Xia; W. Zhao

    2006-09-26

    The coincidence problem is studied for the dark energy model of effective Yang-Mills condensate in a flat expanding universe during the matter-dominated stage. The YMC energy $\\rho_y(t)$ is taken to represent the dark energy, which is coupled either with the matter, or with both the matter and the radiation components. The effective YM Lagrangian is completely determined by quantum field theory up to 1-loop order. It is found that under very generic initial conditions and for a variety of forms of coupling, the existence of the scaling solution during the early stages and the subsequent exit from the scaling regime are inevitable. The transition to the accelerating stage always occurs around a redshift $z\\simeq (0.3\\sim 0.5)$. Moreover, when the Yang-Mills condensate transfers energy into matter or into both matter and radiation, the equation of state $w_y$ of the Yang-Mills condensate can cross over -1 around $z\\sim 2$, and takes on a current value $\\simeq -1.1$. This is consistent with the recent preliminary observations on supernovae Ia. Therefore, the coincidence problem can be naturally solved in the effective YMC dark energy models.

  2. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    dropped from near zero to -7°C. Subsequently mean energy budget residuals remained small and near zero. Energy budget transitions were dominated by the net radiative fluxes, largely controlledA transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo

  3. Measurement of the energy spectrum of underground muons at Gran Sasso with a transition radiation detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The MACRO Collaboration; M. Ambrosio et al

    1998-07-09

    We have measured directly the residual energy of cosmic ray muons crossing the MACRO detector at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. For this measurement we have used a transition radiation detector consisting of three identical modules, each of about 12 m^2 area, operating in the energy region from 100 GeV to 1 TeV. The results presented here were obtained with the first module collecting data for more than two years. The average single muon energy is found to be 320 +/- 4 (stat.) +/- 11 (syst.) GeV in the rock depth range 3000-6500 hg/cm^2. The results are in agreement with calculations of the energy loss of muons in the rock above the detector.

  4. Multi-channel infrared thermometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulrickson, Michael A. (East Windsor, NJ)

    1986-01-01

    A device for measuring the two-dimensional temperature profile of a surface comprises imaging optics for generating an image of the light radiating from the surface; an infrared detector array having a plurality of detectors; and a light pipe array positioned between the imaging optics and the detector array for sampling, transmitting, and distributing the image over the detector surfaces. The light pipe array includes one light pipe for each detector in the detector array.

  5. Ferroelectric infrared detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lashley, Jason Charles (Sante Fe, NM); Opeil, Cyril P. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Smith, James Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-03-30

    An apparatus and method are provided for sensing infrared radiation. The apparatus includes a sensor element that is positioned in a magnetic field during operation to ensure a .lamda. shaped relationship between specific heat and temperature adjacent the Curie temperature of the ferroelectric material comprising the sensor element. The apparatus is operated by inducing a magnetic field on the ferroelectric material to reduce surface charge on the element during its operation.

  6. Dark matter, dark energy, and dark radiation coupled with a transversal interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis P. Chimento; Martín G. Richarte

    2012-10-19

    We investigate a cosmological scenario with three interacting components that includes dark matter, dark energy, and radiation in the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. We introduce a 3-dimensional internal space, the interaction vector $\\mathbf{Q}=(Q_{x}, Q_{m}, Q_{r})$ satisfying the constraint plane $Q_{x}+ Q_{m}+ Q_{r}=0$, the barotropic index vector $ \\boldmath ${\\gamma}$=(\\ga_x,\\ga_m,\\ga_r)$ and select a transversal interaction vector $\\mathbf{Q_t}$ in a sense that $\\mathbf{Q_t}\\cdot \\boldmath ${\\gamma}$=0$. We exactly solve the source equation for a linear $\\mathbf{Q_t}$, that depends on the total energy density and its derivatives up to third order, and find all the component energy densities. We obtain a large set of interactions for which the source equation admits a power law solution and show its asymptotic stability by constructing the Lyapunov function. We apply the $\\chi^{2}$ method to the observational Hubble data for constraining the cosmic parameters, and analyze the amount of dark energy in the radiation era for the above linear $\\mathbf{Q_t}$. It turns to be that our model fulfills the severe bound of $\\Omega_{x}(z\\simeq 1100)<0.1$ and is consistent with the future constraints achievable by Planck and CMBPol experiments.

  7. HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION OF GRB 130427A: EVIDENCE FOR INVERSE COMPTON RADIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Zhang, Fu-Wen; He, Hao-Ning; Zhou, Bei; Yang, Rui-Zhi; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Tam, P. H. T. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liang, Yun-Feng, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: fwzhang@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn [Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Guangxi 530004 (China)

    2013-10-20

    A nearby superluminous burst GRB 130427A was simultaneously detected by six ?-ray space telescopes (Swift, the Fermi GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM)/Large Area Telescope, Konus-Wind, SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL, AGILE, and RHESSI) and by three RAPTOR full-sky persistent monitors. The isotropic ?-ray energy release is ?10{sup 54} erg, rendering it the most powerful explosion among gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a redshift z ? 0.5. The emission above 100 MeV lasted about one day, and four photons are at energies greater than 40 GeV. We show that the count rate of 100 MeV-100 GeV emission may be mainly accounted for by the forward shock synchrotron radiation and the inverse Compton radiation likely dominates at GeV-TeV energies. In particular, an inverse Compton radiation origin is favored for the ?(95.3, 47.3, 41.4, 38.5, 32) GeV photons arriving at t ? (243, 256.3, 610.6, 3409.8, 34366.2) s after the trigger of Fermi-GBM. Interestingly, the external inverse Compton scattering of the prompt emission (the second episode, i.e., t ? 120-260 s) by the forward-shock-accelerated electrons is expected to produce a few ?-rays at energies above 10 GeV, while five were detected in the same time interval. A possible unified model for the prompt soft ?-ray, optical, and GeV emission of GRB 130427A, GRB 080319B, and GRB 090902B is outlined. Implications of the null detection of >1 TeV neutrinos from GRB 130427A by IceCube are discussed.

  8. Overview of the United States Department of Energy's ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stokes, G.M. ); Tichler, J.L. )

    1990-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is initiating a major atmospheric research effort, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM). The program is a key component of DOE's research strategy to address global climate change and is a direct continuation of DOE's decade-long effort to improve the ability of General Circulation Models (GCMs) to provide reliable simulations of regional, and long-term climate change in response to increasing greenhouse gases. The effort is multi-disciplinary and multi-agency, involving universities, private research organizations and more than a dozen government laboratories. The objective of the ARM Research is to provide an experimental testbed for the study of important atmospheric effects, particularly cloud and radiative processes, and to test parameterizations of these processes for use in atmospheric models. This effort will support the continued and rapid improvement of GCM predictive capability. 2 refs.

  9. The near-infrared radiation background, gravitational wave background and star formation rate of Pop III and Pop II during cosmic reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Y P; Dai, Z G

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we obtain the NIRB and SBGWs from the early stars, which are constrained by the observation of reionization and star formation rate. We study the transition from Pop III to Pop II stars via the star formation model of different population, which takes into account the reionization and the metal enrichment evolution. We calculate the two main metal pollution channels arising from the supernova-driven protogalactic outflows and "genetic channel". We obtain the SFRs of Pop III and Pop II and their NIRB and SBGWs radiation. We predict that the upper limit of metallicity in metal-enriched IGM (the galaxies whose polluted via "genetic channel") reaches $Z_{\\rm crit}=10^{-3.5}Z_{\\odot}$ at $z\\sim13$ ($z\\sim11$), which is consistent with our star formation model. We constrain on the SFR of Pop III stars from the observation of reionization. The peak intensity of NIRB is about $0.03-0.2~nW m^{-2}{sr}^{-1}$ at $\\sim 1 \\mu m$ for $z>6$. The prediction of NIRB signal is consistent with the metallicity evol...

  10. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2012-03-29

    The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit the minimum achievable emittance in the synchrotron light sources for short bunches.

  11. Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2014-02-01

    This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

  12. Human radiation experiments: The Department of Energy roadmap to the story and the records

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The role of the US Government in conducting or sponsoring human radiation experiments has become the subject of public debate. Questions have been raised about the purpose, extent, and health consequences of these studies, and about how subjects were selected. The extent to which subjects provided informed consent is also under scrutiny. To respond to these questions, the Clinton administration has directed the US Department of Energy (DOE), along with other Federal agencies, to retrieve and inventory all records that document human radiation experiments. Many such records are now publicly available and will permit an open accounting and understanding of what took place. This report summarizes the Department`s ongoing search for records about human radiation experiments. It is also a roadmap to the large universe of pertinent DOE information. DOE is working to instill greater openness--consistent with national security and other appropriate considerations--throughout its operations. A key aspect of this effort is opening DOE`s historical records to independent research and analysis.

  13. Proposed mechanism to represent the suppression of dark current density by four orders with low energy light ion (H{sup ?}) implantation in quaternary alloy-capped InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, A.; Ghadi, H.; Mathur, K.L.; Basu, A.; Subrahmanyam, N.B.V.; Singh, P.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Here we propose a carrier transport mechanism for low energy H{sup ?} ions implanted InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors supportive of the experimental results obtained. Dark current density suppression of up to four orders was observed in the implanted quantum dot infrared photodetectors, which further demonstrates that they are effectively operational. We concentrated on determining how defect-related material and structural changes attributed to implantation helped in dark current density reduction for InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors. This is the first study to report the electrical carrier transport mechanism of H{sup ?} ion-implanted InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors.

  14. Optical-infrared flares and radio afterglows from the tidal disruption of Jovian planets by their host star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamazaki, Ryo; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    When a Jovian planet gets sufficiently close to its host star to be tidally disrupted, its debris stream deposits energy on the star's surface, producing an expanding bubble of hot plasma. We study the radiation from the bubble and show that it includes optical-infrared prompt emission and a subsequent radio afterglow. The prompt emission from M31 and Large Magellanic Cloud is detectable by optical-near infrared transient surveys with a large field of view at an event rate of a few events per year. The subsequent radio afterglows are detectable for $10^{3-4}$~years.

  15. Poster — Thur Eve — 18: Cherenkov Emission By High-Energy Radiation Therapy Beams: A Characterization Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zlateva, Y.; El Naqa, I.; Quitoriano, N.

    2014-08-15

    We investigate Cherenkov emission (CE) by radiotherapy beams via radiation dose-versus-CE correlation analyses, CE detection optimization by means of a spectral shift towards the near-infrared (NIR) window of biological tissue, and comparison of CE to on-board MV imaging. Dose-CE correlation was investigated via simulation and experiment. A Monte Carlo (MC) CE simulator was designed using Geant4. Experimental phantoms include: water; tissue-simulating phantom composed of water, Intralipid®, and beef blood; plastic phantom with solid water insert. The detector system comprises an optical fiber and diffraction-grating spectrometer incorporating a front/back-illuminated CCD. The NIR shift was carried out with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs), emitting at (650±10) nm. CE and MV images were acquired with a CMOS camera and electronic portal imaging device. MC and experimental studies indicate a strong linear dose-CE correlation (Pearson coefficient > 0.99). CE by an 18-MeV beam was effectively NIR-shifted in water and a tissue-simulating phantom, exhibiting a significant increase at 650 nm for QD depths up to 10 mm. CE images exhibited relative contrast superior to MV images by a factor of 30. Our work supports the potential for application of CE in radiotherapy online imaging for patient setup and treatment verification, since CE is intrinsic to the beam and non-ionizing and QDs can be used to improve CE detectability, potentially yielding image quality superior to MV imaging for the case of low-density-variability, low-optical-attenuation materials (ex: breast/oropharynx). Ongoing work involves microenvironment functionalization of QDs and application of multi-channel spectrometry for simultaneous acquisition of dosimetric and tumor oxygenation signals.

  16. Overview of Fluence to Dose Conversion Coefficients for High Energy Radiations - Calculational Methods and Results of Two Kinds of Effective Dose per Unit Particle Fluence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iwai, S; Sato, O; Yoshizawa, N; Furihata, S; Takagi, S; Tanaka, S; Sakamoto, Y

    2000-01-01

    Overview of Fluence to Dose Conversion Coefficients for High Energy Radiations - Calculational Methods and Results of Two Kinds of Effective Dose per Unit Particle Fluence

  17. The \\^G Infrared Search for Extraterrestrial Civilizations with Large Energy Supplies. III. The Reddest Extended Sources in WISE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Roger L; Maldonado, Jessica; Povich, Matthew S; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Mullan, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    Nearby Type II (galaxy-spanning) Kardashev supercivilizations would have high mid-infrared (MIR) luminosities. We have used the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to survey ~$1 \\times 10^5$ galaxies for extreme MIR emission, $10^3$ times more galaxies than the only previous such search. We have calibrated the WISE All-sky Catalog pipeline products to improve its photometry for extended sources. We present 563 extended sources with $|b| \\ge 10$ and red MIR colors, having visually vetted them to remove artifacts. No galaxies in our sample host an alien civilization reprocessing more than 85% of its starlight into the MIR, and only 50 galaxies, including Arp 220, have MIR luminosities consistent with >50% reprocessing. Ninety of these (likely) extragalactic sources have little literature presence; in most cases they are likely barely resolved galaxies or pairs of galaxies undergoing large amounts of star formation. Five are new to science and deserve further study. The Be star 48 Librae sits within a MIR...

  18. Infra-Red Process for Colour Fixation on Fabrics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biau, D.; Raymond, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Infra-red radiations find wide application in industrial processes as heating, drying, stoving and forming. The results are often far better than those from the other techniques: convection oven, gas IR etc . They come from the electric IR specific...

  19. Microscreen radiation shield for thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Thomas K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention provides a microscreen radiation shield which reduces radiative heat losses in thermoelectric generators such as sodium heat engines without reducing the efficiency of operation of such devices. The radiation shield is adapted to be interposed between a reaction zone and a means for condensing an alkali metal vapor in a thermoelectric generator for converting heat energy directly to electrical energy. The radiation shield acts to reflect infrared radiation emanating from the reaction zone back toward the reaction zone while permitting the passage of the alkali metal vapor to the condensing means. The radiation shield includes a woven wire mesh screen or a metal foil having a plurality of orifices formed therein. The orifices in the foil and the spacing between the wires in the mesh is such that radiant heat is reflected back toward the reaction zone in the interior of the generator, while the much smaller diameter alkali metal atoms such as sodium pass directly through the orifices or along the metal surfaces of the shield and through the orifices with little or no impedance.

  20. Application of energy and angular momentum balance to gravitational radiation reaction for binary systems with spin-orbit coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jing Zeng; Clifford M. Will

    2007-04-20

    We study gravitational radiation reaction in the equations of motion for binary systems with spin-orbit coupling, at order (v/c)^7 beyond Newtonian gravity, or O(v/c)^2 beyond the leading radiation reaction effects for non-spinning bodies. We use expressions for the energy and angular momentum flux at infinity that include spin-orbit corrections, together with an assumption of energy and angular momentum balance, to derive equations of motion that are valid for general orbits and for a class of coordinate gauges. We show that the equations of motion are compatible with those derived earlier by a direct calculation.

  1. Infrared Optical Imaging Techniques for Gas Visualization and Measurement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safitri, Anisa

    2012-07-16

    imaging techniques for gas detection and visualization. The infrared camera fundamentals and the camera detectors? algorithm to measure the thermal radiation emitted by a target object is described in Section 2. A semi-quantification approach... for detection is the contrast in transmitted radiation between the target and background, which generates a detector output voltage. The infrared camera can see certain gases, mostly hydrocarbons, because the camera?s detector is equipped with a filter which...

  2. On the performance of infrared sensors in earth observations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Luther Franklin

    1972-01-01

    systems is depen- dent upon the radiative properties of targets in addition to constraints imposed by system components . The unclas- sified state-of-the-art of infrared system performance figures is reviewed to indicate the relevance to system... of unclassified infrared literature reveals in- frared systems applications in industry, medicine, and science. Indeed, any detection application is possible if a measurable variation in radiation is caused by the tar- get property of interest. Hudson [10] has...

  3. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Concord, TN); Ohriner, Evan Keith (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  4. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Blue, Craig A.; Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2003-12-23

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  5. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Concord, TN); Ohriner, Evan Keith (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  6. Influence of Primary Cosmic Radiation Mass Composition on the Estimation of Eas Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Knurenko; A. A. Ivanov; V. A. Kolosov; Z. E. Petrov; I. Ye. Sleptsov; G. G. Struchkov

    2005-07-07

    At the Yakutsk EAS array E_em is determined by using measurements of EAS Cherenkov light flux and charged particle flux. It is known from calculations that these characteristics depend on a sort of primary particle and, therefore, the estimation of E_em depends on a primary particle mass. In the work the dependence of the E_em/E_0 ratio on the energy is given and experimental data are compared with calculations by the QGSJET model. The calculations have been carried out for the primary proton and iron nucleus. The average calculated meaning of the value of E_em/E_0 ratio (between the proton and iron nucleus) within experimental errors is in agreement with experimental data that doesnt contradict to the mixed mass composition of primary cosmic radiation.

  7. Conversion of relativistic pair energy into radiation in the jets of active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlickeiser, R; Böttcher, M; Lerche, I; Pohl, M; Schuster, C

    2002-01-01

    It is generally accepted that relativistic jet outflows power the nonthermal emission from active galactic nuclei (AGN). The composition of these jets -- leptonic versus hadronic -- is still under debate. We investigate the microphysical details of the conversion process of the kinetic energy in collimated relativistic pair outflows into radiation through interactions with the ambient interstellar medium. Viewed from the coordinate system comoving with the pair outflow, the interstellar protons and electrons represent a proton-electron beam propagating with relativistic speed in the pair plasma. We demonstrate that the beam excites both electrostatic and low-frequency magnetohydrodynamic Alfven-type waves via a two-stream instability in the pair background plasma, and we calculate the time evolution of the distribution functions of the beam particles and the generated plasma wave turbulence power spectra. For standard AGN jet outflow and environment parameters we show that the initial beam distributions of in...

  8. Infrared Surveys for AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, H E

    2002-01-01

    From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

  9. Infrared Surveys for AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harding E. Smith

    2002-03-06

    From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

  10. Finite-size effects on the radiative energy loss of a fast parton in hot and dense strongly interacting matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caron-Huot, Simon; Gale, Charles [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    We consider finite-size effects on the radiative energy loss of a fast parton moving in a finite-temperature, strongly interacting medium, using the light-cone path integral formalism put forward by B. G. Zakharov [JETP Lett. 63, 952 (1996); 65, 615 (1997)]. We present a convenient reformulation of the problem that makes possible its exact numerical analysis. This is done by introducing the concept of a radiation rate in the presence of finite-size effects. This effectively extends the finite-temperature approach of Arnold, Moore, and Yaffe [J. High Energy Phys. 11 (2001) 057; 12 (2001) 009; 06 (2001) 030] (AMY) to include interference between vacuum and medium radiation. We compare results with those obtained in the regime considered by AMY, with those obtained at leading order in an opacity expansion, and with those obtained deep in the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal regime.

  11. Energy exchange between a laser beam and charged particles using inverse transition radiation and method for its use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kimura, Wayne D. (Bellevue, WA); Romea, Richard D. (Seattle, WA); Steinhauer, Loren C. (Bothell, WA)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for exchanging energy between relativistic charged particles and laser radiation using inverse diffraction radiation or inverse transition radiation. The beam of laser light is directed onto a particle beam by means of two optical elements which have apertures or foils through which the particle beam passes. The two apertures or foils are spaced by a predetermined distance of separation and the angle of interaction between the laser beam and the particle beam is set at a specific angle. The separation and angle are a function of the wavelength of the laser light and the relativistic energy of the particle beam. In a diffraction embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the diffraction effect due to the apertures in the optical elements. In a transition embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the transition effect due to pieces of foil placed in the particle beam path.

  12. int. j. radiat. biol 2000, vol. 76, no. 3, 327 333 Oncogenic transformation in C3H10T cells by low-energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    workers, well signi cant doses of low-energy neutrons, with energies below loggers and reactor workers exposed to two low-energy neutron beams, respectively, with dose-averaged energies of 40 trum to which with the currently recommended decreased values for low-energy neutron radiation weighting factors compared with fast

  13. A Thermal Infrared Video Benchmark for Visual Analysis The Mathworks Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zheng

    for a comprehensive benchmark for a now popular non-visible range sensor, the thermal infrared camera. This passive sensor captures the infrared radiation emitted from the scene and its objects. Thermal imaging quantitative evaluations and comparisons of detection and tracking algorithms. A few of thermal infrared

  14. A generalized framework for in-line energy deposition during steady-state Monte Carlo radiation transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griesheimer, D. P. [Bertis Atomic Power Laboratory, P.O. Box 79, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States); Stedry, M. H. [Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, P.O. Box 1072, Schenectady, NY 12301 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A rigorous treatment of energy deposition in a Monte Carlo transport calculation, including coupled transport of all secondary and tertiary radiations, increases the computational cost of a simulation dramatically, making fully-coupled heating impractical for many large calculations, such as 3-D analysis of nuclear reactor cores. However, in some cases, the added benefit from a full-fidelity energy-deposition treatment is negligible, especially considering the increased simulation run time. In this paper we present a generalized framework for the in-line calculation of energy deposition during steady-state Monte Carlo transport simulations. This framework gives users the ability to select among several energy-deposition approximations with varying levels of fidelity. The paper describes the computational framework, along with derivations of four energy-deposition treatments. Each treatment uses a unique set of self-consistent approximations, which ensure that energy balance is preserved over the entire problem. By providing several energy-deposition treatments, each with different approximations for neglecting the energy transport of certain secondary radiations, the proposed framework provides users the flexibility to choose between accuracy and computational efficiency. Numerical results are presented, comparing heating results among the four energy-deposition treatments for a simple reactor/compound shielding problem. The results illustrate the limitations and computational expense of each of the four energy-deposition treatments. (authors)

  15. Grazing incidence liquid metal mirrors (GILMM) for radiation hardened final optics for laser inertial fusion energy power plants*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    1 Grazing incidence liquid metal mirrors (GILMM) for radiation hardened final optics for laser final optics in a laser inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. The amount of laser light the GILMM substrate, adaptive (deformable) optics, surface tension and low Reynolds number, laminar flow in the film

  16. Applications of Robust, Radiation Hard AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices in Space Exploration and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, K.

    2011-05-04

    This slide show presents: space exploration applications; high energy density physics applications; UV LED and photodiode radiation hardness; UV LED and photodiode space qualification; UV LED AC charge management; and UV LED satellite payload instruments. A UV LED satellite will be launched 2nd half 2012.

  17. Applied Radiation and Isotopes 58 (2003) 333338 Study of air pollutants in Hong Kong using energy dispersive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    2003-01-01

    Applied Radiation and Isotopes 58 (2003) 333­338 Study of air pollutants in Hong Kong using energy were located within the area defined by vehicular emissions. As such, the main air pollutant monitoring site also fell into this same identified area, so the main air pollutant could also be vehicular

  18. Laser fluorescence study of AIO formed in the reaction AI + O2: Product state distribution, dissociation energy, and radiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laser fluorescence study of AIO formed in the reaction AI + O2: Product state distribution, dissociation energy, and radiative lifetime P. J. Dagdigian*, H. W. Cruset, and R. N. Zare Department distributions are found to differ significantly, with v = 0 having more rotational excitation than v = I

  19. Surface Radiation from GOES: A Physical Approach; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

    2012-09-01

    Models to compute Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) have been in development over the last 3 decades. These models can be classified as empirical or physical, based on the approach. Empirical models relate ground based observations with satellite measurements and use these relations to compute surface radiation. Physical models consider the radiation received from the earth at the satellite and create retrievals to estimate surface radiation. While empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation for the solar energy industry the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from NOAA that computes GHI using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the GOES satellites. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and uses those properties in a radiative transfer model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, University of Wisconsin and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a 4 km GHI and DNI product every 30 minutes. This paper presents an outline of the methodology and a comprehensive validation using high quality ground based solar data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) (http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/surfrad/sitepage.html) and Integrated Surface Insolation Study (ISIS) http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/isis/isissites.html), the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sun Spot One (SS1) stations.

  20. Radiation dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, R.J.

    1981-09-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  1. Radiation dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  2. Development of an infrared absorption spectroscope based on linear variable filters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nogueira, Felipe Guimaraes

    2009-05-15

    ).....................................15 7 Schematic of an LVF based detector..............................................................18 8 Diagram of the infrared radiation path in a dispersive infrared spectrometer. Adapted from ("FT-IR vs. Dispersive Infrared " 2002... radiation path as it passes through the LVF and reaches a detector array. Bottom-left: a display of the linear wavelength output characteristic of the LVF. Bottom-right: rendering of the LVF?s physical aspects (JDSU, 2006...

  3. Finite-size effects on the radiative energy loss of a fast parton in hot and dense strongly interacting matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Caron-Huot; Charles Gale

    2010-12-06

    We consider finite-size effects on the radiative energy loss of a fast parton moving in a finite temperature strongly interacting medium, using the light cone path integral formalism put forward by Zakharov. We present a convenient reformulation of the problem which makes possible its exact numerical analysis. This is done by introducing the concept of a radiation rate in the presence of finite-size effects. This effectively extends the finite-temperature approach of AMY (Arnold, Moore, and Yaffe) to include interference between vacuum and medium radiation. We compare results with those obtained in the regime considered by AMY, with those obtained at leading order in an opacity expansion, and with those obtained deep in the LPM (Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal) regime.

  4. Liquid state materials can self-heal and are not susceptible to damage from high energy radiation unlike their solid state counterparts. Liquid state semiconductors have been recently proposed as the choice of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liquid state materials can self-heal and are not susceptible to damage from high energy radiation as the choice of material for direct conversion of high energy radiation. Se is a naturally occurring material of direct conversion of radiation to electrical energy was developed using the principle of solar cells

  5. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  6. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

    1983-01-01

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  7. A Radiative Transport Model for Heating Paints using High Density Plasma Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Duty, Chad E; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Nichols, Mark; Blue, Craig A; Ott, Ronald D

    2009-01-01

    The energy distribution and ensuing temperature evolution within paint-like systems under the influence of infrared radiation was studied. Thermal radiation effects as well as those due to heat conduction were considered. A complete set of material properties was derived and discussed. Infrared measurements were conducted to obtain experimental data for the temperature in the paint film. The heat flux of the incident radiation from the plasma arc lamp was measured using a heat flux sensor with a very short response time. The comparison between the computed and experimental results for temperature show that the models that are based on spectral four-flux RTE and accurate optical properties yield accurate results for the black paint systems.

  8. Atmospheric radiative transfer parametrization for solar energy yield calculations on buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Jochen E

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the practical approach to evaluate the incoming solar radiation on buildings based on atmospheric composition and cloud cover is presented. The effects of absorption and scattering due to atmospheric composition is taken into account to calculate, using radiative transfer models, the net incoming solar radiation at surface level. A specific validation of the Alpine Region in Europe is presented with a special focus on the region of South Tyrol.

  9. Conversion of relativistic pair energy into radiation in the jets of active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Schlickeiser; R. Vainio; M. Boettcher; I. Lerche; M. Pohl; C. Schuster

    2002-07-02

    It is generally accepted that relativistic jet outflows power the nonthermal emission from active galactic nuclei (AGN). The composition of these jets -- leptonic versus hadronic -- is still under debate. We investigate the microphysical details of the conversion process of the kinetic energy in collimated relativistic pair outflows into radiation through interactions with the ambient interstellar medium. Viewed from the coordinate system comoving with the pair outflow, the interstellar protons and electrons represent a proton-electron beam propagating with relativistic speed in the pair plasma. We demonstrate that the beam excites both electrostatic and low-frequency magnetohydrodynamic Alfven-type waves via a two-stream instability in the pair background plasma, and we calculate the time evolution of the distribution functions of the beam particles and the generated plasma wave turbulence power spectra. For standard AGN jet outflow and environment parameters we show that the initial beam distributions of interstellar protons and electrons quickly relax to plateau-distributions in parallel momentum, transferring thereby one-half of the initial energy density of the beam particles to electric field fluctuations of the generated electrostatic turbulence. On considerably longer time scales, the plateaued interstellar electrons and protons will isotropise by their self-generated transverse turbulence and thus be picked-up in the outflow pair plasma. These longer time scales are also characteristic for the development of transverse hydromagnetic turbulence from the plateaued electrons and protons. This hydromagnetic turbulence upstream and downstream is crucial for diffusive shock acceleration to operate at external or internal shocks associated with pair outflows.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  11. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface. 4 figs.

  12. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forman, Steven E. (Framingham, MA); Caunt, James W. (Concord, MA)

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface.

  13. Physical conditions in potential sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays: Updated Hillas plot and radiation-loss constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ksenia Ptitsyna; Sergey Troitsky

    2010-03-26

    We review basic constraints on the acceleration of ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CRs) in astrophysical sources, namely the geometrical (Hillas) criterion and restrictions from radiation losses in different acceleration regimes. Using the latest available astrophysical data, we redraw the Hillas plot and figure out potential UHECR accelerators. For the acceleration in central engines of active galactic nuclei, we constrain the maximal UHECR energy for a given black-hole mass. Among active galaxies, only the most powerful ones, radio galaxies and blazars, are able to accelerate protons to UHE, though acceleration of heavier nuclei is possible in much more abundant lower-power Seyfert galaxies.

  14. Supplemental Discussion Infrared spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael E.

    Supplemental Discussion Infrared spectroscopy We obtained near infrared reflectance spectra of 26 /~160 (see Supplemental Figure 1). The region between 1.81 and 1.89 µm has residual contamination the 50 Myr time period (see Supplemental Figure 2). doi: 10.1038/nature05619 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

  15. Fire effects on net radiation and energy partitioning: Contrasting responses of tundra and boreal forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, S. D; Randerson , J. T.; Beringer, J.; Chapin , F. S

    2005-01-01

    EFFECTS ON SURFACE ENERGY EXCHANGE forest: Evidence from1998), Energy balance storage terms in a mixed forest,and energy exchanges of a boreal black spruce forest, J.

  16. FINAL REPORT FORMER RADIATION WORKER MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM AT ROCKY FLATS For Department of Energy Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe M. Aldrich

    2004-11-01

    The Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats was conducted in Arvada, CO, by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education under DOE Contract DE-AC05-00OR22750. Objectives of the program were to obtain information on the value of medical surveillance among at-risk former radiation workers and to provide long-term internal radiation dosimetry information to the scientific community. This program provided the former radiation workers of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (formerly Rocky Flats Plant) an opportunity to receive follow-up medical monitoring and a re-evaluation of their internal radiation dose. The former Rocky Flats radiation worker population is distinctive because it was a reasonably stable work force that received occupational exposures, at times substantial, over several decades. This report reflects the summation of health outcomes, statistical analyses, and dose assessment information on former Rocky Flats radiation workers to the date of study termination as of March 2004.

  17. Gravitational radiation from compact binary systems: gravitational waveforms and energy loss to second post-Newtonian order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clifford M. Will; Alan G. Wiseman

    1996-08-05

    We derive the gravitational waveform and gravitational-wave energy flux generated by a binary star system of compact objects (neutron stars or black holes), accurate through second post-Newtonian order ($O[(v/c)^4] \\sim O[(Gm/rc^2)^2]$) beyond the lowest-order quadrupole approximation. We cast the Einstein equations into the form of a flat-spacetime wave equation together with a harmonic gauge condition, and solve it formally as a retarded integral over the past null cone of the chosen field point. The part of this integral that involves the matter sources and the near-zone gravitational field is evaluated in terms of multipole moments using standard techniques; the remainder of the retarded integral, extending over the radiation zone, is evaluated in a novel way. The result is a manifestly convergent and finite procedure for calculating gravitational radiation to arbitrary orders in a post-Newtonian expansion. Through second post-Newtonian order, the radiation is also shown to propagate toward the observer along true null rays of the asymptotically Schwarzschild spacetime, despite having been derived using flat spacetime wave equations. The method cures defects that plagued previous ``brute- force'' slow-motion approaches to the generation of gravitational radiation, and yields results that agree perfectly with those recently obtained by a mixed post-Minkowskian post-Newtonian method. We display explicit formulae for the gravitational waveform and the energy flux for two-body systems, both in arbitrary orbits and in circular orbits. In an appendix, we extend the formalism to bodies with finite spatial extent, and derive the spin corrections to the waveform and energy loss.

  18. St. Louis Sites Fact Sheet RADIATION BASICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    , radiation is described as either non-ionizing (low energy) or ionizing (high energy). Non-ionizing radiation or concrete. WHAT IS DOSE? HOW IS RADIATION MEASURED? The dose is the quantity of radiation or energy received dose and takes into account the type of radiation absorbed into the body and the likelihood of damage

  19. Radiation from Ag high energy density Z-pinch plasmas and applications to lasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, M. E. Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Petkov, E. E.; Apruzese, J. P.; Giuliani, J. L.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2014-03-15

    Silver (Ag) wire arrays were recently introduced as efficient x-ray radiators and have been shown to create L-shell plasmas that have the highest electron temperature (>1.8?keV) observed on the Zebra generator so far and upwards of 30?kJ of energy output. In this paper, results of single planar wire arrays and double planar wire arrays of Ag and mixed Ag and Al that were tested on the UNR Zebra generator are presented and compared. To further understand how L-shell Ag plasma evolves in time, a time-gated x-ray spectrometer was designed and fielded, which has a spectral range of approximately 3.5–5.0?Å. With this, L-shell Ag as well as cold L{sub ?} and L{sub ?} Ag lines was captured and analyzed along with photoconducting diode (PCD) signals (>0.8?keV). Along with PCD signals, other signals, such as filtered XRD (>0.2?keV) and Si-diodes (SiD) (>9?keV), are analyzed covering a broad range of energies from a few eV to greater than 53?keV. The observation and analysis of cold L{sub ?} and L{sub ?} lines show possible correlations with electron beams and SiD signals. Recently, an interesting issue regarding these Ag plasmas is whether lasing occurs in the Ne-like soft x-ray range, and if so, at what gains? To help answer this question, a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) kinetic model was utilized to calculate theoretical lasing gains. It is shown that the Ag L-shell plasma conditions produced on the Zebra generator at 1.7 maximum current may be adequate to produce gains as high as 6?cm{sup ?1} for various 3p???3s transitions. Other potential lasing transitions, including higher Rydberg states, are also included in detail. The overall importance of Ag wire arrays and plasmas is discussed.

  20. Radiative emission and energy deposition in transient luminous events This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mende, Stephen B.

    Radiative emission and energy deposition in transient luminous events This article has been (14pp) doi:10.1088/0022-3727/41/23/234014 Radiative emission and energy deposition in transient luminous events C L Kuo1,2 , A B Chen2 , J K Chou2 , L Y Tsai2 , R R Hsu2 , H T Su2 , H U Frey3 , S B Mende

  1. On the stability of the Earth's radiative energy balance: Response to the Mt. Pinatubo eruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    short wave energy into the outgoing long wave energy stream, it is of interest to understand how and why

  2. Re-evaluation of SO2 release of the 15 June 1991 Pinatubo eruption using ultraviolet and infrared satellite sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Re-evaluation of SO2 release of the 15 June 1991 Pinatubo eruption using ultraviolet and infrared Infrared Radiation Sounder/2) sensor, whose data sets have a higher temporal resolution, are also analyzed ultraviolet and infrared satellite sensors, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 5, Q04001, doi:10.1029/ 2003GC000654

  3. Accurate, practical simulation of satellite infrared radiometer spectral data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study's purpose is to determine whether a relatively simple random band model formulation of atmospheric radiation transfer in the infrared region can provide valid simulations of narrow interval satellite-borne infrared sounder system data. Detailed ozonesondes provide the pertinent atmospheric information and sets of calibrated satellite measurements provide the validation. High resolution line-by-line model calculations are included to complete the evaluation.

  4. RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakhor, Avideh

    RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2002 D. Delacroix* J. P. Guerre** P. Leblanc'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

  5. Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate (CSSEFARMBE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; Gaustad, Krista L.; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2012-09-28

    The Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project is working to improve the representation of the hydrological cycle in global climate models, critical information necessary for decision-makers to respond appropriately to predictions of future climate. In order to accomplish this objective, CSSEF is building testbeds to implement uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques to objectively calibrate and diagnose climate model parameterizations and predictions with respect to local, process-scale observations. In order to quantify the agreement between models and observations accurately, uncertainty estimates on these observations are needed. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program takes atmospheric and climate related measurements at three permanent locations worldwide. The ARM VAP called the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) [Xie et al., 2010] collects a subset of ARM observations, performs quality control checks, averages them to one hour temporal resolution, and puts them in a standard format for ease of use by climate modelers. ARMBE has been widely used by the climate modeling community as a summary product of many of the ARM observations. However, the ARMBE product does not include uncertainty estimates on the data values. Thus, to meet the objectives of the CSSEF project and enable better use of this data with UQ techniques, we created the CSSEFARMBE data set. Only a subset of the variables contained in ARMBE is included in CSSEFARMBE. Currently only surface meteorological observations are included, though this may be expanded to include other variables in the future. The CSSEFARMBE VAP is produced for all extended facilities at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site that contain surface meteorological equipment. This extension of the ARMBE data set to multiple facilities at SGP allows for better comparison between model grid boxes and the ARM point observations. In the future, CSSEFARMBE may also be created for other ARM sites. As each site has slightly different instrumentation, this will require additional development to understand the uncertainty characterization associated with instrumentation at those sites. The uncertainty assignment process is implemented into the ARM program’s new Integrated Software Development Environment (ISDE) so that many of the key steps can be used in the future to screen data based on ARM Data Quality Reports (DQRs), propagate uncertainties when transforming data from one time scale into another, and convert names and units into NetCDF Climate and Forecast (CF) standards. These processes are described in more detail in the following sections.

  6. Plutonium radiation surrogate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

    2010-02-02

    A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

  7. Radiation protection at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

  8. Optical transition radiation used in the diagnostic of low energy and low current electron beams in particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, T. F.; Bonini, A. L.; Lima, R. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Malafronte, A. A.; Pascholati, P. R.; Vanin, V. R.; Martins, M. N. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) plays an important role in beam diagnostics for high energy particle accelerators. Its linear intensity with beam current is a great advantage as compared to fluorescent screens, which are subject to saturation. Moreover, the measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation enables the determination of many beam parameters in a single observation point. However, few works deals with the application of OTR to monitor low energy beams. In this work we describe the design of an OTR based beam monitor used to measure the transverse beam charge distribution of the 1.9-MeV electron beam of the linac injector of the IFUSP microtron using a standard vision machine camera. The average beam current in pulsed operation mode is of the order of tens of nano-Amps. Low energy and low beam current make OTR observation difficult. To improve sensitivity, the beam incidence angle on the target was chosen to maximize the photon flux in the camera field-of-view. Measurements that assess OTR observation (linearity with beam current, polarization, and spectrum shape) are presented, as well as a typical 1.9-MeV electron beam charge distribution obtained from OTR. Some aspects of emittance measurement using this device are also discussed.

  9. Determination of the LEP beam energy using radiative fermion-pair events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Graham Wallace; OPAL Collaboration; Abbiendi, G.; Ainsley, C.; Å kesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.

    2004-12-16

    uncertainties in se of hadronic events. The results could also be ed as a check on the Monte Carlo modelling tial-state radiation (ISR) in the radiative return ss. is Letter is organised as follows: a summary of ta and Monte Carlo samples used is given in Sec...- , the analysis method is explained in Section 3 e estimation of systematic errors is described in n 4. Finally we summarise and discuss the re- n Section 5. ta and Monte Carlo samples e OPAL detector,25 trigger and data acquisition are fully described elsewhere...

  10. Preliminary analysis of the possibility of making use of part of the energy flow of zero-point radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Alvargonzalez; L. S. Soto

    2008-03-07

    The energy flow of zero-point radiation is very great, but difficult to put to use. However, the observations made by Sparnaay in 1958 and by Lamoureux in 1997 reveal the possibility of making use of a very small fraction of that immense amount. This possibility is big enough for such a minute fraction to have significant importance, but such a possibility requires miniaturisation to a degree which may be unattainable. It is worth trying to achieve it, since it would open the way to interstellar travel.

  11. On the conversion of blast wave energy into radiation in active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Pohl; Reinhard Schlickeiser

    1999-11-24

    It has been suggested that relativistic blast waves may power the jets of AGN and gamma-ray bursts (GRB). We address the important issue how the kinetic energy of collimated blast waves is converted into radiation. It is shown that swept-up ambient matter is quickly isotropised in the blast wave frame by a relativistic two-stream instability, which provides relativistic particles in the jet without invoking any acceleration process. The fate of the blast wave and the spectral evolution of the emission of the energetic particles is therefore solely determined by the initial conditions. We compare our model with existing multiwavelength data of AGN and find remarkable agreement.

  12. Infrared Debonding - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THEVorticesInformation| U.S. DOE

  13. Infrared emission from tidal disruption events --- probing the pc-scale dust content around galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wenbin; Evans, Neal J

    2015-01-01

    Recent UV-optical surveys have been successful in finding tidal disruption events (TDEs), in which a star is tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (BH). These TDEs release a huge amount of radiation energy ~ 10^51-52 erg into the circum-nuclear medium. If the medium is dusty, most of the radiation energy will be absorbed by dust grains within ~ 1 pc from the BH and re-radiated in the infrared. We calculate the dust emission lightcurve from a 1-D radiative transfer model, taking into account the time-dependent heating, cooling and sublimation of dust grains. We show that the dust emission peaks at 3-10 microns and has typical luminosities ~ 10^42-43 erg/s (with sky covering factor of dusty clouds ranging from 0.1-1). This is detectable by current generation of telescopes. In the near future, James Webb Space Telescope will be able to perform photometric and spectroscopic measurements, in which silicate or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features may be found. Observations at rest-frame wavelengt...

  14. Radiation Hydrodynamics Scaling Laws in High Energy Density Physics and Laboratory Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emeric Falize; Serge Bouquet; Claire Michaut

    2008-05-20

    In this paper, radiating fluids scaling laws are studied. We focus on optically thin and optically thick regimes which are relevant for both astrophysics and laboratory experiments. By using homothetic Lie groups, we obtain the scaling laws, the similarity properties and the number of free parameters which allow to rescale experiments in the two astrophyscial situations.

  15. Photochemistry Radiation and Photolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    energy is done (i.e. energy per unit time) #12;Sample Problem: A microwave oven puts out radiation at 50? How does a microwave oven heat food anyway? First note that 50 GHz is a frequency (Hz = s-1) E = hn, as a function of l · Amount of solar radiation, as a function of

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLE Infrared thermography investigations in transitional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuccher, Simone

    investigation. The additional advantage of no need for special apparatus, except for the infrared camera, makes IRT well suited for both wind-tunnel and in-flight testing. Practical problems and limitations downstream are responsi- ble for energy losses. In subsonic and transonic flight this type of drag

  17. Renewable energies such as solar photovoltaics "PV" have been widely used to minimize the use of grid power. Nevertheless, solar PV is hampered by the lack of solar radiation during peak energy demand hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable energies such as solar photovoltaics "PV" have been widely used to minimize the use of grid power. Nevertheless, solar PV is hampered by the lack of solar radiation during peak energy demand curve and make the energy accessible during peak hours can be accomplished through pairing solar PV

  18. Correlation between radiation processes in silicon and long-time degradation of detectors for high energy physics experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorina Lazanu; Ionel Lazanu

    2006-11-20

    In this contribution, the correlation between fundamental interaction processes induced by radiation in silicon and observable effects which limit the use of silicon detectors in high energy physics experiments is investigated in the frame of a phenomenological model which includes: generation of primary defects at irradiation starting from elementary interactions in silicon; kinetics of defects, effects at the p-n junction detector level. The effects due to irradiating particles (pions, protons, neutrons), to their flux, to the anisotropy of the threshold energy in silicon, to the impurity concentrations and resistivity of the starting material are investigated as time, fluence and temperature dependences of detector characteristics. The expected degradation of the electrical parameters of detectors in the complex hadron background fields at LHC & SLHC are predicted.

  19. Radiation sources with planar wire arrays and planar foils for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Astanovitsky, A.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Weller, M. E.; Keim, S.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.

    2014-03-15

    This article reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research, each of them being a multi-year international effort. One of these is the development of innovative sources, such as planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator, which act mainly as a resistor, even though the physical mechanism of efficient magnetic energy conversion into radiation still remains unclear. We review the results of our extensive studies of PWAs. We also report the new results of the experimental comparison PWAs with planar foil liners (another promising alternative to wire array loads at multi-mega-ampere generators). Pioneered at UNR, the PWA Z-pinch loads have later been tested at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on the Saturn generator, on GIT-12 machine in Russia, and on the QiangGuang-1 generator in China, always successfully. Another of these is the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, which started in early 1980s with Zucker's experiments at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Successful continuation of this approach was the Load Current Multiplier (LCM) proposed by Chuvatin in collaboration with Rudakov and Weber from NRL. The 100?ns LCM was integrated into the Zebra generator, which almost doubled the plasma load current, from 0.9 to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum radiation source for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR [Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The first successful proof-of-the-principle experimental implementation of new hohlraum concept at university-scale generator Zebra/LCM is demonstrated. A numerical simulation capability with VisRaD code (from PRISM Co.) established at UNR allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics and provides the possibility of optimization of a new hohlraum. Future studies are discussed.

  20. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braicovich, L. Minola, M.; Dellea, G.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Le Tacon, M.; Moretti Sala, M.; Morawe, C.; Peffen, J.-Ch.; Yakhou, F.; Brookes, N. B.; Supruangnet, R.

    2014-11-15

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution soft-RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L{sub 3} edge on a high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the spectrometer equipped with this test facility was a factor 17.5. We propose also a more advanced version, suitable for a routine use on the next generation of RIXS spectrometers and with an overall efficiency up to 10%.

  1. Near-infrared fluorescence enhanced optical imaging: an analysis of penetration depth 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Jessica Perea

    2002-01-01

    , but also may facilitate cancer staging and increase our understanding of tumor progression. Frequency domain photon migration imaging (FDPM) is a maturing optical tool that is based upon the propagation of near infrared (NIR) radiation through tissue...

  2. Commissioning and Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with high energy collisions at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of close to 300,000 thin-wall drift-tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points for charged particle tracks. The straws have 0.13 mm resolution and measure tracks with $ ert eta ert 0.5 GeV$. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high Lorenz gamma particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. In this talk, a review of the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector will be presented. Emphasis will be given to performance studies based on the reconstruction and analysis of LHC proton-proton collisions.

  3. Energy recovery linacs as synchrotron radiation sources ,,invited... Sol M. Grunera)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Qun

    , Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 Don Bilderback Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source York 14853 Ken Finkelstein Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, Ithaca, New York 14853 Qun Shen Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source and Department of Materials

  4. Remote sensing of Greenland ice sheet using multispectral near-infrared and visible radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    .1029/2007JD008742. 1. Introduction [2] The present atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide is about 380Remote sensing of Greenland ice sheet using multispectral near-infrared and visible radiances Petr remote-sensing algorithm that utilizes reflected visible and near-infrared radiation to discriminate

  5. High-Speed Non-Directional Infrared Communication for Wireless Local-Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carruthers, Jeffrey

    terminals and a base station, allowing construction of in-building wireless local-area networks. We discuss.0 Introduction Non-directional infrared radiation [1-4] is an attrac- tive transmission medium for wireless characterized free-space infrared channels in a variety of indoor environments [6] using a swept

  6. Infrared emission spectroscopy of CO2 at high temperature. Part I: Experimental setup and source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Infrared emission spectroscopy of CO2 at high temperature. Part I: Experimental setup and source measurement, tube effects, CO2 infrared radiation 1. Introduction The knowledge of very high temperature for instance that the IR emission of the CO2 molecule remains predominant at temperatures as high as 4000 K [1

  7. Infrared source test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, L.

    1994-11-15

    The purpose of the Infrared Source Test (IRST) is to demonstrate the ability to track a ground target with an infrared sensor from an airplane. The system is being developed within the Advance Technology Program`s Theater Missile Defense/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) section. The IRST payload consists of an Amber Radiance 1 infrared camera system, a computer, a gimbaled mirror, and a hard disk. The processor is a custom R3000 CPU board made by Risq Modular Systems, Inc. for LLNL. The board has ethernet, SCSI, parallel I/O, and serial ports, a DMA channel, a video (frame buffer) interface, and eight MBytes of main memory. The real-time operating system VxWorks has been ported to the processor. The application code is written in C on a host SUN 4 UNIX workstation. The IRST is the result of a combined effort by physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists.

  8. The design and construction of an infrared detector for use with a highway traffic survey system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mundkowsky, William Fredrick

    1961-01-01

    to test the infrared detector system for parameter variations. The hot plate, which was used to simulate a mui'fler, had a surface area of nearly 30 sq. in. This radiating area could be Inzited to I sq. in. by placing a shield across the plate. Fig... The Optics Spectral Filtering Spatial Filtering Design Considerations Test Procedures and. Results 20 CONCLUSION APPENDIX I Basic infrared Radiation Laws APPENDIX II Baclqpound Rad. iation APPENDIX III Atmospheric Transmission...

  9. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

  10. Interstellar Weather Vanes: GLIMPSE Mid-Infrared Stellar-Wind Bowshocks in M17 and RCW49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew S. Povich; Robert A. Benjamin; Barbara A. Whitney; Brian L. Babler; Remy Indebetouw; Marilyn R. Meade; Ed Churchwell

    2008-08-15

    We report the discovery of six infrared stellar-wind bowshocks in the Galactic massive star formation regions M17 and RCW49 from Spitzer GLIMPSE (Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire) images. The InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope clearly resolves the arc-shaped emission produced by the bowshocks. We combine Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), Spitzer, MSX, and IRAS observations to obtain the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the bowshocks and their individual driving stars. We use the stellar SEDs to estimate the spectral types of the three newly-identified O stars in RCW49 and one previously undiscovered O star in M17. One of the bowshocks in RCW49 reveals the presence of a large-scale flow of gas escaping the H II region at a few 10^2 km/s. Radiation-transfer modeling of the steep rise in the SED of this bowshock toward longer mid-infrared wavelengths indicates that the emission is coming principally from dust heated by the star driving the shock. The other 5 bowshocks occur where the stellar winds of O stars sweep up dust in the expanding H II regions.

  11. Herbig stars' near-infrared excess: An origin in the protostellar disk's magnetically supported atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, N. J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Benisty, M.; Dullemond, C. P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Hirose, S., E-mail: neal.turner@jpl.nasa.gov [Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3173-25 Showamachi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 236-0001 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    Young stars with masses 2-8 times solar, the Herbig Ae and Be stars, often show a near-infrared excess too large to explain with a hydrostatically supported circumstellar disk of gas and dust. At the same time, the accretion flow carrying the circumstellar gas to the star is thought to be driven by magnetorotational turbulence, which, according to numerical MHD modeling, yields an extended low-density atmosphere supported by the magnetic fields. We demonstrate that the base of the atmosphere can be optically thick to the starlight and that the parts lying near 1 AU are tall enough to double the fraction of the stellar luminosity reprocessed into the near-infrared. We generate synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations with opacities for submicron silicate and carbonaceous grains. The synthetic SEDs closely follow the median Herbig SED constructed recently by Mulders and Dominik and, in particular, match the large near-infrared flux, provided the grains have a mass fraction close to interstellar near the disk's inner rim.

  12. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, Nancy K. (San Leandro, CA); Durbin, Philip F. (Livermore, CA); Dolan, Kenneth W. (Livermore, CA); Perkins, Dwight E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features.

  13. Measurement and simulation of the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation on the Jefferson Laboratory energy recovery linac electron beam

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hall, C C.; Biedron, S G.; Edelen, A L.; Milton, S V.; Benson, S; Douglas, D; Li, R; Tennant, C D.; Carlsten, B E.

    2015-03-09

    In an experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR free-electron laser driver, the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR recirculator. Here we examine the impact of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of bunch compression as well as the impact of CSR on the energy spectrum of the bunch. Simulation of beam dynamics in the machine, including the one-dimensional CSR model, shows very good agreement with themore »measured effect of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of compression. Finally, a well-defined structure is observed in the energy spectrum with a feature in the spectrum that varies as a function of the compression. This effect is examined in simulations, as well, and a simple explanation for the variation is proposed.« less

  14. Change of primary cosmic radiation nuclear composition in the energy range 10^{15} - 10^{17} eV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. T. Barnaveli; T. T. Barnaveli; A. P. Chubenko; N. A. Eristavi; I. V. Khaldeeva; N. M. Nesterova; Yu. G. Verbetsky

    2002-08-14

    The dependence E_h (N_e) of Extensive Air Shower (EAS) hadronic component energy flux on the number N_e of particles in EAS is investigated in the primary energy range of the order of 10^{15} - 10^{17} eV. The work was aimed at checking the existence of irregularities of E_h (N_e)/N_e behavior at these energies in several independent experiments. The investigation is carried out using large statistical material obtained at different configurations of experimental apparatus and under different triggering conditions. The existence of irregularities of E_h (N_e)/N_e behavior in the region Ne > 2*10^6 is confirmed. These irregularities have the character of sharp deeps and are located near the same values of N_e regardless of the experimental material and selection conditions used. So, at recent stage of research the existence of these irregularities of E_h (N_e)/N_e behavior in the range of N_e > 2*10^6 may be regarded as reliably established. This fact supports our earlier conclusion on the existence of primary cosmic radiation (PCR) nuclei spectra cutoff effect in the primary energy region 10^{15} - 10^{17} eV.

  15. Quantitative analysis of electron energy loss spectra and modelling of optical properties of multilayer systems for extreme ultraviolet radiation regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gusenleitner, S.; Hauschild, D.; Reinert, F.; Handick, E.

    2014-03-28

    Ruthenium capped multilayer coatings for use in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation regime have manifold applications in science and industry. Although the Ru cap shall protect the reflecting multilayers, the surface of the heterostructures suffers from contamination issues and surface degradation. In order to get a better understanding of the effects of these impurities on the optical parameters, reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) measurements of contaminated and H cleaned Ru multilayer coatings were taken at various primary electron beam energies. Experiments conducted at low primary beam energies between 100?eV and 1000?eV are very surface sensitive due to the short inelastic mean free path of the electrons in this energy range. Therefore, influences of the surface condition on the above mentioned characteristics can be appraised. In this paper, it can be shown that carbon and oxide impurities on the mirror surface decrease the transmission of the Ru cap by about 0.75% and the overall reflectance of the device is impaired as the main share of the non-transmitted EUV light is absorbed in the contamination layer.

  16. Working With Radiation For Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    flight New York to LA 5 Moving from east coast to Denver for one year 50 Moving from frame house to brick with an ever-present background of radiation. Radiation & Life 1* *2 #12;3 · Radiation is energy traveling with sufficiently energy to remove electrons from the atoms or molecules of the substances it passes through. Can

  17. Cosmogenic Neutrinos from Cosmic Ray Interactions with Extragalactic Infrared Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel De Marco; Todor Stanev; F. W. Stecker

    2005-12-19

    We discuss the production of cosmogenic neutrinos on extragalactic infrared photons in a model of its cosmological evolution. The relative importance of these infrared photons as a target for proton interactions is significant, especially in the case of steep injection spectra of the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. For an E$^{-2.5}$ cosmic ray injection spectrum, for example, the event rate of neutrinos of energy above 1 PeV is more than doubled.

  18. Dual-Energy Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Radiation-Induced Vascular Changes in Primary Mouse Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moding, Everett J. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Clark, Darin P.; Qi, Yi [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Yifan; Ma, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ghaghada, Ketan [The Edward B. Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States)] [The Edward B. Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Johnson, G. Allan [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States) [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Badea, Cristian T., E-mail: cristian.badea@duke.edu [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy on primary tumor vasculature using dual-energy (DE) micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Methods and Materials: Primary sarcomas were generated with mutant Kras and p53. Unirradiated tumors were compared with tumors irradiated with 20 Gy. A liposomal-iodinated contrast agent was administered 1 day after treatment, and mice were imaged immediately after injection (day 1) and 3 days later (day 4) with DE micro-CT. CT-derived tumor sizes were used to assess tumor growth. After DE decomposition, iodine maps were used to assess tumor fractional blood volume (FBV) at day 1 and tumor vascular permeability at day 4. For comparison, tumor vascularity and vascular permeability were also evaluated histologically by use of CD31 immunofluorescence and fluorescently-labeled dextrans. Results: Radiation treatment significantly decreased tumor growth from day 1 to day 4 (P<.05). There was a positive correlation between CT measurement of tumor FBV on day 1 and extravasated iodine on day 4 with microvascular density (MVD) on day 4 (R{sup 2}=0.53) and dextran accumulation (R{sup 2}=0.63) on day 4, respectively. Despite no change in MVD measured by histology, tumor FBV significantly increased after irradiation as measured by DE micro-CT (0.070 vs 0.091, P<.05). Both dextran and liposomal-iodine accumulation in tumors increased significantly after irradiation, with dextran fractional area increasing 5.2-fold and liposomal-iodine concentration increasing 4.0-fold. Conclusions: DE micro-CT is an effective tool for noninvasive assessment of vascular changes in primary tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability increased after a single therapeutic dose of radiation treatment.

  19. Low radiative efficiency accretion at work in active galactic nuclei: the nuclear spectral energy distribution of NGC4565

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Chiaberge; R. Gilli; F. D. Macchetto; W. B. Sparks

    2006-07-26

    We derive the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC4565. Despite its classification as a Seyfert2, the nuclear source is substantially unabsorbed. The absorption we find from Chandra data (N_H=2.5 X 10^21 cm^-2) is consistent with that produced by material in the galactic disk of the host galaxy. HST images show a nuclear unresolved source in all of the available observations, from the near-IR H band to the optical U band. The SED is completely different from that of Seyfert galaxies and QSO, as it appears basically ``flat'' in the IR-optical region, with a small drop-off in the U-band. The location of the object in diagnostic planes for low luminosity AGNs excludes a jet origin for the optical nucleus, and its extremely low Eddington ratio L_o/L_Edd indicates that the radiation we observe is most likely produced in a radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF). This would make NGC4565 the first AGN in which an ADAF-like process is identified in the optical. We find that the relatively high [OIII] flux observed from the ground cannot be all produced in the nucleus. Therefore, an extended NLR must exist in this object. This may be interpreted in the framework of two different scenarios: i) the radiation from ADAFs is sufficient to give rise to high ionization emission-line regions through photoionization, or ii) the nuclear source has recently ``turned-off'', switching from a high-efficiency accretion regime to the present low-efficiency state.

  20. Multi-frequency Radio Profiles of PSR B1133+16: radiation location and particle energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji-Guang, Lu; Long-Fei, Hao; Zhen, Yan; Zhi-Yong, Liu; Ke-Jia, Lee; Guo-Jun, Qiao; Lun-Hua, Shang; Min, Wang; Ren-Xin, Xu; Qi-Jun, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The pulse profile of PSR B1133+16 is usually regarded as a conal-double structure. However, its multifrequency profiles cannot simply be fitted with two Gaussian functions, and a third component is always needed to fit the bridge region (between two peaks). This would introduce additional, redundant parameters. In this paper, through a comparison of five fitting functions (Gaussian, von Mises, hyperbolic secant, square hyperbolic secant, and Lorentz), it is found that the square hyperbolic secant function can best reproduce the profile, yielding an improved fit. Moreover, a symmetric 2D radiation beam function, instead of a simple 1D Gaussian function, is used to fit the profile. Each profile with either well-resolved or not-so-well-resolved peaks could be fitted adequately using this beam function, and the bridge emission between the two peaks does not need to be a new component. Adopting inclination and impact angles based on polarization measurements, the opening angle ({\\theta}_{\\mu}0) of the radiation be...

  1. Polarization of high-energy pulsar radiation in the striped wind model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Petri; J. Kirk

    2005-05-20

    The Stokes parameters of the pulsed synchrotron radiation produced in the striped pulsar wind model are computed and compared with optical observations of the Crab pulsar. We assume the main contribution to the wind emissivity comes from a thin transition layer where the dominant toroidal magnetic field reverses its polarity. The radial component of the field is neglected, but a small meridional component is added. The resulting radiation is linearly polarized (Stokes V=0). In the off-pulse region, the electric vector lies in the direction of the projection on the sky of the rotation axis of the pulsar. This property is unique to the wind model and in good agreement with the data. Other properties such as a reduced degree of polarization and a characteristic sweep of the polarization angle within the pulses are also reproduced. These properties are qualitatively unaffected by variations of the wind Lorentz factor, the electron injection power law index and the inclination of the line of sight.

  2. Radiative Energy Balance in the Tropical Tropopause Layer: An Investigation with ARM Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Qiang

    2013-10-22

    The overall objective of this project is to use the ARM observational data to improve our understanding of cloud-radiation effects in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), which is crucial for improving the simulation and prediction of climate and climate change. In last four and half years, we have been concentrating on (i) performing the comparison of the ice cloud properties from the ground-based lidar observations with those from the satellite CALIPSO lidar observations at the ARM TWP sites; (ii) analyzing TTL cirrus and its relation to the tropical planetary waves; (iii) calculating the radiative heating rates using retrieved cloud microphysical properties by combining the ground-based lidar and radar observations at the ARM TWP sites and comparing the results with those using cloud properties retrieved from CloudSat and CALIPSO observations; (iv) comparing macrophysical properties of tropical cirrus clouds from the CALIPSO satellite and from ground-based micropulse and Raman lidar observations; (v) improving the parameterization of optical properties of cirrus clouds with small effective ice particle sizes; and (vi) evaluating the enhanced maximum warming in the tropical upper troposphere simulated by the GCMs. The main results of our research efforts are reported in the 12 referred journal publications that acknowledge the DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-09ER64769.

  3. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    the other hand, energy transfer by thermal radiation betweenit was shown that energy transfer by thermal radi- ationpyroelectric energy conversion and nanoscale thermal

  4. Defining the infrared systems for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichle, R.; Andrew, P.; Drevon, J.-M.; Encheva, A.; Janeschitz, G.; Levesy, B.; Martin, A.; Pitcher, C. S.; Pitts, R.; Thomas, D.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.; Counsell, G.; Johnson, D.; Kusama, Y.

    2010-10-15

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will have wide angle viewing systems and a divertor thermography diagnostic, which shall provide infrared coverage of the divertor and large parts of the first wall surfaces with spatial and temporal resolution adequate for operational purposes and higher resolved details of the divertor and other areas for physics investigations. We propose specifications for each system such that they jointly respond to the requirements. Risk analysis driven priorities for future work concern mirror degradation, interfaces with other diagnostics, radiation damage to refractive optics, reflections, and the development of calibration and measurement methods for varying optical and thermal target properties.

  5. RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pehl, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    the high-energy proton damage than was the planar detector.as far as radiation damage is concerned. Unfortunately, some28-29, 1978 LBL-7967 RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

  6. High energy femtosecond fiber laser at 1018 nm and high power Cherenkov radiation generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Hongyu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Two novel laser systems for ultrafast applications have been designed and built. For the seeding of a high energy cryogenically cooled Yb:YLF laser, a novel 1018 nm fiber laser system is demonstrated. It produces >35 nJ ...

  7. Investigation of proportional counter action with application in the study of low energy radiations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaikh, Fakhruddin

    1968-01-01

    The method of measuring the energy of a charged particle by means of the total amount of ionisation it produces in a gas, through which it passes, is well established. Gas filled devices may be subdivided into (a) current ...

  8. S17 near Zero Energy in a Direct Radiative Capture Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyung Hoon Kim

    2011-10-23

    S17 near zero energy was calculated without using the effective expansion of the S factor or the asymptotic wave functions. Variations of the nuclear potential parameters scarcely affect the d-wave capture cross section below 0.1 MeV, but the s-wave capture cross section near zero energy is affected strongly by the shape of the nuclear potential in our calculations. This result is contrary to the existing assumption that the value of the S factor near zero energy depends on the asymptotic wave function (or asymptotic normalization coefficient). We showed that although the s-wave contribution is dominant near zero energy, the d-wave contribution is not negligible.

  9. Energy Balance Partitioning and Net Radiation Controls on Soil Moisture – Precipitation Feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Aubrey R.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.

    2009-01-14

    stream_size 63174 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Brunsell_2009_Energy-balance-partitioning.pdf.txt stream_source_info Brunsell_2009_Energy-balance-partitioning.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text... turbulence, with coarser resolutions unable to capture turbulent motions, which are necessary for convective processes. The ability of the model to capture boundary layer turbulence will alter the dynamics of soil moisture–precipitation feedback...

  10. Near infrared surfaceplasmonpolariton with hyperbolic metamaterials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Near infrared surfaceplasmonpolariton with hyperbolic metamaterials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Near infrared surfaceplasmonpolariton with hyperbolic metamaterials....

  11. Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

  12. Consequences of incomplete surface energy balance closure for CO2 fluxes from open-path CO2/H2O infrared gas analysers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H; Liu, H; Randerson, JT; Lindfors, J; Massman, WJ; Foken, T

    2006-01-01

    Verma, S. : 2002, ‘Energy Balance Closure at FLUXNET Sites’,J. H. C. : 2004, ‘The Energy Balance Closure Problem’, inTest of Density and Energy-Balance Corrections on Carbon

  13. Gravitational effectiveness of the zero-point energy of the radiation field: a possible solution of a paradox raised by Pauli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Silva

    2010-06-08

    A modified vacuum energy density of the radiation field is evaluated, which leads to accepted prediction for the radius of the universe. The modification takes into account the existence of a new gauge boson which also can be used in order to determine the mass of the boson responsible for the weak decay of the muon.

  14. Radiative Magnetic Reconnection in Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2015-01-01

    I review a new rapidly growing area of high-energy plasma astrophysics --- radiative magnetic reconnection, i.e., a reconnection regime where radiation reaction influences reconnection dynamics, energetics, and nonthermal particle acceleration. This influence be may be manifested via a number of astrophysically important radiative effects, such as radiation-reaction limits on particle acceleration, radiative cooling, radiative resistivity, braking of reconnection outflows by radiation drag, radiation pressure, viscosity, and even pair creation at highest energy densities. Self-consistent inclusion of these effects in magnetic reconnection theory and modeling calls for serious modifications to our overall theoretical approach to the problem. In addition, prompt reconnection-powered radiation often represents our only observational diagnostic tool for studying remote astrophysical systems; this underscores the importance of developing predictive modeling capabilities to connect the underlying physical condition...

  15. Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    energy, is energy in the form of waves or particles moving through space. Visi- ble light, heat, radio in the form of electromagnetic waves. Examples include gamma rays, ultraviolet light, and radio waves waves, and alpha particles are examples of radiation. When people feel warmth from sunlight

  16. Radiation analysis devices, radiation analysis methods, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roybal, Lyle Gene

    2010-06-08

    Radiation analysis devices include circuitry configured to determine respective radiation count data for a plurality of sections of an area of interest and combine the radiation count data of individual of sections to determine whether a selected radioactive material is present in the area of interest. An amount of the radiation count data for an individual section is insufficient to determine whether the selected radioactive material is present in the individual section. An article of manufacture includes media comprising programming configured to cause processing circuitry to perform processing comprising determining one or more correction factors based on a calibration of a radiation analysis device, measuring radiation received by the radiation analysis device using the one or more correction factors, and presenting information relating to an amount of radiation measured by the radiation analysis device having one of a plurality of specified radiation energy levels of a range of interest.

  17. Relative Response to Low-Energy Photons and Determination of Instrument Correction Factors for Portable Radiation Instrumentation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagoner, David Andrew

    2011-10-21

    ................................................ 7 Basic Radiation Detector Theory ................................................... 7 Portable Radiation Instrumentation Tested .................................... 10 Ck Dose Equivalent Conversion Factors... of rugged silicon diode detectors. Through the years it has become necessary to develop compact and portable instruments based on these detectors. With the onset of nuclear power and the increasing use of radioactive materials, portable radiation...

  18. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 531 (2004) 435444 Transition radiation detectors for energy measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    2004-01-01

    of several radiators and detectors. Typically, the detectors are gaseous ARTICLE IN PRESS *Corresponding. The threshold value of g may be varied by appro- priately choosing the parameters of radiators and detectorsNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 531 (2004) 435­444 Transition radiation

  19. Radiative-convective instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Allison A.

    Radiative-moist-convective equilibrium (RCE) is a simple paradigm for the statistical equilibrium the earth's climate would exhibit in the absence of lateral energy transport. It has generally been assumed that for a given ...

  20. Solutions and reductions for radiative energy transport in laser-heated plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Broadbridge; N. M. Ivanova

    2014-01-08

    A full symmetry classification is given for models of energy transport in radiant plasma when the mass density is spatially variable and the diffusivity is nonlinear. A systematic search for conservation laws also leads to some potential symmetries, and to an integrable nonlinear model. Classical point symmetries, potential symmetries and nonclassical symmetries are used to effect variable reductions and exact solutions. The simplest time-dependent solution is shown to be stable, and relevant to a closed system.

  1. Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 20153Daniel BoffDepartment of Energy Defense, Interiorin

  2. Radiation Chemistry Radiation causes changes in molecules by both

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    Module 4 Radiation Chemistry · Radiation causes changes in molecules by both direct and indirect radiation on the target molecules · Indirect Action - energy transported by chemical species to cause damage or Pyrimidene. · Loss of Purine or Pyrimidine · Free radical transfer causing the loss of base and chain

  3. Contrasting the direct radiative effect and direct radiative forcing of aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, Colette L.

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols, which is the instantaneous radiative impact of all atmospheric particles on the Earth's energy balance, is sometimes confused with the direct radiative forcing (DRF), which ...

  4. THE EFFECT OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION ON THE ACCURACY OF PYRHELIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, D.

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse, and Total Solar Radiation," Solar Energy, vol. 4,r Presented at the Solar Radiation workshop of Solar Rising,MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION D. Grether, D.

  5. Femtosecond measurements of near-infrared pulse induced mid-infrared transmission modulation of quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Hong; Liu, Sheng; Lalanne, Elaine; Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Choa, Fow-Sen; Wang, Xiaojun; Johnson, Anthony M.

    2014-05-26

    We temporally resolved the ultrafast mid-infrared transmission modulation of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) using a near-infrared pump/mid-infrared probe technique at room temperature. Two different femtosecond wavelength pumps were used with photon energy above and below the quantum well (QW) bandgap. The shorter wavelength pump modulates the mid-infrared probe transmission through interband transition assisted mechanisms, resulting in a high transmission modulation depth and several nanoseconds recovery lifetime. In contrast, pumping with a photon energy below the QW bandgap induces a smaller transmission modulation depth but much faster (several picoseconds) recovery lifetime, attributed to intersubband transition assisted mechanisms. The latter ultrafast modulation (>60?GHz) could provide a potential way to realize fast QCL based free space optical communication.

  6. ALARA engineering at Department of Energy facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Khan, T.A.; Lane, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1991-03-01

    This report is the second in the series of bibliographies supporting the efforts at the Brookhaven National Laboratory ALARA Center on dose reduction at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health to include DOE nuclear facilities. Abstracts for this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy Data Base, and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Information that the reader feels should be included in the next volume of this bibliography may be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center. These abstracts, which have a bearing on dose reduction, consolidates information from publications pertinent to Radiological Engineers and Operational Health Physicists. Volume 2 contains 127 abstracts numbered from 69 through 195 as well as author and subject indices. The subject index contains the abstract numbers from both the previous volume and the current volume, the latter being indicated in boldface.

  7. The role of high-energy synchrotron radiation in biomedical trace element research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pounds, J.G.; Long, G.J.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper will present the results of an investigation of the distribution of essential elements in the normal hepatic lobule. the liver is the organ responsible for metabolism and storage of most trace elements. Although parenchymal hepatocytes are rather uniform histologically, morphometry, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and microdissection with microchemical investigations have revealed marked heterogeneity on a functional and biochemical level. Hepatocytes from the periportal and perivenous zones of the liver parrenchyma differ in oxidative energy metabolism, glucose uptake and output, unreagenesis, biotransformation, bile acid secretion, and palsma protein synthesis and secretion. Although trace elements are intimately involved in the regulation and maintenance of these functions, little is known regarding the heterogeneity of trace element localization of the liver parenchyma. Histochemical techniques for trace elements generally give high spatial resolution, but lack specificity and stoichiometry. Microdissection has been of marginal usefulness for trace element analyses due to the very small size of the dissected parenchyma. The characteristics of the high-energy x-ray microscope provide an effective approach for elucidating the trace element content of these small biological structures or regions. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Radiation effects in nuclear materials: Role of nuclear and electronic energy losses and their synergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomé, Lionel; Debelle, Aurelien; Garrido, Frederico; Mylonas, Stamatis; Décamps, B.; Bachelet, C.; Sattonnay, G.; Pellegrino, S.; Miro, S.; Trocellier, P.; Serruys, Y.; Velisa, G.; Grygiel, C.; Monnet, I.; Toulemonde, Marcel; Simon, P.; Jagielski, Jacek; Jozwik-Biala, Iwona; Nowicki, Lech; Behar, M.; Weber, William J; Zhang, Yanwen; Backman, Marie; Nordlund, Kai; Djurabekova, Flyura

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic oxides and carbides are promising matrices for the immobilization and/or transmutation of nuclear wastes, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors and structural components for fusion reactors. For these applications there is a need of fundamental data concerning the behavior of nuclear ceramics upon irradiation. This article is focused on the presentation of a few remarkable examples regarding ion-beam modifications of nuclear ceramics with an emphasis on the mechanisms leading to damage creation and phase transformations. Results obtained by combining advanced techniques (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and channeling, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy) concern irradiations in a broad energy range (from keV to GeV) with the aim of exploring both nuclear collision (Sn) and electronic excitation (Se) regimes. Finally, the daunting challenge of the demonstration of the existence of synergistic effects between Sn and Se is tackled by discussing the healing due to intense electronic energy deposition (SHIBIEC) and by reporting results recently obtained in dual-beam irradiation (DBI) experiments.

  9. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  10. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Dr. Kyle J. Alvine, kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 21C...

  11. The high-energy radiation pattern from BFKLex with double-log collinear contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chachamis, G

    2015-01-01

    We study high-energy jet production in the multi-Regge limit making use of the Monte Carlo event generator BFKLex which includes collinear improvements in the form of double-log contributions as presented in [1]. Making use of the anti-kt jet algorithm in the FastJet implementation, we present results for the average transverse momentum and azimuthal angle of the produced jets when two tagged forward/backward jets are present in the final state. We also introduce a new observable which accounts for the average rapidity separation among subsequent emissions. Results are presented, for comparison, at leading order and next-to-leading order, with the resummation of collinear double logs proposed in [2].

  12. Blocked impurity band hybrid infrared focal plane arrays for astronomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, D.B.; Seib, D.H.; Stetson, S.B.; Herter, T.; Rowlands, N.; Schoenwald, J.

    1989-02-01

    High-performance infrared hybrid focal plane arrays using 10 x 50 element Si:As Blocked-Impurity-Band (BIB) detectors (cut-off wavelength = 28 ..mu..m) and matching switched MOSFET multiplexers have been developed and characterized for space astronomy. Use of impurity band conduction technology provides detectors which are nuclear radiation hard and free of the many anomalies associated with conventional silicon photoconductive detectors. Emphasis in this paper is on recent advances in detector material quality which have led to significantly improved detector and hybrid characteristics. Results demonstrating increase quantum efficiency (particular at short wavelength infrared), obtained by varying the Blocked-Impurity-Band detector properties (infrared active layer thickness and arsenic doping profile), are summarized. Read noise and dark current for different temperatures have been measured and are also described. The hybrid array performance achieved clearly demonstrates that BIB detectors are well suited for use in astronomical instrumentation.

  13. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  14. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  15. High Energy Positrons and Gamma Radiation from Decaying Constituents of a two-component Dark Atom Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Belotsky; M. Khlopov; C. Kouvaris; M. Laletin

    2015-08-12

    We study a two component dark matter candidate inspired by the Minimal Walking Technicolor model. Dark matter consists of a dominant SIMP-like dark atom component made of bound states between primordial helium nuclei and a doubly charged technilepton, and a small WIMP-like component made of another dark atom bound state between a doubly charged technibaryon and a technilepton. This scenario is consistent with direct search experimental findings because the dominant SIMP component interacts too strongly to reach the depths of current detectors with sufficient energy to recoil and the WIMP-like component is too small to cause significant amount of events. In this context a metastable technibaryon that decays to $e^+e^+$, $\\mu^+ \\mu^+$ and $\\tau^+ \\tau^+$ can in principle explain the observed positron excess by AMS-02 and PAMELA, while being consistent with the photon flux observed by FERMI/LAT. We scan the parameters of the model and we find the best possible fit to the latest experimental data. We find that there is a small range of parameter space that this scenario can be realised under certain conditions regarding the cosmic ray propagation and the final state radiation. This range of parameters fall inside the region where the current run of LHC can probe, and therefore it will soon be possible to either verify or exclude conclusively this model of dark matter.

  16. Development of ultralow energy (1–10 eV) ion scattering spectrometry coupled with reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption for the investigation of molecular solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bag, Soumabha; Bhuin, Radha Gobinda; Methikkalam, Rabin Rajan J.; Pradeep, T., E-mail: pradeep@iitm.ac.in [DST Unit of Nanoscience (DST UNS), Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Kephart, Luke; Walker, Jeff; Kuchta, Kevin; Martin, Dave; Wei, Jian [Extrel CMS, LLC, 575 Epsilon Drive, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15238 (United States)] [Extrel CMS, LLC, 575 Epsilon Drive, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15238 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Extremely surface specific information, limited to the first atomic layer of molecular surfaces, is essential to understand the chemistry and physics in upper atmospheric and interstellar environments. Ultra low energy ion scattering in the 1–10 eV window with mass selected ions can reveal extremely surface specific information which when coupled with reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectroscopies, diverse chemical and physical properties of molecular species at surfaces could be derived. These experiments have to be performed at cryogenic temperatures and at ultra high vacuum conditions without the possibility of collisions of neutrals and background deposition in view of the poor ion intensities and consequent need for longer exposure times. Here we combine a highly optimized low energy ion optical system designed for such studies coupled with RAIR and TPD and its initial characterization. Despite the ultralow collision energies and long ion path lengths employed, the ion intensities at 1 eV have been significant to collect a scattered ion spectrum of 1000 counts/s for mass selected CH{sub 2}{sup +}.

  17. ALARA engineering at Department of Energy facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Khan, T.A.; Lane, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1991-05-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report, prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health, is the second in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose reduction activities, with a specific focus towards DOE facilities. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste; uranium enrichment; fuel fabrication, storage, and reprocessing; facility decommissioning; hot laboratories; tritium production; research, test and production reactors; weapons fabrication and testing; and accelerators. Material on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, job planning, improved operational techniques, and other topics has also been included. This volume (Volume 2 of the series) contains 127 abstracts numbered from 69 through 195, as well as author and subject indices. The subject index contains the abstract numbers from both the previous volume and the current volume, the latter being indicated in boldface. Information that the reader feels should be included in the next volume of this bibliography should be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center.

  18. ON THE JITTER RADIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelner, S. R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-6917 Heidelberg (Germany); Aharonian, F. A. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Khangulyan, D., E-mail: skelner@rambler.ru, E-mail: Felix.Aharonian@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: khangul@astro.isas.jaxa.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    In a small-scale turbulent medium, when the nonrelativistic Larmor radius R{sub L} = mc {sup 2}/eB exceeds the correlation length {lambda} of the magnetic field, the magnetic Bremsstrahlung radiation of charged relativistic particles unavoidably proceeds to the so-called jitter radiation regime. The cooling timescale of parent particles is identical to the synchrotron cooling time, thus this radiation regime can be produced with very high efficiency in different astrophysical sources characterized by high turbulence. The jitter radiation has distinct spectral features shifted toward high energies, compared to synchrotron radiation. This effect makes the jitter mechanism an attractive broad-band gamma-ray production channel, which, in highly magnetized and turbulent environments, can compete or even dominate over other high-energy radiation mechanisms. In this paper, we present a novel study of the spectral properties of the jitter radiation performed within the framework of perturbation theory. The derived general expression for the spectral power of radiation is presented in a compact and convenient form for numerical calculations.

  19. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerwert, Klaus

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy Klaus Gerwert, Lehrstuhl fu¨r Biophysik, Ruhr, Germany Based in part on the previous version of this Encyclopedia of Life Sciences (ELS) article, Fourier Transform IR by Johannes Orphal. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is an experimental technique

  20. Lateral conduction infrared photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Carroll, Malcolm S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-09-20

    A photodetector for detecting infrared light in a wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m is disclosed. The photodetector has a mesa structure formed from semiconductor layers which include a type-II superlattice formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. Impurity doped regions are formed on sidewalls of the mesa structure to provide for a lateral conduction of photo-generated carriers which can provide an increased carrier mobility and a reduced surface recombination. An optional bias electrode can be used in the photodetector to control and vary a cut-off wavelength or a depletion width therein. The photodetector can be formed as a single-color or multi-color device, and can also be used to form a focal plane array which is compatible with conventional read-out integrated circuits.

  1. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Dolan, K.W.; Perkins, D.E.

    1995-08-22

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation is disclosed. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features. 1 fig.

  2. Final LDRD report : infrared detection and power generation using self-assembled quantum dots.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cederberg, Jeffrey George; Ellis, Robert; Shaner, Eric Arthur

    2008-02-01

    Alternative solutions are desired for mid-wavelength and long-wavelength infrared radiation detection and imaging arrays. We have investigated quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) as a possible solution for long-wavelength infrared (8 to 12 {mu}m) radiation sensing. This document provides a summary for work done under the LDRD 'Infrared Detection and Power Generation Using Self-Assembled Quantum Dots'. Under this LDRD, we have developed QDIP sensors and made efforts to improve these devices. While the sensors fabricated show good responsivity at 80 K, their detectivity is limited by high noise current. Following efforts concentrated on how to reduce or eliminate this problem, but with no clear path was identified to the desired performance improvements.

  3. Hybrid optical-thermal devices and materials for light manipulation and radiative cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boriskina, Svetlana V; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Weinstein, Lee; Huang, Xiaopeng; Loomis, James; Xu, Yanfei; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    We report on optical design and applications of hybrid meso-scale devices and materials that combine optical and thermal management functionalities owing to their tailored resonant interaction with light in visible and infrared frequency bands. We outline a general approach to designing such materials, and discuss two specific applications in detail. One example is a hybrid optical-thermal antenna with sub-wavelength light focusing, which simultaneously enables intensity enhancement at the operating wavelength in the visible and reduction of the operating temperature. The enhancement is achieved via light recycling in the form of whispering-gallery modes trapped in an optical microcavity, while cooling functionality is realized via a combination of reduced optical absorption and radiative cooling. The other example is a fabric that is opaque in the visible range yet highly transparent in the infrared, which allows the human body to efficiently shed energy in the form of thermal emission. Such fabrics can find...

  4. Electro-Optical Sensing Apparatus and Method for Characterizing Free-Space Electromagnetic Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Libelo, Louis Francis; Wu, Qi

    1999-09-14

    Apparatus and methods for characterizing free-space electromagnetic energy, and in particular, apparatus/method suitable for real-time two-dimensional far-infrared imaging applications are presented. The sensing technique is based on a non-linear coupling between a low-frequency electric field and a laser beam in an electro-optic crystal. In addition to a practical counter-propagating sensing technique, a co-linear approach is described which provides longer radiated field--optical beam interaction length, thereby making imaging applications practical.

  5. SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN ROTATIONAL EMISSION TOWARDS TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SPITZER INFRARED...

  6. Molecular Hydrogen in Infrared Cirrus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristen Gillmon; J. Michael Shull

    2005-07-25

    We combine data from our recent FUSE survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen absorption toward 50 high-latitude AGN with COBE-corrected IRAS 100 micron emission maps to study the correlation of infrared cirrus with H2. A plot of the H2 column density vs. IR cirrus intensity shows the same transition in molecular fraction, f_H2, as seen with total hydrogen column density, N_H. This transition is usually attributed to H2 self-shielding, and it suggests that many diffuse cirrus clouds contain H2 in significant fractions, f_H2 = 1-30%. These clouds cover approximately 50% of the northern sky at latitudes b > 30 degrees, at temperature-corrected 100 micron intensities D_100 > 1.5 MJy/sr. The sheetlike cirrus clouds, with hydrogen densities n_H > 30 cm^-3, may be compressed by dynamical processes at the disk-halo interface, and they are conducive to H2 formation on grain surfaces. Exploiting the correlation between N(H2) and 100 micron intensity, we estimate that cirrus clouds at b > 30 contain approximately 3000 M_sun in H2. Extrapolated over the inner Milky Way, the cirrus may contain 10^7 M_sun of H2 and 10^8 M_sun in total gas mass. If elevated to 100 pc, their gravitational potential energy is ~10^53 erg.

  7. Infrared-Transparent Visible-Opaque Fabrics for Wearable Personal Thermal Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Jonathan K; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Loomis, James; Xu, Yanfei; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Personal cooling technologies locally control the temperature of an individual rather than a large space, thus providing personal thermal comfort while supplementing cooling loads in thermally regulated environments. This can lead to significant energy and cost savings. In this study, a new approach to personal cooling was developed using an infrared-transparent visible-opaque fabric (ITVOF), which provides passive cooling via the transmission of thermal radiation emitted by the human body directly to the environment. Here, we present a conceptual framework to thermally and optically design an ITVOF. Using a heat transfer model, the fabric was found to require a minimum infrared (IR) transmittance of 0.644 and a maximum IR reflectance of 0.2 to ensure thermal comfort at ambient temperatures as high as 26.1oC (79oF). To meet these requirements, an ITVOF design was developed using synthetic polymer fibers with an intrinsically low IR absorptance. These fibers were then structured to minimize IR reflection via w...

  8. Estimation of the electron density and radiative energy losses in a calcium plasma source based on an electron cyclotron resonance discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potanin, E. P. Ustinov, A. L.

    2013-06-15

    The parameters of a calcium plasma source based on an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge were calculated. The analysis was performed as applied to an ion cyclotron resonance system designed for separation of calcium isotopes. The plasma electrons in the source were heated by gyrotron microwave radiation in the zone of the inhomogeneous magnetic field. It was assumed that, in such a combined trap, the energy of the extraordinary microwave propagating from the high-field side was initially transferred to a small group of resonance electrons. As a result, two electron components with different transverse temperatures-the hot resonance component and the cold nonresonance component-were created in the plasma. The longitudinal temperatures of both components were assumed to be equal. The entire discharge space was divided into a narrow ECR zone, where resonance electrons acquired transverse energy, and the region of the discharge itself, where the gas was ionized. The transverse energy of resonance electrons was calculated by solving the equations for electron motion in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Using the law of energy conservation and the balance condition for the number of hot electrons entering the discharge zone and cooled due to ionization and elastic collisions, the density of hot electrons was estimated and the dependence of the longitudinal temperature T{sub e Parallel-To} of the main (cold) electron component on the energy fraction {beta} lost for radiation was obtained.

  9. Liquid cooled fiber thermal radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, B.L.

    1985-03-29

    A radiation-to-thermal receiver apparatus for collecting radiation and converting it to thermal energy is disclosed. The invention includes a fibrous mat material which captures radiation striking the receiver. Captured radiation is removed from the fibrous mat material by a transparent fluid within which the material is bathed.

  10. Danger radiations

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions à prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

  11. ANALYTICAL MODELS OF EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES. II. RADIATIVE TRANSFER VIA THE TWO-STREAM APPROXIMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, Kevin; Mendonça, João M.; Lee, Jae-Min E-mail: joao.mendonca@csh.unibe.ch

    2014-11-01

    We present a comprehensive analytical study of radiative transfer using the method of moments and include the effects of non-isotropic scattering in the coherent limit. Within this unified formalism, we derive the governing equations and solutions describing two-stream radiative transfer (which approximates the passage of radiation as a pair of outgoing and incoming fluxes), flux-limited diffusion (which describes radiative transfer in the deep interior), and solutions for the temperature-pressure profiles. Generally, the problem is mathematically underdetermined unless a set of closures (Eddington coefficients) is specified. We demonstrate that the hemispheric (or hemi-isotropic) closure naturally derives from the radiative transfer equation if energy conservation is obeyed, while the Eddington closure produces spurious enhancements of both reflected light and thermal emission. We concoct recipes for implementing two-stream radiative transfer in stand-alone numerical calculations and general circulation models. We use our two-stream solutions to construct toy models of the runaway greenhouse effect. We present a new solution for temperature-pressure profiles with a non-constant optical opacity and elucidate the effects of non-isotropic scattering in the optical and infrared. We derive generalized expressions for the spherical and Bond albedos and the photon deposition depth. We demonstrate that the value of the optical depth corresponding to the photosphere is not always 2/3 (Milne's solution) and depends on a combination of stellar irradiation, internal heat, and the properties of scattering in both the optical and infrared. Finally, we derive generalized expressions for the total, net, outgoing, and incoming fluxes in the convective regime.

  12. Mid-infrared tunable metamaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brener, Igal; Miao, Xiaoyu; Shaner, Eric A; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Jun, Young Chul

    2015-04-28

    A mid-infrared tunable metamaterial comprises an array of resonators on a semiconductor substrate having a large dependence of dielectric function on carrier concentration and a semiconductor plasma resonance that lies below the operating range, such as indium antimonide. Voltage biasing of the substrate generates a resonance shift in the metamaterial response that is tunable over a broad operating range. The mid-infrared tunable metamaterials have the potential to become the building blocks of chip based active optical devices in mid-infrared ranges, which can be used for many applications, such as thermal imaging, remote sensing, and environmental monitoring.

  13. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators: Implementation of ALARA in Design and Operation of Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasso, A.; Rokni, S.; /SLAC

    2011-06-30

    It used to happen often, to us accelerator radiation protection staff, to be asked by a new radiation worker: ?How much dose am I still allowed?? And we smiled looking at the shocked reaction to our answer: ?You are not allowed any dose?. Nowadays, also thanks to improved training programs, this kind of question has become less frequent, but it is still not always easy to convince workers that staying below the exposure limits is not sufficient. After all, radiation is still the only harmful agent for which this is true: for all other risks in everyday life, from road speed limits to concentration of hazardous chemicals in air and water, compliance to regulations is ensured by keeping below a certain value. It appears that a tendency is starting to develop to extend the radiation approach to other pollutants (1), but it will take some time before the new attitude makes it way into national legislations.

  14. NNSA to conduct Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey over Boston...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    background radiation. Officials from U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) announced that the radiation assessment will cover...

  15. Handbook of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes-Siedle, A. (ed.) (Radiation Experiments and Monitors, Oxford (United Kingdom) Univ. of West London (United Kingdom)); Adams, L. (ed.) (European Space Agency-ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands). Radiation Effects and Analysis Techniques Unit)

    1993-01-01

    This handbook is intended to serve as a tool for designers of equipment and scientific instruments in cases where they are required to ensure the survival of the equipment in radiation environments. High-technology materials, especially semiconductors and optics, tend to degrade on exposure to radiation in many different ways. Intense high-energy radiation environments are found in nuclear reactors and accelerators, machines for radiation therapy, industrial sterilization, and space. Some engineers have to build equipment which will survive a nuclear explosion from a hostile source. Proper handling of a disaster with radioactive materials requires equipment which depends utterly on semiconductor microelectronics and imaging devices. Thus the technology of radiation-tolerant electronics is an instrument for good social spheres as diverse as disaster planning and the exploration of Mars. In order to design equipment for intense environments like those described above, then degradation from high-energy irradiation must be seen as a basic design parameter. The aim of this handbook is to assist the engineer or student in that thought; to make it possible to write intelligent specifications; to offer some understanding of the complex variety of effects which occur when high-technology components encounter high-energy radiation; and to go thoroughly into the balance of choices of how to alleviate the effects and hence achieve the design aims of the project. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 chapters of this book.

  16. Industrial Use of Infrared Inspections 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duch, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared is and has been an established technology in the military and aerospace fields. However, only relatively recently has this technology found a "use" in the industrial sector. Many reasons exist why the technology has not been used...

  17. Design of the First Infrared Beamline at the Siam Photon Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pattanasiriwisawa, W.; Songsiriritthigul, P.; Dumas, P.

    2010-06-23

    This report presents the optical design and optical simulations for the first infrared beamline at the Siam Photon Laboratory. The beamline collects the edge radiation and bending magnet radiation, producing from the BM4 bending magnet of the 1.2 GeV storage ring of the Siam Photon Source. The optical design is optimized for the far- to mid-infrared spectral range (4000-100 cm{sup -1}) for microspectroscopic applications. The optical performance has been examined by computer simulations.

  18. SOLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AND LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FLOW PARAMETERS FROM INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER LOW ENERGY HYDROGEN MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; French, J.; Saul, L.; Wurz, P.; Bzowski, M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Frisch, P.; Gruntman, M.; Mueller, H. R.

    2013-10-01

    Neutral hydrogen atoms that travel into the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM) experience strong effects due to charge exchange and radiation pressure from resonant absorption and re-emission of Ly?. The radiation pressure roughly compensates for the solar gravity. As a result, interstellar hydrogen atoms move along trajectories that are quite different than those of heavier interstellar species such as helium and oxygen, which experience relatively weak radiation pressure. Charge exchange leads to the loss of primary neutrals from the LISM and the addition of new secondary neutrals from the heliosheath. IBEX observations show clear effects of radiation pressure in a large longitudinal shift in the peak of interstellar hydrogen compared with that of interstellar helium. Here, we compare results from the Lee et al. interstellar neutral model with IBEX-Lo hydrogen observations to describe the distribution of hydrogen near 1 AU and provide new estimates of the solar radiation pressure. We find over the period analyzed from 2009 to 2011 that radiation pressure divided by the gravitational force (?) has increased slightly from ? = 0.94 ± 0.04 in 2009 to ? = 1.01 ± 0.05 in 2011. We have also derived the speed, temperature, source longitude, and latitude of the neutral H atoms and find that these parameters are roughly consistent with those of interstellar He, particularly when considering the filtration effects that act on H in the outer heliosheath. Thus, our analysis shows that over the period from 2009 to 2011, we observe signatures of neutral H consistent with the primary distribution of atoms from the LISM and a radiation pressure that increases in the early rise of solar activity.

  19. Calibration method for video and radiation imagers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Mark F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fabris, Lorenzo (Knoxville, TN); Gee, Timothy F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goddard, Jr., James S. (Knoxville, TN); Karnowski, Thomas P. (Knoxville, TN); Ziock, Klaus-peter (Clinton, TN)

    2011-07-05

    The relationship between the high energy radiation imager pixel (HERIP) coordinate and real-world x-coordinate is determined by a least square fit between the HERIP x-coordinate and the measured real-world x-coordinates of calibration markers that emit high energy radiation imager and reflect visible light. Upon calibration, a high energy radiation imager pixel position may be determined based on a real-world coordinate of a moving vehicle. Further, a scale parameter for said high energy radiation imager may be determined based on the real-world coordinate. The scale parameter depends on the y-coordinate of the moving vehicle as provided by a visible light camera. The high energy radiation imager may be employed to detect radiation from moving vehicles in multiple lanes, which correspondingly have different distances to the high energy radiation imager.

  20. Influence of Infrared Radiation on Attic Heat Transfer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katipamula, S.; Turner, W. D.; Murphy, W. E.; O'Neal, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study concerned with different modes of heal transfer in fibrous and cellulose insulating material is presented. A series of experiments were conducted using an attic simulator to determine the effects of ventilation on attic heat...

  1. A Source for Ultrafast Continuum Infrared and Terahertz Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen, Poul B.

    A compact and stable method for generating high-intensity linearly polarized continuum mid-IR and terahertz light using ultrafast femtosecond (fs) laser pulses is demonstrated. Continuous light generation from <400cm?1 ...

  2. Demonstration of Si homojunction far-infrared detectors A. G. U. Pereraa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, A. G. Unil

    Institute for Microstructural Sciences, National Research Council, Ottawa K1A 0R6, Canada M. O. Tanner and K applications, such as NASA's Space Infrared Telescope Facility SIRTF program.1 Present far-infrared FIR, the work function is the energy gap between the impurity band and the conduction valence band

  3. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1978 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eleventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1978.

  4. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1977 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1977.

  5. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1975 Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Eighth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for ERDA & ERDA Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and its contractor employees during 1975.

  6. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1976 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ninth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1976.

  7. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1984 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventeenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1984.

  8. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1986 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nineteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1986.

  9. Interaction of Radiation with Matter Electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    Module 2 Interaction of Radiation with Matter · Gammas · Electrons · Charged Particles · Neutron of mass. · Energy from radiation only deposited if it interacts with the material. · Only the amount;Pair Production #12;Gamma Interaction with Water #12;http://physics

  10. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1985 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1985.

  11. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1982 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fifteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1982.

  12. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1979 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Twelfth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1979.

  13. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1983 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sixteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1983.

  14. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1980 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Thirteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1980.

  15. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1981 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fourteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1981.

  16. ROSAT/ASCA Observations of a Serendipitous BL Lac Object PKS 2316-423: The Variable High-Energy Tail of Synchrotron Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sui-Jian Xue; You-Hong Zhang; Jian-Sheng Chen

    2000-05-22

    We present the analysis of archival data from ROSAT and ASCA of a serendipitous BL Lac object PKS 2316-423. Because of its featureless non-thermal radio/optical continuum, PKS 2316-423 has been called as a BL Lac candidate in the literature. PKS 2316-423 was evidently variable over the multiple X-ray observations, in particular, a variable high-energy tail of the synchrotron radiation is revealed. The X-ray spectral analysis provides further evidence of the synchrotron nature of its broad-band spectrum: a steep and downward curving spectrum between 0.1--10 keV, typical of high-energy peaked BL Lacs (HBL). The spectral energy distribution (SED) through radio-to-X-ray yields the synchrotron radiation peak at frequency Vp=7.3 10^{15} Hz, with integrated luminosity of Lsyn=2.1 10^{44} ergs s^{-1}. The averaged SED properties of PKS 2316-423 are very similar to those ``intermediate'' BL Lac objects (IBL) found recently in several deep surveys, such as Deep X-ray Radio Blazar, Radio-Emitting X-ray, and ROSAT-Green Bank surveys. We suggest that PKS 2316-423 is an IBL though it also shows some general features of a HBL. Actually, this double attribute of PKS 2316-423 provides a good test of the prediction that an IBL object can show either synchrotron or inverse-Compton characteristics in different variability states.

  17. MICROANALYSIS OF MATERIALS USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.

    2000-12-01

    High intensity synchrotron radiation produces photons with wavelengths that extend from the infrared to hard x rays with energies of hundreds of keV with uniquely high photon intensities that can be used to determine the composition and properties of materials using a variety of techniques. Most of these techniques represent extensions of earlier work performed with ordinary tube-type x-ray sources. The properties of the synchrotron source such as the continuous range of energy, high degree of photon polarization, pulsed beams, and photon flux many orders of magnitude higher than from x-ray tubes have made possible major advances in the possible chemical applications. We describe here ways that materials analyses can be made using the high intensity beams for measurements with small beam sizes and/or high detection sensitivity. The relevant characteristics of synchrotron x-ray sources are briefly summarized to give an idea of the x-ray parameters to be exploited. The experimental techniques considered include x-ray fluorescence, absorption, and diffraction. Examples of typical experimental apparatus used in these experiments are considered together with descriptions of actual applications.

  18. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

    1994-08-16

    A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

  19. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, Daniel N. (Sound Beach, NY); Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY); Spanne, Per O. (Shoreham, NY)

    1994-01-01

    A method of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation, in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue.

  20. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grills, David C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Farrington, Jaime A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Layne, Bobby H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Preses, Jack M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bernstein, Herbert J. [Dowling College, Shirley, NY (United States); Wishart, James F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm?¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ?40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ?100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. This new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  1. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Wishart, James F.

    2015-04-27

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of amore »unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm?¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ~40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ~100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. As a result, this new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.« less

  2. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Wishart, James F.

    2015-04-27

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm?¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ~40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ~100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. As a result, this new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  3. RADIATION MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation Exposure due to a Boiling Water Reactor Plume fromIN THE VICINITY OF A BOILING WATER REACTOR EXPOSURE RATE

  4. Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Composition of Accelerator Radiation Fields; Shielding of Electrons and Photons at Accelerators; Shielding of Hadrons at Accelerators; Low Energy Prompt Radiation Phenomena; Induced Radioactivity at Accelerators; Topics in Radiation Protection Instrumentation at Accelerators; and Accelerator Radiation Protection Program Elements.

  5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, certain urban areas were required to add oxygenates to gasoline in order, violence, health issues and economic costs are beyond the scope of this introduction. In Part II range of the IR region extends from about 780 nm to 1,000 µm, with the relation between energy (E

  6. Induction and Persistence of Large ?H2AX Foci by High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation in DNA-Dependent protein kinase–Deficient Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracalente, Candelaria; Ibañez, Irene L.; Molinari, Beatriz; Palmieri, Mónica; Kreiner, Andrés; Valda, Alejandro; and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the cell response to DNA double-strand breaks induced by low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), an essential protein of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway, lacks kinase activity. Methods and Materials: CHO10B2, a Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and its derived radiosensitive mutant cell line, irs-20, lacking DNA-PKcs activity, were evaluated after 0 to 3 Gy of ?-rays, plateau and Bragg peak protons, and lithium beams by clonogenic assay, and as a measurement of double-strand breaks, phosphorylated H2AX (?H2AX) foci number and size were quantified by immunocytofluorescence. Results: Irs-20 exhibited greater radiosensitivity and a higher amount of ?H2AX foci than CHO10B2 at 6 hours after irradiation for all types of radiations. Remarkably, CHO10B2 and irs-20 maintained their difference in radiosensitivity after high-LET radiation. Six hours after low-LET radiations, irs-20 did not reach basal levels of ?H2AX at high doses, whereas CHO10B2 recovered basal levels for all doses. After high-LET radiation, only CHO10B2 exhibited a reduction in ?H2AX foci, but it never reached basal levels. Persistent foci in irs-20 confirmed a repair deficiency. Interestingly, after 30 minutes of high-LET radiation both cell lines exhibited large foci (size >0.9 ?m{sup 2}) related to the damage nature, whereas at 6 hours irs-20 showed a higher amount of large foci than CHO10B2, with a 7-fold increase at 3 Gy, that could also be associated to radiosensitivity. Conclusions: We demonstrated, for the first time, an association between deficient DNA-PKcs activity and not only high levels of H2AX phosphorylation but also persistence and size increase of ?H2AX foci after high-LET irradiation.

  7. Solid-state radiation-emitting compositions and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.

    1992-08-11

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation, wherein a first substance functions as a source of exciting radiation, and a second substance interacts with the exciting radiation to provide a second radiation. The compositions comprise a porous substrate which is loaded with: a source of exciting radiation, a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with the exciting radiation, or both. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with both a source of exciting radiation, such as tritium, and a component capable of interacting with the exciting radiation, e.g., a phosphor, to produce radiation of a second energy. 4 figs.

  8. Solid-state radiation-emitting compositions and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott (Albuquerque, NM); Walko, Robert J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation, wherein a first substance functions as a source of exciting radiation, and a second substance interacts with the exciting radiation to provide a second radiation. The compositions comprise a porous substrate which is loaded with: a source of exciting radiation, a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with the exciting radiation, or both. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with both a source of exciting radiation, such as tritium, and a component capable of interacting with the exciting radiation, e.g., a phosphor, to produce radiation of a second energy.

  9. Efficient Phase-Change Materials: Development of a Low-Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase-Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-05

    HEATS Project: USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF’s PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

  10. Radiation Modeling In Fluid Flow Iain D. Boyd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei

    Collector #12;4 Fundamentals of Radiation (1) · All matter with non-zero temperature emits thermal radiation with energy flux given by the Stefan-Boltzmann Law: e.g., Sun: T=5800 K, total radiated power = 4 distribution (Planck spectrum) !q =T 4 W/m2 #12;5 Planck Radiation Spectrum #12;6 Solar Radiation Spectrum

  11. Electro-optical and Magneto-optical Sensing Apparatus and Method for Characterizing Free-space Electromagnetic Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Riordan, Jenifer Ann; Sun, Feng-Guo

    2000-08-29

    Apparatus and methods for characterizing free-space electromagnetic energy, and in particular, apparatus/method suitable for real-time two-dimensional far-infrared imaging applications are presented. The sensing technique is based on a non-linear coupling between a low-frequency electric (or magnetic) field and a laser beam in an electro-optic (or magnetic-optic) crystal. In addition to a practical counter-propagating sensing technique, a co-linear approach is described which provides longer radiated field-optical beam interaction length, thereby making imaging applications practical.

  12. RADIATION AND CLOUD MONITORING STATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    how they affect the energy balance between incoming solar radiation and heat re-radiated from Earth's surface back into space -- is crucial to improving the general circulation models used for climate students. #12;A MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF THE PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY LOS

  13. Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data UO SOLAR MONITORING LAB Physics Department -- Solar Energy Center 1274 University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon 97403-1274 April 1, 1999 #12;Hourly solar radiation data can be obtained from the University of Oregon Solar Moni- toring Laboratory after obtaining permission

  14. Electrically tunable infrared metamaterial devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brener, Igal; Jun, Young Chul

    2015-07-21

    A wavelength-tunable, depletion-type infrared metamaterial optical device is provided. The device includes a thin, highly doped epilayer whose electrical permittivity can become negative at some infrared wavelengths. This highly-doped buried layer optically couples with a metamaterial layer. Changes in the transmission spectrum of the device can be induced via the electrical control of this optical coupling. An embodiment includes a contact layer of semiconductor material that is sufficiently doped for operation as a contact layer and that is effectively transparent to an operating range of infrared wavelengths, a thin, highly doped buried layer of epitaxially grown semiconductor material that overlies the contact layer, and a metallized layer overlying the buried layer and patterned as a resonant metamaterial.

  15. Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T; Schaich, David A

    2011-09-01

    We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that itmore »does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.« less

  16. Radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fultz, B.T.

    1980-12-05

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  17. Asymmetric Dual Axis Energy Recovery Linac for Ultra-High Flux sources of coherent X-ray/THz radiation: Investigations Towards its Ultimate Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ainsworth, R; Konoplev, I V; Seryi, A

    2015-01-01

    Truly compact and high current, efficient particle accelerators are required for sources of coherent high brightness and intensity THz and X-Ray radiation to be accepted by university or industrial R&D laboratories. The demand for compactness and efficiency can be satisfied by superconducting RF energy recovery linear accelerators (SRF ERL) allowing effectively minimising the footprint and maximising the efficiency of the system. However such set-ups are affected by regenerative beam-break up (BBU) instabilities which limit the beam current and may terminate the beam transport as well as energy recuperation. In this paper we suggest and discuss a SRF ERL with asymmetric configuration of accelerating and decelerating cavities resonantly coupled. In this model of SRF ERL we propose an electron bunch passing through accelerating and decelerating cavities each once and we show that in this case the regenerative BBU instability can be minimised allowing high currents to be achieved. We study the BBU start curr...

  18. An Infrared Renormalization Group Limit Cycle in QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Braaten; H. -W. Hammer

    2003-09-22

    We conjecture that QCD can be tuned to an infrared limit cycle in the three-nucleon system by adjusting the up and down quark masses to critical values at which the binding energies of the deuteron and its spin-singlet partner are tuned to zero. At the critical point, the triton would have infinitely many arbitrarily-shallow excited states with the ratio of the binding energies of successive states approaching a universal constant close to 515.

  19. Real time infrared aerosol analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL); Reedy, Gerald T. (Bourbonnais, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL)

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

  20. Noise Reduction Efforts for the ALS Infrared Beamlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarvie, Tom; Andresen, Nord; Baptiste, Ken; Byrd, John; Chin, Mike; Martin, Michael; McKinney, Wayne; Steier, Christoph

    2004-05-12

    The quality of infrared microscopy and spectroscopy data collected at synchrotron based sources is strongly dependent on signal-to-noise. We have successfully identified and suppressed several noise sources affecting Beamlines 1.4.2, 1.4.3, and 1.4.4 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), resulting in a significant increase in the quality of FTIR spectra obtained. In this paper, we present our methods of noise source analysis, the negative effect of noise on the infrared beam quality, and the techniques used to reduce the noise. These include reducing the phase noise in the storage ring radio-frequency (RF) system, installing an active mirror feedback system, analyzing and changing physical mounts to better isolate portions of the beamline optics from low-frequency environmental noise, and modifying the input signals to the main ALS RF system. We also discuss the relationship between electron beam energy oscillations at a point of dispersion and infrared beamline noise.

  1. The structure of disks around intermediate-mass young stars from mid-infrared interferometry. Evidence for a population of group II disks with gaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menu, J; Henning, Th; Leinert, Ch; Waelkens, C; Waters, L B F M

    2015-01-01

    The disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars are commonly divided into group I and group II based on their far-infrared spectral energy distribution, and the common interpretation for that is flared and flat disks. Recent observations suggest that many flaring disks have gaps, whereas flat disks are thought to be gapless. The different groups of objects can be expected to have different structural signatures in high-angular-resolution data. Over the past 10 years, the MIDI instrument on the Very Large Telescope Interferometer has collected observations of several tens of protoplanetary disks. We model the large set of observations with simple geometric models. A population of radiative-transfer models is synthesized for interpreting the mid-infrared signatures. Objects with similar luminosities show very different disk sizes in the mid-infrared. Restricting to the young objects of intermediate mass, we confirm that most group I disks are in agreement with being transitional. We find that several group II objects have ...

  2. Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Vibrational Populations Monitored after Electronic and Infrared Excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werncke, W.; Kozich, V.; Dreyer, J. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2008-11-14

    Pathways of vibrational energy flow in molecules with an intramolecular hydrogen bond are studied after intramolecular proton transfer reactions as well as after infrared excitation of the O-H stretching vibration which is coupled to this hydrogen bond.

  3. TESTING THE HYPOTHESIS THAT METHANOL MASER RINGS TRACE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS: HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-INFRARED AND MID-INFRARED IMAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Buizer, James M. [Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy-USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, MS N232-12, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Bartkiewicz, Anna; Szymczak, Marian, E-mail: jdebuizer@sofia.usra.edu [Torun Centre for Astronomy, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina 11, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2012-08-01

    Milliarcsecond very long baseline interferometry maps of regions containing 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission have lead to the recent discovery of ring-like distributions of maser spots and the plausible hypothesis that they may be tracing circumstellar disks around forming high-mass stars. We aimed to test this hypothesis by imaging these regions in the near- and mid-infrared at high spatial resolution and compare the observed emission to the expected infrared morphologies as inferred from the geometries of the maser rings. In the near-infrared we used the Gemini North adaptive optics system of ALTAIR/NIRI, while in the mid-infrared we used the combination of the Gemini South instrument T-ReCS and super-resolution techniques. Resultant images had a resolution of {approx}150 mas in both the near-infrared and mid-infrared. We discuss the expected distribution of circumstellar material around young and massive accreting (proto)stars and what infrared emission geometries would be expected for the different maser ring orientations under the assumption that the masers are coming from within circumstellar disks. Based upon the observed infrared emission geometries for the four targets in our sample and the results of spectral energy distribution modeling of the massive young stellar objects associated with the maser rings, we do not find compelling evidence in support of the hypothesis that methanol masers rings reside in circumstellar disks.

  4. Present and Future Optics Challenges at CHESS and for Proposed Energy Recovery Linac Source of Synchrotron Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Qun

    Present and Future Optics Challenges at CHESS and for Proposed Energy Recovery Linac Source-ray optics, energy-recovery linac, high brilliance 1. INTRODUCTION As one of the pioneer synchrotron in the area of high heat load and high x-ray flux optics [1-5] since the high critical-energy wigglers

  5. Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). (Photo courtesy of NETL) MLEF 2.jpg Isis Fukai is utilizing infrared-spectroscopy and scanning-electron-microscopy to determine...

  6. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Cosmic Rays and First High Energy Collisions at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smirnov, S Yu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 130 ?m resolution for charged particle tracks with |?| 0.5 GeV. The TRT is immersed in a 2 T magnetic field generated by the central solenoid, significantly contributing together with the other two Inner Detector sub-systems to the particle momentum reconstruction. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. As expected from the production of transition radiation (TR), the first collision results show the increase in the number of detected TR-photons for particles with a gamma-factor above 1000, thus e...

  7. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Cosmic Rays and First High Energy Collisions at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mashinistov, R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 130 ?m resolution for charged particle tracks with |?| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV. The TRT is immersed in a 2 T magnetic field generated by the central solenoid, significantly contributing together with the other two Inner Detector sub-systems to the particle momentum reconstruction. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. As expected from the production of transition radiation (TR), the first collision results show the increase in the number of detected TR-photons for particles with a gamma-factor abo...

  8. Far-infrared Point Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Guiderdoni

    1999-03-08

    The analysis of the submm anisotropies that will be mapped by the forthcoming MAP and PLANCK satellites requires careful foreground subtraction before measuring CMB fluctuations. Among these, the foreground due to IR/submm thermal radiation from dusty sources was poorly known until recent observational breakthroughs began unveiling the properties of these objects. We hereafter briefly review the observational evidence for a strong evolution of IR/submm sources with respect to the local universe explored by IRAS. We present the basic principles of a new modeling effort where consistent spectral energy distributions of galaxies are implemented into the paradigm of hierarchical clustering with the fashionable semi-analytic approach. This model provides us with specific predictions in IR/submm wavebands, that seem to reproduce the current status of the observations and help assessing the capabilities of forthcoming instruments to pursue the exploration of the deep universe at IR/submm wavelengths. Finally, the ability of the PLANCK High Frequency Instrument all-sky survey to produce a catalogue of dusty sources at submm wavelengths is briefly described.

  9. Near-infrared and Mid-infrared Spectroscopy with the Infrared Camera (IRC) for AKARI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youichi Ohyama; Takashi Onaka; Hideo Matsuhara; Takehiko Wada; Woojung Kim; Naofumi Fujishiro; Kazunori Uemizu; Itsuki Sakon; Martin Cohen; Miho Ishigaki; Daisuke Ishihara; Yoshifusa Ita; Hirokazu Kataza; Toshio Matsumoto; Hiroshi Murakami; Shinki Oyabu; Toshihiko Tanabe; Toshinobu Takagi; Munetaka Ueno; Fumio Usui; Hidenori Watarai; Chris P. Pearson; Norihide Takeyama; Tomoyasu Yamamuro; Yuji Ikeda

    2007-08-31

    The Infrared Camera (IRC) is one of the two instruments on board the AKARI satellite. In addition to deep imaging from 1.8-26.5um for the pointed observation mode of the AKARI, it has a spectroscopic capability in its spectral range. By replacing the imaging filters by transmission-type dispersers on the filter wheels, it provides low-resolution (lambda/d_lambda ~ 20-120) spectroscopy with slits or in a wide imaging field-of-view (approximately 10'X10'). The IRC spectroscopic mode is unique in space infrared missions in that it has the capability to perform sensitive wide-field spectroscopic surveys in the near- and mid-infrared wavelength ranges. This paper describes specifications of the IRC spectrograph and its in-orbit performance.

  10. Galaxies that Shine: radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of disk galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosdahl, Joakim; Teyssier, Romain; Agertz, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Radiation feedback is typically implemented using subgrid recipes in hydrodynamical simulations of galaxies. Very little work has so far been performed using radiation-hydrodynamics (RHD), and there is no consensus on the importance of radiation feedback in galaxy evolution. We present RHD simulations of isolated galaxy disks of different masses with a resolution of 18 pc. Besides accounting for supernova feedback, our simulations are the first galaxy-scale simulations to include RHD treatments of photo-ionisation heating and radiation pressure, from both direct optical/UV radiation and multi-scattered, re-processed infrared (IR) radiation. Photo-heating smooths and thickens the disks and suppresses star formation about as much as the inclusion of ("thermal dump") supernova feedback does. These effects decrease with galaxy mass and are mainly due to the prevention of the formation of dense clouds, as opposed to their destruction. Radiation pressure, whether from direct or IR radiation, has little effect, but ...

  11. Computational and experimental research on infrared trace by human being contact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong Zonglong; Yang Kuntao; Ding Wenxiu; Zhang Nanyangsheng; Zheng Wenheng

    2010-06-20

    The indoor detection of the human body's thermal trace plays an important role in the fields of infrared detecting, scouting, infrared camouflage, and infrared rescuing and tracking. Currently, quantitative description and analysis for this technology are lacking due to the absence of human infrared radiation analysis. To solve this problem, we study the heating and cooling process by observing body contact and removal on an object, respectively. Through finite-element simulation and carefully designed experiments, an analytical model of the infrared trace of body contact is developed based on infrared physics and heat transfer theory. Using this model, the impact of body temperature on material thermal parameters is investigated. The sensitivity of material thermal parameters, the thermal distribution, and the changes of the thermograph's contrast are then found and analyzed. Excellent matching results achieved between the simulation and the experiments demonstrate the strong impact of temperature on material thermal parameters. Conclusively, the new model, simulation, and experimental results are beneficial to the future development and implementation of infrared trace technology.

  12. Thermo Tracer Infrared Thermal Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    -range area G Environment monitoring Volcano, ecology, vegetation, global warming, pollution G R&D Evaluation is a fixed installation type infrared thermal imaging camera to monitor important facilities Production line monitoring Quality anomalies in production processes G Facility monitoring Anomalies

  13. Devices, systems, and methods for harvesting energy and methods for forming such devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotter, Dale K.; Novack, Steven D.

    2012-12-25

    Energy harvesting devices include a substrate coupled with a photovoltaic material and a plurality of resonance elements associated with the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to collect energy in at least visible and infrared light spectra. Each resonance element is capacitively coupled with the photovoltaic material, and may be configured to resonate at a bandgap energy of the photovoltaic material. Systems include a photovoltaic material coupled with a feedpoint of a resonance element. Methods for harvesting energy include exposing a resonance element having a resonant electromagnetic radiation having a frequency between approximately 20 THz and approximately 1,000 THz, absorbing at least a portion of the electromagnetic radiation with the resonance element, and resonating the resonance element at a bandgap energy of an underlying photovoltaic material. Methods for forming an energy harvesting device include forming resonance elements on a substrate and capacitively coupling the resonance elements with a photovoltaic material.

  14. Infrared Dry-peeling Technology for Tomatoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This research will use infrared heating technology for peeling tomatoes. Infrared dry peeling, a device District: 8 Senate District: 5 Application: Nationwide Amount: $324,250 Term: November 1, 2010

  15. Drones, Infrared Imagery, and Body Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, L

    2015-01-01

    afar: The politics of drones and liminal security-scapes.of Communication 8 (2014) Drones, Infrared Imagery, and Body2521 1932–8036/2014FEA0002 Drones, Infrared Imagery, and

  16. radiation detection | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, NNSA, Argentina Transition Radiation...

  17. MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Donald

    2013-01-01

    data acquisition system. Support facilities at LBL include the Solar Energydata to the atmos- pheric processes that attenuate the solar radiation available to terres- trial solar energy

  18. Infrared Freezing of Euclidean QCD observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul M. Brooks; C. J. Maxwell

    2006-08-22

    We consider the leading one-chain term in a skeleton expansion for QCD observables and show that for energies Q^2>\\Lambda^2, where Q^2=\\Lambda^2 is the Landau pole in the coupling, the skeleton expansion result is equivalent to the standard Borel integral representation, with ambiguities related to infrared (IR) renormalons. For Q^2freezing behaviour, vanishing at Q^2=0. Finiteness at Q^2=\\Lambda^2 implies specific relations between the residues of IR and UV renormalons in the Borel plane. These relations, only one of which has previously been noted (though it remained unexplained) are shown to follow from the continuity of the characteristic function in the skeleton expansion. By considering the compensation of non-perturbative and perturbative ambiguities we are led to a result for the Q^2 dependence of these observables at all Q^2, in which there is a single undetermined non-perturbative parameter, and which involves the skeleton expansion characteristic function. The observables freeze to zero in the infrared. We briefly consider the freezing behaviour of the Minkowskian R_{e+e-} ratio.

  19. DOE 2010 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  20. ATHENA radiation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shumway, R.W.

    1987-10-01

    The ATHENA computer program has many features that make it desirable to use as a space reactor evaluation tool. One of the missing features was a surface-to-surface thermal radiation model. A model was developed that allows any of the regular ATHENA heat slabs to radiate to any other heat slab. The view factors and surface emissivities must be specified by the user. To verify that the model was properly accounting for radiant energy transfer, two different types of test calculations were performed. Both calculations have excellent results. The updates have been used on both the INEL CDC-176 and the Livermore Cray. 7 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. RADIATION MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    ment," U.S. Atomic Energy Commission Symposium Series (Beck, U. S. Atomic Energy commission, Health and Safety

  2. Radiation Safety Edward O'Connell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Bureau of Environmental Radiation Protection (BERP) · Regulatory Compliance ­ State Sanitary 16 · Required Radiation to cause ionization depends on the energy #12;Radiation Can Cause Ionization #12;Units of Measurements millirem per year. · At 50,000 feet, the dose rate is about 1 millirem per hour. · There are areas

  3. Fabrication and testing of an infrared spectral control component for thermophotovoltaic power conversion applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Sullivan, Francis M. (Francis Martin), 1980-

    2004-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power conversion is the direct conversion of thermal radiation to electricity. Conceptually, TPV power conversion is a very elegant means of energy conversion. A thermal source emits a radiative ...

  4. Far-infrared surface emissivity and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Pincus, Robert; Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong

    2014-11-03

    Presently, there are no global measurement constraints on the surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 ?m, even though this surface property in this far-IR region has a direct impact on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and infrared cooling rates where the column precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm. Such dry conditions are common for high-altitude and high-latitude locations, with the potential for modeled climate to be impacted by uncertain surface characteristics. This paper explores the sensitivity of instantaneous OLR and cooling rates to changes in far-IR surface emissivity and how this unconstrained property impacts climate model projections. At high latitudes and altitudes, a 0.05 change in emissivity due to mineralogy and snow grain size can cause a 1.8–2.0 W m?² difference in the instantaneous clear-sky OLR. A variety of radiative transfer techniques have been used to model the far-IR spectral emissivities of surface types defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. Incorporating these far-IR surface emissivities into the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario of the Community Earth System Model leads to discernible changes in the spatial patterns of surface temperature, OLR, and frozen surface extent. The model results differ at high latitudes by as much as 2°K, 10 W m?², and 15%, respectively, after only 25 y of integration. The calculated difference in far-IR emissivity between ocean and sea ice of between 0.1 and 0.2, suggests the potential for a far-IR positive feedback for polar climate change.

  5. Far-infrared surface emissivity and climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Pincus, Robert; Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong

    2014-11-03

    Presently, there are no global measurement constraints on the surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 ?m, even though this surface property in this far-IR region has a direct impact on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and infrared cooling rates where the column precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm. Such dry conditions are common for high-altitude and high-latitude locations, with the potential for modeled climate to be impacted by uncertain surface characteristics. This paper explores the sensitivity of instantaneous OLR and cooling rates to changes in far-IR surface emissivity and how this unconstrained property impacts climate modelmore »projections. At high latitudes and altitudes, a 0.05 change in emissivity due to mineralogy and snow grain size can cause a 1.8–2.0 W m?² difference in the instantaneous clear-sky OLR. A variety of radiative transfer techniques have been used to model the far-IR spectral emissivities of surface types defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. Incorporating these far-IR surface emissivities into the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario of the Community Earth System Model leads to discernible changes in the spatial patterns of surface temperature, OLR, and frozen surface extent. The model results differ at high latitudes by as much as 2°K, 10 W m?², and 15%, respectively, after only 25 y of integration. The calculated difference in far-IR emissivity between ocean and sea ice of between 0.1 and 0.2, suggests the potential for a far-IR positive feedback for polar climate change.« less

  6. Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    In the first chapter, terminology, physical and radiological quantities, and units of measurement used to describe the properties of accelerator radiation fields are reviewed. The general considerations of primary radiation fields pertinent to accelerators are discussed. The primary radiation fields produced by electron beams are described qualitatively and quantitatively. In the same manner the primary radiation fields produced by proton and ion beams are described. Subsequent chapters describe: shielding of electrons and photons at accelerators; shielding of proton and ion accelerators; low energy prompt radiation phenomena; induced radioactivity at accelerators; topics in radiation protection instrumentation at accelerators; and accelerator radiation protection program elements.

  7. Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-06-14

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  8. Spectral response of localized surface plasmon in resonance with mid-infrared light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusa, Fumiya [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakacho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ashihara, Satoshi, E-mail: ashihara@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2014-10-21

    We study spectral responses of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) in gold nanorods, which resonate at mid-infrared frequencies, by transmission spectroscopy and electromagnetic field analyses. The resonance linewidth is found to be linearly proportional to the resonance frequency, indicating that the dephasing due to Drude relaxation is suppressed and that the overall dephasing is dominated by radiative damping. Owing to the reduced radiative/non-radiative damping and large geometrical length of the nanorod, near-field intensity enhancement exceeds several hundred times. Nonetheless the resonance linewidth is comparable with or larger than the bandwidth of a 100-fs pulse, and therefore the enhanced near-field as short as 100-fs can be created upon pulsed excitation. The large enhancements with appropriate bandwidths make LSPs promising for enhanced nonlinear spectroscopies, coherent controls, and strong-field light-matter interactions in the mid-infrared range.

  9. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burger, Arnold (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-03-30

    A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

  10. Near Infrared Surveys | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd Jump to:InformationNdunga Geothermal Power Plant

  11. Near Infrared Surveys | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd Jump to:InformationNdunga Geothermal Power Plant

  12. Injection seeded tunable mid-infrared pulses by difference frequency mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Masuda, Takahiko; Sasao, Noboru; Uetake, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We report on generation of nanosecond mid-infrared pulses having frequency tunability, narrow linewidth and high intensity. They are obtained by frequency mixing between injection seeded near-infrared pulses in potassium titanyl arsenate crystals. A continuous-wave external cavity laser diode or a Ti:Sapphire ring laser are used as a tunable seeding source for the near-infrared pulses. Typical energy and pulse duration of the generated mid-infrared pulses is 0.4 mJ/pulse and 2 ns, respectively. Narrow linewidth of about 1 GHz and good frequency reproducibility of the mid-infrared pulses are confirmed by observing a ro-vibrational absorption line of gaseous carbon monoxide.

  13. Oxidative Stress and Skeletal Health with Low-Dose, Low-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-11-03

    We performed in vivo and in vitro experiments to accomplish the following specific aims of this project: 1) determine if low dose, low LET radiation affects skeletal remodeling at structural, cellular and molecular levels and 2) determine if low dose, low LET radiation modulates skeletal health during aging via oxidative mechanisms. A third aim is supported by NASA supplement to this DOE grant focusing on the influence of high LET radiation on bone. A series of experiments were conducted at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven, NSRL-BNL, using iron (56Fe) or a sequential exposure to protons / iron / protons, and separate experiments at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) using 137Cs. The following provides a summary of key findings. (1) Exposure of nine-week old female mice to priming doses of gamma radiation (10cGy x 5) did not significantly affect bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) or microarchitecture as analyzed by 3D microcomputed tomography. As expected, exposure to the challenge dose of 2 Gy gamma irradiation resulted in significant decreases in BV/TV. The priming dose combined with the 2Gy challenge dose had no further effect on BV/TV compared to challenge dose alone, with the sole exception of the Structural Model Index (SMI). SMI reflects the ratio of rods-to-plates in cancellous bone tissue, such that higher SMI values indicate a tendency toward a weaker structure compared to lower SMI values. Mice treated with both priming and challenge dose had 25% higher SMI values compared to sham-irradiated controls and 7% higher values compared to mice treated with the challenge dose alone. Thus, although this priming regimen had relatively modest effects on cancellous tissue, the difference in SMI suggests this fractionated priming doses have adverse, rather than beneficial, effects on bone structure. (2) In 10-week old male mice, a single exposure to 100cGy of 137Cs reduces trabecular bone number and connectivity density by 20% and 36% respectively one month after irradiation (IR). At four months post-IR, these animals were comparable to sham-treated controls with regards to the abovementioned structural parameters. Irradation at 1 or 10 cGy did not result in any significant changes in bone structural parameters. (3) Irradiation of 16-wk old male mice with high doses of 56Fe or proton (50 or 200cGy), but not at low doses (5 or 10cGy), showed a similar loss of cancellous BV/TV and trabecular number at five weeks post-IR. (4) Age-related bone loss overtook acute radiation-induced decrements in bone structure within four months post-IR with 100 cGy gamma and 12 months post-IR with 200 cGy iron. Transgenic mice globally overexpressing human catalase gene in mitochondria did not exhibit cancellous bone loss as assessed at four month post-IR with 10 cGy proton, 50 cGy iron, or in combination. (5) The cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for loss of bone with radiation are mediated primarily through increased osteoclastogenesis. Our data provide evidence that there are increases in gene expression of TNF alpha and MCP1 in the bone marrow cells 24 hours post-IR and of osteoclastogenic differentiation factor RANKL by day 3. These cytokines in the marrow may stimulate mature osteoclasts or drive osteoclastogenesis from precursors. (6) Osteoblastogenesis from marrow progenitors evaluated ex vivo decreased following whole body 56Fe irradiation at a dose threshold between 20 and 50 cGy whereas osteoclastogenesis ex vivo increased with doses as low as 10cGy two days post-IR of mice. However, the latter finding was not observed in more than a single experiment. (7) Gamma irradiation of cells in vitro requires relatively high doses (200cGy) to disturb normal osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis as evidenced by decrements in mineralized nodule formation, osteoclast counts, and expression of osteoblast related genes such as runx2, col1a1. (8) We also investigated the effect of antioxidants on osteoblastogenesis following low dose in vitro gamma irradiation (15cGy) on day four bone marrow stromal cell cultures. Super

  14. Panchromatic Spectral Energy Distributions of Dusty Galaxies with RADISHE. I. Predictions for Herschel: Correlating Colors with Galactic Energy Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanya Chakrabarti; Barbara Whitney

    2007-11-27

    We present three-dimensional, self-consistent radiative transfer solutions with a new Monte Carlo radiative equilibrium code. The code, RADISHE ($\\bf{RAD}$iative transfer $\\bf{I}$n $\\bf{S}$moothed particle $\\bf{H}$ydrodynamics and $\\bf{E}$ulerian codes), can be applied to calculate the emergent spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and broadband images from optical to millimeter wavelengths of arbitrary density geometries with distributed sources of radiation. One of the primary uses of this code has been to interface with hydrodynamical codes to calculate emergent SEDs along a simulation time sequence. The primary methodological focus of this paper is on the radiative equilibrium temperature calculation. We find that an iterative calculation of the temperature, which takes as the Monte Carlo estimator for the mean free intensity the sum of photon flight paths, is significantly faster than relaxation temperature calculation methods, particularly when large numbers of grid cells are required, i.e., in modeling three-dimensional geometries such as the dust envelopes of turbulent massive protostellar cores or infrared bright galaxies. We present simulated color-color plots for infrared bright galaxies at a range of redshifts, and unfold these plots as color vs the fractional AGN luminosity, to demonstrate that $\\it{Herschel}$ will be able to effectively discriminate between submillimeter galaxies where the energy source is dominated by AGN and those where star formation dominates. [abridged

  15. Temperature dependence of non-radiative energy transfer in hybrid structures of InGaN/GaN nanorods and F8BT films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R. M.; Liu, B.; Bai, J.; Wang, T., E-mail: t.wang@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-27

    Hybrid organic/inorganic white light emitting structures have been fabricated based on a combination of high efficiency InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) nanorod arrays and a yellow emitting co-polymer F8BT, leading to a minimised separation between them in order to achieve high efficiency non-radiative energy transfer (NRET). The NRET efficiency has been found 6.7 times higher at room temperature than at 7?K. This is attributed to the existence of strong exciton localization the InGaN MQWs, which can undergo thermally activated delocalization at high temperatures. The enhanced NRET efficiency is not only due to the delocalized MQW excitons, but also enhanced by the increased exciton diffusion at higher temperatures. This behaviour highlights the potential for high efficiency NRET in down-conversion hybrid white light emitting diodes operating at room temperature.

  16. Perspective of monochromatic gamma-ray line detection with the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility onboard China's Space Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xiaoyuan; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Qiang; Chang, Jin; Dong, Yong-Wei; Hu, Bing-Liang; Lü, Jun-Guang; Wang, Le; Wu, Bo-Bing; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    HERD is the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection instrument proposed to operate onboard China's space station in the 2020s. It is designed to detect energetic cosmic ray nuclei, leptons and photons with a high energy resolution ($\\sim1\\%$ for electrons and photons and $20\\%$ for nuclei) and a large geometry factor ($>3\\, m^2sr$ for electrons and diffuse photons and $>2\\, m^2sr$ for nuclei). In this work we discuss the capability of HERD to detect monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray lines, based on simulations of the detector performance. It is shown that HERD will be one of the most sensitive instruments for monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray searches at energies between $\\sim10$ to a few hundred GeV. Above hundreds of GeV, Cherenkov telescopes will be more sensitive due to their large effective area. As a specific example, we show that a good portion of the parameter space of a supersymmetric dark matter model can be probed with HERD.

  17. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Jones, Scott C. (Pullman, WA)

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission.

  18. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

    1991-03-12

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

  19. Minisuperspace models as infrared contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojowald, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A direct correspondence of quantum mechanics as a minisuperspace model for a self-interacting scalar quantum-field theory is established by computing, in several models, the infrared contributions to 1-loop effective potentials of Coleman--Weinberg type. A minisuperspace approximation rather than truncation is thereby obtained. By this approximation, the spatial averaging scale of minisuperspace models is identified with an infrared scale (but not a regulator or cut-off) delimiting the modes included in the minisuperspace model. Some versions of the models studied here have discrete space or modifications of the Hamiltonian expected from proposals of loop quantum gravity. They shed light on the question of how minisuperspace models of quantum cosmology can capture features of full quantum gravity. While it is shown that modifications of the Hamiltonian can well be described by minisuperspace truncations, some related phenomena such as signature change, confirmed and clarified here for modified scalar field th...

  20. New Insights into the Mechanism Underlying the Synergistic Action of Ionizing Radiation With Platinum Chemotherapeutic Drugs: The Role of Low-Energy Electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezaee, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Rezaee@USherbrooke.ca; Hunting, Darel John; Sanche, Léon

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the efficiencies of platinum chemotherapeutic drugs (Pt-drugs) in the sensitization of DNA to the direct effects of ionizing radiation and to determine the role of low-energy electrons (LEEs) in this process. Methods and Materials: Complexes of supercoiled plasmid DNA covalently bound to either cisplatin, carboplatin, or oxaliplatin were prepared in different molar ratios. Solid films of DNA and DNA modified by Pt-drugs were irradiated with either 10-KeV or 10-eV electrons. Damages to DNA were quantified by gel electrophoresis, and the yields for damage formation were obtained from exposure–response curves. Results: The presence of an average of 2 Pt-drug–DNA adducts (Pt-adducts) in 3199-bp plasmid DNA increases the probability of a double-strand break by factors of 3.1, 2.5, and 2.4 for carboplatin, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin, respectively. Electrons with energies of 10 eV and 10 KeV interact with Pt-adducts to preferentially enhance the formation of cluster lesions. The maximum increase in radiosensitivity per Pt-adduct is found at ratios up to 3.1 × 10{sup ?4} Pt-adducts per nucleotide, which is equivalent to an average of 2 adducts per plasmid. Carboplatin and oxaliplatin show higher efficiencies than cisplatin in the radiosensitization of DNA. Because carboplatin and cisplatin give rise to identical reactive species that attach to DNA, carboplatin must be considered as a better radiosensitizer for equal numbers of Pt-adducts. Conclusion: Platinum chemotherapeutic drugs preferentially enhance the formation of cluster damage to DNA induced by the direct effect of ionizing radiation, and LEEs are the main species responsible for such an enhancement via the formation of electron resonances.

  1. Results of a direct search using synchrotron radiation for the low-energy $^{229}$Th nuclear isomeric transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeet, Justin; Sullivan, Scott T; Rellergert, Wade G; Mirzadeh, Saed; Cassanho, A; Jenssen, H P; Tkalya, Eugene V; Hudson, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a direct search for the $^{229}$Th ($I^{p} = 3/2^+\\leftarrow 5/2^+$) nuclear isomeric transition, performed by exposing $^{229}$Th-doped LiSrAlF$_6$ crystals to tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and observing any resulting fluorescence. We also use existing nuclear physics data to establish a range of possible transition strengths for the isomeric transition. We find no evidence for the thorium nuclear transition between $7.3 \\mbox{eV}$ and $8.8 \\mbox{eV}$ with transition lifetime $(1-2)\\mbox{s} \\lesssim \\tau \\lesssim (2000-5600)\\mbox{s}$. This measurement excludes roughly half of the favored transition search area and can be used to direct future searches.

  2. Results of a direct search using synchrotron radiation for the low-energy $^{229}$Th nuclear isomeric transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin Jeet; Christian Schneider; Scott T. Sullivan; Wade G. Rellergert; Saed Mirzadeh; A. Cassanho; H. P. Jenssen; Eugene V. Tkalya; Eric R. Hudson

    2015-02-18

    We report the results of a direct search for the $^{229}$Th ($I^{p} = 3/2^+\\leftarrow 5/2^+$) nuclear isomeric transition, performed by exposing $^{229}$Th-doped LiSrAlF$_6$ crystals to tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and observing any resulting fluorescence. We also use existing nuclear physics data to establish a range of possible transition strengths for the isomeric transition. We find no evidence for the thorium nuclear transition between $7.3 {eV}$ and $8.8 {eV}$ with transition lifetime $(1-2){s} \\lesssim \\tau \\lesssim (2000-5600){s}$. This measurement excludes roughly half of the favored transition search area and can be used to direct future searches.

  3. On the Bel radiative gravitational fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joan Josep Ferrando; Juan Antonio Sáez

    2012-04-18

    We analyze the concept of intrinsic radiative gravitational fields defined by Bel and we show that the three radiative types, N, III and II, correspond with the three following different physical situations: {\\it pure radiation}, {\\it asymptotic pure radiation} and {\\it generic} (non pure, non asymptotic pure) {\\it radiation}. We introduce the concept of {\\em observer at rest} with respect to the gravitational field and that of {\\em proper super-energy} of the gravitational field and we show that, for non radiative fields, the minimum value of the relative super-energy density is the proper super-energy density, which is acquired by the observers at rest with respect to the field. Several {\\it super-energy inequalities} are also examined.

  4. Method of lightening radiation darkened optical elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reich, Frederich R. (Richland, WA); Schwankoff, Albert R. (W. Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01

    A method of lightening a radiation-darkened optical element in wich visible optical energy or electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in the range of from about 2000 to about 20,000 angstroms is directed into the radiation-darkened optical element; the method may be used to lighten radiation-darkened optical element in-situ during the use of the optical element to transmit data by electronically separating the optical energy from the optical output by frequency filtering, data cooling, or interlacing the optic energy between data intervals.

  5. Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-24

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  6. Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation G-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , radio waves, and alpha particles are examples of radiation. When people feel warmth from sunlight in the form of electromagnetic waves. Examples include gamma rays, ultraviolet light, and radio waves, or radiant energy, is energy in the form of waves or particles moving through space. Visi- ble light, heat

  7. Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    energy, is energy in the form of waves or particles moving through space. Visi- ble light, heat, radio in the form of electromagnetic waves. Examples include gamma rays, ultraviolet light, and radio waves waves, and alpha particles are examples of radiation. When people feel warmth from sunlight

  8. Infrared spectroscopic signatures of (NH4)2SO4 aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weis, David D.; Ewing, George E.

    1996-08-20

    - ____ _ IRDetector xperiment p oduced a rosols at 304-5% RH as measured spectroscopically. Finally, i sedimentation experim nts, I /  aerosols were trapped in the flow-through cell just as they were queous Solution WroCloth Desiccant in the desiccating cell... to the cell wall was packed with silica gel. In this  x3.6 rs(SO cell he inle and outlet ports are nearly parallel with the cell axis. 0.40 Infrared extinction spectra were obtained by directing collimated radiation from a Fourier transform infrared (FT...

  9. Sensitized near infrared emission from lanthanide-exchanged zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monguzzi, A.; Macchi, G.; Meinardi, F.; Tubino, R.; Burger, M.; Calzaferri, G.

    2008-03-24

    In this work, we present an alternative approach to sensitize the near infrared emission of Er{sup 3+} ions (used in telecom applications) by exploiting the geometrical confinement occurring in porous zeolites structures. The sensitization of the Ln ion is obtained by energy transfer between a suitable organic molecule acting as an antenna and the emitting ion arranged in closed proximity, thus, avoiding the limits imposed by the coordination chemistry.

  10. DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure report, _Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security. December 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Hagemeyer, Yolanda McCormick

    2012-12-12

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2011 occupational radiation dose data along with trends over the past 5 years, and provides instructions to submit successful as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) projects.

  11. Collaborative Research: Barotropic Radiation Experiment (BARX) The question of how energy flows through the oceans, especially how energy is lost from the currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dushaw, Brian

    flows through the oceans, especially how energy is lost from the currents comprising the general and vorticity. Intellectual Merit. A fundamental process by which ocean currents lose the energy acquired from will provide a benchmark on a phenomenon that is important to the dynamics of ocean currents but is difficult

  12. DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    2010-01-01

    I. Applications of Radiation Detectors 1) X-Rays, Gammaof the Conference DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY VictorT E D LBL9651 DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY - DISCLAIM*

  13. Simulating the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect(s): including radiative cooling and energy injection by galactic winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin White; Lars Hernquist; Volker Springel

    2002-07-08

    We present results on the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effects from a sequence of high resolution hydrodynamic simulations of structure formation, including cooling, feedback and metal injection. These simulations represent a self-consistent thermal model which incorporates ideas from the `pre-heating' scenario while preserving good agreement with the low density IGM at z~3 probed by the Ly-a forest. Four simulations were performed, at two different resolutions with and without radiative effects and star formation. The long-wavelength modes in each simulation were the same, so that we can compare the results on an object by object basis. We demonstrate that our simulations are converged to the sub-arcminute level. The effect of the additional physics is to suppress the mean Comptonization parameter by 20% and to suppress the angular power spectrum of fluctuations by just under a factor of two in this model while leaving the source counts and properties relatively unchanged. We quantify how non-Gaussianity in the SZ maps increases the sample variance over the standard result for Gaussian fluctuations. We identify a large scatter in the Y-M relation which will be important in searches for clusters using the SZ effect(s).

  14. RESMDD'02 Radiation in Life Sciences: Hartmut F.-W. Sadrozinski , SCIPP Radiation Effects in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    for Cancer Research to induce DNA Faults #12;RESMDD'02 Radiation in Life Sciences: Hartmut F.-W. Sadrozinski Parameters to Describe Quality of Radiation · Dose & Dose Rate · Fluence & Fluence Rate · Linear EnergyVery High Repairable ?1-5Low Damage# of Ionizations (Cluster Size) LET #12;RESMDD'02 Radiation in Life

  15. Radiation damage effects on detectors and eletronic devices in harsh radiation environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiore, S

    2015-01-01

    Radiation damage effects represent one of the limits for technologies to be used in harsh radiation environments as space, radiotherapy treatment, high-energy phisics colliders. Different technologies have known tolerances to different radiation fields and should be taken into account to avoid unexpected failures which may lead to unrecoverable damages to scientific missions or patient health.

  16. RSSC FUNDAMENTAL RADIATION CONCEPTS 072011 2-1 FUNDAMENTAL RADIATION CONCEPTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    .............................................................................................. 2-9 VII. Interactions of Radiations with Matter IS RADIATION? Radiation is defined as energy that travels through space or matter in the form of a particle), or by the interaction of a particle with matter. Some attributes of radioactive decay are that it is spontaneous

  17. Portable Heaters | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of air in a room), some rely on radiant heating. Radiant heaters emit infrared radiation that directly heats objects and people within their line of sight, and are a more...

  18. Passive-solar directional-radiating cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

    1986-01-01

    A radiative cooling system for use with an ice-making system having a radiating surface aimed at the sky for radiating energy at one or more wavelength bands for which the atmosphere is transparent and a cover thermally isolated from the radiating surface and transparent at least to the selected wavelength or wavelengths, the thermal isolation reducing the formation of condensation on the radiating surface and/or cover and permitting the radiation to continue when the radiating surface is below the dewpoint of the atmosphere, and a housing supporting the radiating surface, cover and heat transfer means to an ice storage reservoir.

  19. Passive-solar directional-radiating cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Schertz, W.W.

    1985-06-27

    A radiative cooling system for use with an ice-making system having a radiating surface aimed at the sky for radiating energy at one or more wavelength bands for which the atmosphere is transparent and a cover thermally isolated from the radiating surface and transparent at least to the selected wavelength or wavelengths, the thermal isolation reducing the formation of condensation on the radiating surface and/or cover and permitting the radiation to continue when the radiating surface is below the dewpoint of the atmosphere, and a housing supporting the radiating surface, cover and heat transfer means to an ice storage reservoir.

  20. Infrared Observations of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Elbaz

    1997-11-28

    This short paper reviews some of the results obtained from ISO observations (ISOCAM and ISOPHOT) on galaxy clusters: Chap.1: "Intracluster dust": new evidence for the presence of dust outside galaxies. Chap.2:"Mid-Infrared Emission of Galaxies" origin of the mid-IR emission. Chap.3:"Star Formation in Nearby Clusters" correlation of the 7 and 15 microns fluxes with the SFR. Chap.4:"Star Formation in z=0.2 Galaxy clusters" Study of the mid-IR emission of A1732 and A1689. Chap.5:"Star Formation in z>0.4 Galaxy clusters" Preliminary.

  1. Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of California and the ALS has succeeded in probing the intrinsic electronic properties of the charge carriers in organic FETs using infrared spectromicroscopy. The...

  2. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Window Coatings Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings 1 of 5 An oxygen plasma etcher is used to clean test substrates for window coatings. Image: Pacific Northwest...

  3. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been...

  4. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared...

  5. Uncooled infrared imaging using bimaterial microcantilever arrays...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    main figures of merit of the IR imager were found to be comparable to those of uncooled MEMS infrared detectors with substantially higher degree of fabrication complexity. In...

  6. Near-Infrared Photoluminescence Enhancement in Ge/CdS and Ge/ZnS Core/Shell Nanocrystals: Utilizing IV/II-VI Semiconductor Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Yijun [Ames Laboratory; Rowland, Clare E [Argonne National Laboratory; Schaller, Richard D [Argonne National Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-26

    Ge nanocrystals have a large Bohr radius and a small, size-tunable band gap that may engender direct character via strain or doping. Colloidal Ge nanocrystals are particularly interesting in the development of near-infrared materials for applications in bioimaging, telecommunications and energy conversion. Epitaxial growth of a passivating shell is a common strategy employed in the synthesis of highly luminescent II–VI, III–V and IV–VI semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we use relatively unexplored IV/II–VI epitaxy as a way to enhance the photoluminescence and improve the optical stability of colloidal Ge nanocrystals. Selected on the basis of their relatively small lattice mismatch compared with crystalline Ge, we explore the growth of epitaxial CdS and ZnS shells using the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction method. Powder X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy techniques, including energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction, clearly show the controllable growth of as many as 20 epitaxial monolayers of CdS atop Ge cores. In contrast, Ge etching and/or replacement by ZnS result in relatively small Ge/ZnS nanocrystals. The presence of an epitaxial II–VI shell greatly enhances the near-infrared photoluminescence and improves the photoluminescence stability of Ge. Ge/II–VI nanocrystals are reproducibly 1–3 orders of magnitude brighter than the brightest Ge cores. Ge/4.9CdS core/shells show the highest photoluminescence quantum yield and longest radiative recombination lifetime. Thiol ligand exchange easily results in near-infrared active, water-soluble Ge/II–VI nanocrystals. We expect this synthetic IV/II–VI epitaxial approach will lead to further studies into the optoelectronic behavior and practical applications of Si and Ge-based nanomaterials.

  7. Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

    2008-09-30

    The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

  8. Department of Energy Cites Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Cites Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection Violations Department of Energy Cites Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC for Nuclear...

  9. Terahertz source at 9.4 THz based on a dual-wavelength infrared laser and quasi-phase matching in organic crystals OH1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majki?, A., E-mail: aleksej.majkic@ijs.si; Zgonik, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Petelin, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jazbinšek, M.; Ruiz, B.; Medrano, C.; Günter, P. [Rainbow Photonics AG, Farbhofstrasse 21, CH-8048 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-06

    We present a compact, room temperature, and narrowband terahertz source, based on difference-frequency generation in the organic nonlinear optical crystals OH1 (2-[3-(4-hydroxystyryl)-5,5-dimethylcyclohex-2-enylidene]malononitrile). The system employs a specific dual-wavelength infrared laser that emits coaxial, synchronous 10-ns pulses of similar energy and duration at wavelengths of 1064?nm and 1030?nm by using Nd:YAG and Yb:YAG crystals within the split laser cavity. The common part of the laser cavity comprises an acousto-optic Q-switch and an output coupler. The output is frequency-mixed in a stack of several OH1 crystals in a quasi-phase-matching configuration, which is determined on the basis of refractive index and absorption measurements in the 1–11 THz range. The system generates terahertz radiation in pulse trains with 1.0??W average power and a near-Gaussian intensity profile.

  10. The Microwave Air Yield Beam Experiment (MAYBE): measurement of GHz radiation for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Monasor; M. Bohacova; C. Bonifazi; G. Cataldi; S. Chemerisov; J. R. T. De Mello Neto; P. Facal San Luis; B. Fox; P. W. Gorham; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; R. Meyhandan; L. C. Reyes; B. Rouille D'Orfeuil; E. M. Santos; J. Pochez; P. Privitera; H. Spinka; V. Verzi; C. Williams; J. Zhou

    2011-08-31

    We present first measurements by MAYBE of microwave emission from an electron beam induced air plasma, performed at the electron Van de Graaff facility of the Argonne National Laboratory. Coherent radio Cherenkov, a major background in a previous beam experiment, is not produced by the 3 MeV beam, which simplifies the interpretation of the data. Radio emission is studied over a wide range of frequencies between 3 and 12 GHz. This measurement provides further insight on microwave emission from extensive air showers as a novel detection technique for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

  11. Low temperature optical characterization of near infrared single photon emitter in nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siyushev, P; Aharonovich, I; Kaiser, F; Müller, T; Lombez, L; Atatüre, M; Castelletto, S; Prawer, S; Jelezko, F; Wrachtrup, J

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the optical properties of single defects emitting in the near infrared in nanodiamonds at liquid helium temperature. The nanodiamonds are synthesized using a microwave chemical vapor deposition method followed by nickel implantation and annealing. We show that single defects exhibit several striking features at cryogenic temperature: the photoluminescence is strongly concentrated into a sharp zero-phonon line in the near infrared, the radiative lifetime is in the nanosecond range and the emission is perfectly linearly polarized. The spectral stability of the defects is then investigated. An optical resonance linewidth of 4 GHz is measured using resonant excitation on the zero-phonon line. Although Fourier-transform limited emission is not achieved, our results show that it might be possible to use consecutive photons emitted in the near infrared by single defects in diamond nanocrystals to perform two photon interference experiments, which are at the heart of linear quantum computing p...

  12. Low temperature optical characterization of near infrared single photon emitters in nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Siyushev; V. Jacques; I. Aharonovich; F. Kaiser; T. Muller; L. Lombez; M. Atature; S. Castelletto; S. Prawer; F. Jelezko; J. Wrachtrup

    2009-11-18

    In this paper, we study the optical properties of single defects emitting in the near infrared in nanodiamonds at liquid helium temperature. The nanodiamonds are synthesized using a microwave chemical vapor deposition method followed by nickel implantation and annealing. We show that single defects exhibit several striking features at cryogenic temperature: the photoluminescence is strongly concentrated into a sharp zero-phonon line in the near infrared, the radiative lifetime is in the nanosecond range and the emission is perfectly linearly polarized. The spectral stability of the defects is then investigated. An optical resonance linewidth of 4 GHz is measured using resonant excitation on the zero-phonon line. Although Fourier-transform limited emission is not achieved, our results show that it might be possible to use consecutive photons emitted in the near infrared by single defects in diamond nanocrystals to perform two photon interference experiments, which are at the heart of linear quantum computing protocols.

  13. Testing a model of IR radiative losses Frank Vignola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    losses associated with the pyranometers. High quality data from the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Energy Laboratory (NREL) operates a very high quality solar monitoring station at the Solar Radiation Energy Laboratory ABSTRACT Thermopile pyranometers exhibit IR radiative losses that affect global

  14. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Lane, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1991-11-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report, prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health, contains the third in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. This report also contains abstracts from the two previous volumes. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy Data Base, and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, storage, and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, and accelerators. Material on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, job planning, improved operational techniques, and other topics are also included.

  15. AOI 1— COMPUTATIONAL ENERGY SCIENCES:MULTIPHASE FLOW RESEARCH High-fidelity multi-phase radiation module for modern coal combustion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modest, Michael

    2013-11-15

    The effects of radiation in particle-laden flows were the object of the present research. The presence of particles increases optical thickness substantially, making the use of the “optically thin” approximation in most cases a very poor assumption. However, since radiation fluxes peak at intermediate optical thicknesses, overall radiative effects may not necessarily be stronger than in gas combustion. Also, the spectral behavior of particle radiation properties is much more benign, making spectral models simpler (and making the assumption of a gray radiator halfway acceptable, at least for fluidized beds when gas radiation is not large). On the other hand, particles scatter radiation, making the radiative transfer equation (RTE) much more di#14;fficult to solve. The research carried out in this project encompassed three general areas: (i) assessment of relevant radiation properties of particle clouds encountered in fluidized bed and pulverized coal combustors, (ii) development of proper spectral models for gas–particulate mixtures for various types of two-phase combustion flows, and (iii) development of a Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) solution module for such applications. The resulting models were validated against artificial cases since open literature experimental data were not available. The final models are in modular form tailored toward maximum portability, and were incorporated into two research codes: (i) the open-source CFD code OpenFOAM, which we have extensively used in our previous work, and (ii) the open-source multi-phase flow code MFIX, which is maintained by NETL.

  16. Cloud Effects on Radiative Heating Rate Profiles over Darwin using ARM and A-train Radar/Lidar Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2013-06-11

    Observations of clouds from the ground-based U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) and satellite-based A-train are used to compute cloud radiative forcing profiles over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. Cloud properties are obtained from both radar (the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) and the CloudSat satellite in the A-train) and lidar (the ARM Micropulse lidar (MPL) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite in the A-train) observations. Cloud microphysical properties are taken from combined radar and lidar retrievals for ice clouds and radar only or lidar only retrievals for liquid clouds. Large, statistically significant differences of up to 1.43 K/day exist between the mean ARM and A-train net cloud radiative forcing profiles. The majority of the difference in cloud radiative forcing profiles is shown to be due to a large difference in the cloud fraction above 12 km. Above this altitude the A-train cloud fraction is significantly larger because more clouds are detected by CALIPSO than by the ground-based MPL. It is shown that the MPL is unable to observe as many high clouds as CALIPSO due to being more frequently attenuated and a poorer sensitivity even in otherwise clear-sky conditions. After accounting for cloud fraction differences and instrument sampling differences due to viewing platform we determined that differences in cloud radiative forcing due to the retrieved ice cloud properties is relatively small. This study demonstrates that A-train observations are better suited for the calculation cloud radiative forcing profiles. In addition, we find that it is necessary to supplement CloudSat with CALIPSO observations to obtain accurate cloud radiative forcing profiles since a large portion of clouds at Darwin are detected by CALIPSO only.

  17. Infrared freezing of Euclidean observables and analyticity in perturbative QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irinel Caprini; Jan Fischer

    2006-12-21

    The renormalization-group improved finite order expansions of the QCD observables have an unphysical singularity in the Euclidean region, due to the Landau pole of the running coupling. Recently it was claimed that, by using a modified Borel representation, the leading one-chain term in a skeleton expansion of the Euclidean QCD observables is finite and continuous across the Landau pole, and then exhibits an infrared freezing behaviour, vanishing at $Q^2=0$. In the present paper we show, using for illustration the Adler-${\\cal D}$ function, that the above Borel prescription violates the causality properties expressed by energy-plane analyticity: the function ${\\cal D}(Q^2)$ thus defined is the boundary value of a piecewise analytic function in the complex plane, instead of being a standard analytic function. So, the price to be paid for the infrared freezing of Euclidean QCD observables is the loss of a fundamental property of local quantum field theory.

  18. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE`s Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts.

  19. Handheld CZT radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

    2004-08-24

    A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

  20. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  1. Validation of the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) (2005-2012): Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, Manajit; Weekley, Andrew; Habte, Aron; Lopez, Anthony; Molling, Christine

    2015-09-15

    Publicly accessible, high-quality, long-term, satellite-based solar resource data is foundational and critical to solar technologies to quantify system output predictions and deploy solar energy technologies in grid-tied systems. Solar radiation models have been in development for more than three decades. For many years, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed and/or updated such models through the National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB). There are two widely used approaches to derive solar resource data from models: (a) an empirical approach that relates ground-based observations to satellite measurements and (b) a physics-based approach that considers the radiation received at the satellite and creates retrievals to estimate clouds and surface radiation. Although empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation, the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that computes global horizontal irradiance (GHI) using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) system. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and then uses those properties in the Satellite Algorithm for Surface Radiation Budget (SASRAB) model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, the University of Wisconsin, and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a high temporal and spatial resolution data set. The product initially generates the cloud properties using the AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres-Extended (PATMOS-x) algorithms [3], whereas the GHI is calculated using SASRAB. Then NREL implements accurate and high-resolution input parameters such as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) to compute direct normal irradiance (DNI) using the DISC model. The AOD and PWV, temperature, and pressure data are also combined with the MMAC model to simulate solar radiation under clear-sky conditions. The current NSRDB update is based on a 4-km x 4-km resolution at a 30-minute time interval, which has a higher temporal and spatial resolution. This paper demonstrates the evaluation of the data set using ground-measured data and detailed evaluation statistics. The result of the comparison shows a good correlation to the NSRDB data set. Further, an outline of the new version of the NSRDB and future plans for enhancement and improvement are provided.

  2. Wide-Field InfrarRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets WFIRST-AFTA 2015 Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spergel, D; Baltay, C; Bennett, D; Breckinridge, J; Donahue, M; Dressler, A; Gaudi, B S; Greene, T; Guyon, O; Hirata, C; Kalirai, J; Kasdin, N J; Macintosh, B; Moos, W; Perlmutter, S; Postman, M; Rauscher, B; Rhodes, J; Wang, Y; Weinberg, D; Benford, D; Hudson, M; Jeong, W -S; Mellier, Y; Traub, W; Yamada, T; Capak, P; Colbert, J; Masters, D; Penny, M; Savransky, D; Sterns, D; Zimmerman, N; Barry, R; Bartusek, L; Carpenter, K; Cheng, E; Content, D; Dekens, F; Demers, R; Grady, K; Jackson, C; Kuan, G; Kruk, J; Melton, M; Nemati, B; Parvin, B; Poberezhskiy, I; Peddie, C; Ruffa, J; Wallace, J K; Whipple, A; Wollack, E; Zhao, F

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the 2014 study by the Science Definition Team (SDT) of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission. It is a space observatory that will addresses the most compelling scientific problems in dark energy, exoplanets and general astrophysics using a 2.4m telescope with a wide-field infrared instrument and an optical coronagraph. The Astro2010 Decadal Survey recommended a Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope as its top priority for a new large space mission. As conceived by the decadal survey, WFIRST would carry out a dark energy science program, a microlensing program to determine the demographics of exoplanets, and a general observing program utilizing its ultra wide field. In October 2012, NASA chartered a Science Definition Team (SDT) to produce, in collaboration with the WFIRST Study Office at GSFC and the Program Office at JPL, a Design Reference Mission (DRM) for an implementation of WFIRST using one of the 2.4-m, Hubble-quality telescope assemblies recently made availabl...

  3. The role of radiative reabsorption on the electron energy distribution functions in H{sub 2}/He plasma expansion through a tapered nozzle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Ammando, Giuliano Capitelli, Mario

    2014-09-15

    A collisional-radiative model for the H{sub 2}/He plasma, coupled to a Boltzmann solver for the free electron kinetics is used to investigate the non-equilibrium conditions created in the expansion of an high-temperature plasma flow through a converging-diverging nozzle, starting from the steady state composition at T{sub 0}=10?000?K and p{sub 0}=1?atm in the reservoir. It is shown that the plasma optical thickness plays a major role on the evolution of macroscopic quantities and internal distributions along the nozzle axis. Structured electron energy distribution functions, characterized by long plateaux and humps, are created due to superelastic collisions of cold electrons and electronically excited atomic hydrogen. The magnitudes of the plateaux are orders of magnitude higher in an optically thick plasma compared with a thin plasma, while the electron-electron collisions play a role in smoothing the peaks created by superelastic collisions between cold electrons and H(n>2)

  4. Final spin and radiated energy in numerical simulations of binary black holes with equal masses and equal, aligned or anti-aligned spins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel A. Hemberger; Geoffrey Lovelace; Thomas J. Loredo; Lawrence E. Kidder; Mark A. Scheel; Béla Szilágyi; Nicholas W. Taylor; Saul A. Teukolsky

    2013-09-23

    The behavior of merging black holes (including the emitted gravitational waves and the properties of the remnant) can currently be computed only by numerical simulations. This paper introduces ten numerical relativity simulations of binary black holes with equal masses and equal spins aligned or anti-aligned with the orbital angular momentum. The initial spin magnitudes have $|\\chi_i| \\lesssim 0.95$ and are more concentrated in the aligned direction because of the greater astrophysical interest of this case. We combine this data with five previously reported simulations of the same configuration, but with different spin magnitudes, including the highest spin simulated to date, $\\chi_i \\approx 0.97$. This data set is sufficiently accurate to enable us to offer improved analytic fitting formulae for the final spin and for the energy radiated by gravitational waves as a function of initial spin. The improved fitting formulae can help to improve our understanding of the properties of binary black hole merger remnants and can be used to enhance future approximate waveforms for gravitational wave searches, such as Effective-One-Body waveforms.

  5. Radiation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel Ruggirello RachelRadiation DrySafety Home

  6. Radiation Safety – Protecting the Public and the Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy has a stringent program for protecting its workers, the public, and the environment from radiation.  This web area has links to tools and aids for the radiation protection...

  7. 22.01 Introduction to Ionizing Radiation, Fall 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coderre, Jeffrey A.

    Introduction to basic properties of ionizing radiations and their uses in medicine, industry, science, and environmental studies. Discusses natural and man-made radiation sources, energy deposition and dose calculations, ...

  8. ORISE: REAC/TS Medical Management of Radiation Incidents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Management of Radiation Incidents As part of its primary mission for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS)...

  9. Lack of Bystander Effects From High LET Radiation For Early Cytogenetic Endpoints.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groesser, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Department of Energy, Low Dose Radiation Research Program,review for modelling low-dose radiation action. Mutat Reslow doses (see (20) for a review) this phenomenon is important for radiation

  10. Impact of the Geo-synchronous Orbit Radiation Environment on the Design of Astronomical Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruk, Jeffrey W; Armani, Nerses; Stauffer, Craig; Hirata, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Geo-Synchronous orbits are appealing for Solar or astrophysical observatories because they permit continuous data downlink at high rates. The radiation environment in these orbits presents unique challenges, however. This paper describes the characteristics of the radiation environment in Geo-Synchronous orbit and the implications for instrument design. Radiation-induced background event rates are given for some simplified shielding models, and for a detailed model of the proposed Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope observatory.

  11. A Survey and Analysis of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Spectra of T Tauri Stars in Taurus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Furlan; L. Hartmann; N. Calvet; P. D'Alessio; R. Franco-Hernandez; W. J. Forrest; D. M. Watson; K. I. Uchida; B. Sargent; J. D. Green; L. D. Keller; T. L. Herter

    2006-08-01

    We present mid-infrared spectra of T Tauri stars in the Taurus star-forming region obtained with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). For the first time, the 5-36 micron spectra of a large sample of T Tauri stars belonging to the same star-forming region is studied, revealing details of the mid-infrared excess due to dust in circumstellar disks. We analyze common features and differences in the mid-IR spectra based on disk structure, dust grain properties, and the presence of companions. Our analysis encompasses spectral energy distributions from the optical to the far-infrared, a morphological sequence based on the IRS spectra, and spectral indices in IRS wave bands representative of continuum emission. By comparing the observed spectra to a grid of accretion disk models, we infer some basic disk properties for our sample of T Tauri stars, and find additional evidence for dust settling.

  12. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose reduction activities, with a focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and aocelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts. An author index and a subject index are provided to facilitate use. Both indices contain the abstract numbers from previous volumes, as well as the current volume. Information that the reader feels might be included in the next volume of this bibliography should be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center.

  13. High Energy Positrons and Gamma Radiation from Decaying Constituents of a two-component Dark Atom Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belotsky, K; Kouvaris, C; Laletin, M

    2015-01-01

    We study a two component dark matter candidate inspired by the Minimal Walking Technicolor model. Dark matter consists of a dominant SIMP-like dark atom component made of bound states between primordial helium nuclei and a doubly charged technilepton, and a small WIMP-like component made of another dark atom bound state between a doubly charged technibaryon and a technilepton. This scenario is consistent with direct search experimental findings because the dominant SIMP component interacts too strongly to reach the depths of current detectors with sufficient energy to recoil and the WIMP-like component is too small to cause significant amount of events. In this context a metastable technibaryon that decays to $e^+e^+$, $\\mu^+ \\mu^+$ and $\\tau^+ \\tau^+$ can in principle explain the observed positron excess by AMS-02 and PAMELA, while being consistent with the photon flux observed by FERMI/LAT. We scan the parameters of the model and we find the best possible fit to the latest experimental data. We find that th...

  14. Two-color infrared detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klem, John F; Kim, Jin K

    2014-05-13

    A two-color detector includes a first absorber layer. The first absorber layer exhibits a first valence band energy characterized by a first valence band energy function. A barrier layer adjoins the first absorber layer at a first interface. The barrier layer exhibits a second valence band energy characterized by a second valence band energy function. The barrier layer also adjoins a second absorber layer at a second interface. The second absorber layer exhibits a third valence band energy characterized by a third valence band energy function. The first and second valence band energy functions are substantially functionally or physically continuous at the first interface and the second and third valence band energy functions are substantially functionally or physically continuous at the second interface.

  15. FY 2005 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Bradley M.; Martinez, James E.; Qiao, Hong; Schultz, John F.

    2005-12-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions. During FY 2005, PNNL’s Infrared Photonics research team made measurable progress exploiting the extraordinary optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to develop miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. We investigated sulfur purification methods that will eventually lead to routine production of optical quality chalcogenide glass. We also discovered a glass degradation phenomenon and our investigation uncovered the underlying surface chemistry mechanism and developed mitigation actions. Key research was performed to understand and control the photomodification properties. This research was then used to demonstrate several essential infrared photonic devices, including LWIR single-mode waveguide devices and waveguide couplers. Optical metrology tools were also developed to characterize optical waveguide structures and LWIR optical components.

  16. Subwavelength films for standoff radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Suter, Jonathan D.

    2015-05-22

    We present optical subwavelength nanostructure architecture suitable for standoff radiation dosimetry with remote optical readout in the visible or infrared spectral regions. To achieve this, films of subwavelength structures are fabricated over several square inches via the creation of a 2D non-close packed (NCP) array template of radiation-sensitive polymeric nanoparticles, followed by magnetron sputtering of a metallic coating to form a 2D array of separated hemispherical nanoscale metallic shells. The nanoshells are highly reflective at resonance in the visible or infrared depending on design. These structures and their behavior are based on the open ring resonator (ORR) architecture and have their analog in resonant inductive-capacitive (LC) circuits, which display a resonance wavelength that is inversely proportional to the square root of the product of the inductance and capacitance. Therefore, any modification of the nanostructure material properties due to radiation alters the inductive or capacitive behavior of the subwavelength features, which in turn changes their optical properties resulting in a shift in the optical resonance. This shift in resonance may be remotely interrogated actively using either laser illumination or passively by hyperspectral or multispectral sensing with broadband illumination. These structures may be designed to be either anisotropic or isotropic, which can also offer polarization-sensitive interrogation. We present experimental measurements of a radiation induced shift in the optical resonance of a subwavelength film after exposure to an absorbed dose of gamma radiation from 2 Mrad up to 62 Mrad demonstrating the effect. Interestingly the resonance shift is non-monotonic for this material system and possible radiation damage mechanisms to the nanoparticles are discussed.

  17. Dissecting the Homunculus nebula around Eta Carinae with spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2002-11-27

    Near-infrared emission lines provide unique diagnostics of the geometry, structure, kinematics, and excitation of eta Carinae's circumstellar ejecta, and give clues to the nature of its wind. The infrared spectrum is a strong function of position in eta Car's nebula, with a mix of intrinsic and reflected emission. Molecular hydrogen traces cool gas and dust in the polar lobes, while [Fe II] blankets their inner surfaces. These lines reveal the back wall of the SE polar lobe for the first time, and give the clearest picture yet of the 3-D geometry. Additionally, collisionally-excited [Fe II] reveals the kinematic structure of a recently discovered `Little Homunculus' expanding inside the larger one. Equatorial gas in the `Fan', on the other hand, shows a spectrum indicating recombination and fluorescent pumping. Some equatorial ejecta glow in the He I 10830 line, showing evidence for material ejected in the 1890 outburst of eta Car. Closer to the star, the compact `Weigelt blobs' are marginally resolved, allowing their infrared spectrum to be separated from the star for the first time. In general, infrared spectra reveal a coherent, directional dependence of excitation in the Homunculus: polar ejecta are collisionally excited, whereas equatorial ejecta are dominated by fluorescence and normal photoexcitation. These are important clues to the geometry of the central star's UV radiation field. Reflected near-infrared emission lines also reveal interesting latitudinal dependence in the stellar wind.

  18. Anisotropic radiation from accretion disc-coronae in active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Ya-Di

    2015-01-01

    In the unification scheme of active galactic nuclei (AGN), Seyfert 1s and Seyfert 2s are intrinsically same, but they are viewed at different angles. However, the Fe K\\alpha emission line luminosity of Seyfert 1s was found in average to be about twice of that of Seyfert 2s at given X-ray continuum luminosity in the previous work (Ricci et al. 2014). We construct an accretion disc-corona model, in which a fraction of energy dissipated in the disc is extracted to heat the corona above the disc. The radiation transfer equation containing Compton scattering processes is an integro-differential equation, which is solved numerically for the corona with a parallel plane geometry. We find that the specific intensity of X-ray radiation from the corona changes little with the viewing angle \\theta when \\theta is small (nearly face-on), and it is sensitive to \\theta if the viewing angle is large (\\theta> 40 degrees). The radiation from the cold disc, mostly in infrared/optical/UV bands, is almost proportional to cos\\thet...

  19. Dose-to-water conversion for the backscatter-shielded EPID: A frame-based method to correct for EPID energy response to MLC transmitted radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwan, Benjamin J. O’Connor, Daryl J.; King, Brian W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a frame-by-frame correction for the energy response of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (a-Si EPIDs) to radiation that has transmitted through the multileaf collimator (MLC) and to integrate this correction into the backscatter shielded EPID (BSS-EPID) dose-to-water conversion model. Methods: Individual EPID frames were acquired using a Varian frame grabber and iTools acquisition software then processed using in-house software developed inMATLAB. For each EPID image frame, the region below the MLC leaves was identified and all pixels in this region were multiplied by a factor of 1.3 to correct for the under-response of the imager to MLC transmitted radiation. The corrected frames were then summed to form a corrected integrated EPID image. This correction was implemented as an initial step in the BSS-EPID dose-to-water conversion model which was then used to compute dose planes in a water phantom for 35 IMRT fields. The calculated dose planes, with and without the proposed MLC transmission correction, were compared to measurements in solid water using a two-dimensional diode array. Results: It was observed that the integration of the MLC transmission correction into the BSS-EPID dose model improved agreement between modeled and measured dose planes. In particular, the MLC correction produced higher pass rates for almost all Head and Neck fields tested, yielding an average pass rate of 99.8% for 2%/2 mm criteria. A two-sample independentt-test and fisher F-test were used to show that the MLC transmission correction resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the mean and the standard deviation of the gamma values, respectively, to give a more accurate and consistent dose-to-water conversion. Conclusions: The frame-by-frame MLC transmission response correction was shown to improve the accuracy and reduce the variability of the BSS-EPID dose-to-water conversion model. The correction may be applied as a preprocessing step in any pretreatment portal dosimetry calculation and has been shown to be beneficial for highly modulated IMRT fields.

  20. Planck's Radiation Law in the Quantized Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer Collier

    2014-09-15

    Physical research looks for clues to quantum properties of the gravitational field. On the basis of the common Schr\\"odinger theory, a simple model of the quantization of a Friedmann universe comprising dust and radiation is investigated. With regard to energy quantization, the result suggests a universal limitation of the energy spacing between neighbouring quantum states by the Planck energy. Applied to black-body radiation, a modified Planck radiation law follows. If this could be verified in the laboratory, it would provide a direct hint at quantum properties of the space-time manifold.