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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: BIOfuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

2

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Impacts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

3

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bessie's Biofuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

4

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

5

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biofuel Acts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

6

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Seward HS in Seward, AK, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

7

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Tertiary Treatment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Nikola Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, WA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

8

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: What is Biogas?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

9

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biomass Reduces Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

10

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: The History of Biomass  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

11

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Biomass  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

12

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: What is Biomass?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

13

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Energy from Biomass  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

14

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Biomass  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

15

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

16

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Iowa Ethanol Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

17

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biofuels Sustainable Transportation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

18

INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America August 14, 2012 - 9:21am Addthis This infographic details key findings from the Energy Departments

19

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biomass: Types/Characteristics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Albany Academies and Academy of the Holy Names in Albany, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The...

20

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biosolids to Biofuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Nikola Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, WA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biofuels vs Fossil Fuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from North Caddo Magnet High School in Vivian, LA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

22

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Effects of Bioenergy on the Environment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

23

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental impacts of Bio energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

24

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: From Fish Food to Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from LISD TECH Center in Adrian, MI, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

25

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: A "Biomassive" Innovation: Fueling Life in Appalachia  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Belfry School in Belfry, KY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

26

FORGE Infographic | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit|Department ofof Energy Offers TrainingFaxFORGE Infographic FORGE

27

INFOGRAPHIC: Understanding the Grid | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Grid November 17, 2014 - 2:05pm Addthis Our GridWeek infographic shows how electricity is generated, transmitted and distributed for use in our homes. | Graphic by

28

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Imagine Renewable Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Clean Technologies and Sustainable Industries Early College High School in Ballston Spa, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME...

29

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Oil Future of the World  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Miami Palmetto Senior High School in Pinecrest, FL, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

30

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bioenergy: Creating Biofuels from Biomass  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from North Caddo Magnet High School in Vivian, LA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

31

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

32

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Powering the World One Poop at a Time  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Genesee Career Institute in Flint, MI, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

33

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Comparison of Bio-fuels to Other Commonly Used Forms of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

34

Picture of the Week: Gamma Ray Bursts: infographic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gamma Ray Bursts: infographic Today with the help of sophisticated tools like the ground based RAPTOR robotic observatory system that can find, and study on its own, transient...

35

Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Student teams were asked to create a clear and engaging infographic that would explain geothermal energy simply to a non-technical audience. Click below to download the winning...

36

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bio-Fuel at Farms  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Clean Technologies and Sustainable Industries Early College High School in Ballston Spa, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME...

37

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: A History of Bio-Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Clean Technologies and Sustainable Industries Early College High School in Ballston Spa, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME...

38

Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Energy Audits | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Energy Saver 101 infographic breaks down a home energy audit, explaining what energy auditors look for and the special tools they use to determine where a home is wasting...

39

BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: One Man's Yardwaste is Another Man's Energy (BioHydrogen)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Nikola Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, WA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

40

Turning Bacteria into Biofuel: Development of an Integrated Microbial Electrocatalytic (MEC) System for Liquid Biofuel Production from CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrofuels Project: LBNL is improving the natural ability of a common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to use hydrogen and carbon dioxide for biofuel production. First, LBNL is genetically modifying the bacteria to produce biofuel at higher concentrations. Then, LBNL is using renewable electricity obtained from solar, wind, or wave power to produce high amounts of hydrogen in the presence of the bacteria—increasing the organism’s access to its energy source and improving the efficiency of the biofuel-creation process. Finally, LBNL is tethering electrocatalysts to the bacteria’s surface which will further accelerate the rate at which the organism creates biofuel. LBNL is also developing a chemical method to transform the biofuel that the bacteria produce into ready-to-use jet fuel.

None

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Infographic Guide  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S.Indiana College ProvidesSteamLightingSaltsns of gr ee n ga

42

biosemiotics turning wild  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biosemiotics turning wild essays in honour of kalevi kull on the occasion of his 60th birthday #12;Biosemiotics Turning Wild. Essays in Honour of Kalevi Kull on the Occasion of His 60th Birthday. Edited by Timo

Markos, Anton

43

Turning fungus into fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation6/14/11 Page 1 of 17TurbinesTurningTurning

44

Diamond turning of glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Infographic Guide - Print Version  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S.Indiana College ProvidesSteamLightingSaltsns of gr ee n

46

Group Response System Turning Point  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. · But more often I do use it within a slide show. Somewhat more difficult to manage. But some great uses-Add-in for Power Point. · Some "Clicking" practice. #12;Make A Slide-Add to this file. · Esc, click on TurningPoint add-in · Pick Insert Slide in Turning Point bar and insert a Turning Point slide after this slide

47

Bioelectricity Aware of bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(translation by Google Translate) Bacteria of the genus Geobacter and electrical nanowires. #12;Bioelectricity Aware of bacteria Bacteria of the genus Geobacter carry out anaerobic respiration the mechanism that makes these bacteria conductors of electricity. Researchers have studied

Lovley, Derek

48

Tune Evaluation From Phased BPM Turn-By-Turn Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In fast ramping synchrotrons like the Fermilab Booster the conventional methods of betatron tune evaluation from the turn-by-turn data may not work due to rapid changes of the tunes (sometimes in a course of a few dozens of turns) and a high level of noise. We propose a technique based on phasing of signals from a large number of BPMs which significantly increases the signal to noise ratio. Implementation of the method in the Fermilab Booster control system is described and some measurement results are presented.

Alexahin, Y; Marsh, W

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector has been developed to facilitate the location of shorted turns in magnet coils. Finding these shorted turns is necessary to determine failure modes that are a necessary step in developing future production techniques. Up to this point, coils with shorted turns had the insulation burned off without the fault having been located. This disassembly process destroyed any chance of being able to find the fault. In order to maintain a flux balance in a coupled system such as a magnet coil, the current in a shorted turn must be opposed to the incident current. If the direction of the current in each conductor can be measured relative to the incident current, then the exact location of the short can be determined. In this device, an AC voltage is applied to the magnet under test. A small hand held B-dot pickup coil monitors the magnetic field produced by current in the individual magnet conductors. The relative phase of this pickup coil voltage is compared to a reference signal derived from the input current to detect a current reversal as the B-dot pickup coil is swept over the conductors of the coil under test. This technique however, is limited to only those conductors that are accessible to the hand held probe.

Dinkel, J.A.; Biggs, J.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Hamilton's theory of turns revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new approach to Hamilton's theory of turns for the groups SO(3) and SU(2) which renders their properties, in particular their composition law, nearly trivial and immediately evident upon inspection. We show that the entire construction can be based on binary rotations rather than mirror reflections.

N. Mukunda; S. Chaturvedi; R. Simon

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Diamond turning machine controller implementation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The standard controller for a Pnuemo ASG 2500 Diamond Turning Machine, an Allen Bradley 8200, has been replaced with a custom high-performance design. This controller consists of four major components. Axis position feedback information is provided by a Zygo Axiom 2/20 laser interferometer with 0.1 micro-inch resolution. Hardware interface logic couples the computers digital and analog I/O channels to the diamond turning machine`s analog motor controllers, the laser interferometer, and other machine status and control information. It also provides front panel switches for operator override of the computer controller and implement the emergency stop sequence. The remaining two components, the control computer hardware and software, are discussed in detail below.

Garrard, K.P.; Taylor, L.W.; Knight, B.F.; Fornaro, R.J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

TurningPoint Evaluation Results  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012 Greenbuy3 Archive DOE-HDBK-1129-2008of EnergyTurn Your

54

Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Infographic Guide | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIan Kalin About UsIndustrial Energy EfficiencyBPDepartment

56

EGS Infographic | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit ServicesMirantPartners, Inc. |MoneyDougDepartment of EnergyRuleEGS

57

Bacteria in shear flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacteria are ubiquitous and play a critical role in many contexts. Their environment is nearly always dynamic due to the prevalence of fluid flow: creeping flow in soil, highly sheared flow in bodily conduits, and turbulent ...

Marcos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Right Turn on Red! | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

benefits for the country, helping us all save money by saving energy. Prior to the 1970's, some states already allowed drivers to turn right on a red light, but many others -...

59

Climate Entrepreneurship ...turning an idea into business  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Entrepreneurship ...turning an idea into business Dr. Anaïs Sägesser, Director Climate-KIC Switzerland Dr. Regina Vogel, Education Lead Climate-KIC Switzerland Akitaka Fujii, Executive Assistant Climate-KIC Switzerland 20 October 2014 #12;Climate-KIC 2 #12;Climate-KIC 3 «... 1968 you went

Fischlin, Andreas

60

Turning ideas into reality Roberto Cipolla  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Magic Mirrors #12;Qualities of an engineer 1. Analytical and technical skills 2. Creative and thinking · Logical thinking #12;Qualities of an engineer 2. Creativity and thinking skills: · Good problemTurning ideas into reality Roberto Cipolla Department of Engineering http

Cipolla, Roberto

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Mechanical Engineering Turning Ideas into Reality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical Engineering Turning Ideas into Reality EnErgy Environ m Ent HEaltH matEria ls transpo rt u r s e s ? Home The Department Overview The Courses Mechanical Engineering (MEng / BEng) Mechanical Engineering With International Study (MEng / BEng) Aero-Mechanical Engineering (MEng / BEng) #12;tHE DEpartm

Mottram, Nigel

62

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Turning Ideas into Reality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Turning Ideas into Reality EnErgy Environ m Ent HEaltH mat Overview The Courses Mechanical Engineering (MEng / BEng) Mechanical Engineering With International Study (MEng / BEng) Aero-Mechanical Engineering (MEng / BEng) E N T r y F A Q S A p p l y i n g C a m p u

Mottram, Nigel

63

Measurement of tool forces in diamond turning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dynamometer has been designed and built to measure forces in diamond turning. The design includes a 3-component, piezoelectric transducer. Initial experiments with this dynamometer system included verification of its predicted dynamic characteristics as well as a detailed study of cutting parameters. Many cutting experiments have been conducted on OFHC Copper and 6061-T6 Aluminum. Tests have involved investigation of velocity effects, and the effects of depth and feedrate on tool forces. Velocity has been determined to have negligible effects between 4 and 21 m/s. Forces generally increase with increasing depth of cut. Increasing feedrate does not necessarily lead to higher forces. Results suggest that a simple model may not be sufficient to describe the forces produced in the diamond turning process.

Drescher, J.; Dow, T.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Sandia National Laboratories: Officials Turn to Sandia National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ClimateECResearch & CapabilitiesCapabilitiesOfficials Turn to Sandia National Labs for Help on Huge Sinkhole Officials Turn to Sandia National Labs for Help on Huge Sinkhole...

65

Nicole Lambiase: Aspiring Astronaut Turned Next-generation Car...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nicole Lambiase: Aspiring Astronaut Turned Next-generation Car Designer Nicole Lambiase: Aspiring Astronaut Turned Next-generation Car Designer January 7, 2010 - 4:05pm Addthis...

66

ARM - VAP Product - 10rlprofdep1turn  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmr Documentation & Plots Technicalrlprofdep1turn Documentation

67

ARM - VAP Product - 10rlprofmr1turn  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmr Documentation & Plots Technicalrlprofdep1turn

68

Ecosystem Component Characterization "Things don't turn up in this world until somebody turns them up."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 6 Ecosystem Component Characterization "Things don't turn up in this world until somebody turns them up." James A. Garfield CONTENTS Overview

Pitt, Robert E.

69

An apparatus for measuring turn-by-turn transverse beam profile in electron storage rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new apparatus is designed to measure the beam profile turn-by-turn using synchrotron light. The apparatus consists of optical fibers, photo multiplier tubes and digitizers. It is cost efficient and easy to operate. Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the apparatus has an acceptable resolution. The concept has been tested preliminarily at the SLC damping ring, and a full equipment is being set up at CESR to observe coherent beam-beam phenomenon.

Chen, T.; Siemann, R.H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA (United States); Hartill, D.; Smith, S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Beyond Bacteria | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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71

ARM - VAP Product - aerosolbe1turn  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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72

Powerpedia Turns Two | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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73

Hamilton's Turns for the Lorentz Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hamilton in the course of his studies on quaternions came up with an elegant geometric picture for the group SU(2). In this picture the group elements are represented by ``turns'', which are equivalence classes of directed great circle arcs on the unit sphere $S^2$, in such a manner that the rule for composition of group elements takes the form of the familiar parallelogram law for the Euclidean translation group. It is only recently that this construction has been generalized to the simplest noncompact group $SU(1,1) = Sp(2, R) = SL(2,R)$, the double cover of SO(2,1). The present work develops a theory of turns for $SL(2,C)$, the double and universal cover of SO(3,1) and $SO(3,C)$, rendering a geometric representation in the spirit of Hamilton available for all low dimensional semisimple Lie groups of interest in physics. The geometric construction is illustrated through application to polar decomposition, and to the composition of Lorentz boosts and the resulting Wigner or Thomas rotation.

R. Simon; S. Chaturvedi; V. Srinivasan; N. Mukunda

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

74

Evaluation of machining dispersions for turning process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article we propose to extend the model of simulation of dispersions in turning based on the geometrical specifications. Our study is articulated around two trends of development: the first trend relates to the geometrical model. The geometrical model suggested must allow a follow-up of the geometry of the part during the simulation of machining. It is thus a question of carrying out a systematic treatment of the whole dimensioning and tolerancing process while being based on the principles of the \\DeltaL method. We also planned to integrate this type of specification in the model of simulation of machining suggested. It is more generally a question of extending the traditional model for better taking into account the multi axis specification of coaxiality and perpendicularity on the turned workpieces. The second trend of our study relates to the widening of the field of application of the model. We propose to extend the field of application of the model by taking into account the modifications of several parameters of the manufacturing process plans, likely to involve variations of dispersions.

Arnaud Lefebvre; Valery Wolff

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

75

Hard turning micro-machine tool  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A micro-scale apparatus for supporting a tool for hard turning comprises a base, a pivot coupled to the base, an actuator coupled to the base, and at least one member coupled to the actuator at one end and rotatably coupled to the pivot at another end. A tool mount is disposed on the at least one member. The at least one member defines a first lever arm between the pivot and the tool mount, and a second lever arm between the pivot and the actuator. The first lever arm has a length that is less than a length of the second lever arm. The actuator moves the tool mount along an arc.

DeVor, Richard E; Adair, Kurt; Kapoor, Shiv G

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

76

Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

77

Electrodeposited coatings for diamond turning applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrodeposited coatings are attractive for precision machining operations because thick coatings can be economically applied, with good adhesion, to a variety of substrates. Approximately 20 pure metals and a large number of alloys can be deposited from aqueous solutions. Fused salt and organic solvent electrolytes can be used to lengthen the list of metals that can be electrodeposited. However, both the choice of the metallic coating and the control of the plating process are critical for success in precision finishing of electrodeposited coatings. Some preliminary results at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory suggest that electrodeposited nickel-phosphorus alloys are excellent coatings for single point diamond turning from the standpoint of material properties and low tool wear. Electrodeposited aluminum and aluminum alloy coatings also merit consideration for precision finishing where weight is an important factor. 10 refs., 6 figs.

Mayer, A.; Bramlett, R.D.; Day, R.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Evans, C.J.; Polvani, R.S. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing the Clean Energy Game Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing the Clean Energy Game February...

80

WHEN THE BLUE-GREEN WATERS TURN RED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHEN THE BLUE-GREEN WATERS TURN RED Historical Flooding in Havasu Creek, Arizona U.S. GEOLOGICAL OF RECLAMATION #12;WHEN THE BLUE-GREEN WATERS TURN RED Historical Flooding in Havasu Creek, Arizona By THEODORE S

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Paper Number -1-Simulation model of dispersions in turning process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paper Number -1- Simulation model of dispersions in turning process Wolff Valery 1, Lefebvre Arnaud. In this paper, an extent of the simulation model of dispersions in turning process first exposed in [W1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

82

Application of the lie-transform perturbation theory for the turn-by-turn data analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Harmonic analysis of turn-by-turn BPM data is a rich source of information on linear and nonlinear optics in circular machines. In the present report the normal form approach first introduced by R. Bartolini and F. Schmidt is extended on the basis of the Lie-transform perturbation theory to provide direct relation between the sources of perturbation and observable spectra of betatron oscillations. The goal is to localize strong perturbing elements, find the resonance driving terms--both absolute value and phase--that are necessary for calculation of the required adjustments in correction magnet circuits: e.g. skew-quadrupoles for linear coupling correction. The theory is nonlinear and permits to analyze higher order effects, such as coupling contribution to beta-beating and nonlinear sum resonances.

Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

INFOGRAPHIC: Wide Bandgap Semiconductors | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4InFinding Investigationof

84

INFOGRAPHIC: Offshore Wind Outlook | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi NationalBusiness Plan Competition |According to a new report

85

INFOGRAPHIC: Understanding the Grid | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable ProjectsHistoryia/802871 IAINFOGRAPHIC: Understanding

86

geothermal infographic 7.14.2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of EnergyofDepartmentDEPARTMENT OF ENERGYBPA NUMBER2-14

87

Property:InfographicType | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProceduresFY JumpThis isWebsite"InActDtTechMin Jump

88

ArgonneNext Infographic | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2Argonne National

89

Geobiology of marine magnetotactic bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) biomineralize intracellular membrane-bound crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4), and are abundant in the suboxic to anoxic zones of stratified marine environments worldwide. Their ...

Simmons, Sheri Lynn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

USATODAY.com -Bacteria-powered battery runs on a sweet tooth Page 1 Close|EMAIL THIS|SAVE THIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

|SAVE THIS Bacteria-powered battery runs on a sweet tooth By Elizabeth Weise USA TODAY Scientists at the University in carbohydrates and turn them into electricity. Previous research has shown it is possible to use microbes to turn organic matter into electricity, but the process required the use of added materials to shuttle

Lovley, Derek

91

Local prediction of turning points of oscillating time series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For oscillating time series, the prediction is often focused on the turning points. In order to predict the turning point magnitudes and times it is proposed to form the state space reconstruction only from the turning points and modify the local (nearest neighbor) model accordingly. The model on turning points gives optimal prediction at a lower dimensional state space than the optimal local model applied directly on the oscillating time series and is thus computationally more efficient. Monte Carlo simulations on different oscillating nonlinear systems showed that it gives better predictions of turning points and this is confirmed also for the time series of annual sunspots and total stress in a plastic deformation experiment.

D. Kugiumtzis

2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

92

Electroless nickel: an important coating for diamond turning applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diamond turning is the use of a single-point diamond tool on a precision lathe under very precisely controlled machine and environmental conditions to fabricate finished components. With a machine presently available at LLNL a part accuracy between 0.05 and 1.0 ..mu..m (2 and 40 millionths of an inch) is obtainable. Coatings offer significant advantages for diamond turning applications inasmuch as they can be applied to lightweight substrates such as aluminum or beryllium. One of the most used coatings for diamond turning applications is electroless nickel. Purpose of this paper is to document case histories of such applications and suggest areas for future work.

Dini, J.W.

1980-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

93

Diamond turning of Si and Ge single crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single-point diamond turning studies have been completed on Si and Ge crystals. A new process model was developed for diamond turning which is based on a critical depth of cut for plastic flow-to-brittle fracture transitions. This concept, when combined with the actual machining geometry for single-point turning, predicts that {open_quotes}ductile{close_quotes} machining is a combined action of plasticity and fracture. Interrupted cutting experiments also provide a meant to directly measure the critical depth parameter for given machining conditions.

Blake, P.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

96

When to Turn Off Your Lights | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of when to turn off lights depends on the type of lights and the price of electricity. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.comkyoshino. The cost effectiveness of when...

97

Solving the corner-turning problem for large interferometers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The so-called corner-turning problem is a major bottleneck for radio telescopes with large numbers of antennas. The problem is essentially that of rapidly transposing a matrix that is too large to store on one single device; ...

Lutomirski, Andrew

98

Modeling the Capacity of Left-Turn and Through Movement Considering Left-Turn Blockage and Spillback at Signalized Intersection with Short Left-Turn Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the vehicles in the queue in the current cycle. ?????? 10ij )c y c l ei n a r r i v a l s(P r o bp im CkPim 2nd situation: Left-turning queue carryover will take place in the next cycle. C ijmPijm ??????? )c y c l ei n a r r i v a l s(Pr o bp ij...

Cho, Kyoung Min

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

99

Liquid Fuel From Bacteria: Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from CO2, Hydrogen, and Oxygen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrofuels Project: MIT is using solar-derived hydrogen and common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) directly into biofuel. This bacteria already has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. MIT is engineering the bacteria to use hydrogen to convert CO2 directly into liquid transportation fuels. Hydrogen is a flammable gas, so the MIT team is building an innovative reactor system that will safely house the bacteria and gas mixture during the fuel-creation process. The system will pump in precise mixtures of hydrogen, oxygen, and CO2, and the online fuel-recovery system will continuously capture and remove the biofuel product.

None

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Turn-of-the-nut tightening of anchor bolts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

progressive tightening tests were performed in order to monitor the stress ranges occurring in the bolt at various locations of interest at various degrees of turn-of-the-nut tightness. Tests were performed on six diameters of anchor bolt ranging from 1 to 2...

Richards, Jason Halbert

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Brief Communication 809 Photoactivation turns green fluorescent protein red  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brief Communication 809 Photoactivation turns green fluorescent protein red Michael B. Elowitz gene was first cloned, the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) has become a powerful tool- wavelength (red) fluorescence has remained elusive. Here we describe a red-emitting, green

Elowitz, Michael

103

Microbes turn mud into electricity By Paula Hartman Cohen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds, such as toluene, to electricity. Lovley says this suggests that some Geobacters can be usedMicrobes turn mud into electricity By Paula Hartman Cohen News Office staff microorganisms can transform organic matter commonly found at the bottom of the ocean into electrical energy

Lovley, Derek

104

Being Interactive oogle's popularity has turned link analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Being Interactive Deep Web Structure G oogle's popularity has turned link analysis into a major the user has specialized information needs. DeepWeb Our current understanding of Web structure is based the so-called surface Web, which consists, loosely speaking, of interlinked HTML pages. The deep Web

105

Managing Bacteria Pollution in Texas Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 2 BACTERIA MANAGING tx H2O | pg. 3 IN TEXAS WATERS POLLUTION Managing Bacteria Pollution in Texas Waters tx H2O | pg. 4 W ith 310 water bodies in Texas failing to meetwater quality standards because... of bacteria,managing bacteria pollution is commanding the attention of water agencies, researchers and stake- holders across Texas. These water bodies are listed in the 2006 Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for failing to meet the standards...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Aggregation Patterns in Stressed Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the formation of spot patterns seen in bacterial colonies when the bacteria are subjected to oxidative stress due to hazardous by-products of respiration. The cell density is coupled to a chemoattractant concentration as well as to nutrient and waste fields. The model combines the propagation of a front of motile bacterial radially outward from an initial site, a Turing instability of the uniformly dense state, and a reduction of motility for cells sufficiently far behind the front. The wide variety of patterns seen in the experiments is reproduced by the model by varying the details of the initiation of the chemoattractant emission as well as the transition to a nonmotile phase.

Tsimring, L.; Levine, H. [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0402 (United States)] [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0402 (United States); Aranson, I. [Deptartment of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan (Israel)] [Deptartment of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan (Israel); Ben-Jacob, E.; Cohen, I.; Shochet, O. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond & Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond & Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Reynolds, W.N. [Complex Systems Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico (United States)] [Complex Systems Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico (United States)

1995-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

107

Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA AND SURFACTANT ACTIVITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fate of benzene ethylbenzene toluene xylenes (BTEX) compounds through biodegradation was investigated using two different bacteria, Ralstonia picketti (BP-20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B). These bacteria were isolated from extremely polluted petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. PCR and Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) were used to identify the isolates. Biodegradation was measured using each organism individually and in combination. Both bacteria were shown to degrade each of the BTEX compounds. Alcaligenes piechaudii biodegraded BTEXs more efficiently while mixed with BP-20 and individually. Biosurfactant production was observed by culture techniques. In addition 3-hydroxy fatty acids, important in biosurfactant production, was observed by FAME analysis. In the all experiments toluene and m+p- xylenes were better growth substrates for both bacteria than the other BTEX compounds. In addition, the test results indicate that the bacteria could contribute to bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) pollution increase biodegradation through the action by biosurfactants.

Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; jacek Wypych, j

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

Hazen, T.C.

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

110

Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program...

111

Analysis of the influence of tool dynamics in diamond turning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress in defining the role of machine and interface dynamics on the surface finish in diamond turning. It contains a review of literature from conventional and diamond machining processes relating tool dynamics, material interactions and tool wear to surface finish. Data from experimental measurements of tool/work piece interface dynamics are presented as well as machine dynamics for the DTM at the Center.

Fawcett, S.C.; Luttrell, D.E.; Keltie, R.F.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Use of diamond-turned mirrors for synchrotron radiation (SR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diamond turning technique has great interest for users of synchrotron radiation because of its ability to produce surfaces of arbitrary shape. It also has the advantage of being well adapted to producing metal optics. These are of interest because they lend themselves to water cooling and hence represent one approach to the problem of high synchrotron radiation power loadings on optical surfaces. The optical figure produced by diamond turning is generally adequate for synchrotron radiation applications. The main difficulty centers around the question of smoothness. Diamond turned surfaces must receive a final polish after machining before they are sufficiently smooth for use with ultra-violet or x-ray radiation. The manufacturing stages can be carried out by various groups in the optics industry and the National Synchrotron Light Source has procured a considerable number of mirrors and is having them polished for use on the vuv storage ring. At the time of writing one mirror has been completed and evaluated and we give the results for this and discuss the indications for the future. The important measurement of the r.m.s. height of the surface roughness has given a value of 3 +- 0.9A using total integrated scatter of visible light at normal incidence.

Howells, M.R.; Takacs, P.Z.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Turn Your Halloween Pumpkins Into Power | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation6/14/11 Page 1 of 17TurbinesTurning

114

ARM - VAP Product - aerich2nf1turn  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by MicrotopsProductsmwravg5mwravg Documentation Data Management FacilityProductsaerinfaerich2nf1turn

115

TurningPoint Evaluation Results | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternationalTechnologyDepartmentStorageDepartment ofJanuary 08,Turning on

116

Turn Motors Off When Not in Use | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of EnergyTheDepartment of Energy andJanuaryTurn Motors Off

117

As summer turns to fall, a new school year begins  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2Argonne National4ArtificialAs summer turns

118

Reverse and flick: Hybrid locomotion in bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many bacteria are motile. They use one or more helical flagella as propellers, rotating them like the corkscrew on a wine bottle opener. Despite the limited morphological repertoire of the propulsive system, radically ...

Stocker, Roman

119

Probiotic Bacteria Induce a ‘Glow of Health’  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiant skin and hair are universally recognized as indications of good health. However, this ‘glow of health’ display remains poorly understood. We found that feeding of probiotic bacteria to aged mice induced integumentary ...

Levkovich, Tatiana

120

Fuel from Bacteria: Bioconversion of Carbon Dioxide to Biofuels by Facultatively Autotrophic Hydrogen Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrofuels Project: Ohio State is genetically modifying bacteria to efficiently convert carbon dioxide directly into butanol, an alcohol that can be used directly as a fuel blend or converted to a hydrocarbon, which closely resembles a gasoline. Bacteria are typically capable of producing a certain amount of butanol before it becomes too toxic for the bacteria to survive. Ohio State is engineering a new strain of the bacteria that could produce up to 50% more butanol before it becomes too toxic for the bacteria to survive. Finding a way to produce more butanol more efficiently would significantly cut down on biofuel production costs and help make butanol cost competitive with gasoline. Ohio State is also engineering large tanks, or bioreactors, to grow the biofuel-producing bacteria in, and they are developing ways to efficiently recover biofuel from the tanks.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Self-excited vibrations in turning: cutting moment analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work aims at analysing the moment effects at the tool tip point and at the central axis, in the framework of a turning process. A testing device in turning, including a six-component dynamometer, is used to measure the complete torsor of the cutting actions in the case of self-excited vibrations. Many results are obtained regarding the mechanical actions torsor. A confrontation of the moment components at the tool tip and at the central axis is carried out. It clearly appears that analysing moments at the central axis avoids the disturbances induced by the transport of the moment of the mechanical actions resultant at the tool tip point. For instance, the order relation between the components of the forces is single. Furthermore, the order relation between the moments components expressed at the tool tip point is also single and the same one. But at the central axis, two different order relations regarding moments are conceivable. A modification in the rolling moment localization in the (y, z) tool plan is associated to these two order relations. Thus, the moments components at the central axis are particularly sensitive at the disturbances of machining, here the self-excited vibrations.

Olivier Cahuc; Jean-Yves K'Nevez; Alain Gérard; Philippe Darnis; Gaëtan Albert; Claudiu F. Bisu; Céline Gérard

2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

122

Agencies Approve Bacteria TMDL Task Force Recommendations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their agencies to update their TMDL guidance documents to reflect these recommendations. They also authorized establishing a multi-agency bacteria TMDL work group to examine the research and development needs identified in the task force report. Both TCEQ... activities needed to strengthen the scientific tools available for TMDL and I-Plan development. The report and related documents are available at twri.tamu.edu/bacteriatmdl/. Tier 1 Analysis (T1) (one-year) Required for all bacteria TMDLs. ? Form TMDL...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants comprising the steps of placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container, placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours, retrieving the container, collecting the contents of the container, and microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to inoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Guidelines for left-turn bays at unsignalized access locations on arterial roadways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has long been recognized that effective access management along arterial streets can alleviate traffic congestion. A major goal within access management is to limit the speed differential between turning and through vehicles. Left-turn bays...

Hawley, Patrick Emmett

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Heating | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

lays out everything you need to know about home heating -- from how heating systems work and the different types on the market to what to look for when replacing your...

126

Energy Saver 101: Home Cooling Infographic | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTanklessDOJ TitleDr.Double |Department ofPumpkinSaverCooling

127

Energy Saver 101: Water Heating Infographic | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTanklessDOJ TitleDr.Double |Department

128

Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Cooling | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember 2011District | DepartmentEnergy Reports

129

Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Energy Audits | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember 2011District | DepartmentEnergy ReportsEnergy Audits

130

Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Heating | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember 2011District | DepartmentEnergy ReportsEnergy

131

Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Landscaping | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember 2011District | DepartmentEnergy

132

INFOGRAPHIC | Made in America: Clean Energy Jobs | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecemberGlossaryEnergy andActionCoal to Liquids

133

INFOGRAPHIC: Everything You Need to Know About Supercomputers | Department  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecemberGlossaryEnergy andActionCoal to Liquidsof Energy

134

INFOGRAPHIC: The Road to Fuel Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi NationalBusiness Plan Competition |According to a new reporttakes

135

Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi NationalBusiness PlanPosting Thomas F. Edgar,

136

INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable ProjectsHistoryia/802871 IAINFOGRAPHIC:

137

BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Map | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsBSCmemo.pdf BSCmemo.pdf BSCmemo.pdfBetter BuildingsBetterBiodiesel Fuel

138

BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsBSCmemo.pdf BSCmemo.pdf BSCmemo.pdfBetter BuildingsBetterBiodiesel FuelEducation

139

America's Clean, Efficient Fleets: An Infographic | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 Documentation and ApprovalAmandaClean, Efficient

140

Picture of the Week: Gamma-ray bursts, infographic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006Photovoltaic Theory and Modeling LosPhysicsEtched Emitters.Picture

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cities Leading Through Energy Analysis and Planning Infographic |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FORSuperior Energy5-1 ChapterWASHINGTON,AP.O. Box

142

The Facts on Gas Prices: Infographic | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on EnergyEnergy SecretarySeries |Energy John7

143

INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andof EnergyHydrogen-PoweredIDIQ DOEThe Road to

144

Infographic: Where in Space is the Energy Department? | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIan Kalin About UsIndustrial Energy

145

America's Clean Efficient Fleets: An Infographic | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3--Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation |

146

Spring 2015 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Rubric | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the GridwiseSite ManagementSolid-StateDakota10-044January 13, 2015October

147

Solar Decathlon 2013 Infographic: The Path to a Brighter Future |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of Energy U.S. DepartmentCommitmentGovernmentSmart

148

U.S. Virgin Islands Infographic | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept. of Energy, Office ofNuclear WeaponstoU.S.

149

Picture of the Week: Gamma-ray bursts, infographic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home Design Passive SolarCenter |Photoinduced2Zoeand Physics4 Gamma-ray

150

Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study ...

Hospodsky, Denina

151

Hypermutation and adaptation of experimentally evolved marine Vibrio bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental bacteria display tremendous genetic diversity, but we are still learning how this diversity arises and relates to their wide range of habitats. Investigating how bacteria adapt helps us understand their ...

Clarke, Sean Aidan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Raman activity in synchronously dividing bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a spectrometer equipped with an optical-multichannel analyzer as the detector (OMA), we have observed the Stokes laser-Raman spectra of metabolically active Escherichia coli and Bacillus megaterium from 100 - 2100 cm/sup -1/. After lengthy investigation, no Raman lines attributable to the metabolic process nor the cells themselves were found. Previous Raman spectra of active bacteria cannot be used to support nonlinear theories in biology. 34 refs., 9 figs.

Layne, S.P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Bacteria-Mineral Interactions on the Surfaces of Metal-Resistant Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The extraordinary ability of indigenous microorganisms, like metal-resistant bacteria, for biotransformation of toxic compounds is of considerable interest for the emerging area of environmental bioremediation. However, the underlying mechanisms by which metal-resistant bacteria transform toxic compounds are currently unknown and await elucidation. The project's objective was to study stress-induced responses of metal-resistant bacteria to environmental changes and chemical stimulants. This project involved a multi-institutional collaboration of our LLNL group with the group of Dr. H.-Y. Holman (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). In this project, we have utilized metal-resistant bacteria Arthrobacter oxydans as a model bacterial system. We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize for the first time at the nanometer scale formation of stress-induced structures on bacterial surfaces in response to Cr (VI) exposure. We have demonstrated that structure, assembly, and composition of these stress-induced structures are dependent on Cr (VI) concentrations. Our AFM observations of the appearance and development of stress-induced layers on the surfaces of Arthrobacter oxydans bacteria exposed to Cr (VI) were confirmed by Dr. Holman's biochemical, electron microscopy, and synchrotron infrared spectromicroscopy studies. In general, in vitro imaging of live microbial and cellular systems represents one of the most challenging issues in application of AFM. Various approaches for immobilization of bacteria on the substrate for in vitro imaging were tested in this project. Imaging of live bacteria was achieved, however further optimization of experimental methods are needed for high-resolution visualization of the cellular environmental structural dynamics by AFM. This project enhanced the current insight into molecular architecture, structural and environmental variability of bacterial systems. The project partially funded research for two book chapters (1,2), and we anticipate one more publication (3). The publications describe development of methods and results of studies of structural dynamics of metal-resistant bacteria that contribute to more comprehensive understanding of the architecture, function, and environmental dynamics of bacterial and cellular systems. The results of this LDRD were presented in invited talks and contributed presentations at five national and international conferences and five seminar presentations at the external institutions. These included invited talks at the conferences of Gordon Research, Materials Research and American Chemical Societies. Our scientific results and methodologies developed in this project enabled us to receive new funding for the multiyear project 'Chromium transformation pathways in metal-reducing bacteria' funded by the University of California Lab Fees Program ($500,000, 5/1/09 - 4/30/2012), with our proposal being ranked 1st from a total of 138 in the Earth, Energy, Environmental & Space Sciences panel.

Malkin, A J

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

Efficiency of static core turn-off in a system-on-a-chip with variation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A processor-implemented method for improving efficiency of a static core turn-off in a multi-core processor with variation, the method comprising: conducting via a simulation a turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's design stage, wherein the turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's design stage includes a first output corresponding to a first multi-core processor core to turn off; conducting a turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's testing stage, wherein the turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's testing stage includes a second output corresponding to a second multi-core processor core to turn off; comparing the first output and the second output to determine if the first output is referring to the same core to turn off as the second output; outputting a third output corresponding to the first multi-core processor core if the first output and the second output are both referring to the same core to turn off.

Cher, Chen-Yong; Coteus, Paul W; Gara, Alan; Kursun, Eren; Paulsen, David P; Schuelke, Brian A; Sheets, II, John E; Tian, Shurong

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Haptic Models of an Automotive Turn-Signal Switch: Identification and Playback Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Haptic Models of an Automotive Turn-Signal Switch: Identification and Playback Results Mark B of virtual environments. This paper addresses the problem of modeling the feel of an automotive turn- signal would require accurate models of the primary automotive controls, including the steering wheel, gear

Hollerbach, John M.

156

Study on the relationship between left-turn traffic operations and safety at signalized intersections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................ 6? FIGURE 3 Regression Lines and Averaged Data for Model B2 ..................................... 21? FIGURE 4 Regression Lines for Model B4 ..................................................................... 21? FIGURE 5 Left-turn Accident... Distribution ..................................................................... 30? FIGURE 6 Box Plot of the Number of Accidents for Left-Turn Type ............................ 35? FIGURE 7 Box Plot of Number of Crashes for Each Phasing Sequence...

Lee, Sunghoon

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

157

Gender and Maternal Responsivity as Factors in Number of Conversational Turns in Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Gender and Maternal Responsivity as Factors in Number of Conversational Turns in Adolescents, Parlors, 3:00-4:00 PM This study examines factors that influence interactions between adolescents would take more conversational turns than boys, and that higher maternal responsivity would

158

"MINE YOUR OWN BUSINESS": USING PROCESS MINING TO TURN BIG DATA INTO REAL VALUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"MINE YOUR OWN BUSINESS": USING PROCESS MINING TO TURN BIG DATA INTO REAL VALUE Van der Aalst, Wil is to turn event data into valuable insights. Only process mining techniques directly relate event data-oriented analysis techniques (e.g., data mining and machines learning) typically focus on simple classification

van der Aalst, Wil

159

Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

Wise, Arlene A. (Philadelphia, PA); Kuske, Cheryl R. (Los Alamos, NM); Terwilliger, Thomas C. (Santa Fe, NM)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

160

acid bacteria reveals: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diversity and characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in groundwater at a uranium mill tailings site CiteSeer Summary: plays a role in both natural attenuation and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

acid bacteria inducing: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: The Fate of Amino Acid in Soil Experiments: Bacteria, Roots and Fungi Melissa Campbell Clark of amino acid in soil using radioactive isotopes, however many experiments...

162

acid bacteria enhance: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de 4 The Fate of Amino Acid in Soil Experiments: Bacteria, Roots and Fungi Melissa Campbell Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: The Fate of Amino Acid in...

163

Leachability of salmonella and fecal pollution indicator bacteria through soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 6. Percentage of bacteria adsorbed onto soil particles greater than 1 um in diameter 25 7. lhe proportion of bacteria at a given depth that leached thro gh an Arenosa loamy sand 31 8. The proportion of bacteria at a given depth that leached... of the physical regime permitting bacterial movement in soils. They were: bacteria depend on a continuous water pathway where the water filled pores have a greater pore neck diameter than 2 to 3 um, and the lense of water in very large pores must...

Fehrmann, Robert Clinton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

anaerobic phototrophic bacteria: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bacteria convert organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide (a mixture called biogas) in the absence of air. It is a widely used biological process for treating wastewater...

165

An operational analysis of protected-permitted lead-lag left-turn phasing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Daniel B. Fambro This thesis documents an operational analysis of a special type of protected- permitted lead-lag left-turn phasing sequence developed and used by traffic engineers in Dallas, Texas. This phasing, known... as the Dallas phasing, does not follow existing standards for left-turn phasing set forth in the Manual for Uniform Trajfic Control Devices (MUTCD). The objective of this research was to determine whether existing left-turn models can be used to analyze...

Gaston, Gilmer D

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

166

Energy conversion in Purple Bacteria Photosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of how photosynthetic organisms convert light offers insight not only into nature's evolutionary process, but may also give clues as to how best to design and manipulate artificial photosynthetic systems -- and also how far we can drive natural photosynthetic systems beyond normal operating conditions, so that they can harvest energy for us under otherwise extreme conditions. In addition to its interest from a basic scientific perspective, therefore, the goal to develop a deep quantitative understanding of photosynthesis offers the potential payoff of enhancing our current arsenal of alternative energy sources for the future. In the following Chapter, we consider the trade-off between dynamics, structure and function of light harvesting membranes in Rps. Photometricum purple bacteria, as a model to highlight the priorities that arise when photosynthetic organisms adapt to deal with the ever-changing natural environment conditions.

Felipe Caycedo-Soler; Ferney J. Rodriguez; Luis Quiroga; Guannan Zhao; Neil F. Johnson

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy conversion in Purple Bacteria Photosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of how photosynthetic organisms convert light offers insight not only into nature's evolutionary process, but may also give clues as to how best to design and manipulate artificial photosynthetic systems -- and also how far we can drive natural photosynthetic systems beyond normal operating conditions, so that they can harvest energy for us under otherwise extreme conditions. In addition to its interest from a basic scientific perspective, therefore, the goal to develop a deep quantitative understanding of photosynthesis offers the potential payoff of enhancing our current arsenal of alternative energy sources for the future. In the following Chapter, we consider the trade-off between dynamics, structure and function of light harvesting membranes in Rps. Photometricum purple bacteria, as a model to highlight the priorities that arise when photosynthetic organisms adapt to deal with the ever-changing natural environment conditions.

Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Quiroga, Luis; Zhao, Guannan; Johnson, Neil F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Metal-based turn-on fluorescent probes for nitric oxide sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Metal-Based Turn-On Fluorescent Probes for Sensing Nitric Oxide. Nitric oxide, a reactive free radical, regulates a variety of biological processes. The absence of tools to detect NO directly, rapidly, specifically ...

Lim, Mi Hee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

E-Print Network 3.0 - act turns fifty Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Debo's classic work tells the tragic story of the Summary: , Cherokee, Creek, and Seminole na- tions at the turn of the last century in what is now the...

170

Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

NONE

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

171

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeruginosa biofilm bacteria Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of bacteria that are held... and secretion of EPSs, but although some bacteria switch on EPS production at high cell densities in biofilms... , other bacteria switch it off. Nadell...

172

The Stabilisation Potential of Individual and Mixed Assemblages of Natural Bacteria and Microalgae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Stabilisation Potential of Individual and Mixed Assemblages of Natural Bacteria and Microalgae components (heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic microalgae) in terms of their individual contribution benthic assemblages (prokaryotic, eukaryotic and mixed cultures) of bacteria and microalgae. Mag

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

173

The effect of weaving maneuvers on operation of a free right-turn lane at ramp terminals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-turn vehicles on a departure leg. If the ramp terminal is closely followed by the next downstream intersection, weaving maneuvers will occur since some vehicles make a right turn at the ramp terminal and make a left turn at the downstream intersection...

Park, Minchul

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

174

Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load Task Force Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for TMDL and Watershed Studies at Virginia Tech (http://www.tmdl.bse.vt.edu/outreach/C85/). Bacteria Indicator Tool (BIT) Another MB tool is the BIT provided by EPA (http://www.epa.gov/waterscience/ftp/basins/system/BASINS3/bit.htm). The BIT is a... spreadsheet that can be used to estimate the monthly accumulation rate of fecal coliform bacteria on four land uses (cropland, forested, built-up and pastureland). The tool also estimates the direct input of fecal coliform bacteria to streams from grazing...

Jones, C. Allan; Wagner, Kevin; Di Giovanni, George; Hauck, Larry; Mott, Joanna; Rifai, Hanadi; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Ward, George; Wythe, Kathy

175

Beating bacteria: Scientists work to understand and track bacteria in water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Tier 2. Tier 2 is a one- to two-year effort with the follow- ing steps: 1) Collect targeted monitoring data to fill gaps in previously collected data 2) Conduct qualitative library-independent BST and limited library-dependent BST analysis... to determine whether humans and/or a few major classes of animals are sources 3) Develop simple spatially explicit or mass balance models of bacteria in the watershed 4) Analyze data After analysis of Tier 1 and Tier 2 data, the group may chose...

Wythe, Kathy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic sporeforming bacteria Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have spore-forming bacteria that killed... the bacteria found in the soil on bacterial agar and feeding this diverse ... Source: USDA, Forestry Service, Northern Research Station...

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid-tolerant thermophilic bacteria Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Homoacetogenic bacteria - often called acetogenic' bacteria... .1.4 Selection of methanol as electron donor 6 1.1.5 Selection ... Source: Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit -...

178

Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- 2:12pm Addthis Strains of E. coli bacteria were engineered to digest switchgrass biomass and synthesize its sugars into gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. | Image courtesy of...

179

Micro-scale interactions between chemotactic bacteria and algae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditional views of marine environments describe the ocean pelagic zone as a homogeneous nutrient-poor environment. Heterotrophic marine bacteria that have evolved high-energy mechanisms for swimming abilities and sensing ...

Vahora, Nisha

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Biodegradation of bisphenol a and ibuprofen by ammonia oxidizing bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

might be responsible for the removal of these compounds. Several bacterial strains, isolated from waste water, are known to degrade BPA and ibuprofen. No studies, however, have reported using ammonia oxidizing bacteria for this purpose. Ammonia oxidizing...

Subramanya, Nethra T.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Bacteria recovered from endometritis and pyometra in the beef cow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One hundred and one uteri from beef cows with pyometra were collected from a slaughterhouse. Samples of uterine exudate were cultured for aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic bacteria, and also tested for Trichomonas spp. A section of uterine...

Mikulec, Rashel Thi

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Foodborne Sources of Bacteria Associated With Human Obesity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently published research has suggested that the microbial ecology of the digestive system may play a role in obesity. Obese people have been shown to have a higher proportion of bacteria from the Firmicutes division and a lower proportion...

McElhany, Katherine Grace

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Rapid identification of bacteria using an umbelliferone fluorescent assay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA USING AN UMBELLIFERONE FLUORESCENT ASSAY A Thesis by RICHARD THOMAS CHAMBLIN, JR, Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Veterinary Microbiology RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA USING AN UMBELLIFERONE FLUORESCENT ASSAY A Thesis by RICHARD THOMAS CHAMBLIN, JR ~ Approved as to style and content by ( -Chairman of Committee) John M...

Chamblin, Richard Thomas

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Bank-to-Turn Control for a Small UAV using Backstepping and Parameter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bank-to-Turn Control for a Small UAV using Backstepping and Parameter Adaptation Dongwon Jung unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Assuming the UAV is equipped with an autopilot for low level control, we the applicability of the algorithm on a real system. 1. INTRODUCTION For decades unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs

Tsiotras, Panagiotis

185

MAGNETOSPHERIC RESPONSE TIMES FOLLOWING SOUTHWARD IMF TURNINGS N. E. Turner and D. N. Baker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction Southward turnings of the IMF are known to initi- ate the transfer of energy from the solar wind, University of Colorado Boulder, CO T. I. Pulkkinen Finnish Meteorological Institute Helsinki, Finland H. J:2 minutes after the solar wind change reached the magnetopause and continued to recon g- ure forabout 13 min

California at Berkeley, University of

186

It's Too Complicated, So I Turned It Off! Expectations, Perceptions, and Misconceptions of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and misconceptions of personal firewalls. Through a qualitative analysis of the data, we found that most of ourIt's Too Complicated, So I Turned It Off! Expectations, Perceptions, and Misconceptions of Personal Even though personal firewalls are an important aspect of security for the users of personal computers

187

LX-17 and ufTATB Data for Corner-Turning, Failure and Detonation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data is presented for the size (diameter) effect for ambient and cold confined LX-17, unconfined ambient LX-17, and confined ambient ultrafine TATB. Ambient, cold and hot double cylinder corner-turning data for LX-17, PBX 9502 and ufTATB is presented. Transverse air gap crossing in ambient LX-17 is studied with time delays given for detonations that cross.

Souers, P C; Lauderbach, L; Garza, R; Vitello, P; Hare, D E

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

188

Wind Energy in Indian Country: Turning to Wind for the Seventh Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Energy in Indian Country: Turning to Wind for the Seventh Generation by Andrew D. Mills: ___________________________________________ Jane Stahlhut Date #12;Wind Energy in Indian Country A.D. Mills Abstract - ii - Abstract Utility-scale wind projects are increasingly being developed in rural areas of the United States. In the West

Kammen, Daniel M.

189

Turning Relational DBMS into Nested Relational DBMS GeneticXchange, Inc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turning Relational DBMS into Nested Relational DBMS Jing Chen GeneticXchange, Inc chenjing previously been described [24, 23], the details of its interface to relational DBMS and other sources have never been published. In this paper, we describe the Kleisli's interface to relational DBMS

Wong, Limsoon

190

Your Turn : Interactive Story Continuing Agent Report of Surveying Paper Works  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

story continuing agent based on to-date storytelling systems. We introduce our framework and discuss diverse in great variety, including character-based storytelling systems [1], interactive story authoringYour Turn : Interactive Story Continuing Agent Report of Surveying Paper Works Edward Yu-Te Shen

Ouhyoung, Ming

191

Supplement to: Evidence of a possible turning point in solar UV-B over  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplement to: Evidence of a possible turning point in solar UV-B over Canada, Europe and Japan C Observatory Lindenberg, German Meteorological Service, Germany [7] Climate Change Unit, Finnish Meteorological to ground-based AOD changes at 320nm at Thessaloniki (upper panel) and Lindenberg (lower panel). #12;Figure

Meskhidze, Nicholas

192

A Study on Crosstalk Analysis in Aggregative Transmission Lines with Turning Vias Tapobrata Bandyopadhyay1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Study on Crosstalk Analysis in Aggregative Transmission Lines with Turning Vias Tapobrata and signal integrity in high-speed signal channels is extremely important. Transmission lines and vias transmission lines (4 mil width) of different lengths arranged in bundles. The eight transmission line bundles

Swaminathan, Madhavan

193

The dynamic cusp aurora on 30 November 1997: response to southward turning of the IMF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dynamic cusp aurora on 30 November 1997: response to southward turning of the IMF P. E a Accepted: 26 January 1999 Abstract. We document the detailed dynamics of the dayside aurora in the $1200®cation of both the red (630.0 nm) and green (557.7 nm) line emissions in the cusp aurora near 1200 MLT and $100

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

194

Estimated Savings from Turning Off Unnecessary Electrical Loads During Unoccupied Periods at the Langford Architecture Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in those studios during unoccupied hours. Turning off the lights on the third and fourth floor studios would reduce the electricity cost by $4,757 per year and the associated heating and cooling costs by an additional $583 for a total savings of $5...

Soebarto, V. I.; Haberl, J. S.; Degelman, L. O.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Mimicry of Sharp Turning Behaviours in a Robotic Fish* Jindong Liu Huosheng Hu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mimicry of Sharp Turning Behaviours in a Robotic Fish* Jindong Liu Huosheng Hu Department is supported by London Aquarium Ltd. Abstract - In nature, fish has astonishing swimming ability after thousands years of evolution. To realise fish-like swimming behaviours by a robotic system poses tremendous

Hu, Huosheng

196

Energy-Saving Tips 1. Turn the radiator off when you are out.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the windows. 4. Turn the heating down. As well as wasting energy, having your room too hot is bad for you your mobile phone charger at the wall when you are not using it. 16. Use energy efficient light bulbs the thermostat instead of reaching for a jumper 15% wash clothes at 90C Brits waste more energy than

Brierley, Andrew

198

When you turn on your faucet and fill a glass with water, you expect it to be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. However, drinking water can contain gases, minerals, bacteria, metals or chemicals that can affect your water that does not meet those stan- dards. Drinking Water Standards The U.S. Environmental Protection of harmful pollutants: · pathogens, which are disease-causing organ- isms such as bacteria, fungi or viruses

199

Electroless vs electrodeposited Ni-P alloys for diamond turning applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrolytes nickel deposits with greater than 10% phosphorous have been widely used for diamond turning applications such as fabrications of large optics and other high precision parts. Although the coatings have worked well, they are not without their drawbacks. Porosity and nodule formation have been problems as well as the difficulty of obtaining deposits greater than about 75 {mu}m. In recent years much effort has been directed at the investigating electrodeposition of Ni-P alloys in an attempt to avoid these problems. The purpose of this paper is to compare diamond turning results for both electroless and electrodeposited alloys and speculate about the future uses of electrodeposited Ni-P for precision finishing applications. 16 refs., 7 figs.

Dini, J.W.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Turning a negative into a positive: Researchers find promising use for excessive nitrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acre of nitrogen for each inch of water applied. tx H2O | pg. 17 _ Turning a negative into a positive tx H2O | pg. 18 According to Sij, previous research has shown that properly designed and managed drip irrigation systems reduce deep percola... agencies involved in the project were local soil and water conservation districts, U.S. Department of Agriculture?s Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Texas AgriLife Extension Service, and Rolling Plains Groundwater Conservation District...

Wythe, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Permitted Oxygen Abundances and the Temperature Scale of Metal-Poor Turn-Off Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use high quality VLT/UVES published data of the permitted OI triplet and FeII lines to determine oxygen and iron abundances in unevolved (dwarfs, turn-off, subgiants) metal-poor halo stars. The calculations have been performed both in LTE and NLTE, employing effective temperatures obtained with the new infrared flux method (IRFM) temperature scale by Ramirez & Melendez, and surface gravities from Hipparcos parallaxes and theoretical isochrones. A new list of accurate transition probabilities for FeII lines, tied to the absolute scale defined by laboratory measurements, has been used. We find a plateau in the oxygen-to-iron ratio over more than two orders of magnitude in iron abundance (-3.2 < [Fe/H] < -0.7), with a mean [O/Fe] = 0.5 dex (sigma = 0.1 dex), independent of metallicity, temperature and surface gravity. According to the new IRFM Teff scale, the temperatures of turn-off halo stars strongly depend on metallicity, a result that is in excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement with stellar evolution calculations, which predict that the Teff of the turn-off at [Fe/H] = -3 is about 600-700 K higher than that at [Fe/H] = -1.

J. Melendez; N. G. Shchukina; I. E. Vasiljeva; I. Ramirez

2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

202

Bacteria transport through porous media. Annual report, December 31, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following five chapters in this report have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base: (1) theoretical model of convective diffusion of motile and non-motile bacteria toward solid surfaces; (2) interfacial electrochemistry of oxide surfaces in oil-bearing sands and sandstones; (3) effects of sodium pyrophosphate additive on the ''huff and puff''/nutrient flooding MEOR process; (4) interaction of Escherichia coli B, B/4, and bacteriophage T4D with Berea sandstone rock in relation to enhanced oil recovery; and (5) transport of bacteria in porous media and its significance in microbial enhanced oil recovery.

Yen, T.F.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Films of bacteria at interfaces: three stages of behaviour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacterial attachment to a fluid interface can lead to the formation of a film with physicochemical properties that evolve with time. We study the time evolution of interface (micro)mechanics for interfaces between oil and bacterial suspensions by following the motion of colloidal probes trapped by capillarity to determine the interface microrheology. Initially, active bacteria at and near the interface drive superdiffusive motion of the colloidal probes. Over timescales of minutes, the bacteria form a viscoelastic film which we discuss as a quasi-two-dimensional, active, glassy system. To study late stage mechanics of the film, we use pendant drop elastometry. The films, grown over tens of hours on oil drops, are expanded and compressed by changing the drop volume. For small strains, by modeling the films as 2D Hookean solids, we estimate the film elastic moduli, finding values similar to those reported in the literature for the bacteria themselves. For large strains, the films are highly hysteretic. Finally, from wrinkles formed on highly compressed drops, we estimate film bending energies. The dramatic restructuring of the interface by such robust films has broad implications, e.g. in the study of active colloids, in understanding the community dynamics of bacteria, and in applied settings including bioremediation.

Liana Vaccari; Daniel Allan; Nima Sharifi-Mood; Aayush Singh; Robert Leheny; Kathleen Stebe

2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

204

Magnetic Torque of Microfabricated Elements and Magnetotactic Bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a thorough theoretical analysis of the magnetic torque on microfabricated elements with dimensions in the range of 100 to 500 {\\mu}m and magneto-somes of magnetotactic bacteria of a few {\\mu}m length. We derive simple equations for field dependent torque and magnetic shape anisotropy that can be readily used to replace the crude approximations commonly used. We illustrate and verify the theory on microfabricated elements and magnetotactic bacteria, by field depedent torque magnetometry and by observing their rotation in water under application of a rotating magnetic field. The maximum rotation frequency of the largest microfabricated elements agrees within error boundaries with theory. For smaller, and especially thinner, elements the measured frequencies are a factor of three to four too low. We suspect this is caused by incomplete saturation of the magnetisation in the elements, which is not incorporated in our model. The maximum rotation frequency of magnetotactic bacteria agrees with our model within error margins, which are however quite big due to the large spread in bacteria morphology. The model presented provides a solid basis for the analysis of experiments with magnetic objects in liquid, which is for instance the case in the field of medical microrobotics.

Lars Zondervan; Özlem Sardan Sukas; Islam S. M. Khalil; Marc P. Pichel; Sarthak Misra; Leon Abelmann

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

CARD-FISH and Microautoradiography Protocol for Bacteria and Archaea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CARD-FISH and Microautoradiography Protocol for Bacteria and Archaea by Gerhard Herndl Lab @ www FISH Hybridization www.microbial-oceanography.eu 2007 2 Sample Fixation 1. Fix samples in Ethanol 95% 7. Dry and mount in DAPI mix #12;CARD FISH Buffers and Chemicals www

Herndl, Gerhard

206

Methods for targetted mutagenesis in gram-positive bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method of targeted mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, the present invention provides a method that effectively integrates a suicide integrative vector into a target gene in the chromosome of a Gram-positive bacterium, resulting in inactivation of the target gene.

Yang, Yunfeng

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

207

Method for establishing the presence of salmonella bacteria in eggs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Measurement of the acoustical resonances in eggs is shown to provide a rapid, noninvasive technique for establishing the presence of Salmonella bacteria. The technique is also sensitive to yolk puncture, shell cracks, and may be sensitive to other yolk properties and to egg freshness. Remote characterization, potentially useful for characterizing large numbers of eggs, has been demonstrated.

Johnston, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Protein signaling via type III secretion pathways in phytopathogenic bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-5274 Abbreviations HR hypersensitive response Pv pathovar NLS nuclear localization signals Introduction Plants secretion pathway has revealed new mechanisms by which phytopathogenic bacteria infect plants. The suggestion that bacterial gene products are `delivered to' and `perceived by' plants cells has fundamentally

Mudgettt, Mary Beth

209

Bacteria beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Brian Lanoil,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacteria beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Brian Lanoil,1 * Mark Skidmore,1 John C. Priscu,2, particularly those that lie beneath polar ice sheets, are beginning to be recog- nized as an important part Vostok, Antarctica, no sub-ice sheet environments have been shown to support microbial ecosystems. Here

Priscu, John C.

210

Introduction The use of immobilized bacteria for ex situ bioremedi-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Foam embedded bacteria (0.1 g) or equivalent mass of free cells (0.59 ml) were transferred to glass polyurethane-based foams to immobilize algae for metal removal (Wilde et al., 1997), and, more recently et al., 1989) to appropriate concentrations. Foams consisted of 20 g hydrophilic polyurethane pre

Hazen, Terry

211

Modified Extraction Scheme for the CERN PS Multi-Turn Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-activation of the extraction magnetic septum of the CERN PS machine was observed due to the losses of the continuous beam extracted via the Multi-Turn Extraction (MTE) method. A possible mitigation measure consists of using an existing electrostatic septum, located upstream of the extraction magnetic septum, to deflect the beam. This would highly decrease the beam losses, and hence the induced activation, during the rise time of the MTE kickers due to the reduced thickness of the electrostatic septum with respect to the magnetic one. The layout of this new extraction will be described in detail and the results of beam measurements presented.

Gilardoni, S; Hernalsteens, C; Lachaize, A; Métral, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Surface finish measurements of diamond-turned electroless-nickel-plated mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface roughness data are presented for a matrix of diamond-turned electroless nickel samples having a combination of six phosphorus contents and four heat treatments. Roughness measurements were conducted with commercial optical and stylus profilers (WYKO and Talystep). The results are discussed in terms of the material composition and heat treatment, plus other factors having an observed influence on the surface roughness. For the optimum material properties, full-length (665..mu..m) 20x WYKO scans yielded values of better than 10 A rms after correction for instrument roll-off.

Taylor, J.S.; Syn, C.K.; Saito, T.T.; Donaldson, R.R.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Surface finish measurements of diamond-turned electroless-nickel-plated mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface roughness data are presented for a matrix of diamond-turned electroless-nickel samples having a combination of six phosphorous contents and four heat treatments. Roughness measurements were conducted with commercial optical and stylus profilometers (Wyko and Talystep). The results are discussed in terms of the material composition and heat treatment, plus other factors having an observed influence on the surface roughness. For the optimum material properties, full-length (665 ..mu..m) restored 20X Wyko scans yielded values of better than 10A rms.

Taylor, J.S.; Syn, C.K.; Saito, T.T.; Donaldson, R.R.

1985-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

214

Turning the Manhattan Project into a National Park | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation6/14/11 Page 1 ofTurning the Manhattan

215

BPA Turns 75: A Look Back and a Look Ahead | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusA t iBudget2/4/139/4/2012BPABPA Turns 75: A

216

Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

Hu, Jian Zhi (Richland, WA); Sears, Jr., Jesse A. (Kennewick, WA); Hoyt, David W. (Richland, WA); Wind, Robert A. (Kennewick, WA)

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

217

Biofilms as sources of fecal bacteria contamination in the stormwater drainage system in Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study was performed to examine a possible source of fecal bacteria contamination originating from within the stormwater drainage system in Singapore. The extent of fecal bacteria presence in storm drain biofilms was ...

Burkhart, Tsung Hwa (Tsung Hwa Sophia)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - alimentary tract bacteria Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Administered Non-Pathogenic Bacteria 12:20-12:35 Presentation 5 - Dawn Kelly: ,,Optimising... -positive bacteria 12;15:45-16:15 Coffee and Posters 16:15- 17:55 Gut Health...

219

Neem extract as an inhibitor for biocorrosion influenced by sulfate reducing bacteria: A preliminary investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-reducing bacteria (SRB), iron and CO2 reducing bacteria and iron and manganese oxidizing bacteria [1,2]. Among these were characterized with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) coupled with energy of water for cellular maintenance and growth [4], (5) couple sulfate reduction to the intracellular

220

Design of diamond turned holograms by the nonlinear conjugate gradients method Colin Dankwart, Claas Falldorf and Jurgen Jahns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of diamond turned holograms by the nonlinear conjugate gradients method Colin Dankwart investigate a different optimization approach, the nonlinear conjugate gradients (NCG) method. The NGC method design algorithm, based on the generalized projections method (GPM) [?] was established, taking

Jahns, Jürgen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Turn-on fluorescence in tetraphenylethylene-based metal-organic frameworks: An alternative to aggregation-induced emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coordinative immobilization of functionalized tetraphenylethylene within rigid porous metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) turns on fluorescence in the typically non-emissive tetraphenylethylene core. The matrix coordination-induced ...

Shustova, Natalia B.

222

County looks at turning waste ash into money Two companies using grant to investigate ways to recycle incinerator byproduct  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

County looks at turning waste ash into money Two companies using grant to investigate ways Ellen O'Connor. The research money totals $240,000. "Looking down the road and recognizing that waste

Columbia University

223

Large scale dynamics of the Persistent Turning Walker model of fish behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper considers a new model of individual displacement, based on fish motion, the so-called Persistent Turning Walker (PTW) model, which involves an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process on the curvature of the particle trajectory. The goal is to show that its large time and space scale dynamics is of diffusive type, and to provide an analytic expression of the diffusion coefficient. Two methods are investigated. In the first one, we compute the large time asymptotics of the variance of the individual stochastic trajectories. The second method is based on a diffusion approximation of the kinetic formulation of these stochastic trajectories. The kinetic model is a Fokker-Planck type equation posed in an extended phase-space involving the curvature among the kinetic variables. We show that both methods lead to the same value of the diffusion constant. We present some numerical simulations to illustrate the theoretical results.

Pierre Degond; Sébastien Motsch

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

224

PC and monitor night status: Power management enabling and manual turn-off  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While office equipment accounts for about 7 percent of commercial building energy use, this reflects considerable energy savings from the use of automatic power management. Most of these savings were gained through the use of low-power modes that meet the criteria of the U.S. EPA's Energy Star program. Despite this success, there are large amounts of additional savings that could be gained if all equipment capable of power management use were enabled and functioning. A considerable portion of equipment is not enabled for power management at all, enabled only partially, or is enabled but prevented from functioning. Additional savings could be gained if more equipment were turned off at night manually. We compiled results from 17 studies from the office equipment literature addressing PCs and monitors. Some factors important for annual energy use, such as power levels, have been documented elsewhere and are not covered. We review methods for estimating office equipment use patterns and energy use, and present findings on night status--power management and manual turn-off rates. In early studies, PC power management was often found to function in 25 percent or less of the Energy Star compliant units (10 percent of all PCs). However, recent assessments have found higher rates, and we estimate that for Energy Star models, 35 percent of PC CPUs and 65 percent of PC monitors are enabled for power management. While the data lack statistical rigor, they can be used to estimate the magnitude of current and potential power management savings, which we did for major types of office equipment. The data also make clear that the topic of enabling rates, and the factors which influence them, deserve greater scrutiny.

Nordman, Bruce; Meier, Alan; Piette, Mary Ann

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: AVOIDING WRONG TURNS, ROACH MOTELS, AND BOX CANYONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the third of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. In this paper, we provide one example each of our judgments on what constitutes a box canyon, a roach motel, and a wrong turn: ? Wrong Turn: The Reliable Replacement Warhead ? Roach Motel: SRAM T vs the B61 ? A Possible Box Canyon: A Low-Yield Version of the W76 SLBM Warhead Recognizing that new nuclear missions or weapons are not demanded by current circumstances ? a development path that yields future capabilities similar to those of today, which are adequate if not always ideal, and a broader national-security strategy that supports nonproliferation and arms control by reducing the role for, and numbers, of nuclear weapons ? we briefly consider alternate, less desirable futures, and their possible effect on the complex problem of regional deterrence. In this regard, we discuss the issues posed by, and possible responses to, three example regional deterrence challenges: in-country defensive use of nuclear weapons by an adversary; reassurance of U.S. allies with limited strategic depth threatened by an emergent nuclear power; and extraterritorial, non-strategic offensive use of nuclear weapons by an adversary in support of limited military objectives against a U.S. ally.

Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

226

Reduction of trichloroethylene in a model aquifer with methanotrophic bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REDUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A MODEL AQUIFER WITH METHANOTROPHIC BACTERIA A Thesis by Duane Dee Hicks Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fullfillment of the requirements for thc degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Civil Engineering REDUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A MODEL AQUIFER WITH METHANOTROPHIC BACTEPslA A Thesis by Duane Dec Hicks Approved as to style and content by Bill Batchclor (Chair of Committee...

Hicks, Duane Dee

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Effect of electrical stimulation on bacteria of meats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979 ABSTRACT Effect of Electrical Stimulation on Bacteria of meats. (December 1979) Boosya Mrigadat, B. S. , Kasetsart University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. C. Vanderzant Electrostimulation of rabbit muscles caused a slight reduction... stimulation and after storage for up to 45 min. (CON = open bars, ES = shaded bars; muscles with identical numbers were from the same rabbit). Effect of electrical stimulation on the bacterial count of inoculated (Lacto- b 'll . ) bb't 1 (LD=~L dorsi, BF...

Mrigadat, Boosya

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Apparatus and method for the desulfurization of petroleum by bacteria  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating petroleum with anaerobic microorganisms acting as biocatalysts that can remove sulfur atoms from hydrocarbon molecules, under anaerobic conditions, and then convert the sulfur atoms to hydrogen sulfide. The microorganisms utilized are from the family known as the "Sulfate Reducing Bacteria." These bacteria generate metabolic energy from the oxidation of organic compounds, but use oxidized forms of sulfur as an electron acceptor. Because the biocatalyst is present in the form of bacteria in an aqueous suspension, whereas the reacting substrate consists of hydrocarbon molecules in an organic phase, the actual desulfurization reaction takes place at the aqueous-organic interphase. To ensure adequate interfacial contacting and mass transfer, a biphasic electrostatic bioreactor system is utilized. The bioreactor is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the sulfur. High-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the sulfur to produce hydrogen sulfide which is then removed from the bioreactor. The organic liquid, now free of the sulfur, is ready for immediate use or further processing.

Lizama, Hector M. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury1-4. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury5. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally-relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings5, we show that Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can both oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. However, the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is only about one third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidise, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA is able to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

Hu, Haiyan [ORNL] [ORNL; Lin, Hui [ORNL] [ORNL; Zheng, Wang [ORNL] [ORNL; Tomanicek, Stephen J [ORNL] [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL] [ORNL; Feng, Xinbin [ORNL] [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Apparatus and method for the desulfurization of petroleum by bacteria  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for treating petroleum with anaerobic microorganisms acting as biocatalysts that can remove sulfur atoms from hydrocarbon molecules, under anaerobic conditions, and then convert the sulfur atoms to hydrogen sulfide. The microorganisms utilized are from the family known as the ``Sulfate Reducing Bacteria``. These bacteria generate metabolic energy from the oxidation of organic compounds, but use oxidized forms of sulfur as an electron acceptor. Because the biocatalyst is present in the form of bacteria in an aqueous suspension, whereas the reacting substrate consists of hydrocarbon molecules in an organic phase, the actual desulfurization reaction takes place at the aqueous-organic interphase. To ensure adequate interfacial contacting and mass transfer, a biphasic electrostatic bioreactor system is utilized. The bioreactor is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the sulfur. High-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the sulfur to produce hydrogen sulfide which is then removed from the bioreactor. The organic liquid, now free of the sulfur, is ready for immediate use or further processing. 5 figs.

Lizama, H.M.; Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

Hybrid optics for the visible produced by bulk casting of sol-gel glass using diamond-turned molds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent combinations of diffractive and refractive functions in the same optical component allow designers additional opportunities to make systems more compact and enhance performance. This paper describes a research program for fabricating hybrid refractive/diffractive components from diamond-turned molds using the bulk casting of sol-gel silica glass. The authors use the complementary dispersive nature of refractive and diffractive optics to render two-color correction in a single hybrid optical element. Since diamond turning has matured as a deterministic manufacturing technology, techniques previously suitable only in the infrared are now being applied to components used at visible wavelengths. Thus, the marriage of diamond turning and sol-gel processes offers a cost-effective method for producing highly customized and specialized optical components in high quality silica glass. With the sol-gel casting method of replication, diamond-turned mold costs can be shared over many pieces. Diamond turning takes advantage of all of the available degrees of freedom in a single hybrid optical element: aspheric surface to eliminate spherical aberration, kinoform surface for control of primary chromatic aberration, and the flexibility to place the kinoform on non-planar surfaces for maximum design flexibility. The authors discuss the critical issues involved in designing the hybrid element, single point diamond-turning the mold, and fabrication in glass using the sol-gel process.

Bernacki, B.E.; Miller, A.C.; Maxey, L.C.; Cunningham, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moreshead, W.V.; Nogues, J.L.R. [Geltech Inc., Alachua, FL (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Interactions between nitrifying bacteria and hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria during detoxification of oil sands process affected water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large quantities of process water are produced during the extraction of bitumen from oil sands by the Syncrude and Suncor operations in northern Alberta. Freshly produced tailings water is acutely toxic, but it has been shown to slowly detoxify over time. As detoxification proceeds, there is also a precipitous decrease in ammonia concentrations. The present study examines these two microbially-mediated processes in relation to levels of bacteria and toxicants in mixtures of fresh and aged (detoxified) tailings water. Detoxification of tailings water was greatly accelerated when equal volumes of fresh and detoxified (natural aging for one year) tailings water were mixed. Addition of phosphorus further stimulated detoxification, causing levels of ammonia and naphthenic acids (toxic organic acids leached during bitumen extraction) to decrease to those of detoxified water within two months. Such changes were not observed when phosphorus was not added, or when it was added to less diluted (10-.1 or 3-.1) fresh tailings water. Populations of nitrifying bacteria and naphthenic acid degraders increased markedly in the phosphorus-amended mixtures, but not in its absence. Addition of CS{sub 2} (a specific inhibitor of nitrification) to these mixtures prevented ammonia oxidation. Surprisingly, it also prevented the increase in naphthenic acid-degraders and retarded the loss of naphthenic acids. These results suggest the existence of interactions in fresh tailings water between nitrifying bacteria, naphthenic acid degraders and toxicants. The activity of naphthenic acid-degraders apparently remains low until ammonia is oxidized, whereas that of nitrifying bacteria remains low until concentrations of naphthenic acids or other toxicants decrease below some threshold level. Understanding these interactions may lead to more efficient and effective processes to detoxify oil sands process water.

Sobolewski, A. [Microbial Technologies, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); MacKinnon, M. [Syncrude Research, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fuel from Bacteria, CO2, Water, and Solar Energy: Engineering a Bacterial Reverse Fuel Cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrofuels Project: Harvard is engineering a self-contained, scalable Electrofuels production system that can directly generate liquid fuels from bacteria, carbon dioxide (CO2), water, and sunlight. Harvard is genetically engineering bacteria called Shewanella, so the bacteria can sit directly on electrical conductors and absorb electrical current. This current, which is powered by solar panels, gives the bacteria the energy they need to process CO2 into liquid fuels. The Harvard team pumps this CO2 into the system, in addition to water and other nutrients needed to grow the bacteria. Harvard is also engineering the bacteria to produce fuel molecules that have properties similar to gasoline or diesel fuel—making them easier to incorporate into the existing fuel infrastructure. These molecules are designed to spontaneously separate from the water-based culture that the bacteria live in and to be used directly as fuel without further chemical processing once they’re pumped out of the tank.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Local heat transfer distribution in a two-pass trapezoidal channel with a 180 [degree] turn via transient liquid crystal technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cross section. Attention is focused on the effect of the 180' turn on the local heat transfer distributions on the interior surfaces of the various walls at the turn, under turbulent flow conditions. Transient heat transfer experiments, using...

Endley, Saurabh

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Turning point temperature and competition between relativistic and ponderomotive effects in self-focusing of laser beam in plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The propagation characters of Gaussian laser beam in collisionless plasma are investigated by considering the ponderomotive and relativistic nonlinearities. The second-order differential equation of dimensionless beam width parameter is solved numerically, taking into account the effect of electron temperature. The results show that the ponderomotive force does not facilitate the relativistic self-focusing in all intensity ranges. In fact, there exists a certain intensity value that, if below this value, the ponderomotive nonlinearity can contribute to the relativistic self-focusing, or obstruct it, if above. It is also indicated that there is a temperature interval in which self-focusing can occur, while the beam diverges outside of this region. In addition, the results represent the existence of a “turning point temperature” in the mentioned interval that the self-focusing has the strongest power. The value of the turning point is dependent on laser intensity in which higher intensities result in higher turning point.

Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari Milani, M. R. [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Probing the outer edge of an accretion disk: A Her X-1 turn-on observed with RXTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the analysis of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the turn-on phase of a 35 day cycle of the X-ray binary Her X-1. During the early phases of the turn-on, the energy spectrum is composed of X-rays scattered into the line of sight plus heavily absorbed X-rays. The energy spectra in the 3-17 keV range can be described by a partial covering model, where one of the components is influenced by photoelectric absorption and Thomson scattering in cold material plus an iron emission line at 6.5 keV. In this paper we show the evolution of spectral parameters as well as the evolution of the pulse profile during the turn-on. We describe this evolution using Monte Carlo simulations which self-consistently describe the evolution of the X-ray pulse profile and of the energy spectrum.

M. Kuster; J. Wilms; R. Staubert; W. A. Heindl; R. E. Rothschild; N. I. Shakura; K. A. Postnov

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

237

Removal of Heavy Metals from Industrial Effluent Using Bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial development results in the generation of industrial effluents, and if untreated results in water, sediment and soil pollution. (Fakayode and Onianwa, 2002 ? Fakayode, 2005). Industrial wastes and emission contain toxic and hazardous substances, most of which are detrimental to human health (Jimena et al.,2008 ? Ogunfowokan et al.,2005 ? Rajaram et al.,2008). The key pollutants include heavy metals, chemical wastes and oil spills etc. Heavy metal resistant bacteria have significant role in bioremediation of heavy metals in wastewater. The objective of this work is to study the role of bacteria in removing the heavy metals present in the industrial effluent.Five effluent samples out of nine were selected for this study due to high content of heavy metals. The heavy metals Hg and Cu were removed by Bacillus sp. The average Hg reduction was 45 % and Cu reduction was recorded as 62%. The heavy metals Cd, As and Co were removed by Pseudomonas sp. The average Cd reduction was 56%, average As reduction was 34 % and average Co reduction was recorded as 53%. The heavy metals Cd and Cu were removed by Staphylococcus sp. The average Cd reduction was 44 % and average Cu reduction was recorded as 34 %.

Manisha N; Dinesh Sharma; Arun Kumar

238

Process for generation of hydrogen gas from various feedstocks using thermophilic bacteria  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45.degree. C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

Ooteghem, Suellen Van (Morgantown, WV)

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

239

Process for Generation of Hydrogen Gas from Various Feedstocks Using Thermophilic Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45 degrees C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

Ooteghem Van, Suellen

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

240

E-Print Network 3.0 - atypical bacteria accompanying Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Swine Flu and Common Infections to Prepare For Summary: Other common causes - Whooping cough (pertussis) - Atypical bacteria Symptoms - Severe cough - Runny... :...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Contribution of Iron-Reducing Bacteria to Mercury Methylation in Marine Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in continental margin sediments off central Chile. Limnologyof microbial iron reduction in sediments of the Baltic-Northreducing bacteria from sediments of an acid stressed lake.

Fleming, Emily J.; Nelson, D C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Response of Prochlorococcus ecotypes to co-culture with diverse marine bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactions between microorganisms shape microbial ecosystems. Systematic studies of mixed microbes in co-culture have revealed widespread potential for growth inhibition among marine heterotrophic bacteria, but similar ...

Sher, Daniel

243

Purple Bacteria Develops Its Own Form of Sunscreen | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Yellowstone National Park, is due to carotenoid molecules, produced by huge mats of algae and bacteria (Photo from http:en.wikipedia.orgwikiCarotenoid External link )...

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal-associated bacteria warfare Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pheromones by bacteria in the female's gut. Attraction pheromones dissipate from Source: Colorado at Boulder, University of - CIRES, Center for Science and Technology Policy...

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidophilic bioleaching-associated bacteria...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: acidophilic bioleaching-associated bacteria Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biodiversity II: Kingdoms Eubacteria and Archaebacteria Summary: 1 Biodiversity II: Kingdoms...

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biodiversity II: Kingdoms Eubacteria and Archaebacteria Summary: beneficial genes Bacterial...

247

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidophilic bacteria kosansei Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: acidophilic bacteria kosansei Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biodiversity II: Kingdoms Eubacteria and Archaebacteria Summary: 1 Biodiversity II: Kingdoms...

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic bacteria regulation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

regu-lationcontributestothetranscriptionalregula- Summary: , 35043 Marburg, Germany. E-mail: thauer@ mpi-marburg.mpg.de Gram-positive bacteria 3 In strict...

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

organic waste, converting... of anaerobic bacteria, these compounds decompose to yield a biogas that comprises of methane (CH.) and carbon... not processed anaerobically. The...

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic bacteria thermoanaerobacter Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

organic waste, converting... of anaerobic bacteria, these compounds decompose to yield a biogas that comprises of methane (CH.) and carbon... not processed anaerobically. The...

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic selenate-respiring bacteria Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

organic waste, converting... of anaerobic bacteria, these compounds decompose to yield a biogas that comprises of methane (CH.) and carbon... not processed anaerobically. The...

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic bacteria isolated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(White) isolate. The signicance of bacteria for development... by Pearson cor- relation test (Minitab 1997). Results Isolation ... Source: Schal, Coby - Department of Entomology,...

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundant culturable bacteria Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: abundant culturable bacteria Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ria and Virus Like Particles (VLPs) abundance were monitored in enriched seawater batch...

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural soil bacteria Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ies from... for reducing bacteria runoff. With almost 400 water bodies impaired by bacte- ria, a variety of resources... is providing a coordinated and comprehen- sive education...

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid bacteria inhibiting Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

while the activity of isolate C0593... those concentrations that enhance or inhibit the test bacteria or consortium. Conclusions The use... .V. All rights reserved 0167 - 7012...

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

USA EVGENYA S. SHELOBOLINA Summary: .J.P. and Woodward, J.C. (1993) Enzymatic iron and uranium reduction by sulfate- reducing bacteria. Marine Geology... . These results suggest...

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic gram-negative bacteria Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alcaligenes and Serratia, and a very small Gram-negative... , but aerobic, submerged cultivation of bacteria on the mesquite wood increases the digestible protein... each of...

258

The Earth Institute, Columbia University12 annual donor report 2010 13 at the turn of the century, world leaders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Earth Institute, Columbia University12 annual donor report 2010 13 at the turn of the century-General Ban Ki-moon at the Earth Institute's State of the Planet Conference in March 2010. "They of humanity are at stake." The Millennium Villages project, a partnership between the Earth Institute

259

Wind turbines convert the kinetic energy in moving air into rotational energy, which in turn is converted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind turbines convert the kinetic energy in moving air into rotational energy, which in turn of electricity wind can make varies constantly. Sometimes a wind turbine will make no power at all is an indicator of how much energy a particular wind turbine makes in a particular place. Continued on page 2 #12

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

260

Fruit Flies Modulate Passive Wing Pitching to Generate In-Flight Turns Attila J. Bergou,1,* Leif Ristroph,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fruit Flies Modulate Passive Wing Pitching to Generate In-Flight Turns Attila J. Bergou,1,* Leif of their wing motions. Here, we measure the free-flight kinematics of fruit flies and determine how arise and what control variables govern them remains a challenge. Here, we analyze the torques fruit

Guckenheimer, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Lubrication and Tool-wear in the Turning of Hard Powdered Metals By: Edward Chow and Anastasia Linuwih  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lubrication and Tool-wear in the Turning of Hard Powdered Metals By: Edward Chow and Anastasia Linuwih Background A current target and need in the auto industry is to achieve improved tool life in machining powered metal valve seats for an engine block. The tools required are specialized and expensive

Demirel, Melik C.

262

Wind-Power Development in Germany and the U.S.: Multiple Streams, Advocacy Coalitions, and Turning Points  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind-Power Development in Germany and the U.S.: Multiple Streams, Advocacy Coalitions, and Turning). Of the various forms of renewable energy, wind-generated electricity has a unique set of advantages, which make especially large. Wind power produces relatively low levels of environmental damage over its life cycle (like

Qiu, Weigang

263

WTERT (Greece and U.S.) PARTICIPATION IN ISWA-APESB 2009 WORLD CONGRESS:"Turning Waste into  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management 3. Waste To Energy 4. Waste&Climate Change 5. IberoAmerican Symposium Regarding Waste to Energy the conclusions were that, in line with the new EU directive of 2008/98, Waste to Energy is getting higherWTERT (Greece and U.S.) PARTICIPATION IN ISWA- APESB 2009 WORLD CONGRESS:"Turning Waste into Ideas

264

VII Pillars Of Productivity Seven practices characterize highly productive companies turning them into 'digital organizations.' IT is the catalyst,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VII Pillars Of Productivity Seven practices characterize highly productive companies turning them's productivity growth, more than any other economic statistic, that determines our living standards. If productivity grows at 1% per year, living standards will double every 70 years. If productivity grows at 3% per

265

On The Use of Eddy Current Brakes as Tunable, Fast Turn-On Viscous Dampers For Haptic Rendering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On The Use of Eddy Current Brakes as Tunable, Fast Turn-On Viscous Dampers For Haptic Rendering, linear dampers for haptic rendering using a prototype haptic device outfitted with eddy current brakes discuss the results from haptic experiments for rendering viscosity, virtual walls and virtual friction

Hayward, Vincent

266

Estimated Savings from Turning Off Unnecessary Lights at the Langford Architecture Center During the 1996 Christmas Holidays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lights been left on, the building would have consumed 100 kW more electricity every hour. The total electricity savings was about 31,200 kWh over 13 days, which is equivalent to a total cost saving of $936.00. If the College continues to turn off...

Soebarto, V. I.; Haberl, J. S.; Degelman, L. O.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Coliphages and bacteria in ground water from Tehran, Iran  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to examine the microbial quality of Tehran's ground water and selected springs, using coliphages and selected bacteria as indicator organisms. The water table in Tehran varies from approximately 160 meters in the north to approximately 5 meters in the south. Individual wells and subterranean man-made aqueducts (qanate) tap the ground water. Since Tehran lacks municipal sewage facilities, waste disposal is by means of seepage pits, privies and leaching cesspools. There is potential for waste from these sites to leach into the ground water, particularly in the south where the water table is near the surface and the clay content of the soil holds moisture during periods of heavy rainfall.

Shariatpanahi, M.; Anderson, A.C.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

New Infographic and Projects to Keep Your Energy Bills Out of Hot Water |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange VisitorsforDepartment of EnergyFreezers to Save

269

INFOGRAPHIC: Let's Get to Work on Solar Soft Costs | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable ProjectsHistoryia/802871 IA

270

Grades 9-12: Join the BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge! | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment, Safety andGeothermal CompetitionsTechnologiesGetGoalsGosling

271

Algal Research1 Screening and selection of growth-promoting bacteria for Dunaliella cultures2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and potential applications for microalgae, which include food,44 animal feed, healthcare, energy microalgae species and identified using 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis. The recovered bacteria were27 found38 accumulation in Dunaliella sp. cells.39 Keywords: Microalgae, Dunaliella, bacteria, interaction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

272

A simple bioclogging model that accounts for spatial spreading of bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is presented that accounts for spatial expansion of the bacterial popu- lation in the soil. The bacteria move: 35K65, 35M10, 68U20, 76S05, 92D25 1 Introduction In soils, aquifers, and many other porous harmful environ- mental factors and mechanical washout. Naturally occurring bacteria are a major

Demaret, Laurent

273

Nano scale devices for plasmonic nanolithography and rapid sensing of bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NANO SCALE DEVICES FOR PLASMONIC NANOLITHOGRAPHY AND RAPID SENSING OF BACTERIA A Dissertation by SUNGKYU SEO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2007 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering NANO SCALE DEVICES FOR PLASMONIC NANOLITHOGRAPHY AND RAPID SENSING OF BACTERIA A Dissertation by SUNGKYU SEO...

Seo, Sungkyu

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

Clay enhancement of methane, low molecular weight hydrocarbon and halocarbon conversion by methanotrophic bacteria  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for increasing the rate of oxidation of toxic vapors by methanotrophic bacteria. The toxic vapors of interest are methane and trichloroethylene. The apparatus includes a gas phase bioreactor within a closed loop pumping system or a single pass system. The methanotrophic bacteria include Methylomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and uncharacterized environmental enrichments.

Apel, William A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Dugan, Patrick R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Impact of carbon nanotubes on the ingestion and digestion of bacteria by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of carbon nanotubes on the ingestion and digestion of bacteria by ciliated protozoa PARNIAN,4 by ecotoxicologists because of its role in the regulation of microbial populations through the ingestion and digestion to aggregate, which impedes their ability to ingest and digest their prey bacteria species, although it might

Le Roy, Robert J.

276

Aerobic uranium (VI) bioprecipitation by metal-resistant bacteria isolated from radionuclide-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerobic uranium (VI) bioprecipitation by metal-resistant bacteria isolated from radionuclide uranium [U(VI)] mediated by the intrinsic phosphatase acti- vities of naturally occurring bacteria leaks occur, these wastes come into contact with surrounding geologic media, allowing for migration

Skolnick, Jeff

277

Novel Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria at Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps Identified by Stable Isotope Probing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria at Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps Identified by Stable Isotope Probing Running Title: Novel Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria Section incubating sediment with 13 C-labeled methane, ethane, or propane, we5 confirmed the incorporation of 13 C

Sessions, Alex L.

278

Chromatic acclimation and population dynamics of green sulfur bacteria grown with spectrally tailored light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Living organisms have to adjust to their surrounding in order to survive in stressful conditions. We study this mechanism in one of most primitive creatures - photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria. These bacteria absorb photons very efficiently using the chlorosome antenna complexes and perform photosynthesis in extreme low-light environments. How the chlorosomes in green sulfur bacteria are acclimated to the stressful light conditions, for instance, if the spectrum of light is not optimal for absorption, is unknown. Studying Chlorobaculum tepidum cultures with far-red to near-infrared light-emitting diodes, we found that these bacteria react to changes in energy flow by regulating the amount of light-absorbing pigments and the size of the chlorosomes. Surprisingly, our results indicate that the bacteria can survive in near-infrared lights capturing low-frequency photons by the intermediate units of the light-harvesting complex. The latter strategy may be used by the species recently found near hydrothermal ve...

Saikin, Semion K; Huh, Joonsuk; Hannout, Moataz; Wang, Yaya; Zare, Farrokh; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

A Her X-1 Turn-On: Using the pulse profile to probe the outer edge of an accretion disk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The X-ray binary pulsar Her X-1 shows a wide variety of long and short term variabilities in the X-ray light curve. The 35 d variability of the source is interpreted as the influence of a warped, inclined, and twisted accretion disk periodically covering the line of sight to the central neutron star. In 1997 September we observed the ``turn-on'' of a 35 d cycle with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). Spectral analysis reveals that during early phases of the turn-on the overall spectrum is composed of X-rays scattered into the line of sight plus heavily absorbed X-rays. This interpretation is consistent with the variation of the pulse profile observed at the same time. The overall shape of the pulse profile is not changing, but towards earlier phases of the turn-on the pulse signature is steadily ``washed out''. This behavior can be understood as an influence of scattering and absorption due to the presence of the accretion disk rim. Using a Monte Carlo code we simulate the influence of both processes on a time variable, beamed emission characteristic, similar to the pulse profile of Her X-1. By comparing the results of the simulation with the observed profiles we determine the amount of scattered radiation, absorbed radiation, and the size of the scattering region.

M. Kuster; J. Wilms; R. Staubert; P. Risse; W. A. Heindl; R. Rothschild; N. I. Shakura; K. A. Postnov

2002-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

280

Use of Disinfectants and Cleaners to Reduce Bacteria on Poultry Transportation Coops with a Compressed Air Foam System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and evaluated the treatments ability to reduce aerobic bacteria from the manure. The second study added a HPWR step to determine whether this technique would reduce bacteria. In the third study, Salmonella Typhimurium was added to the homogenized fecal slurry...

Hinojosa-Garza, Carolee A.

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Genome-Assisted Analysis of Dissimilatory Metal-Reducing Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whole genome sequence for Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens has provided numerous new biological insights into the function of these model dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Many of the discoveries, including the identification of a high number of c-type cytochromes in both organisms, have been the result of comparative genomic analyses including several that were experimentally confirmed. Genome sequence has also aided the identification of genes important for the reduction of metal ions and other electron acceptors utilized by these organisms during anaerobic growth by facilitating the identification of genes disrupted by random insertions. Technologies for assaying global expression patterns for genes (mRNA) and proteins have also been enabled by the availability of genome sequence but their application has been limited mainly to the analysis of the role of global regulatory genes and to identifying genes expressed or repressed in response to specific electron acceptors. It is anticipated that details regarding the mechanisms of metal ion respiration, and metabolism in general, will eventually be revealed by comprehensive, systems-level analyses enabled by functional genomic analyses.

Fredrickson, Jim K.; Romine, Margaret F.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Upon leaving the airport on Airport Road continue 1.1 miles. Turn right on Garfield Ave. (US Hwy 14 truck route) and continue 1.0 mile.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

until Trailrace Rd. Turn left to Powerhouse Rd. Turn left into the Corps of Engineers complexAve Capitol AveSioux Ave Dakota Ave Tailrace Rd 83 1804 1804 PowerhouseR d 1806 34 14 1806 34 14 83 14 BYP 14 28563 Powerhouse Road Pierre Field Office 28563 Powerhouse Road #12;

283

Population Genomics of Early Events in the Ecological Differentiation of Bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic exchange is common among bacteria, but its effect on population diversity during ecological differentiation remains controversial. A fundamental question is whether advantageous mutations lead to selection of clonal ...

Shapiro, B. J.

284

E-Print Network 3.0 - anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

oxygen in the atmosphere. D) anoxygenic... ) Both a and c 7. When bacteria began evolving, Earth was A) cool and anaerobic. B) warm and aerobic. C... animals. D) microbes make...

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid bacteria elicit Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Zosteric Acid and Their Potential Application as Summary: . putida and Lake Erie bacteria, respectively. Zosteric acid EC50 values were 167 6 3.9 and 375 6 10 mg... )....

286

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid bacteria revisited Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Zosteric Acid and Their Potential Application as Summary: . putida and Lake Erie bacteria, respectively. Zosteric acid EC50 values were 167 6 3.9 and 375 6 10 mg... )....

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid bacteria structure Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Zosteric Acid and Their Potential Application as Summary: . putida and Lake Erie bacteria, respectively. Zosteric acid EC50 values were 167 6 3.9 and 375 6 10 mg... )....

288

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid bacteria affect Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Zosteric Acid and Their Potential Application as Summary: . putida and Lake Erie bacteria, respectively. Zosteric acid EC50 values were 167 6 3.9 and 375 6 10 mg... )....

289

Amoebae/bacteria consortia and uses for degrading wastes and contaminants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of altering trinitrotoluene includes the steps of: providing an amoeba/bacteria consortium, particularly ATCC 40908 or a mutant thereof possessing all the identifying characteristics thereof; and contacting the consortium with trinitrotoluene to alter the trinitrotoluene.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Caenorhabditis elegans NPR-1–mediated behaviors are suppressed in the presence of mucoid bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a diverse range of behaviors in response to bacteria. The presence of bacterial food influences C. elegans aerotaxis, aggregation, locomotion, and pathogen avoidance behaviors through the ...

Reddy, Kirthi C.

291

Engineering Bacteria for Production of Rhamnolipid as an Agent for Enhanced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Engineering Bacteria for Production of Rhamnolipid as an Agent for Enhanced Oil Recovery applications, including enhanced oil recovery (EOR), biodegradation, and bio- remediation. Rhamnolipid; transposome; chromosomal insertion; interfacial tension; enhanced oil recovery Introduction Surfactants

Goddard III, William A.

292

Nano scale devices for plasmonic nanolithography and rapid sensing of bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation contains two different research topics. One is a ‘Nano Scale Device for Plasmonic Nanolithography – Optical Antenna’ and the other is a ‘Nano Scale Device for Rapid Sensing of Bacteria – SEPTIC’. Since these two different research...

Seo, Sungkyu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

The battle of bacteria: Agencies, stakeholders focusing on restoring water quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to watershed stakeholders, who will determine the next steps in managing water quality in the tributaries. The TMDL task force was also charged with developing a roadmap for scientific research on how bacteria behave under different conditions. Tailored...

Foust, Margaret

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The battle of bacteria: Agencies, stakeholders focusing on restoring water quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to watershed stakeholders, who will determine the next steps in managing water quality in the tributaries. The TMDL task force was also charged with developing a roadmap for scientific research on how bacteria behave under different conditions. Tailored...

Foust, Margaret

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Biotemplated Synthesis of Gold NanoparticleBacteria Cellulose Nanofiber Nanocomposites and Their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced by acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter xylinum using D-glucose as the carbon source, which usually of sisal fibers by in situ fermentation and obtained a new class of completely renewable and biodegradable

Qi, Limin

296

Cargo delivery into gram-negative bacteria via enterobactin uptake machinery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Introduction to Iron Homeostasis and Siderophores Iron is an essential nutrient for almost all living organisms. This Chapter presents an overview of iron homeostasis in human and bacteria, as well as the biology ...

Zheng, Tengfei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Bacteria Harnessing Complexity Eshel Ben Jacob, Yakir Aharonov and Yoash Shapira  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Bacteria Harnessing Complexity By Eshel Ben Jacob, Yakir Aharonov and Yoash Shapira School, exchange of meaning-bearing chemical messages, and dialogues. The meaning-based communication permits

Jacob, Eshel Ben

298

The incidence and significance of anaerobic bacteria in the equine uterus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that anaerobic bacteria may participate in inflammatory processes of the equine uterus (Kenney 1978a, Reynolds 1978, Ricketts 1981, Brook 1984). Elliott et al. (1971) conducted a study to obtain uterine cultures under anaerobic conditions but failed to obtain... not definitively been proven whether the normal equine uterine environment is sterile (Peterson et al. 1969, Hughes 1978) or if bacteria may normally be present in the non-inflamed uterus (Farrelly and Mullaney 1964, Kenney 1978a, Samuel et al. 1979). Knudsen...

Bolinger, Dean Roger

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

Effects of UV Light Disinfection on Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria in Wastewater Effluents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF UV LIGHT DISINFECTION ON TETRACYCLINE RESISTANT BACTERIA IN WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS A Thesis by HANNAH CHILDRESS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Biological and Agricultural Engineering EFFECTS OF UV LIGHT DISINFECTION ON TETRACYCLINE RESISTANT BACTERIA IN WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS A Thesis by HANNAH...

Childress, Hannah

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

300

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water Samples from a Nonchlorinated Model Drinking Water Distribution System: Detection of a Large Nitrite-Oxidizing Population Associated with Nitrospira spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water SamplesNo. 12 Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water

Martiny, A. C; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The effect of polyacrylamide polymers and formaldehyde on selected strains of oilfield related bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary study of the effect of two polyacrylamide polymers and formaldehyde on certain strains of oil field related bacteria was performed. Since at this stage of the development of planning the proposed North Sea polymer flood field samples of native bacteria populations and fluid samples were not available, the preliminary study was made using pure strains of bacteria associated with the oilfield environment. The tests were run using ideal growth conditions of temperature and culture media. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of proposed polyacrylamide polymer flooding materials on the growth of selected strains of bacteria belonging to families common to the oilfield environment. The effect of 100 ppm of formaldehyde on these organisms also was investigated. The results of the tests showed that these bacteria responded differently to exposure to formaldehyde, polyacrylamide polymers and mixtures of both. These results indicate another possible mechanism for the occurrence of high bacteria related corrosion rates reported to occur on the producing side of polymer floods.

Farquhar, G.B. [Texaco E.P.T.D., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

ANKLE IMPEDANCE AND ANKLE ANGLES DURING STEP TURN AND STRAIGHT WALK: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DESIGN OF A STEERABLE ANKLE-FOOT PROSTHETIC ROBOT.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? During locomotion, turning is a common and recurring event which is largely neglected in the current state-of-the-art ankle-foot prostheses, forcing amputees to use different… (more)

Ficanha, Evandro M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

High speed measurements of neutral beam turn-on and impact of beam modulation on measurements of ion density  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modulation of neutral beams on tokamaks is performed routinely, enabling background rejection for active spectroscopic diagnostics, and control of injected power and torque. We find that there exists an anomalous initial transient in the beam neutrals delivered to the tokamak that is not accounted for by the accelerator voltage and power supply current. Measurements of the charge-exchange and beam photoemission on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] at high speed (200 ?s) reveal that the energy of the beam neutrals is constant, but the density of beam neutrals displays dramatic variation in the first 2–3 ms following beam turn-on. The impact of this beam density variation on inferred ion densities and impurity transport is presented, with suggested means to correct for the anomalous transient.

Grierson, B. A., E-mail: bgriers@pppl.gov; Grisham, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Crowley, B.; Scoville, J. T. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

Drell, Persis [SLAC Director] [SLAC Director

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

305

The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

Drell, Persis [SLAC Director

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

CEMs turn monitoring giant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crucial to complying with environmental regulations is selecting appropriate pollution control equipment to capture or destroy regulated pollutants. But just as important is selecting a continuous emissions monitoring system (CEM). CEMs play a dual role in an overall compliance strategy. On one hand, they identify the type and quantity of emissions at a source as a first step for determining which regulatory requirements and control technologies are applicable. They also provide ongoing emissions data to demonstrate compliance with air and other environmental regulations. Facilities are required to monitor their processes with CEMs, or a comparable technology, under several titles of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. CEMs meet regulatory requirements if they include a SO[sub 2] concentration monitor, nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) concentration monitor, volumetric flow monitor, opacity monitor, diluent gas monitor and data acquisition and handling system. The entire system and each subsystem has to be installed and certified before it can be used for compliance. A written quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) plan for the CEMs must accompany the permit application. The acid rain rules also impose performance standards and frequent calibration checks to ensure the integrity of CEMs data.

White, J.R. (KVB/Analect, Irvine, CA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Turning on LAMP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Christoph Bostedt, a senior staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, provides a sneak peek of a powerful new instrument, called LAMP, that is now available for experiments that probe the atomic and molecular realm. LAMP replaces and updates the first instrument at LCLS, dubbed CAMP, which will be installed at an X-ray laser in Germany.

Bostedt, Christoph

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

The Wheel Turns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the street. IIJim, corne herso I wBnt to telk to yoU.'I Kirk cems over and knelt 8t Spock's feet, resting hL.;) erms on th(:) Vul can IS knee-3 9 end looking up anxiously into his feee. "What is it, Spack? Have I done something '"rang?" "Of course not...

Piacentini, Valerie

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Turn Hoang Nguyen  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Major: Organic Chemistry Program of Study Committee: George A. Kraus (Major Professor) Richard C. Larock...

310

Turning on LAMP  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Christoph Bostedt, a senior staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, provides a sneak peek of a powerful new instrument, called LAMP, that is now available for experiments that probe the atomic and molecular realm. LAMP replaces and updates the first instrument at LCLS, dubbed CAMP, which will be installed at an X-ray laser in Germany.

Bostedt, Christoph

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

311

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: The History of Biomass  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

312

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Energy from Biomass  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

313

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: History of Biomass  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

314

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Bessie's Biofuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

315

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Algae Biofuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Seward HS in Seward, AK, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

316

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Biofuel Acts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

317

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Comparison of Bio-fuels to Other Commonly Used Forms of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

318

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Biofuels Sustainable Transportation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

319

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Algae Biofuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

320

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: From Fish Food to Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from LISD TECH Center in Adrian, MI, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: A "Biomassive" Innovation: Fueling Life in Appalachia  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Belfry School in Belfry, KY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

322

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Corn to Ethanol the Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

323

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: BIOfuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

324

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: History of Bioenergy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Troy High School in Troy, MI, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

325

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Bioenergy News Today  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from The Preuss School in La Jolla, CA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

326

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Bioenergy: Why is it important?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from The Preuss School in La Jolla, CA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

327

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: What is Biomass?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

328

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Iowa Ethanol Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

329

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Biomass Reduces Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

330

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: History of Biomass  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

331

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: What is Biogas?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

332

Interactions of microbes in aquatic systems Uncultured populations of bacteria were analyzed in aquatic systems and populations related  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and quantitative analysis of Archaea in anaerobic sediments of Lake Rotsee (Lucerne growing by sulfur disproportionation and the purple sulfur bacteria acting as biotic

Upchurch, Gary - Department of Biology, Texas State University

333

The calcification of staphylococcus aureus bacteria by the mineralization by inhibitor exclusion mechanism : a potential defense mechanism against bacterial infections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to all life forms and phosphorous is a necessary componentof calcium and phosphorous suggests that calcificationpeaks for carbon and phosphorous in the calcified bacteria

Truong, Linh Y.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Understanding the Role of the Bacteria, Isolated from the Hanford Site Soil, on the Fate and Transport of Uranium.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Bacteria are known for their abilities to influence the geochemical processes and affect the mobility of contaminants in the subsurface. Arthrobacter strain G975 was… (more)

Carvajal, Denny A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Genomics Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB): a resource for microsymbiont genomes (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wayne Reeve of Murdoch University on "Genomics Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB): a resource for microsymbiont genomes" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Reeve, Wayne [Murdoch University

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Transformations of 14C lignin cell walls of wheat by a fungus and by bacteria from the rumen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transformations of 14C lignin cell walls of wheat by a fungus and by bacteria from the rumen MA but little is known about the fate of lignins. The aim of this work was to study the transformation of 14C lignins of wheat straw by ruminal bacteria and fungi. Cell walls of wheat straw apical internodes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

337

ORNL researchers are studying how bacteria found in Yellowstone hot springs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deconstruction--a major roadblock to the production of advanced biofuels," Giannone said. --Morgan Mc in the development of a cheaper biofuel production process. (Image: Jennifer Morrell-Falvey/ORNL) SCIENCE ORNL explores proteins in Yellowstone bacteria for biofuel inspiration substrates such as pure cellulose

Pennycook, Steve

338

Molecular Diversity of Legume Root-Nodule Bacteria in Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Australia Be´ne´dicte Lafay¤ *, Jeremy J. Burdon Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) Plant Industry, Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Canberra, Australia Background. Symbiotic relationships between leguminous plants (family Fabaceae) and nodule-forming bacteria in Australia

Boyer, Edmond

339

GROWTH OF A POPULATION OF BACTERIA IN A DYNAMICAL HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

´EGINE MARCHAND Abstract. We study the growth of a population of bacteria in a dynami- cal hostile environment´EGINE MARCHAND · We put an oriented edge from (z1, n1) to (z2, n2) if and only if n2 = n1 + 1 and z2 - z1 1 1

340

ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE (ATP) AND DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID (DNA) CONTENT OF MARINE MICROALGAE AND BACTERIA WITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE (ATP) AND DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID (DNA) CONTENT OF MARINE MICROALGAE the relationship between DNA and ATP content of marine bacteria and microalgae. This relationship was used. Laboratory-derived DNA:ATP ratios ranged from 8.5 to 33 (wt:wt) for cultures of marine microalgae, and from

Luther, Douglas S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Role of Fish as Sources and Vectors of Bacteria and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Role of Fish as Sources and Vectors of Bacteria and Influence of Bat Colonies on Indicator) #12;Acknowledgments Dr. Robin Brinkmeyer ­ Bat colony studies Jenny Wrast ­ Fish and Bat study & sediments #12;But what about fish???? #12;But what about bats???? #12;Outline Fish Study Bat Study #12

342

Bacteria can sprout webs of electrical wiring that transform the soil into a geological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cells into a web-like electrical circuit, they report (D. Ntarlagiannis et al. Geophys. Res. Lett. 34, L in La Jolla, California. As the bacteria consume nutrients for energy, they spit out unwanted electrons sand infiltrated with a nutrient compound (lactate), and allowed S. oneidensis to grow in this `fake

Lovley, Derek

343

Microfluidic capture and release of bacteria in a conical nanopore array Peng Guo,ab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidic capture and release of bacteria in a conical nanopore array Peng Guo,ab Eric W. Hall a microfluidic device. As an example, we demonstrate that cyanobacteria can be captured, one bacterium per pore, in a conical nanoporous membrane (CNM) integrated into a microfluidic chip. This study, to our knowledge

Zare, Richard N.

344

Winery waste makes fuel Electricity, bacteria break organics in wastewater into hydrogen gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSNBC.com Winery waste makes fuel Electricity, bacteria break organics in wastewater into hydrogen method for generating hydrogen fuel from wastewater is now operating at a California winery material in the wastewater into hydrogen gas. There is a lot more energy locked in the wastewater than

345

Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates of bacteria for a wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates of bacteria for a wastewater treatment process S. Diop1 for specific growth rates for a wastewater treatment process. A 2-stage model of 6 dynamic states is assumed. Steyer, Dynamic model develop- ment and parameter identification for an anaerobic wastewater treatment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

346

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater anal- ysis and estimation schemes for specific growth rates for an anaerobic wastewater treatment the organic and inorganic materials) of municipal or industrial wastewater often needs to be highly reduced

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

347

Methanobactin: a copper binding compound having antibiotic and antioxidant activity isolated from methanotrophic bacteria  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A means and method for treating bacterial infection, providing antioxidant activity, and chelating copper using a copper binding compound produced by methanotrophic bacteria is described. The compound, known as methanobactin, is the first of a new class of antibiotics having gram-positive activity. Methanobactin has been sequenced, and its structural formula determined.

DiSpirito, Alan A. (Ames, IA); Zahn, James A. (Harbor Beach, MI); Graham, David W. (Lawrence, KS); Kim, Hyung J. (St. Paul, MN); Alterman, Michail (Lawrence, KS); Larive, Cynthia (Lawrence, KS)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

348

Methylation of Mercury by Bacteria Exposed to Dissolved, Nanoparticulate, and Microparticulate Mercuric Sulfides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methylation of Mercury by Bacteria Exposed to Dissolved, Nanoparticulate, and Microparticulate in the environment is partly controlled by the bioavailability of inorganic divalent mercury (Hg(II)) to anaerobic matter to form chemical species that include organic-coated mercury sulfide nanoparticles as reaction

349

Structure-based Inhibitor Discovery against Adenylyl Cyclase Toxins from Pathogenic Bacteria That Cause Anthrax and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

That Cause Anthrax and Whooping Cough* Received for publication, February 4, 2003, and in revised form, March bacteria that cause anthrax and whooping cough, respectively. Using the structure of the catalytic site pathogenesis and to fight against anthrax and whooping cough. The 2001 anthrax attacks in the United States

Mrksich, Milan

350

aerobic hydrogen-consuming bacteria: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aerobic hydrogen-consuming bacteria First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Diversity of...

351

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENT LAKE SEDIMENT: A PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENTH F A PRELIMINARY REPORT IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AKD IN A RECENTrests on the finding that algae have less cellulose and a

Han, Jerry; McCarthy, E.D.; Van Hoeven Jr., William; Calvin, Melvin; Bradley, W. H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Poor and In Poor Health Bottom Line: In the United States, discussion about how to improve health often turns to either access to care or health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

often turns to either access to care or health behaviors like smoking or diet. These things matter children not re- ceiving any health care in a given year is twice that of higher-income children. Another and changes rapidly during the first few years of life. U.S. Health Care The U.S. health care system includes

Liblit, Ben

353

DES 192 INTERNSHIP DOCUMENTATION INSTRUCTIONS Paperwork must be completed, signed, and turned in to the Advising Office in order to obtain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DES 192 INTERNSHIP DOCUMENTATION INSTRUCTIONS Paperwork must be completed, signed, and turned of the quarter) OBJECTIVES OF DESIGN INTERNSHIP CREDIT: Encourage students to obtain applied learning experience's personal and educational goals. To obtain academic credit (units) for an internship, you must: · Have

Hernes, Peter J.

354

Biofuel from Bacteria and Sunlight: Shewanella as an Ideal Platform for Producing Hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Minnesota is developing clean-burning, liquid hydrocarbon fuels from bacteria. The University is finding ways to continuously harvest hydrocarbons from a type of bacteria called Shewanella by using a photosynthetic organism to constantly feed Shewanella the sugar it needs for energy and hydrocarbon production. The two organisms live and work together as a system. Using Shewanella to produce hydrocarbon fuels offers several advantages over traditional biofuel production methods. First, it eliminates many of the time-consuming and costly steps involved in growing plants and harvesting biomass. Second, hydrocarbon biofuels resemble current petroleum-based fuels and would therefore require few changes to the existing fuel refining and distribution infrastructure in the U.S.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Modeling the role of bacteria in leaching of low-grade ores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A robustious structural model is developed to describe the role of bacteria in the leaching process of low-grade ores under conditions controlled by intraparticle diffusion. The main impetus behind developing this model is to provide an insight into such systems, together with a suitable framework for interpreting experimental data. The model is derived in detail with respect to reaction chemistry and the role of bacteria in catalyzing these reactions, specifically the synergism of chemistry, physics and biology in determining the overall behavior of the system. The model is used to simulate the atmospheric oxidation of iron disulfide contained in porous solids in the presence of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans (T. ferrooxidans). The experimental data are predicted well by the model, which demonstrates its applicability and supports the view that the rate of intraparticle diffusion is the controlling mechanism for this system.

Batarseh, K.I.; Stiller, A.H. (West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Data Gathering in Networks of Bacteria Colonies: Collective Sensing and Relaying Using Molecular Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The prospect of new biological and industrial applications that require communication in micro-scale, encourages research on the design of bio-compatible communication networks using networking primitives already available in nature. One of the most promising candidates for constructing such networks is to adapt and engineer specific types of bacteria that are capable of sensing, actuation, and above all, communication with each other. In this paper, we describe a new architecture for networks of bacteria to form a data collecting network, as in traditional sensor networks. The key to this architecture is the fact that the node in the network itself is a bacterial colony; as an individual bacterium (biological agent) is a tiny unreliable element with limited capabilities. We describe such a network under two different scenarios. We study the data gathering (sensing and multihop communication) scenario as in sensor networks followed by the consensus problem in a multi-node network. We will explain as to how th...

Einolghozati, Arash; Beirami, Ahmad; Fekri, Faramarz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Improved oil recovery using bacteria isolated from North Sea petroleum reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During secondary oil recovery, water is injected into the formation to sweep out the residual oil. The injected water, however, follows the path of least resistance through the high-permeability zones, leaving oil in the low-permeability zones. Selective plugging of these their zones would divert the waterflood to the residual oil and thus increase the life of the well. Bacteria have been suggested as an alternative plugging agent to the current method of polymer injection. Starved bacteria can penetrate deeply into rock formations where they attach to the rock surfaces, and given the right nutrients can grow and produce exo-polymer, reducing the permeability of these zones. The application of microbial enhanced oil recovery has only been applied to shallow, cool, onshore fields to date. This study has focused on the ability of bacteria to enhance oil recovery offshore in the North Sea, where the environment can be considered extreme. A screen of produced water from oil reservoirs (and other extreme subterranean environments) was undertaken, and two bacteria were chosen for further work. These two isolates were able to grow and survive in the presence of saline formation waters at a range of temperatures above 50{degrees}C as facultative anaerobes. When a solution of isolates was passed through sandpacks and nutrients were added, significant reductions in permeabilities were achieved. This was confirmed in Clashach sandstone at 255 bar, when a reduction of 88% in permeability was obtained. Both isolates can survive nutrient starvation, which may improve penetration through the reservoir. Thus, the isolates show potential for field trials in the North Sea as plugging agents.

Davey, R.A.; Lappin-Scott, H. [Univ. of Exeter (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Diffusive transport without detailed balance in motile bacteria: Does microbiology need statistical physics?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbiology is the science of microbes, particularly bacteria. Many bacteria are motile: they are capable of self-propulsion. Among these, a significant class execute so-called run-and-tumble motion: they follow a fairly straight path for a certain distance, then abruptly change direction before repeating the process. This dynamics has something in common with Brownian motion (it is diffusive at large scales), and also something in contrast. Specifically, motility parameters such as the run speed and tumble rate depend on the local environment and hence can vary in space. When they do so, even if a steady state is reached, this is not generally invariant under time-reversal: the principle of detailed balance, which restores the microscopic time-reversal symmetry of systems in thermal equilibrium, is mesoscopically absent in motile bacteria. This lack of detailed balance (allowed by the flux of chemical energy that drives motility) creates pitfalls for the unwary modeller. Here I review some statistical mecha...

Cates, M E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Diffusive transport without detailed balance in motile bacteria: Does microbiology need statistical physics?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbiology is the science of microbes, particularly bacteria. Many bacteria are motile: they are capable of self-propulsion. Among these, a significant class execute so-called run-and-tumble motion: they follow a fairly straight path for a certain distance, then abruptly change direction before repeating the process. This dynamics has something in common with Brownian motion (it is diffusive at large scales), and also something in contrast. Specifically, motility parameters such as the run speed and tumble rate depend on the local environment and hence can vary in space. When they do so, even if a steady state is reached, this is not generally invariant under time-reversal: the principle of detailed balance, which restores the microscopic time-reversal symmetry of systems in thermal equilibrium, is mesoscopically absent in motile bacteria. This lack of detailed balance (allowed by the flux of chemical energy that drives motility) creates pitfalls for the unwary modeller. Here I review some statistical mechanical models for bacterial motility, presenting them as a paradigm for exploring diffusion without detailed balance. I also discuss the extent to which statistical physics is useful in understanding real or potential microbiological experiments.

M. E. Cates

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

360

Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Justin Gallivan, of Emory University presents a talk titled "Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

Gallivan, Justin [Emory University

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Justin Gallivan, of Emory University presents a talk titled "Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

Gallivan, Justin [Emory University] [Emory University

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

The Revenge of the Market on the Rentiers: Why neo-liberal Reports of the end of history turned out to be premature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

government transfers (such as social security, unemployment benefits, welfare payments, etc.), and before individual income taxes and employees' payroll taxes (but after employers’ payroll taxes and corporate income taxes). 24 In turn, including capital... ; the value of private and government debt securities from US$9 to US$80 trillion; and bank assets from US$11 to US$96 trillion (on the latter number, see notes below Figure 1; all figures in US$ at 2007 value). 3 FIGURE 1 ? (a...

Palma, J G

363

Long-term developments in Her X-1: Correlation between the histories of the 35 day turn-on cycle and the 1.24 sec pulse period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the long-term (1971-2005) behaviour of the 1.24 sec pulse period and the 35 day precession period of Her X-1 and show that both periods vary in a highly correlated way (see also Staubert et al. 1997 and 2000). When the spin-up rate decreases, the 35 day turn-on period shortens.This correlation is most evident on long time scales (~2000 days),e.g.around four extended spin-down episodes, but also on shorter time scales (a few 100 days) on which quasi-periodic variations are apparent. We argue that the likely common cause is variations of the mass accretion rate onto the neutron star.The data since 1991 allow a continuous sampling and indicate a lag between the turn-on behaviour and the spin behaviour, in the sense that changes are first seen in the spin, about one cycle later in the turn-on. Both the coronal wind model (Schandl & Meyer 1994) as well as the stream-disk model (Shakura et al.999) predict this kind of behaviour.

R. Staubert; S. Schandl; D. Klochkov; J Wilms; K. Postnov; N. Shakura

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

Frischer, Marc E. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

Exploration of Simple Analytical Approaches for Rapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the current methods for pathogenic bacterial detection require long sample-preparation and analysis time, as well as complex instrumentation. This dissertation explores simple analytical approaches (e.g., flow cytometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy) that may be applied towards ideal requirements of a microbial detection system, through method and instrumentation development, and by the creation and characterization of immunosensing platforms. This dissertation is organized into six sections. In the general Introduction section a literature review on several of the key aspects of this work is presented. First, different approaches for detection of pathogenic bacteria will be reviewed, with a comparison of the relative strengths and weaknesses of each approach, A general overview regarding diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is then presented. Next, the structure and function of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed from organosulfur molecules at gold and micrometer and sub-micrometer patterning of biomolecules using SAMs will be discussed. This section is followed by four research chapters, presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 1 describes the efforts and challenges towards the creation of imunosensing platforms that exploit the flexibility and structural stability of SAMs of thiols at gold. 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyl-1-thiol SAM (PFDT) and dithio-bis(succinimidyl propionate)-(DSP)-derived SAMs were used to construct the platform. Chapter 2 describes the characterization of the PFDT- and DSP-derived SAMs, and the architectures formed when it is coupled to antibodies as well as target bacteria. These studies used infrared reflection spectroscopy (IRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), Chapter 3 presents a new sensitive, and portable diffuse reflection based technique for the rapid identification and quantification of pathogenic bacteria. Chapter 4 reports research efforts in the construction and evaluation of a prototype flow cytometry based cell detector and enumerator. This final research chapter is followed by a general summation and future prospectus section that concludes this dissertation.

Salma Rahman

2005-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

366

Soft inertial microfluidics for high throughput separation of bacteria from human blood cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed a new approach to separate bacteria from human blood cells based on soft inertial force induced migration with flow defined curved and focused sample flow inside a microfluidic device. This approach relies on a combination of an asymmetrical sheath flow and proper channel geometry to generate a soft inertial force on the sample fluid in the curved and focused sample flow segment to deflect larger particles away while the smaller ones are kept on or near the original flow streamline. The curved and focused sample flow and inertial effect were visualized and verified using a fluorescent dye primed in the device. First the particle behavior was studied in detail using 9.9 and 1.0 {micro}m particles with a polymer-based prototype. The prototype device is compact with an active size of 3 mm{sup 2}. The soft inertial effect and deflection distance were proportional to the fluid Reynolds number (Re) and particle Reynolds number (Re{sub p}), respectively. We successfully demonstrated separation of bacteria (Escherichia coli) from human red blood cells at high cell concentrations (above 10{sup 8}/mL), using a sample flow rate of up to 18 {micro}L/min. This resulted in at least a 300-fold enrichment of bacteria at a wide range of flow rates with a controlled flow spreading. The separated cells were proven to be viable. Proteins from fractions before and after cell separation were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and staining to verify the removal of red blood cell proteins from the bacterial cell fraction. This novel microfluidic process is robust, reproducible, simple to perform, and has a high throughput compared to other cell sorting systems. Microfluidic systems based on these principles could easily be manufactured for clinical laboratory and biomedical applications.

Wu, Zhigang; Willing, Ben; Bjerketorp, Joakim; Jansson, Janet K.; Hjort, Klas

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

367

A technique for quantitative and qualitative viewing of aquatic bacteria using scanning electron microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

microscopic enumeration techniques. Water samples are concentrated on pre-wetted (Triton X-100) Nuclepore filters (0. 2 um pore size) to prov1de a uniform distri- bution of bacteria on the filter surface and vacuum filtered (660 Torr). The filter... is transferred to a petri dish containing filter paper soaked 1n 2% glutaraldehyde and the bacter1a are fixed for one hour. Dehydration 1s performed by transferr1ng the filters through a series of petri dishes conta1ning filter paper saturated with 25, 50, 75...

Dreier, Thomas Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

Light-harvesting in bacteria exploits a critical interplay between transport and trapping dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light-harvesting bacteria Rhodospirillum Photometricum were recently found to adopt strikingly different architectures depending on illumination conditions. We present analytic and numerical calculations which explain this observation by quantifying a dynamical interplay between excitation transfer kinetics and reaction center cycling. High light-intensity membranes (HLIM) exploit dissipation as a photo-protective mechanism, thereby safeguarding a steady supply of chemical energy, while low light-intensity membranes (LLIM) efficiently process unused illumination intensity by channelling it to open reaction centers. More generally, our analysis elucidates and quantifies the trade-offs in natural network design for solar energy conversion.

Felipe Caycedo-Soler; Ferney J. Rodriguez; Luis Quiroga; Neil F. Johnson

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

369

Chemotactic behavior of deep subsurface bacteria toward carbohydrates, amino acids and a chlorinated alkene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemotactic behavior of deep terrestrial subsurface bacteria toward amino acids, carbohydrates and trichloroethylene was assayed using a modification of the capillary method and bacterial enumeration by acridine orange direct counts. Eleven isolates of bacteria isolated from six different geological formations were investigated. A bimodal response rather than an absolute positive or negative response was observed in most assays. Most of the isolates were positively chemotactic to low concentrations of substrates and were repelled by high concentrations of the same substrate. However, this was not the case for trichloroethylene (TCE) which was mostly an attractant and elicited the highest responses in all the isolates when compared with amino acids and carbohydrates. The movement rates of these isolates in aseptic subsurface sediments in the absence and presence of TCE were also determined using a laboratory model. All of the isolates showed distinct response range, peak, and threshold concentrations when exposed to the same substrates suggesting that they are possibly different species as has been inferred from DNA homology studies. 101 refs., 4 figs., 57 tabs.

Lopez de Victoria, G. (Puerto Rico Univ., Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico). Dept. of Biology)

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Structural similarities between biogenic uraninites produced by phylogenetically and metabolically diverse bacteria.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the product of microbial uranium reduction is often reported to be“UO2”, a comprehensive characterization including stoichiometry and unit cell determination is available for only one Shewanella species. Here, we compare the products of batch uranyl reduction by a collection of dissimilatory metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genera Shewanella, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfovibrio under similar laboratory conditions. Our results demonstrate that U(VI) bioreduction by this assortment of commonly studied, environmentally relevant bacteria leads to the precipitation of uraninite with a composition between UO2.00 and UO2.075, regardless of phylogenetic or metabolic diversity. Coupled analyses, including electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and powder diffraction, confirm that structurally and chemically analogous uraninite solids are produced. These biogenic uraninites have particle diameters of about 2-3 nm and lattice constants consistent with UO2.0 and exhibit a high degree of intermediate-range order. Results indicate that phylogenetic and metabolic variability within delta- and gamma-proteobacteria has little effect on nascent biouraninite structure or crystal size under the investigated conditions.

Sharp, Jonathan; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Veeramani, Harish; Suvorova, Elena; Kennedy, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Mehta, Apurva; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Mannitol Operon Repressor MTIR belongs to a new class of transcription regulators in bacteria.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many bacteria express phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTS). The mannitol-specific PTS catalyze the uptake and phosphorylation of d-mannitol. The uptake system comprises several genes encoded in the single operon. The expression of the mannitol operon is regulated by a proposed transcriptional factor, mannitol operon repressor (MtlR) that was first studied in Escherichia coli. Here we report the first crystal structures of MtlR from Vibrio parahemeolyticus (Vp-MtlR) and its homolog YggD protein from Shigella flexneri (Sf-YggD). MtlR and YggD belong to the same protein family (Pfam05068). Although Vp-MtlR and Sf-YggD share low sequence identity (22%), their overall structures are very similar, representing a novel all {alpha}-helical fold, and indicate similar function. However, their lack of any known DNA-binding structural motifs and their unfavorable electrostatic properties imply that MtlR/YggD are unlikely to bind a specific DNA operator directly as proposed earlier. This structural observation is further corroborated by in vitro DNA-binding studies of E. coli MtlR (Ec-MtlR), which detected no interaction of Ec-MtlR with the well characterized mannitol operator/promoter region. Therefore, MtlR/YggD belongs to a new class of transcription factors in bacteria that may regulate gene expression indirectly as a part of a larger transcriptional complex.

Tan, K.; Borovilos, M.; Zhou, M; Horer, S; Clancy, S; Moy, S; Volkart, LL; Sassoon, J; Baumann, U; Joachimiak, A (Biosciences Division); (Univ. of Berne)

2009-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

372

Determination of kinetic coefficients for the simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium contamination of groundwaters and surface waters near abandoned mill tailings piles is a serious concern in many areas of the western United States. Uranium usually exists in either the U(IV) or the U(VI) oxidation state. U(VI) is soluble in water and, as a result, is very mobile in the environment. U(IV), however, is generally insoluble in water and, therefore, is not subject to aqueous transport. In recent years, researchers have discovered that certain anaerobic microorganisms, such as the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, can mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). Although the ability of this microorganism to reduce U(VI) has been studied in some detail by previous researchers, the kinetics of the reactions have not been characterized. The purpose of this research was to perform kinetic studies on Desulfovibrio desulficans bacteria during simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium and to determine the phase in which uranium exists after it has been reduced and precipitated from solution. The studies were conducted in a laboratory-scale chemostat under substrate-limited growth conditions with pyruvate as the substrate. Kinetic coefficients for substrate utilization and cell growth were calculated using the Monod equation. The maximum rate of substrate utilization (k) was determined to be 4.70 days{sup {minus}1} while the half-velocity constant (K{sub s}) was 140 mg/l COD. The yield coefficient (Y) was determined to be 0.17 mg cells/mg COD while the endogenous decay coefficient (k{sub d}) was calculated as 0.072 days{sup {minus}1}. After reduction, U(IV) Precipitated from solution in the uraninite (UO{sub 2}) phase. Uranium removal efficiency as high as 90% was achieved in the chemostat.

Tucker, M.D.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III) bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Further, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated 2- and 3- dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Most cells had their outer membranes decorated with up to 150 nm diameter aggregates composed of a few nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell-surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C.; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Comolli, Luis R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

374

3rd ASM Conference on Cell-Cell Communication in Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the final program and provides the abstracts presented at the fourth American Society of Microbiology-sponsored conference on Cell-cell Communication in Bacteria, held November 6-9, 2011 in Miami, Florida. Bacteria are the paradigm for unicellular life, yet they also exhibit elaborate coordinated behaviors that often defy unicellularity. Research over the past two decades has revealed that a wide range of microbes communicate by diverse mechanisms. In most cases these microbial conversations occur through the exchange of diffusible signals, although there are also clear examples of contact-dependent communication. Many microbes use these signaling mechanisms to monitor and respond to population density, a process often described as quorum sensing. Interbacterial communication is not, however restricted to quorum sensing mechanisms, and there is mounting evidence that signaling can function in a range of different capacities. Communication between microorganisms has profound impacts on host interactions, as pathogens and commensals often regulate factors critical for interaction with their hosts via signal production and perception. The CCCB-4 conference provided a unique forum for the discussion, dissemination and exchange of new information and ideas among researchers working within this rapidly developing, yet mature field. Sessions were arranged around topics such as: the diversity of signal generation and identity; mechanisms of signal transduction and interference; cell-cell communication in bacterial development and antibiotic synthesis; host-microbe signaling and pathogenesis; symbiosis, mutualism, and microbe-microbe communication; ecology and evolution; advancements in the technological tool-kit for studying cell-cell communication. The conference served as a conduit for the exchange and synthesis of new ideas among leading US and international scientists working on bacterial communication.

Nalker, Lisa K. [ASM

2011-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

375

Technique development for uiper critical field studies of SmFeAs(O,F) in the 300T single turn system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In high temperature superconductors, such as the most recent class of iron pnictides, extremely high upper critical fields H{sub c2} are common. The determination of H{sub c2}(T) is crucial to understand the detailed nature of the superconductor, in particular H{sub c2}(T = 0K) is of great interest. It is not only related to fundamental properties of the system, it is furthermore of great importance for materials science, as it is the ultimate limit of applicability of this superconductor in high field applications. However, this important quantity can only be estimated by extrapolation, as H{sub c2}(T = 0K) well exceeds hundreds of Tesla in optimally doped SillFeAs(O,F). We are developing methods to measure Ha(T) in direct transport in the extreme magnetic fields generated by the LANL single turn magnet.

Mcdonald, Ross D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balakirev, F. F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Altarawneh, M. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Betts, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moll, Philip Jw [ETH ZURICH; Zhigadlo, N D [ETH ZURICH; Karpinski, J [ETH ZURICH; Batlogg, B. [ETH ZURICH

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

Turning greenhouse gases into gold  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

into an acidic solution of pyridine and CO2 and charging it with just 600 millivolts of electricity, the CO2 could be transformed into formic acid, formaldehyde and methanol. Now...

377

Industry turns its attention south  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper discusses the outlook for the gas and oil industries in the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Significant foreign investment continues to elude Russia`s oil and gas industry, so the Caspian nations of Kazakhstan and Azerbaijan are picking up the slack, welcoming the flow of foreign capital to their energy projects. Separate evaluations are given for Russia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Moldova, Tajikstan, Uzbekistan, Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Serbia.

Marhefka, D. [Russian Petroleum Investor, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Turning greenhouse gases into gold  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation6/14/11 Page 1 of

379

What Employees Need (and Want) to Hear When Justifying the Suspension of a Regulated Metals Plan for the Processing of Drums Containing Metal Turnings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Regulated Metals Plan (RMP) was implemented for outdoor work activities involving the removal and disposition of approximately 4,000 deteriorated waste drums containing 236 metric tonnes (260 tons) of lead turnings from various, unspecified machine shop facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Until exposure monitoring could prove otherwise, the work area established for processing the drums was conservatively defined as a Lead Regulated Area (LRA) subject to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Lead Standard found in Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1910.1025. The vast majority of the analytical results for the industrial hygiene breathing zone samples collected and tested for arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, selenium, silver, and thallium using the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's analytical method 7300 were equivalent to the laboratory detection limits for each analyte. All results were less than 6% of their respective Permissible Exposure Limits (PEL), except for one nickel result that was approximately 17% of its PEL. The results provided justification to eventually down-post the LRA to existing employee protection requirements. In addition to removing the deteriorated drums and accompanying debris, the success of this project was quantified in terms of zero recordable injuries. The primary contributor in achieving this success was the sharing and communication of information between management, safety, and the field teams. Specifically, this was what the employees needed (and wanted) to hear when justifying the suspension of the RMP for the processing of drums containing metal turnings. Daily briefings on the status of the project and field monitoring results were just as important as maintaining budget and schedule milestones. Also, the Environmental, Safety and Health organization maintained its presence by continuing to monitor evolving field conditions to ensure the effectiveness of its plans and procedures. (authors)

Todd Potts, T. [WESKEM, LLC, Oak Ridge Turnpike, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hylko, J.M. [Paducah Remediation Services, LLC, Kevil, KY (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

How do microbial fuel cells (MFCs) work? Bacteria need energy to survive, in the same way that humans need food to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

much does it cost to treat wastewater? In the U.S. alone, the cost of treating 33 billion gallonsHow do microbial fuel cells (MFCs) work? Bacteria need energy to survive, in the same way that humans need food to live. Bacteria get this energy in a two-step process. The first step requires

Lee, Dongwon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Protecting Our Water: Tracking Sources of Bacterial Contamination Numerous surface waterbodies in Texas are classified as having high levels of fecal coliform bacteria, an indicator of fecal pollution.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Texas are classified as having high levels of fecal coliform bacteria, an indicator of fecal pollution. coli and other fecal coliform bacteria do not provide information on whether the source of pollution of pollution need to be identified to implement effective pollution control strategies to improve water quality

382

Excitonic energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes in purple bacteria Jun Ye, Kewei Sun, Yang Zhao, Yunjin Yu, Chee Kong Lee et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excitonic energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes in purple bacteria Jun Ye, Kewei Sun, Yang-harvesting complexes in purple bacteria Jun Ye,1 Kewei Sun,1 Yang Zhao,1,a) Yunjin Yu,1,2 Chee Kong Lee,1 and Jianshu

Cao, Jianshu

383

Bugs boost Cold War clean-up: Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago. updated at midnight GMTtoday is friday, november 14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003 · Fungus catches radioactive fallout 8 May 2002 · Depleted uranium soils battlefields 12 MarchBugs boost Cold War clean-up: Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago boost Cold War clean-up Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago. 13 October

Lovley, Derek

384

Digestion of milk protein and methanol-grown bacteria protein in the preruminant calf. I. Kinetics and balance in the terminal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Digestion of milk protein and methanol-grown bacteria protein in the preruminant calf. I. Kinetics the digestion of two milk replacers (control and bacteria), containing different protein sources, in the end of the small intestine and of the digestive tract in the preruminant calf. The protein in the control diet

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

Corrosion Protection due to Bacteria /Metal Interactions E. Kus1, K. H. Nealson2 and F. Mansfeld1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion Protection due to Bacteria /Metal Interactions E. Kus1, K. H. Nealson2 and F. Mansfeld1 1. Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory (CEEL) The Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) refers to the increase of the corrosion rate of metals due to microbial

Southern California, University of

386

University of Minnesota study of exposure of animal manure applicators to bacteria (S. aureus, MRSA) of swine origin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Minnesota study of exposure of animal manure applicators to bacteria (S. aureus, MRSA to certain antibiotics, and those resistant to the drug methicillin (known as MRSA ­ methicillin resistant S be a reservoir of MRSA. Furthermore, people with direct swine contact have an increased high likelihood

Netoff, Theoden

387

Digestion of milk protein and methanol-grown bacteria protein in the preruminant calf. II. Amino acid composition of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Digestion of milk protein and methanol-grown bacteria protein in the preruminant calf. II. Amino Beaumont, France. Summary. The aim of this trial was to study the balance of the amino acid digestion digestibility of all the amino acids assayed was lower in the terminal small intestine than in the whole

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

388

When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic compounds in the fish and the fish becomes spoiled. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy neural network (ANN) for the development of an ANN based FT-IR Screening System for fish

Michel, Howard E.

389

Detecting bacteria and Determining Their Susceptibility to Antibiotics by Stochastic Confinement in Nanoliter Droplets using Plug-Based Microfluidics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes plug-based microfluidic technology that enables rapid detection and drug susceptibility screening of bacteria in samples, including complex biological matrices, without pre-incubation. Unlike conventional bacterial culture and detection methods, which rely on incubation of a sample to increase the concentration of bacteria to detectable levels, this method confines individual bacteria into droplets nanoliters in volume. When single cells are confined into plugs of small volume such that the loading is less than one bacterium per plug, the detection time is proportional to plug volume. Confinement increases cell density and allows released molecules to accumulate around the cell, eliminating the pre-incubation step and reducing the time required to detect the bacteria. We refer to this approach as stochastic confinement. Using the microfluidic hybrid method, this technology was used to determine the antibiogram - or chart of antibiotic sensitivity - of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to many antibiotics in a single experiment and to measure the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drug cefoxitin (CFX) against this strain. In addition, this technology was used to distinguish between sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus in samples of human blood plasma. High-throughput microfluidic techniques combined with single-cell measurements also enable multiple tests to be performed simultaneously on a single sample containing bacteria. This technology may provide a method of rapid and effective patient-specific treatment of bacterial infections and could be extended to a variety of applications that require multiple functional tests of bacterial samples on reduced timescales.

Boedicker, J.; Li, L; Kline, T; Ismagilov, R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Dissimilatory Metabolism of Nitrogen Oxides in Bacteria:Comparative Reconstruction of Transcriptional Networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO) is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR and NnrR, two-component systems NarXL and NarQP, NO-responsive activator NorR, and nitrite sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches we predict DNA-binding signals for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA signal. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria including Clostridia, Thermotogales and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides metabolism not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species like Escherichia coli), but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding signal. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon includes also two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr) and nipC(dnrN), thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e., nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include denitrification genes. As the result, we demonstrate considerable interconnection between various nitrogen-oxides-responsive regulatory systems for the denitrification and NO detoxification genes and evolutionary plasticity of this transcriptional network.

Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, EricJ.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

In-Situ Survival Mechanisms of U and Tc Reducing Bacteria in Contaminated Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are model subsurface organisms for studying genes involving in situ radionuclide transformation and sediment survival. Our research objective for this project has been to develop a signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) procedure and use it to identify mutants in genes of these subsurface bacteria involved in sediment survival and radionuclide reduction. The mutant genes identified in these studies allow us for the first time to describe at the genetic level microbial processes that are actually being used by environmental bacteria while growing in their natural ecosystems. Identification of these genes revealed facets of microbial physiology and ecology that are not accessible through laboratory studies. Ultimately, this information may be used to optimize bioremediation or other engineered microbial processes. Furthermore, the identification of a mutant in a gene conferring multidrug resistance in strain MR-1 shows that this widespread mechanism of antibiotic resistance, likely has its origins as a mechanism of bacterial defense against naturally occurring toxins. Studies with D. desulfuricans G20: The STM procedure first involved generating a library of 5760 G20 mutants and screening for potential non-survivors in subsurface sediment microcosms. After two rounds of screening, a total of 117 mutants were confirmed to be true non-survivors. 97 transposon insertion regions have been sequenced to date. Upon further analysis of these mutants, we classified the sediment survival genes into COG functional categories. STM mutant insertions were located in genes encoding proteins related to metabolism (33%), cellular processes (42%), and information storage and processing (17%). We also noted 8% of STM mutants identified had insertions in genes for hypothetical proteins or unknown functions. Interestingly, at least 64 of these genes encode cytoplasmic proteins, 46 encode inner membrane proteins, and only 7 encode periplasmic space and outer membrane associated proteins. Through blast search analysis, we also showed that 81 out of 94 proteins shown to be important in sediment survival have homologs in D. vulgaris, 70 have homologs in Geobacter metallireducens, and 69 have homologs in Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Some interesting proteins include ribonucleotide reductase and chemotaxis related proteins. Ribonucleotide reductase catalyzes the reductive synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides from their corresponding ribonucleotides, providing the precursors necessary for DNA synthesis. Two ribonucleotide reductase genes (nrdE, nrdD) were found to be essential for G20 survival in the sediment, but not essential for growth in the lactate-sulfate medium. Bacterial methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCP) respond to changes in the concentration of attractants and repellents in the environment.

Krumholz, Lee R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Diversity and characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in groundwater at a uranium mill tailings site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plays a role in both natural attenuation and accelerated bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites. To realize bioremediation potential and accurately predict natural attenuation, it is important to first understand the microbial diversity of such sites. In this paper, the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in contaminated groundwater associated with a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Shiprock, N.Mex., was investigated. Two culture-independent analyses were employed: sequencing of clone libraries of PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) gene fragments and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarker analysis. A remarkable diversity among the DSR sequences was revealed, including sequences from ?-Proteobacteria, gram-positive organisms, and the Nitrospira division. PLFA analysis detected at least 52 different mid-chain-branched saturate PLFA and included a high proportion of 10me16:0. Desulfotomaculum and Desulfotomaculum-like sequences were the most dominant DSR genes detected. Those belonging to SRB within ?-Proteobacteria were mainly recovered from low-uranium (1,500 ppb) sites. Logistic regression showed a significant influence of uranium concentration over the dominance of this cluster of sequences (P ? 0.0001). This strong association indicates that Desulfotomaculum has remarkable

Yun-juan Chang; Aaron D. Peacock; Philip E. Long; John R. Stephen; James P. Mckinley; Sarah J. Macnaughton; A. K. M. Anwar Hussain; Arnold M. Saxton; David C. White

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Stuttering Min oscillations within E. coli bacteria: A stochastic polymerization model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed a 3D off-lattice stochastic polymerization model to study subcellular oscillation of Min proteins in the bacteria Escherichia coli, and used it to investigate the experimental phenomenon of Min oscillation stuttering. Stuttering was affected by the rate of immediate rebinding of MinE released from depolymerizing filament tips (processivity), protection of depolymerizing filament tips from MinD binding, and fragmentation of MinD filaments due to MinE. Each of processivity, protection, and fragmentation reduces stuttering, speeds oscillations, and reduces MinD filament lengths. Neither processivity or tip-protection were, on their own, sufficient to produce fast stutter-free oscillations. While filament fragmentation could, on its own, lead to fast oscillations with infrequent stuttering; high levels of fragmentation degraded oscillations. The infrequent stuttering observed in standard Min oscillations are consistent with short filaments of MinD, while we expect that mutants that exhibit higher stuttering frequencies will exhibit longer MinD filaments. Increased stuttering rate may be a useful diagnostic to find observable MinD polymerization in experimental conditions.

Supratim Sengupta; Julien Derr; Anirban Sain; Andrew D. Rutenberg

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

394

Active transport, substrate specificity, and methylation of Hg(II) in anaerobic bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of methylmercury (MeHg), which is biomagnified in aquatic food chains and poses a risk to human health, is effected by some iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (FeRB and SRB) in anaerobic environments. However, very little is known regarding the mechanism of uptake of inorganic Hg by these organisms, in part because of the inherent difficulty in measuring the intracellular Hg concentration. By using the FeRB Geobacter sulfurreducens and the SRB Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as model organisms, we demonstrate that Hg(II) uptake occurs by active transport. We also establish that Hg(II) uptake by G. sulfurreducens is highly dependent on the characteristics of the thiols that bind Hg(II) in the external medium, with some thiols promoting uptake and methylation and others inhibiting both. The Hg(II) uptake system of D. desulfuricans has a higher affinity than that of G. sulfurreducens and promotes Hg methylation in the presence of stronger complexing thiols. We observed a tight coupling between Hg methylation and MeHg export from the cell, suggesting that these two processes may serve to avoid the build up and toxicity of cellular Hg. Our results bring up the question of whether cellular Hg uptake is specific for Hg(II) or accidental, occurring via some essential metal importer. Our data also point at Hg(II) complexation by thiols as an important factor controlling Hg methylation in anaerobic environments.

Schasfer, Jeffra [Princeton University; Rocks, Sara [Princeton University; Zheng, Wang [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Morel, Francois M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Growth of Nanoscale Nickel Ferrite on Carbonaceous Matrix- A Novel Method of Turning Harmful Particulates into a Functional Nanocomposite: An XAFS Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particulate matter (PM) emission from residual oil combustion typically consists of carbonaceous material accompanied by inorganic matter notably transition metal sulfates. Often a minor sulfide form is found in the coarse fraction while an oxide form is more common in the fine and ultrafine fractions. A composite comprising of nanoscale nickel ferrite dispersed on carbonaceous matrix has been obtained following liberation of metal sulfates from the fine PM - a novel method of turning harmful particulates into a functional nanocomposite without the need for elaborate preparation using expensive precursors. The nickel ferrite content in the composite varies with the Fe/Ni ratio in particulate, fuel type, and combustion condition. Such variation may lead to the composite exhibiting diverse physical behaviors. Detailed structure and cation distribution in dispersed ferrite have been studied using Fe and Ni K-edges XAFS spectroscopy. Peaks are identified in the radial structure function with specific atom pair correlations within the spinel ferrite from which the relative occupancy of the cations in the octahedral and tetrahedral sites can be discerned. The results show that Ni(II) has strong preference for the octahedral site, while Fe(III) prefers both sites which is consistent with that of an inverted spinel ferrite.

Pattanaik, S.; Huggins, F; Huffman, G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Composition, Reactivity, and Regulations of Extracellular Metal-Reducing Structures (Bacterial Nanowires) Produced by Dissimilatory Metal Reducing Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research proposal seeks to describe the composition and function of electrically conductive appendages known as bacterial nanowires. This project targets bacterial nanowires produced by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria Shewanella and Geobacter. Specifically, this project will investigate the role of these structures in the reductive transformation of iron oxides as solid phase electron acceptors, as well as uranium as a dissolved electron acceptor that forms nanocrystalline particles of uraninite upon reduction.

Scholten, Johannes

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Title: Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria DOE Grant Number: DE-FG02-06ER64205 Principal Investigator: Jizhong (Joe) Zhou (University of Oklahoma) Key members: Zhili He, Aifen Zhou, Christopher Hemme, Joy Van Nostrand, Ye Deng, and Qichao Tu Collaborators: Terry Hazen, Judy Wall, Adam Arkin, Matthew Fields, Aindrila Mukhopadhyay, and David Stahl Summary Three major objectives have been conducted in the Zhou group at the University of Oklahoma (OU): (i) understanding of gene function, regulation, network and evolution of Desulfovibrio vugaris Hildenborough in response to environmental stresses, (ii) development of metagenomics technologies for microbial community analysis, and (iii) functional characterization of microbial communities with metagenomic approaches. In the past a few years, we characterized four CRP/FNR regulators, sequenced ancestor and evolved D. vulgaris strains, and functionally analyzed those mutated genes identified in salt-adapted strains. Also, a new version of GeoChip 4.0 has been developed, which also includes stress response genes (StressChip), and a random matrix theory-based conceptual framework for identifying functional molecular ecological networks has been developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data as well as pyrosequencing data from 16S rRNA genes. In addition, GeoChip and sequencing technologies as well as network analysis approaches have been used to analyze microbial communities from different habitats. Those studies provide a comprehensive understanding of gene function, regulation, network, and evolution in D. vulgaris, and microbial community diversity, composition and structure as well as their linkages with environmental factors and ecosystem functioning, which has resulted in more than 60 publications.

Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma

2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

Diversity and characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in groundwater at a uranium mill tailings site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbially mediated reduction and immobilization of U(VI) to U(TV) plays a role in both natural attenuation and accelerated bioremediation of uranium contaminated sites. To realize bioremediation potential and accurately predict natural attenuation, it is important to first understand the microbial diversity of such sites. In this paper, the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in contaminated groundwater associated with a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Shiprock, N.Mex,, was investigated. Two culture-independent analyses were employed: sequencing of clone libraries of PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) gene fragments and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarker analysis. A remarkable diversity among the DSR sequences was revealed, including sequences from F-Proteobacteria, gram-positive organisms, and the Nitrospira division. PLFA analysis detected at least,52 different mid-chain-branched saturate PLFA and included a high proportion of 10me16:0, Desulfotomaculum and Desulfotomaculum-like sequences were the most dominant DSR genes detected. Those belonging to SRB within F-Proteobacteria were mainly recovered from low-uranium (less than or equal to 302 ppb) samples. One Desulfotomaculum like sequence cluster overwhelmingly dominated high-U (> 1,500 ppb) sites. Logistic regression showed a significant influence of uranium concentration over the dominance of this cluster of sequences (P= 0.0001), This strong association indicates that Desulfotomaculum has remarkable tolerance and adaptation to high levels of uranium and suggests the organism's possible involvement in natural attenuation of uranium. The in situ activity level of Desulfotomaculum in uranium-contaminated environments and its comparison to the activities of other SRB and other functional groups should be an important area for future research.

Chang, Yun-Juan (Unknown); Peacock, A D. (Tennessee, Univ Of); Long, Philip E. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Stephen, John R. (Unknown); McKinley, James P. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Mcnaughton, Sarah J. (Unknown); Hussain, A K M A.; Saxton, A M.; White, D C. (Unknown)

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are often identified by their distinctive morphologies, such as the extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks formed by Gallionella ferruginea or Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. Similar filaments preserved in silica are often identified as FeOB fossils in rocks. Although it is assumed that twisted iron stalks are indicative of FeOB, the stalk's metabolic role has not been established. To this end, we studied the marine FeOB M. ferrooxydans by light, X-ray and electron microscopy. Using time-lapse light microscopy, we observed cells excreting stalks during growth (averaging 2.2 {micro}m h(-1)). Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy show that stalks are Fe(III)-rich, whereas cells are low in Fe. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that stalks are composed of several fibrils, which contain few-nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide crystals. Lepidocrocite crystals that nucleated on the fibril surface are much larger ({approx}100 nm), suggesting that mineral growth within fibrils is retarded, relative to sites surrounding fibrils. C and N 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy and fluorescence probing show that stalks primarily contain carboxyl-rich polysaccharides. On the basis of these results, we suggest a physiological model for Fe oxidation in which cells excrete oxidized Fe bound to organic polymers. These organic molecules retard mineral growth, preventing cell encrustation. This model describes an essential role for stalk formation in FeOB growth. We suggest that stalk-like morphologies observed in modern and ancient samples may be correlated confidently with the Fe-oxidizing metabolism as a robust biosignature.

Chan, Clara S; Fakra, Sirine C; Emerson, David; Fleming, Emily J; Edwards, Katrina J

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The effects of petroleum residues and the associated degrading bacteria on the development and survival of the larvae of Penaeus aztecus ives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF PETROLEUM RESIDUES AND THE ASSOCIATED DEGRADING BACTERIA ON THE DEVELOPMENT AND SURVIVAL OF THE LARVAE OF PENAEUS AZTECUS IVES A Thesis by JOHN CURTIS GLARY III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Biology THE EFFECTS OF PETROLEUM RESIDUES AND THE ASSOCIATED DEGRADING BACTERIA ON THE DEVELOPMENT AND SURVIVAL OF THE LARVAE OF PENAEUS AZTECUS...

Clary, John Curtis

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Biosolids to Biofuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Nikola Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, WA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

402

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Oil Future of the World  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from Miami Palmetto Senior High School in Pinecrest, FL, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

403

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Bioenergy: Creating Biofuels from Biomass  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This infographic was created by students from North Caddo Magnet High School in Vivian, LA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

404

Use of bromodeoxyuridine immunocapture to identify psychrotolerant phenanthrene-degrading bacteria in phenanthrene-enriched polluted Baltic Sea sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to enrich and identify psychrotolerant phenanthrenedegrading bacteria from polluted Baltic Sea sediments. Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sediments were spiked with phenanthrene and incubated for 2 months in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine that is incorporated into the DNA of replicating cells. The bromodeoxyuridine-incorporated DNA was extracted by immunocapture and analyzed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism and 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing to identify bacterial populations that were growing. In addition, degradation genes were quantified in the bromodeoxyuridine-incorporated DNA by real-time PCR. Phenanthrene concentrations decreased after 2 months of incubation in the phenanthrene-enriched sediments and this reduction correlated to increases in copy numbers of xylE and phnAc dioxygenase genes. Representatives of Exiguobacterium, Schewanella,Methylomonas, Pseudomonas, Bacteroides and an uncultured Deltaproteobacterium and a Gammaproteobacterium dominated the growing community in the phenanthrene spiked sediments. Isolates that were closely related to three of these bacteria (two pseudomonads and an Exiguobacterium sp.) could reduce phenanthrene concentrations in pure cultures and they all harbored phnAc dioxygenase genes. These results confirm that this combination of culture-based and molecular approaches was useful for identification of actively growing bacterial species with a high potential for phenanthrene degradation.

Edlund, A.; Jansson, J.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium contaminated groundwaters are a legacy concern for the U.S. Department of Energy. Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site have demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduces the ambient soluable uranium concentration, sequestering the radionuclide as uraninite. However, questions remain regarding which microorganism(s) are consuming this acetate and if active groundwater microorganisms are different from active particle-associated bacteria. In this report, 13-C acetate was used to assess the active microbes that synthesize DNA on 3 size fractions [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 micron), groundwater (0.2-8 micron)] over a 24 -day time frame. Results indicated a stronger signal from 13-C acetate associated with the “fines” fraction compared with smaller amounts of 13-C uptake on the sand fraction and groundwater samples during the SIP incubations. TRFLP analysis of this 13-C-labeled DNA, indicated 31+ 9 OTU's with 6 peaks dominating the active profiles (166, 187, 210, 212, and 277 bp peaks using MnlI). Cloning/sequencing of the amplification products indicated a Geobacter-like group (187, 210, 212 bp) primarily synthesized DNA from acetate in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium (166 bp) primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. (277 bp) utilized much of the 13C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria during field-scale acetate addition and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

Kerkhoff, Lee; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; McGuinness, L.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Processing of cellulosic material by a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from cellulase-producing bacteria, ATCC 55702  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Bacteria which produce large amounts of a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate, have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase degrading bacterium ATCC 55702, which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic materials.

Dees, H. Craig (Lenoir City, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Twenty-One Genome Sequences from Pseudomonas Species and 19 Genome Sequences from Diverse Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere and Endosphere of Populus deltoides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To aid in the investigation of the Populus deltoides microbiome we generated draft genome sequences for twenty one Pseudomonas and twenty one other diverse bacteria isolated from Populus deltoides roots. Genome sequences for isolates similar to Acidovorax, Bradyrhizobium, Brevibacillus, Burkholderia, Caulobacter, Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Novosphingobium, Pantoea, Phyllobacterium, Polaromonas, Rhizobium, Sphingobium and Variovorax were generated.

Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Johnson, Courtney M [ORNL; Martin, Stanton [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A soil microscale study to reveal the heterogeneity of Hg(II) impact on indigenous bacteria by quantication of adapted phenotypes and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

toxicants. Heavy metals in soil are known to have a deleterious e¡ect on the num- bers of bacteria; RISA; Indirect enumeration 1. Introduction Bacterial response to heavy metal contamination in soil,2]). Several studies reported an impact of heavy metals at the community level using phenotypic or genetic

Thioulouse, Jean

409

Making more efficient fuel cells 08.09.2009 -Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells to provide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells to provide power in remote environments or to convert waste to electricity. Professor Derek Lovley from the University of Massachusetts, USA isolated bacteria with large. The researchers isolated a strain of Geobacter sulfurreducens which they called KN400 that grew prolifically

Lovley, Derek

410

Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells to provide power in remote environments or to convert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells to provide power in remote environments or to convert waste to electricity. Professor Derek Lovley from at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh. The researchers isolated a strain of Geobacter sulfurreducens which

Lovley, Derek

411

Rust-Breathing Bacteria: Miracle Microbes? Search news.nationalgeographic.com Sign up for our free e-mail newsletter Also see: Today's Top Stories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

colleagues sequenced the genome of a Geobacter species that can generate electricity and cleanup groundwater up polluted groundwater, generate electricity, and may harbor clues to the origins of life. That with another wonder from the Geobacter genus of bacteria. "When we think we have hit the last of the big

Lovley, Derek

412

Bacteria power may be possible http://www.masslive.com/hampfrank/republican/index.ssf?/base/news... 1 of 2 5/12/2006 2:33 PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel cells powered by so-called geobacter, tiny bacteria that convert iron to electricity, to the point geobacter) to change that trash to electricity," Lovley said. A typical fuel cell converts fuels that conduct electricity to the outside for use as power. The UMass researchers found that when the geobacter

Lovley, Derek

413

Single-cell analysis of growth in budding yeast and bacteria reveals a common size regulation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unicellular organism from various kingdoms of life face the challenge of regulating their size. Despite decades of research, we still do not have a good understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in this regulation, and how cells coordinate the different events of the cell cycle, such as growth, division and DNA replication is still unclear. Here, we report on experimental results for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the bacterium Escherichia coli, showing that, remarkably, they share a common strategy for cell size control. We collected data on single-cell growth and cell cycle progression in S. cerevisiae in several growth media and estimated the distributions of size at birth and interdivision time as well as their correlations throughout cell lineages. We also performed the same analysis on previously collected data on single-cell growth and division in E. coli. The results are in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the incremental model, which leads to the addition of a constant volume (up to fluctuations), independent of size at birth, between birth and division; we show that in both organisms size at birth and size at division exhibit a linear relationship with slope one. This result, together with extended additional analysis supporting the incremental model, argues against the existing "critical size" paradigm for cell size control in bacteria and yeast.

Ilya Soifer; Lydia Robert; Naama Barkai; Ariel Amir

2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

414

Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Vertical Turn: Topographies of Metropolitan Modernism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irony is presumably what Camus had in mind when hemay well appear absurd, as Camus argued in his essay ona similar point in comparing Camus and Kafka: “Camus’s views

Haacke, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The Stanford Way: Turning Problems Into Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Students (BASES) Center for Entrepreneurial Studies (CES) Center for Social Innovation (CSI) Graduate

Prinz, Friedrich B.

417

Turning waste into energy beats landfilling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, not incineration. Miller and others also refer to incineration as a source of dioxins, and they're right. But let's put things in perspective. In Sweden, which has 30 incineration plants, the total amount of dioxins that the landfills throughout Ontario and Michigan release fewer dioxins than that, he needs to hire better advisers

Columbia University

418

ARM - VAP Product - 10rlprofbe1turn  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops AtmosphericApplication andAnthe Infraredturn Documentation Data Management Facility

419

ARM - VAP Product - 10srlprofmr1turn  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops AtmosphericApplication andAnthe Infraredturn Documentation

420

ARM - VAP Product - 2rlprofdep1turn  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops AtmosphericApplicationswfanalsiros1long Documentation Datarlprofasr1ferr

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Laser turns 50 (Inside Business) | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 CERNSemiconductor thin film on Si(111)

422

ARM - VAP Product - rlprofmerge1turn  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmr Documentation

423

Turn Motors Off When Not in Use  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7DepartmentEnergy TurbineTurboThe

424

The Buck Institute Turned to Geothermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency results in very high energy consumption rate of 1.45 KW/TN. #12;Buck used one chiller any day § Increased Energy Efficiency § Reduced Energy Consumption Buck Institute Priorities Achieved: #12;§ Current. PREVIOUS CONDENSER WATER PROBLEM: #12;§ New Research Building Requirements: Additional 300 tons of cooling

425

Business Plan Turning waste into fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D- Biogas Digester Specifications 20 E- Regulations and Subsidies 21 F - Risks and Mitigations 22 G to both the market and the slum residents. Our plan is to introduce a local, community scale biogas for the nearby struggling families. The biogas fuel will be offered at a lower rate than the current subsidized

Mlllet, Dylan B.

426

DOE Turns 25 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FYBeauTransition Documents - 2008 DOE

427

The Silicon Solar Cell Turns 50  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe MolecularPlaceThe RoadDavidofSequence andDaryl

428

Solar Decathlon Turns Ten | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof the Americas |DOEEnergy Smooth BromeSoftwareWake of Disasters

429

Turning Grass into Gas for Less  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2TopoPortalBRDFTunableTurbulence may be key

430

Determination of kinetic coefficients for the reduction and removal of uranium from water by the Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium contamination of groundwater and surface water from abandoned uranium mill tailings piles is a serious concern in many areas of the western United States. U(VI) is soluble in water and, as a result, is relatively mobile in the environment. U(IV), however, is generally insoluble in water and, therefore, is not subject to aqueous transport. In recent years, researchers have discovered that certain microorganisms, such as the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desuffiovibrio desulfricans, can mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by anaerobic respiration. Although the ability of this microorganism to reduce U(VI) has been studied in some detail by previous researchers, the kinetics of the reaction have not been characterized. The purpose of this research was to perform kinetic studies on Desuffiovibrio desulfricans during simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium and to determine the mineral phase of uranium after it has been reduced. The studies were conducted in a laboratory-scale chemostat under substrate-limited growth conditions with pyruvate as the substrate. The maximum rate of substrate utilization (k) was determined to be 4.70 days{sup -1} while the half-velocity constant (Ks) was 140 mg CODA. The yield coefficient (Y) was determined to be 0. 17 mg cells/mg COD while the endogenous decay coefficient (kd) was found to be 0.072 days{sup -1}. After reduction, U(IV) precipitated from solution in the uraninite (UO{sub 2}) phase as predicted by thermodynamics. Uranium removal efficiency as high as 90% was achieved in the chemostat.

Tucker, M.D.; Barton, L.L.; Thomson, B.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

Competitive Reduction of Pertechnetate (99TcO4?) by Dissimilatory Metal Reducing Bacteria and Biogenic Fe(II)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fate of pertechnetate (99Tc(VII)O4 -) during bioreduction was investigated in the presence of 2-line ferrihydrite (Fh) and various dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) (Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Shewanella) in comparison with TcO4 - bioreduction in the absence of Fh. In the presence of Fh, Tc was present primarily as a fine-grained Tc(IV)/Fe precipitate that was distinct from the Tc(IV)O2 ·nH2O solids produced by direct biological Tc(VII) reduction. Aqueous Tc concentrations (<0.2 ?m) in the bioreduced Fh suspensions (1.7 to 3.2 × 10-9 mol L-1) were over 1 order of magnitude lower than when TcO4 - was biologically reduced in the absence of Fh (4.0 × 10-8 to 1.0 × 10-7 mol L-1). EXAFS analyses of the bioreduced Fh-Tc products were consistent with variable chain length Tc-O octahedra bonded to Fe-O octahedra associated with the surface of the residual or secondary Fe(III) oxide. In contrast, biogenic TcO2 ·nH2O had significantly more Tc-Tc second neighbors and a distinct long-range order consistent with small particle polymers of TcO2. In Fe-rich subsurface sediments, the reduction of Tc(VII) by Fe(II) may predominate over direct microbial pathways, potentially leading to lower concentrations of aqueous 99Tc(IV).

Plymale, Andrew E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Heald, Steve M.; Moore, Dean A.; Kennedy, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Chong M.; Resch, Charles T.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Significant Association between Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Uranium-Reducing Microbial Communities as Revealed by a Combined Massively Parallel Sequencing-Indicator Species Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Massively parallel sequencing has provided a more affordable and high-throughput method to study microbial communities, although it has mostly been used in an exploratory fashion. We combined pyrosequencing with a strict indicator species statistical analysis to test if bacteria specifically responded to ethanol injection that successfully promoted dissimilatory uranium(VI) reduction in the subsurface of a uranium contamination plume at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center in Tennessee. Remediation was achieved with a hydraulic flow control consisting of an inner loop, where ethanol was injected, and an outer loop for flow-field protection. This strategy reduced uranium concentrations in groundwater to levels below 0.126 M and created geochemical gradients in electron donors from the inner-loop injection well toward the outer loop and downgradient flow path. Our analysis with 15 sediment samples from the entire test area found significant indicator species that showed a high degree of adaptation to the three different hydrochemical-created conditions. Castellaniella and Rhodanobacter characterized areas with low pH, heavy metals, and low bioactivity, while sulfate-, Fe(III)-, and U(VI)-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfosporosinus) were indicators of areas where U(VI) reduction occurred. The abundance of these bacteria, as well as the Fe(III) and U(VI) reducer Geobacter, correlated with the hydraulic connectivity to the substrate injection site, suggesting that the selected populations were a direct response to electron donor addition by the groundwater flow path. A false-discovery-rate approach was implemented to discard false-positive results by chance, given the large amount of data compared.

Cardenas, Erick [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Leigh, Mary Beth [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Marsh, Terence [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Luo, Jian [Stanford University; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew [Stanford University; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

A combined massively parallel sequencing indicator species approach revealed significant association between sulfate-reducing bacteria and uranium-reducing microbial communities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Massively parallel sequencing has provided a more affordable and high throughput method to study microbial communities, although it has been mostly used in an exploratory fashion. We combined pyrosequencing with a strict indicator species statistical analysis to test if bacteria specifically responded to ethanol injection that successfully promoted dissimilatory uranium (VI) reduction in the subsurface of a uranium contamination plume at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center in Tennessee, USA. Remediation was achieved with a hydraulic flow control consisting of an inner loop, where ethanol was injected, and an outer loop for flow field protection. This strategy reduced uranium concentrations in groundwater to levels below 0.126 {micro}M, and created geochemical gradients in electron donors from the inner loop injection well towards the outer loop and down-gradient flow path. Our analysis with 15 sediment samples from the entire test area found significant indicator species that showed a high degree of adaptation to the three different hydrochemical created conditions. Castellaniella, and Rhodanobacter characterized areas with low pH, heavy metals, and low bioactivity; while sulfate-, Fe(III)-, and U(VI)-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfosporosinus) were indicators of areas where U(VI) reduction occurred. Abundance of these bacteria as well as the Fe(III)- and U(VI)-reducer Geobacter correlated with the hydraulic connectivity to the substrate injection site, suggesting that the selected populations were a direct response to the electron donor addition and by the groundwater flow path. A false discovery rate approach was implemented to discard false positives by chance given the large amount of data compared.

Cardenas, Erick [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Leigh, Mary Beth [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Gentry, Terry [Texas A& M University; Luo, Jian [Georgia Institute of Technology; Watson, David B [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A. [Stanford University; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University; Jardine, Philip [University of Tennessee; Kelly, Shelly D [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Marsh, Terence [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tiedje, James [Michigan State University, East Lansing

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Chromium(VI) bioremoval by pseudomonas bacteria: role of microbial exudates for natural attenuation and biotreatment of Cr(VI) contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the role of microbial exudates, e.g., exopolymeric substance (EPS) and alginic acid, on microbial Cr(VI) reduction by two different Pseudomonas strains (P. putida P18 and P. aeuroginosa P16) as a method for treating subsurface environment contaminated with Cr(VI). Our results indicate that microbial exudates significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by forming less toxic and highly soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes despite the fact Cr(III) has a very low solubility under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). The formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes led to the protection of the cells and chromate reductases from inactivation. In systems with no organic ligands, soluble organo-Cr(III) end products were formed between Cr(III) and the EPS directly released by bacteria due to cell lysis. Our results also provide evidence that cell lysis played an important role in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas bacteria due to the release of constitutive reductases that intracellularly and/or extracellularly catalyzed the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The overall results highlight the need for incorporation of the release and formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes into reactive transport models to more accurately design and monitor in situ microbial remediation techniques for the treatment of subsurface systems contaminated with Cr(VI).

Dogan, N.M.; Dodge, C.; Kantar, C.; Gulcan, S.; Yilmaz, B.C.; Mazmanci, M.A.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

435

Chromium(VI) Bioremoval by Pseudomonas Bacteria: Role of Microbial Exudates for Natural Attenuation and Biotreatment of Cr(VI) Contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the role of microbial exudates, e.g., exopolymeric substance (EPS) and alginic acid, on microbial Cr(VI) reduction by two different Pseudomonas strains (P. putida P18 and P. aeuroginosa P16) as a method for treating subsurface environment contaminated with Cr(VI). Our results indicate that microbial exudates significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by forming less toxic and highly soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes despite the fact Cr(III) has a very low solubility under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). The formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes led to the protection of the cells and chromate reductases from inactivation. In systems with no organic ligands, soluble organo-Cr(III) end products were formed between Cr(III) and the EPS directly released by bacteria due to cell lysis. Our results also provide evidence that cell lysis played an important role in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas bacteria due to the release of constitutive reductases that intracellularly and/or extracellularly catalyzed the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The overall results highlight the need for incorporation of the release and formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes into reactive transport models to more accurately design and monitor in situ microbial remediation techniques for the treatment of subsurface systems contaminated with Cr(VI).

N Mercan Dogan; C Kantar; S Gulcan; C Dodge; B Coskun Yilmaz; M Ali Mazmanci

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Use of the high-energy x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source to investigate the interactions between metals and bacteria.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the fate of heavy-metal contaminants in the environment is of fundamental importance in the development and evaluation of effective remediation and sequestration strategies. Among the factors influencing the transport of these contaminants are their chemical separation and the chemical and physical attributes of the surrounding medium. Bacteria and the extracellular material associated with them are thought to play a key role in determining a contaminant's speciation and thus its mobility in the environment. In addition, the microenvironment at and adjacent to actively metabolizing cell surfaces can be significantly different from the bulk environment. Thus, the spatial distribution and chemical separation of contaminants and elements that are key to biological processes must be characterized at micron and submicron resolution in order to understand the microscopic physical, geological, chemical, and biological interfaces that determine a contaminant's macroscopic fate. Hard X-ray microimaging is a powerful technique for the element-specific investigation of complex environmental samples at th needed micron and submicron resolution. An important advantage of this technique results from the large penetration depth of hard X-rays in water. This advantage minimizes the requirements for sample preparation and allows the detailed study of hydrated samples. This paper presents results of studies of the spatial distribution of naturally occurring metals and a heavy-metal contaminant (Cr) in and near hydrated bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) in the early stages of biofilm development, performed at the Advanced Photon Source Sector 2 X-ray microscopy beamline.

Kemner, K. M.; Lai, B.; Maser, J.; Schneegurt, M. A.; Cai, Z.; Ilinski, P. P.; Kulpa, C. F.; Legnini, D. G.; Nealson, K. H.; Pratt, S. T.; Rodrigues, W.; Tischler, M. L.; Yun, W.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

437

TurnItInTrialReportV2.doc 1 Turn It In Project Steering Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Membership Rob Phillips (TLC) Chris Foley (ITS) Pat James (ITS) Suellen Tapsall (DOA) Colin Beasley (TLC

438

Turning on the Fan and Turning off the A/C | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on EnergyEnergyThe sun risesTheTrent

439

Assessing the Role of Iron Sulfides in the Long Term Sequestration of Uranium by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This overarching aim of this project was to identify the role of biogenic and synthetic iron-sulfide minerals in the long-term sequestration of reduced U(IV) formed under sulfate-reducing conditions when subjected to re-oxidizing conditions. The work reported herein was achieved through the collaborative research effort conducted at Arizona State University (ASU) and the University of Michigan (UM). Research at ASU, focused on the biogenesis aspects, examined the biogeochemical bases for iron-sulfide production by Desulfovibrio vulgaris, a Gram-negative bacterium that is one of the most-studied strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A series of experimental studies were performed to investigate comprehensively important metabolic and environmental factors that affect the rates of sulfate reduction and iron-sulfide precipitation, the mineralogical characteristics of the iron sulfides, and how uranium is reduced or co-reduced by D. vulagaris. FeS production studies revealed that controlling the pH affected the growth of D. vulgaris and strongly influenced the formation and growth of FeS solids. In particular, lower pH produced larger-sized mackinawite (Fe1+xS). Greater accumulation of free sulfide, from more sulfate reduction by D. vulgaris, also led to larger-sized mackinawite and stimulated mackinawite transformation to greigite (Fe3S4) when the free sulfide concentration was 29.3 mM. On the other hand, using solid Fe(III) (hydr)oxides as the iron source led to less productivity of FeS due to their slow and incomplete dissolution and scavenging of sulfide. Furthermore, sufficient free Fe2+, particularly during Fe(III) (hydr)oxide reductions, led to the additional formation of vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2•8(H2O)]. The U(VI) reduction studies revealed that D. vulgaris reduced U(VI) fastest when accumulating sulfide from concomitant sulfate reduction, since direct enzymatic and sulfide-based reductions of U(VI) occurred in parallel. The UO2 produced in presence of ferrous iron was poorly crystalline. At UM, laboratory-scale reactor studies were performed to assess the potential for the predominant abiotic reductants formed under sulfate reducing conditions (SRCs) to: (1) reduce U(VI) in contaminated groundwater sediments), and (2) inhibit the re-oxidation of U(IV) species, and in particular, uraninite (UO2(s)). Under SRCs, mackinawite and aqueous sulfide are the key reductants expected to form. To assess their potential for abiotic reduction of U(VI) species, a series of experiments were performed in which either FeS or S(-II) was added to solutions of U(VI), with the rates of conversion to U(IV) solids monitored as a function of pH, and carbonate and calcium concentration. In the presence of FeS and absence of oxygen or carbonate, U(IV) was completely reduced uraninite. S(-II) was also found to be an effective reductant of aqueous phase U(VI) species and produced uraninite, with the kinetics and extent of reduction depending on geochemical conditions. U(VI) reduction to uraninite was faster under higher S(-II) concentrations but was slowed by an increase in the dissolved Ca or carbonate concentration. Rapid reduction of U(VI) occurred at circumneutral pH but virtually no reduction occurred at pH 10.7. In general, dissolved Ca and carbonate slowed abiotic U(VI) reduction by forming stable Ca-U(VI)-carbonate soluble complexes that are resistant to reaction with aqueous sulfide. To investigate the stability of U(IV) against re-oxidation in the presence of iron sulfides by oxidants in simulated groundwater environments, and to develop a mechanistic understanding the controlling redox processes, continuously-mixed batch reactor (CMBR) and flow-through reactor (CMFR) studies were performed at UM. In these studies a series of experiments were conducted under various oxic groundwater conditions to examine the effectiveness of FeS as an oxygen scavenger to retard UO2 dissolution. The results indicate that FeS is an effective oxygen scavenger, and can lower the rate of oxidative dissolution of UO2 by over an order of magnitude compared to

Hayes, Kim F.; Bi, Yuqiang; Carpenter, Julian; Hyng, Sung Pil; Rittmann, Bruce E.; Zhou, Chen; Vannela, Raveender; Davis, James A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Showing 1 - 5 of 5 results. Download Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition With the theme of GeoEnergy is Beautiful, the Energy Department's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 Education Toolbox Search Education Toolbox Search Enter terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 6 of 6 results. Download Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal...

442

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

7 Education Toolbox Search Education Toolbox Search Enter terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 10 of 14 results. Download Infographics from the 2014 National...

443

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

7 Education Toolbox Search Education Toolbox Search Enter terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results. Download Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal...

444

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

5 Education Toolbox Search Education Toolbox Search Enter terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results. Download Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal...

445

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

5 Education Toolbox Search Education Toolbox Search Enter terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal...

446

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

6 Education Toolbox Search Education Toolbox Search Enter terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 10 of 12 results. Download Infographics from the 2014 National...

447

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

3 Education Toolbox Search Education Toolbox Search Enter terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 6 of 6 results. Download Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal...

448

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

5 Education Toolbox Search Education Toolbox Search Enter terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 5 of 5 results. Download Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal...

449

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

4 Education Toolbox Search Education Toolbox Search Enter terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 10 of 21 results. Download Infographics from the 2014 National...

450

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2 Education Toolbox Search Education Toolbox Search Enter terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 6 of 6 results. Download Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal...

451

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

4 Education Toolbox Search Education Toolbox Search Enter terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 10 of 15 results. Download Infographics from the 2014 National...

452

4 Questions for a Better Buildings Case Competition Judge: Marc...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CHALLENGE Register for Better Buildings Challenge webinars on multifamily housing, the public sector, and K-12 and higher education Infographic: Leaders Cutting Energy Waste in...

453

Photo Galleries | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Wind Energy In America: Ventower Industries Saving Energy and Resources Revolutionizing Manufacturing INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America National Wind Technology Center - Colorado...

454

UPI.com: Bacteria might prove to be energy source http://license.icopyright.net/user/viewFreeUse.act?fuid=Mzk4NDQ= 1 of 1 6/5/2006 12:31 PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel cells show promise for conversion of organic wastes and renewable biomass to electricity by allowing bacteria in microbial fuel cells to grow on biofilms in the electrodes of a fuel cell. This week, but further optimization is required for most applications," said Derek Lovley of the University

Lovley, Derek

455

23/01/2008 20:56Null Hypothesis | Straight Talking Page 1 of 2http://www.null-hypothesis.co.uk/science/straight-talking/item/selfish_bacteria_threaten_slime_cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and even cheat on each other," Diggle said. Sound like anyone you know? As Diggle hints, such human Experiment: Speed of Light Candiru: The Willy Fish For The Love Of PCR Video Games & Sick Leave 10 Rules.com Liquid Zeolite 100% Pure Zeolite 30ml bottles Lab- Certified 100% Bacteria-Free. www.liquid

West, Stuart

456

Molecular analysis of deep subsurface Cretaceous rock indicates abundant Fe(III)- and S°-reducing bacteria in a sulfate-rich environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-level sampler (MLS) was emplaced in a borehole straddling anaerobic, sulfate-rich Cretaceous-era shale and sandstone rock formations {approx}200 m below ground surface at Cerro Negro, New Mexico. Sterile quartzite sand contained in chambers in the sampler allowed in situ colonization and recovery of nucleic acids for molecular analyses. DGGE and 16S rRNA gene cloning results indicated a homogeneously distributed bacterial community across the shale/sandstone interface. ?-Proteobacteria sequences were common at all depths, and were dominated by members of the Geobacteraceae family (Pelobacter, Desulfuromonas, and Geobacter). Other members of this group are capable of dissimilatory Fe(III) and/or S0 reduction, but not sulfate reduction. RNA hybridization data also suggested that Fe(III)/S0 reducing bacteria were predominant. These findings are striking considering the lack of significant concentrations of these electron acceptors in this environment. The next most abundant bacterial group indicated was the sulfate reducers, including Desulfobacterium, Desulfocapsa and Desulfobulbus. Sequences related to fermenters, denitrifiers and acetogens were also recovered. The presence of a phylogenetically and functionally diverse microbial community in this deep subsurface environment likely reflects the complex nature of the primary energy and carbon sources, kerogen associated with the shale.

Kovacik, William P.; Takai, Ken; Mormile, Melanie R.; McKinley, James P.; Brockman, Fred J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Holben, William E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

Dougal, R.A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

DNA UPTAKE BY TRANSFORMABLE BACTERIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The various processes of DNA uptake by cells can be categorized as: viral DNA entry, conjugation, or transformation. Within each category, a variety of mechanisms have been found. However, considerable similarities occur among the different mechanisms of conjugation and, especially, transformation. All of these natural mechanisms of DNA transfer are quite elaborate and involve multiple protein components, as the case may be, of the virus, the donor cell, and the recipient cell. The mechanisms of viral infection and conjugation will be discussed mainly with respect to their relevance to transformation.

LACKS,S.A.

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

459

Sampling for Bacteria in Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication will instruct you on the proper procedures for collecting a sample from a water well for bacteriological analysis....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Bacteria Photosynthesis | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home'Low tech'

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infographic turning bacteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Bacteria to the Rescue | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP

462

INVESTIGATION OF TURN-OF-NUT METHOD FOR...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and the clamping force were accomplished by using a device called a Skidmore-Wilhelm bolt tension calibrator. The Skidmore-Wilhelm bolt tension calibrator gives a direct dial...

463

Turning Businesspeople into Environmentalists: The Sierra Business Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aspects of SBC’s sustainability framework. Unlike someProsperity and the SBC sustainability framework. This was to

Innes, Judith; Sandoval, Gerardo

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

USDA Funding to Turn Biomass Material Into Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Ths U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is accepting applications from energy facilities interested in receiving forest or agricultural residues to generate clean energy.

465

REMOTE UNIX TURNING IDLE WORKSTATIONS INTO CYCLE SERVERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

department currently has about 100 MicroVaxII workstations, several VAX 11/750's, and two VAX 11/780's. All. ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ UNIX is a trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories MicroVaxII, VAX 11/750, and VAX 11/780 are trademarks

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

466

REMOTE UNIX TURNING IDLE WORKSTATIONS INTO CYCLE SERVERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

department currently has about 100 MicroVaxII++ workstations, several VAX 11/750's++, and two VAX 11/780's&T Bell Laboratories ++MicroVaxII, VAX 11/750, and VAX 11/780 are trademarks of Digital Equipment

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

467

AMA305 1 TURN OVER The University of Sheffield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is such that the net flux of fluid in the tube across any fixed horizontal plane is zero, show that 8 2 ga U = . (7 in the fluid parallel to the motion of the tube is zero. (i) Show that the pressure field within the tube satisfy -+-= ijkkijijij eep µ 3 1 2 , where p is the pressure and µ is the viscosity, calculate ij

468

Insider turns 25 this month | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

students who served as interpreters with the Chinese engineers installing the steam engine. Inside the first issue, was an article with photos of the service award winners,...

469

As the world turns in a convergence culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The American daytime serial drama is among the oldest television genres and remains a vital part of the television lineup for ABC and CBS as what this thesis calls an immersive story world. However, many within the television ...

Ford, Samuel Earl

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

PSI Gibson turns compliance into a vision for the future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines the technologies and the decisions behind their selection to help this plant achieve compliance with environmental regulations and remain competitive. The topics of the article include an overview of retrofits on the five boilers, on-line coal analysis, low nitrogen oxide burners, use of wet scrubbers, electrostatic precipitator upgrades, addition of a distributed control and data acquisition system that interfaces with an existing on-line boiler and turbine performance monitoring system, and chemical cleaning of supercritical boilers to improve plant performance.

Makansi, J.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Microbial Electrosynthesis Turns Solar Energy into Chemicals May 31, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

infrastructure and distributed on demand. Further, ME requires no biomass feedstock or arable land, uses far less

Lovley, Derek

472

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

Message from the Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Turning Promise into Reality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . .8 HCCI: Synergy Fosters Success . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 High-Speed Flame Imaging

Papalambros, Panos

474

Former Student Turns Thesis Into Energy Savings for Taylor University  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Not long ago Kevin Crosby was an engineering major and the president of Taylor University’s student environmental club, Stewards of Creation. Now with recommendations from his thesis in hand, the Environmental Science Master’s degree candidate is the Upland, Indiana, university’s first Coordinator of Stewardship and Sustainability.

475

analysis turn positive: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

position data was installed in the PS Booster. In this note the measurement system as well as the specific measurement conditions at the PS Booster are discussed. The theory on...

476

Syntheses and conformational studies of peptidomimetics of B-turns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

connectivities observed for cyclo-EK-Lys-Ar. (b) ROESY spectrum for cyclo-EK-Lys-Ar showing the key sequential connectivities. . . . 53 Figure 5. 13 Assignments of COSY specnum of cyclo-EK-Hse-Ar in DMSO-d6. . . . . . . . 56 Figure 5. 14 (a) Sequential... connectivities observed for cyclo-EK-Hse-Ar. (b) ROESY spectrum for cyclo-EK-Hse-Ar showing the key sequential connectivities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Page Figure 5. 15 A portion of ROESY spectrum of cyclo-EK-Dpr-Ar showing the long...

Wang, Zhicheng

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

The religious turn (to theory) in Shakespeare studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an “armed prophet” who Gr aham Hammill arranged matters sowithin the state’s domain. Gr aham Hammill Etienne Balibar

Lupton, Julia R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Power business Turning wireless power research into a top business  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to replace conventional slip rings in the turbines with its wireless technology. "The challenge with wind-generation

Auckland, University of

479

Earth System Grid II, Turning Climate Datasets into Community Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Earth System Grid (ESG) II project, funded by the Department of Energy’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing program, has transformed climate data into community resources. ESG II has accomplished this goal by creating a virtual collaborative environment that links climate centers and users around the world to models and data via a computing Grid, which is based on the Department of Energy’s supercomputing resources and the Internet. Our project’s success stems from partnerships between climate researchers and computer scientists to advance basic and applied research in the terrestrial, atmospheric, and oceanic sciences. By interfacing with other climate science projects, we have learned that commonly used methods to manage and remotely distribute data among related groups lack infrastructure and under-utilize existing technologies. Knowledge and expertise gained from ESG II have helped the climate community plan strategies to manage a rapidly growing data environment more effectively. Moreover, approaches and technologies developed under the ESG project have impacted datasimulation integration in other disciplines, such as astrophysics, molecular biology and materials science.

Middleton, Don

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

The aesthetic turn in the face of nihilism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 1 Martin Heidegger, “The Word of Nietzsche: God is Dead,” in The Question Concerning Technology and Other Essays, translated by William Lovitt (New York: Garland Publishing, 1977), 62. 2 Consequently, the condition of society..., Technology & Society, Vol. 23, No. 5, 339-349 (2003), 340. 12 in which entities are revealed as claiming us, taking possession of us.”16 This structuring from technology is one of the major contributors to the problem of nihilism because humankind...

Craig, Benjamin Taylor

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

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481

60 Years Since Nuclear Turned on the Lights  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On the 60th anniversary of the world’s first nuclear power plant to produce electricity, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Peter Lyons discusses the Energy Department's and the Administration's commitment to promoting a nuclear renaissance in the United States.

482

Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the environment. Your finished product should be dark, crumbly soil that is rich with nutrients and organic matter is included below, but any mixture of organic matter will break down and eventually give you rich soil to use structure and reduces soil erosion. Compost also gives soil aeration and water retention properties

Hutcheon, James M.

483

EECBG Success Story: Nashville Turns an Eyesore into an Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

completed Nashville Bridge Company's building includes a geothermal heat pump system to keep public energy costs low. | Photo courtesy of David Powell, AIA. The completed Nashville...

484

Copyright 2009 IBM Global Business Services Turning Green into Gold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In a recent IBM survey of more than 400 Supply Chain Executives, 89 percent reported that cost reduction credentials. And consumers are also taking notice. In a recent survey, 12 percent of U.S. adults reported: In a market characterized by volatile energy costs and other rising supply chain costs, cost containment

485

Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

sulfur (SOx). These pollutants worsen cardiovascular and respiratory problems, such as heart disease, asthma, and bronchitis. It is particularly important to reduce diesel...

486

What If Your DNA Turned Sunshine Into A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Newark; and dozens of other programs geared toward empowering and improving the health status Coat Tradition Continues 3 A Pedestrian Injury Partnership to Save Little Lives 3 Kudos 4 Psychiatric

Garfunkel, Eric

487

Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

sulfide. Meanwhile, researchers at the Technical University of Denmark engineered light absorbers designed to capture as much solar energy as possible. The absorbers...

488

Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to 8,000 homes. The future revenue generated from the sale of the gas and the sale of the electricity could reach 1 million annually. County Executive Larry Walsh praised this...

489

"Turn-Key" Open Source Software Solutions for Energy Management...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

that uses EnergyPlus peak loads analysis and equipment sizing capabilities to allow mechanical engineers to quickly explore and compare multiple HVAC systems (top image). Photos...

490

Turning methane into usable liquid fuel: Illinois Institute of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agency, or DARPA. Argonne was one of 13 projects aimed at developing new fuel cell technology as part of ARPA-E's Reliable Electricity Based on Electrochemical Systems (REBELS)...

491

How Miami, Florida is Turning Waste Into Cash | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

from a landfill will provide 30 percent of the electricity used at an adjacent wastewater plant. The project will upgrade and expand the existing power generation system at...

492

Far Infrared and Terahertz at the turning point of change!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2 Advanced Development 6.3 A&B Eng Development 6.4 OT&E Production -10 5 0 -5 -10 Documentation Prototypes Screening System · Robotic Sensors for Short Range Vision through Obscurants 10Copyright 2011 Lockheed

Van Stryland, Eric

493

When Metal Organic Frameworks Turn into One-Dimensional Magnets...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22Germantown Building 1000 Independence...

494

Turning the right corner : ensuring development through a low...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to reduce greenhouse gas emissions with broader sector reforms aimed at reducing local air pollution, road safety risks, and congestion. This report looks at relationships...

495

Chemistry courses as the turning point for premedical students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

009-9165-3 ORIGINAL PAPER Chemistry courses as the turningnegative experiences in chemistry courses are a major factorTo determine if chemistry courses have a similar effect at a

Barr, Donald A.; Matsui, John; Wanat, Stanley F.; Gonzalez, Maria Elena

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Turning 802.11 Inside-Out Pravin Bhagwat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

217.8 167.3 46.6 China 138.1 110.3 25.7 Africa 26.2 32.2 8.5 India 33.8 6.3 6.8 Table 1. Density population constitutes 74%: www.censusindia.net). Hence the low tele-density as given in Tab. 1. The cost population density is much lower than in cities. While cellular wireless technologies may help in quick de

Raman, Bhaskaran

497

EECBG Success Story: How Chula Vista, California is Turning Cooking...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department. The city of Chula Vista, California has installed a new 10,000 gallon biodiesel fuel tank to facilitate the conversion of over 125 heavy-duty fleet vehicles to...

498

Insider trading at the turn of the century: two essays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) prior to positive (negative) earnings surprises declined after the Act. Finally, I document that the earnings announcements become more informative after the Act, which is consistent with less price discovery through insider trading prior to earnings...

Tartaroglu, Semih -.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

499

June 2009 UWMREPORT 15 solar cells turn Bolton roof  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the hours of highest demand ­ in the late afternoon. And stor- ing energy is expensive. Nasiri's lab peak times. "We want to convert that PV power from off-load [low demand] to peak load," says Nasiri and associate professor of health sciences at UWM. "She serves on multiple committees and advances the profile

Saldin, Dilano

500

EECBG Success Story: Georgia County Turning Industrial and Farm...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Georgia, a town that's poised to see big savings thanks to their investment in biodiesel. | Photo by Ken Cook EECBG Success Story: Atlanta Suburb Greases the Path to Savings...