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  1. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol This...

  2. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Infographic Guide | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Infographic Guide BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Infographic Guide Infographic Guide for the BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. PDF icon bioenergizeme_infographic_guide.pdf More Documents & Publications BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Toolkit BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Rubric

  3. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: BIOfuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  4. FORGE Phase Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FORGE Phase Infographic FORGE Phase Infographic FORGE Phase Infographic More Documents & Publications FORGE Infographic FORGE Phase Infographic EERE Strategic Plan Infographic FORGE Phase Infographic Milford, Utah FORGE Map

  5. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bioenergy History

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  6. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biofuel Acts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  7. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Impacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  8. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bessie's Biofuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  9. EGS Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Calpine Staff Run Tests at The Geysers Geothermal Power Plant in California Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Infographic FORGE Infographic Geothermal Energy: A Geothermal Teacher ...

  10. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Photosynthesis: Plants Making...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel

  11. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Tertiary Treatment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Nikola Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, WA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  12. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from General Douglas MacArthur High School in Levittown, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  13. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algae Biofuel BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel

  14. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Iowa Ethanol Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  15. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Why is it important?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from The Preuss School in La Jolla, CA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  16. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: What is Biomass?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  17. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bioenergy News Today

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from The Preuss School in La Jolla, CA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  18. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Roads to Success

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Denmark-Olar High in Denmark , SC, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  19. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Troy High School in Troy, MI, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  20. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  1. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Algae Biofuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks High School in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  2. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Space Algae

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Cascade High School in Everett, WA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  3. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biomass Reduces Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  4. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: What is Biogas?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  5. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Energy from Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  6. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  7. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: The History of Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  8. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  9. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Careers in Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  10. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bioenergy Career: Plant Operator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  11. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Workforce and Education

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  12. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biofuels Sustainable Transportation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  13. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: From Fields to Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  14. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Transportation Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Dwight-Englewood School in Englewood, NJ, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  15. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Sustainable Transportation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Dwight-Englewood School in Englewood, NJ, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  16. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Transportation Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Denmark-Olar High School in Denmark, SC, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  17. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bioenergy Through Time

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Robinson HS in Tampa, FL, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  18. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can ...

  19. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: A "Biomassive" Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge encourages young people to improve their ... The ideas expressed in these infographics reflect where students are in the learning ...

  20. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel

  1. FORGE Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FORGE Infographic FORGE Infographic The Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) constitutes the strategic thrust of the Geothermal Technologies Office, Department of Energy, over the next five years. Advances in EGS technologies could unlock up to 10% of the nation's energy supply from enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), geothermal energy potential where there is little or no fluid or permeable rock. The FORGE infographic below shows the scope of this undertaking. Click

  2. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spring 2015 Infographic Challenge Winner Read more BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge: Algae for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge: Algae for a...

  3. Energy Saver 101: Water Heating Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Saver 101: Water Heating Infographic Energy Saver 101: Water Heating Infographic Looking for ways to save money on water heating? Energy Saver 101: Water Heating infographic ...

  4. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biomass: Types/Characteristics |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Biomass: Types/Characteristics BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biomass: Types/Characteristics BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biomass: Types/Characteristics This infographic was created by students from Albany Academies and Academy of the Holy Names in Albany, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge encourages young people to improve their foundational understanding of bioenergy,

  5. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Cellulosic Ethanol BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol This infographic was created by students from Williamsburg HS for Architecture and Design in Brooklyn, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge encourages young people to improve their foundational understanding of bioenergy, which is a broad and complex topic. The ideas

  6. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Rubric | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rubric BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Rubric Rubric for the BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. Image icon bioenergizeme_rubric.png More Documents & Publications Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Infographic Guide BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Toolkit

  7. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Education in Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown High School East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  8. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Energy From Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown High School East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  9. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: History of Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This infographic was created by students from General Douglas MacArthur High School in Levittown, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  10. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Cellulosic Ethanol

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown High School East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  11. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biofuels vs Fossil Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from North Caddo Magnet High School in Vivian, LA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  12. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Corn Can Save the Earth | Department of Energy Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY

  13. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Annual Update | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual Update BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Annual Update Annual Update for the BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. PDF icon 2016_annual_update.pdf More Documents & Publications Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Flyer BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Toolkit

  14. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Social Media Guide | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Social Media Guide BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Social Media Guide Social Media Guide for the BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. PDF icon bioenergizeme_social_media_guide.pdf More Documents & Publications BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Flyer BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Toolkit Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge

  15. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Hemp as an Alternative to Plastic

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Cascade High School in Everett, WA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  16. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: US Energy Consumption By Source

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from High Tech Early College in Denver, CO, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  17. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Oil Consumption vs Ethanol

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks High School in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  18. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biosolids to Biofuels | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Biosolids to Biofuels BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biosolids to Biofuels BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biosolids to Biofuels This infographic was created by students from Nikola Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, WA

  19. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy History of Bioenergy BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy This infographic was created by students from Nikola Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, WA

  20. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Biobutanol- A Better Bio-Alternative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks High School in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  1. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Corn to Ethanol the Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  2. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: From Fish Food to Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from LISD TECH Center in Adrian, MI, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  3. Solar Decathlon 2013 Infographic: The Path to a Brighter Future...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infographic: The Path to a Brighter Future Solar Decathlon 2013 Infographic: The Path to a Brighter Future September 13, 2013 - 11:50am Addthis Our latest infographic -- Solar ...

  4. Solar Decathlon 2013 Infographic: The Path to a Brighter Future...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infographic: The Path to a Brighter Future Solar Decathlon 2013 Infographic: The Path to a Brighter Future September 13, 2013 - 11:50am Addthis Our latest infographic -- Solar...

  5. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Biofuel Jobs and Education

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks High School in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  6. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Use of Fossil Fuels & Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This infographic was created by students from High Tech Early College in Denver, CO, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  7. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Biofuels Hit the Road

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This infographic was created by students from High Tech Early College in Denver, CO, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  8. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: History in the Making

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Denmark-Olar High in Denmark , SC, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  9. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental impacts of Bio energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  10. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Effects of Bioenergy on the Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  11. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Map | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Click the colored markers to see details about infographics. Then click "View Infographic" to access the infographic's Web page. Click the black markers to learn more about U.S. ...

  12. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education & Workforce Development » BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar View information for past and upcoming BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinars. Read more BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge: Cellulosic Ethanol BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge: Cellulosic Ethanol BioenergizeME Spring 2015 Infographic Challenge Winner Read more BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge: Algae for a

  13. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algae Biofuel BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel This infographic was created by students from Seward HS in Seward, AK, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge encourages young people to improve their foundational understanding of bioenergy, which is a broad and complex topic. The ideas expressed in these infographics reflect where students are in the

  14. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Map | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Map BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Map X BioenergizeME Map Explore the BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Map to view infographics submitted by student teams from across the country! Click the colored markers to see details about infographics. Then click "View Infographic" to access the infographic's Web page. Click the black markers to learn more about U.S. integrated biorefinery projects that have received funding from the Bioenergy Technologies Office. Get Started The

  15. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner ...

  16. INFOGRAPHIC: Understanding the Grid | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Understanding the Grid INFOGRAPHIC: Understanding the Grid November 17, 2014 - 2:05pm Addthis Our #GridWeek infographic shows how electricity is generated, transmitted and distributed for use in our homes. | Graphic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>, Energy Department. Our #GridWeek infographic shows how electricity is generated, transmitted and distributed for use in our homes. | Graphic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Sarah Gerrity Sarah Gerrity Former

  17. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge: Understanding America's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infographic Challenge Understanding America's Bioenergy Choices Bioenergy is derived from organic matter to produce renewable fuels, products, and power. This national...

  18. INFOGRAPHIC: Understanding the Grid | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the infographic above, our power grid is a network of power plants, substations, transformers, wires, sensors and poles that carry electricity sometimes hundreds of miles to be...

  19. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Toolkit | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Toolkit BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Toolkit Toolkit for the BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. PDF icon bioenergizeme_toolkit.pdf More Documents & Publications Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Flyer Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Biomass Basics

  20. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: A "Biomassive" Innovation: Fueling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Life in Appalachia | Department of Energy A "Biomassive" Innovation: Fueling Life in Appalachia BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: A "Biomassive" Innovation: Fueling Life in Appalachia BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: A "Biomassive" Innovation: Fueling Life in Appalachia This infographic was created by students from Belfry School in Belfry, KY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic

  1. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: One Man's Yardwaste is Another Man's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy (BioHydrogen) | Department of Energy One Man's Yardwaste is Another Man's Energy (BioHydrogen) BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: One Man's Yardwaste is Another Man's Energy (BioHydrogen) BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: One Man's Yardwaste is Another Man's Energy (BioHydrogen) This infographic was created by students from Nikola Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, WA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic

  2. INFOGRAPHIC: The Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INFOGRAPHIC: The Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle INFOGRAPHIC: The Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle INFOGRAPHIC: The Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle This infographic shows how fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) work and some of the benefits of FCEVs, such as how they reduce greenhouse gas emissions, emit only water, and operate efficiently. PDF icon INFOGRAPHIC: The Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) More Documents & Publications Amped Up! Volume 1, No. 4: The Transportation Issue Fuel Cell Technologies

  3. BioenergizeME Infographic Guide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ŏ - 30 million retired Christma s trees could produce 68 million gallons of green gasoline . - 68 million gallons of green gasoline could take you from New York to Los Angeles 700,000 times. 3 DESIGN Now it's time to bring everything together in one cohesive design. Create the layout, and choose a color scheme. Bring your sketches to life with hand-drawn or digital illustrations and icons. Be sure to use a consistent design style throughout the infographic. 1 RESEARCH 5 STEPS FOR BUILDING AN

  4. INFOGRAPHIC: Carbon Capture 101 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Capture 101 INFOGRAPHIC: Carbon Capture 101 January 7, 2016 - 11:34am Addthis Carbon capture is an important part of the Energy Department's Fossil Energy research and development efforts, but it can be hard to understand. This infographic breaks it down for you. | Infographic by <a href="/node/1332956">Carly Wilkins</a>, Energy Department. Carbon capture is an important part of the Energy Department's Fossil Energy research and development efforts, but it can be

  5. INFOGRAPHIC: Offshore Wind Outlook | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INFOGRAPHIC: Offshore Wind Outlook INFOGRAPHIC: Offshore Wind Outlook December 12, 2012 - 2:15pm Addthis According to a new report commissioned by the Energy Department, a U.S. offshore wind industry that takes advantage of this abundant domestic resource could support up to 200,000 manufacturing, construction, operation and supply chain jobs across the country and drive over $70 billion in annual investments by 2030. Infographic by <a href="node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>.

  6. Energy Saver 101: Water Heating Infographic

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Looking for ways to save money on water heating? Energy Saver 101: Water Heating infographic lays out evergything you need to know about water heating and shares ways to save energy and money.

  7. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Imagine Renewable Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Clean Technologies and Sustainable Industries Early College High School in Ballston Spa, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME...

  8. Understanding Energy Use in Cities Infographic

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Cities Leading through Energy Analysis and Planning (Cities-LEAP) infographic describes the key points from the report, City-Level Energy Decision Making: Data Use in Energy Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation in U.S. Cities.

  9. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Oil Future of the World

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Miami Palmetto Senior High School in Pinecrest, FL, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  10. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: The Algae's Always Greener

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown High School East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  11. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Travel to the Future with Bioenergy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Travel to the Future with Bioenergy BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Travel to the Future with Bioenergy BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Travel to the Future with Bioenergy

  12. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tomorrow | Department of Energy Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow

  13. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Sustainable Lignin-Based Methanol

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from High Tech High North County in San Marcos, CA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  14. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bioenergy: Creating Biofuels from Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from North Caddo Magnet High School in Vivian, LA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  15. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Fossil Fuels vs Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown High School East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  16. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Algae as a Biofuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown High School East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  17. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Biofuels vs Fossil Fuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This infographic was created by students from General Douglas MacArthur High School in Levittown, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  18. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: The History of Ethanol

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown High School East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  19. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Renewable Alternatives: Cellulosic Ethanol

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from General Douglas MacArthur High School in Levittown, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  20. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Energy Audits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Audits Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Energy Audits August 15, 2013 - 3:19pm Addthis New Energy Saver 101 infographic breaks down a home energy audit, explaining what energy auditors look for and the special tools they use to determine where a home is wasting energy. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. New Energy Saver 101 infographic breaks down a home energy audit, explaining what energy auditors look for and the special tools they use to determine where a home is

  1. Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report Infographic | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report Infographic Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report Infographic PDF icon biogas_opportunites_roadmap_progress_report_infographic.pdf More Documents & Publications Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report: Proceedings from the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop, Golden, Colorado, June 11-13, 2012 Biogas Opportunities Roadmap

  2. U.S. Virgin Islands Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infographic U.S. Virgin Islands Infographic U.S. Virgin Islands Infographic This infographic highlights progress the U.S. Virgin islands has made toward meeting its goal of a 60% reduction in fossil fuel use by 2025. Click on the link below to download a full-resolution version. PDF icon Download the USVI Infographic. More Documents & Publications Almost 1,500 solar water heating and PV systems have popped up throughout the territory since the EDIN-USVI project launched in February 2010, and

  3. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Flyer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flyer BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Flyer Flyers for the BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge can be downloaded in three sizes: 3.5"x5", 8.5"x11", and 11"x16" PDF icon bioenergizeme_flyer_3.5x5.pdf PDF icon bioenergizeme_flyer_8.5x11.pdf PDF icon bioenergizeme_flyer_11x16.pdf More Documents & Publications BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Toolkit BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Infographic Guide

  4. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooling Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Cooling June 13, 2014 - 5:10pm Addthis Just in time for summer, our new Energy Saver 101 infographic covers everything you need to know about home cooling. Download a <a href="/node/920771">high-resolution version</a> of the home cooling infographic. | Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>, Energy Department. Just in time for summer, our new Energy Saver 101 infographic covers everything you

  5. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Landscaping | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Landscaping Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Landscaping April 3, 2014 - 4:04pm Addthis Our new Energy Saver 101 infographic highlights everything you need to know to landscape for energy savings. Download a <a href="/node/898361">high resolution version</a> of the infographic or individual sections. | Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>, Energy Department. Our new Energy Saver 101 infographic highlights everything you need to know to

  6. INFOGRAPHIC: The Road to Fuel Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INFOGRAPHIC: The Road to Fuel Efficiency INFOGRAPHIC: The Road to Fuel Efficiency November 27, 2012 - 11:01am Addthis This infographic takes a look at fuel economy standards and how recent improvements in these standards will benefit consumers and the U.S. economy. | Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>. This infographic takes a look at fuel economy standards and how recent improvements in these standards will benefit consumers and the U.S. economy. |

  7. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Registration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Complete the registration form to register for the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. We encourage you to register early to help us in planning for a timely review. The registration period closes on Feb. 4, 2016, at 5 p.m. Central Time.

  8. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Comparison of Bio-fuels to Other Commonly Used Forms of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  9. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Energy Crops: The Future of Bioenergy Feedstocks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Franklin High School in Franklin, MA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  10. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Powering the World One Poop at a Time

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Genesee Career Institute in Flint, MI, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  11. Turning Bacteria into Fuel: Cyanobacteria Designed for Solar-Powered Highly Efficient Production of Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: ASU is engineering a type of photosynthetic bacteria that efficiently produce fatty acidsa fuel precursor for biofuels. This type of bacteria, called Synechocystis, is already good at converting solar energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) into a type of fatty acid called lauric acid. ASU has modified the organism so it continuously converts sunlight and CO2 into fatty acidsoverriding its natural tendency to use solar energy solely for cell growth and maximizing the solar-to-fuel conversion process. ASUs approach is different because most biofuels research focuses on increasing cellular biomass and not on excreting fatty acids. The project has also identified a unique way to convert the harvested lauric acid into a fuel that can be easily blended with existing transportation fuels.

  12. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Winners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Winners BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Winners BioenergizeME Spring 2015 Infographic Challenge Award Ceremomy at Bioenergy 2015. BioenergizeME Spring 2015 Infographic Challenge Award Ceremomy at Bioenergy 2015. Spring 2015 Challenge Winners: Winning Team, Director's Prize for Excellence in Content, Design, and Social Media Promotion: Cellulosic Ethanol-Williamsburg High School for Architecture and Design in Brooklyn, New York First Runner Up: Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener

  13. Cities Leading Through Energy Analysis and Planning Infographic |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Cities Leading Through Energy Analysis and Planning Infographic Cities Leading Through Energy Analysis and Planning Infographic The Cities Leading through Energy Analysis and Planning (Cities-LEAP) project delivers standardized, localized energy data and analysis that enables cities to lead clean energy innovation and integrate strategic energy analysis into decision making. Two Cities-LEAP infographics catalog the programs and tools currently supporting local

  14. Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Infographic Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Infographic Calpine Staff Run Tests at The Geysers Geothermal Power Plant in California Calpine Staff Run Tests at The Geysers Geothermal Power Plant in California The EGS infographic provides an overview of this burgeoning technology that could access an enormous, domestic, clean energy resource predicted at more than 100 GW in the United States alone, according to an MIT study. To take advantage of this vast

  15. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heating Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Heating December 16, 2013 - 10:48am Addthis Our new Energy Saver 101 infographic lays out everything you need to know about home heating -- from how heating systems work and the different types on the market to what to look for when replacing your system and proper maintenance. Download a <a href="/node/784286">high-resolution version</a> of the infographic or individual sections. | Infographic by <a

  16. INFOGRAPHIC | Made in America: Clean Energy Jobs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INFOGRAPHIC | Made in America: Clean Energy Jobs INFOGRAPHIC | Made in America: Clean Energy Jobs August 23, 2012 - 1:44pm Addthis Breaking down the latest Clean Energy Roundup from the Environmental Entrepreneurs. More details <a href="/node/385315">here</a>. | Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>. Breaking down the latest Clean Energy Roundup from the Environmental Entrepreneurs. More details here. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity.

  17. INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Energy in America INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America August 14, 2012 - 9:21am Addthis This infographic details key findings from the Energy Department’s <a href="http://www1.eere.energy.gov/wind/resources.html">2011 Wind Technologies Market Report </a> -- which underscores the dramatic growth of the U.S. wind industry. | Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>. This infographic details key findings from the Energy

  18. Winning Team Announced for 2015 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Excellence in Content, Design, and Social Media Promotion and is invited to present ... BETO also recognized the top ten finalists from the infographic challenge social media ...

  19. 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Winners Crowned

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The winner of the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge was announced during a special awards ceremony on May 11, 2016, by Dr. Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO). The winning infographic entitled “Cellulosic Ethanol: Fueling the Future,” was developed by students from Smithtown High School East in St. James, New York.

  20. INFOGRAPHIC: Better Buildings Leading to Big Energy Savings | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy INFOGRAPHIC: Better Buildings Leading to Big Energy Savings INFOGRAPHIC: Better Buildings Leading to Big Energy Savings May 11, 2016 - 12:35pm Addthis Better Buildings partners have saved more than $1.3 billion on energy costs. Our new infographic explains how Better Buildings works and why it’s important. | Graphic by <a href="/node/1332956">Carly Wilkins</a>, Energy Department Better Buildings partners have saved more than $1.3 billion on energy costs. Our

  1. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge 2016 Annual Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R A T I O N B i o e n e r g i z e M E U . S . D E P A R T M ENT O F E N E R G Y BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge 2016 Annual Update "Exploring the Future American Energy Landscape" CHALLENGE DEADLINES TOPIC AREA 1 - BIOENERGY HISTORY RESEARCH TOPICS AND PROMPTS The 2016 Annual Update contains the deadlines and prompts for the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. In this challenge, student teams research, interpret, apply, and then design an infographic that responds to one of

  2. Energy Saver 101: Home Cooling Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Saver 101: Home Cooling Infographic Energy Saver 101: Home Cooling Infographic While home cooling only accounts for 6 percent of the average home's energy use, it can lead to high energy bills during the warm months. This summer, don't let your energy bills go through the roof. Our Energy Saver 101 infographic covers everything you need to know about home cooling -- from how an air conditioner works and the different types of systems on the market to proper maintenance and energy-saving

  3. INFOGRAPHIC: Everything You Need to Know About Supercomputers | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Everything You Need to Know About Supercomputers INFOGRAPHIC: Everything You Need to Know About Supercomputers November 18, 2015 - 5:37pm Addthis Infographic by <a href="/node/1332956">Carly Wilkins</a> and <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>. Infographic by Carly Wilkins and Sarah Gerrity. Pat Adams Pat Adams Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? National Labs are home to some of the most

  4. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bio-Fuel at Farms

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Clean Technologies and Sustainable Industries Early College High School in Ballston Spa, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME...

  5. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: A History of Bio-Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Clean Technologies and Sustainable Industries Early College High School in Ballston Spa, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME...

  6. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: The Miracles of Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Clean Technologies and Sustainable Industries Early College High School in Malta, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME...

  7. INFOGRAPHIC | Made in America: Clean Energy Jobs | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Breaking down the latest Clean Energy Roundup from the Environmental Entrepreneurs. More details here. | Infographic by Sarah...

  8. INFOGRAPHIC: Let's Get to Work on Solar Soft Costs | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Let's Get to Work on Solar Soft Costs INFOGRAPHIC: Let's Get to Work on Solar Soft Costs December 2, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis Learn how soft costs are contributing to the price of ...

  9. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Energy Audits | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New Energy Saver 101 infographic breaks down a home energy audit, explaining what energy auditors look for and the special tools they use to determine where a home is wasting...

  10. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Job Opportunities in Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Clean Technologies and Sustainable Industries Early College High School in Malta, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME...

  11. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge: Understanding America's Bioenergy Choices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy is derived from organic matter to produce renewable fuels, products, and power. This national challenge aims to inspire students to explore America's bioenergy choices and share what they learn with others. The Energy Department is challenging high school-aged students to investigate a bioenergy topic and design an infographic that illustrates their research. For more information, please visit energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/infographic-challenge Questions? Email BioenergizeME@ee.doe.gov O P

  12. Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition Phil Ulibarri of Truckee Meadows Community College in Reno earned first place in the Geo Energy is Beautiful contest in 2014. Phil Ulibarri of Truckee Meadows Community College in Reno earned first place in the Geo Energy is Beautiful contest in 2014. With the theme of GeoEnergy is Beautiful, the Energy Department's National Geothermal

  13. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: From Feedstock to Fuel Pump: Careers in the Biofuel Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Williamsburg High School for Architecture and Design in Brooklyn, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The...

  14. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Algae Biofuels, Exploring the Energy of Tomorrow Today

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown High School East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  15. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Environmental Impacts of Bioenergy vs Fossil Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown High School East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  16. New Infographic and Projects to Keep Your Energy Bills Out of Hot Water |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Infographic and Projects to Keep Your Energy Bills Out of Hot Water New Infographic and Projects to Keep Your Energy Bills Out of Hot Water April 19, 2013 - 3:21pm Addthis New Energy Saver 101 infographic lays out the different types of water heaters on the market and will help you figure out how to select the best model for your home. Download a high-resolution version of the <a href="/node/612506">infographic</a>. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity.

  17. Turning Bacteria into Biofuel: Development of an Integrated Microbial Electrocatalytic (MEC) System for Liquid Biofuel Production from CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-08-01

    Electrofuels Project: LBNL is improving the natural ability of a common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to use hydrogen and carbon dioxide for biofuel production. First, LBNL is genetically modifying the bacteria to produce biofuel at higher concentrations. Then, LBNL is using renewable electricity obtained from solar, wind, or wave power to produce high amounts of hydrogen in the presence of the bacteria—increasing the organism’s access to its energy source and improving the efficiency of the biofuel-creation process. Finally, LBNL is tethering electrocatalysts to the bacteria’s surface which will further accelerate the rate at which the organism creates biofuel. LBNL is also developing a chemical method to transform the biofuel that the bacteria produce into ready-to-use jet fuel.

  18. INFOGRAPHIC: How Appliance Standards Help Consumers Save Big | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy How Appliance Standards Help Consumers Save Big INFOGRAPHIC: How Appliance Standards Help Consumers Save Big December 14, 2015 - 3:10pm Addthis FACT: Consumers are saving more than $62 billion a year as a result of the Energy Department's Appliance and Equipment Standards Program. | Infographic by <a href="/node/1332956">Carly Wilkins</a>, Energy Department FACT: Consumers are saving more than $62 billion a year as a result of the Energy Department's Appliance

  19. INFOGRAPHIC: How SuperTruck is Making Heavy Duty Vehicles More Efficient |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy SuperTruck is Making Heavy Duty Vehicles More Efficient INFOGRAPHIC: How SuperTruck is Making Heavy Duty Vehicles More Efficient March 1, 2016 - 10:45am Addthis Our latest infographic explains how heavy-duty trucks are more getting more sustainable thanks to the Energy Department's SuperTruck initiative. | Infographic by <a href="/node/1332956">Carly Wilkins</a>, Energy Department. Our latest infographic explains how heavy-duty trucks are more

  20. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge: Understanding America's Bioenergy Choices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Take hold of your energy future: Bioenergy is derived from organic matter to produce renewable fuels, products, and power. This national challenge aims to inspire students to explore America's bioenergy choices and share what they learn with others. The Energy Department challenges you to investigate a bioenergy topic and design an infographic that illustrates your research. Submissions are due by March 4, 2016, at 5:00 p.m. central time. Follow us on #BioenergizeME. Questions? Email

  1. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge: Understanding America's Bioenergy Choices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    produce renewable fuels, products, and power. This national challenge aims to inspire students to explore America's bioenergy choices and share what they learn with others. The Energy Department challenges you to investigate a bioenergy topic and design an infographic that illustrates your research. Submissions are due by March 4, 2016, at 5:00 p.m. central time. Follow us on #BioenergizeME. Questions? Email BioenergizeME@ee.doe.gov For more information, please visit

  2. Picture of the Week: Gamma-ray bursts, infographic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gamma-ray bursts: infographic Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful explosions in the universe. With the help of sophisticated instruments such as the ground based RAPTOR robotic observatory system in New Mexico and the High Altitude Water Chernekov (HAWC) Gamma Ray Observatory in Mexico, scientists at Los Alamos National Lab and around the world are working to understand the ongoing mysteries relating to their physics and origins. Gamma Ray Bursts Click the image to see a larger view.

  3. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Must-Know Tips for the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Infographics are a useful visual tool for explaining complex information, numbers, or data quickly and effectively. However, you do not need to be an experienced graphic designer to make an eye-catching infographic. To assist student teams with the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge, this webinar will highlight strategies for designing engaging infographics and will provide creative approaches that can bring attention to your infographic and motivate others to share it across their social media networks. The webinar will also include lessons learned from previous challenges and tips from last year’s winning team. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge engages 9th–12th-grade high school teams to research one of four cross-curricular bioenergy topics and design an infographic to share what they have learned. This webinar is part of the BioenergizeME Office Hours webinar series developed by the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office.

  4. INFOGRAPHIC: How Do We Know Iran Isn't Building a Nuclear Bomb? |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Do We Know Iran Isn't Building a Nuclear Bomb? INFOGRAPHIC: How Do We Know Iran Isn't Building a Nuclear Bomb? February 2, 2016 - 12:00pm Addthis Infographic by <a href="/node/1332956">Carly Wilkins</a>, Energy Department. Infographic by Carly Wilkins, Energy Department. Pat Adams Pat Adams Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Carly Wilkins Carly Wilkins Multimedia Designer The Iran Deal puts in place unprecedented monitoring and

  5. Winning Team Announced for 2015 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Pilot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Director Jonathan Male announced the winner and finalists of the 2015 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Pilot in a special webinar awards ceremony on June 3, 2015.

  6. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge is an engaging way for students to explore topics in bioenergy and share what they have learned with others across the nation. In this challenge, high school-aged teams (grades 9–12) will use technology to research, interpret, apply, and then design an infographic that responds to one of four cross-curricular bioenergy topics. To make the challenge easier and more effective, this webinar is designed to guide interested students, teachers, and other educators through the submission process and highlight the resources that are available on the BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge website. These resources will assist students with researching their selected topics, developing their infographics, and designing effective social media campaigns. This webinar is part of the BioenergizeME Office Hours webinar series developed by the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office.

  7. New Infographic and Projects to Keep Your Energy Bills Out of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New Energy Saver 101 infographic lays out the different types of water heaters on the market and will help you figure out how to select the best model for your home. Download a...

  8. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Biofuel: Making Sustainable Fuels Through Organic Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This infographic was created by students from Clean Technologies and Sustainable Industries Early College High School in Malta, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME...

  9. Grades 9-12: Join the BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is hosting the BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge to engage 9th–12th grade students in learning about bioenergy and educating their peers. In this...

  10. BioenergizeME Office Hours: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 15, 2015 BioenergizeME Office Hours Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Shannon Zaret Communications Specialist, The Hannon Group Contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office | Bioenergy Technologies Office Agenda * Overview * Research Topic Areas And Prompts * Research Resources * Infographic Resources * Rubric * Social Media Campaign * Awards * Registration * Resources for Educators * Questions 3 |

  11. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is hosting the Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge webinar on Oct. 15, 2015, from 4 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. Eastern...

  12. Turning fungus into fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turning fungus into fuel Turning fungus into fuel A spidery fungus with a voracious appetite for military uniforms and canvas tents could hold the key to improvements in the production of biofuels. May 4, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National

  13. Turn Hoang Nguyen

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of polycyclic natural products by Turn Hoang Nguyen A dissertation submitted to the graduate faculty in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Major: Organic Chemistry Program of Study Committee: George A. Kraus (Major Professor) Richard C. Larock Valerie V. Sheares-Ashby Jacob W. Petrich Earl G. Hammond Iowa State University Arnes, Iowa 2003 .. 1 1 . Graduate College Iowa State University This is to certify that the doctoral dissertation of Tuan Hoang

  14. Diamond turning of glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  15. Tune Evaluation From Phased BPM Turn-By-Turn Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Marsh, W.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-18

    In fast ramping synchrotrons like the Fermilab Booster the conventional methods of betatron tune evaluation from the turn-by-turn data may not work due to rapid changes of the tunes (sometimes in a course of a few dozens of turns) and a high level of noise. We propose a technique based on phasing of signals from a large number of BPMs which significantly increases the signal to noise ratio. Implementation of the method in the Fermilab Booster control system is described and some measurement results are presented.

  16. Turning collectors for solar radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barak, Amitzur Z.

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for turning a solar collector about the polar axis so that the collector is directed toward the sun as the sun tracks the sky each day. It includes two heat-expansive elements and a shadow plate. In the morning a first expansive element is heated, expands to turn the collector to face the sun, while the second expansive element is shaded by the plate. In the afternoon the second element is heated, expands to turn the collector to face the sun, while the first is shaded by the plate.

  17. MHD plant turn down considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lineberry, J.T.; Chapman, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    The topic of part load operation of the MHD power plant is assessed. Current and future planned MHD research is reviewed in terms of addressing topping and bottoming cycle integration needs. The response of the MHD generator to turn up and down scenarios is reviewed. The concept of turning the MHD power to met changes in plant load is discussed. The need for new ideas and focused research to study MHD plant integration and problems of plant turn down and up is cited. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Diamond turning machine controller implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrard, K.P.; Taylor, L.W.; Knight, B.F.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    The standard controller for a Pnuemo ASG 2500 Diamond Turning Machine, an Allen Bradley 8200, has been replaced with a custom high-performance design. This controller consists of four major components. Axis position feedback information is provided by a Zygo Axiom 2/20 laser interferometer with 0.1 micro-inch resolution. Hardware interface logic couples the computers digital and analog I/O channels to the diamond turning machine`s analog motor controllers, the laser interferometer, and other machine status and control information. It also provides front panel switches for operator override of the computer controller and implement the emergency stop sequence. The remaining two components, the control computer hardware and software, are discussed in detail below.

  19. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  20. DOE Turns 25 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    DOE Turns 25 DOE Turns 25 Washington, DC The Department of Energy marked the 25th anniversary of its establishment in 1977

  1. INFOGRAPHIC: Wide Bandgap Semiconductors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakthrough material technology called wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors can help reduce the amount of wasted heat, boost energy efficiency, improve reliability, reduce cost, and decrease system size in existing and future power electronics.

  2. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1995-05-30

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  3. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  4. ARM - VAP Product - 10rlprofdep1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rlprofdep1turn Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027252 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Example 10rlprofdep1turn Data Plot Example 10rlprofdep1turn data plot VAP Output : 10RLPROFDEP1TURN 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm Active

  5. ARM - VAP Product - 10rlprofmr1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsrlprof10rlprofmr1turn Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027254 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Example 10rlprofmr1turn Data Plot Example 10rlprofmr1turn data plot VAP Output : 10RLPROFMR1TURN Raman LIDAR (RL): water vapor mixing ratio and relative humidity profiles, along with PWV Active Dates 1998.03.01 -

  6. ARM - VAP Product - 10rlprofbe1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    turn Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027251 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Example 10rlprofbe1turn Data Plot Example 10rlprofbe1turn data plot VAP Output : 10RLPROFBE1TURN Raman LIDAR (RL): Best-estimate state of the atmos. profiles from RL & AERI+GOES retrievals Active Dates 1998.03.01 - 2004.01.06 Originating

  7. Turning Grass into Gas for Less

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    like this switchgrass could be turned into biofuels, rather than using corn or other food crops. Pull up to the pump these days and chances are your gas will be laced with...

  8. Powerpedia Turns Two | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thomas O'Neill. The 500 most viewed pages on Powerpedia, the Energy Department's internal information-sharing website which turned two on January 27, 2011. | Image credit Thomas ...

  9. ARM - VAP Product - rlprofmerge1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsrlprofrlprofmerge1turn Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027756 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : RLPROFMERGE1TURN Merged analog and photon counting profiles used as input for other RLPROF VAPs Active Dates 2004.10.01 - 2015.10.03 Originating VAP Process Raman LIDAR Vertical Profiles : RLPROF

  10. ARM - VAP Product - 10srlprofmr1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    srlprofmr1turn Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027724 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : 10SRLPROFMR1TURN Raman LIDAR (RL): 10-sec water vapor mixing ratio andrelative humidity profiles , along with PWV Active Dates 2004.10.01 - 2015.09.23 Originating VAP Process Raman LIDAR Vertical Profiles : RLPROF

  11. ARM - VAP Product - 2rlprofdep1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsrlprof2rlprofdep1turn Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027735 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : 2RLPROFDEP1TURN 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths Active Dates 2004.10.01 - 2015.09.25 Originating VAP Process Raman LIDAR Vertical Profiles :

  12. ARM - VAP Product - aerosolbe1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsaerosolbeaerosolbe1turn Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1095310 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : AEROSOLBE1TURN Aerosol Best Estimate, from 1st Turner algorithm Active Dates 2001.01.01 - 2016.03.31 Originating VAP Process Aerosol Best Estimate : AEROSOLBE Measurements Only measurements considered

  13. Silicon Carbide Emitter Turn-Off Thyristor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Gangyao; Li, Jun; Huang, Alex Q.; Melcher, Jerry; Atcitty, Stan

    2008-01-01

    A novel MOS-conmore » trolled SiC thyristor device, the SiC emitter turn-off thyristor (ETO) is a promising technology for future high-voltage switching applications because it integrates the excellent current conduction capability of a SiC thyristor with a simple MOS-control interface. Through unity-gain turn-off, the SiC ETO also achieves excellent Safe Operation Area (SOA) and faster switching speeds than silicon ETOs. The world's first 4.5-kV SiC ETO prototype shows a forward voltage drop of 4.26 V at 26.5  A / cm 2 current density at room and elevated temperatures. Tested in an inductive circuit with a 2.5 kV DC link voltage and a 9.56-A load current, the SiC ETO shows a fast turn-off time of 1.63 microseconds and a low 9.88 mJ turn-off energy. The low switching loss indicates that the SiC ETO could operate at about 4 kHz if 100  W / cm 2 conduction and the 100  W / cm 2 turn-off losses can be removed by the thermal management system. This frequency capability is about 4 times higher than 4.5-kV-class silicon power devices. The preliminary demonstration shows that the SiC ETO is a promising candidate for high-frequency, high-voltage power conversion applications, and additional developments to optimize the device for higher voltage (>5 kV) and higher frequency (10 kHz) are needed.« less

  14. Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy November 1, 2013 - 1:28pm Addthis Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Matthew...

  15. Measurement of tool forces in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drescher, J.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    A dynamometer has been designed and built to measure forces in diamond turning. The design includes a 3-component, piezoelectric transducer. Initial experiments with this dynamometer system included verification of its predicted dynamic characteristics as well as a detailed study of cutting parameters. Many cutting experiments have been conducted on OFHC Copper and 6061-T6 Aluminum. Tests have involved investigation of velocity effects, and the effects of depth and feedrate on tool forces. Velocity has been determined to have negligible effects between 4 and 21 m/s. Forces generally increase with increasing depth of cut. Increasing feedrate does not necessarily lead to higher forces. Results suggest that a simple model may not be sufficient to describe the forces produced in the diamond turning process.

  16. Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Will County, Illinois officials yesterday formally broke ground on a new $7 million project (that includes $1 million of Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant funds) to turn methane gas from the Prairie View Landfill into electricity in a partnership with Waste Management. Will County will receive revenue from the sale of the gas created from decomposing garbage which will be harnessed and converted to generate 4.8 megawatts of green electrical power and used to power up to 8,000 homes. The future revenue generated from the sale of the gas and the sale of the electricity could reach $1 million annually.

  17. Science on the Hill: Turning windows into solar panels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turning windows into solar panels Science on the Hill: Turning windows into solar panels Working with quantum dots, researchers achieve a breakthrough in solar-concentrating technology that can turn windows into electric generators. February 7, 2016 solar panel windows The luminescent solar concentrator could turn any window into a daytime power source. Science on the Hill: Turning windows into solar panels Sunlight is abundant, free and for all practical purposes, eternal. Harvesting that light

  18. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2014-06-24

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  19. Hard turning micro-machine tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVor, Richard E; Adair, Kurt; Kapoor, Shiv G

    2013-10-22

    A micro-scale apparatus for supporting a tool for hard turning comprises a base, a pivot coupled to the base, an actuator coupled to the base, and at least one member coupled to the actuator at one end and rotatably coupled to the pivot at another end. A tool mount is disposed on the at least one member. The at least one member defines a first lever arm between the pivot and the tool mount, and a second lever arm between the pivot and the actuator. The first lever arm has a length that is less than a length of the second lever arm. The actuator moves the tool mount along an arc.

  20. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2013-07-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  1. Nuclear Navy Turns 50 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Navy Turns 50 Nuclear Navy Turns 50 Washington, DC Crew members of the U.S.S. Enterprise, the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, spell out NR-50 To commemorate the 50th ...

  2. EECBG Success Story: How Chula Vista, California is Turning Cooking...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chula Vista, California is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings EECBG Success Story: How Chula Vista, California is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings January 19, 2011 - 1:21pm Addthis...

  3. DOE ZERH Webinar: Turning the Building America Solution Center...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turning the Building America Solution Center into an Expert Advisor DOE ZERH Webinar: Turning the Building America Solution Center into an Expert Advisor As we have often said, the ...

  4. When Green Turns to Gold | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When Green Turns to Gold May 6, 2014 When Green Turns to Gold PARC Certificate Graduate Harry Bolson explains the importance of LEED Certification at WUSTL An error occurred. Try...

  5. Model-independent analysis of the Fermilab Tevatron turn-by-turn beam position monitor measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrenko, A.V.; Valishev, A.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Coherent transverse beam oscillations in the Tevatron were analyzed with the model-independent analysis (MIA) technique. This allowed one to obtain the model-independent values of coupled betatron amplitudes, phase advances, and dispersion function around the ring from a single dipole kick measurement. In order to solve the MIA mode mixing problem which limits the accuracy of determination of the optical functions, we have developed a new technique of rotational MIA mode untangling. The basic idea is to treat each beam position monitor (BPM) as two BPMs separated in a ring by exactly one turn. This leads to a simple criterion of MIA mode separation: the betatron phase advance between any BPM and its counterpart shifted by one turn should be equal to the betatron tune and therefore should not depend on the BPM position in the ring. Furthermore, we describe a MIA-based technique to locate vibrating magnets in a storage ring.

  6. When to Turn Off Your Lights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » When to Turn Off Your Lights When to Turn Off Your Lights The cost effectiveness of when to turn off lights depends on the type of lights and the price of electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/kyoshino. The cost effectiveness of when to turn off lights depends on the type of lights and the price of electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/kyoshino. The cost effectiveness of when to turn off lights depends on the type of bulb and the

  7. EECBG Success Story: Georgia County Turning Industrial and Farm...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Georgia County Turning Industrial and Farm Waste Into Big Energy Savings EECBG Success ... Learn more. Addthis Related Articles EECBG Success Story: County Aims to Save with ...

  8. Carbon Capture Turned Upside Down: High-Temperature Adsorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Capture Turned Upside Down: High-Temperature Adsorption & Low-Temperature Desorption (HALD) Previous Next List Joos, Lennart; Lejaeghere, Kurt; Huck, Johanna M.; Van...

  9. "Turn-Key" Open Source Software Solutions for Energy Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This FOA seeks to develop a "turn key" BAS solution using Open-Source software and architecture specifically tailored to small and medium buildings to advance opportunities for ...

  10. Turning Bayesian model averaging into Bayesian model combination...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Turning Bayesian model averaging into Bayesian model combination Authors: Carroll, James 1 ; Monteith, Kristine 2 ; Seppi, Kevin 2 ; Martinez, Tony 2 + Show Author ...

  11. ARM - VAP Product - aerich1nf1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsaerinfaerich1nf1turn Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027272 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : AERICH1NF1TURN AERI ch. 1

  12. ARM - VAP Product - aerich2nf1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsaerinfaerich2nf1turn Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027273 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : AERICH2NF1TURN AERI ch. 2

  13. Turn-by-Turn and Bunch-by-Bunch Transverse Profiles of a Single Bunch in a Full Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraus, R.; Fisher, A.S.; /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    The apparatus described in this paper can image the evolution of the transverse profile of a single bunch, isolated from a full PEP-II ring of 1500 bunches. Using this apparatus there are two methods of single bunch imaging; bunch-by-bunch beam profiling can image every bunch in the ring a single bunch at a time with the images of sequential bunches being in order, allowing one to see variations in beam size along a train. Turn-by-turn beam profiling images a single bunch on each successive turn it makes around the ring. This method will be useful in determining the effect that an injected bunch has on a stable bunch as the oscillations of the injected bunch damp out. Turn-by-turn imaging of the synchrotron light uses a system of lenses and mirrors to image many turns of both the major and minor axis of a single bunch across the photocathode of a gateable camera. The bunch-by-bunch method is simpler: because of a focusing mirror used in porting the light from the ring, the synchrotron light from the orbiting electrons becomes an image at a certain distance from the mirror; and since the camera does not use a lens, the photocathode is set exactly at this image distance. Bunch-by-bunch profiling has shown that in the Low Energy Ring (LER) horizontal bunch size decreases along a train. Turn-by-turn profiling has been able to image 100 turns of a single bunch on one exposure of the camera. The turn-by-turn setup has also been able to image 50 turns of the minor axis showing part of the damping process of an oscillating injected charge during a LER fill. The goal is to image the damping of oscillations of injected charge for 100 turns of both the major and minor axis throughout the damping process during trickle injection. With some changes to the apparatus this goal is within reach and will make turn-by-turn imaging a very useful tool in beam diagnostics.

  14. LX-17 Corner-Turning and Reactive Flow Failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P C; Andreski, H; Cook III, C F; Garza, R; Pastrone, R; Phillips, D; Roeske, F; Vitello, P; Molitoris, J

    2004-03-11

    We have performed a series of highly-instrumented experiments examining corner-turning of detonation. A TATB booster is inset 15 mm into LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% kel-F) so that the detonation must turn a right angle around an air well. An optical pin located at the edge of the TATB gives the start time of the corner-turn. The breakout time on the side and back edges is measured with streak cameras. Three high-resolution X-ray images were taken on each experiment to examine the details of the detonation. We have concluded that the detonation cannot turn the corner and subsequently fails, but the shock wave continues to propagate in the unreacted explosive, leaving behind a dead zone. The detonation front farther out from the corner slowly turns and eventually reaches the air well edge 180{sup o} from its original direction. The dead zone is stable and persists 7.7 {micro}s after the corner-turn, although it has drifted into the original air well area. Our regular reactive flow computer models sometimes show temporary failure but they recover quickly and are unable to model the dead zones. We present a failure model that cuts off the reaction rate below certain detonation velocities and reproduces the qualitative features of the corner-turning failure.

  15. Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy November 1, 2013 - 1:28pm Addthis Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? 1.4 billion pounds of pumpkins are produced in the U.S. each year, many of which end up in landfills or compost piles after Halloween. Oakland's EBMUD collects food waste and uses microbes to convert it into methane

  16. Diamond turning of Si and Ge single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, P.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single-point diamond turning studies have been completed on Si and Ge crystals. A new process model was developed for diamond turning which is based on a critical depth of cut for plastic flow-to-brittle fracture transitions. This concept, when combined with the actual machining geometry for single-point turning, predicts that {open_quotes}ductile{close_quotes} machining is a combined action of plasticity and fracture. Interrupted cutting experiments also provide a meant to directly measure the critical depth parameter for given machining conditions.

  17. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  18. Potential of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with Sugarcane for Energycane Production Potential of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with Sugarcane for Energycane ...

  19. Functionalized Polyacrylamide Monolith for Rapid Bacteria Pathogen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bacteria Pathogen Detection in Human Blood. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Functionalized Polyacrylamide Monolith for Rapid Bacteria Pathogen Detection in Human Blood. ...

  20. Turn Motors Off When Not in Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This tip sheet discusses pros and cons of repeated motor starts and stops and provides suggested actions. Motor Systems Tip Sheet 10 PDF icon Turn Motors Off When Not in Use ...

  1. When to Turn Off Your Lights | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    are not already factored into the rate. LED Lighting The operating life of a light emitting diode (LED) is unaffected by turning it on and off. While lifetime is reduced for...

  2. Turning Leftover Trees into Biogasoline | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turning Leftover Trees into Biogasoline Turning Leftover Trees into Biogasoline June 7, 2010 - 11:00am Addthis Researchers at Virginia Tech are working to show how biogasoline could potentially be created in existing petroleum refineries, instead of at new biorefineries as shown here. | File illustration Researchers at Virginia Tech are working to show how biogasoline could potentially be created in existing petroleum refineries, instead of at new biorefineries as shown here. | File illustration

  3. To the Cloud! Apidae Helps Modelers Turn Information into Knowledge |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy To the Cloud! Apidae Helps Modelers Turn Information into Knowledge To the Cloud! Apidae Helps Modelers Turn Information into Knowledge October 26, 2015 - 2:41pm Addthis Apidae is a collection of cloud-based simulation and data analysis tools that help modelers better understand their models. Image credit: BUILDlab. Apidae is a collection of cloud-based simulation and data analysis tools that help modelers better understand their models. Image credit: BUILDlab. Apidae

  4. As summer turns to fall, a new school year begins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    As summer turns to fall, a new school year begins Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit As summer turns to fall, a new school year begins Welcome to the back-to-school issue of Community Connections August 1, 2013 Kurt Steinhaus, Director of the Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus, Director of the Community Programs Office Contact Community Programs Office Director Kurt Steinhaus

  5. Turning Bayesian model averaging into Bayesian model combination

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Turning Bayesian model averaging into Bayesian model combination Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Turning Bayesian model averaging into Bayesian model combination Authors: Carroll, James [1] ; Monteith, Kristine [2] ; Seppi, Kevin [2] ; Martinez, Tony [2] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory BYU Publication Date: 2011-07-28 OSTI Identifier: 1084524 Report Number(s): LA-UR-11-04419; LA-UR-11-4419 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396

  6. Simultaneous linear optics and coupling correction for storage rings with turn-by-turn beam position monitor data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xi; Huang, Xiaobiao

    2015-11-10

    We propose a method to simultaneously correct linear optics errors and linear coupling for storage rings using turn-by-turn (TbT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. The independent component analysis (ICA) method is used to isolate the betatron normal modes from the measured TbT BPM data. The betatron amplitudes and phase advances of the projections of the normal modes on the horizontal and vertical planes are then extracted, which, combined with dispersion measurement, are used to fit the lattice model. Furthermore, the fitting results are used for lattice correction. Our method has been successfully demonstrated on the NSLS-II storage ring.

  7. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  8. Engineering Biofuels from Photosynthetic Bacteria | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Engineering Biofuels from Photosynthetic Bacteria Technology available for licensing: Using photosynthetic bacteria to produce biofuels. 30-70% of the fuel's waste can be used to create other fuel sources Combines both engineered and natural photosynthetic mechanisms to generate the fuel PDF icon biofuels_from_bacteria

  9. Turning Windows into Solar Panels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Windows into Solar Panels Turning Windows into Solar Panels March 7, 2016 - 3:23pm Addthis UV light shines through a sample of transparent material containing quantum dots, tiny nanoparticles that can be used to harness solar energy for electricity. | Photo courtesy of LANL. UV light shines through a sample of transparent material containing quantum dots, tiny nanoparticles that can be used to harness solar energy for electricity. | Photo courtesy of LANL. Victor Klimov Los Alamos National

  10. Analysis of the influence of tool dynamics in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, S.C.; Luttrell, D.E.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the progress in defining the role of machine and interface dynamics on the surface finish in diamond turning. It contains a review of literature from conventional and diamond machining processes relating tool dynamics, material interactions and tool wear to surface finish. Data from experimental measurements of tool/work piece interface dynamics are presented as well as machine dynamics for the DTM at the Center.

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Central Ohio Turns Trash Into Natural Gas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Central Ohio Turns Trash Into Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Central Ohio Turns Trash Into Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Central Ohio Turns Trash Into Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Central Ohio Turns Trash Into Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Central Ohio Turns Trash Into Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Central Ohio Turns Trash

  12. America's Clean, Efficient Fleets: An Infographic | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy.gov will be hosting a Live Twitter Q&A on the National Clean Fleets Partnership with Mark Smith, Vehicle Technologies Deployment Manager for the Energy Department's national ...

  13. Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report Infographic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (EPA), created the Biogas Opportunities Roadmap as a response to the White House Climate ... BIOGAS OPPORTUNITIES ROADMAP PROGRESS REPORT POTENTIAL CAPACITY POLICY ACHIEVEMENTS There ...

  14. Infographic: The Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    gas * water (electrolysis) * biomass * waste products Uses Domestic Fuel Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions 50% 90% Operates Efficiently FCEV internal combustion 20-30% 60% ...

  15. INFOGRAPHIC: Carbon Capture 101 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Carly Wilkins Carly Wilkins Multimedia Designer Power plants are vital to modern life. They produce the energy we need to light our homes,...

  16. geothermal infographic 7.14.2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications: Heating Cooling Hot Water Snowmelt sytems in sidewalks and bridges Industrial applications (food drying, dairies, etc) Geothermal greenhouses Fish farms Klamath Falls, OR Case Study: Produces geothermal fluid from 2 wells @ ~212°F Procedure: 1) Geothermal fluid is pumped from the production wells to a central pumping station. 2) Geothermal fluid is passed through heat exchangers and injected back into the subsurface. 3) After being heated, the working fluid leaves the central

  17. Property:InfographicType | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crucial Areas Planning System + Map + CHAT: Crucial Habitat Assessment Tools + Map + Casa DiabloLong Valley Caldera Area, Mono County + Map + E EFSEC Generalized Siting...

  18. Computational modeling of drug-resistant bacteria. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDougall, Preston

    2015-03-12

    Initial proposal summary: The evolution of antibiotic-resistant mutants among bacteria (superbugs) is a persistent and growing threat to public health. In many ways, we are engaged in a war with these microorganisms, where the corresponding arms race involves chemical weapons and biological targets. Just as advances in microelectronics, imaging technology and feature recognition software have turned conventional munitions into smart bombs, the long-term objectives of this proposal are to develop highly effective antibiotics using next-generation biomolecular modeling capabilities in tandem with novel subatomic feature detection software. Using model compounds and targets, our design methodology will be validated with correspondingly ultra-high resolution structure-determination methods at premier DOE facilities (single-crystal X-ray diffraction at Argonne National Laboratory, and neutron diffraction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The objectives and accomplishments are summarized.

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rio Rico Fire District Turns Grease Into

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel Rio Rico Fire District Turns Grease Into Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rio Rico Fire District Turns Grease Into Biodiesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rio Rico Fire District Turns Grease Into Biodiesel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rio Rico Fire District Turns Grease Into Biodiesel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rio Rico Fire District Turns Grease Into Biodiesel on Delicious Rank

  20. Liquid Fuel From Bacteria: Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from CO2, Hydrogen, and Oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-15

    Electrofuels Project: MIT is using solar-derived hydrogen and common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) directly into biofuel. This bacteria already has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. MIT is engineering the bacteria to use hydrogen to convert CO2 directly into liquid transportation fuels. Hydrogen is a flammable gas, so the MIT team is building an innovative reactor system that will safely house the bacteria and gas mixture during the fuel-creation process. The system will pump in precise mixtures of hydrogen, oxygen, and CO2, and the online fuel-recovery system will continuously capture and remove the biofuel product.

  1. Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

    2014-03-11

    The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

  2. Spectroscopic diagnostics for bacteria in biologic sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; El-Sayed, Ivan H.

    2002-01-01

    A method to analyze and diagnose specific bacteria in a biologic sample using spectroscopy is disclosed. The method includes obtaining the spectra of a biologic sample of a non-infected patient for use as a reference, subtracting the reference from the spectra of an infected sample, and comparing the fingerprint regions of the resulting differential spectrum with reference spectra of bacteria in saline. Using this diagnostic technique, specific bacteria can be identified sooner and without culturing, bacteria-specific antibiotics can be prescribed sooner, resulting in decreased likelihood of antibiotic resistance and an overall reduction of medical costs.

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: DeKalb County Turns Trash to Gas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    DeKalb County Turns Trash to Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: DeKalb County Turns Trash to Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: DeKalb County Turns Trash to Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: DeKalb County Turns Trash to Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: DeKalb County Turns Trash to Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: DeKalb County Turns Trash to Gas on Digg Find More places to share

  4. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  5. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-09-24

    A new protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. The isolated consortia and bacteria are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. The isolated consortia, bacteria, and dispersants are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  6. Hydrogen metabolism of photosynthetic bacteria and algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumazawa, S.; Mitsui, A.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolism, metabolic pathways and biochemistry of hydrogen in photosynthetic bacteria and algae are reviewed. Detailed information on the occurrence and measurement of hydrogenase activity is presented. Hydrogen production rates for different species of algae and bacteria are presented. 173 references, 1 figure, 7 tables.

  7. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-03-04

    A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  8. Energy Department Turns Up the Heat and Power on Industrial Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turns Up the Heat and Power on Industrial Energy Efficiency Energy Department Turns Up the Heat and Power on Industrial Energy Efficiency March 13, 2013 - 12:19pm Addthis Learn how ...

  9. Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos Physicist Eva Birnbaum shows how the laboratory ...

  10. AutoGrid - Turning Big Data Into Power with the Energy Data Platform and Apps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narayan, Amit; Dresselhuys, Eric; Kulp, Yann; Buseman, Greg; Piette, Mary Ann; Tang, Andrew; Dailey, Karla; Knudsen, Chris

    2014-03-25

    AutoGrid personnel discuss how they are turning big data into power with the energy data platform and apps.

  11. Property Transfer or Turn In Form, HQ F 1400.18 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Property Transfer or Turn In Form, HQ F 1400.18 Property Transfer or Turn In Form, HQ F 1400.18 Property Transfer or Turn In Form, HQ F 1400.18 PDF icon Property Transfer or Turn In Form, HQ F 1400.18 More Documents & Publications DOE HQ F 1400.18 DOE F 1400.8 DOE HQ F 580

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuels Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky

  13. Proposed plant will turn wood residues into synfuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    A group of entrepreneurs plan to have a plant operating in Burney, CA. The projected facility will produce an estimated 21,000 gallons of oil per day, converting about 300 tons of raw material. Converting cellulose into synthetic fuel is superior to alcohol production. The process yields approximately 84 gallons of synthetic fuel per ton of raw material. The entire LHG (liquid hydrogen gas) patented facility is self-sufficient and releases only carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Synfuel production is a three-phase process. First, butyl alcohol (butanol) and acetone are produced from a portion of the raw material. This is facilitated by adding to the raw material a bacteria culture. The planned facility in Burney will have thirty-five 2100 gallon fermentation tanks and will produce 1.25 million gallons of butanol. Next, organic material is blended with water and is pumped into patented LHG catalytic converters, charged with carbon monoxide gas as a catalyst and then heated to 350 degrees C at 2000 to 5000 psi. Here, the organic material is converted to No. 4 oil with bituminous tar as a residue. A patented gasifier system produces the carbon monoxide catalyst plus COH (carbon hydroxide) gas. The COH is used to power a gas turbine driving a 100 kW generator and a central hydraulic pump. The facility, which will be energy self-sufficient, will have approximately 50 kW of excess power to sell to the local utility power grid. Finally, the No. 4 oil, butanol and liquified COH gas are blended to produce any grade fuel oil or a gasoline substitute of very high octane.

  14. Methane and Methanotrophic Bacteria as a Biotechnological Platform...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Methane and Methanotrophic Bacteria as a Biotechnological Platform Methane and Methanotrophic Bacteria as a Biotechnological Platform Breakout Session 2-B: NewEmerging Pathways ...

  15. Utilizing Bacteria for Sustainable Manufacturing of Low-Cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bacteria for Sustainable Manufacturing of Low-Cost Nanoparticles Chad Duty, Ph.D. ... bacteria Valuable mass produced nanoparticles Cheap sugar 4 Managed by UT-Battelle ...

  16. How Bacteria Make Magnets | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Bacteria Make Magnets For a number of animals, including birds, fish and mammals, there is evidence that magnets are used for orientation. However, little is known about how...

  17. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-11-26

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution.

  18. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom.

  19. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.; Sorokin, A.; Mirkin, B.; Koonin, E.; Pavlov, A.; Pavlova, N.; Karamychev, V.; Polouchine, N.; Shakhova, V.; Grigoriev, I.; Lou, Y.; Rokhsar, D.; Lucas, S.; Huang, K.; Goodstein, D. M.; Hawkins, T.; Plengvidhya, V.; Welker, D.; Hughes, J.; Goh, Y.; Benson, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lee, J.-H.; Diaz-Muniz, I.; Dosti, B.; Smeianov, V,; Wechter, W.; Barabote, R.; Lorca, G.; Altermann, E.; Barrangou, R.; Ganesan, B.; Xie, Y.; Rawsthorne, H.; Tamir, D.; Parker, C.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Hutkins, R.; O'Sullivan, D.; Steele, J.; Unlu, G.; Saier, M.; Klaenhammer, T.; Richardson, P.; Kozyavkin, S.; Weimer, B.; Mills, D.

    2006-06-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive gene loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats.

  20. Functionalized Polyacrylamide Monolith for Rapid Bacteria Pathogen

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Detection in Human Blood. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Functionalized Polyacrylamide Monolith for Rapid Bacteria Pathogen Detection in Human Blood. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Functionalized Polyacrylamide Monolith for Rapid Bacteria Pathogen Detection in Human Blood. Abstract not provided. Authors: Mai, Junyu ; Piccini, Matthew Ernest ; Hatch, Anson V. ; Abhyankar, Vinay V. ; Olano, Juan ; Willson, Richard Publication Date: 2014-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1140705

  1. Fuel from Bacteria: Bioconversion of Carbon Dioxide to Biofuels by Facultatively Autotrophic Hydrogen Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: Ohio State is genetically modifying bacteria to efficiently convert carbon dioxide directly into butanol, an alcohol that can be used directly as a fuel blend or converted to a hydrocarbon, which closely resembles a gasoline. Bacteria are typically capable of producing a certain amount of butanol before it becomes too toxic for the bacteria to survive. Ohio State is engineering a new strain of the bacteria that could produce up to 50% more butanol before it becomes too toxic for the bacteria to survive. Finding a way to produce more butanol more efficiently would significantly cut down on biofuel production costs and help make butanol cost competitive with gasoline. Ohio State is also engineering large tanks, or bioreactors, to grow the biofuel-producing bacteria in, and they are developing ways to efficiently recover biofuel from the tanks.

  2. Biofuels from Solar Energy and Bacteria: Electrofuels Via Direct Electron Transfer from Electrodes to Microbes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: UMass is feeding renewable electricity to bacteria to provide the microorganisms with the energy they need to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) directly into liquid fuels. UMass’ energy-to-fuels conversion process is anticipated to be more efficient than current biofuels approaches in part because this process will leverage the high efficiency of photovoltaics to convert solar energy into electricity. UMass is using bacteria already known to produce biofuel from electric current and CO2 and working to increase the amount of electric current those microorganisms will accept and use for biofuels production. In collaboration with scientists at University of California, San Diego, the UMass team is also investigating the use of hydrogen sulfide as a source of energy to power biofuel production.

  3. Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos Physicist Eva Birnbaum shows how the laboratory is manufacturing a radioactive treatment that targets tumors, without killing the surrounding healthy tissue. December 20, 2015 LANL physicist Eva Birnbaum LANL physicist Eva Birnbaum Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer NBC News got exclusive access to Los Alamos National Laboratory where

  4. DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Civilian Reactors | National Nuclear Security Administration Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civilian Reactors DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civi Washington, DC Secretary Abraham announced that DOE will dispose of 34 metric tons of surplus weapons grade plutonium by turning the material into mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for use in nuclear reactors. The decision follows an exhaustive Administration review of

  5. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C.

    1994-01-01

    A method for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants comprising the steps of placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container, placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours, retrieving the container, collecting the contents of the container, and microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to inoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  6. PPPL featured as DOE celebrates turning 35 | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    featured as DOE celebrates turning 35 October 5, 2012 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook 35 Years at the Department of Energy (Flickr Photostream)

  7. Turn Down the Temp, But Don't Let Your Pipes Freeze!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Before you go crazy with turning down the thermostat really low, I'd like to point out some things you might want to keep in mind.

  8. Turn Down the Heat: Why a 4C Warmer World Must Be Avoided ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sitesdefaultfilesTurnDowntheheatWhy Transport Toolkit Region(s): Global This report provides a snapshot of recent scientific literature and new analyses of...

  9. EERE Success Story-Uncle Sam Turns to SAM for Solar Modeling...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Turns to SAM for Solar Modeling When it comes to making performance predictions and cost-of-energy estimates for ... PROJECTS: Additional Data Could Improve Understanding ...

  10. Efficiency of static core turn-off in a system-on-a-chip with variation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cher, Chen-Yong; Coteus, Paul W; Gara, Alan; Kursun, Eren; Paulsen, David P; Schuelke, Brian A; Sheets, II, John E; Tian, Shurong

    2013-10-29

    A processor-implemented method for improving efficiency of a static core turn-off in a multi-core processor with variation, the method comprising: conducting via a simulation a turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's design stage, wherein the turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's design stage includes a first output corresponding to a first multi-core processor core to turn off; conducting a turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's testing stage, wherein the turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's testing stage includes a second output corresponding to a second multi-core processor core to turn off; comparing the first output and the second output to determine if the first output is referring to the same core to turn off as the second output; outputting a third output corresponding to the first multi-core processor core if the first output and the second output are both referring to the same core to turn off.

  11. Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blow, M. J.; Deutschbauer, A. M.; Hoover, C. A.; Lamson, J.; Lamson, J.; Price, M. N.; Waters, J.; Wetmore, K. M.; Bristow, J.; Arkin, A. P.

    2013-03-20

    Bacteria and Archaea exhibit a huge diversity of metabolic capabilities with fundamental importance in the environment, and potential applications in biotechnology. However, the genetic bases of these capabilities remain unclear due largely to an absence of technologies that link DNA sequence to molecular function. To address this challenge, we are developing a pipeline for high throughput annotation of gene function using mutagenesis, growth assays and DNA sequencing. By applying this pipeline to annotate gene function in 50 diverse microbes we hope to discover thousands of new gene functions and produce a proof of principle `Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea?.

  12. EERE Success Story-Uncle Sam Turns to SAM for Solar Modeling | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Uncle Sam Turns to SAM for Solar Modeling EERE Success Story-Uncle Sam Turns to SAM for Solar Modeling July 9, 2015 - 11:15am Addthis EERE Success Story—Uncle Sam Turns to SAM for Solar Modeling When it comes to making performance predictions and cost-of-energy estimates for grid-connected power projects, you can trust SAM to make it happen. SAM, or the System Advisor Model, is a performance and financial analysis tool funded by the SunShot Initiative that was built based on

  13. Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to Help Drive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    America | Department of Energy Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to Help Drive America Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to Help Drive America December 6, 2011 - 2:12pm Addthis Strains of E. coli bacteria were engineered to digest switchgrass biomass and synthesize its sugars into gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. | Image courtesy of Berkeley Lab. Strains of E. coli bacteria were engineered to digest switchgrass biomass and synthesize its sugars

  14. Engineering Biofuels from Photosynthetic Bacteria - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Engineering Biofuels from Photosynthetic Bacteria Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology <em>Schematic of the overall approach including the invented method for production of co-factors and anchors as biofuel precursors.</em> Schematic of the overall approach including the invented method for production of co-factors and anchors as biofuel precursors. Technology Marketing

  15. Georgia County Turning Industrial and Farm Waste Into Big Energy Savings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Thanks to a Department of Energy Recovery Act grant, Gwinnett County, Georgia is taking some of the grossest stuff on earth and turning it into some of the greenest stuff on earth.

  16. Method And Apparatus For Reducing Sample Dispersion In Turns And Junctions Of Micro-Channel Systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Stewart K. , Nilson, Robert H.

    2004-05-11

    What is disclosed pertains to improvement in the performance of microchannel devices by providing turns, wyes, tees, and other junctions that produce little dispersion of a sample as it traverses the turn or junction. The reduced dispersion results from contraction and expansion regions that reduce the cross-sectional area over some portion of the turn or junction. By carefully designing the geometries of these regions, sample dispersion in turns and junctions is reduced to levels comparable to the effects of ordinary diffusion. The low dispersion features are particularly suited for microfluidic devices and systems using either electromotive force, pressure, or combinations thereof as the principle of fluid transport. Such microfluidic devices and systems are useful for separation of components, sample transport, reaction, mixing, dilution or synthesis, or combinations thereof.

  17. Turning Down the Heat on Carbon | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Turning Down the Heat on Carbon Unusual reaction eschews high temperatures and water to lock away climate-changing carbon dioxide. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare ...

  18. Fact #732: June 18, 2012 Days to Turn Trend by Vehicle Class

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Days to turn" is an automotive industry term that refers to the number of days that vehicles stay in dealer inventories before they are sold (i.e., the time a vehicle stays on the dealer's lot)....

  19. Winners of Hydrogen Student Design Contest Turn Urban Waste into Energy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Winners of Hydrogen Student Design Contest Turn Urban Waste into Energy Winners of Hydrogen Student Design Contest Turn Urban Waste into Energy September 20, 2012 - 1:10pm Addthis The University of Maryland team accepted the award for the best combined heat, hydrogen, and power system design at the World Hydrogen Energy Conference (WHEC) in Toronto. | Photo courtesy of Jennie Moton. The University of Maryland team accepted the award for the best combined heat, hydrogen,

  20. How Miami, Florida is Turning Waste Into Cash | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Miami, Florida is Turning Waste Into Cash How Miami, Florida is Turning Waste Into Cash April 7, 2011 - 3:43pm Addthis Miami-Dade officials talk about using EECBG grant funds for their Methane Sequestration Project. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Methane gas captured from a landfill will provide 30 percent of the electricity used at an adjacent wastewater plant. The project will upgrade and expand the existing

  1. Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing the Clean

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Game | Department of Energy Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing the Clean Energy Game Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing the Clean Energy Game February 9, 2011 - 1:40pm Addthis Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing the Clean Energy Game Paul Bryan Biomass Program Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy How does it work? Vegetative and agricultural waste reacts with oxygen to produce synthesis

  2. Nashville Turns an Eyesore into an Energy-Efficient Asset | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Nashville Turns an Eyesore into an Energy-Efficient Asset Nashville Turns an Eyesore into an Energy-Efficient Asset September 19, 2012 - 10:43am Addthis The completed Nashville Bridge Company's building (called NABRICO for short) includes a geothermal heat pump system to keep public energy costs low. | Photo courtesy of David Powell, AIA. The completed Nashville Bridge Company's building (called NABRICO for short) includes a geothermal heat pump system to keep public energy costs low.

  3. DOE ZERH Webinar: Turning the Building America Solution Center into an

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Expert Advisor | Department of Energy Turning the Building America Solution Center into an Expert Advisor DOE ZERH Webinar: Turning the Building America Solution Center into an Expert Advisor As we have often said, the Building America Solution Center (BASC) is your new best friend if you have anything to do with high-performance homes. It provides extensive, up-to-date content needed to integrate building science best practices in specifications, field applications, education, and code

  4. SunShot Awardee 1366 Technologies Turns Cutting-Edge Research into

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Success | Department of Energy Awardee 1366 Technologies Turns Cutting-Edge Research into Manufacturing Success SunShot Awardee 1366 Technologies Turns Cutting-Edge Research into Manufacturing Success October 14, 2015 - 2:42pm Addthis 1366 Technician Becky Allen works in a lab at the company’s Bedford, MA demonstration facility. | Photo courtesy of Bob Frechette 1366 Technician Becky Allen works in a lab at the company's Bedford, MA demonstration facility. | Photo courtesy

  5. Turn Motors Off When Not in Use - Motor Tip Sheet #10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    Motors use no energy when turned off. Reducing motor operating time by just 10% usually saves more energy than replacing a standard efficiency motor with a NEMA Premium efficiency motor. In fact, given that 97% of the life cycle cost of purchasing and operating a motor is energy-related, turning a motor off 10% of the time could reduce energy costs enough to purchase three new motors.

  6. ZERH Webinar: Turning the Building America Solution Center into an Expert

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advisor (Text Version) | Department of Energy Turning the Building America Solution Center into an Expert Advisor (Text Version) ZERH Webinar: Turning the Building America Solution Center into an Expert Advisor (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar Your New Best Friend in Action: Business Solutions Using the Building America Solution Center, presented in September 2015. Watch the presentation. Lindsay Parker: Presentation cover slide: ... so today's session is one in a

  7. Method and apparatus for reducing sample dispersion in turns and junctions of microchannel systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of microchannel devices is improved by providing turns, wyes, tees, and other junctions that produce little dispersions of a sample as it traverses the turn or junction. The reduced dispersion results from contraction and expansion regions that reduce the cross-sectional area over some portion of the turn or junction. By carefully designing the geometries of these regions, sample dispersion in turns and junctions is reduced to levels comparable to the effects of ordinary diffusion. A numerical algorithm was employed to evolve low-dispersion geometries by computing the electric or pressure field within candidate configurations, sample transport through the turn or junction, and the overall effective dispersion. These devices should greatly increase flexibility in the design of microchannel devices by permitting the use of turns and junctions that do not induce large sample dispersion. In particular, the ability to fold electrophoretic and electrochrornatographic separation columns will allow dramatic improvements in the miniaturization of these devices. The low-lispersion devices are particularly suited to electrochromatographic and electrophoretic separations, as well as pressure-driven chromatographic separation. They are further applicable to microfluidic systems employing either electroosrnotic or pressure-driven flows for sample transport, reaction, mixing, dilution or synthesis.

  8. Bacteria-Mineral Interactions on the Surfaces of Metal-Resistant Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malkin, A J

    2010-03-24

    The extraordinary ability of indigenous microorganisms, like metal-resistant bacteria, for biotransformation of toxic compounds is of considerable interest for the emerging area of environmental bioremediation. However, the underlying mechanisms by which metal-resistant bacteria transform toxic compounds are currently unknown and await elucidation. The project's objective was to study stress-induced responses of metal-resistant bacteria to environmental changes and chemical stimulants. This project involved a multi-institutional collaboration of our LLNL group with the group of Dr. H.-Y. Holman (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). In this project, we have utilized metal-resistant bacteria Arthrobacter oxydans as a model bacterial system. We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize for the first time at the nanometer scale formation of stress-induced structures on bacterial surfaces in response to Cr (VI) exposure. We have demonstrated that structure, assembly, and composition of these stress-induced structures are dependent on Cr (VI) concentrations. Our AFM observations of the appearance and development of stress-induced layers on the surfaces of Arthrobacter oxydans bacteria exposed to Cr (VI) were confirmed by Dr. Holman's biochemical, electron microscopy, and synchrotron infrared spectromicroscopy studies. In general, in vitro imaging of live microbial and cellular systems represents one of the most challenging issues in application of AFM. Various approaches for immobilization of bacteria on the substrate for in vitro imaging were tested in this project. Imaging of live bacteria was achieved, however further optimization of experimental methods are needed for high-resolution visualization of the cellular environmental structural dynamics by AFM. This project enhanced the current insight into molecular architecture, structural and environmental variability of bacterial systems. The project partially funded research for two book chapters (1,2), and we anticipate one more publication (3). The publications describe development of methods and results of studies of structural dynamics of metal-resistant bacteria that contribute to more comprehensive understanding of the architecture, function, and environmental dynamics of bacterial and cellular systems. The results of this LDRD were presented in invited talks and contributed presentations at five national and international conferences and five seminar presentations at the external institutions. These included invited talks at the conferences of Gordon Research, Materials Research and American Chemical Societies. Our scientific results and methodologies developed in this project enabled us to receive new funding for the multiyear project 'Chromium transformation pathways in metal-reducing bacteria' funded by the University of California Lab Fees Program ($500,000, 5/1/09 - 4/30/2012), with our proposal being ranked 1st from a total of 138 in the Earth, Energy, Environmental & Space Sciences panel.

  9. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2004-08-10

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  10. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2007-12-04

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  11. Commercial Ethanol Turns Dross to Dollars for Rural Iowans | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Commercial Ethanol Turns Dross to Dollars for Rural Iowans Commercial Ethanol Turns Dross to Dollars for Rural Iowans September 28, 2011 - 3:23pm Addthis American farmers harvest 80 million acres of corn each autumn. The corn stover usually left on a hewn field can be processed into a renewable transportation fuel called bioethanol. | Image courtesy of POET American farmers harvest 80 million acres of corn each autumn. The corn stover usually left on a hewn field can be processed into

  12. Geek-Up[08.20.10] -- Turning Trash Bags into Battery Anodes and Researching

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Gut Microbiome | Department of Energy 0.10] -- Turning Trash Bags into Battery Anodes and Researching the Gut Microbiome Geek-Up[08.20.10] -- Turning Trash Bags into Battery Anodes and Researching the Gut Microbiome August 20, 2010 - 5:18pm Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? An Argonne Scholar has figured out a way to convert grocery bags into carbon nanotubes that can be used

  13. BPA Turns 75: A Look Back and a Look Ahead | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BPA Turns 75: A Look Back and a Look Ahead BPA Turns 75: A Look Back and a Look Ahead September 28, 2012 - 11:59am Addthis To commemorate what BPA considers a 75-year partnership with the Columbia River, which is the cornerstone of BPA's relationship with the people and utilities of the Northwest, BPA releases the first video of a series detailing its history. Teresa Waugh Public Affairs Specialist, Bonneville Power Administration What is BPA? BPA markets wholesale electrical power from 31

  14. 60 Years Since Nuclear Turned on the Lights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    60 Years Since Nuclear Turned on the Lights 60 Years Since Nuclear Turned on the Lights December 20, 2011 - 10:50am Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs "We have moved far to tame for peaceful uses the mighty forces unloosed when the atom was split." President Johnson, 1966 At 1:23pm on December 20, 1951, Argonne National Laboratory director Walter Zinn scribbled into his log book, "Electricity flows from atomic energy. Rough

  15. Energy Innovation Hubs and the Quest to Turn Sunlight Into Fuel |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Innovation Hubs and the Quest to Turn Sunlight Into Fuel Energy Innovation Hubs and the Quest to Turn Sunlight Into Fuel July 22, 2010 - 12:01pm Addthis Daniel B. Poneman Daniel B. Poneman Former Deputy Secretary of Energy From the Manhattan Project to AT&T's Bell Laboratories, we've seen the transformative results that can happen when we bring together some of our best scientific minds. American innovation has solved some of the world's toughest problems and made

  16. Transport measurements of FeAs superconductors in the 150T single-turn

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    magnet (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Transport measurements of FeAs superconductors in the 150T single-turn magnet Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Transport measurements of FeAs superconductors in the 150T single-turn magnet Authors: Moll, Philip J.W. [1] ; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D. [1] ; Karpinski, J. [1] ; Batlogg, B. [1] ; McDonald, Ross David [2] ; Rickel, Dwight G. [2] ; Mielke, Charles H. [2] ; Balakirev, Fedor F. [2] ; Betts, Jonathan B. [2] + Show Author Affiliations ETH

  17. Transport measurements of FeAs superconductors in the 150T single-turn

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    magnet (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Transport measurements of FeAs superconductors in the 150T single-turn magnet Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Transport measurements of FeAs superconductors in the 150T single-turn magnet × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional

  18. "Turn-Key" Open Source Software Solutions for Energy Management of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small to Medium Sized Buildings (DE-FOA-0000822) | Department of Energy "Turn-Key" Open Source Software Solutions for Energy Management of Small to Medium Sized Buildings (DE-FOA-0000822) "Turn-Key" Open Source Software Solutions for Energy Management of Small to Medium Sized Buildings (DE-FOA-0000822) March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis This funding opportunity is closed Buildings consume over 40% of the total energy consumption in the U.S. A significant portion of the

  19. Methane and Methanotrophic Bacteria as a Biotechnological Platform |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Methane and Methanotrophic Bacteria as a Biotechnological Platform Methane and Methanotrophic Bacteria as a Biotechnological Platform Breakout Session 2-B: New/Emerging Pathways Methane and Methanotrophic Bacteria as a Biotechnological Platform Dr. Lori Giver, Vice President of Biological Engineering, Calysta Energy, Inc. PDF icon giver_bioenergy_2015.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-100166 Categorical Exclusion Determination Biobased Chemicals Landscape in 2015:

  20. Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by sequencing randomly bar-coded transposons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rapid quantification of mutant...

  1. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. ...

  2. Copy of Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Copy of Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced Production of ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Copy of Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic ...

  3. Argonne scientists use bacteria to power simple machines | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University and placed in the solution along with the common aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis. Andrey Sokolov of Princeton University and Igor Aronson from Argonne, along...

  4. Bacteria mix it up at the microscopic level | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Technology and now postdoctoral researcher at Princeton University, piled Bacillus subtillis bacteria into thin films to decode the physics that govern how they move....

  5. Xylan utilization in human gut commensal bacteria is orchestrated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Xylan utilization in human gut commensal bacteria is orchestrated by unique modular ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Xylan utilization in human gut commensal ...

  6. LX-17 and ufTATB Data for Corner-Turning, Failure and Detonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P C; Lauderbach, L; Garza, R; Vitello, P; Hare, D E

    2010-02-03

    Data is presented for the size (diameter) effect for ambient and cold confined LX-17, unconfined ambient LX-17, and confined ambient ultrafine TATB. Ambient, cold and hot double cylinder corner-turning data for LX-17, PBX 9502 and ufTATB is presented. Transverse air gap crossing in ambient LX-17 is studied with time delays given for detonations that cross.

  7. Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-05-18

    We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

  8. Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport: Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport: Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics Model-simulated transport of atmospheric trace components can be combined with observed concentrations to obtain estimates of

  9. Method of separating bacteria from free living amoebae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  10. Potential of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with Sugarcane for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energycane Production | Department of Energy Potential of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with Sugarcane for Energycane Production Potential of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with Sugarcane for Energycane Production This presentation by Michal Gisham was given at the Symbiosis Conference. PDF icon symbiosis_conference_grisham.pdf More Documents & Publications Symbiosis Biofeedstock Conference: Expanding Commercialization of Mutualistic Microbes to Increase

  11. How to Turn Carbon into A Magnet? X-rays and Protons Give the Answer!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Turn Carbon into A Magnet? X-rays and Protons Give the Answer! Since antiquity, magnetism has appeared to be a trick performed only by iron, nickel, cobalt and a handful of rare alloys. But now the exclusive club of magnetic elements officially has a new member: carbon. Using a proton beam and advanced x-ray techniques, researchers at the Department of Energy's Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Leipzig and Lawrence Berkeley

  12. NREL's Multi-Junction Solar Cells Teach Scientists How to Turn Plants into

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powerhouses - News Releases | NREL NREL's Multi-Junction Solar Cells Teach Scientists How to Turn Plants into Powerhouses May 12, 2011 Plants can overcome their evolutionary legacies to become much better at using biological photosynthesis to produce energy, the kind of energy that can power vehicles in the near future, an all-star collection of biologists, physicists, photochemists, and solar scientists has found. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) workshop that drew a prestigious collection

  13. Sandia researcher turns "problem" of nonlinear capacitors into a solution |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia researcher turns "problem" of nonlinear capacitors into a solution Friday, January 22, 2016 - 2:00am NNSA Blog Sandia National Laboratories' Researcher Juan Elizondo-Decanini holds two compact, high-voltage nonlinear transmission lines. He leads a project on nonlinear behavior in materials - behavior that's usually shunned because it's so unpredictable. (Photo by Randy Montoya) Sandia National Laboratories' Juan Elizondo-Decanini

  14. Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    If you’ve ever driven by an industrial plant, you’ve probably noticed big white plumes rising from the tops of the facilities. While it might look like smoke or pollution at first glance, most of the time those white plumes are comprised of steam and heat, or what Ener-G-Rotors CEO Michael Newell calls waste heat. Mike and the researchers of Ener-G-Rotors are finding ways to use this escaped steam and turn it into energy.

  15. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Cooling | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to heat up and temperatures rise, many of us are cranking up the air conditioners to stay cool. It should come as no surprise then that air conditioners use about 5 percent of...

  16. U.S. Virgin Islands Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...em> U.S. Virgin Islands Clears the Way for Unprecedented Levels of Solar Energy USVI Energy Road Map: Charting the Course to a Clean Energy Future (Brochure), EDIN (Energy ...

  17. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Heating | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office of Public Affairs Space heating is likely the largest energy expense in your home, accounting for about 45 percent of the average American family's energy bills. That...

  18. INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    INDIANAPOLIS LEAVES A LEGACY OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY INDIANAPOLIS LEAVES A LEGACY OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY INDIANAPOLIS LEAVES A LEGACY OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY The City of Indianapolis, Indiana, used its status as host of the 2012 Super Bowl to address inefficiencies in the area's older housing stock and leave behind a legacy of energy efficiency. Seeking to overcome market barriers to residential and commercial energy upgrades and build upon the neighborhood improvement efforts that were part of its

  19. INFOGRAPHIC: Everything You Need to Know About Supercomputers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    complex models that simulate our changing climate, the Big Bang, nuclear weapons and more. ... facilities that will be five to 10 times more powerful than existing machines. ...

  20. INFOGRAPHIC: The Road to Fuel Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    money at the pump, all while reducing our dependence on foreign oil and growing the U.S. economy. Learn more in the 54.5 MPG and Beyond: Fueling Energy-Efficient Vehicles blog...

  1. Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    first place in the Geo Energy is Beautiful contest in 2014. Phil Ulibarri of Truckee Meadows Community College in Reno earned first place in the Geo Energy is Beautiful ...

  2. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: One Man's Yardwaste is Another...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    N.p., 01 Dec. 2004. Web. 5 Mar. 2015. Halper, Mark. "Nuclear: Less CO2 than Solar, Hydro, Biomass | ZDNet."" ZDNet. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Mar. 2015. "Hydrogen and Fuel Cells." ...

  3. Remote Area Modular Monitoring (RAMM) infographic | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remote Alaskan Communities Energy Efficiency Competition (RACEE) Technical Assistance Guide March 2016 2 Technical Assistance Table of Contents How to Use this Guide ......................................................... Page 2 Technical Assistance Provider Network ..........................................................Page 2 * Regional Liaisons ..........................................................Page 4 * Regional Liaison Contact List

  4. Infographic: Where in Space is the Energy Department?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since the beginning of the space race, the Energy Department and its National Labs have been supplying the space power systems and instruments that make missions across our solar system, and the discoveries they uncover, possible.

  5. Energy Saver 101: Home Cooling Infographic | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    While home cooling only accounts for 6 percent of the average home's energy use, it can lead to high energy bills during the warm months. This summer, don't let your energy bills...

  6. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Energy Audits | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Considering new energy-efficient windows? Before making individual efficiency upgrades, it's important to know how your home uses energy. A home energy audit is the first step to ...

  7. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge: Frequently Asked Questions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    They should be 18 years of age or older and can be a teacher, parent, or organization ... in the social media campaign, we request this be approved by the classroom teacher. ...

  8. Metal Cycling by Bacteria: Moving Electrons Around

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nealson, Ken

    2010-01-08

    About 20 years ago, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was isolated from a manganese-rich lack in upstate New York, and subsequently shown to utilize solid forms of oxidized manganese or iron as an electron acceptor. Recent studies of metal-reducing bacterial have unveiled a number of unexpected properties of microbes that have enlarged our view of microbes and their role(s) in natural ecosystems. For example, the processes of metal reduction themselves are fundamental to the carbon cycle in many lakes and sediments, where iron and manganese account for the major portion of organic carbon oxidation in many sediments. On more modest spatial scales, iron and manganese reduction can be linked to the oxidation of a wide variety of carbon compounds, many of them recalcitrant and/or toxic. One remarkable property of metal reducers is their ability to reduce solid, often highly crystalline substrates such as iron and manganese oxides and oxyhydroxides. It is now clear that this is done via the utilization of enzymes located on the outer wall of the bacteria - enzymes that apparently interact directly with these solid substrates. Molecular and genomic studies combined have revealed the genes and protoeins responsible for these activities, and many facets of the regulation. This talk focuses on the general features and properties of these remarkable organisms that seem to communicate via electron transfer across a wide variety of soluable, insoluable, and even "inert" substrates, and the way that these processes may be mechanistically linked.

  9. Metal Cycling by Bacteria: Moving Electrons Around

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nealson, Ken

    2009-07-06

    About 20 years ago, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was isolated from a manganese-rich lack in upstate New York, and subsequently shown to utilize solid forms of oxidized manganese or iron as an electron acceptor. Recent studies of metal-reducing bacterial have unveiled a number of unexpected properties of microbes that have enlarged our view of microbes and their role(s) in natural ecosystems. For example, the processes of metal reduction themselves are fundamental to the carbon cycle in many lakes and sediments, where iron and manganese account for the major portion of organic carbon oxidation in many sediments. On more modest spatial scales, iron and manganese reduction can be linked to the oxidation of a wide variety of carbon compounds, many of them recalcitrant and/or toxic. One remarkable property of metal reducers is their ability to reduce solid, often highly crystalline substrates such as iron and manganese oxides and oxyhydroxides. It is now clear that this is done via the utilization of enzymes located on the outer wall of the bacteria - enzymes that apparently interact directly with these solid substrates. Molecular and genomic studies combined have revealed the genes and protoeins responsible for these activities, and many facets of the regulation. This talk focuses on the general features and properties of these remarkable organisms that seem to communicate via electron transfer across a wide variety of soluable, insoluable, and even "inert" substrates, and the way that these processes may be mechanistically linked.

  10. Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to Help Drive America Advanced ... This non-food crop is a perennial grass that is both salt- and drought-tolerant, can ...

  11. Small Talk: Cell-to-Cell Communication in Bacteria

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bassler, Bonnie [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States

    2010-01-08

    Cell-cell communication in bacteria involves the production, release, and subsequent detection of chemical signaling molecules called autoinducers. This process, called quorum sensing, allows bacteria to regulate gene expression on a population-wide scale. Processes controlled by quorum sensing are usually ones that are unproductive when undertaken by an individual bacterium but become effective when undertaken by the group. For example, quorum sensing controls bioluminescence, secretion of virulence factors, biofilm formation, sporulation, and the exchange of DNA. Thus, quorum sensing is a mechanism that allows bacteria to function as multi-cellular organisms. Bacteria make, detect, and integrate information from multiple autoinducers, some of which are used exclusively for intra-species communication while others enable communication between species. Research is now focused on the development of therapies that interfere with quorum sensing to control bacterial virulence.

  12. Material and method for promoting the growth of anaerobic bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, H.I.

    1984-10-09

    A material and method is disclosed for promoting the growth of anaerobic bacteria which includes a nutrient media containing a hydrogen donor and sterile membrane fragments of bacteria having an electron transfer system which reduces oxygen to water. Dissolved oxygen in the medium is removed by adding the sterile membrane fragments to the nutrient medium and holding the medium at a temperature of about 10 to about 60 C until the dissolved oxygen is removed. No Drawings

  13. Material and method for promoting the growth of anaerobic bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, Howard I.

    1984-01-01

    A material and method for promoting the growth of anaerobic bacteria which includes a nutrient media containing a hydrogen donor and sterile membrane fragments of bacteria having an electron transfer system which reduces oxygen to water. Dissolved oxygen in the medium is removed by adding the sterile membrane fragments to the nutrient medium and holding the medium at a temperature of about 10.degree. to about 60.degree. C. until the dissolved oxygen is removed.

  14. Copy of Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Production of Ethanol from 5-Carbon Sugars (LDRD %23 105944). (Conference) | SciTech Connect Copy of Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced Production of Ethanol from 5-Carbon Sugars (LDRD %23 105944). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Copy of Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced Production of Ethanol from 5-Carbon Sugars (LDRD %23 105944). Abstract not provided. Authors: Reichmuth, David ; Kozina, Carol L. ; Sale, Kenneth L. ;

  15. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOEPatents Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria Title: Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its

  16. Probiotic formula reverses cow's milk allergies by changing gut bacteria

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of infants | Argonne National Laboratory Probiotic formula reverses cow's milk allergies by changing gut bacteria of infants September 22, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint This press release was originally printed by The University of Chicago Medicine & Biological Sciences. The gut bacteria of infants who developed tolerance to cow's milk after treatment with probiotic formula showed significant differences from those who remained allergic, according to a new study published September 22, 2015, in

  17. Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced Production of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ethanol from 5-Carbon Sugars (LDRD %23 105944). (Conference) | SciTech Connect Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced Production of Ethanol from 5-Carbon Sugars (LDRD %23 105944). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced Production of Ethanol from 5-Carbon Sugars (LDRD %23 105944). Abstract not provided. Authors: Sapra, Rajat ; Reichmuth, David ; Kozina, Carol L. ; Sale, Kenneth L. ; Keasling, Jay ; Tang,

  18. Tolerance engineering in bacteria for the production of advanced biofuels

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and chemicals (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Tolerance engineering in bacteria for the production of advanced biofuels and chemicals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Tolerance engineering in bacteria for the production of advanced biofuels and chemicals Authors: Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila Publication Date: 2015-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1250601 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-05CH11231 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Trends in Microbiology Additional Journal

  19. Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Wind, Robert A.

    2009-05-19

    Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

  20. SNS 2.1K Cold Box Turn-down Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Casagrande; P.A. Gurd; D.R. Hatfield; M.P. Howell; W.H. Strong; D. Arenius; J. Creel; V. Ganni; P. Knudsen

    2006-06-26

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is nearing completion. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The 2.1K cold box consists of four stages of centrifugal compressors with LN2-cooled variable speed electric motors and magnetic bearings. The cryogenic system successfully supported the Linac beam commissioning at both 4.2K and 2.1K and has been fully operational since June 2005. This paper describes the control principles utilized and the experimental results obtained for the SNS cold compressors turn-down capability to about 30% of the design flow, and possible limitation of the frequency dependent power factor of the cold compressor electric motors, which was measured for the first time during commissioning. These results helped to support the operation of the Linac over a very broad and stable cold compressor operating flow range (refrigeration capacity) and pressure. This in turn helped to optimize the cryogenic system operating parameters, minimizing the utilities and improving the system reliability and availability.

  1. A NEW CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF THE SNS FULL TURN FAST EXTRACTION KICKER POWER SUPPLY SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHANG,W.; SANDBERG,J.; TSOUPAS,N.; MI,J.; LAMBIASE,R.; PAI,C.; TUOZZOLO,J.; NEHRING,T.; WARBURTON,D.

    2001-06-18

    The new conceptual design of full turn fast extraction kicker power supply system of the Spallation Neutron Source main ring will be presented in this paper. In this design, the extraction kicker power modulators will be located outside of the tunnel, as requested by the SNS Project. Its purpose is to minimize the components inside of the synchrotron tunnel. The high voltage modulator will use Blumlein pulser and hollow-anode thyratron structure, a parallel termination resistor and two transmission cables. Main advantages include: flexible system configuration for unipolar single drive or push-pull double drive of the kicker magnets, lower charging voltage, lower beam impedance, lower number of high voltage cables, and large design margin for implementation and future upgrade.

  2. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: AVOIDING WRONG TURNS, ROACH MOTELS, AND BOX CANYONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-11

    This is the third of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. In this paper, we provide one example each of our judgments on what constitutes a box canyon, a roach motel, and a wrong turn: � Wrong Turn: The Reliable Replacement Warhead � Roach Motel: SRAM T vs the B61 � A Possible Box Canyon: A Low-Yield Version of the W76 SLBM Warhead Recognizing that new nuclear missions or weapons are not demanded by current circumstances � a development path that yields future capabilities similar to those of today, which are adequate if not always ideal, and a broader national-security strategy that supports nonproliferation and arms control by reducing the role for, and numbers, of nuclear weapons � we briefly consider alternate, less desirable futures, and their possible effect on the complex problem of regional deterrence. In this regard, we discuss the issues posed by, and possible responses to, three example regional deterrence challenges: in-country defensive use of nuclear weapons by an adversary; reassurance of U.S. allies with limited strategic depth threatened by an emergent nuclear power; and extraterritorial, non-strategic offensive use of nuclear weapons by an adversary in support of limited military objectives against a U.S. ally.

  3. Combined features in the primordial spectra induced by a sudden turn in two-field DBI inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizuno, Shuntaro; Saito, Ryo; Langlois, David E-mail: rsaito@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the features generated by a sharp turn along the inflationary trajectory in a two-field model of Dirac-Born-Infeld inflation, where one of the fields is heavy. Distinct features are generated by two different effects: the mixing of the light and heavy modes during the turn, on the one hand, and the resonance between the oscillations along the heavy direction after the turn, on the other hand. Contrary to models with standard kinetic terms, the resonance effect is not strongly suppressed because the action contains derivative interactions. Working in the potential basis, we study the oscillations after the turn and compute the amplitude of the mixing and resonance features in the power spectrum, as well as in the bispectrum for the latter effect. We find that the amplitudes and positions of these combined features obey specific consistency relations, which could be confronted with cosmological data.

  4. Hairlike appendages on ultra-small bacteria cell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hairlike appendages on ultra-small bacteria cell Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window) Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) Cryo-transmission electron microscopy captured numerous hairlike appendages radiating from the surface of this ultra-small bacteria cell. The scientists theorize the pili-like structures enable the cell to connect with other microbes and obtain life-giving

  5. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungan, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2008-02-05

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in 0 reactive flow JWL++ and Linked Cheetah V4, mostly at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. The physical basis of the input parameters is considered.

  6. Method for establishing the presence of salmonella bacteria in eggs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G.; Sinha, Dipen N.

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of the acoustical resonances in eggs is shown to provide a rapid, noninvasive technique for establishing the presence of Salmonella bacteria. The technique is also sensitive to yolk puncture, shell cracks, and may be sensitive to other yolk properties and to egg freshness. Remote characterization, potentially useful for characterizing large numbers of eggs, has been demonstrated.

  7. Methods for targetted mutagenesis in gram-positive bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of targeted mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, the present invention provides a method that effectively integrates a suicide integrative vector into a target gene in the chromosome of a Gram-positive bacterium, resulting in inactivation of the target gene.

  8. Turning point temperature and competition between relativistic and ponderomotive effects in self-focusing of laser beam in plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R.; Jafari Milani, M. R.

    2013-10-15

    The propagation characters of Gaussian laser beam in collisionless plasma are investigated by considering the ponderomotive and relativistic nonlinearities. The second-order differential equation of dimensionless beam width parameter is solved numerically, taking into account the effect of electron temperature. The results show that the ponderomotive force does not facilitate the relativistic self-focusing in all intensity ranges. In fact, there exists a certain intensity value that, if below this value, the ponderomotive nonlinearity can contribute to the relativistic self-focusing, or obstruct it, if above. It is also indicated that there is a temperature interval in which self-focusing can occur, while the beam diverges outside of this region. In addition, the results represent the existence of a turning point temperature in the mentioned interval that the self-focusing has the strongest power. The value of the turning point is dependent on laser intensity in which higher intensities result in higher turning point.

  9. ION MANIPULATIONS IN STRUCTURES FOR LOSSLESS ION MANIPULATIONS (SLIM): COMPUTATIONAL EVALUATION OF A 90o TURN AND A SWITCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garimella, Venkata BS; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; Ipsen, Andreas B.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-08-19

    The process of redirecting ions through 90o turns and ‘tee’ switches utilizing Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) was evaluated using theoretical and simulation methods at 4 Torr pressure. SIMION simulations were used to optimize and evaluate conditions for performing turns without loss of signal intensity or ion mobility resolving power. Fundamental considerations indicated that the “race track” effect during ion turns may incur only small losses to the ion mobility resolving power at 4 Torr pressure for the typical plume widths predicted in an optimized SLIM ‘tee’ switch design. The dynamic switching of ions into orthogonal channels was also evaluated using SIMION ion trajectory simulations, and achieved similar performance. Simulation results were in close agreement with experimental results and were used to refine SLIM designs and applied potentials for their use.

  10. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungen, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2007-05-30

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in the Linked Cheetah V4.0 reactive flow code at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. A report card of 25 tests run with the same settings on LX-17 is shown, possibly the most extensive simultaneous calibration yet tried with an explosive. The physical basis of some of the input parameters is considered.

  11. Methods for Engineering Sulfate Reducing Bacteria of the Genus Desulfovibrio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chhabra, Swapnil R; Keller, Kimberly L.; Wall, Judy D.

    2011-03-15

    Sulfate reducing bacteria are physiologically important given their nearly ubiquitous presence and have important applications in the areas of bioremediation and bioenergy. This chapter provides details on the steps used for homologous-recombination mediated chromosomal manipulation of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a well-studied sulfate reducer. More specifically, we focus on the implementation of a 'parts' based approach for suicide vector assembly, important aspects of anaerobic culturing, choices for antibiotic selection, electroporation-based DNA transformation, as well as tools for screening and verifying genetically modified constructs. These methods, which in principle may be extended to other sulfate-reducing bacteria, are applicable for functional genomics investigations, as well as metabolic engineering manipulations.

  12. Multiple Species of Bacteria Convert Elemental Mercury to Toxic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methylmercury | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Multiple Species of Bacteria Convert Elemental Mercury to Toxic Methylmercury Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Community Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy

  13. Universal Gene Transfer Technology for Gram Positive Bacteria - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Universal Gene Transfer Technology for Gram Positive Bacteria Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication 11-G00255_ID2139_rev.pdf (493 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryA genetic engineering technology invented at ORNL facilitates DNA delivery to a cell by using ultrasound to permeate the cell's

  14. Apparatus and method for the desulfurization of petroleum by bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lizama, Hector M.; Scott, Timothy C.; Scott, Charles D.

    1995-01-01

    A method for treating petroleum with anaerobic microorganisms acting as biocatalysts that can remove sulfur atoms from hydrocarbon molecules, under anaerobic conditions, and then convert the sulfur atoms to hydrogen sulfide. The microorganisms utilized are from the family known as the "Sulfate Reducing Bacteria." These bacteria generate metabolic energy from the oxidation of organic compounds, but use oxidized forms of sulfur as an electron acceptor. Because the biocatalyst is present in the form of bacteria in an aqueous suspension, whereas the reacting substrate consists of hydrocarbon molecules in an organic phase, the actual desulfurization reaction takes place at the aqueous-organic interphase. To ensure adequate interfacial contacting and mass transfer, a biphasic electrostatic bioreactor system is utilized. The bioreactor is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the sulfur. High-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the sulfur to produce hydrogen sulfide which is then removed from the bioreactor. The organic liquid, now free of the sulfur, is ready for immediate use or further processing.

  15. Apparatus and method for the desulfurization of petroleum by bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lizama, H.M.; Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.

    1995-10-17

    A method is described for treating petroleum with anaerobic microorganisms acting as biocatalysts that can remove sulfur atoms from hydrocarbon molecules, under anaerobic conditions, and then convert the sulfur atoms to hydrogen sulfide. The microorganisms utilized are from the family known as the ``Sulfate Reducing Bacteria``. These bacteria generate metabolic energy from the oxidation of organic compounds, but use oxidized forms of sulfur as an electron acceptor. Because the biocatalyst is present in the form of bacteria in an aqueous suspension, whereas the reacting substrate consists of hydrocarbon molecules in an organic phase, the actual desulfurization reaction takes place at the aqueous-organic interphase. To ensure adequate interfacial contacting and mass transfer, a biphasic electrostatic bioreactor system is utilized. The bioreactor is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the sulfur. High-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the sulfur to produce hydrogen sulfide which is then removed from the bioreactor. The organic liquid, now free of the sulfur, is ready for immediate use or further processing. 5 figs.

  16. Expansion of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinke, Christian; Sczyrba, Alex; Malfatti, Stephanie; Lee, Janye; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Hallam, Steven; Inskeep, William P.; Hedlund, Brian P.; Sievert, Stefan M.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Tsiamis, George; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-03-20

    To date the vast majority of bacterial and archaeal genomes sequenced are of rather limited phylogenetic diversity as they were chosen based on their physiology and/ or medical importance. The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project (Wu et al. 2009) is aimed to systematically filling the gaps of the tree of life with phylogenetically diverse reference genomes. However more than 99percent of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes of these largely mysterious species. These limitations gave rise to the GEBA uncultured project. Here we propose to use single cell genomics to massively expand the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea by targeting 80 single cell representatives of uncultured candidate phyla which have no or very few cultured representatives. Generating these reference genomes of uncultured microbes will dramatically increase the discovery rate of novel protein families and biological functions, shed light on the numerous underrepresented phyla that likely play important roles in the environment, and will assist in improving the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of Bacteria and Archaea. Moreover, these data will improve our ability to interpret metagenomics sequence data from diverse environments, which will be of tremendous value for microbial ecology and evolutionary studies to come.

  17. Expansion of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinke, Christian; Sczyrba, Alex; Malfatti, Stephanie; Lee, Janey; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Hallam, Steven; Inskeep, William P.; Hedlund, Brian P.; Sievert, Stefan M.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Tsiamis, George; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-06-02

    To date the vast majority of bacterial and archaeal genomes sequenced are of rather limited phylogenetic diversity as they were chosen based on their physiology and/ or medical importance. The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project (Wu et al. 2009) is aimed at systematically filling the gaps of the tree of life with phylogenetically diverse reference genomes. However more than 99 percent of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes of these largely mysterious species. These limitations gave rise to the GEBA uncultured project. Here we propose to use single cell genomics to massively expand the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea by targeting 80 single cell representatives of uncultured candidate phyla which have no or very few cultured representatives. Generating these reference genomes of uncultured microbes will dramatically increase the discovery rate of novel protein families and biological functions, shed light on the numerous underrepresented phyla that likely play important roles in the environment, and will assist in improving the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of Bacteria and Archaea. Moreover, these data will improve our ability to interpret metagenomics sequence data from diverse environments, which will be of tremendous value for microbial ecology and evolutionary studies to come.

  18. Fuel from Bacteria, CO2, Water, and Solar Energy: Engineering a Bacterial Reverse Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: Harvard is engineering a self-contained, scalable Electrofuels production system that can directly generate liquid fuels from bacteria, carbon dioxide (CO2), water, and sunlight. Harvard is genetically engineering bacteria called Shewanella, so the bacteria can sit directly on electrical conductors and absorb electrical current. This current, which is powered by solar panels, gives the bacteria the energy they need to process CO2 into liquid fuels. The Harvard team pumps this CO2 into the system, in addition to water and other nutrients needed to grow the bacteria. Harvard is also engineering the bacteria to produce fuel molecules that have properties similar to gasoline or diesel fuelmaking them easier to incorporate into the existing fuel infrastructure. These molecules are designed to spontaneously separate from the water-based culture that the bacteria live in and to be used directly as fuel without further chemical processing once theyre pumped out of the tank.

  19. Turning off the heat. Why America must double energy efficiency to save money and reduce global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casten, T.R.

    1998-12-31

    Turning Off the Heat targets a main source of overuse of fossil fuels--the energy producers themselves who, through their government-approved monopolies have led to energy inefficiency and needless pollution. A leading authority with 20 years of experience in the development and operation of energy conversions in the development and operation of energy conversions, Thomas R. Casten clearly explains that the US and other nations of the world can, and must, double the efficiency of energy utilities. This efficiency improvement will lead to a reduction of electric prices by 30 to 40% and cut carbon dioxide emissions (a greenhouse gas) in half. Two-thirds of the fuel used to make US Electricity is wasted, resulting in higher energy prices and excess pollution. If market forces are unleased and monopolies ended, competition will save money and fuel, Casten says. Turning Off the Heat is an essential volume for policy-makers, legislators, leaders in industry, environmentalists, and concerned citizens.

  20. Elimination of mercury and organomercurials by nitrogen-fixing bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, S.; Sadhukhan, P.C.; Ghosh, D.K.

    1997-06-01

    Bacteria isolated from mercury-polluted environments are often resistant to mercuric ions (Hg{sup 2+}) and organomercurials. Plasmids determining mercury resistance have been well characterized in gram-negative system. However, in Staphylococcus aureus mercury resistance has been found to be chromosomally determined. The known mechanism of bacterial Hg{sup 2+}-resistance is detoxification of the toxic Hg{sup 2+} by its enzymatic transformation by mercuric reductase to Hg (o). Organomercurial lyase mediates the degradation of organomercurial compounds to Hg{sup 2+}. Mercury and organomercurial resistances have been studied in different bacterial genera. There is little information on Hg-resistance in N{sub 2}-fixing soil bacteria, however, in many developing countries, including India, mercury pollution is still a problem because Hg-based pesticides and fungicides are still used routinely as seed-dressers in agriculture to control soil-borne and seed-borne fungal diseases. Volatilization of Hg from laboratory media by mercury-resistant bacteria containing low levels of mercury has been reported by several workers. It is interesting to note that N{sub 2}-fixing, Hg-resistant soil isolates could volatilize Hg from medium containing very high amounts of HgCl{sub 2}. In the present paper we report the volatilization patterns of five N{sub 2}-fixing bacterial strains, the effect of different inducers on mercuric reductase, and the pattern of substrate utilization by organomercurial lyase. In the presence of a low concentration of HgCl{sub 2}. enzymatic detoxification is sufficient to combat the adverse situation created by the presence of Hg{sup 2+} ions. In the presence of a high concentration of HgCl{sub 2}, intracellular sequestration by Hg{sup 2+} binding components may play an additional role in counteracting Hg-toxicity.

  1. Office of Fossil Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Fossil Energy INFOGRAPHIC: Carbon Capture 101 INFOGRAPHIC: Carbon Capture 101 Want to know how carbon capture works? This infographic breaks it down for you Read more ...

  2. Biofuels from Bacteria, Electricity, and CO2: Biofuels from CO2 Using Ammonia or Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria in Reverse Microbial Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: Electrofuels Project: Columbia University is using carbon dioxide (CO2) from ambient air, ammoniaan abundant and affordable chemical, and a bacteria called N. europaea to produce liquid fuel. The Columbia University team is feeding the ammonia and CO2 into an engineered tank where the bacteria live. The bacteria capture the energy from ammonia and then use that energy to convert CO2 into a liquid fuel. When the bacteria use up all the ammonia, renewable electricity can regenerate it and pump it back into the systemcreating a continuous fuel-creation cycle. In addition, Columbia University is also working with the bacteria A. ferrooxidans to capture and use energy from ferrous iron to produce liquid fuels from CO2.

  3. Pathway of Fermentative Hydrogen Production by Sulfate-reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Judy D.

    2015-02-16

    Biofuels are a promising source of sustainable energy. Such biofuels are intermediate products of microbial metabolism of renewable substrates, in particular, plant biomass. Not only are alcohols and solvents produced in this degradative process but energy-rich hydrogen as well. Non photosynthetic microbial hydrogen generation from compounds other than sugars has not been fully explored. We propose to examine the capacity of the abundant soil anaerobes, sulfate-reducing bacteria, for hydrogen generation from organic acids. These apparently simple pathways have yet to be clearly established. Information obtained may facilitate the exploitation of other microbes not yet readily examined by molecular tools. Identification of the flexibility of the metabolic processes to channel reductant to hydrogen will be useful in consideration of practical applications. Because the tools for genetic and molecular manipulation of sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genus Desulfovibrio are developed, our efforts will focus on two strains, D. vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfovibrio G20.Therefore total metabolism, flux through the pathways, and regulation are likely to be limiting factors which we can elucidate in the following experiments.

  4. The Dimensions and Number of Turns for the Tracker Solenoids As-Built compared to the Original Magnet Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P

    2008-06-18

    The two tracker solenoids for MICE [1]-[3] as-built are different from the original design proposed by Wang NMR [4]. The Wang NMR design is in turn different from the magnet design proposed in the original MICE tracker magnet specification [5]. The two tracker solenoids where fabricated with niobium titanium conductor supplied to LBNL by Luvata under a specification written by LBNL [6]. This report compares the as-built tracker solenoids to the original Wang NMR design [4]. The as-built solenoid coils are thicker by 5 to 8 percent than called for the original design. This means that the current center is moved outward from 0.2 to 0.5 percent. In both tracker magnets, the thickness of end coil 2 was increased by 2-layers over the original design [5]. Thus, the current center for end coil 2 was moved outward by 0.7 percent. The number of turns per layer was underestimated in the original design from 2 to 4 percent. As a result, the current in each of the five tracker solenoid coils must be increased. In turn, the two as built tracker solenoids are compared to each other. In the ways that matter, the two tracker solenoids are nearly identical to each other. The largest difference between the two magnets that matters is a 0.05 percent change in the current in the center coil of the three coil set that forms the spectrometer solenoid. Since this is the largest variation that matters, it can be concluded that coils M1, coils M2, and the spectrometer solenoid can be connected in series without affecting the beam dynamics of MICE. This includes the two tuned end coils as well. The position of the coils within the cryostats vacuum vessel appears to be acceptable.

  5. Process for generation of hydrogen gas from various feedstocks using thermophilic bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ooteghem, Suellen Van

    2005-09-13

    A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45.degree. C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

  6. Using Rhodobacter Bacteria to Express Membrane Proteins (ANL-IN-99-089) -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Using Rhodobacter Bacteria to Express Membrane Proteins (ANL-IN-99-089) Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology <p> A strategy to express heterologous membrane proteins by using photosynthetic bacteria</p> A strategy to express heterologous membrane proteins by using photosynthetic bacteria Technology Marketing Summary Cell membranes serve as the

  7. Selection against spurious promoter motifs correlates withtranslational efficiency across bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Froula, Jeffrey L.; Francino, M. Pilar

    2007-05-01

    Because binding of RNAP to misplaced sites could compromise the efficiency of transcription, natural selection for the optimization of gene expression should regulate the distribution of DNA motifs capable of RNAP-binding across the genome. Here we analyze the distribution of the -10 promoter motifs that bind the {sigma}{sup 70} subunit of RNAP in 42 bacterial genomes. We show that selection on these motifs operates across the genome, maintaining an over-representation of -10 motifs in regulatory sequences while eliminating them from the nonfunctional and, in most cases, from the protein coding regions. In some genomes, however, -10 sites are over-represented in the coding sequences; these sites could induce pauses effecting regulatory roles throughout the length of a transcriptional unit. For nonfunctional sequences, the extent of motif under-representation varies across genomes in a manner that broadly correlates with the number of tRNA genes, a good indicator of translational speed and growth rate. This suggests that minimizing the time invested in gene transcription is an important selective pressure against spurious binding. However, selection against spurious binding is detectable in the reduced genomes of host-restricted bacteria that grow at slow rates, indicating that components of efficiency other than speed may also be important. Minimizing the number of RNAP molecules per cell required for transcription, and the corresponding energetic expense, may be most relevant in slow growers. These results indicate that genome-level properties affecting the efficiency of transcription and translation can respond in an integrated manner to optimize gene expression. The detection of selection against promoter motifs in nonfunctional regions also implies that no sequence may evolve free of selective constraints, at least in the relatively small and unstructured genomes of bacteria.

  8. Clay enhancement of methane, low molecular weight hydrocarbon and halocarbon conversion by methanotrophic bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apel, William A.; Dugan, Patrick R.

    1995-04-04

    An apparatus and method for increasing the rate of oxidation of toxic vapors by methanotrophic bacteria. The toxic vapors of interest are methane and trichloroethylene. The apparatus includes a gas phase bioreactor within a closed loop pumping system or a single pass system. The methanotrophic bacteria include Methylomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and uncharacterized environmental enrichments.

  9. Clay enhancement of methane, low molecular weight hydrocarbon and halocarbon conversion by methanotrophic bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apel, William A.; Dugan, Patrick R.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for increasing the rate of oxidation of toxic vapors by methanotrophic bacteria. The toxic vapors of interest are methane and trichloroethylene. The apparatus includes a gas phase bioreactor within a closed loop pumping system or a single pass system. The methanotrophic bacteria include Methylomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and uncharacterized environmental enrichments.

  10. Turning on LAMP

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bostedt, Christoph

    2014-07-16

    Christoph Bostedt, a senior staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, provides a sneak peek of a powerful new instrument, called LAMP, that is now available for experiments that probe the atomic and molecular realm. LAMP replaces and updates the first instrument at LCLS, dubbed CAMP, which will be installed at an X-ray laser in Germany.

  11. Right Turn on Red!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Read about a great example of how state and local governments can learn from each other – and how a very simple policy change can produce huge benefits for the country, helping us all save money by saving energy.

  12. The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Drell, Persis [SLAC Director

    2011-06-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

  13. Business Case Analysis for Replacing the Mazak 30Y Mill-Turn Machine in SM-39. Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Steven Richard; Dinehart, Timothy Grant; Benson, Faith Ann

    2015-03-19

    Business case studies are being looked at to support procurement of new machines and capital equipment in the SM-39 and TA-03-0102 machine shops. The first effort conducted economic analysis of replacing the Mazak 30Y Mill-Turn Machine located in SM-39. To determine the value of switching machinery, a baseline scenario was compared with a future scenario where new machinery was purchased and installed. The conditions under the two scenarios were defined via interviews with subject matter experts in terms of one-time and periodic costs. The results of the analysis were compiled in a life-cycle cost/benefit table. The costs of procuring, installing, and maintaining a new machine were balanced against the costs avoided by replacing older machinery. Productivity savings were included as a measure to show the costs avoided by being able to produce parts at a quicker and more efficient pace.

  14. The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drell, Persis [SLAC Director] [SLAC Director

    2011-03-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

  15. High speed measurements of neutral beam turn-on and impact of beam modulation on measurements of ion density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grierson, B. A. Grisham, L.; Burrell, K. H.; Crowley, B.; Scoville, J. T.

    2014-10-15

    Modulation of neutral beams on tokamaks is performed routinely, enabling background rejection for active spectroscopic diagnostics, and control of injected power and torque. We find that there exists an anomalous initial transient in the beam neutrals delivered to the tokamak that is not accounted for by the accelerator voltage and power supply current. Measurements of the charge-exchange and beam photoemission on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] at high speed (200 ?s) reveal that the energy of the beam neutrals is constant, but the density of beam neutrals displays dramatic variation in the first 23 ms following beam turn-on. The impact of this beam density variation on inferred ion densities and impurity transport is presented, with suggested means to correct for the anomalous transient.

  16. An affinity-structure database of helix-turn-helix: DNA complexes with a universal coordinate system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AlQuraishi, Mohammed; Tang, Shengdong; Xia, Xide

    2015-11-19

    Molecular interactions between proteins and DNA molecules underlie many cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome replication, and nucleosome positioning. Computational analyses of protein-DNA interactions rely on experimental data characterizing known protein-DNA interactions structurally and biochemically. While many databases exist that contain either structural or biochemical data, few integrate these two data sources in a unified fashion. Such integration is becoming increasingly critical with the rapid growth of structural and biochemical data, and the emergence of algorithms that rely on the synthesis of multiple data types to derive computational models of molecular interactions. We have developed an integrated affinity-structure database in which the experimental and quantitative DNA binding affinities of helix-turn-helix proteins are mapped onto the crystal structures of the corresponding protein-DNA complexes. This database provides access to: (i) protein-DNA structures, (ii) quantitative summaries of protein-DNA binding affinities using position weight matrices, and (iii) raw experimental data of protein-DNA binding instances. Critically, this database establishes a correspondence between experimental structural data and quantitative binding affinity data at the single basepair level. Furthermore, we present a novel alignment algorithm that structurally aligns the protein-DNA complexes in the database and creates a unified residue-level coordinate system for comparing the physico-chemical environments at the interface between complexes. Using this unified coordinate system, we compute the statistics of atomic interactions at the protein-DNA interface of helix-turn-helix proteins. We provide an interactive website for visualization, querying, and analyzing this database, and a downloadable version to facilitate programmatic analysis. Lastly, this database will facilitate the analysis of protein-DNA interactions and the development of programmatic computational methods that capitalize on integration of structural and biochemical datasets. The database can be accessed at http://ProteinDNA.hms.harvard.edu.

  17. An affinity-structure database of helix-turn-helix: DNA complexes with a universal coordinate system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    AlQuraishi, Mohammed; Tang, Shengdong; Xia, Xide

    2015-11-19

    Molecular interactions between proteins and DNA molecules underlie many cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome replication, and nucleosome positioning. Computational analyses of protein-DNA interactions rely on experimental data characterizing known protein-DNA interactions structurally and biochemically. While many databases exist that contain either structural or biochemical data, few integrate these two data sources in a unified fashion. Such integration is becoming increasingly critical with the rapid growth of structural and biochemical data, and the emergence of algorithms that rely on the synthesis of multiple data types to derive computational models of molecular interactions. We have developed an integrated affinity-structure database inmore » which the experimental and quantitative DNA binding affinities of helix-turn-helix proteins are mapped onto the crystal structures of the corresponding protein-DNA complexes. This database provides access to: (i) protein-DNA structures, (ii) quantitative summaries of protein-DNA binding affinities using position weight matrices, and (iii) raw experimental data of protein-DNA binding instances. Critically, this database establishes a correspondence between experimental structural data and quantitative binding affinity data at the single basepair level. Furthermore, we present a novel alignment algorithm that structurally aligns the protein-DNA complexes in the database and creates a unified residue-level coordinate system for comparing the physico-chemical environments at the interface between complexes. Using this unified coordinate system, we compute the statistics of atomic interactions at the protein-DNA interface of helix-turn-helix proteins. We provide an interactive website for visualization, querying, and analyzing this database, and a downloadable version to facilitate programmatic analysis. Lastly, this database will facilitate the analysis of protein-DNA interactions and the development of programmatic computational methods that capitalize on integration of structural and biochemical datasets. The database can be accessed at http://ProteinDNA.hms.harvard.edu.« less

  18. Production of ethanol from lignocellulosic materials using thermophilic bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynd, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    The production of ethanol from lignocellulosic materials, e.g. wood, agricultural residues, and municipal solid wastes, is considered. The conversion of these materials to ethanol in the US could annually yield approximately 430 million tons ethanol, or about 9.8 quads, within the next 20 years. Thermophilic bacteria have advantages over yeasts for ethanol production because various species produce an active cellulase enzyme and utilize pentose sugars. However thermophiles have lower ethanol tolerance and usually lower ethanol yields. The potential of thermophilic ethanol production from hardwood chips is examined in detail. It is concluded that if high ethanol yield can be achieved this process could have economics competitive with either ethanol production from corn via yeast or synthetic production from ethylene. Low ethanol tolerance is not a major problem provided concentrations {ge} 1.5% are produced, ethanol is continuously removed from the fermentor, and IHOSR/extractive distillation is employed. Research was undertaken aimed at closing the gap between the attractive potential of thermophiles for ethanol production, and that which is possible based on present knowledge, which is not practical. Major topics were the activity of Clostridium thermocellum cellulase on pretreated mixed hardwood and Avicel in vivo, continuous culture of C. thermocellum on pretreated mixed hardwood and Avicel, and the continuous culture of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum at high xylose concentrations in the presence and absence of ethanol removal.

  19. Newly identified helper bacteria stimulate ectomycorrhizal formation in Populus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Labbe, Jessy L.; Weston, David J.; Dunkirk, Nora; Pelletier, Dale A.; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2014-10-24

    Mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) are known to increase host root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi but the molecular mechanisms and potential tripartite trophic interactions are poorly understood. Through an effort to study Populus microbiome, we isolated 21 Pseudomonas strains from native Populus deltoides roots. These bacterial isolates were characterized and screened for MHB effectiveness on the Populus-Laccaria system. Two other Pseudomonas strains (i.e., Pf-5 and BBc6R8) from existing collections were also included as reference in the screening process. We analyzed Laccaria bicolor S238N growth rate, mycelial architecture and transcriptional changes induced by the contrasting Pseudomonas strains (i.e., inhibitory, neutral and beneficial).more » We characterized 17 out of the 21 Pseudomonas strains from the Populus rhizosphere with positive effects on L. bicolor S238N growth, as well as on Populus root architecture and colonization by L. bicolor S238N across three Populus species. Four of seven reporter genes, Tra1, Tectonin2, Gcn5 and Cipc1, thought to be specific to the interaction with strain BBc6R8, were induced or repressed while interacting with six (i.e., GM17, GM33, GM41, GM48, Pf-5 and BBc6R8) of the tested Pseudomonas strains. GM41 promoted the highest roots colonization across three Populus species but most notably in P. deltoides, which is otherwise, poorly colonized by L. bicolor. Here we report novel MHB strains isolated from native Populus that improve roots colonization. This tripartite relationship could be exploited in nursery production for target Populus species/genotypes as a means of improving establishment and survival in marginal lands.« less

  20. Newly identified helper bacteria stimulate ectomycorrhizal formation in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labbe, Jessy L.; Weston, David J.; Dunkirk, Nora; Pelletier, Dale A.; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2014-10-24

    Mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) are known to increase host root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi but the molecular mechanisms and potential tripartite trophic interactions are poorly understood. Through an effort to study Populus microbiome, we isolated 21 Pseudomonas strains from native Populus deltoides roots. These bacterial isolates were characterized and screened for MHB effectiveness on the Populus-Laccaria system. Two other Pseudomonas strains (i.e., Pf-5 and BBc6R8) from existing collections were also included as reference in the screening process. We analyzed Laccaria bicolor S238N growth rate, mycelial architecture and transcriptional changes induced by the contrasting Pseudomonas strains (i.e., inhibitory, neutral and beneficial). We characterized 17 out of the 21 Pseudomonas strains from the Populus rhizosphere with positive effects on L. bicolor S238N growth, as well as on Populus root architecture and colonization by L. bicolor S238N across three Populus species. Four of seven reporter genes, Tra1, Tectonin2, Gcn5 and Cipc1, thought to be specific to the interaction with strain BBc6R8, were induced or repressed while interacting with six (i.e., GM17, GM33, GM41, GM48, Pf-5 and BBc6R8) of the tested Pseudomonas strains. GM41 promoted the highest roots colonization across three Populus species but most notably in P. deltoides, which is otherwise, poorly colonized by L. bicolor. Here we report novel MHB strains isolated from native Populus that improve roots colonization. This tripartite relationship could be exploited in nursery production for target Populus species/genotypes as a means of improving establishment and survival in marginal lands.

  1. Amoebae/bacteria consortia and uses for degrading wastes and contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    A method of altering trinitrotoluene includes the steps of: providing an amoeba/bacteria consortium, particularly ATCC 40908 or a mutant thereof possessing all the identifying characteristics thereof; and contacting the consortium with trinitrotoluene to alter the trinitrotoluene.

  2. A vast collection of microbial genes that are toxic to bacteria (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect A vast collection of microbial genes that are toxic to bacteria Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A vast collection of microbial genes that are toxic to bacteria In the process of clone-based genome sequencing, initial assemblies frequently contain cloning gaps that can be resolved using cloning-independent methods, but the reason for their occurrence is largely unknown. By analyzing 9,328,693 sequencing clones from 393 microbial genomes we systematically

  3. Discovery of functional toxin/antitoxin systems in bacteria by shotgun

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cloning (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discovery of functional toxin/antitoxin systems in bacteria by shotgun cloning Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Discovery of functional toxin/antitoxin systems in bacteria by shotgun cloning Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules, composed of a toxic protein and a counteracting antitoxin, play important roles in bacterial physiology. We examined the experimental insertion of 1.5 million genes from 388 microbial genomes into an Escherichia coli host

  4. Purple Bacteria Develops Its Own Form of Sunscreen | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Purple Bacteria Develops Its Own Form of "Sunscreen" Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights Highlight Archives News & Events Publications History Contact BES Home 05.03.12 Purple Bacteria Develops Its Own Form of "Sunscreen" Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Scientific Achievement Found that specific pigments in the light harvesting complex of a photosynthetic bacterium act primarily to protect the

  5. Toxin-eating bacteria and bioremediation (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Toxin-eating bacteria and bioremediation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toxin-eating bacteria and bioremediation Methods are provided for reducing a level of one or more antibiotics from an antibiotic-contaminated substance. An organism that can utilize the one or more antibiotics as a carbon source is cultured in the presence of the antibiotic-contaminated substance for a sufficient amount of time to reduce the level of one or more antibiotics from the antibiotic-contaminated

  6. Xylan utilization in human gut commensal bacteria is orchestrated by unique

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    modular organization of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Xylan utilization in human gut commensal bacteria is orchestrated by unique modular organization of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Xylan utilization in human gut commensal bacteria is orchestrated by unique modular organization of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes Authors: Zhang, Meiling ; Chekan, Jonathan R. ; Dodd, Dylan ; Hong, Pei-Ying ; Radlinski,

  7. INFOGRAPHIC: How Do We Know Iran's Paths to a Nuclear Bomb are Blocked?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn about the monitoring and verification measures the IAEA uses to ensure Iran complies with the Iran Deal.

  8. Liquid Fuel From Renewable Electricity and Bacteria: Electro-Autotrophic Synthesis of Higher Alcohols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: UCLA is utilizing renewable electricity to power direct liquid fuel production in genetically engineered Ralstonia eutropha bacteria. UCLA is using renewable electricity to convert carbon dioxide into formic acid, a liquid soluble compound that delivers both carbon and energy to the bacteria. The bacteriaare genetically engineered to convert the formic acid into liquid fuelin this case alcohols such as butanol. The electricity required for the process can be generated from sunlight, wind, or other renewable energy sources. In fact, UCLAs electricity-to-fuel system could be a more efficient way to utilize these renewable energy sources considering the energy density of liquid fuel is much higher than the energy density of other renewable energy storage options, such as batteries.

  9. Geek-Up[12.03.2010]: Halomonadaceae Bacteria and the Return of Quark Gluon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plasma | Department of Energy 03.2010]: Halomonadaceae Bacteria and the Return of Quark Gluon Plasma Geek-Up[12.03.2010]: Halomonadaceae Bacteria and the Return of Quark Gluon Plasma December 3, 2010 - 4:59pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs As a fellow geek, you probably heard NASA's big news yesterday. If not, here's a recap: It was once assumed that all life on Earth, from humans and giraffes to scorpions and plankton, are all based on

  10. Geek-Up[09.24.10] -- Magical BEANs, Combating Bacteria's Resistance to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Antibiotics and the ChemCam's Journey to Mars | Department of Energy 9.24.10] -- Magical BEANs, Combating Bacteria's Resistance to Antibiotics and the ChemCam's Journey to Mars Geek-Up[09.24.10] -- Magical BEANs, Combating Bacteria's Resistance to Antibiotics and the ChemCam's Journey to Mars September 24, 2010 - 5:19pm Addthis Check out the ChemCam close-up, which will reveal which elements are present in Mars' rocks and soils. Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience

  11. Genetically Modified Bacteria for Fuel Production: Development of Rhodobacteria as a Versatile Platform for Fuels Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: Penn State is genetically engineering bacteria called Rhodobacter to use electricity or electrically generated hydrogen to convert carbon dioxide into liquid fuels. Penn State is taking genes from oil-producing algae called Botryococcus braunii and putting them into Rhodobacter to produce hydrocarbon molecules, which closely resemble gasoline. Penn State is developing engineered tanks to support microbial fuel production and determining the most economical way to feed the electricity or hydrogen to the bacteria, including using renewable sources of power like solar energy.

  12. Genomics Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB): a resource for microsymbiont genomes (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeve, Wayne [Murdoch University

    2013-03-01

    Wayne Reeve of Murdoch University on "Genomics Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB): a resource for microsymbiont genomes" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  13. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip windowmore » surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.« less

  14. Amoebae/bacteria consortia and uses for degrading wastes and contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-05-21

    A method is disclosed of altering trinitrotoluene. The steps include the following: providing an amoeba/bacteria consortium, particularly ATCC 40908 or a mutant which possesses all the identifying characteristics thereof; and contacting the consortium with trinitrotoluene to alter the trinitrotoluene.

  15. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.

  16. Methanobactin: a copper binding compound having antibiotic and antioxidant activity isolated from methanotrophic bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DiSpirito, Alan A.; Zahn, James A.; Graham, David W.; Kim, Hyung J.; Alterman, Michail; Larive, Cynthia

    2007-04-03

    A means and method for treating bacterial infection, providing antioxidant activity, and chelating copper using a copper binding compound produced by methanotrophic bacteria is described. The compound, known as methanobactin, is the first of a new class of antibiotics having gram-positive activity. Methanobactin has been sequenced, and its structural formula determined.

  17. Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by sequencing randomly bar-coded transposons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; Lamson, Jacob S.; He, Jennifer; Hoover, Cindi A.; Blow, Matthew J.; Bristow, James; Butland, Gareth; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam

    2015-05-12

    Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with any transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative D-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. A large challenge in microbiology is the functional assessment of the millions of uncharacterized genes identified by genome sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis coupled to next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to assign phenotypes and functions to genes. However, the current strategies for TnSeq are too laborious to be applied to hundreds of experimental conditions across multiple bacteria. Here, we describe an approach, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which greatly simplifies the measurement of gene fitness by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to monitor the abundance of mutants. We performed 387 genome-wide fitness assays across five bacteria and identified phenotypes for over 5,000 genes. RB-TnSeq can be applied to diverse bacteria and is a powerful tool to annotate uncharacterized genes using phenotype data.

  18. Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by sequencing randomly bar-coded transposons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; Lamson, Jacob S.; He, Jennifer; Hoover, Cindi A.; Blow, Matthew J.; Bristow, James; Butland, Gareth; Arkin, Adam P.; et al

    2015-05-12

    Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with anymore » transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative D-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. A large challenge in microbiology is the functional assessment of the millions of uncharacterized genes identified by genome sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis coupled to next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to assign phenotypes and functions to genes. However, the current strategies for TnSeq are too laborious to be applied to hundreds of experimental conditions across multiple bacteria. Here, we describe an approach, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which greatly simplifies the measurement of gene fitness by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to monitor the abundance of mutants. We performed 387 genome-wide fitness assays across five bacteria and identified phenotypes for over 5,000 genes. RB-TnSeq can be applied to diverse bacteria and is a powerful tool to annotate uncharacterized genes using phenotype data.« less

  19. THE OLD, SUPER-METAL-RICH OPEN CLUSTER, NGC 6791ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES IN TURN-OFF STARS FROM KECK/HIRES SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchant Boesgaard, Ann; Lum, Michael G.; Deliyannis, Constantine P. E-mail: mikelum@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2015-02-01

    The study of star clusters has advanced our understanding of stellar evolution, Galactic chemical evolution, and nucleosynthesis. Here we investigate the composition of turn-off stars in the intriguing open cluster, NGC 6791, which is old, but super-metal-rich with high-resolution (R= 46,000) Keck/HIRES spectra. We find [Fe/H]= +0.300.02 from measurements of some 40 unblended, unsaturated lines of both Fe I and Fe II in eight turn-off stars. Our O abundances come from the O I triplet near 7774 and we perform a differential analysis relative to the Sun from our Lunar spectrum also obtained with Keck/HIRES. The O results are corrected for small nLTE effects. We find consistent ratios of [O/Fe]{sub n} with a mean of 0.060.02. This is low with respect to field stars that are also both old and metal-rich and continue the trend of decreasing [O/Fe] with increasing [Fe/H]. The small range in our oxygen abundances is consistent with a single population of stars. Our results for the alpha elements [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe] are near solar and compare well with those of the old, metal-rich field stars. The two Fe-peak elements, Cr and Ni, are consistent with Fe. These turn-off-star abundances provide benchmark abundances to investigate whether there are any observable abundance differences with the giants that might arise from nuclear-burning and dredge-up processes. Determinations of upper limits were found for Li by spectrum synthesis and are consistent with the upper limits in similar stars in the relatively old, super-metal-rich cluster NGC 6253. Our results support the prediction from standard theory that higher-metallicity stars deplete more Li. Probably no stars in NGC 6791 have retained their initial Li.

  20. Biofuel from Bacteria and Sunlight: Shewanella as an Ideal Platform for Producing Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Minnesota is developing clean-burning, liquid hydrocarbon fuels from bacteria. The University is finding ways to continuously harvest hydrocarbons from a type of bacteria called Shewanella by using a photosynthetic organism to constantly feed Shewanella the sugar it needs for energy and hydrocarbon production. The two organisms live and work together as a system. Using Shewanella to produce hydrocarbon fuels offers several advantages over traditional biofuel production methods. First, it eliminates many of the time-consuming and costly steps involved in growing plants and harvesting biomass. Second, hydrocarbon biofuels resemble current petroleum-based fuels and would therefore require few changes to the existing fuel refining and distribution infrastructure in the U.S.

  1. Pathway engineering and organism development for ethanol production from cellulosic biomass using thermophilic bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogsett, D.A.L.; Klapatch, T.A.; Lynd, L.R.

    1995-12-01

    Thermophilic bacteria collectively exemplify organisms that produce both cellulose and ethanol while fermenting both the cellulose and hemicellulose components of biomass. As a result, thermophiles could be the basis for highly streamlined and cost-effective processes for production of renewable fuels and chemicals. Recent research results involving ethanol production from thermophilic bacteria will be presented, with a primary focus on work pursuant to molecularly-based pathway engineering to increase ethanol selectivity. Specifically, we will describe the restriction endonuclease systems operative in Clostridium thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum, as well as efforts to document and improve transformation of these organisms and to clone key catabolic enzymes. In addition, selected results from fermentation studies will be presented as necessary in order to present a perspective on the status of thermophilic ethanol production.

  2. A Scanning Auger Microprobe analysis of corrosion products associated with sulfate reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, R.A.; Chen, G.; Clayton, C.R.; Kearns, J.R.; Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.

    1995-03-01

    A Scanning Auger Microprobe analysis was performed on the corrosion products of an austenitic AISI type 304 SS after a potentiostatic polarization of one volt for ten minutes in a modified Postgate`s C media containing sulfate reducing bacteria. The corrosion products were characterized and mapped in local regions where pitting was observed. A critical evaluation of the applicability of this technique for the examination of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) is presented.

  3. Development of Microarrays-Based Metagenomics Technology for Monitoring Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Subsurface Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cindy, Shi

    2015-07-17

    At the contaminated DOE sites, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are a significant population and play an important role in the microbial community during biostimulation for metal reduction. However, the diversity, structure and dynamics of SRB communities are poorly understood. Therefore, this project aims to use high throughput sequencing-based metagenomics technologies for characterizing the diversity, structure, functions, and activities of SRB communities by developing genomic and bioinformatics tools to link the SRB biodiversity with ecosystem functioning.

  4. Structure of the DUF2233 Domain in Bacteria and the Stuttering-associated

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UCE Glycoprotein | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource the DUF2233 Domain in Bacteria and the Stuttering-associated UCE Glycoprotein Wednesday, July 31, 2013 UCE figure DUF2233, a Domain of Unknown Function (DUF), is present in ~1200 bacterial and several viral and eukaryotic proteins. DUF2233 has been identified in proteins ranging in size from ~300-2000 residues. The 515 amino acid mammalian transmembrane glycoprotein α-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphodiester N-acetylglucosaminidase

  5. Learning How Bacteria Communicate | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning How Bacteria Communicate Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Community Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301)

  6. Cycling of DOC and DON by Novel Heterotrophic and Photoheterotrophic Bacteria in the Ocean: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchman, David L

    2008-12-09

    The flux of dissolved organic matter (DOM) through aquatic bacterial communities is a major process in carbon cycling in the oceans and other aquatic systems. Our work addressed the general hypothesis that the phylogenetic make-up of bacterial communities and the abundances of key types of bacteria are important factors influencing the processing of DOM in aquatic ecosystems. Since most bacteria are not easily cultivated, the phylogenetic diversity of these microbes has to be assessed using culture-independent approaches. Even if the relevant bacteria were cultivated, their activity in the lab would likely differ from that under environmental conditions. This project found variation in DOM uptake by the major bacterial groups found in coastal waters. In brief, the data suggest substantial differences among groups in the use of high and molecular weight DOM components. It also made key discoveries about the role of light in affecting this uptake especially by cyanobacteria. In the North Atlantic Ocean, for example, over half of the light-stimulated uptake was by the coccoid cyanobacterium, Prochlorococcus, with the remaining uptake due to Synechococcus and other photoheterotrophic bacteria. The project also examined in detail the degradation of one organic matter component, chitin, which is often said to be the second most abundant compound in the biosphere. The findings of this project contribute to our understanding of DOM fluxes and microbial dynamics supported by those fluxes. It is possible that these findings will lead to improvements in models of the carbon cycle that have compartments for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the largest pool of organic carbon in the oceans.

  7. Environmental diagnostic analysis of ground water bacteria and their involvement in utilization of aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wear, J.E. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that select functional groups of bacteria from pristine sites have an innate ability to degrade synthetic aromatics that often contaminate groundwater environments,due to exposure to naturally occurring recalcitrant aromatics in their environment. This study demonstrates that subsurface microbial communities are capable of utilizing lignin and humic acid breakdown products. Utilizers of these compounds were found to be present in most all the wells tested. Even the deepest aquifer tested had utilizers present for all six of the aromatics tested. Highest counts for the aromatics tested were observed with the naturally occurring breakdown products of either lignin or humic acid. Carboxylic acids were found to be an important sole carbon source for groundwater bacteria possibly explained by the fact that they are produced by the oxidative cleavage of aromatic ring structures. The carbohydrate sole carbon sources that demonstrated the greatest densities were ones commonly associated with humics. This study indicates that utilization of naturally occurring aromatic compounds in the subsurface is an important nutritional source for groundwater bacteria. In addition, it suggests that adaptation to naturally occurring recalcitrant substrates is the origin of degradative pathways for xenobiotic compounds with analogous structure. This work has important implications for in situ bioremediation as a method of environmental cleanup.

  8. Isolation of butyrate-utilizing bacteria from thermophilic and mesophilic methane-producing ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henson, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The ability of various ecosystems to convert butyrate to methane was studied in order to isolate the bacteria responsible for the conversion. When thermophilic digester sludge was enriched with butyrate, methane was produced without a lag period. Marine sediments enriched with butyrate required a 2-week incubation period before methanogenesis began. A thermophilic digester was studied in more detail and found by most-probable-number enumeration to have ca. 5 x 10/sup 6/ butyrate-utilizing bactera/ml of sludge. A thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium was isolated in coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and a Methanosarcina sp. This bacterium was a gram-negative, slightly curved rod that occurred singly, was nonmotile, and did not appear to produce spores. The thermophilic digester was infused with butyrate at the rate of 10 ..mu..moles/ml of sludge per day. Biogas production increased by 150%, with the percentage of methane increasing from 58% to 68%. Acetate, propionate, and butyrate did not accumulate. Butyrate-utilizing enrichments from mesophilic ecosystems were used in obtaining cocultures of butyrate-utilizing bacteria. These cocultures served as inocula for attempts to isolate pure cultures of butyrate-utilizing bacteria by use of hydrogenase-containing membrane fragments of Escherichia coli. After a 3-week incubation period, colonies appeared only in inoculated tubes that contained membrane fragments and butyrate.

  9. Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallivan, Justin [Emory University] [Emory University

    2012-03-21

    Justin Gallivan, of Emory University presents a talk titled "Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  10. Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gallivan, Justin [Emory University

    2013-01-22

    Justin Gallivan, of Emory University presents a talk titled "Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  11. Turn emergency generators into dollars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheahen, T.P.; Stegen, G.R.

    1997-10-01

    The concept of distributed, dispatchable power generation is essentially the reverse of interruptible service. It can be understood by regarding both power and money as vectors: when the direction of the power flow switches, so does the direction of the money flow. At a signal given by the utility, a factory activates its emergency generating system and briefly becomes an independent power producer (IPP), feeding power into a local region of the grid. Upon receipt of another signal, it retires from that role. It may, however, continue to generate power for its own use.

  12. Industry turns its attention south

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marhefka, D.

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the gas and oil industries in the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Significant foreign investment continues to elude Russia`s oil and gas industry, so the Caspian nations of Kazakhstan and Azerbaijan are picking up the slack, welcoming the flow of foreign capital to their energy projects. Separate evaluations are given for Russia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Moldova, Tajikstan, Uzbekistan, Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Serbia.

  13. Big wheels keep on turning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casteel, K.

    2008-05-15

    Although the structure of the market for bucketwheel and bucket chain based equipment has changed over the years, design advances have enabled the technology to retain a significant place in the production and distribution of coal and minerals. 4 photos.

  14. Turning nuclear waste into glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pegg, Ian L.

    2015-02-15

    Vitrification has emerged as the treatment option of choice for the most dangerous radioactive waste. But dealing with the nuclear waste legacy of the Cold War will require state-of-the-art facilities and advanced glass formulations.

  15. TurningPoint Evaluation Results

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Tuesday Talk: Secretary Chu Answers Your Questions LIVE Tuesday Talk: Secretary Chu Answers Your Questions LIVE November 30, 2010 - 12:02pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Later today Secretary Chu will be answering your questions as a part of the White House's Tuesday Talk series. The discussion will be broadcast live starting at 1:15 EST and will build off of the Secretary's speech at the National Press Club yesterday, which

  16. October 2013 News Blast

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 2013 Harvest Your Energy This Halloween, think of turning seasonal municipal solid waste (MSW) into energy as one very interesting "trick!" The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) wants to illustrate how common holiday waste can create a positive environmental impact. Earlier this month, BETO released a spooktastic infographic that demonstrates how waste materials like hay, pumpkins, candy, and autumn leaves can be used to generate both heat and

  17. Technique development for uiper critical field studies of SmFeAs(O,F) in the 300T single turn system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcdonald, Ross D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balakirev, F. F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Altarawneh, M. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Betts, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moll, Philip Jw [ETH ZURICH; Zhigadlo, N D [ETH ZURICH; Karpinski, J [ETH ZURICH; Batlogg, B. [ETH ZURICH

    2011-01-14

    In high temperature superconductors, such as the most recent class of iron pnictides, extremely high upper critical fields H{sub c2} are common. The determination of H{sub c2}(T) is crucial to understand the detailed nature of the superconductor, in particular H{sub c2}(T = 0K) is of great interest. It is not only related to fundamental properties of the system, it is furthermore of great importance for materials science, as it is the ultimate limit of applicability of this superconductor in high field applications. However, this important quantity can only be estimated by extrapolation, as H{sub c2}(T = 0K) well exceeds hundreds of Tesla in optimally doped SillFeAs(O,F). We are developing methods to measure Ha(T) in direct transport in the extreme magnetic fields generated by the LANL single turn magnet.

  18. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: History of Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  19. MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frischer, Marc E.; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

    2013-09-12

    Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

  20. Palladium nanoparticles produced by fermentatively cultivated bacteria as catalyst for diatrizoate removal with biogenic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hennebel, T.; Fitts, J.; Nevel, S. V.; Verschuere, S.; DeCorte, S.; DeGusseme, B.; Cuvelier, C.; vanderLelie, D.; Boon, N.; Verstraete, W.

    2011-05-17

    A new biological inspired method to produce nanopalladium is the precipitation of Pd on a bacterium, i.e., bio-Pd. This bio-Pd can be applied as catalyst in dehalogenation reactions. However, large amounts of hydrogen are required as electron donor in these reactions resulting in considerable costs. This study demonstrates how bacteria, cultivated under fermentative conditions, can be used to reductively precipitate bio-Pd catalysts and generate the electron donor hydrogen. In this way, one could avoid the costs coupled to hydrogen supply. The catalytic activities of Pd(0) nanoparticles produced by different strains of bacteria (bio-Pd) cultivated under fermentative conditions were compared in terms of their ability to dehalogenate the recalcitrant aqueous pollutants diatrizoate and trichloroethylene. While all of the fermentative bio-Pd preparations followed first order kinetics in the dehalogenation of diatrizoate, the catalytic activity differed systematically according to hydrogen production and starting Pd(II) concentration in solution. Batch reactors with nanoparticles formed by Citrobacter braakii showed the highest diatrizoate dehalogenation activity with first order constants of 0.45 {+-} 0.02 h{sup -1} and 5.58 {+-} 0.6 h{sup -1} in batches with initial concentrations of 10 and 50 mg L{sup -1} Pd, respectively. Nanoparticles on C. braakii, used in a membrane bioreactor treating influent containing 20 mg L{sup -1} diatrizoate, were capable of dehalogenating 22 mg diatrizoate mg{sup -1} Pd over a period of 19 days before bio-Pd catalytic activity was exhausted. This study demonstrates the possibility to use the combination of Pd(II), a carbon source and bacteria under fermentative conditions for the abatement of environmental halogenated contaminants.

  1. Exploration of Simple Analytical Approaches for Rapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salma Rahman

    2005-12-17

    Many of the current methods for pathogenic bacterial detection require long sample-preparation and analysis time, as well as complex instrumentation. This dissertation explores simple analytical approaches (e.g., flow cytometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy) that may be applied towards ideal requirements of a microbial detection system, through method and instrumentation development, and by the creation and characterization of immunosensing platforms. This dissertation is organized into six sections. In the general Introduction section a literature review on several of the key aspects of this work is presented. First, different approaches for detection of pathogenic bacteria will be reviewed, with a comparison of the relative strengths and weaknesses of each approach, A general overview regarding diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is then presented. Next, the structure and function of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed from organosulfur molecules at gold and micrometer and sub-micrometer patterning of biomolecules using SAMs will be discussed. This section is followed by four research chapters, presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 1 describes the efforts and challenges towards the creation of imunosensing platforms that exploit the flexibility and structural stability of SAMs of thiols at gold. 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyl-1-thiol SAM (PFDT) and dithio-bis(succinimidyl propionate)-(DSP)-derived SAMs were used to construct the platform. Chapter 2 describes the characterization of the PFDT- and DSP-derived SAMs, and the architectures formed when it is coupled to antibodies as well as target bacteria. These studies used infrared reflection spectroscopy (IRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), Chapter 3 presents a new sensitive, and portable diffuse reflection based technique for the rapid identification and quantification of pathogenic bacteria. Chapter 4 reports research efforts in the construction and evaluation of a prototype flow cytometry based cell detector and enumerator. This final research chapter is followed by a general summation and future prospectus section that concludes this dissertation.

  2. Soft inertial microfluidics for high throughput separation of bacteria from human blood cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Zhigang; Willing, Ben; Bjerketorp, Joakim; Jansson, Janet K.; Hjort, Klas

    2009-01-05

    We developed a new approach to separate bacteria from human blood cells based on soft inertial force induced migration with flow defined curved and focused sample flow inside a microfluidic device. This approach relies on a combination of an asymmetrical sheath flow and proper channel geometry to generate a soft inertial force on the sample fluid in the curved and focused sample flow segment to deflect larger particles away while the smaller ones are kept on or near the original flow streamline. The curved and focused sample flow and inertial effect were visualized and verified using a fluorescent dye primed in the device. First the particle behavior was studied in detail using 9.9 and 1.0 {micro}m particles with a polymer-based prototype. The prototype device is compact with an active size of 3 mm{sup 2}. The soft inertial effect and deflection distance were proportional to the fluid Reynolds number (Re) and particle Reynolds number (Re{sub p}), respectively. We successfully demonstrated separation of bacteria (Escherichia coli) from human red blood cells at high cell concentrations (above 10{sup 8}/mL), using a sample flow rate of up to 18 {micro}L/min. This resulted in at least a 300-fold enrichment of bacteria at a wide range of flow rates with a controlled flow spreading. The separated cells were proven to be viable. Proteins from fractions before and after cell separation were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and staining to verify the removal of red blood cell proteins from the bacterial cell fraction. This novel microfluidic process is robust, reproducible, simple to perform, and has a high throughput compared to other cell sorting systems. Microfluidic systems based on these principles could easily be manufactured for clinical laboratory and biomedical applications.

  3. Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge | Department of Energy Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge PDF icon bioenergizeme_challenge_guide_20151015.pdf More Documents & Publications BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Rubric BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Toolkit Webinar:

  4. Students Recognized in Washington, D.C. for their Winning Bioenergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infographic | Department of Energy Students Recognized in Washington, D.C. for their Winning Bioenergy Infographic Students Recognized in Washington, D.C. for their Winning Bioenergy Infographic September 24, 2015 - 10:21am Addthis A team of high school students designed this infographic about cellulosic ethanol. View the entire infographic from the <a href="http://energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergizeme-infographic-challenge-cellulosic-ethanol">Bioenergy Technologies Office

  5. Discovery of novel plant interaction determinants from the genomes of 163 root nodule bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seshadri, Rekha; Reeve, Wayne G.; Ardley, Julie K.; Tennessen, Kristin; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.

    2015-11-20

    Root nodule bacteria (RNB) or “rhizobia” are a type of plant growth promoting bacteria, typified by their ability to fix nitrogen for their plant host, fixing nearly 65% of the nitrogen currently utilized in sustainable agricultural production of legume crops and pastures. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of 110 RNB from diverse hosts and biogeographical regions, and undertook a global exploration of all available RNB genera with the aim of identifying novel genetic determinants of symbiotic association and plant growth promotion. Specifically, we performed a subtractive comparative analysis with non-RNB genomes, employed relevant transcriptomic data, and leveraged phylogenetic distribution patterns and sequence signatures based on known precepts of symbioticand host-microbe interactions. A total of 184 protein families were delineated, including known factors for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, and candidates with previously unexplored functions, for which a role in host-interaction, -regulation, biocontrol, and more, could be posited. Lastly, these analyses expand our knowledge of the RNB purview and provide novel targets for strain improvement in the ultimate quest to enhance plant productivity and agricultural sustainability.

  6. Discovery of novel plant interaction determinants from the genomes of 163 root nodule bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Seshadri, Rekha; Reeve, Wayne G.; Ardley, Julie K.; Tennessen, Kristin; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.

    2015-11-20

    Root nodule bacteria (RNB) or “rhizobia” are a type of plant growth promoting bacteria, typified by their ability to fix nitrogen for their plant host, fixing nearly 65% of the nitrogen currently utilized in sustainable agricultural production of legume crops and pastures. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of 110 RNB from diverse hosts and biogeographical regions, and undertook a global exploration of all available RNB genera with the aim of identifying novel genetic determinants of symbiotic association and plant growth promotion. Specifically, we performed a subtractive comparative analysis with non-RNB genomes, employed relevant transcriptomic data, and leveraged phylogeneticmore » distribution patterns and sequence signatures based on known precepts of symbioticand host-microbe interactions. A total of 184 protein families were delineated, including known factors for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, and candidates with previously unexplored functions, for which a role in host-interaction, -regulation, biocontrol, and more, could be posited. Lastly, these analyses expand our knowledge of the RNB purview and provide novel targets for strain improvement in the ultimate quest to enhance plant productivity and agricultural sustainability.« less

  7. Thiol-facilitated cell export and desorption of methylmercury by anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Hui; Lu, Xia; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2015-09-04

    Neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg), formed by anaerobic bacteria, is shown to be rapidly excreted from the cell, but the mechanism of this process is unclear. Using both Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 strains, we investigated the factors affecting export and distribution of MeHg in mercury methylation and MeHg sorption-desorption assays. Thiols, such as cysteine, were found to greatly facilitate desorption and export of MeHg, particularly by PCA cells. However, in cysteine-free assays (4 h) >90% of the synthesized MeHg was associated with PCA, among which ~73% was sorbed on the cell surface and 19% remained inside the cells. In comparison, a majority of the MeHg (70%) was exported by ND132, leaving ~20% of the MeHg sorbed on the surface and 10% inside the cells. When MeHg was added directly to the cell suspensions, ND132 adsorbed much lower MeHg but took up more MeHg inside cells than PCA did. These results demonstrate that MeHg export is bacteria strain-specific, time dependent, and is influenced by thiols, implicating important roles of ligand complexation in facilitating MeHg production and mobilization in the environment.

  8. Size tunable elemental copper nanoparticles: extracellular synthesis by thermoanaerobic bacteria and capping molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jang, Gyoung Gug; Jacobs, Christopher B; Gresback, Ryan G; Ivanov, Ilia N; Meyer III, Harry M; Kidder, Michelle; Joshi, Pooran C; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Graham, David E; Moon, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal sized elemental copper (Cu) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized from inexpensive oxidized copper salts by an extracellular metal-reduction process using anaerobic Thermoanaerobacter sp. X513 bacteria in aqueous solution. The bacteria nucleate NPs outside of the cell, and they control the Cu2+ reduction rate to form uniform crystallites with an average diameter of 1.75 0.46 m after 3-day incubation. To control the size and enhance air stability of Cu NPs, the reaction mixtures were supplemented with nitrilotriacetic acid as a chelator, and the surfactant capping agents oleic acid, oleylamine, ascorbic acid, or L-cysteine. Time-dependent UV-visible absorption measurements and XPS studies indicated well-suspended, bimodal colloidal Cu NPs (70 150 and 5 10 nm) with extended air-stability up to 300 min and stable Cu NP films surfaces with 14% oxidation after 20 days. FTIR spectroscopy suggested that these capping agents were effectively adsorbed on the NP surface providing oxidation resistance in aqueous and dry conditions. Compared to previously reported Cu NP syntheses, this biological process substantially reduced the requirement for hazardous organic solvents and chemical reducing agents, while reducing the levels of Cu oxide impurities in the product. This process was highly reproducible and scalable from 0.01 to 1-L batches.

  9. Anaerobic metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C.F.

    1994-06-01

    Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds used aerobic microorganisms. In most cases no mineralization of nitroaromatics occurs, and only superficial modifications of the structures are reported. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds reportedly undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. For example, trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of ammonia from triaminotoluene is achieved by reductive deamination catalyzed by the enzyme reductive deaminase, with the production of ammonia and toluene. Some sulfate reducers can metabolize toluene to CO{sub 2}. Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. Many methanogenic bacteria can reduce nitroaromatic compounds to amino compounds. In this paper we review the anaerobic metabolic processes of nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing And methanogenic conditions.

  10. Lubricating bacteria model for the growth of bacterial colonies exposed to ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Shengli; Zhang Lei; Liang Run; Zhang Erhu; Liu Yachao; Zhao Shumin

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we study the morphological transition of bacterial colonies exposed to ultraviolet radiation by modifying the bacteria model proposed by Delprato et al. Our model considers four factors: the lubricant fluid generated by bacterial colonies, a chemotaxis initiated by the ultraviolet radiation, the intensity of the ultraviolet radiation, and the bacteria's two-stage destruction rate with given radiation intensities. Using this modified model, we simulate the ringlike pattern formation of the bacterial colony exposed to uniform ultraviolet radiation. The following is shown. (1) Without the UV radiation the colony forms a disklike pattern and reaches a constant front velocity. (2) After the radiation is switched on, the bacterial population migrates to the edge of the colony and forms a ringlike pattern. As the intensity of the UV radiation is increased the ring forms faster and the outer velocity of the colony decreases. (3) For higher radiation intensities the total population decreases, while for lower intensities the total population increases initially at a small rate and then decreases. (4) After the UV radiation is switched off, the bacterial population grows both outward as well as into the inner region, and the colony's outer front velocity recovers to a constant value. All these results agree well with the experimental observations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 158102 (2001)]. Along with the chemotaxis, we find that lubricant fluid and the two-stage destruction rate are critical to the dynamics of the growth of the bacterial colony when exposed to UV radiation, and these were not previously considered.

  11. Soft rot decay capabilities and interactions of fungi and bacteria from fumigated utility poles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.J.K.; Worrall, J.J. . Coll. of Environmental Science and Forestry)

    1992-11-01

    The objectives were to (1) identify microfungi and bacterial associates isolated from fumigated southern pine poles from EPRI project RP 1471-72, (2) study the soft-rot capabilities of predominant fungi, and (3) study interactions among microorganisms in relation to wood decay. Methods for identification followed standard techniques using morphological and physiological criteria. Soft-rot by microfungi alone and with bacteria was determined as weight loss and anatomical examination of wood blocks using light microscopy and limited electron microscopy. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was the predominant bacterium. Twenty-one species of microfungi were identified including four new species. A book entitled IDENTIFICATION MANUAL FOR FUNGI FROM UTILITY POLES IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES was published. An improved soft-rot test was devised. Fifty-one of 84 species (60%) of microfungi from poles tested were soft-rot positive; that is much greater than previously reported. Three types of anatomical damage of wood of pine or birch caused by soft-rot fungi were described. Interaction tests showed that, in some cases, there was a strong synergism between bacteria and fungi in causing weight loss, but results were inconsistent. Although soft rot is often most apparent under conditions of very high moisture, intermediate moisture levels appear to be optimal, as with basidiomycete decayers.

  12. Soft rot decay capabilities and interactions of fungi and bacteria from fumigated utility poles. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.J.K.; Worrall, J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The objectives were to (1) identify microfungi and bacterial associates isolated from fumigated southern pine poles from EPRI project RP 1471-72, (2) study the soft-rot capabilities of predominant fungi, and (3) study interactions among microorganisms in relation to wood decay. Methods for identification followed standard techniques using morphological and physiological criteria. Soft-rot by microfungi alone and with bacteria was determined as weight loss and anatomical examination of wood blocks using light microscopy and limited electron microscopy. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was the predominant bacterium. Twenty-one species of microfungi were identified including four new species. A book entitled IDENTIFICATION MANUAL FOR FUNGI FROM UTILITY POLES IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES was published. An improved soft-rot test was devised. Fifty-one of 84 species (60%) of microfungi from poles tested were soft-rot positive; that is much greater than previously reported. Three types of anatomical damage of wood of pine or birch caused by soft-rot fungi were described. Interaction tests showed that, in some cases, there was a strong synergism between bacteria and fungi in causing weight loss, but results were inconsistent. Although soft rot is often most apparent under conditions of very high moisture, intermediate moisture levels appear to be optimal, as with basidiomycete decayers.

  13. Size tunable elemental copper nanoparticles: extracellular synthesis by thermoanaerobic bacteria and capping molecules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jang, Gyoung Gug; Ivanov, Ilia N; Meyer III, Harry M; Kidder, Michelle; Joshi, Pooran C; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Graham, David E; Moon, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal sized elemental copper (Cu) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized from inexpensive oxidized copper salts by an extracellular metal-reduction process using anaerobic Thermoanaerobacter sp. X513 bacteria in aqueous solution. The bacteria nucleate NPs outside of the cell, and they control the Cu2+ reduction rate to form uniform crystallites with an average diameter of 1.75 0.46 m after 3-day incubation. To control the size and enhance air stability of Cu NPs, the reaction mixtures were supplemented with nitrilotriacetic acid as a chelator, and the surfactant capping agents oleic acid, oleylamine, ascorbic acid, or L-cysteine. Time-dependent UV-visible absorption measurements and XPS studies indicatedmore » well-suspended, bimodal colloidal Cu NPs (70 150 and 5 10 nm) with extended air-stability up to 300 min and stable Cu NP films surfaces with 14% oxidation after 20 days. FTIR spectroscopy suggested that these capping agents were effectively adsorbed on the NP surface providing oxidation resistance in aqueous and dry conditions. Compared to previously reported Cu NP syntheses, this biological process substantially reduced the requirement for hazardous organic solvents and chemical reducing agents, while reducing the levels of Cu oxide impurities in the product. This process was highly reproducible and scalable from 0.01 to 1-L batches.« less

  14. Thiol-facilitated cell export and desorption of methylmercury by anaerobic bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Hui; Lu, Xia; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2015-09-04

    Neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg), formed by anaerobic bacteria, is shown to be rapidly excreted from the cell, but the mechanism of this process is unclear. Using both Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 strains, we investigated the factors affecting export and distribution of MeHg in mercury methylation and MeHg sorption-desorption assays. Thiols, such as cysteine, were found to greatly facilitate desorption and export of MeHg, particularly by PCA cells. However, in cysteine-free assays (4 h) >90% of the synthesized MeHg was associated with PCA, among which ~73% was sorbed on the cell surface and 19% remained inside the cells. Inmore » comparison, a majority of the MeHg (70%) was exported by ND132, leaving ~20% of the MeHg sorbed on the surface and 10% inside the cells. When MeHg was added directly to the cell suspensions, ND132 adsorbed much lower MeHg but took up more MeHg inside cells than PCA did. These results demonstrate that MeHg export is bacteria strain-specific, time dependent, and is influenced by thiols, implicating important roles of ligand complexation in facilitating MeHg production and mobilization in the environment.« less

  15. Multimedia | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Infographic EERE Annual Website Reports BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Toolkit Stay Updated Sign up to receive updates on FORGE news and developments as we move into Phase...

  16. Bioenergy News | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 9, 2015 Cropped view of the winning infographic "Cellulosic Ethanol." Winning Team Announced for 2015 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Pilot Bioenergy Technologies Office...

  17. Water Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Services Homes Water Heating Water Heating Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Everything you need to know about saving money on water...

  18. The C-Terminal RpoN Domain of sigma54 Forms an unpredictedHelix-Turn-Helix Motif Similar to domains of sigma70

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doucleff, Michaeleen; Malak, Lawrence T.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-11-01

    The ''{delta}'' subunit of prokaryotic RNA-polymerase allows gene-specific transcription initiation. Two {sigma} families have been identified, {sigma}{sup 70} and {sigma}{sup 54}, which use distinct mechanisms to initiate transcription and share no detectable sequence homology. Although the {sigma}{sup 70}-type factors have been well characterized structurally by x-ray crystallography, no high-resolution structural information is available for the {sigma}{sup 54}-type factors. Here we present the NMR derived structure of the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} from Aquifex aeolicus. This domain (Thr323 to Gly389), which contains the highly conserved RpoN box sequence, consists of a poorly structured N-terminal tail followed by a three-helix bundle, which is surprisingly similar to domains of the {sigma}{sup 70}-type proteins. Residues of the RpoN box, which have previously been shown to be critical for DNA binding, form the second helix of an unpredicted helix-turn-helix motif. This structure's homology with other DNA binding proteins, combined with previous biochemical data, suggest how the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} binds to DNA.

  19. Structure, Function, and Regulation of Antenna Complexes of Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert E. Blankenship

    2001-04-27

    This project is concerned with the structure and function of the chlorosome antennas found in green photosynthetic bacteria. Chlorosomes are ellipsoidal structures attached to the cytoplasmic side of the inner cell membrane. These antenna complexes provide a very large absorption cross section for light capture. Evidence is overwhelming that the chlorosome represents a very different type of antenna from that found in any other photosynthetic system yet studied. It is now clear that chlorosomes do not contain traditional pigment-proteins, in which the pigments bind to specific sites on proteins. Instead, the chlorosome pigments are organized in vivo into pigment oligomers in which direct pigment-pigment interactions are of dominant importance. Our group has used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate this unique system, including model systems, ultrafast spectroscopy, molecular biology, protein chemistry and X-ray crystallography.

  20. Detecting bacteria and Determining Their Susceptibility to Antibiotics by Stochastic Confinement in Nanoliter Droplets using Plug-Based Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boedicker, J.; Li, L; Kline, T; Ismagilov, R

    2008-01-01

    This article describes plug-based microfluidic technology that enables rapid detection and drug susceptibility screening of bacteria in samples, including complex biological matrices, without pre-incubation. Unlike conventional bacterial culture and detection methods, which rely on incubation of a sample to increase the concentration of bacteria to detectable levels, this method confines individual bacteria into droplets nanoliters in volume. When single cells are confined into plugs of small volume such that the loading is less than one bacterium per plug, the detection time is proportional to plug volume. Confinement increases cell density and allows released molecules to accumulate around the cell, eliminating the pre-incubation step and reducing the time required to detect the bacteria. We refer to this approach as stochastic confinement. Using the microfluidic hybrid method, this technology was used to determine the antibiogram - or chart of antibiotic sensitivity - of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to many antibiotics in a single experiment and to measure the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drug cefoxitin (CFX) against this strain. In addition, this technology was used to distinguish between sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus in samples of human blood plasma. High-throughput microfluidic techniques combined with single-cell measurements also enable multiple tests to be performed simultaneously on a single sample containing bacteria. This technology may provide a method of rapid and effective patient-specific treatment of bacterial infections and could be extended to a variety of applications that require multiple functional tests of bacterial samples on reduced timescales.

  1. Impact of bacteria and bacterial components on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiedler, Tomas; Salamon, Achim; Adam, Stefanie; Herzmann, Nicole; Taubenheim, Jan; Peters, Kirsten

    2013-11-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are present in several tissues, e.g. bone marrow, heart muscle, brain and subcutaneous adipose tissue. In invasive infections MSC get in contact with bacteria and bacterial components. Not much is known about how bacterial pathogens interact with MSC and how contact to bacteria influences MSC viability and differentiation potential. In this study we investigated the impact of three different wound infection relevant bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes, and the cell wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Gram-negative bacteria) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA; Gram-positive bacteria) on viability, proliferation, and osteogenic as well as adipogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (adMSC). We show that all three tested species were able to attach to and internalize into adMSC. The heat-inactivated Gram-negative E. coli as well as LPS were able to induce proliferation and osteogenic differentiation but reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. Conspicuously, the heat-inactivated Gram-positive species showed the same effects on proliferation and adipogenic differentiation, while its cell wall component LTA exhibited no significant impact on adMSC. Therefore, our data demonstrate that osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adMSC is influenced in an oppositional fashion by bacterial antigens and that MSC-governed regeneration is not necessarily reduced under infectious conditions. - Highlights: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Escherichia coli bind to and internalize into adMSC. Heat-inactivated cells of these bacterial species trigger proliferation of adMSC. Heat-inactivated E. coli and LPS induce osteogenic differentiation of adMSC. Heat-inactivated E. coli and LPS reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. LTA does not influence adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation of adMSC.

  2. Metabolic Engineering and Modeling of Metabolic Pathways to Improve Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, Y.; Navid, A.

    2014-12-19

    Rising energy demands and the imperative to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are driving research on biofuels development. Hydrogen gas (H2) is one of the most promising biofuels and is seen as a future energy carrier by virtue of the fact that 1) it is renewable, 2) does not evolve the “greenhouse gas” CO2 in combustion, 3) liberates large amounts of energy per unit weight in combustion (having about 3 times the energy content of gasoline), and 4) is easily converted to electricity by fuel cells. Among the various bioenergy strategies, environmental groups and others say that the concept of the direct manufacture of alternative fuels, such as H2, by photosynthetic organisms is the only biofuel alternative without significant negative criticism [1]. Biological H2 production by photosynthetic microorganisms requires the use of a simple solar reactor such as a transparent closed box, with low energy requirements, and is considered as an attractive system to develop as a biocatalyst for H2 production [2]. Various purple bacteria including Rhodopseudomonas palustris, can utilize organic substrates as electron donors to produce H2 at the expense of solar energy. Because of the elimination of energy cost used for H2O oxidation and the prevention of the production of O2 that inhibits the H2-producing enzymes, the efficiency of light energy conversion to H2 by anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria is in principle much higher than that by green algae or cyanobacteria, and is regarded as one of the most promising cultures for biological H2 production [3]. Here implemented a simple and relatively straightforward strategy for hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms using sunlight, sulfur- or iron-based inorganic substrates, and CO2 as the feedstock. Carefully selected microorganisms with bioengineered beneficial traits act as the biocatalysts of the process designed to both enhance the system efficiency of CO2 fixation and the net hydrogen production rate. Additionally we applied metabolic engineering approaches guided by computational modeling for the chosen model microorganisms to enable efficient hydrogen production.

  3. [Genetics in methylotrophic bacteria]. Progress report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    The focus of this project has been to identify and characterize mox genes and other methylotrophy genes in both methane- and methanol-utilizing bacteria, and study expression of those genes. In the last three years of support, the project has focused on identifying methylotrophy genes and the regions involved in their expression for comparative purposes, and has begun the process of analyzing the genes involved in transcriptional regulation of the mox system in the strain for which the authors have the most information, M. extorquens AM1. In order to carry out comparative studies of the transcription of methylotrophy genes, they have cloned and characterized genes involved in methanol oxidation (mox genes) from two Type I methanotrophs, Methylobacter marinus A45 (formerly Methylomonas sp A45) and Methylobacter albus BG8 (formerly Methylomonas albus BG8). In both cases, the organization of the genes was found to be identical, and the transcriptional start sites upstream of the mxaF genes were mapped. Other methylotrophy genes have been cloned and characterized from these methanotrophs, including mxaAKL and fdh. The rest of this project has focused on the regulatory network for the mox system in M. extorquens AM1. The authors have sequenced two mox regulatory genes, mxbD and mxbM and they show identify with a specific group of sensor-kinase/response regulator pair systems.

  4. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of aerosolized bacteria collected from African dust events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Christina A.; Brigmon, Robin L.; Yeager, Chris; Smith, Garriet W.; Polson, Shawn W.

    2013-07-31

    Twenty-one bacteria were isolated and characterized from air samples collected in Africa and the Caribbean by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Isolates were selected based on preliminary characterization as possible pathogens. Identification of the bacterial isolates was 25 achieved using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) profiling, the BIOLOG Microlog® System (carbon substrate assay), and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP)-PCR analysis. The majority of isolates (18/21) were identified as species of the genus Bacillus. Three isolates were classified within the Bacillus cereus senso lato group, which includes Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus cereus strains. One isolate was identified as a Staphylococcus sp., 30 most closely related to species (i.e Staphylococcus kloosii, Staphylococcus warneri) that are commonly associated with human or animal skin, but can also act as opportunistic pathogen. Another isolate was tentatively identified as Tsukamurella inchonensis, a known respiratory pathogen, and was resistant to the ten antibiotics tested including vancomycin.

  5. Alteration of Iron-Rich Lacustrine Sediments by Dissimilatory Iron-Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe,S.; Roberts, J.; Weisener, C.; Fowle, D.

    2007-01-01

    The reduction of Fe during bacterial anaerobic respiration in sediments and soils not only causes the degradation of organic matter but also results in changes in mineralogy and the redistribution of many nutrients and trace metals. Understanding trace metal patterns in sedimentary rocks and predicting the fate of contaminants in the environment requires a detailed understanding of the mechanisms through which they are redistributed during Fe reduction. In this work, lacustrine sediments from Lake Matano in Indonesia were incubated in a minimal media with the dissimilatory iron reducing (DIR) bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens 200R. These sediments were reductively dissolved at rates slower than pure synthetic goethite despite the presence of an 'easily reducible' component, as defined by selective extractions. DIR of the lacustrine sediments resulted in the substrate-dependent production of abundant quantities of extracellular polymeric substances. Trace elements, including Ni, Co, P, Si, and As, were released from the sediments with progressive Fe reduction while Cr was sequestered. Much of the initial trace metal mobility can be attributed to the rapid reduction of a Mn-rich oxyhydroxide phase. The production of organo-Fe(III) reveals that DIR bacteria can generate significant metal complexation capacity. This work demonstrates that DIR induces the release of many elements associated with Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides, despite secondary mineralization.

  6. Conversion of cellulose to ethanol by mesophilic bacteria. Progress report, July 15, 1983-February 15, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canale-Parola, E.

    1985-03-15

    Highlights of accomplishments during the period from July 1983 to February 1985 are summarized. Research has dealt primarily with strains of obligately anaerobic, mesophilic cellulolytic bacteria that we isolated from various natural environments. Eight strains (referred to as C strains) were isolated from mud of freshwater environments. As described in the previous progress report, the C strains represented a species of Clostridium that was different from other described species. The C strains fermented cellulose with formation of ethanol. They differed from thermophilic cellulolytic clostridia (e.g. Clostridium thermocellum) not only in growth temperature range, but also because they fermented xylan and pentoses with formation of ethanol. This result indicated that these mesophilic clostridia can convert to ethanol both cellulosic and hemicellulosic components of biomass. In contrast, monocultures of Clostridium thermocellum ferment only the cellulosic component of biomass. Furthermore, cellulose was degraded by the C strains at a rate comparable to that of thermophilic cellulolytic clostridia. These observations indicated that the mesophilic cellulolytic isolates constituted potentially useful microorganisms for ethanol production from biomass.

  7. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of aerosolized bacteria collected from African dust events

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wilson, Christina A.; Brigmon, Robin L.; Yeager, Chris; Smith, Garriet W.; Polson, Shawn W.

    2013-07-31

    Twenty-one bacteria were isolated and characterized from air samples collected in Africa and the Caribbean by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Isolates were selected based on preliminary characterization as possible pathogens. Identification of the bacterial isolates was 25 achieved using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) profiling, the BIOLOG Microlog® System (carbon substrate assay), and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP)-PCR analysis. The majority of isolates (18/21) were identified as species of the genus Bacillus. Three isolates were classified within the Bacillus cereus senso lato group, which includes Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus cereus strains. Onemore » isolate was identified as a Staphylococcus sp., 30 most closely related to species (i.e Staphylococcus kloosii, Staphylococcus warneri) that are commonly associated with human or animal skin, but can also act as opportunistic pathogen. Another isolate was tentatively identified as Tsukamurella inchonensis, a known respiratory pathogen, and was resistant to the ten antibiotics tested including vancomycin.« less

  8. Size-dependent fluorescence of bioaerosols: Mathematical model using fluorescing and absorbing molecules in bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hill, Steven C.; Williamson, Chatt C.; Doughty, David C.; Pan, Yong-Le; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Hill, Hanna H.

    2015-02-02

    This paper uses a mathematical model of fluorescent biological particles composed of bacteria and/or proteins (mostly as in Hill et al., 2013 [23]) to investigate the size-dependence of the total fluorescence emitted in all directions. The model applies to particles which have negligible reabsorption of fluorescence within the particle. The specific particles modeled here are composed of ovalbumin and of a generic Bacillus. The particles need not be spherical, and in some cases need not be homogeneous. However, the results calculated in this paper are for spherical homogeneous particles. Light absorbing and fluorescing molecules included in the model are aminomore » acids, nucleic acids, and several coenzymes. Here the excitation wavelength is 266 nm. The emission range, 300 to 370 nm, encompasses the fluorescence of tryptophan. The fluorescence cross section (CF) is calculated and compared with one set of published measured values. We investigate power law (Ady) approximations to CF, where d is diameter, and A and y are parameters adjusted to fit the data, and examine how y varies with d and composition, including the fraction as water. The particle's fluorescence efficiency (QF=CF/geometric-cross-section) can be written for homogeneous particles as QabsRF, where Qabs is the absorption efficiency, and RF, the fraction of the absorbed light emitted as fluorescence, is independent of size and shape. When QF is plotted vs. mid or mi(mr-1)d, where m=mr+imi is the complex refractive index, the plots for different fractions of water in the particle tend to overlap.« less

  9. Size-dependent fluorescence of bioaerosols: Mathematical model using fluorescing and absorbing molecules in bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Steven C.; Williamson, Chatt C.; Doughty, David C.; Pan, Yong-Le; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Hill, Hanna H.

    2015-02-02

    This paper uses a mathematical model of fluorescent biological particles composed of bacteria and/or proteins (mostly as in Hill et al., 2013 [23]) to investigate the size-dependence of the total fluorescence emitted in all directions. The model applies to particles which have negligible reabsorption of fluorescence within the particle. The specific particles modeled here are composed of ovalbumin and of a generic Bacillus. The particles need not be spherical, and in some cases need not be homogeneous. However, the results calculated in this paper are for spherical homogeneous particles. Light absorbing and fluorescing molecules included in the model are amino acids, nucleic acids, and several coenzymes. Here the excitation wavelength is 266 nm. The emission range, 300 to 370 nm, encompasses the fluorescence of tryptophan. The fluorescence cross section (CF) is calculated and compared with one set of published measured values. We investigate power law (Ady) approximations to CF, where d is diameter, and A and y are parameters adjusted to fit the data, and examine how y varies with d and composition, including the fraction as water. The particle's fluorescence efficiency (QF=CF/geometric-cross-section) can be written for homogeneous particles as QabsRF, where Qabs is the absorption efficiency, and RF, the fraction of the absorbed light emitted as fluorescence, is independent of size and shape. When QF is plotted vs. mid or mi(mr-1)d, where m=mr+imi is the complex refractive index, the plots for different fractions of water in the particle tend to overlap.

  10. A Banner Year for the U.S. Wind Industry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Banner Year for the U.S. Wind Industry A Banner Year for the U.S. Wind Industry August 14, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis 1 of 6 This infographic details key findings from the 2011 Wind Market Report. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. 2 of 6 This infographic details key findings from the 2011 Wind Market Report. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. 3 of 6 This infographic details key findings from the 2011 Wind Market Report. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. 4 of 6 This infographic details key findings from

  11. A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Banner Year for the U.S. Wind Industry A Banner Year for the U.S. Wind Industry August 14, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis 1 of 6 This infographic details key findings from the 2011 Wind Market Report. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. 2 of 6 This infographic details key findings from the 2011 Wind Market Report. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. 3 of 6 This infographic details key findings from the 2011 Wind Market Report. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. 4 of 6 This infographic details key findings from

  12. Comparative genomic insights into ecophysiology of neutrophilic, microaerophilic iron oxidizing bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kato, Shingo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Powell, Deborah H.; Krepski, Sean T.; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Chan, Clara S.

    2015-11-13

    Neutrophilic microaerophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are thought to play a significant role in cycling of carbon, iron and associated elements in both freshwater and marine iron-rich environments. However, the roles of the neutrophilic microaerophilic FeOB are still poorly understood due largely to the difficulty of cultivation and lack of functional gene markers. Here, we analyze the genomes of two freshwater neutrophilic microaerophilic stalk-forming FeOB, Ferriphaselus amnicola OYT1 and Ferriphaselus strain R-1. Phylogenetic analyses confirm that these are distinct species within Betaproteobacteria; we describe strain R-1 and propose the name F. globulitus. We compare the genomes to those of two freshwatermore » Betaproteobacterial and three marine Zetaproteobacterial FeOB isolates in order to look for mechanisms common to all FeOB, or just stalk-forming FeOB. The OYT1 and R-1 genomes both contain homologs to cyc2, which encodes a protein that has been shown to oxidize Fe in the acidophilic FeOB, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. This c-type cytochrome common to all seven microaerophilic FeOB isolates, strengthening the case for its common utility in the Fe oxidation pathway. In contrast, the OYT1 and R-1 genomes lack mto genes found in other freshwater FeOB. OYT1 and R-1 both have genes that suggest they can oxidize sulfur species. Both have the genes necessary to fix carbon by the Calvin–Benson– Basshom pathway, while only OYT1 has the genes necessary to fix nitrogen. The stalk-forming FeOB share xag genes that may help form the polysaccharide structure of stalks. Both OYT1 and R-1 make a novel biomineralization structure, short rod-shaped Fe oxyhydroxides much smaller than their stalks; these oxides are constantly shed, and may be a vector for C, P, and metal transport to downstream environments. Lastly, our results show that while different FeOB are adapted to particular niches, freshwater and marine FeOB likely share common mechanisms for Fe oxidation electron transport and biomineralization pathways.« less

  13. Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport: Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Rayner, Perter; Butler, T.; Lawrence, M.

    2013-06-04

    Model-simulated transport of atmospheric trace components can be combined with observed concentrations to obtain estimates of ground-based sources using various inversion techniques. These approaches have been applied in the past primarily to obtain source estimates for long-lived trace gases such as CO2. We consider the application of similar techniques to source estimation for atmospheric aerosols, by using as a case study the estimation of bacteria emissions from different ecosystem regions in the global atmospheric chemistry and climate model ECHAM5/MESSy-Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC). Simulated particle concentrations in the tropopause region and at high latitudes, as well as transport of particles to tundra and land ice regions are shown to be highly sensitive to scavenging in mixed-phase clouds, which is poorly characterized in most global climate models. This may be a critical uncertainty in correctly simulating the transport of aerosol particles to the Arctic. Source estimation via Monte Carlo Markov Chain is applied to a suite of sensitivity simulations and the global mean emissions are estimated. We present an analysis of the partitioning of uncertainties in the global mean emissions that are attributable to particle size, CCN activity, the ice nucleation scavenging ratios for mixed-phase and cold clouds, and measurement error. Uncertainty due to CCN activity or to a 1 um error in particle size is typically between 10% and 40% of the uncertainty due to data uncertainty, as measured by the 5%-ile to 95%-ile range of the Monte Carlo ensemble. Uncertainty attributable to the ice nucleation scavenging ratio in mized-phase clouds is as high as 10% to 20% of the data uncertainty. Taken together, the four model 20 parameters examined contribute about half as much to the uncertainty in the estimated emissions as do the measurements. This was a surprisingly large contribution from model uncertainty in light of the substantial data uncertainty, which ranges from 81% to 870% for each of ten ecosystems for this case study. The effects of these and other model parameters in contributing to the uncertainties in the transport of atmospheric aerosol particles should be treated explicitly and systematically in both forward and inverse modelling studies.

  14. Comparative genomic insights into ecophysiology of neutrophilic, microaerophilic iron oxidizing bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Shingo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Powell, Deborah H.; Krepski, Sean T.; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Chan, Clara S.

    2015-11-13

    Neutrophilic microaerophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are thought to play a significant role in cycling of carbon, iron and associated elements in both freshwater and marine iron-rich environments. However, the roles of the neutrophilic microaerophilic FeOB are still poorly understood due largely to the difficulty of cultivation and lack of functional gene markers. Here, we analyze the genomes of two freshwater neutrophilic microaerophilic stalk-forming FeOB, Ferriphaselus amnicola OYT1 and Ferriphaselus strain R-1. Phylogenetic analyses confirm that these are distinct species within Betaproteobacteria; we describe strain R-1 and propose the name F. globulitus. We compare the genomes to those of two freshwater Betaproteobacterial and three marine Zetaproteobacterial FeOB isolates in order to look for mechanisms common to all FeOB, or just stalk-forming FeOB. The OYT1 and R-1 genomes both contain homologs to cyc2, which encodes a protein that has been shown to oxidize Fe in the acidophilic FeOB, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. This c-type cytochrome common to all seven microaerophilic FeOB isolates, strengthening the case for its common utility in the Fe oxidation pathway. In contrast, the OYT1 and R-1 genomes lack mto genes found in other freshwater FeOB. OYT1 and R-1 both have genes that suggest they can oxidize sulfur species. Both have the genes necessary to fix carbon by the Calvin–Benson– Basshom pathway, while only OYT1 has the genes necessary to fix nitrogen. The stalk-forming FeOB share xag genes that may help form the polysaccharide structure of stalks. Both OYT1 and R-1 make a novel biomineralization structure, short rod-shaped Fe oxyhydroxides much smaller than their stalks; these oxides are constantly shed, and may be a vector for C, P, and metal transport to downstream environments. Lastly, our results show that while different FeOB are adapted to particular niches, freshwater and marine FeOB likely share common mechanisms for Fe oxidation electron transport and biomineralization pathways.

  15. Understanding and Implementing DOE Quality Requirements and ASME NQA-1 in

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Understanding Energy Use in Cities Infographic Understanding Energy Use in Cities Infographic Understanding Energy Use in Cities Infographic This Cities Leading through Energy Analysis and Planning (Cities-LEAP) infographic describes the key points from the report, City-Level Energy Decision Making: Data Use in Energy Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation in U.S. Cities. Download this infographic. Read the Report cities-leap paper cover.jpg Read City-Level Energy Decision Making: Data Use in

  16. Understanding Process Plant Schedule Slippage and Startup Costs

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Understanding Energy Use in Cities Infographic Understanding Energy Use in Cities Infographic Understanding Energy Use in Cities Infographic This Cities Leading through Energy Analysis and Planning (Cities-LEAP) infographic describes the key points from the report, City-Level Energy Decision Making: Data Use in Energy Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation in U.S. Cities. Download this infographic. Read the Report cities-leap paper cover.jpg Read City-Level Energy Decision Making: Data Use in

  17. The Effect of Bicarbonate on the Microbial Dissolution of Autunite Mineral in the Presence of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepulveda-Medina, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria are key players in the processes that govern fate and transport of contaminants. The uranium release from Na and Ca-autunite by Arthrobacter oxydans strain G968 was evaluated in the presence of bicarbonate ions. This bacterium was previously isolated from Hanford Site soil and in earlier prescreening tests demonstrated low tolerance to U(VI) toxicity compared to other A.oxydans isolates. Experiments were conducted using glass serum bottles as mixed bioreactors and sterile 6-well cell culture plates with inserts separating bacteria cells from mineral solids. Reactors containing phosphorus-limiting media were amended with bicarbonate ranging between 0-10 mM and metaautunite solids to provide a U(VI) concentration of 4.4 mmol/L. Results showed that in the presence of bicarbonate, A.oxydans G968 was able to enhance the release of U(VI) from Na and Ca autunite at the same capacity as other A.oxydans isolates with relatively high tolerance to U(VI). The effect of bacterial strains on autunite dissolution decreases as the concentration of bicarbonate increases. The results illustrate that direct interaction between the bacteria and the mineral is not necessary to result in U (VI) biorelease from autunite. The formation of secondary calcium-phosphate mineral phases on the surface of the mineral during the dissolution can ultimately reduce the natural autunite mineral contact area, which bacterial cells can access. This thereby reduces the concentration of uranium released into the solution. This study provides a better understanding of the interactions between meta-autunite and microbes in conditions mimicking arid and semiarid subsurface environments of western U.S.

  18. MamO Is a Repurposed Serine Protease that Promotes Magnetite Biomineralization through Direct Transition Metal Binding in Magnetotactic Bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hershey, David M.; Ren, Xuefeng; Melnyk, Ryan A.; Browne, Patrick J.; Ozyamak, Ertan; Jones, Stephanie R.; Chang, Michelle C. Y.; Hurley, James H.; Komeili, Arash

    2016-03-16

    Many living organisms transform inorganic atoms into highly ordered crystalline materials. An elegant example of such biomineralization processes is the production of nano-scale magnetic crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. Previous studies have implicated the involvement of two putative serine proteases, MamE and MamO, during the early stages of magnetite formation in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Here, using genetic analysis and X-ray crystallography, we show that MamO has a degenerate active site, rendering it incapable of protease activity. Instead, MamO promotes magnetosome formation through two genetically distinct, noncatalytic activities: activation of MamE-dependent proteolysis of biomineralization factors and direct binding to transition metal ions.more » By solving the structure of the protease domain bound to a metal ion, we identify a surface-exposed di-histidine motif in MamO that contributes to metal binding and show that it is required to initiate biomineralization in vivo. Finally, we find that pseudoproteases are widespread in magnetotactic bacteria and that they have evolved independently in three separate taxa. In conclusion, our results highlight the versatility of protein scaffolds in accommodating new biochemical activities and provide unprecedented insight into the earliest stages of biomineralization.« less

  19. Use of bromodeoxyuridine immunocapture to identify psychrotolerant phenanthrene-degrading bacteria in phenanthrene-enriched polluted Baltic Sea sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edlund, A.; Jansson, J.

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to enrich and identify psychrotolerant phenanthrenedegrading bacteria from polluted Baltic Sea sediments. Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sediments were spiked with phenanthrene and incubated for 2 months in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine that is incorporated into the DNA of replicating cells. The bromodeoxyuridine-incorporated DNA was extracted by immunocapture and analyzed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism and 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing to identify bacterial populations that were growing. In addition, degradation genes were quantified in the bromodeoxyuridine-incorporated DNA by real-time PCR. Phenanthrene concentrations decreased after 2 months of incubation in the phenanthrene-enriched sediments and this reduction correlated to increases in copy numbers of xylE and phnAc dioxygenase genes. Representatives of Exiguobacterium, Schewanella,Methylomonas, Pseudomonas, Bacteroides and an uncultured Deltaproteobacterium and a Gammaproteobacterium dominated the growing community in the phenanthrene spiked sediments. Isolates that were closely related to three of these bacteria (two pseudomonads and an Exiguobacterium sp.) could reduce phenanthrene concentrations in pure cultures and they all harbored phnAc dioxygenase genes. These results confirm that this combination of culture-based and molecular approaches was useful for identification of actively growing bacterial species with a high potential for phenanthrene degradation.

  20. Mechanical properties of interacting lipopolysaccharide membranes from bacteria mutants studied by specular and off-specular neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneck, Emanuel; Tanaka, Motomu; Oliveira, Rafael G.; Rehfeldt, Florian; Deme, Bruno; Brandenburg, Klaus; Seydel, Ulrich

    2009-10-15

    Specular and off-specular neutron scattering are used to study the influence of molecular chemistry (mutation) on the intermembrane interactions and mechanical properties of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria consisting of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs). For this purpose, solid-supported multilayers of mutant LPS membranes are deposited on silicon wafers and hydrated either at defined humidity or in bulk buffers. The planar sample geometry allows to identify out-of-plane and in-plane scattering vector components. The measured two-dimensional reciprocal space maps are simulated with membrane displacement correlation functions determined by two mechanical parameters (vertical compression modulus and bending rigidity) and an effective cutoff radius for the membrane fluctuation wavelength. Experiments at controlled humidity enable one to examine the influence of the disjoining pressure on the saccharide-mediated intermembrane interactions, while experiments in bulk buffers (i.e., in the absence of an external osmotic stress) reveal the effect of divalent cations on LPS membranes, highlighting the role of divalent cations in the survival mechanism of bacteria in the presence of antimicrobial molecules.

  1. Manila clams from Hg polluted sediments of Marano and Grado lagoons (Italy) harbor detoxifying Hg resistant bacteria in soft tissues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldi, Franco; Gallo, Michele; Marchetto, Davide; Faleri, Claudia; Maida, Isabel; Fani, Renato

    2013-08-15

    A mechanism of mercury detoxification has been suggested by a previous study on Hg bioaccumulation in Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) in the polluted Marano and Grado lagoons and in this study we demonstrate that this event could be partly related to the detoxifying activities of Hg-resistant bacteria (MRB) harbored in clam soft tissues. Therefore, natural clams were collected in six stations during two different periods (winter and spring) from Marano and Grado Lagoons. Siphons, gills and hepatopancreas from acclimatized clams were sterile dissected to isolate MRB. These anatomical parts were glass homogenized or used for whole, and they were lying on a solid medium containing 5 mg l{sup −1} HgCl{sub 2} and incubated at 30 °C. A total of fourteen bacterial strains were isolated and were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing and analysis, revealing that strains were representative of eight bacterial genera, four of which were Gram-positive (Enterococcus, Bacillus, Jeotgalicoccus and Staphylococcus) and other four were Gram-negative (Stenotrophomonas, Vibrio, Raoultella and Enterobacter). Plasmids and merA genes were found and their sequences determined. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique shows the presence of Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria by using different molecular probes in siphon and gills. Bacterial clumps inside clam flesh were observed and even a Gram-negative endosymbiont was disclosed by transmission electronic microscope inside clam cells. Bacteria harbored in cavities of soft tissue have mercury detoxifying activity. This feature was confirmed by the determination of mercuric reductase in glass-homogenized siphons and gills. -- Highlights: ► We isolated Gram-positive and Gram-negative Hg resistant strains from soft tissues of Ruditapes philippinarum. ► We identify 14 mercury resistant strains by 16S rRNA gene sequences. ► Bacteria in siphon and gill tissues of clams were observed by TEM and identified with different FISH probes. ► Hg-reductase (MerA) activity in glass homogenized clam tissues was also determined.

  2. The Silicon Solar Cell Turns 50

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Daryl Chapin, Calvin Fuller, and Gerald Pearson likely never imagined inventing a solar cell that would revolutionize the photovoltaics industry. There wasn't even a photovoltaics industry to revolu- tionize in 1952. The three scientists were simply trying to solve problems within the Bell tele- phone system. Traditional dry cell batteries, which worked fine in mild climates, degraded too rapidly in the tropics and ceased to work when needed. The company therefore asked its famous research

  3. 4 oil firms turn secret on reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaffer, P.

    1980-04-14

    US oil companies are complying with Saudi Arabia's and Indonesia's request by not revealing the companies' shares of oil reserves, adding to supply uncertainties and increasing the power of the producing countries. The information blackout reduces the reserve estimates filed by Exxon, Mobil, Standard Oil of California, and Texaco with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which plans to deal with the reporting problem on a case-by-case basis. Unless the companies decide the information can be disclosed to DOE's Financial Reporting System, a legal battle will ensue. A summary of reserve reports indicates a trend in declining production relative to new discoveries as well. (DCK)

  4. Laser turns 50 (Inside Business) | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    our CD and DVD players wouldn't work." And it may be hard to believe, but CD burners did not exist until about 1994, Shinn said to illustrate how quickly the technology...

  5. Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In a key step towards advancing a clean energy economy, scientists have engineered a cheap, abundant way to make hydrogen fuel from sunlight and water.

  6. Turn Motors Off When Not in Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    While a typical National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Design B motor may draw from four to eight times the full-load current during starting, the power factor is low ...

  7. Solar Decathlon Turns Ten | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the clean energy economy. | Photo courtesy of Stefano Paltera, U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Former Digital Communications Specialist, ...

  8. Turn Motors Off When Not in Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-07-01

    This is one in a series of tip sheets to help manufacturers optimize their industrial motor and motor-driven systems.

  9. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerkhoff, Lee; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-15

    Uranium contaminated groundwaters are a legacy concern for the U.S. Department of Energy. Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site have demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduces the ambient soluable uranium concentration, sequestering the radionuclide as uraninite. However, questions remain regarding which microorganism(s) are consuming this acetate and if active groundwater microorganisms are different from active particle-associated bacteria. In this report, 13-C acetate was used to assess the active microbes that synthesize DNA on 3 size fractions [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 micron), groundwater (0.2-8 micron)] over a 24 -day time frame. Results indicated a stronger signal from 13-C acetate associated with the fines fraction compared with smaller amounts of 13-C uptake on the sand fraction and groundwater samples during the SIP incubations. TRFLP analysis of this 13-C-labeled DNA, indicated 31+ 9 OTU's with 6 peaks dominating the active profiles (166, 187, 210, 212, and 277 bp peaks using MnlI). Cloning/sequencing of the amplification products indicated a Geobacter-like group (187, 210, 212 bp) primarily synthesized DNA from acetate in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium (166 bp) primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. (277 bp) utilized much of the 13C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria during field-scale acetate addition and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  10. Preliminary investigation of the effects of mineralogy and fluid composition on the growth of thermophilic bacteria in geothermal hot springs on the island of Vulcano, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amend, J.P.; Helgeson, H.C. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); Gurrieri, S.; Valenza, M. ); Clark, D.S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Hydrothermal experiments were carried out recently on the island of Vulcano to investigate at in situ temperatures the relation of thermophilic bacterial growth to the mineralogy and fluid chemistry of geothermal hot springs. A preheated nutrient medium was inoculated with geothermal fluid and placed in the hydrothermal reactor, together with a sample of the mineralogic matrix through which the fluid flows. The results of the experiments are somewhat equivocal owing to (1) the inability to maintain the pH of the reactor fluid at the in situ pH (2.9 at 98 C), (2) apparent phase separation of what is probably a CO[sub 2]-rich gas leading to abnormally high pressures as the reactor temperature was increased in stages to 125 C, and (3) the fact that (unexpectedly) all of the bacteria were found to occur on the surfaces of mineral grains, which could not be sequentially collected in a representative manner with the apparatus at hand. Nevertheless, it appeared qualitatively that the population of bacteria increased during the experiment. Although this observation requires future confirmation and quantification with a more sophisticated reactor, the experimental results clearly indicate that conventional microbiological growth experiments using thermophilic bacteria that have been removed from their natural nutrient, in situ pH, and mineralogic environment may have little to do with the behavior of such bacteria in geothermal systems. Understanding this behavior requires integrated studies of the organobiogeochemistry of geothermal systems.

  11. Processing of cellulosic material by a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from cellulase-producing bacteria, ATCC 55702

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, H.C.

    1998-08-04

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate, have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase degrading bacterium ATCC 55702, which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic materials. 5 figs.

  12. Processing of cellulosic material by a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from cellulase-producing bacteria, ATCC 55702

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dees, H. Craig

    1998-01-01

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate, have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase degrading bacterium ATCC 55702, which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic materials.

  13. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-21

    Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  14. In situ capping for size control of monochalcogenides (ZnS, CdS, and SnS) nanocrystals produced by anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jang, Gyoung Gug; Jacobs, Christopher B; Ivanov, Ilia N; Joshi, Pooran C; Meyer III, Harry M; Kidder, Michelle; Armstrong, Beth L; Datskos, Panos G; Graham, David E; Moon, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    Metal monochalcogenide quantum dot nanocrystals of ZnS, CdS and SnS were prepared by anaerobic, metal-reducing bacteria using in situ capping by oleic acid or oleylamine. The capping agent preferentially adsorbs on the surface of the nanocrystal, suppressing the growth process in the early stages, thus leading to production of nanocrystals with a diameter of less than 5 nm.

  15. In situ capping for size control of monochalcogenides (ZnS, CdS, and SnS) nanocrystals produced by anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jang, Gyoung Gug; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Joshi, Pooran C.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Kidder, Michelle; Armstrong, Beth L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Graham, David E.; Moon, Ji -Won

    2015-07-24

    Metal monochalcogenide quantum dot nanocrystals of ZnS, CdS and SnS were prepared by anaerobic, metal-reducing bacteria using in situ capping by oleic acid or oleylamine. Furthermore, the capping agent preferentially adsorbs on the surface of the nanocrystal, suppressing the growth process in the early stages, thus leading to production of nanocrystals with a diameter of less than 5 nm.

  16. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; and others

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis.

  17. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.

  18. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two activemore » bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.« less

  19. Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Webinar: BioenergizeME ...

  20. BioEnergy Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. for their Winning Bioenergy Infographic A team of five freshmen from Williamsburg High School for Architecture and Design in Brooklyn, New York-designed an infographic on the...

  1. Turning on the Fan and Turning off the A/C

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of some recent money- and energy-savings improvements I've been making to my home, a couple of weeks ago I installed a ceiling fan in my main living room. Part of my research led me to...

  2. America's Wind Industry Reaches Record Highs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Industry Reaches Record Highs America's Wind Industry Reaches Record Highs August 6, 2013 - 8:01am Addthis Our latest Infographic highlights key findings from the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report. | Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>. Our latest Infographic highlights key findings from the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy LEARN MORE Watch our new video

  3. American Nuclear Society Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Industry Reaches Record Highs America's Wind Industry Reaches Record Highs August 6, 2013 - 8:01am Addthis Our latest Infographic highlights key findings from the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report. | Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>. Our latest Infographic highlights key findings from the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy LEARN MORE Watch our new video

  4. Wrapping Up: Our Conversation on Increasing Diversity in STEM...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    While industry demand for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) professionals ... in science, technology, engineering & math disciplines. | Infographic by Sarah ...

  5. Design and mechanism of action of a novel bacteria-selective antimicrobial peptide from the cell-penetrating peptide Pep-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, W.L.; Lan Hongliang; Park, Il-Seon; Kim, Jae Il; Jin, H.Z.; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Shin, S.Y. . E-mail: syshin@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-10-20

    Here, we report the successful design of a novel bacteria-selective antimicrobial peptide, Pep-1-K (KKTWWKTWWTKWSQPKKKRKV). Pep-1-K was designed by replacing Glu-2, Glu-6, and Glu-11 in the cell-penetrating peptide Pep-1 with Lys. Pep-1-K showed strong antibacterial activity against reference strains (MIC = 1-2 {mu}M) of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as against clinical isolates (MIC = 1-8 {mu}M) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In contrast, Pep-1-K did not cause hemolysis of human erythrocytes even at 200 {mu}M. These results indicate that Pep-1-K may be a good candidate for antimicrobial drug development, especially as a topical agent against antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. Tryptophan fluorescence studies indicated that the lack of hemolytic activity of Pep-1-K correlated with its weak ability to penetrate zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol (10:1, w/w) vesicles, which mimic eukaryotic membranes. Furthermore, Pep-1-K caused little or no dye leakage from negatively charged phosphatidylethanolamine/phosphatidylglycerol (7:3, w/w) vesicles, which mimic bacterial membranes but had a potent ability to cause depolarization of the cytoplasmic membrane potential of intact S. aureus cells. These results suggested that Pep-1-K kills microorganisms by not the membrane-disrupting mode but the formation of small channels that permit transit of ions or protons but not molecules as large as calcein.

  6. Comparison of killing of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by pure singlet oxygen. [Salmonella typhimurium; Escherichia coli; Sarcina lutea; Staphylococcus aureus; Streptococcus lactis; Streptococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahl, T.A.; Midden, W.R. ); Hartman, P.E. )

    1989-04-01

    Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria were found to display different sensitivities to pure singlet oxygen generated outside of cells. Killing curves for Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli strains were indicative of multihit killing, whereas curves for Sarcina lutea, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus lactis, and Streptococcus faecalis exhibited single-hit kinetics. The S. typhimurium deep rough strain TA1975, which lacks nearly all of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide coat and manifests concomitant enhancement of penetration by some exogenous substances, responded to singlet oxygen with initially faster inactivation than did the S. typhimurium wild-type strain, although the maximum rates of killing appeared to be quite similar. The structure of the cell wall thus plays an important role in susceptibility to singlet oxygen. The outer membrane-lipopolysaccharide portion of the gram-negative cell wall initially protects the bacteria from extracellular singlet oxygen, although it may also serve as a source for secondary reaction products which accentuate the rates of cell killing. S. typhimurium and E. coli strains lacking the cellular antioxidant, glutathione, showed no difference from strains containing glutathione in response to the toxic effects of singlet oxygen. Strains of Sarcina lutea and Staphylococcus aureus that contained carotenoids, however, were far more resistant to singlet oxygen lethality than were both carotenoidless mutants of the same species and other gram-positive species lacking high levels of protective carotenoids.

  7. Information Bridge MARC Records FAQ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Infographic: Where in Space is the Energy Department? Infographic: Where in Space is the Energy Department? June 9, 2015 - 2:54pm Addthis In the infographic above, learn about the space missions, past and present, where technology from the Energy Department and its National Labs has made discovery possible. | Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>, Energy Department. In the infographic above, learn about the space missions, past and present,

  8. Winning the Future: Grand Ronde Solar Projects Reduce Pollution, Cut Costs

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Winning Team Announced for 2015 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Pilot Winning Team Announced for 2015 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Pilot June 9, 2015 - 2:57pm Addthis Cropped view of the winning infographic “Cellulosic Ethanol.” Cropped view of the winning infographic "Cellulosic Ethanol." Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Director Jonathan Male announced the winner and finalists of the 2015 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Pilot in a

  9. Energy Saving 'Cool Roofs' Installed at Y-12 | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cooling Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Cooling June 13, 2014 - 5:10pm Addthis Just in time for summer, our new Energy Saver 101 infographic covers everything you need to know about home cooling. Download a <a href="/node/920771">high-resolution version</a> of the home cooling infographic. | Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>, Energy Department. Just in time for summer, our new Energy Saver 101 infographic covers everything you

  10. New Insight on a Familiar Glow | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Infographic and Projects to Keep Your Energy Bills Out of Hot Water New Infographic and Projects to Keep Your Energy Bills Out of Hot Water April 19, 2013 - 3:21pm Addthis New Energy Saver 101 infographic lays out the different types of water heaters on the market and will help you figure out how to select the best model for your home. Download a high-resolution version of the <a href="/node/612506">infographic</a>. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity.

  11. Information Pods Inform Public on Savannah River Site Missions | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Infographic: Where in Space is the Energy Department? Infographic: Where in Space is the Energy Department? June 9, 2015 - 2:54pm Addthis In the infographic above, learn about the space missions, past and present, where technology from the Energy Department and its National Labs has made discovery possible. | Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>, Energy Department. In the infographic above, learn about the space missions, past and present,

  12. Non-destructive observation of intact bacteria and viruses in water by the highly sensitive frequency transmission electric-field method based on SEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: We developed a high-sensitive frequency transmission electric-field (FTE) system. The output signal was highly enhanced by applying voltage to a metal layer on SiN. The spatial resolution of new FTE method is 41 nm. New FTE system enables observation of the intact bacteria and virus in water. - Abstract: The high-resolution structural analysis of biological specimens by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) presents several advantages. Until now, wet bacterial specimens have been examined using atmospheric sample holders. However, images of unstained specimens in water using these holders exhibit very poor contrast and heavy radiation damage. Recently, we developed the frequency transmission electric-field (FTE) method, which facilitates the SEM observation of biological specimens in water without radiation damage. However, the signal detection system presents low sensitivity. Therefore, a high EB current is required to generate clear images, and thus reducing spatial resolution and inducing thermal damage to the samples. Here a high-sensitivity detection system is developed for the FTE method, which enhances the output signal amplitude by hundredfold. The detection signal was highly enhanced when voltage was applied to the metal layer on silicon nitride thin film. This enhancement reduced the EB current and improved the spatial resolution as well as the signal-to-noise ratio. The spatial resolution of a high-sensitive FTE system is 41 nm, which is considerably higher than previous FTE system. New FTE system can easily be utilised to examine various unstained biological specimens in water, such as living bacteria and viruses.

  13. Phages of lactic acid bacteria: The role of genetics in understanding phage-host interactions and their co-evolutionary processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahony, Jennifer; Ainsworth, Stuart; Stockdale, Stephen; Sinderen, Douwe van

    2012-12-20

    Dairy fermentations are among the oldest food processing applications, aimed at preservation and shelf-life extension through the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) starter cultures, in particular strains of Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. Traditionally this was performed by continuous passaging of undefined cultures from a finished fermentation to initiate the next fermentation. More recently, consumer demands on consistent and desired flavours and textures of dairy products have led to a more defined approach to such processes. Dairy (starter) companies have responded to the need to define the nature and complexity of the starter culture mixes, and dairy fermentations are now frequently based on defined starter cultures of low complexity, where each starter component imparts specific technological properties that are desirable to the product. Both mixed and defined starter culture approaches create the perfect environment for the proliferation of (bacterio)phages capable of infecting these LAB. The repeated use of the same starter cultures in a single plant, coupled to the drive towards higher and consistent production levels, increases the risk and negative impact of phage infection. In this review we will discuss recent advances in tracking the adaptation of phages to the dairy industry, the advances in understanding LAB phage-host interactions, including evolutionary and genomic aspects.

  14. Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougal, R.A.

    1993-08-01

    High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: City of Cincinnati Turns Sustainable...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Dedicated to promoting the use of cleaner, domestic fuels and efficient vehicles, CFO has been working with the City of Cincinnati-one of its top stakeholders-on various projects ...

  16. Sandia Energy - Officials Turn to Sandia National Labs for Help...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural Resources) The 300-foot-wide sinkhole that has threatened since August to swallow gas pipelines, homes, and property in south Louisiana has drawn in experts from Sandia...

  17. Employees turn student | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    what we do at Y-12," Weller said. "This program will give Y-12 people they can put into management positions who have both technical and managerial aspects. That's really valuable...

  18. How Chula Vista, California Is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Chula Vista, California is saving their citizens money and reducing emissions by converting over 125 of their heavy-duty fleet vehicles to run off biodiesel.

  19. When to Turn Off Your Lights | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy When the Internet Runs Out of Addresses, It'll be IPv6 to the Rescue! When the Internet Runs Out of Addresses, It'll be IPv6 to the Rescue! June 8, 2011 - 5:25pm Addthis Wendy Wolfson Tsabba Communications Specialist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory What does this mean for me? There are "only" 3.2 billion unique addresses available across the Internet and we are quickly approaching that limit. Network engineers have been working on a new protocol called

  20. Turning Ideas into Impact: The Energy Department's Office of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... lighter and stronger materials for aircraft and vehicles, to improved radiation detection tools and improved cancer therapies. But there's so much more that we can and should do. ...

  1. Carbon Capture Turned Upside Down: High-Temperature Adsorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the same time surmounting the negative effect of H2O is therefore an attractive idea. ... a theoretical background for this entropy-driven behavior and demonstrate under ...

  2. ZERH Webinar: Turning the Building America Solution Center into...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    field applications, education, and code official meetings. In this webinar, Sam Rashkin and Chrissi Antonopolous will be diving into how to use the BASC for specific...

  3. When Metal Organic Frameworks Turn into One-Dimensional Magnets...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22Germantown ... one-dimensional chains of transition metal magnets (green sections of structure). ...

  4. Savannah River Site's H Canyon Turns 60 Years Old | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    "H Canyon has served our nation well for 60 years and today it remains the only operating production-scale shielded chemical separations facility in the country," said Energy ...

  5. Nicole Lambiase: Aspiring Astronaut Turned Next-generation Car Designer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    How participating in the EcoCAR competition convinced one student to switch career paths and put her talents toward designing advanced vehicles.

  6. READ THIS: Before You Turn Over a Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-12-08

    This pamphlet is designed for members of the residential construction and remodeling industries, and presents building guidance for both new construction and rehabilitation, as well as practices that can be used by property personnel.

  7. Turning things downside up: Adsorbate induced water flipping...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    between the water and the adsorbates. Authors: Kimmel, Gregory A. ; Zubkov, Tykhon ; Smith, R. Scott ; Petrik, Nikolay G. ; Kay, Bruce D. Publication Date: 2014-11-14 OSTI...

  8. Turn Your Halloween Pumpkins Into Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Another one of these projects, from Emerald Biofuels, will use a different type of waste-fats, oils, and greases-as a feedstock that will be hydro-treated and upgraded at its ...

  9. NREL: Technology Deployment - More Than 70 Countries Turn to...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy access and clean energy project finance programs in Chile Helping Grenada meet ... Kitts Establishing geothermal development and policy in the Caribbean Establishing ...

  10. Firm turns trash to steam, saves $60,500

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohn, L.

    1982-05-17

    An incinerator/boiler system that the Ingersoll-Rand Co. uses to burn trash and produce steam for heating and parts cleaning saved the company $60,500 in avoided fuel and trash-disposal costs last year. Replacing a natural gas-fired boiler, the new system reduces the demand for gas by 14%. Heat recovered from the trash burning is transferred to the boiler to make steam. No smoke is emitted. (DCK)

  11. Trash burns, turns into $120,000 in annual savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W.A.

    1981-09-01

    A plan was developed to generate a major portion of the energy required for heating and air conditioning by burning factory trash instead of using natural gas and electricity. Trash from the Rockwell Int'l. plant, including broken wood pallets, cardboard packing materials and office waste paper, amounted to 1,000 tons per year. Previously, a contractor was being paid to come to the plant several times a week, pick up the trash and haul it to a landfill. To supplement the 1,000 tons of usable waste generated by the plant annually, the additional 500 tons of similar trash needed to operate the system are received from other industries in the vicinity. Besides accepting waste from other plants, the Marysville facility stockpiles and uses refuse corn stalks harvested from 50 acres of Rockwell-owned land adjacent to the plant. The incinerator featuring a pyrolytic heat recovery system is presented and its operation is illustrated.

  12. ZERH Webinar: Turning the Building America Solution Center into...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... This is the application available for both Android and IOS, or Apple devices. You can access the Apple app through the Apple store, but you cannot access the Android app through ...

  13. Science & Industry Peers Turn to NREL for Biomass Solutions ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "These heavily cited papers highlight the impact that ... that offer substantial economic and environmental benefits." ... scale up and commercialize leading biofuels projects. ...

  14. Turning Bayesian model averaging into Bayesian model combination...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Number(s): LA-UR-11-04419; LA-UR-11-4419 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: International Joint Conference of Neural ...

  15. Former Student Turns Thesis Into Energy Savings for Taylor University

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Not long ago Kevin Crosby was an engineering major and the president of Taylor University’s student environmental club, Stewards of Creation. Now with recommendations from his thesis in hand, the Environmental Science Master’s degree candidate is the Upland, Indiana, university’s first Coordinator of Stewardship and Sustainability.

  16. TurningPoint Evaluation Results | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Turkish-U.S. Business Council Turkish-U.S. Business Council November 16, 2007 - 4:31pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you Minister Guler for the introduction. And let me say how very much I appreciated your remarks just now. I also want to extend my personal greetings to Mr. Sahenk and to the members of the Turkish-U.S. Business Council's Executive Committee for sponsoring this lunch. We have many things to talk about this afternoon. Since leaving the United States, I was

  17. Turning the right corner : ensuring development through a low...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions with broader sector reforms aimed at reducing local air pollution, road safety risks, and congestion. This report looks at relationships...

  18. The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rochlin, Cliff

    2009-11-15

    Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

  19. Turning the Manhattan Project into a National Park | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    part of the Manhattan Project National Park. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs ...

  20. Turning Bayesian model averaging into Bayesian model combination...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: International Joint Conference of Neural Networks 2011 ; July 31, 2011 ; San Jose, CA Research Org: Los Alamos National ...