Sample records for infographic turning bacteria

  1. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: BIOfuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  2. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bioenergy History

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  3. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Impacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  4. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bessie's Biofuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  5. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biofuel Acts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  6. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Tertiary Treatment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Nikola Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, WA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  7. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: The History of Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  8. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  9. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: What is Biomass?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  10. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Energy from Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  11. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  12. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Why is it important?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from The Preuss School in La Jolla, CA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  13. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Iowa Ethanol Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  14. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: From Fields to Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  15. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bioenergy Career: Plant Operator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  16. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biomass Reduces Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  17. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  18. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Troy High School in Troy, MI, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  19. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: What is Biogas?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  20. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biofuels Sustainable Transportation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  1. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Workforce and Education

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  2. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biofuels vs Fossil Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from North Caddo Magnet High School in Vivian, LA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  3. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Corn to Ethanol the Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  4. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental impacts of Bio energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  5. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Effects of Bioenergy on the Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  6. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: From Fish Food to Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from LISD TECH Center in Adrian, MI, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  7. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner...

  8. Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition Phil Ulibarri of Truckee Meadows Community...

  9. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth BIOENERGIZEME...

  10. Infographic Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment andJuneJobsInfographic Guide

  11. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Imagine Renewable Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Clean Technologies and Sustainable Industries Early College High School in Ballston Spa, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME...

  12. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Oil Future of the World

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Miami Palmetto Senior High School in Pinecrest, FL, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  13. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bioenergy: Creating Biofuels from Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from North Caddo Magnet High School in Vivian, LA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  14. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Powering the World One Poop at a Time

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Genesee Career Institute in Flint, MI, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  15. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Comparison of Bio-fuels to Other Commonly Used Forms of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  16. Turning Bacteria into Fuel: Cyanobacteria Designed for Solar-Powered Highly Efficient Production of Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: ASU is engineering a type of photosynthetic bacteria that efficiently produce fatty acids—a fuel precursor for biofuels. This type of bacteria, called Synechocystis, is already good at converting solar energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) into a type of fatty acid called lauric acid. ASU has modified the organism so it continuously converts sunlight and CO2 into fatty acids—overriding its natural tendency to use solar energy solely for cell growth and maximizing the solar-to-fuel conversion process. ASU’s approach is different because most biofuels research focuses on increasing cellular biomass and not on excreting fatty acids. The project has also identified a unique way to convert the harvested lauric acid into a fuel that can be easily blended with existing transportation fuels.

  17. Picture of the Week: Gamma-ray bursts, infographic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Gamma-ray bursts: infographic Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful explosions in the universe. With the help of sophisticated instruments such as the ground based RAPTOR...

  18. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bio-Fuel at Farms

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Clean Technologies and Sustainable Industries Early College High School in Ballston Spa, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME...

  19. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: A History of Bio-Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Clean Technologies and Sustainable Industries Early College High School in Ballston Spa, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME...

  20. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: One Man's Yardwaste is Another Man's Energy (BioHydrogen)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Nikola Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, WA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  1. Turning Bacteria into Biofuel: Development of an Integrated Microbial Electrocatalytic (MEC) System for Liquid Biofuel Production from CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrofuels Project: LBNL is improving the natural ability of a common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to use hydrogen and carbon dioxide for biofuel production. First, LBNL is genetically modifying the bacteria to produce biofuel at higher concentrations. Then, LBNL is using renewable electricity obtained from solar, wind, or wave power to produce high amounts of hydrogen in the presence of the bacteria—increasing the organism’s access to its energy source and improving the efficiency of the biofuel-creation process. Finally, LBNL is tethering electrocatalysts to the bacteria’s surface which will further accelerate the rate at which the organism creates biofuel. LBNL is also developing a chemical method to transform the biofuel that the bacteria produce into ready-to-use jet fuel.

  2. From Data Snore, to Data Score: Communicating Library Assessment Data Visually through Infographics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    will discuss different types of infographics, how academic libraries are using them, and tools and tipsFrom Data Snore, to Data Score: Communicating Library Assessment Data Visually through Infographics Cassi Pretlow, cassi.pretlow@ucdenver.edu, Auraria Library, Denver Introduction

  3. America's Clean Efficient Fleets: An Infographic | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJune 17,Agenda Agenda Agenda4 Image: Infographic by Hantz Leger

  4. INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe SolarContaminationCurrentHydronic71INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in

  5. Infographic: Where in Space is the Energy Department? | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment andJuneJobsInfographic

  6. The Facts on Gas Prices: Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTest for PumpingThe Facts on Gas Prices: Infographic The Facts

  7. U.S. Virgin Islands Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTestFeedEnergy Navy MoanaluaDepartment of4:Infographic U.S.

  8. Infographic Guide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment andJuneJobs

  9. Photo Galleries | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    KBK to the Trade San Antonio's City Lights program America's Clean Efficient Fleets: An Infographic Turning Bacteria into Fuel 2012 ARPA-E Technology Showcase LED Lighting on the...

  10. biosemiotics turning wild

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markos, Anton

    biosemiotics turning wild essays in honour of kalevi kull on the occasion of his 60th birthday #12;Biosemiotics Turning Wild. Essays in Honour of Kalevi Kull on the Occasion of His 60th Birthday. Edited by Timo

  11. Turn Hoang Nguyen

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of polycyclic natural products by Turn Hoang Nguyen A dissertation submitted to the graduate faculty in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF...

  12. Diamond turning of glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  13. Turning fungus into fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence may be key to "fast magneticTurn Your

  14. Bioelectricity Aware of bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    (translation by Google Translate) Bacteria of the genus Geobacter and electrical nanowires. #12;Bioelectricity Aware of bacteria Bacteria of the genus Geobacter carry out anaerobic respiration the mechanism that makes these bacteria conductors of electricity. Researchers have studied

  15. Tune Evaluation From Phased BPM Turn-By-Turn Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexahin, Y; Marsh, W

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In fast ramping synchrotrons like the Fermilab Booster the conventional methods of betatron tune evaluation from the turn-by-turn data may not work due to rapid changes of the tunes (sometimes in a course of a few dozens of turns) and a high level of noise. We propose a technique based on phasing of signals from a large number of BPMs which significantly increases the signal to noise ratio. Implementation of the method in the Fermilab Booster control system is described and some measurement results are presented.

  16. Tune Evaluation From Phased BPM Turn-By-Turn Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Marsh, W.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In fast ramping synchrotrons like the Fermilab Booster the conventional methods of betatron tune evaluation from the turn-by-turn data may not work due to rapid changes of the tunes (sometimes in a course of a few dozens of turns) and a high level of noise. We propose a technique based on phasing of signals from a large number of BPMs which significantly increases the signal to noise ratio. Implementation of the method in the Fermilab Booster control system is described and some measurement results are presented.

  17. Infographic Guide - Print Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment andJuneJobs

  18. Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinkel, J.A.; Biggs, J.E.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector has been developed to facilitate the location of shorted turns in magnet coils. Finding these shorted turns is necessary to determine failure modes that are a necessary step in developing future production techniques. Up to this point, coils with shorted turns had the insulation burned off without the fault having been located. This disassembly process destroyed any chance of being able to find the fault. In order to maintain a flux balance in a coupled system such as a magnet coil, the current in a shorted turn must be opposed to the incident current. If the direction of the current in each conductor can be measured relative to the incident current, then the exact location of the short can be determined. In this device, an AC voltage is applied to the magnet under test. A small hand held B-dot pickup coil monitors the magnetic field produced by current in the individual magnet conductors. The relative phase of this pickup coil voltage is compared to a reference signal derived from the input current to detect a current reversal as the B-dot pickup coil is swept over the conductors of the coil under test. This technique however, is limited to only those conductors that are accessible to the hand held probe.

  19. Turning greenhouse gases into gold

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence may be key to "fast magneticTurn YourTurning

  20. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  1. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  2. Diamond turning machine controller implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrard, K.P.; Taylor, L.W.; Knight, B.F.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard controller for a Pnuemo ASG 2500 Diamond Turning Machine, an Allen Bradley 8200, has been replaced with a custom high-performance design. This controller consists of four major components. Axis position feedback information is provided by a Zygo Axiom 2/20 laser interferometer with 0.1 micro-inch resolution. Hardware interface logic couples the computers digital and analog I/O channels to the diamond turning machine`s analog motor controllers, the laser interferometer, and other machine status and control information. It also provides front panel switches for operator override of the computer controller and implement the emergency stop sequence. The remaining two components, the control computer hardware and software, are discussed in detail below.

  3. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  4. TurningPoint Evaluation Results

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation WorkDecember 28, 2004 PartTurning on the Fan

  5. Bacteria TMDL Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the projects are listed below. ? Peach CreekWater Quality Improvement Project ? Monitoring and Educational Programs Focused on Bacteria and Nutrient Runoff on Dairy Operations in the LeonWatershed ? Development of the Plum CreekWPP ? Impact of Proper... Star Healthy Streams * ? Environmental Management of Grazing Lands * *TWRI-managed projects More information on the initiative is available at www.tsswcb.state.tx.us/managementprogram/ initiatives/bacteria. Bacteria Projects Across the State...

  6. Bacteria TMDL Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of TMDL projects for water bodies where swimming or wading may be unsafe or harvesting of oysters is limited or prohibited due to high concentrations of bacteria. ? Atascosa River: A TMDL Project for Bacteria ? Buffalo andWhite Oak Bayous: A TMDL...

  7. Bacteria to the Rescue | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bacteria to the Rescue Bacteria to the Rescue Released: December 05, 2011 High-performance computing adds speed, clarity to uranium bioremediation research Isosurfaces for aqueous...

  8. Bacteria in shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteria are ubiquitous and play a critical role in many contexts. Their environment is nearly always dynamic due to the prevalence of fluid flow: creeping flow in soil, highly sheared flow in bodily conduits, and turbulent ...

  9. Glowing Bacteria: Transformation Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    1 Glowing Bacteria: Transformation Efficiency Purpose: To determine how well your E. coli cells took up and expressed GFP after transformation. Background: Transformation efficiency is a quantitative)______ (Fraction of DNA spread on plate) = ______ µg plasmid DNA spread on plate #12;2 5. Transformation efficiency

  10. EGS Infographic | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJulySavannah

  11. FORGE Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager6-OPAM FLASH2011-16-OPAMTuesday,FORD FORD FORD FORDFORGE

  12. EGS Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of98-F, Western22,EERE Solar SunShotAbsorption Spectroscopy Probe

  13. Infographic Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOEthe RankingReform atSolar2014Information Resources

  14. Collaborative Unit Construction in Korean: Pivot Turns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, Hee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. (1996). Practices in the construction of turns: the ‘TCU’Scheutz, H. (2005). Pivot constructions in spoken German. InM. (2000). The construction of units in conversational talk.

  15. Right Turn on Red! | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    benefits for the country, helping us all save money by saving energy. Prior to the 1970's, some states already allowed drivers to turn right on a red light, but many others -...

  16. HEADLAND TURNING CONTROL METHOD SIMULATION OF AUTONOMOUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagasaka et al., 2004). This method could minimize the headland space but makes steering controlHEADLAND TURNING CONTROL METHOD SIMULATION OF AUTONOMOUS AGRICULTRUAL MACHINE BASED ON IMPROVED PURE PURSUIT MODEL Peichen Huang1 , Xiwen Luo 2,* , Zhigang Zhang 3 Key Laboratory of Key Technology

  17. Turning waste into energy beats landfilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Turning waste into energy beats landfilling By Christopher Hume The Hamilton Spectator (Nov 16, the fact remains that dumping garbage in a landfill site is far more environmentally destructive, damaging wrong with that picture: it describes landfill, where spontaneous combustion occurs regularly

  18. The Buck Institute Turned to Geothermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Buck Institute Turned to Geothermal Heating and Cooling for Significant Savings on Energy with the goal of sustaining the healthy years of life... #12;Geothermal Exchange #12;§ Cooling Tower: One. Other Challenges to the Original Central Plant: #12;The geothermal well field replaces the cooling tower

  19. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Turning Ideas into Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Turning Ideas into Reality EnErgy Environ m Ent HEaltH mat Overview The Courses Mechanical Engineering (MEng / BEng) Mechanical Engineering With International Study (MEng / BEng) Aero-Mechanical Engineering (MEng / BEng) E N T r y F A Q S A p p l y i n g C a m p u

  20. Mechanical Engineering Turning Ideas into Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Mechanical Engineering Turning Ideas into Reality EnErgy Environ m Ent HEaltH matEria ls transpo rt u r s e s ? Home The Department Overview The Courses Mechanical Engineering (MEng / BEng) Mechanical Engineering With International Study (MEng / BEng) Aero-Mechanical Engineering (MEng / BEng) #12;tHE DEpartm

  1. Can entropy save bacteria?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suckjoon Jun

    2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a physical biology approach to understanding organization and segregation of bacterial chromosomes. The author uses a "piston" analogy for bacterial chromosomes in a cell, which leads to a phase diagram for the organization of two athermal chains confined in a closed geometry characterized by two length scales (length and width). When applied to rod-shaped bacteria such as Escherichia coli, this phase diagram predicts that, despite strong confinement, duplicated chromosomes will demix, i.e., there exists a primordial physical driving force for chromosome segregation. The author discusses segregation of duplicating chromosomes using the concentric-shell model, which predicts that newly synthesized DNA will be found in the periphery of the chromosome during replication. In contrast to chromosomes, these results suggest that most plasmids will be randomly distributed inside the cell because of their small sizes. An active partitioning system is therefore required for accurate segregation of low-copy number plasmids. Implications of these results are also sketched, e.g., on the role of proteins, segregation mechanisms for bacteria of diverse shapes, cell cycle of an artificial cell, and evolution.

  2. TSSWCB Bacteria-Related Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the projects are listed below. ? Peach CreekWater Quality Improvement Project ? Monitoring and Educational Programs Focused on Bacteria and Nutrient Runoff on Dairy Operations in the LeonWatershed ? Development of the Plum CreekWPP ? Impact of Proper... Star Healthy Streams * ? Environmental Management of Grazing Lands * *TWRI-managed projects More information on the initiative is available at www.tsswcb.state.tx.us/managementprogram/ initiatives/bacteria. Bacteria Projects Across the State...

  3. Measurement of tool forces in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drescher, J.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamometer has been designed and built to measure forces in diamond turning. The design includes a 3-component, piezoelectric transducer. Initial experiments with this dynamometer system included verification of its predicted dynamic characteristics as well as a detailed study of cutting parameters. Many cutting experiments have been conducted on OFHC Copper and 6061-T6 Aluminum. Tests have involved investigation of velocity effects, and the effects of depth and feedrate on tool forces. Velocity has been determined to have negligible effects between 4 and 21 m/s. Forces generally increase with increasing depth of cut. Increasing feedrate does not necessarily lead to higher forces. Results suggest that a simple model may not be sufficient to describe the forces produced in the diamond turning process.

  4. ARM - VAP Product - 10rlprofdep1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap DocumentationProductsmwravg DocumentationProductstoacessrlprofdep1turn Documentation Data

  5. ARM - VAP Product - 10rlprofmr1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap DocumentationProductsmwravg DocumentationProductstoacessrlprofdep1turn Documentation

  6. Ecosystem Component Characterization "Things don't turn up in this world until somebody turns them up."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    CHAPTER 6 Ecosystem Component Characterization "Things don't turn up in this world until somebody turns them up." James A. Garfield CONTENTS Overview

  7. TSSWCB Bacteria-Related Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of TMDL projects for water bodies where swimming or wading may be unsafe or harvesting of oysters is limited or prohibited due to high concentrations of bacteria. ? Atascosa River: A TMDL Project for Bacteria ? Buffalo andWhite Oak Bayous: A TMDL...

  8. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling for Bacteria in Wells E-126 11/01 Water samples for bacteria tests must always be col- lected in a sterile container. The procedure for collect- ing a water sample is as follows: 1. Obtain a sterile container from a Health Department...

  9. Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Will County, Illinois officials yesterday formally broke ground on a new $7 million project (that includes $1 million of Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant funds) to turn methane gas from the Prairie View Landfill into electricity in a partnership with Waste Management. Will County will receive revenue from the sale of the gas created from decomposing garbage which will be harnessed and converted to generate 4.8 megawatts of green electrical power and used to power up to 8,000 homes. The future revenue generated from the sale of the gas and the sale of the electricity could reach $1 million annually.

  10. Turning Grass into Gas for Less

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Zand Analysis UtilitiesTurbulenceTurning

  11. Solar Decathlon Turns Ten | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of Energy Ready,SmartEnergy Opening Ceremony andTurns

  12. DOE Turns 25 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office of theNuclearNanotechnologies HighAnnounces PlansTurns

  13. Turn Motors Off When Not in Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|IndustrialCenterMarch 4; RSVP byof Energy TurbinesTurn Motors

  14. ARM - VAP Product - 10srlprofmr1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative AbsorptionARMsrlprofmr1turn Documentation Data Management Facility

  15. Evaluation of machining dispersions for turning process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnaud Lefebvre; Valery Wolff

    2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we propose to extend the model of simulation of dispersions in turning based on the geometrical specifications. Our study is articulated around two trends of development: the first trend relates to the geometrical model. The geometrical model suggested must allow a follow-up of the geometry of the part during the simulation of machining. It is thus a question of carrying out a systematic treatment of the whole dimensioning and tolerancing process while being based on the principles of the \\DeltaL method. We also planned to integrate this type of specification in the model of simulation of machining suggested. It is more generally a question of extending the traditional model for better taking into account the multi axis specification of coaxiality and perpendicularity on the turned workpieces. The second trend of our study relates to the widening of the field of application of the model. We propose to extend the field of application of the model by taking into account the modifications of several parameters of the manufacturing process plans, likely to involve variations of dispersions.

  16. Engineering Biofuels from Photosynthetic Bacteria | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Biofuels from Photosynthetic Bacteria Technology available for licensing: Using photosynthetic bacteria to produce biofuels. 30-70% of the fuel's waste can be used to...

  17. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling for Bacteria in Wells E-126 11/01 Water samples for bacteria tests must always be col- lected in a sterile container. The procedure for collect- ing a water sample is as follows: 1. Obtain a sterile container from a Health Department... immediately after collecting water sample. Refrigerate the sample and transport it to the laborato- ry (in an ice chest) as soon after collection as possible (six hours is best, but up to 30 hours). Many labs will not accept bacteria samples on Friday so check...

  18. Efficient photoassociation with a slowly-turned-on and rapidly-turned-off laser field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Wei; Huang Yin; Xie Ting; Wang Gaoren; Cong Shulin [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical scheme used for investigating the formation of ultracold molecules via photoassociation with a slowly-turned-on and rapidly-turned-off (STRT) laser pulse, with Cs{sub 2} as an example. As compared with an unshaped laser pulse, this kind of shaped laser pulse has a prominent advantage by which we can prevent the associated molecules from returning to the initial scattering state. Numerical calculations show that an efficient photoassociation can be realized with the STRT laser pulse, which is available in the current experiment as an optical tool.

  19. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  20. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  1. Electrodeposited coatings for diamond turning applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, A.; Bramlett, R.D.; Day, R.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Evans, C.J.; Polvani, R.S. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrodeposited coatings are attractive for precision machining operations because thick coatings can be economically applied, with good adhesion, to a variety of substrates. Approximately 20 pure metals and a large number of alloys can be deposited from aqueous solutions. Fused salt and organic solvent electrolytes can be used to lengthen the list of metals that can be electrodeposited. However, both the choice of the metallic coating and the control of the plating process are critical for success in precision finishing of electrodeposited coatings. Some preliminary results at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory suggest that electrodeposited nickel-phosphorus alloys are excellent coatings for single point diamond turning from the standpoint of material properties and low tool wear. Electrodeposited aluminum and aluminum alloy coatings also merit consideration for precision finishing where weight is an important factor. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Geobiology of marine magnetotactic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Sheri Lynn

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) biomineralize intracellular membrane-bound crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4), and are abundant in the suboxic to anoxic zones of stratified marine environments worldwide. Their ...

  3. USATODAY.com -Bacteria-powered battery runs on a sweet tooth Page 1 Close|EMAIL THIS|SAVE THIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    |SAVE THIS Bacteria-powered battery runs on a sweet tooth By Elizabeth Weise USA TODAY Scientists at the University in carbohydrates and turn them into electricity. Previous research has shown it is possible to use microbes to turn organic matter into electricity, but the process required the use of added materials to shuttle

  4. "Turn-Key" Open Source Software Solutions for Energy Management...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Turn-Key" Open Source Software Solutions for Energy Management of Small to Medium Sized Buildings (DE-FOA-0000822) "Turn-Key" Open Source Software Solutions for Energy Management...

  5. WHEN THE BLUE-GREEN WATERS TURN RED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WHEN THE BLUE-GREEN WATERS TURN RED Historical Flooding in Havasu Creek, Arizona U.S. GEOLOGICAL OF RECLAMATION #12;WHEN THE BLUE-GREEN WATERS TURN RED Historical Flooding in Havasu Creek, Arizona By THEODORE S

  6. Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing the Clean Energy Game Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing the Clean Energy Game February...

  7. Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free April 13, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What activity wastes...

  8. Modeling the Capacity of Left-Turn and Through Movement Considering Left-Turn Blockage and Spillback at Signalized Intersection with Short Left-Turn Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Kyoung Min

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    of grade separation that can do as much as signals do (Roess, Prassas, and McShane, 2004). Left-turns are the most difficult and complex procedures to deal with at a signalized intersection. There are several different ways of left- turns. Different... of the intersection according to several elements such as left-turning and opposing volume related to traffic operation(Roess et al., 2004). Roger et al. suggested general guidelines for selecting more suitable left-turn sequence in each intersection with various...

  9. Turning on the Fan and Turning off the A/C | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation WorkDecember 28, 2004 PartTurning on the Fan

  10. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  11. Observation on growth of bacteria 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    5.16 Proposed copolymer from iptycene and fluorene............... 133 Figure 5.17 Perfluoropropylene trimers............................... 137 Figure 5.18 (a) Absorbance of 13 encapsulated in silica nanoparticles in solid state and (b... permeability, intracelular compartmentalization and photostability has made it dificult to extend the applications of probes from mamalian cels to plant cels, bacteria and yeast. 8 A careful examination of probe design with respect to their biocompatibility...

  12. Local prediction of turning points of oscillating time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Kugiumtzis

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    For oscillating time series, the prediction is often focused on the turning points. In order to predict the turning point magnitudes and times it is proposed to form the state space reconstruction only from the turning points and modify the local (nearest neighbor) model accordingly. The model on turning points gives optimal prediction at a lower dimensional state space than the optimal local model applied directly on the oscillating time series and is thus computationally more efficient. Monte Carlo simulations on different oscillating nonlinear systems showed that it gives better predictions of turning points and this is confirmed also for the time series of annual sunspots and total stress in a plastic deformation experiment.

  13. Turning Back Time: The Application of Predictive Technology to Big Data 1 Turning Back Time: The Application of Predictive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oard, Doug

    " to lower the cost of discovery in litigation [1]. This technology aims to reduce costs in a number of legal effective it can be in reducing litigation costs. For example that it is a very expensive technology usefulTurning Back Time: The Application of Predictive Technology to Big Data 1 Turning Back Time

  14. Diamond turning of Si and Ge single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, P.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-point diamond turning studies have been completed on Si and Ge crystals. A new process model was developed for diamond turning which is based on a critical depth of cut for plastic flow-to-brittle fracture transitions. This concept, when combined with the actual machining geometry for single-point turning, predicts that {open_quotes}ductile{close_quotes} machining is a combined action of plasticity and fracture. Interrupted cutting experiments also provide a meant to directly measure the critical depth parameter for given machining conditions.

  15. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  16. Electroless nickel: an important coating for diamond turning applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.

    1980-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Diamond turning is the use of a single-point diamond tool on a precision lathe under very precisely controlled machine and environmental conditions to fabricate finished components. With a machine presently available at LLNL a part accuracy between 0.05 and 1.0 ..mu..m (2 and 40 millionths of an inch) is obtainable. Coatings offer significant advantages for diamond turning applications inasmuch as they can be applied to lightweight substrates such as aluminum or beryllium. One of the most used coatings for diamond turning applications is electroless nickel. Purpose of this paper is to document case histories of such applications and suggest areas for future work.

  17. Liquid Fuel From Bacteria: Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from CO2, Hydrogen, and Oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrofuels Project: MIT is using solar-derived hydrogen and common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) directly into biofuel. This bacteria already has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. MIT is engineering the bacteria to use hydrogen to convert CO2 directly into liquid transportation fuels. Hydrogen is a flammable gas, so the MIT team is building an innovative reactor system that will safely house the bacteria and gas mixture during the fuel-creation process. The system will pump in precise mixtures of hydrogen, oxygen, and CO2, and the online fuel-recovery system will continuously capture and remove the biofuel product.

  18. The aesthetic turn in the face of nihilism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Benjamin Taylor

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis outlines one's overcoming of nihilism by consulting two figures, Martin Heidegger and John Dewey. Each thinker holds a pivotal role for art, such that, a turn to the aesthetic allows the individual to overcome this nihilistic age. I...

  19. INFOGRAPHIC: Understanding the Grid | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    can I participate? Send us your questions about how the grid works using GridWeek on Facebook, Twitter and Google+. Join the GridWeek Twitter chat on Thursday, November 20 at 2PM...

  20. INFOGRAPHIC: Understanding the Grid | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPowerHome| DepartmentPumpHomeof Energy

  1. INFOGRAPHIC: Wide Bandgap Semiconductors | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral TestimonyEnergyFinding U.INDIANAPOLISINFOGRAPHIC:

  2. geothermal infographic 7.14.2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of Bad Cholesterol

  3. INFOGRAPHIC: Offshore Wind Outlook | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37EnergySubmit ait'sII. GENERALOffshore Wind

  4. Property:InfographicType | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to: navigation,ProjectStartDate JumpAuth3LinkTechMin Jump to:4-County

  5. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartmentWind Siting ArticlesAugustBETO Monthly

  6. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biomass: Types/Characteristics |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYearAviBEopt Version

  7. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYearAviBEopt VersionEnergyCorn

  8. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYearAviBEoptEnergy (BioHydrogen)

  9. INFOGRAPHIC: Wide Bandgap Semiconductors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND DTechnologiesFindingThe Road to

  10. Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

  11. Spectroscopic diagnostics for bacteria in biologic sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A. (Atlanta, GA); El-Sayed, Ivan H. (Somerville, MA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to analyze and diagnose specific bacteria in a biologic sample using spectroscopy is disclosed. The method includes obtaining the spectra of a biologic sample of a non-infected patient for use as a reference, subtracting the reference from the spectra of an infected sample, and comparing the fingerprint regions of the resulting differential spectrum with reference spectra of bacteria in saline. Using this diagnostic technique, specific bacteria can be identified sooner and without culturing, bacteria-specific antibiotics can be prescribed sooner, resulting in decreased likelihood of antibiotic resistance and an overall reduction of medical costs.

  12. Managing Bacteria Pollution in Texas Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 2 BACTERIA MANAGING tx H2O | pg. 3 IN TEXAS WATERS POLLUTION Managing Bacteria Pollution in Texas Waters tx H2O | pg. 4 W ith 310 water bodies in Texas failing to meetwater quality standards because... of bacteria,managing bacteria pollution is commanding the attention of water agencies, researchers and stake- holders across Texas. These water bodies are listed in the 2006 Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for failing to meet the standards...

  13. Managing Bacteria Pollution in Texas Waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 2 BACTERIA MANAGING tx H2O | pg. 3 IN TEXAS WATERS POLLUTION Managing Bacteria Pollution in Texas Waters tx H2O | pg. 4 W ith 310 water bodies in Texas failing to meetwater quality standards because... of bacteria,managing bacteria pollution is commanding the attention of water agencies, researchers and stake- holders across Texas. These water bodies are listed in the 2006 Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for failing to meet the standards...

  14. Systematic characterization of protein glycosylation of bacteria...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bacteria cell Insoluble fraction Glycoprotein Enrichment Integrated top-down and bottom-up Glycoprotein & Glycopeptide Step 1: Glycoproteome profile Glycans HILIC-FTICR-MSMS...

  15. Beating bacteria: Scientists work to understand and track bacteria in water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 11 Story by Kathy Wythe Bacteria Task Force Recommendations Acknowledging the enormity of the bacteria problem within the state, in September 2006, TCEQ and the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board (TSSWCB...) established a joint Task Force on Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) to make recommenda- tions to strengthen the agencies? efforts in cleaning up bacteria- contaminated waters. Dr. Allan Jones, formerly of the Texas Water Resources Institute...

  16. Aggregation Patterns in Stressed Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsimring, L.; Levine, H. [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0402 (United States)] [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0402 (United States); Aranson, I. [Deptartment of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan (Israel)] [Deptartment of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan (Israel); Ben-Jacob, E.; Cohen, I.; Shochet, O. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond & Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond & Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Reynolds, W.N. [Complex Systems Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico (United States)] [Complex Systems Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico (United States)

    1995-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation of spot patterns seen in bacterial colonies when the bacteria are subjected to oxidative stress due to hazardous by-products of respiration. The cell density is coupled to a chemoattractant concentration as well as to nutrient and waste fields. The model combines the propagation of a front of motile bacterial radially outward from an initial site, a Turing instability of the uniformly dense state, and a reduction of motility for cells sufficiently far behind the front. The wide variety of patterns seen in the experiments is reproduced by the model by varying the details of the initiation of the chemoattractant emission as well as the transition to a nonmotile phase.

  17. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  18. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. The isolated consortia and bacteria are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. The isolated consortia, bacteria, and dispersants are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  19. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  20. Copyright 2009 IBM Global Business Services Turning Green into Gold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright 2009 IBM Global Business Services 1 Turning Green into Gold Are Supply Chain Cost: In a market characterized by volatile energy costs and other rising supply chain costs, cost containment IBM survey, a majority of Supply Chain Executives identified cost containment as a continuing

  1. Being Interactive oogle's popularity has turned link analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Being Interactive Deep Web Structure G oogle's popularity has turned link analysis into a major the user has specialized information needs. DeepWeb Our current understanding of Web structure is based the so-called surface Web, which consists, loosely speaking, of interlinked HTML pages. The deep Web

  2. Microbes turn mud into electricity By Paula Hartman Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    compounds, such as toluene, to electricity. Lovley says this suggests that some Geobacters can be usedMicrobes turn mud into electricity By Paula Hartman Cohen News Office staff microorganisms can transform organic matter commonly found at the bottom of the ocean into electrical energy

  3. Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure Filling and Maintaining Compost Georgia://ceps.georgiasouthern.edu/garden This brochure is funded in part by a grant from a Museums for America Grant. Types of Composting Bins To fill your compost bin, alternate brown and green materials. Keep in mind that the ideal ratio is three

  4. Hydrogen (H2) Production by Anoxygenic Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Anoxygenic Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria Hydrogen (H2) Production by Anoxygenic Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria Presentation by Jake McKinlay, Indiana University, at the Biological Hydrogen...

  5. How plants beckon bacteria that do it harm | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plants beckon bacteria that do it harm How plants beckon bacteria that do it harm Released: April 28, 2014 Work on microbial signaling offers better biofuels, human health...

  6. Motility fractionation of bacteria by centrifugation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Maggi; Alessia Lepore; Jacopo Solari; Alessandro Rizzo; Roberto Di Leonardo

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Centrifugation is a widespread laboratory technique used to separate mixtures into fractions characterized by a specific size, weight or density. We demonstrate that centrifugation can be also used to separate swimming cells having different motility. To do this we study self-propelled bacteria under the influence of an external centrifugal field. Using dynamic image correlation spectroscopy we measure the spatially resolved motility of bacteria after centrifugation. A significant gradient in swimming-speeds is observed for increasing centrifugal speeds. Our results can be reproduced by a model that treats bacteria as "hot" colloidal particles having a diffusion coefficient that depends on the swimming speed.

  7. Fuel from Bacteria: Bioconversion of Carbon Dioxide to Biofuels by Facultatively Autotrophic Hydrogen Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrofuels Project: Ohio State is genetically modifying bacteria to efficiently convert carbon dioxide directly into butanol, an alcohol that can be used directly as a fuel blend or converted to a hydrocarbon, which closely resembles a gasoline. Bacteria are typically capable of producing a certain amount of butanol before it becomes too toxic for the bacteria to survive. Ohio State is engineering a new strain of the bacteria that could produce up to 50% more butanol before it becomes too toxic for the bacteria to survive. Finding a way to produce more butanol more efficiently would significantly cut down on biofuel production costs and help make butanol cost competitive with gasoline. Ohio State is also engineering large tanks, or bioreactors, to grow the biofuel-producing bacteria in, and they are developing ways to efficiently recover biofuel from the tanks.

  8. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.; Sorokin, A.; Mirkin, B.; Koonin, E.; Pavlov, A.; Pavlova, N.; Karamychev, V.; Polouchine, N.; Shakhova, V.; Grigoriev, I.; Lou, Y.; Rokhsar, D.; Lucas, S.; Huang, K.; Goodstein, D. M.; Hawkins, T.; Plengvidhya, V.; Welker, D.; Hughes, J.; Goh, Y.; Benson, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lee, J.-H.; Diaz-Muniz, I.; Dosti, B.; Smeianov, V,; Wechter, W.; Barabote, R.; Lorca, G.; Altermann, E.; Barrangou, R.; Ganesan, B.; Xie, Y.; Rawsthorne, H.; Tamir, D.; Parker, C.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Hutkins, R.; O'Sullivan, D.; Steele, J.; Unlu, G.; Saier, M.; Klaenhammer, T.; Richardson, P.; Kozyavkin, S.; Weimer, B.; Mills, D.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive gene loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats.

  9. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution.

  10. Probiotic Bacteria Induce a ‘Glow of Health’

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levkovich, Tatiana

    Radiant skin and hair are universally recognized as indications of good health. However, this ‘glow of health’ display remains poorly understood. We found that feeding of probiotic bacteria to aged mice induced integumentary ...

  11. Agencies Approve Bacteria TMDL Task Force Recommendations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 10 In June 2007 the Texas Commission onEnvironmental Quality (TCEQ) and the TexasState Soil and Water Conservation Board (TSSW- CB) approved the recommendations of the Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Task Force and asked... their agencies to update their TMDL guidance documents to reflect these recommendations. They also authorized establishing a multi-agency bacteria TMDL work group to examine the research and development needs identified in the task force report. Both TCEQ...

  12. Analysis of the influence of tool dynamics in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, S.C.; Luttrell, D.E.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the progress in defining the role of machine and interface dynamics on the surface finish in diamond turning. It contains a review of literature from conventional and diamond machining processes relating tool dynamics, material interactions and tool wear to surface finish. Data from experimental measurements of tool/work piece interface dynamics are presented as well as machine dynamics for the DTM at the Center.

  13. Use of diamond-turned mirrors for synchrotron radiation (SR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howells, M.R.; Takacs, P.Z.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The diamond turning technique has great interest for users of synchrotron radiation because of its ability to produce surfaces of arbitrary shape. It also has the advantage of being well adapted to producing metal optics. These are of interest because they lend themselves to water cooling and hence represent one approach to the problem of high synchrotron radiation power loadings on optical surfaces. The optical figure produced by diamond turning is generally adequate for synchrotron radiation applications. The main difficulty centers around the question of smoothness. Diamond turned surfaces must receive a final polish after machining before they are sufficiently smooth for use with ultra-violet or x-ray radiation. The manufacturing stages can be carried out by various groups in the optics industry and the National Synchrotron Light Source has procured a considerable number of mirrors and is having them polished for use on the vuv storage ring. At the time of writing one mirror has been completed and evaluated and we give the results for this and discuss the indications for the future. The important measurement of the r.m.s. height of the surface roughness has given a value of 3 +- 0.9A using total integrated scatter of visible light at normal incidence.

  14. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants comprising the steps of placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container, placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours, retrieving the container, collecting the contents of the container, and microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to inoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  15. When to Turn Off Your Lights | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sureReportsofDepartmentSeries |Attacksof EnergyWhen to Turn Off Your

  16. TurningPoint Evaluation Results | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon theTedRegion | Department ofAugust 14,Turning on the Fan

  17. Turn Motors Off When Not in Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTest forTechnologiesTribal UtilityFebruary 12,Turkish-U.S.Turn

  18. Directions to Gebbie Speech-Language Hearing Clinic From the Main SU Campus: Go south on Comstock Ave (toward Manley Field House). Turn left onto Colvin St. Turn right

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    . Turn right at the next light onto Brighton Avenue. Go to Route 11 and turn right onto Salina St. Go

  19. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    general es de entre $8.00 y $25.00. La bacteria de hierro es otro contaminante que forma lama muy obvia dentro de los tubos y los grifos. No se necesita un an?lisis de laboratorio para identificarla. Busque una lama color caf? o rojiza dentro del tanque...

  20. Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hospodsky, Denina

    Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study ...

  1. Hypermutation and adaptation of experimentally evolved marine Vibrio bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Sean Aidan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental bacteria display tremendous genetic diversity, but we are still learning how this diversity arises and relates to their wide range of habitats. Investigating how bacteria adapt helps us understand their ...

  2. Guidelines for left-turn bays at unsignalized access locations on arterial roadways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawley, Patrick Emmett

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has long been recognized that effective access management along arterial streets can alleviate traffic congestion. A major goal within access management is to limit the speed differential between turning and through vehicles. Left-turn bays...

  3. Using the Oxygen Plasma Machine 1. Turn on the O2 (g) valve on the wall.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using the Oxygen Plasma Machine 1. Turn on the O2 (g) valve on the wall. 2. Turn on the O2 inlet valve on the front of the machine just a tiny-bit ­ O2 should now be leaking through the black, chamber-right of the machine), just the Red Power Switch. 6. Turn off the O2 valve on the chamber door. At the same time, turn

  4. Turn Scanning 133 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 168: Protein Structure, Stability, and Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, Jay

    Turn Scanning 133 133 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 168: Protein Structure, Stability, and Folding Edited by: K. P. Murphy © Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 7 Turn Scanning: Experimental extended structures. Here we present the use of turn scanning as an experimental method for assessing

  5. Bacteria-Mineral Interactions on the Surfaces of Metal-Resistant Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malkin, A J

    2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The extraordinary ability of indigenous microorganisms, like metal-resistant bacteria, for biotransformation of toxic compounds is of considerable interest for the emerging area of environmental bioremediation. However, the underlying mechanisms by which metal-resistant bacteria transform toxic compounds are currently unknown and await elucidation. The project's objective was to study stress-induced responses of metal-resistant bacteria to environmental changes and chemical stimulants. This project involved a multi-institutional collaboration of our LLNL group with the group of Dr. H.-Y. Holman (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). In this project, we have utilized metal-resistant bacteria Arthrobacter oxydans as a model bacterial system. We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize for the first time at the nanometer scale formation of stress-induced structures on bacterial surfaces in response to Cr (VI) exposure. We have demonstrated that structure, assembly, and composition of these stress-induced structures are dependent on Cr (VI) concentrations. Our AFM observations of the appearance and development of stress-induced layers on the surfaces of Arthrobacter oxydans bacteria exposed to Cr (VI) were confirmed by Dr. Holman's biochemical, electron microscopy, and synchrotron infrared spectromicroscopy studies. In general, in vitro imaging of live microbial and cellular systems represents one of the most challenging issues in application of AFM. Various approaches for immobilization of bacteria on the substrate for in vitro imaging were tested in this project. Imaging of live bacteria was achieved, however further optimization of experimental methods are needed for high-resolution visualization of the cellular environmental structural dynamics by AFM. This project enhanced the current insight into molecular architecture, structural and environmental variability of bacterial systems. The project partially funded research for two book chapters (1,2), and we anticipate one more publication (3). The publications describe development of methods and results of studies of structural dynamics of metal-resistant bacteria that contribute to more comprehensive understanding of the architecture, function, and environmental dynamics of bacterial and cellular systems. The results of this LDRD were presented in invited talks and contributed presentations at five national and international conferences and five seminar presentations at the external institutions. These included invited talks at the conferences of Gordon Research, Materials Research and American Chemical Societies. Our scientific results and methodologies developed in this project enabled us to receive new funding for the multiyear project 'Chromium transformation pathways in metal-reducing bacteria' funded by the University of California Lab Fees Program ($500,000, 5/1/09 - 4/30/2012), with our proposal being ranked 1st from a total of 138 in the Earth, Energy, Environmental & Space Sciences panel.

  6. Predictions of flow and heat transfer in sharp 180-deg turns of gas turbine coolant channels with and without turning vanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonhoff, B.; Leusch, J.; Johnson, B.V.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical study was conducted to determine the effects of turning vanes on the flow characteristics, the pressure drop and the heat transfer distribution in the turn region of two-legged, coolant passages for application to cooling gas turbine blades. The channels consisted of two straight, square-sectioned legs connected by a 180-deg. turn, with an inner radius of 0.15 hydraulic diameters. The ribs were square-sectioned with a height of 0.1 D{sub h}, staggered between leading and trailing side and at an angle of 45-deg. to the flow. Three different configurations of the coolant channel were investigated: with smooth walls, with ribs on two walls and no vane and with ribs on two walls and a 180-deg guide vane in the turn. For all calculations, the Reynolds number at the inlet was Re{sub D} = 100,000, the fluid was water and buoyancy effects were neglected. The simulations were made for rotation numbers, Ro = 0.0 and 0.15. The flow and heat transfer simulations were made with the FLUENT structured code. Based on the results of several previous studies, the differential-Reynolds-Stress turbulence model with wall functions was used. The highest heat transfer in the turn was obtained for both the rotating and non-rotating cases with the ribbed channel without the guide vane. The pressure loss was also higher without the vane. Due to the staggering of the ribs, secondary flow and heat transfer in the turn was higher on the side of the channel where the last rib at the entrance reaches further into the turn. With increasing rotation number, the secondary flow and heat transfer increased on the leading side of the turn. For the configuration with a 180-deg. vane, the mass flux at the outer side of the vane increased with increasing rotation number.

  7. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wise, Arlene A. (Philadelphia, PA); Kuske, Cheryl R. (Los Alamos, NM); Terwilliger, Thomas C. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  8. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  9. Leachability of salmonella and fecal pollution indicator bacteria through soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehrmann, Robert Clinton

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors controlling bs. cterial movement Movement of Salmonella in soils MATERIALS AND METHODS Soil ana1ysis Inoculum preparation Soil column preparation Bacterial adsorption to soil particles Ei'fects of different salts on the leaching of bacteria... Distribution of bacteria in soil columns Bacterial saturation of soils Break through curves Enumeration of bacteria Bacterial size 1. 4 17 17 18 18 1 9 19 20 Field studies Statistics RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 20 21 22 Filter selection...

  10. Efficiency of static core turn-off in a system-on-a-chip with variation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cher, Chen-Yong; Coteus, Paul W; Gara, Alan; Kursun, Eren; Paulsen, David P; Schuelke, Brian A; Sheets, II, John E; Tian, Shurong

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A processor-implemented method for improving efficiency of a static core turn-off in a multi-core processor with variation, the method comprising: conducting via a simulation a turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's design stage, wherein the turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's design stage includes a first output corresponding to a first multi-core processor core to turn off; conducting a turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's testing stage, wherein the turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's testing stage includes a second output corresponding to a second multi-core processor core to turn off; comparing the first output and the second output to determine if the first output is referring to the same core to turn off as the second output; outputting a third output corresponding to the first multi-core processor core if the first output and the second output are both referring to the same core to turn off.

  11. Microsoft Word - PR-24-13-BPA-turns-science-educators-visions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BPA turns science educators' visions into reality with grants From purchasing energy robotic kits to providing funds for the construction of small scale hydropower generators,...

  12. DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civilian Reactors | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People...

  13. acid bacteria revisited: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: The Fate of Amino Acid in Soil Experiments: Bacteria, Roots and Fungi Melissa Campbell Clark of amino acid in soil using radioactive isotopes, however many experiments...

  14. acid bacteria elicit: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: The Fate of Amino Acid in Soil Experiments: Bacteria, Roots and Fungi Melissa Campbell Clark of amino acid in soil using radioactive isotopes, however many experiments...

  15. acid bacteria affect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: The Fate of Amino Acid in Soil Experiments: Bacteria, Roots and Fungi Melissa Campbell Clark of amino acid in soil using radioactive isotopes, however many experiments...

  16. acid bacteria structure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: The Fate of Amino Acid in Soil Experiments: Bacteria, Roots and Fungi Melissa Campbell Clark of amino acid in soil using radioactive isotopes, however many experiments...

  17. acid bacteria inducing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: The Fate of Amino Acid in Soil Experiments: Bacteria, Roots and Fungi Melissa Campbell Clark of amino acid in soil using radioactive isotopes, however many experiments...

  18. acid bacteria purification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: The Fate of Amino Acid in Soil Experiments: Bacteria, Roots and Fungi Melissa Campbell Clark of amino acid in soil using radioactive isotopes, however many experiments...

  19. acid bacteria enhance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de 4 The Fate of Amino Acid in Soil Experiments: Bacteria, Roots and Fungi Melissa Campbell Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: The Fate of Amino Acid in...

  20. Transfer of noncoding DNA drives regulatory rewiring in bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Yaara

    Understanding the mechanisms that generate variation is a common pursuit unifying the life sciences. Bacteria represent an especially striking puzzle, because closely related strains possess radically different metabolic ...

  1. Cytotoxic Cells Kill Intracellular Bacteria through Granulysin-Mediated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchhausen, Tomas

    , cytotoxic granules also contain granulysin, an antimicrobial peptide. Here, we show that granulysin delivers (ROS) that rapidly kill bacteria. ROS scavengers and bac- terial antioxidant protein overexpression

  2. acid bacteria reveals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diversity and characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in groundwater at a uranium mill tailings site CiteSeer Summary: plays a role in both natural attenuation and...

  3. anaerobic phototrophic bacteria: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bacteria convert organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide (a mixture called biogas) in the absence of air. It is a widely used biological process for treating wastewater...

  4. Energy conversion in Purple Bacteria Photosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felipe Caycedo-Soler; Ferney J. Rodriguez; Luis Quiroga; Guannan Zhao; Neil F. Johnson

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of how photosynthetic organisms convert light offers insight not only into nature's evolutionary process, but may also give clues as to how best to design and manipulate artificial photosynthetic systems -- and also how far we can drive natural photosynthetic systems beyond normal operating conditions, so that they can harvest energy for us under otherwise extreme conditions. In addition to its interest from a basic scientific perspective, therefore, the goal to develop a deep quantitative understanding of photosynthesis offers the potential payoff of enhancing our current arsenal of alternative energy sources for the future. In the following Chapter, we consider the trade-off between dynamics, structure and function of light harvesting membranes in Rps. Photometricum purple bacteria, as a model to highlight the priorities that arise when photosynthetic organisms adapt to deal with the ever-changing natural environment conditions.

  5. Energy conversion in Purple Bacteria Photosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Quiroga, Luis; Zhao, Guannan; Johnson, Neil F

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of how photosynthetic organisms convert light offers insight not only into nature's evolutionary process, but may also give clues as to how best to design and manipulate artificial photosynthetic systems -- and also how far we can drive natural photosynthetic systems beyond normal operating conditions, so that they can harvest energy for us under otherwise extreme conditions. In addition to its interest from a basic scientific perspective, therefore, the goal to develop a deep quantitative understanding of photosynthesis offers the potential payoff of enhancing our current arsenal of alternative energy sources for the future. In the following Chapter, we consider the trade-off between dynamics, structure and function of light harvesting membranes in Rps. Photometricum purple bacteria, as a model to highlight the priorities that arise when photosynthetic organisms adapt to deal with the ever-changing natural environment conditions.

  6. mexico city at the turn of the twentieth century I Speak of the City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    mexico city at the turn of the twentieth century I Speak of the City m a u r i c i o t e n o r i o of History The University of Chicago In this dazzling multidisciplinary tour of Mexico City, Mauricio Tenorio epidemiology to poetry, this book challenges the conventional wisdom about both Mexico City and the turn

  7. A Reconfigurable Motor for Experimental Emulation of Stator Winding Inter-Turn and Broken Bar Faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Povinelli, Richard J.

    A Reconfigurable Motor for Experimental Emulation of Stator Winding Inter-Turn and Broken Bar emulation of stator winding inter-turn and broken rotor bar faults, are presented in this paper such as stator windings or rotor bars when acquiring data from a knWi dinL lar Bearit faulty machine for fault

  8. CAPACITY AT SIGNALIZED INTERSECTION APPROACH WITH A SHORT RIGHT-TURN LANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Zong Z.

    blockage to the short right-turn lane. The proposed model provides enhancements to the current Highway to the short-lane section, the capacity of the approach is reduced. The current HCM procedure wouldCAPACITY AT SIGNALIZED INTERSECTION APPROACH WITH A SHORT RIGHT-TURN LANE Zong Z. Tian Associate

  9. Haptic Models of an Automotive Turn-Signal Switch: Identification and Playback Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollerbach, John M.

    Haptic Models of an Automotive Turn-Signal Switch: Identification and Playback Results Mark B of virtual environments. This paper addresses the problem of modeling the feel of an automotive turn- signal would require accurate models of the primary automotive controls, including the steering wheel, gear

  10. "MINE YOUR OWN BUSINESS": USING PROCESS MINING TO TURN BIG DATA INTO REAL VALUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Aalst, Wil

    "MINE YOUR OWN BUSINESS": USING PROCESS MINING TO TURN BIG DATA INTO REAL VALUE Van der Aalst, Wil is to turn event data into valuable insights. Only process mining techniques directly relate event data-oriented analysis techniques (e.g., data mining and machines learning) typically focus on simple classification

  11. Magnetic minerals produced by magnetotactic bacteria Balzs Arat1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Magnetic minerals produced by magnetotactic bacteria Balázs Arató1 , Mihály Pósfai1 and Rafal E-controlled mineralization Abstract. Magnetotactic bacteria produce intracellular magnetic minerals that have distinct for studying the biological membrane around the mineral grains. Our goals were to deduce the possible growth

  12. Characteristics of cyclic AMP transport by marine bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, J.W.; Azam, F.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uptake and autoradiography experiments with natural populations of marine bacteria, sea water cultures, and cultured isolates showed that the high-affinity cyclic AMP transport system in marine bacteria has stringent structural requirements, is found in a minority of cells in mixed bacterial assemblages, and appears to be related to the culture growth state.

  13. Method of separating bacteria from free living amoebae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  14. Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

  15. The Stabilisation Potential of Individual and Mixed Assemblages of Natural Bacteria and Microalgae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Stabilisation Potential of Individual and Mixed Assemblages of Natural Bacteria and Microalgae components (heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic microalgae) in terms of their individual contribution benthic assemblages (prokaryotic, eukaryotic and mixed cultures) of bacteria and microalgae. Mag

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - abundant culturable bacteria Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Culturable bacteria in Summary: BGD 3, 765-778, 2006 Culturable bacteria in Himalayan ice S. Zhang et al. Title Page Abstract... Biogeosciences Discussions is the access...

  17. Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load Task Force Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, C. Allan; Wagner, Kevin; Di Giovanni, George; Hauck, Larry; Mott, Joanna; Rifai, Hanadi; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Ward, George; Wythe, Kathy

    for TMDL and Watershed Studies at Virginia Tech (http://www.tmdl.bse.vt.edu/outreach/C85/). Bacteria Indicator Tool (BIT) Another MB tool is the BIT provided by EPA (http://www.epa.gov/waterscience/ftp/basins/system/BASINS3/bit.htm). The BIT is a... spreadsheet that can be used to estimate the monthly accumulation rate of fecal coliform bacteria on four land uses (cropland, forested, built-up and pastureland). The tool also estimates the direct input of fecal coliform bacteria to streams from grazing...

  18. Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program March 16,...

  19. Winning Team Announced for 2015 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    during the social media campaign. The runners up were also announced: First runner up: "Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow" by a team from Smithtown High School East in St....

  20. Cities Leading Through Energy Analysis and Planning Infographic |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. Feedstock &EnergyDepartment of Energy Cities

  1. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  2. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Landscaping | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas Energy Incentive Programs,EnergyAugustPublicEnergyEnergy

  3. Energy Saver 101: Water Heating Infographic | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen| DepartmentTrackingSeptemberSpace heating

  4. INFOGRAPHIC | Made in America: Clean Energy Jobs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P.Department of Energy InternetHydrogenApril 30,

  5. INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P.Department of Energy InternetHydrogenApril 30,Learn how6

  6. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Cooling | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:researchEmergingPartnershipBio-Inspired Solar

  7. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Map | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-Oil DeploymentCombustion

  8. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:WhetherNovember 13, 2009OakDepartmentBill McMillan - ORNL BioenergizeME

  9. Cities Leading Through Energy Analysis and Planning Infographic |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSSDepartmentDepartment of EnergyDataDepartment

  10. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Energy Audits | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPowerHome | DocumentsElements ofin LogEnergyEnergy

  11. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Heating | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPowerHome | DocumentsElements ofin

  12. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Landscaping | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  13. Energy Saver 101: Home Cooling Infographic | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  14. INFOGRAPHIC: Everything You Need to Know About Supercomputers | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  15. INFOGRAPHIC: The Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle | Department of Energy

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  16. Picture of the Week: Gamma-ray bursts, infographic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. Infographic: Where in Space is the Energy Department? | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  18. America's Clean, Efficient Fleets: An Infographic | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA Newsletters 20103-03EnergyAlternative DisputeAmbitious

  19. Solar Decathlon 2013 Infographic: The Path to a Brighter Future |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  20. Spring 2015 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Rubric | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  1. INFOGRAPHIC: The Road to Fuel Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37EnergySubmit ait'sII. GENERALOffshore WindThe

  2. Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  3. Understanding Energy Use in Cities Infographic | Department of Energy

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  4. INFOGRAPHIC | Made in America: Clean Energy Jobs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  5. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  6. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  7. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Winners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartmentWindConversion Biochemical Conversion ThisBioenergizeME

  8. Understanding Energy Use in Cities Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads into FuelDEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS |4,ofDevelopment |n

  9. Picture of the Week: Gamma-ray bursts, infographic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics Our sciencePhysics53 Fuel

  10. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Energy Audits | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclearand Characterization ofCDecember 12, 2014 Energy SecretaryUSTheNew

  11. Energy Saver 101: Home Cooling Infographic | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclearand Characterization ofCDecember 12, 2014 EnergyhighlightsWhile

  12. INFOGRAPHIC | Made in America: Clean Energy Jobs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe SolarContaminationCurrentHydronic71 IAINDEPENDENT

  13. INFOGRAPHIC: Everything You Need to Know About Supercomputers | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe SolarContaminationCurrentHydronic71 IAINDEPENDENTof Energy

  14. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Energy Audits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |in STEMEnergyI.ofTrack(CHP) WhiteSupporting Jobs

  15. BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Map | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplicationCommittee | DepartmentDesignBiodiesel Fuel2015 FlyerMap

  16. INFOGRAPHIC: The Road to Fuel Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 at IowaSecretary Chu SecretaryRemarksDepartmentPhotoToMira,INDEXThis

  17. INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 at IowaSecretary Chu SecretaryRemarksDepartmentPhotoToMira,INDEXThisThis

  18. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: A "Biomassive" Innovation: Fueling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYearAviBEopt Version 2.0:Life in

  19. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYearAviBEopt Version 2.0:Life

  20. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biosolids to Biofuels | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYearAviBEopt VersionEnergy

  1. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYearAviBEopt

  2. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: One Man's Yardwaste is Another Man's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYearAviBEoptEnergy (BioHydrogen) |

  3. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Travel to the Future with Bioenergy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYearAviBEoptEnergy

  4. Beating bacteria: Scientists work to understand and track bacteria in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Tier 2. Tier 2 is a one- to two-year effort with the follow- ing steps: 1) Collect targeted monitoring data to fill gaps in previously collected data 2) Conduct qualitative library-independent BST and limited library-dependent BST analysis... to determine whether humans and/or a few major classes of animals are sources 3) Develop simple spatially explicit or mass balance models of bacteria in the watershed 4) Analyze data After analysis of Tier 1 and Tier 2 data, the group may chose...

  5. Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteria in molecular plant pathology.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Foster, G.D. (2012) The top 10 fungal pathogens in molecularBLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteriaC. and Foster, G.D. (2011) Top 10 plant viruses in molecular

  6. Bacteria mix it up at the microscopic level | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by 100-fold. A second surprise came when the researchers began to measure the viscosity of the fluid in which the bacteria swam. Viscosity measures how easily a fluid...

  7. Micro-scale interactions between chemotactic bacteria and algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahora, Nisha

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional views of marine environments describe the ocean pelagic zone as a homogeneous nutrient-poor environment. Heterotrophic marine bacteria that have evolved high-energy mechanisms for swimming abilities and sensing ...

  8. Argonne scientists use bacteria to power simple machines | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    use bacteria to power simple machines December 16, 2009 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and...

  9. Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load Task Force Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, C. Allan; Wagner, Kevin; Di Giovanni, George; Hauck, Larry; Mott, Joanna; Rifai, Hanadi; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Ward, George; Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2006, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board (TSSWCB) charged a seven-person Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Task Force with: * examining approaches...

  10. Bacteria recovered from endometritis and pyometra in the beef cow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikulec, Rashel Thi

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred and one uteri from beef cows with pyometra were collected from a slaughterhouse. Samples of uterine exudate were cultured for aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic bacteria, and also tested for Trichomonas spp. A section of uterine...

  11. Just How Fast Can Bacteria Grow? It Depends. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coli compared with E. coli that had been adapted for growth on either lactate or glycerol media. Bacteria are among the fastest reproducing organisms in the world, doubling every...

  12. Petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the Galveston Bay system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schropp, Steven James

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department) (Membge' ) I, (Member) December, 1979 ABSTRACT Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria in the Galveston Bay System {December 1979) Steven James Schropp: B. S. , Texas A&M University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. John R. Schwarz... about the distribution and abundance of petroleum hydrocarbon-degrad- ing bacteria in the Galveston Bay system. Several parts of the Galveston Bay system were sampled during this study. Petroleum input to the study area ranged from relatively small...

  13. Petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the Galveston Bay system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schropp, Steven James

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PETROLEUM HYDRQCARBOiV-DEGRADING BACTERIA IN THE GALVESTON BAY SYSTEM A Thesis by STEVEN JAMES SCHROPP Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIFNCE... December 1979 Major Subject: Biology PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA IN THE GALVESTON BAY SYSTEM A Thesis by STEVEN JAMES SCHROPP Approved as to style and content by: (Co-Chairman of Committee) '( ~CA. ( -Chairman of Committee) (Head...

  14. Leachability of salmonella and fecal pollution indicator bacteria through soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehrmann, Robert Clinton

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department (Member) / /. ' Member) August 1977 74M3- ABSTRACT Leachability of Salmonella and Fecal Pollution Indicator Bacteria through Soil. (August 1977) Robert Clinton Fehrmann, B. S. , Texas AM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr... microorganisms to be leached through soil, columns :ere filled with different soils and inoculs. ted with suspensions of fecal bacteria. Dif er ences in bacterial movement within a particular sni I, and bacterial movement between different types of soils...

  15. Diagnosis of Stator Winding Inter-Turn Shorts in Induction Motors Fed by PWM-Inverter Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Povinelli, Richard J.

    Diagnosis of Stator Winding Inter-Turn Shorts in Induction Motors Fed by PWM-Inverter Drive Systems Abstract---An effective technique for diagnosis of stator winding inter-turn shorts in induction motors fed diagnostics, on-line condition monitoring, stator winding inter-turn shorts, time series, space vector

  16. The effect of weaving maneuvers on operation of a free right-turn lane at ramp terminals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Minchul

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    -turn vehicles on a departure leg. If the ramp terminal is closely followed by the next downstream intersection, weaving maneuvers will occur since some vehicles make a right turn at the ramp terminal and make a left turn at the downstream intersection...

  17. The effect of weaving maneuvers on operation of a free right-turn lane at ramp terminals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Minchul

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    -turn vehicles on a departure leg. If the ramp terminal is closely followed by the next downstream intersection, weaving maneuvers will occur since some vehicles make a right turn at the ramp terminal and make a left turn at the downstream intersection...

  18. Beam-turning magnet design and test for the Recirculating Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crow, J.T. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Platt, R.C. (Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed and tested a system for applying a ramped vertical magnetic field for turning the electron beam in the IFR Recirculating Linear Accelerator. The field is highly uniform over two Gaussian beam radii, and can be adjusted for a large radial gradient for increased energy bandwidth. The system includes shielding of the current-carrying rods to protect the pulser from REB induced fields and to reduce the effect of REB images on the beam transport to negligible levels. The system has been tested on the IBEX accelerator with > 95% peak current transport and > 90% charge transport through a 90{degree} turn. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Corrections to Thomas-Fermi densities at turning points and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael F. Ribeiro; Donghyung Lee; Attila Cangi; Peter Elliott; Kieron Burke

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform semiclassical approximations for the number and kinetic-energy densities are derived for many non-interacting fermions in one-dimensional potentials with two turning points. The resulting simple, closed-form expressions contain the leading corrections to Thomas-Fermi theory, involve neither sums nor derivatives, are spatially uniform approximations, and are exceedingly accurate.

  20. A Study on Crosstalk Analysis in Aggregative Transmission Lines with Turning Vias Tapobrata Bandyopadhyay1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Madhavan

    A Study on Crosstalk Analysis in Aggregative Transmission Lines with Turning Vias Tapobrata and signal integrity in high-speed signal channels is extremely important. Transmission lines and vias transmission lines (4 mil width) of different lengths arranged in bundles. The eight transmission line bundles

  1. The dynamic cusp aurora on 30 November 1997: response to southward turning of the IMF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The dynamic cusp aurora on 30 November 1997: response to southward turning of the IMF P. E a Accepted: 26 January 1999 Abstract. We document the detailed dynamics of the dayside aurora in the $1200®cation of both the red (630.0 nm) and green (557.7 nm) line emissions in the cusp aurora near 1200 MLT and $100

  2. Turning The Web Into An Effective Knowledge Repository INESC-ID / IST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Paulo

    . This includes safely preserving static and dynamic content as well as performing stor- age managementTurning The Web Into An Effective Knowledge Repository Luis Veiga INESC-ID / IST Rua Alves Redol, 9 management, web proxy, detecting distributed cycles, distributed garbage collection. Abstract: To fulfill

  3. Estimated Savings from Turning Off Unnecessary Electrical Loads During Unoccupied Periods at the Langford Architecture Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soebarto, V. I.; Haberl, J. S.; Degelman, L. O.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in those studios during unoccupied hours. Turning off the lights on the third and fourth floor studios would reduce the electricity cost by $4,757 per year and the associated heating and cooling costs by an additional $583 for a total savings of $5...

  4. ON THE BIDIRECTIONALITY OF THE JWKB CONNECTION FORMULA AT A LINEAR TURNING POINT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverstone, Harris J.

    ON THE BIDIRECTIONALITY OF THE JWKB CONNECTION FORMULA AT A LINEAR TURNING POINT Hujun SHENa1) connection formula is demonstrated by a simple numerical example constructed from a linear potential and a box. Keywords: JWKB; Connection formula; Borel sum; Asymptotic expansion; Tunneling; Jeffreys

  5. Wind Energy in Indian Country: Turning to Wind for the Seventh Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Wind Energy in Indian Country: Turning to Wind for the Seventh Generation by Andrew D. Mills: ___________________________________________ Jane Stahlhut Date #12;Wind Energy in Indian Country A.D. Mills Abstract - ii - Abstract Utility-scale wind projects are increasingly being developed in rural areas of the United States. In the West

  6. DOCUMENTS TO BE TURNED IN AT THE SAME TIME AS ELECTRONIC THESIS/DISSERTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Laurence J.

    DOCUMENTS TO BE TURNED IN AT THE SAME TIME AS ELECTRONIC THESIS/DISSERTATION In addition to the submission of an acceptably formatted electronic thesis or dissertation (ETD), the following documents must in order for you to graduate in a given semester. Deadlines may be found at http://www.grad.gatech.edu/theses-dissertations

  7. Mimicry of Sharp Turning Behaviours in a Robotic Fish* Jindong Liu Huosheng Hu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    Mimicry of Sharp Turning Behaviours in a Robotic Fish* Jindong Liu Huosheng Hu Department is supported by London Aquarium Ltd. Abstract - In nature, fish has astonishing swimming ability after thousands years of evolution. To realise fish-like swimming behaviours by a robotic system poses tremendous

  8. Aortic Valve Turning Over a New Leaf(let) in Endothelial Phenotypic Heterogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Craig A.

    Aortic Valve Turning Over a New Leaf(let) in Endothelial Phenotypic Heterogeneity Peter F. Davies, Anthony G. Passerini, Craig A. Simmons A ortic valve diseases are debilitating cardiovascular disorders the longevity of replacement valves and to improve tissue engineered substitutes,1 the underlying mech- anisms

  9. MAGNETOSPHERIC RESPONSE TIMES FOLLOWING SOUTHWARD IMF TURNINGS N. E. Turner and D. N. Baker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    . Introduction Southward turnings of the IMF are known to initi- ate the transfer of energy from the solar wind, University of Colorado Boulder, CO T. I. Pulkkinen Finnish Meteorological Institute Helsinki, Finland H. J:2 minutes after the solar wind change reached the magnetopause and continued to recon g- ure forabout 13 min

  10. Road salt turning Twin Cities lakes into dead seas By JOSEPHINE MARCOTTY, Star Tribune

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Road salt turning Twin Cities lakes into dead seas By JOSEPHINE MARCOTTY, Star Tribune March 23 in lakes and streams around the Twin Cities -- road salt. The fish, bugs and other wildlife that live, a primary ingredient in salt, and what it will take to keep urban waters healthy. But the far more difficult

  11. Turning Relational DBMS into Nested Relational DBMS GeneticXchange, Inc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Limsoon

    Turning Relational DBMS into Nested Relational DBMS Jing Chen GeneticXchange, Inc chenjing previously been described [24, 23], the details of its interface to relational DBMS and other sources have never been published. In this paper, we describe the Kleisli's interface to relational DBMS

  12. Managing Chaos: Models of Turn-taking in Character-multichild Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    . ACM 978-1-4503-2129-7/13/12 ...$15.00. . exchanges are also desirable when humans talk with virtual-child interaction. 1. INTRODUCTION Turn-taking is an essential mechanism in human language interactions [19]. Our, an animated or robotic character has one overarching goal: to make play effective and fun. The character must

  13. Supplement to: Evidence of a possible turning point in solar UV-B over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Supplement to: Evidence of a possible turning point in solar UV-B over Canada, Europe and Japan C Observatory Lindenberg, German Meteorological Service, Germany [7] Climate Change Unit, Finnish Meteorological to ground-based AOD changes at 320nm at Thessaloniki (upper panel) and Lindenberg (lower panel). #12;Figure

  14. Energy-Saving Tips 1. Turn the radiator off when you are out.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    the windows. 4. Turn the heating down. As well as wasting energy, having your room too hot is bad for you your mobile phone charger at the wall when you are not using it. 16. Use energy efficient light bulbs the thermostat instead of reaching for a jumper 15% wash clothes at 90C Brits waste more energy than

  15. Abstract. Free-floating space manipulator systems have spacecraft actuators turned off and exhibit nonholonomic be-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadopoulos, Evangelos

    Abstract. Free-floating space manipulator systems have spacecraft actuators turned off and exhibit a specific system design so that the system is made controllable and linearizable by prolongations. Agrawal- Kostas Nanos is with the Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Greece

  16. Bacteria transport through porous media. Annual report, December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yen, T.F.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following five chapters in this report have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base: (1) theoretical model of convective diffusion of motile and non-motile bacteria toward solid surfaces; (2) interfacial electrochemistry of oxide surfaces in oil-bearing sands and sandstones; (3) effects of sodium pyrophosphate additive on the ''huff and puff''/nutrient flooding MEOR process; (4) interaction of Escherichia coli B, B/4, and bacteriophage T4D with Berea sandstone rock in relation to enhanced oil recovery; and (5) transport of bacteria in porous media and its significance in microbial enhanced oil recovery.

  17. Bacteria beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Brian Lanoil,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    Bacteria beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Brian Lanoil,1 * Mark Skidmore,1 John C. Priscu,2, particularly those that lie beneath polar ice sheets, are beginning to be recog- nized as an important part Vostok, Antarctica, no sub-ice sheet environments have been shown to support microbial ecosystems. Here

  18. Methods for targetted mutagenesis in gram-positive bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of targeted mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, the present invention provides a method that effectively integrates a suicide integrative vector into a target gene in the chromosome of a Gram-positive bacterium, resulting in inactivation of the target gene.

  19. Measurement of chlorite dismutase activities in perchlorate respiring bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concentration (0.6 mM) to four other perchlorate respiring bacteria (PRB), and to one non-PRB (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Chlorate-grown cultures of the five PRB strains had CD activities ranging from 25 to 50 U/mg of cell dry weight (DW), while aerobically grown cultures of the PRB had much lower CD activities (0.5­4 U

  20. Magnetic Torque of Microfabricated Elements and Magnetotactic Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Zondervan; Özlem Sardan Sukas; Islam S. M. Khalil; Marc P. Pichel; Sarthak Misra; Leon Abelmann

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a thorough theoretical analysis of the magnetic torque on microfabricated elements with dimensions in the range of 100 to 500 {\\mu}m and magneto-somes of magnetotactic bacteria of a few {\\mu}m length. We derive simple equations for field dependent torque and magnetic shape anisotropy that can be readily used to replace the crude approximations commonly used. We illustrate and verify the theory on microfabricated elements and magnetotactic bacteria, by field depedent torque magnetometry and by observing their rotation in water under application of a rotating magnetic field. The maximum rotation frequency of the largest microfabricated elements agrees within error boundaries with theory. For smaller, and especially thinner, elements the measured frequencies are a factor of three to four too low. We suspect this is caused by incomplete saturation of the magnetisation in the elements, which is not incorporated in our model. The maximum rotation frequency of magnetotactic bacteria agrees with our model within error margins, which are however quite big due to the large spread in bacteria morphology. The model presented provides a solid basis for the analysis of experiments with magnetic objects in liquid, which is for instance the case in the field of medical microrobotics.

  1. Films of bacteria at interfaces: three stages of behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liana Vaccari; Daniel Allan; Nima Sharifi-Mood; Aayush Singh; Robert Leheny; Kathleen Stebe

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacterial attachment to a fluid interface can lead to the formation of a film with physicochemical properties that evolve with time. We study the time evolution of interface (micro)mechanics for interfaces between oil and bacterial suspensions by following the motion of colloidal probes trapped by capillarity to determine the interface microrheology. Initially, active bacteria at and near the interface drive superdiffusive motion of the colloidal probes. Over timescales of minutes, the bacteria form a viscoelastic film which we discuss as a quasi-two-dimensional, active, glassy system. To study late stage mechanics of the film, we use pendant drop elastometry. The films, grown over tens of hours on oil drops, are expanded and compressed by changing the drop volume. For small strains, by modeling the films as 2D Hookean solids, we estimate the film elastic moduli, finding values similar to those reported in the literature for the bacteria themselves. For large strains, the films are highly hysteretic. Finally, from wrinkles formed on highly compressed drops, we estimate film bending energies. The dramatic restructuring of the interface by such robust films has broad implications, e.g. in the study of active colloids, in understanding the community dynamics of bacteria, and in applied settings including bioremediation.

  2. Method for establishing the presence of salmonella bacteria in eggs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of the acoustical resonances in eggs is shown to provide a rapid, noninvasive technique for establishing the presence of Salmonella bacteria. The technique is also sensitive to yolk puncture, shell cracks, and may be sensitive to other yolk properties and to egg freshness. Remote characterization, potentially useful for characterizing large numbers of eggs, has been demonstrated.

  3. Electroless vs electrodeposited Ni-P alloys for diamond turning applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes nickel deposits with greater than 10% phosphorous have been widely used for diamond turning applications such as fabrications of large optics and other high precision parts. Although the coatings have worked well, they are not without their drawbacks. Porosity and nodule formation have been problems as well as the difficulty of obtaining deposits greater than about 75 {mu}m. In recent years much effort has been directed at the investigating electrodeposition of Ni-P alloys in an attempt to avoid these problems. The purpose of this paper is to compare diamond turning results for both electroless and electrodeposited alloys and speculate about the future uses of electrodeposited Ni-P for precision finishing applications. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Turning a negative into a positive: Researchers find promising use for excessive nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Cristine Morgan, Texas AgriLife Research soil scientist, takes soil cores for nitrate analysis before the drip irrigation system was installed. Story by Kathy Wythe Turning a negative into a positive Researchers fi nd promising use... for excessive nitrate For 30 years, farmers in northwest central Texas have known that high level of nitrates in irrigation water from the Seymour Aquifer is a problem. Now, with research conducted by Texas AgriLife Research scientists, that problem may...

  5. Draft!07"18"2011! 1 Turning the Tide on Outages1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    !programs!of!replacement,!rehabilitation!and!new!investment!in!the! U.S.!infrastructure.! ! Focusing!on!the!electric!power!sector,!the!power!outages!whether!the!carrying!capacity!or!safety!margin!will!exist! to!support!anticipated!demand!is!in!question.! ! To!assess!impacts!using!actual!electric!power!outage! Draft!07"18"2011! 1 Turning the Tide on Outages1 What are the true costs of implementing

  6. Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    If you’ve ever driven by an industrial plant, you’ve probably noticed big white plumes rising from the tops of the facilities. While it might look like smoke or pollution at first glance, most of the time those white plumes are comprised of steam and heat, or what Ener-G-Rotors CEO Michael Newell calls waste heat. Mike and the researchers of Ener-G-Rotors are finding ways to use this escaped steam and turn it into energy.

  7. Turning a negative into a positive: Researchers find promising use for excessive nitrate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for excessive nitrate For 30 years, farmers in northwest central Texas have known that high level of nitrates in irrigation water from the Seymour Aquifer is a problem. Now, with research conducted by Texas AgriLife Research scientists, that problem may... turn into a benefit. Nitrate is the most common chemical con- taminant in groundwater. For the Seymour, a shallow aquifer underlying about 300,000 acres in 20 counties, more than 50 percent of groundwater nitrate measurements exceed the federal...

  8. Permitted Oxygen Abundances and the Temperature Scale of Metal-Poor Turn-Off Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Melendez; N. G. Shchukina; I. E. Vasiljeva; I. Ramirez

    2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We use high quality VLT/UVES published data of the permitted OI triplet and FeII lines to determine oxygen and iron abundances in unevolved (dwarfs, turn-off, subgiants) metal-poor halo stars. The calculations have been performed both in LTE and NLTE, employing effective temperatures obtained with the new infrared flux method (IRFM) temperature scale by Ramirez & Melendez, and surface gravities from Hipparcos parallaxes and theoretical isochrones. A new list of accurate transition probabilities for FeII lines, tied to the absolute scale defined by laboratory measurements, has been used. We find a plateau in the oxygen-to-iron ratio over more than two orders of magnitude in iron abundance (-3.2 < [Fe/H] < -0.7), with a mean [O/Fe] = 0.5 dex (sigma = 0.1 dex), independent of metallicity, temperature and surface gravity. According to the new IRFM Teff scale, the temperatures of turn-off halo stars strongly depend on metallicity, a result that is in excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement with stellar evolution calculations, which predict that the Teff of the turn-off at [Fe/H] = -3 is about 600-700 K higher than that at [Fe/H] = -1.

  9. Biofilms as sources of fecal bacteria contamination in the stormwater drainage system in Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burkhart, Tsung Hwa (Tsung Hwa Sophia)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed to examine a possible source of fecal bacteria contamination originating from within the stormwater drainage system in Singapore. The extent of fecal bacteria presence in storm drain biofilms was ...

  10. Development of Methodology and Characterization of Ruminal Lipase-Producing Bacteria In Vitro 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Holly Danielle

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    nutrients into ruminant produced foods. Three experiments were conducted to learn how to better enrich, isolate and study lipolytic bacteria from the rumen while providing further characterization of four prominent lipase-producing bacteria that are known...

  11. The Association of Virulent Vibrio Spp. Bacteria on Gafftopsail and Hardhead Catfish in Galveston Bay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Leslie Deanne

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) and V. parahaemolyticus (Vp) are gram negative, halophilic bacteria that occur naturally in estuarine waters of Galveston Bay. Both bacteria have the potential to cause infections in humans either via consumption or direct...

  12. Extremophilic iron-reducing bacteria: Their implications for possible life in extraterrestrial environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, J.; Liu, S.V.; Zhang, C.; Palumbo, A.V.; Phelps, T.J.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron reduction is believed to be an early form of respiration and iron-reducing bacteria might have evolved very early on Earth. To support this hypothesis, the authors began to search for both thermophilic and psychrophilic iron-reducing bacteria because iron-reducing capacity may be a widely distributed trait if ancestral microorganisms include extremophilic iron-reducing bacteria. To date, they have obtained thermophilic Fe(III)-reducing and magnetite-forming enrichment cultures from geologically and hydrologically isolated, millions of years-old deep terrestrial subsurface samples. Three dominant bacteria were identified based on 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Phylogenetical analysis indicated that these bacteria were closely related to Thermoanaerobacter ethanoliticus. Two pure thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria have been isolated and characterized from these enrichments, they also are able to degrade cellulose and xylan. Geological evidence indicated that these bacteria were separated from modern organisms for about 200 million years, and they are the oldest isolated bacteria available now. Evolutionary sequence analysis showed that the 16S rRNA genes evolved extremely slowly in these bacteria. In addition, the authors have obtained about 30 psychrophilic iron-reducing bacteria in samples from Siberia and Alaska permafrost soils, Pacific marine sediments and Hawaii deep sea water. These bacteria were also able to reduce other heavy metals. The isolation of both thermophilic and psychrophilic iron-reducing bacteria from surface and subsurface environments has significant implications for microbial evolution and for studying the origin of life in extraterrestrial environments.

  13. MCM LTER METADATA FILE TITLE: Bacteria enumeration in lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    with a five-liter Niskin bottle during normal LTER limnological sampling. Sub-samples for bacteria enumeration are decanted into a 1 L amber Nalgene bottle. 18 mL bacteria samples are pipetted from the amber Nalgene bottle into new 20 ml glass scintillation vials for each depth. Bacteria samples are preserved by adding 0.5 ml

  14. A Highly Selective Turn-On Colorimetric, Red Fluorescent Sensor for Detecting Mobile Zinc in Living Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Pingwu

    We describe ZRL1, a turn-on colorimetric and red fluorescent zinc ion sensor. The Zn2+-promoted ring opening of the rhodamine spirolactam ring in ZRL1 evokes a 220-fold fluorescence turn-on response. In aqueous media, ZRL1 ...

  15. PCR detection of groundwater bacteria associated with colloidal transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz-Perez, P.; Stetzenbach, L.D.; Alvarez, A.J.

    1996-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Colloidal transport may increase the amount of contaminant material than that which could be transported by water flow alone. The role of colloids in groundwater contaminant transport is complicated and may involve many different processes, including sorption of elements onto colloidal particles, coagulation/dissolution, adsorption onto solid surfaces, filtration, and migration. Bacteria are known to concentrate minerals and influence the transport of compounds in aqueous environments and may also serve as organic colloids, thereby influencing subsurface transport of radionuclides and other contaminants. The initial phase of the project consisted of assembling a list of bacteria capable of sequestering or facilitating mineral transport. The development and optimization of the PCR amplification assay for the detection of the organisms of interest, and the examination of regional groundwaters for those organisms, are presented for subsequent research.

  16. Methods for Engineering Sulfate Reducing Bacteria of the Genus Desulfovibrio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chhabra, Swapnil R; Keller, Kimberly L.; Wall, Judy D.

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfate reducing bacteria are physiologically important given their nearly ubiquitous presence and have important applications in the areas of bioremediation and bioenergy. This chapter provides details on the steps used for homologous-recombination mediated chromosomal manipulation of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a well-studied sulfate reducer. More specifically, we focus on the implementation of a 'parts' based approach for suicide vector assembly, important aspects of anaerobic culturing, choices for antibiotic selection, electroporation-based DNA transformation, as well as tools for screening and verifying genetically modified constructs. These methods, which in principle may be extended to other sulfate-reducing bacteria, are applicable for functional genomics investigations, as well as metabolic engineering manipulations.

  17. Development of combinatorial bacteria for metal and radionuclide bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. C. Matin, Ph. D.

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The grant concerned chromate [Cr(VI)] bioremediation and it was our aim from the outset to construct individual bacterial strains capable of improved bioremediation of multiple pollutants and to identify the enzymes suited to this end. Bacteria with superior capacity to remediate multiple pollutants can be an asset for the cleanup of DOE sites as they contain mixed waste. I describe below the progress made during the period of the current grant, providing appropriate context.

  18. Reduction of trichloroethylene in a model aquifer with methanotrophic bacteria 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Duane Dee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REDUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A MODEL AQUIFER WITH METHANOTROPHIC BACTERIA A Thesis by Duane Dee Hicks Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fullfillment of the requirements for thc degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Civil Engineering REDUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A MODEL AQUIFER WITH METHANOTROPHIC BACTEPslA A Thesis by Duane Dec Hicks Approved as to style and content by Bill Batchclor (Chair of Committee...

  19. Reduction of trichloroethylene in a model aquifer with methanotrophic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Duane Dee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Methane Mineralization by Methanotrophic Bacteria ? Enzyme Reactions are a) Methane Monooxygenase, b) Methanol Dehydrogenase, c) Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase, d) Formate Dchydrogenase (Adapted From Dalton and Leak, 1985) . . . . . 9 FIG. 4 Proposed..., which is less efficient. Type II obligate methanotrophs using the serine pathway have been the focus of most of the recent methanotrophic bacterial research. Leak et al. (1985) found that different species of methane utilizers not only differ...

  20. Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Haiyan [ORNL] [ORNL; Lin, Hui [ORNL] [ORNL; Zheng, Wang [ORNL] [ORNL; Tomanicek, Stephen J [ORNL] [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL] [ORNL; Feng, Xinbin [ORNL] [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury1-4. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury5. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally-relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings5, we show that Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can both oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. However, the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is only about one third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidise, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA is able to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

  1. Apparatus and method for the desulfurization of petroleum by bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lizama, H.M.; Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for treating petroleum with anaerobic microorganisms acting as biocatalysts that can remove sulfur atoms from hydrocarbon molecules, under anaerobic conditions, and then convert the sulfur atoms to hydrogen sulfide. The microorganisms utilized are from the family known as the ``Sulfate Reducing Bacteria``. These bacteria generate metabolic energy from the oxidation of organic compounds, but use oxidized forms of sulfur as an electron acceptor. Because the biocatalyst is present in the form of bacteria in an aqueous suspension, whereas the reacting substrate consists of hydrocarbon molecules in an organic phase, the actual desulfurization reaction takes place at the aqueous-organic interphase. To ensure adequate interfacial contacting and mass transfer, a biphasic electrostatic bioreactor system is utilized. The bioreactor is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the sulfur. High-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the sulfur to produce hydrogen sulfide which is then removed from the bioreactor. The organic liquid, now free of the sulfur, is ready for immediate use or further processing. 5 figs.

  2. Apparatus and method for the desulfurization of petroleum by bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lizama, Hector M. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating petroleum with anaerobic microorganisms acting as biocatalysts that can remove sulfur atoms from hydrocarbon molecules, under anaerobic conditions, and then convert the sulfur atoms to hydrogen sulfide. The microorganisms utilized are from the family known as the "Sulfate Reducing Bacteria." These bacteria generate metabolic energy from the oxidation of organic compounds, but use oxidized forms of sulfur as an electron acceptor. Because the biocatalyst is present in the form of bacteria in an aqueous suspension, whereas the reacting substrate consists of hydrocarbon molecules in an organic phase, the actual desulfurization reaction takes place at the aqueous-organic interphase. To ensure adequate interfacial contacting and mass transfer, a biphasic electrostatic bioreactor system is utilized. The bioreactor is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the sulfur. High-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the sulfur to produce hydrogen sulfide which is then removed from the bioreactor. The organic liquid, now free of the sulfur, is ready for immediate use or further processing.

  3. Degradation of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria by neutral oxygen atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cvelbar, U.; Mozetic, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Hauptman, N.; Klanjsek-Gunde, M. [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The degradation of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria during treatment with neutral oxygen atoms was monitored by scanning electron microscopy. Experiments were performed in an afterglow chamber made from borosilicate glass. The source of oxygen atoms was remote inductively coupled radiofrequency oxygen plasma. The density of atoms at the samples was 8x10{sup 20} m{sup -3}. The treatment was performed at room temperature. The first effect was the removal of dried capsule. Capsule on exposed parts of bacteria was removed after receiving the dose of 6x10{sup 23} at./m{sup 2}, while the parts of capsule filling the gaps between bacteria were removed after receiving the dose of 2.4x10{sup 24} m{sup -2}. After removing the capsule, degradation continued as etching of bacterial cell wall. The etching was rather nonuniform as holes with diameter of several 10 nm were observed. The cell wall was removed after receiving the dose of about 7x10{sup 24} m{sup -2}. The etching probabilities were about 2x10{sup -5} for the capsule and 2x10{sup -6} for the cell wall. The results were explained by different compositions of capsule and the cell wall.

  4. The effects of a fast-turning trajectory in multiple-field inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciej Konieczka; Raquel H. Ribeiro; Krzysztof Turzynski

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest results from PLANCK impose strong constraints on features in the spectrum of the curvature perturbations from inflation. We analyse the possibility of particle production induced by sharp turns of the trajectory in field space in inflation models with multiple fields. Although the evolution of the background fields can be altered by particle production, we find rather modest changes in the power spectrum even for the most extreme case in which the entire kinetic energy of the scalar fields is converted into particles.

  5. Modified Extraction Scheme for the CERN PS Multi-Turn Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilardoni, S; Hernalsteens, C; Lachaize, A; Métral, G

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-activation of the extraction magnetic septum of the CERN PS machine was observed due to the losses of the continuous beam extracted via the Multi-Turn Extraction (MTE) method. A possible mitigation measure consists of using an existing electrostatic septum, located upstream of the extraction magnetic septum, to deflect the beam. This would highly decrease the beam losses, and hence the induced activation, during the rise time of the MTE kickers due to the reduced thickness of the electrostatic septum with respect to the magnetic one. The layout of this new extraction will be described in detail and the results of beam measurements presented.

  6. Surface finish measurements of diamond-turned electroless-nickel-plated mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J.S.; Syn, C.K.; Saito, T.T.; Donaldson, R.R.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface roughness data are presented for a matrix of diamond-turned electroless nickel samples having a combination of six phosphorus contents and four heat treatments. Roughness measurements were conducted with commercial optical and stylus profilers (WYKO and Talystep). The results are discussed in terms of the material composition and heat treatment, plus other factors having an observed influence on the surface roughness. For the optimum material properties, full-length (665..mu..m) 20x WYKO scans yielded values of better than 10 A rms after correction for instrument roll-off.

  7. Surface finish measurements of diamond-turned electroless-nickel-plated mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J.S.; Syn, C.K.; Saito, T.T.; Donaldson, R.R.

    1985-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface roughness data are presented for a matrix of diamond-turned electroless-nickel samples having a combination of six phosphorous contents and four heat treatments. Roughness measurements were conducted with commercial optical and stylus profilometers (Wyko and Talystep). The results are discussed in terms of the material composition and heat treatment, plus other factors having an observed influence on the surface roughness. For the optimum material properties, full-length (665 ..mu..m) restored 20X Wyko scans yielded values of better than 10A rms.

  8. Uncle Sam Turns to SAM for Solar Modeling | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success|Sustainable EnergyMotorUncle Sam Turns to SAM for

  9. Turn Down the Temp, But Don't Let Your Pipes Freeze! | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation WorkDecember 28, 2004 Part IIIDepartmentTurn

  10. Turning the Manhattan Project into a National Park | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTest forTechnologiesTribal UtilityFebruaryTurning on the Fan

  11. Fuel from Bacteria, CO2, Water, and Solar Energy: Engineering a Bacterial Reverse Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrofuels Project: Harvard is engineering a self-contained, scalable Electrofuels production system that can directly generate liquid fuels from bacteria, carbon dioxide (CO2), water, and sunlight. Harvard is genetically engineering bacteria called Shewanella, so the bacteria can sit directly on electrical conductors and absorb electrical current. This current, which is powered by solar panels, gives the bacteria the energy they need to process CO2 into liquid fuels. The Harvard team pumps this CO2 into the system, in addition to water and other nutrients needed to grow the bacteria. Harvard is also engineering the bacteria to produce fuel molecules that have properties similar to gasoline or diesel fuel—making them easier to incorporate into the existing fuel infrastructure. These molecules are designed to spontaneously separate from the water-based culture that the bacteria live in and to be used directly as fuel without further chemical processing once they’re pumped out of the tank.

  12. Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian Zhi (Richland, WA); Sears, Jr., Jesse A. (Kennewick, WA); Hoyt, David W. (Richland, WA); Wind, Robert A. (Kennewick, WA)

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

  13. SNS 2.1K Cold Box Turn-down Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Casagrande; P.A. Gurd; D.R. Hatfield; M.P. Howell; W.H. Strong; D. Arenius; J. Creel; V. Ganni; P. Knudsen

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is nearing completion. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The 2.1K cold box consists of four stages of centrifugal compressors with LN2-cooled variable speed electric motors and magnetic bearings. The cryogenic system successfully supported the Linac beam commissioning at both 4.2K and 2.1K and has been fully operational since June 2005. This paper describes the control principles utilized and the experimental results obtained for the SNS cold compressors turn-down capability to about 30% of the design flow, and possible limitation of the frequency dependent power factor of the cold compressor electric motors, which was measured for the first time during commissioning. These results helped to support the operation of the Linac over a very broad and stable cold compressor operating flow range (refrigeration capacity) and pressure. This in turn helped to optimize the cryogenic system operating parameters, minimizing the utilities and improving the system reliability and availability.

  14. Design of diamond turned holograms by the nonlinear conjugate gradients method Colin Dankwart, Claas Falldorf and Jurgen Jahns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Design of diamond turned holograms by the nonlinear conjugate gradients method Colin Dankwart investigate a different optimization approach, the nonlinear conjugate gradients (NCG) method. The NGC method design algorithm, based on the generalized projections method (GPM) [?] was established, taking

  15. Turn-on fluorescence in tetraphenylethylene-based metal-organic frameworks: An alternative to aggregation-induced emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shustova, Natalia B.

    Coordinative immobilization of functionalized tetraphenylethylene within rigid porous metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) turns on fluorescence in the typically non-emissive tetraphenylethylene core. The matrix coordination-induced ...

  16. Design of an 8 GeV h transport and multi-turn injection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.E.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An 8 GeV superconducting linear accelerator (SCL) has been proposed as a single stage H{sup -} injector into the Main Injector (MI) synchrotron. This could be a multi-use facility which would, among other things, support a 2 MW Neutrino program at Fermi National Accelerator Lab (FNAL) [1,2,3,4]. This paper describes a solution for a transport line which is capable of low loss transmission of an H{sup -} beam from the linac to the MI, transverse and momentum collimation, and provides for flexible matching into the MI lattice. The required modifications to the MI accelerator complex to accommodate the transfer line and multi-turn injection utilizing carbon foil stripping (and/or potentially laser stripping) and the injection layout are discussed.

  17. PC and monitor night status: Power management enabling and manual turn-off

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordman, Bruce; Meier, Alan; Piette, Mary Ann

    1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    While office equipment accounts for about 7 percent of commercial building energy use, this reflects considerable energy savings from the use of automatic power management. Most of these savings were gained through the use of low-power modes that meet the criteria of the U.S. EPA's Energy Star program. Despite this success, there are large amounts of additional savings that could be gained if all equipment capable of power management use were enabled and functioning. A considerable portion of equipment is not enabled for power management at all, enabled only partially, or is enabled but prevented from functioning. Additional savings could be gained if more equipment were turned off at night manually. We compiled results from 17 studies from the office equipment literature addressing PCs and monitors. Some factors important for annual energy use, such as power levels, have been documented elsewhere and are not covered. We review methods for estimating office equipment use patterns and energy use, and present findings on night status--power management and manual turn-off rates. In early studies, PC power management was often found to function in 25 percent or less of the Energy Star compliant units (10 percent of all PCs). However, recent assessments have found higher rates, and we estimate that for Energy Star models, 35 percent of PC CPUs and 65 percent of PC monitors are enabled for power management. While the data lack statistical rigor, they can be used to estimate the magnitude of current and potential power management savings, which we did for major types of office equipment. The data also make clear that the topic of enabling rates, and the factors which influence them, deserve greater scrutiny.

  18. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: AVOIDING WRONG TURNS, ROACH MOTELS, AND BOX CANYONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. In this paper, we provide one example each of our judgments on what constitutes a box canyon, a roach motel, and a wrong turn: ? Wrong Turn: The Reliable Replacement Warhead ? Roach Motel: SRAM T vs the B61 ? A Possible Box Canyon: A Low-Yield Version of the W76 SLBM Warhead Recognizing that new nuclear missions or weapons are not demanded by current circumstances ? a development path that yields future capabilities similar to those of today, which are adequate if not always ideal, and a broader national-security strategy that supports nonproliferation and arms control by reducing the role for, and numbers, of nuclear weapons ? we briefly consider alternate, less desirable futures, and their possible effect on the complex problem of regional deterrence. In this regard, we discuss the issues posed by, and possible responses to, three example regional deterrence challenges: in-country defensive use of nuclear weapons by an adversary; reassurance of U.S. allies with limited strategic depth threatened by an emergent nuclear power; and extraterritorial, non-strategic offensive use of nuclear weapons by an adversary in support of limited military objectives against a U.S. ally.

  19. Hybrid optics for the visible produced by bulk casting of sol-gel glass using diamond-turned molds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernacki, B.E.; Miller, A.C.; Maxey, L.C.; Cunningham, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moreshead, W.V.; Nogues, J.L.R. [Geltech Inc., Alachua, FL (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent combinations of diffractive and refractive functions in the same optical component allow designers additional opportunities to make systems more compact and enhance performance. This paper describes a research program for fabricating hybrid refractive/diffractive components from diamond-turned molds using the bulk casting of sol-gel silica glass. The authors use the complementary dispersive nature of refractive and diffractive optics to render two-color correction in a single hybrid optical element. Since diamond turning has matured as a deterministic manufacturing technology, techniques previously suitable only in the infrared are now being applied to components used at visible wavelengths. Thus, the marriage of diamond turning and sol-gel processes offers a cost-effective method for producing highly customized and specialized optical components in high quality silica glass. With the sol-gel casting method of replication, diamond-turned mold costs can be shared over many pieces. Diamond turning takes advantage of all of the available degrees of freedom in a single hybrid optical element: aspheric surface to eliminate spherical aberration, kinoform surface for control of primary chromatic aberration, and the flexibility to place the kinoform on non-planar surfaces for maximum design flexibility. The authors discuss the critical issues involved in designing the hybrid element, single point diamond-turning the mold, and fabrication in glass using the sol-gel process.

  20. Process for generation of hydrogen gas from various feedstocks using thermophilic bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ooteghem, Suellen Van (Morgantown, WV)

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45.degree. C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

  1. Process for Generation of Hydrogen Gas from Various Feedstocks Using Thermophilic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooteghem Van, Suellen

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45 degrees C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

  2. Response of Prochlorococcus ecotypes to co-culture with diverse marine bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sher, Daniel

    Interactions between microorganisms shape microbial ecosystems. Systematic studies of mixed microbes in co-culture have revealed widespread potential for growth inhibition among marine heterotrophic bacteria, but similar ...

  3. Purple Bacteria Develops Its Own Form of Sunscreen | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Yellowstone National Park, is due to carotenoid molecules, produced by huge mats of algae and bacteria (Photo from http:en.wikipedia.orgwikiCarotenoid External link )...

  4. anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diversity and characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in groundwater at a uranium mill tailings site CiteSeer Summary: plays a role in both natural attenuation and...

  5. Local heat transfer distribution in a two-pass trapezoidal channel with a 180 [degree] turn via transient liquid crystal technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endley, Saurabh

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cross section. Attention is focused on the effect of the 180' turn on the local heat transfer distributions on the interior surfaces of the various walls at the turn, under turbulent flow conditions. Transient heat transfer experiments, using...

  6. When you turn on your faucet and fill a glass with water, you expect it to be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health and the quali- ty of your water. Some of these contaminants occur naturally, such as minerals. However, drinking water can contain gases, minerals, bacteria, metals or chemicals that can affect your of certain contaminants that can be pres- ent in public water supplies. These limits, or stan- dards, were

  7. Turning point temperature and competition between relativistic and ponderomotive effects in self-focusing of laser beam in plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari Milani, M. R. [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation characters of Gaussian laser beam in collisionless plasma are investigated by considering the ponderomotive and relativistic nonlinearities. The second-order differential equation of dimensionless beam width parameter is solved numerically, taking into account the effect of electron temperature. The results show that the ponderomotive force does not facilitate the relativistic self-focusing in all intensity ranges. In fact, there exists a certain intensity value that, if below this value, the ponderomotive nonlinearity can contribute to the relativistic self-focusing, or obstruct it, if above. It is also indicated that there is a temperature interval in which self-focusing can occur, while the beam diverges outside of this region. In addition, the results represent the existence of a “turning point temperature” in the mentioned interval that the self-focusing has the strongest power. The value of the turning point is dependent on laser intensity in which higher intensities result in higher turning point.

  8. Probing the outer edge of an accretion disk: A Her X-1 turn-on observed with RXTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kuster; J. Wilms; R. Staubert; W. A. Heindl; R. E. Rothschild; N. I. Shakura; K. A. Postnov

    2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the analysis of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the turn-on phase of a 35 day cycle of the X-ray binary Her X-1. During the early phases of the turn-on, the energy spectrum is composed of X-rays scattered into the line of sight plus heavily absorbed X-rays. The energy spectra in the 3-17 keV range can be described by a partial covering model, where one of the components is influenced by photoelectric absorption and Thomson scattering in cold material plus an iron emission line at 6.5 keV. In this paper we show the evolution of spectral parameters as well as the evolution of the pulse profile during the turn-on. We describe this evolution using Monte Carlo simulations which self-consistently describe the evolution of the X-ray pulse profile and of the energy spectrum.

  9. Fe-CYCLE BACTERIA FROM INDUSTRIAL CLAYS MINED IN GEORGIA, USA EVGENYA S. SHELOBOLINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Fe-CYCLE BACTERIA FROM INDUSTRIAL CLAYS MINED IN GEORGIA, USA EVGENYA S. SHELOBOLINA 1, *,{, SAM M are major discoloring impurities in mined commercial white kaolin clay. In order to evaluate the potential influence of Fe-cycle bacteria on Fe cycling during post- depositional clay-weathering alteration, Fe

  10. Clay enhancement of methane, low molecular weight hydrocarbon and halocarbon conversion by methanotrophic bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apel, William A.; Dugan, Patrick R.

    1995-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for increasing the rate of oxidation of toxic vapors by methanotrophic bacteria. The toxic vapors of interest are methane and trichloroethylene. The apparatus includes a gas phase bioreactor within a closed loop pumping system or a single pass system. The methanotrophic bacteria include Methylomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and uncharacterized environmental enrichments.

  11. Clay enhancement of methane, low molecular weight hydrocarbon and halocarbon conversion by methanotrophic bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apel, William A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Dugan, Patrick R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for increasing the rate of oxidation of toxic vapors by methanotrophic bacteria. The toxic vapors of interest are methane and trichloroethylene. The apparatus includes a gas phase bioreactor within a closed loop pumping system or a single pass system. The methanotrophic bacteria include Methylomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and uncharacterized environmental enrichments.

  12. Impact of carbon nanotubes on the ingestion and digestion of bacteria by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Impact of carbon nanotubes on the ingestion and digestion of bacteria by ciliated protozoa PARNIAN,4 by ecotoxicologists because of its role in the regulation of microbial populations through the ingestion and digestion to aggregate, which impedes their ability to ingest and digest their prey bacteria species, although it might

  13. What is the Role of Arsenite-Oxidising Bacteria in Dissolving Arsenic Minerals?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    What is the Role of Arsenite-Oxidising Bacteria in Dissolving Arsenic Minerals? Supervisors: Dr through dissolution of arsenic-bearing minerals. This process is mediated by bacteria, which can break down the mineral lattice by extracting nutrient elements such as potassium, or by causing redox changes

  14. Novel Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria at Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps Identified by Stable Isotope Probing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessions, Alex L.

    Novel Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria at Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps Identified by Stable Isotope Probing Running Title: Novel Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria Section incubating sediment with 13 C-labeled methane, ethane, or propane, we5 confirmed the incorporation of 13 C

  15. Design, testing and optimization of a microfluidic device for capture and concentration of bacteria 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherla, Srinivas

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ¢Â?Â?Critical Design ParametersâÂ?Â? and âÂ?Â?Design ConstraintsâÂ?Â?. Electrokinetic phenomena are used to exploit the surface charges on bacteria. Electrophoresis is used to transport the bacteria to electrode surface and âÂ?Â?Electrostatic trapping...

  16. Algal Research1 Screening and selection of growth-promoting bacteria for Dunaliella cultures2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and potential applications for microalgae, which include food,44 animal feed, healthcare, energy microalgae species and identified using 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis. The recovered bacteria were27 found38 accumulation in Dunaliella sp. cells.39 Keywords: Microalgae, Dunaliella, bacteria, interaction

  17. Chromatic acclimation and population dynamics of green sulfur bacteria grown with spectrally tailored light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saikin, Semion K; Huh, Joonsuk; Hannout, Moataz; Wang, Yaya; Zare, Farrokh; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Living organisms have to adjust to their surrounding in order to survive in stressful conditions. We study this mechanism in one of most primitive creatures - photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria. These bacteria absorb photons very efficiently using the chlorosome antenna complexes and perform photosynthesis in extreme low-light environments. How the chlorosomes in green sulfur bacteria are acclimated to the stressful light conditions, for instance, if the spectrum of light is not optimal for absorption, is unknown. Studying Chlorobaculum tepidum cultures with far-red to near-infrared light-emitting diodes, we found that these bacteria react to changes in energy flow by regulating the amount of light-absorbing pigments and the size of the chlorosomes. Surprisingly, our results indicate that the bacteria can survive in near-infrared lights capturing low-frequency photons by the intermediate units of the light-harvesting complex. The latter strategy may be used by the species recently found near hydrothermal ve...

  18. On The Use of Eddy Current Brakes as Tunable, Fast Turn-On Viscous Dampers For Haptic Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayward, Vincent

    On The Use of Eddy Current Brakes as Tunable, Fast Turn-On Viscous Dampers For Haptic Rendering, linear dampers for haptic rendering using a prototype haptic device outfitted with eddy current brakes discuss the results from haptic experiments for rendering viscosity, virtual walls and virtual friction

  19. Estimated Savings from Turning Off Unnecessary Lights at the Langford Architecture Center During the 1996 Christmas Holidays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soebarto, V. I.; Haberl, J. S.; Degelman, L. O.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lights been left on, the building would have consumed 100 kW more electricity every hour. The total electricity savings was about 31,200 kWh over 13 days, which is equivalent to a total cost saving of $936.00. If the College continues to turn off...

  20. Initial results using Eddy Current Brakes as Fast Turn-on, Programmable Physical Dampers for Haptic Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayward, Vincent

    Initial results using Eddy Current Brakes as Fast Turn-on, Programmable Physical Dampers for Haptic Machines McGill University, Montr´eal, Qu´ebec, Canada ABSTRACT We demonstrate the use of eddy current propose an alternate method to create damping in a haptic interface that uses eddy current brakes. 2 EDDY

  1. Wind turbines convert the kinetic energy in moving air into rotational energy, which in turn is converted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Wind turbines convert the kinetic energy in moving air into rotational energy, which in turn is converted to electricity. Since wind speeds vary from month to month and second to second, the amount of electricity wind can make varies constantly. Sometimes a wind turbine will make no power at all

  2. The Earth Institute, Columbia University12 annual donor report 2010 13 at the turn of the century, world leaders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Earth Institute, Columbia University12 annual donor report 2010 13 at the turn of the century-General Ban Ki-moon at the Earth Institute's State of the Planet Conference in March 2010. "They of humanity are at stake." The Millennium Villages project, a partnership between the Earth Institute

  3. Lubrication and Tool-wear in the Turning of Hard Powdered Metals By: Edward Chow and Anastasia Linuwih

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Lubrication and Tool-wear in the Turning of Hard Powdered Metals By: Edward Chow and Anastasia Linuwih Background A current target and need in the auto industry is to achieve improved tool life in machining powered metal valve seats for an engine block. The tools required are specialized and expensive

  4. County looks at turning waste ash into money Two companies using grant to investigate ways to recycle incinerator byproduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    in York County generates about 160,000 tons of ash per year, and attempts to dispose of it have caused Technology Inc. will seek to use the ash in synthetic stones called Brixx, which also re-use coal wasteCounty looks at turning waste ash into money Two companies using grant to investigate ways

  5. Journal of Materials Processing Technology 189 (2007) 192198 Modelling of surface finish and tool flank wear in turning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozel, Tugrul

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flank wear in turning of AISI D2 steel with ceramic wiper inserts Tugrul ¨Ozela,, Yigit Karpata, Lu (60 HRC) using ceramic wiper (multi-radii) design inserts. Multiple linear regression models. Experimental results indicate that surface roughness Ra values as low as 0.18­0.20 m are attainable with wiper

  6. VII Pillars Of Productivity Seven practices characterize highly productive companies turning them into 'digital organizations.' IT is the catalyst,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VII Pillars Of Productivity Seven practices characterize highly productive companies turning them's productivity growth, more than any other economic statistic, that determines our living standards. If productivity grows at 1% per year, living standards will double every 70 years. If productivity grows at 3% per

  7. Motifs in Protein SequencesMotifs in Protein Sequences Examples: Helix-Turn-Helix, Zinc-finger,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, Giri

    -finger, Homeobox domain, Hairpin-beta motif, Calcium-binding motif, Beta-alpha-beta motif, Coiled-coil motifs. Examples: Helix-Turn-Helix, Zinc-finger, Homeobox domain, Hairpin-beta motif, Calcium-binding motif, Beta-alpha-beta minimum energy configuration? Unfolded Molten Globule State Folded Native State Rapid (

  8. Genome-Assisted Analysis of Dissimilatory Metal-Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Romine, Margaret F.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Whole genome sequence for Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens has provided numerous new biological insights into the function of these model dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Many of the discoveries, including the identification of a high number of c-type cytochromes in both organisms, have been the result of comparative genomic analyses including several that were experimentally confirmed. Genome sequence has also aided the identification of genes important for the reduction of metal ions and other electron acceptors utilized by these organisms during anaerobic growth by facilitating the identification of genes disrupted by random insertions. Technologies for assaying global expression patterns for genes (mRNA) and proteins have also been enabled by the availability of genome sequence but their application has been limited mainly to the analysis of the role of global regulatory genes and to identifying genes expressed or repressed in response to specific electron acceptors. It is anticipated that details regarding the mechanisms of metal ion respiration, and metabolism in general, will eventually be revealed by comprehensive, systems-level analyses enabled by functional genomic analyses.

  9. The battle of bacteria: Agencies, stakeholders focusing on restoring water quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foust, Margaret

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to watershed stakeholders, who will determine the next steps in managing water quality in the tributaries. The TMDL task force was also charged with developing a roadmap for scientific research on how bacteria behave under different conditions. Tailored...

  10. Biotemplated Synthesis of Gold NanoparticleBacteria Cellulose Nanofiber Nanocomposites and Their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Limin

    produced by acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter xylinum using D-glucose as the carbon source, which usually of sisal fibers by in situ fermentation and obtained a new class of completely renewable and biodegradable

  11. Contamination Cross-contamination occurs when bacteria, or "germs," are moved from one food to another.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combat Cross Contamination Cross-contamination occurs when bacteria, or "germs," are moved from one food to another. To combat cross-contamination, keep foods SEPARATE!! At the grocery store, keep raw

  12. Amoebae/bacteria consortia and uses for degrading wastes and contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of altering trinitrotoluene includes the steps of: providing an amoeba/bacteria consortium, particularly ATCC 40908 or a mutant thereof possessing all the identifying characteristics thereof; and contacting the consortium with trinitrotoluene to alter the trinitrotoluene.

  13. Population Genomics of Early Events in the Ecological Differentiation of Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, B. J.

    Genetic exchange is common among bacteria, but its effect on population diversity during ecological differentiation remains controversial. A fundamental question is whether advantageous mutations lead to selection of clonal ...

  14. Reduction of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Present in Food Animal Manures by Composting and Anaerobic Digestion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    Reduction of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Present in Food Animal Manures by Composting digestion and composting at mesophilic or moderate temperature significantly reduced the antimicrobial resistance in animal manure. The most effective treatment was composting at thermophilic or high temperature

  15. Characterization of Extremophilic Bacteria for Potential in the Biofuel and Bioprocess Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haynes, Abria R

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    of bioprocess byproducts (e.g. lignocellulosic hydrolysate, bio-oil) that are known to harbor both compounds with inhibitory effects on growth and pentose sugars released after hydrolysis. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are bio-plastics produced by some bacteria...

  16. Cargo delivery into gram-negative bacteria via enterobactin uptake machinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Tengfei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1. Introduction to Iron Homeostasis and Siderophores Iron is an essential nutrient for almost all living organisms. This Chapter presents an overview of iron homeostasis in human and bacteria, as well as the biology ...

  17. Study of Midgut Bacteria in the Red Imported Fire Ant, Solenopsis invicta Büren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina, Freder

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Ants are capable of building close associations with plants, insects, fungi and bacteria. Symbionts can provide essential nutrients to their insect host, however, the development of new molecular tools has allowed the discovery of new microorganisms...

  18. Effects of UV Light Disinfection on Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria in Wastewater Effluents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childress, Hannah

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    of antibioticresistance genes (ARGs) and antibiotic-resistant and multidrug resistant bacteria in wastewater and drinking water treatment plants. There is also evidence to suggest that ARGs spread to the environment, and to humans and animals, through wastewater effluents...

  19. Engineering Bacteria for Production of Rhamnolipid as an Agent for Enhanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    ARTICLE Engineering Bacteria for Production of Rhamnolipid as an Agent for Enhanced Oil Recovery applications, including enhanced oil recovery (EOR), biodegradation, and bio- remediation. Rhamnolipid; transposome; chromosomal insertion; interfacial tension; enhanced oil recovery Introduction Surfactants

  20. Study of Midgut Bacteria in the Red Imported Fire Ant, Solenopsis invicta Büren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina, Freder

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    that manipulate insect reproduction, development and even provide defense against parasitoids and pathogens. In this study we investigated the presence of bacteria inside the Red Imported Fire Ant midgut using molecular tools and transmission electron microscopy...

  1. Bacteria Harnessing Complexity Eshel Ben Jacob, Yakir Aharonov and Yoash Shapira

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Eshel Ben

    1 Bacteria Harnessing Complexity By Eshel Ben Jacob, Yakir Aharonov and Yoash Shapira School, exchange of meaning-bearing chemical messages, and dialogues. The meaning-based communication permits

  2. 2011MEDIA KIT 170,000college-educated, affluent alumni turn to the award-winning Colorado State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011MEDIA KIT #12;170,000college-educated, affluent alumni turn to the award-winning Colorado State Colorado's valuable peaks WINTER 2007-2008 M A G A Z I N E Cancer and TB research Peace Corps origins Denver Center High-Country Help Twittering Coach WINTER 2010-2011 M A G A Z I N E Departments 3 VIEW FROM

  3. The incidence and significance of anaerobic bacteria in the equine uterus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Dean Roger

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE INCIDENCE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF ANAEROBIC BACTERIA IN THE EQUINE UTERUS A Thesis by DEAN ROGER BOLINGER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCF.... December I 987 Major Subject: Veterinary Medical Sciences THE INCIDENCE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF ANAEROBIC BACTERIA IN THE EQUINE UTERUS A Thesis by DEAN ROGER BOLINGER Approved as to style and content by: Ronnie G. Elmore (Chairman of Committee...

  4. A Her X-1 Turn-On: Using the pulse profile to probe the outer edge of an accretion disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kuster; J. Wilms; R. Staubert; P. Risse; W. A. Heindl; R. Rothschild; N. I. Shakura; K. A. Postnov

    2002-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-ray binary pulsar Her X-1 shows a wide variety of long and short term variabilities in the X-ray light curve. The 35 d variability of the source is interpreted as the influence of a warped, inclined, and twisted accretion disk periodically covering the line of sight to the central neutron star. In 1997 September we observed the ``turn-on'' of a 35 d cycle with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). Spectral analysis reveals that during early phases of the turn-on the overall spectrum is composed of X-rays scattered into the line of sight plus heavily absorbed X-rays. This interpretation is consistent with the variation of the pulse profile observed at the same time. The overall shape of the pulse profile is not changing, but towards earlier phases of the turn-on the pulse signature is steadily ``washed out''. This behavior can be understood as an influence of scattering and absorption due to the presence of the accretion disk rim. Using a Monte Carlo code we simulate the influence of both processes on a time variable, beamed emission characteristic, similar to the pulse profile of Her X-1. By comparing the results of the simulation with the observed profiles we determine the amount of scattered radiation, absorbed radiation, and the size of the scattering region.

  5. The effect of polyacrylamide polymers and formaldehyde on selected strains of oilfield related bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farquhar, G.B. [Texaco E.P.T.D., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary study of the effect of two polyacrylamide polymers and formaldehyde on certain strains of oil field related bacteria was performed. Since at this stage of the development of planning the proposed North Sea polymer flood field samples of native bacteria populations and fluid samples were not available, the preliminary study was made using pure strains of bacteria associated with the oilfield environment. The tests were run using ideal growth conditions of temperature and culture media. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of proposed polyacrylamide polymer flooding materials on the growth of selected strains of bacteria belonging to families common to the oilfield environment. The effect of 100 ppm of formaldehyde on these organisms also was investigated. The results of the tests showed that these bacteria responded differently to exposure to formaldehyde, polyacrylamide polymers and mixtures of both. These results indicate another possible mechanism for the occurrence of high bacteria related corrosion rates reported to occur on the producing side of polymer floods.

  6. Harold and Inge Marcus Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Fall 2010 Lubrication and Tool Wear in the Turning of Powdered Metal M2 Steel Valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Lubrication and Tool Wear in the Turning of Powdered Metal M2 Steel Valve Seats Final Report Overview) cutting insert on M2 steel valve seats. Two parameters were collected in order to perform a statistical was to analyze tool wear and the effect of select lubricants in the turning operation of powdered M2 metal valve

  7. SHAPE CONTROL OF REPRESENTATIVE TURNED SURFACE G.P. PETROPOULOS*, N.M. VAXEVANIDIS**, C.N. PANDAZARAS*, A. T. ANTONIADIS***

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis, Antoniadis

    is to investigate into the topography (roughness and waviness) of turned surfaces processed under cutting factors simulation models. Specimens of Ck60 steel were turned for cutting factors properly selected to achieve were, as follows: I) built-up edge: cutting speed v = 25 m/min, feed f = 0.32 mm/rev, depth of cut

  8. Note: High turn density magnetic coils with improved low pressure water cooling for use in atom optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay Parry, Nicholas, E-mail: n.mckayparry@uq.net.au; Neely, Tyler; Carey, Thomas; Bell, Thomas; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, St Lucia 4072 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, University of Queensland, St Lucia 4072 (Australia); Baker, Mark [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, St Lucia 4072 (Australia)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a magnetic coil design utilizing concentrically wound electro-magnetic insulating (EMI) foil (25.4 ?m Kapton backing and 127 ?m thick layers). The magnetic coils are easily configurable for different coil sizes, while providing large surfaces for low-pressure (0.12 bar) water cooling. The coils have turn densities of ?5 mm{sup ?1} and achieve a maximum of 377 G at 2.1 kW driving power, measured at a distance 37.9 mm from the axial center of the coil. The coils achieve a steady-state temperature increase of 36.7°C/kW.

  9. Effects of oil spill dispersants and drilling fluids on substrate specificity of marine bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okpokwasili, G.C.; Nnubia, C. [Univ. of Port Harcourt (Nigeria). Dept. of Microbiology] [Univ. of Port Harcourt (Nigeria). Dept. of Microbiology

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of oil spill dispersants and drilling fluids on the sizes of populations of specific heterotroph subgroups of marine bacteria were monitored in this study. The bacteria were isolated from drill cuttings recovered from Agbara--an offshore oilfield located some 100 nautical miles off the Atlantic coast of Nigeria. Numbers of cellulolytic, proteolytic, starch-hydrolyzing and lipolytic bacteria in the drill cuttings were monitored for 28 days in the presence of oil spill dispersants and drilling fluids. The percentages of these bacterial subgroups within the total heterotrophic population enumerated on tryptic soy agar (10% with 3% NaCl) fluctuated between 3.0 and 17.0%, 0.0 and 27.0%, 4.0 and 25.0% and 3.0 and 18.0% for cellulolytic, proteolytic, starch-hydrolyzing and lipolytic bacteria respectively. These results indicate that oil spill dispersants and drilling fluids affect the ability of marine bacteria to metabolize these substrates in the environment.

  10. Direct immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for evaluating chlorinated hydrocarbon degrading bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigmon, R.L.; Franck, M.M.; Brey, J.; Fliermans, C.B. [Westinghouse Savannah River, Aiken, SC (United States). Environmental Biotechnology Section; Scott, D.; Lanclos, K. [Medical Coll. of Georgia, Augusta, GA (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Immunological procedures were developed to enumerate chlorinated hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. Polyclonal antibodies (Pabs) were produced by immunizing New Zealand white rabbits against 18 contaminant-degrading bacteria. These included methanotrophic and chlorobenzene (CB) degrading species. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to test for specificity and sensitivity of the Pabs. Direct fluorescent antibodies (DFAs) were developed with these Pabs against select methanotrophic bacteria isolated from a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and cultures from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). Analysis of cross reactivity testing data showed some of the Pabs to be group specific while others were species specific. The threshold of sensitivity for the ELISA is 105 bacteria cells/ml. The DFA can detect as few as one bacterium per ml after concentration. Results from the DFA and ELISA techniques for enumeration of methanotrophic bacteria in groundwater were higher but not significantly different (P < 0.05) compared to indirect microbiological techniques such as MPN. These methods provide useful information on in situ community structure and function for bioremediation applications within 1--4 hours of sampling.

  11. Turning “on” and “off” nucleation and growth: Microwave assisted synthesis of CdS clusters and nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrer, Edmy; Nater, Sariann; Rivera, Daniel; Colon, Jean Marie; Zayas, Francisco; Gonzalez, Miguel [Chemical Imaging Center, Department of Chemistry, The University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, Mayaguez, PR 00680 (United States)] [Chemical Imaging Center, Department of Chemistry, The University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, Mayaguez, PR 00680 (United States); Castro, Miguel E., E-mail: miguel.castro2@upr.edu [Chemical Imaging Center, Department of Chemistry, The University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, Mayaguez, PR 00680 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Cadmium acetate and DMSO were employed as ion precursors. ? New approach to controlled CdS nanoparticle synthesis. ? CdS clusters and nanoparticles synthesis achieved using microwave irradiation. ? Microwave irradiation turns on and off nanoparticle growth. ? The formation of clusters, embryos and nanoparticles studied with optical spectroscopy. -- Abstract: We report here on the formation of CdS NP from the microwave assisted reaction of Cd(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2} with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). DMSO serves as the solvent and a controlled source of sulfide ions to form (CdS){sub 1?n?5} clusters at the early stages of the process. The clusters grow into CdS nanoparticles, with diameters that range from 1.6 nm up to over 250 nm, with microwave heating. The time dependence of the onset of light absorption and absorbance are consistent with a concurrent nucleation and growth processes. The formation of clusters and nuclei and their subsequent reactions is controlled by turning on and off the energy supply consistent with an energy barrier to the formation of CdS nanostructures.

  12. Liquid Fuel From Renewable Electricity and Bacteria: Electro-Autotrophic Synthesis of Higher Alcohols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrofuels Project: UCLA is utilizing renewable electricity to power direct liquid fuel production in genetically engineered Ralstonia eutropha bacteria. UCLA is using renewable electricity to convert carbon dioxide into formic acid, a liquid soluble compound that delivers both carbon and energy to the bacteria. The bacteria are genetically engineered to convert the formic acid into liquid fuel—in this case alcohols such as butanol. The electricity required for the process can be generated from sunlight, wind, or other renewable energy sources. In fact, UCLA’s electricity-to-fuel system could be a more efficient way to utilize these renewable energy sources considering the energy density of liquid fuel is much higher than the energy density of other renewable energy storage options, such as batteries.

  13. Genetically Modified Bacteria for Fuel Production: Development of Rhodobacteria as a Versatile Platform for Fuels Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrofuels Project: Penn State is genetically engineering bacteria called Rhodobacter to use electricity or electrically generated hydrogen to convert carbon dioxide into liquid fuels. Penn State is taking genes from oil-producing algae called Botryococcus braunii and putting them into Rhodobacter to produce hydrocarbon molecules, which closely resemble gasoline. Penn State is developing engineered tanks to support microbial fuel production and determining the most economical way to feed the electricity or hydrogen to the bacteria, including using renewable sources of power like solar energy.

  14. The battle of bacteria: Agencies, stakeholders focusing on restoring water quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foust, Margaret

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    txH2O | pg. 20 Story by Margaret Foust Bacteria is the No. 1 pollutant of water in Texas, causing many of the state?s water bodies to be placed on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for failing to meet contact recreation use... standards. Across the state, agencies and local stakeholders are identifying the sources of pollution in bacteria-impaired water bodies and are developing management strategies to restore water quality and remove these water bodies from the impaired...

  15. The battle of bacteria: Agencies, stakeholders focusing on restoring water quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foust, Margaret

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    txH2O | pg. 20 Story by Margaret Foust Bacteria is the No. 1 pollutant of water in Texas, causing many of the state?s water bodies to be placed on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for failing to meet contact recreation use... standards. Across the state, agencies and local stakeholders are identifying the sources of pollution in bacteria-impaired water bodies and are developing management strategies to restore water quality and remove these water bodies from the impaired...

  16. The possible symbiotic role of proteolytic and cellulolytic bacteria found in the gut of Limnoria 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traganza, Eugene Dewees

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE POSSIBLE SYMBIOTIC ROLE OF PROTEOLYTIC AND CELLVLOLYTIC BACTERIA FOUND IN TBE GV1' OF LIINORIA A Thesis By Eugene Dewees Traganza ~ ~ I Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1959 Ma)or Sub5ect: Biological Oceanography THE POSSIBLE SYMBIO1'IC ROLE OF PROTEOLYTIC AND CELLULOLYTIC BACTERIA FOUND IN THE GU1' OF Like(RIA A Thesis By Eugene Dewees...

  17. Investigation of anaerobic bacteria associated with mortality in grey mullet (Mugil cephalus) and redfish (Sciaenops ocellatus) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henley, Michael Waite

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INVEST1GATION OF ANAEROBIC BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH NDRTALITY IN GREY MULLET t~N' I ~*h I ) AND REDYIRH (~H' o ll t A Thesis MICHAEL WAITE HENLEY f Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Veterinary Microbiology INVESTIGATION OF ANAEROBIC BACTERIA ASSOCIATED NITH liIIH NDR IlDIIY IN GREY NUDE EI 1M~I ~ll END REDPI H l~R' ll t 1 A Thesis !G!ICHAEL WAITE HENLEY...

  18. Factors affecting the recovery of bacteria in freeze-dried model systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Custer, Carl Steven

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FACTORS AFFECTING THE RECOVERY OF BACTERIA IN FREEZE-DRIED NODEL SYSTENS A Thesis by CARL STEVEN CUSTER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&N University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for tbe degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1970' Najor Subject: Food Technology FACTORS AFFECTING THE RECOVERY OF BACTERIA IN FREEZE-DRIED MODEL SYSTEMS A Thesis CARL STEVEN CUSTER Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman of Com tee) Head of Departme (Member) (Member) (Member...

  19. The battle of bacteria: Agencies, stakeholders focusing on restoring water quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foust, Margaret

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    txH2O | pg. 20 Story by Margaret Foust Bacteria is the No. 1 pollutant of water in Texas, causing many of the state?s water bodies to be placed on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for failing to meet contact recreation use... standards. Across the state, agencies and local stakeholders are identifying the sources of pollution in bacteria-impaired water bodies and are developing management strategies to restore water quality and remove these water bodies from the impaired...

  20. Gravid Mosquito Trap P462 -Trap The ChemTica GMT operates on 4 size D cell batteries. A photo-activated switch turns on the fan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    batteries. A photo-activated switch turns on the fan at dusk. Manual shutoff is required at dawn to prevent at dawn to prevent loss of trapped mosquitoes. Power is supplied by four D cell batteries. The upper case

  1. To do list for laser maintenance 8.28-8.30 1. Clean the turning box and compressor chamber, remove all broken glass piece on bread board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shvets, Gennady

    and compressor chamber, remove all broken glass piece on bread board and mirror mount all optics in turning box and compressor chamber, replace all optics with damage spots on it, measure the reflectivity of compressor. 4. Check focal spot

  2. Genomics Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB): a resource for microsymbiont genomes (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeve, Wayne [Murdoch University

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wayne Reeve of Murdoch University on "Genomics Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB): a resource for microsymbiont genomes" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  3. Winning Team Announced for 2015 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Pilot |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley NickellApril 16, 2008 TBD-0075Department of Energy

  4. INFOGRAPHIC: Let's Get to Work on Solar Soft Costs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P.Department of Energy InternetHydrogenApril 30,Learn how

  5. New Infographic and Projects to Keep Your Energy Bills Out of Hot Water |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilverNephelineNeuralNewIdeas Spring from

  6. Grades 9-12: Join the BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge! | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), Geothermal TechnologiesGeothermalGo for theEnergyand

  7. New Infographic and Projects to Keep Your Energy Bills Out of Hot Water |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P.Department OfficeMicrosoftThe missionofDishwashersDepartment

  8. INFOGRAPHIC: Let's Get to Work on Solar Soft Costs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOEthe Ranking Member,711997 MEMORANDUM FORINCITE

  9. High speed measurements of neutral beam turn-on and impact of beam modulation on measurements of ion density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grierson, B. A., E-mail: bgriers@pppl.gov; Grisham, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Crowley, B.; Scoville, J. T. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modulation of neutral beams on tokamaks is performed routinely, enabling background rejection for active spectroscopic diagnostics, and control of injected power and torque. We find that there exists an anomalous initial transient in the beam neutrals delivered to the tokamak that is not accounted for by the accelerator voltage and power supply current. Measurements of the charge-exchange and beam photoemission on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] at high speed (200 ?s) reveal that the energy of the beam neutrals is constant, but the density of beam neutrals displays dramatic variation in the first 2–3 ms following beam turn-on. The impact of this beam density variation on inferred ion densities and impurity transport is presented, with suggested means to correct for the anomalous transient.

  10. The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drell, Persis [SLAC Director] [SLAC Director

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

  11. The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Drell, Persis [SLAC Director

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

  12. Turning on LAMP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostedt, Christoph

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Christoph Bostedt, a senior staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, provides a sneak peek of a powerful new instrument, called LAMP, that is now available for experiments that probe the atomic and molecular realm. LAMP replaces and updates the first instrument at LCLS, dubbed CAMP, which will be installed at an X-ray laser in Germany.

  13. Turning requirements into opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, A.M. [Tenneco Gas, Houston, TX (United States); Brenner, R. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current emphasis on regulatory reinvention at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides opportunities for companies to work with government to devise innovative and cost-effective solutions to meet environmental challenges. A good example of this is the current, cooperative working relationship between Tenneco Gas, EPA and certain state environmental agencies. Through this program, Tenneco has the flexibility necessary to implement an efficient and cost-effective strategy to enhance air quality and achieve greater environmental protection. This is illustrated by Tenneco`s attempts to comply with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 by reducing its emission of NO{sub x}.

  14. The Wheel Turns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piacentini, Valerie

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the street. IIJim, corne herso I wBnt to telk to yoU.'I Kirk cems over and knelt 8t Spock's feet, resting hL.;) erms on th(:) Vul can IS knee-3 9 end looking up anxiously into his feee. "What is it, Spack? Have I done something '"rang?" "Of course not...

  15. The Wheel Turns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piacentini, Valerie

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the street. IIJim, corne herso I wBnt to telk to yoU.'I Kirk cems over and knelt 8t Spock's feet, resting hL.;) erms on th(:) Vul can IS knee-3 9 end looking up anxiously into his feee. "What is it, Spack? Have I done something '"rang?" "Of course not...

  16. Turning on LAMP

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bostedt, Christoph

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Christoph Bostedt, a senior staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, provides a sneak peek of a powerful new instrument, called LAMP, that is now available for experiments that probe the atomic and molecular realm. LAMP replaces and updates the first instrument at LCLS, dubbed CAMP, which will be installed at an X-ray laser in Germany.

  17. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 7 JULY 2013 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS2676 Bacteria can exploit a flagellar buckling instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    in the locomotion of bacteria with multiple flagella (peritrichous), such as Escherichia coli, which bundles its a single flagellum (monotrichous), including 90% of motile marine bacteria3 , and how they reorient has long remained unclear. Only recently has the monotrichous marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus been

  18. Digestion of milk protein and methanol-grown bacteria protein in the preruminant calf. II. Amino acid composition of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Digestion of milk protein and methanol-grown bacteria protein in the preruminant calf. II. Amino of milk and of methanol-grown bacteria in the terminal small intestine and the hindgut of the preruminant exclusively by skim-milk powder ; 50.5 p. 100 of the protein of the bacte- ria diet was supplied by methanol

  19. ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE (ATP) AND DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID (DNA) CONTENT OF MARINE MICROALGAE AND BACTERIA WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE (ATP) AND DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID (DNA) CONTENT OF MARINE MICROALGAE the relationship between DNA and ATP content of marine bacteria and microalgae. This relationship was used. Laboratory-derived DNA:ATP ratios ranged from 8.5 to 33 (wt:wt) for cultures of marine microalgae, and from

  20. The effect of agrochemicals on indicator bacteria densities in outdoor mesocosmsemi_2287 3150..3158

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohr, Jason

    The effect of agrochemicals on indicator bacteria densities in outdoor mesocosmsemi_2287 3150, including patho- gens. Agrochemicals may influence the survival of these microorganisms in water bodies were used to investigate the response of Escherichia coli and enterococci to agrochemicals. Replicate

  1. Microfluidic capture and release of bacteria in a conical nanopore array Peng Guo,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Microfluidic capture and release of bacteria in a conical nanopore array Peng Guo,ab Eric W. Hall a microfluidic device. As an example, we demonstrate that cyanobacteria can be captured, one bacterium per pore, in a conical nanoporous membrane (CNM) integrated into a microfluidic chip. This study, to our knowledge

  2. A conjecture on the relationship of bacterial shape to motility in rod-shaped bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    ; Escherichia coli; Hydrodynamic e¤ciency 1. Introduction After we ¢rst notice that rod-shaped bacteria, for example, why does Escherichia coli have the shape it does? Why isn't it longer or shorter? 1.1. A priori School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0620, USA b Department of Biology, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine

  3. Rapid chemotactic response enables marine bacteria to exploit ephemeral microscale nutrient patches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    chemotaxis model Escherichia coli, leading to twice the nutrient exposure. We demonstrate that such rapidRapid chemotactic response enables marine bacteria to exploit ephemeral microscale nutrient patches mechanisms dissipate them. Here we show that the rapid chemo- tactic response of the marine bacterium

  4. Transfer of carbohydrate-active enzymes from marine bacteria to Japanese gut microbiota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    in Escherichia coli. However, only Zg1017 and the catalytic module of Zg2600 were expressed as soluble proteinsLETTERS Transfer of carbohydrate-active enzymes from marine bacteria to Japanese gut microbiota Jan of the marine Bacteroidetes, Zobellia galactanivorans, active on the sulphated polysaccharide porphyran from

  5. Roles of Naturally Occurring Bacteria in Controlling Iodine-129 Mobility in Subsurface Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hsiu-Ping

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    - to reactive intermediates. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of naturally occurring aerobic bacteria isolated from an 129I contaminated aquifer (F-area of the Savannah River Site, SC) on I- oxidation and OI formation. It was demonstrated...

  6. Structure-based Inhibitor Discovery against Adenylyl Cyclase Toxins from Pathogenic Bacteria That Cause Anthrax and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrksich, Milan

    That Cause Anthrax and Whooping Cough* Received for publication, February 4, 2003, and in revised form, March bacteria that cause anthrax and whooping cough, respectively. Using the structure of the catalytic site pathogenesis and to fight against anthrax and whooping cough. The 2001 anthrax attacks in the United States

  7. Winery waste makes fuel Electricity, bacteria break organics in wastewater into hydrogen gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from agricultural wastes." Napa Wine Company's wastewater comes from grape disposal, wine makingMSNBC.com Winery waste makes fuel Electricity, bacteria break organics in wastewater into hydrogen method for generating hydrogen fuel from wastewater is now operating at a California winery

  8. ORNL researchers are studying how bacteria found in Yellowstone hot springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    deconstruction--a major roadblock to the production of advanced biofuels," Giannone said. --Morgan Mc in the development of a cheaper biofuel production process. (Image: Jennifer Morrell-Falvey/ORNL) SCIENCE ORNL explores proteins in Yellowstone bacteria for biofuel inspiration substrates such as pure cellulose

  9. A phylogenetic mixture model for gene family loss in parasitic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A phylogenetic mixture model for gene family loss in parasitic bacteria Submitted as a research words: gene families, mixture model, parasites, maximum likelihood,phylogenetics Running head: gene family gain and loss 1 #12;Abstract Gene families are frequently gained and lost from prokaryotic genomes

  10. Additive and Competitive Effects of Bacteria and Mn Oxides on Arsenite Oxidation Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Additive and Competitive Effects of Bacteria and Mn Oxides on Arsenite Oxidation Kinetics L oxidizing As(III) at the same time than for either component alone. The additive effect of the mixed cell even though As(III) was oxidized fastest in a mixed cell--MnO2 system. The additive effect of biotic

  11. in-house windrow composting Many of the water bodies that are impaired by bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in-house windrow composting Many of the water bodies that are impaired by bacteria throughout from new and existing facilities. One such BMP is in-house windrow composting (IWC) of poultry litter. The Environmental Effects of In-House Windrow Composting of Poultry Litter project is demonstrating

  12. Bacteria can sprout webs of electrical wiring that transform the soil into a geological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    cells into a web-like electrical circuit, they report (D. Ntarlagiannis et al. Geophys. Res. Lett. 34, L in La Jolla, California. As the bacteria consume nutrients for energy, they spit out unwanted electrons sand infiltrated with a nutrient compound (lactate), and allowed S. oneidensis to grow in this `fake

  13. aerobic hydrogen-consuming bacteria: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerobic hydrogen-consuming bacteria First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Diversity of...

  14. Growth Temperature and Genome Size in Bacteria Are Negatively Correlated, Suggesting Genomic Streamlining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Andreas

    Growth Temperature and Genome Size in Bacteria Are Negatively Correlated, Suggesting Genomic.wagner@ieu.uzh.ch; nsabath@gmail.com. Accepted: March 25, 2013 Abstract Prokaryotic genomes are small and compact. Either this feature is caused by neutral evolution or by natural selection favoring small genomes--genome streamlining

  15. How do microbial fuel cells (MFCs) work? Bacteria need energy to survive, in the same way that humans need food to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    How do microbial fuel cells (MFCs) work? Bacteria need energy to survive, in the same way" in photobiological fuel cell systems that utilize photosynthetic bacteria, amino acids, and proteins. What

  16. ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENT LAKE SEDIMENT: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jerry; McCarthy, E.D.; Van Hoeven Jr., William; Calvin, Melvin; Bradley, W. H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENTH F A PRELIMINARY REPORT IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AKD IN A RECENTrests on the finding that algae have less cellulose and a

  17. Local heat/mass transfer distributions around sharp 180 deg turns in two-pass smooth and rib-roughened channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, J.C.; Chandra, P.R.; Lau, S.C. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed mass transfer distributions around the sharp 180 deg turns in a two-pass, square, smooth channel and in an identical channel with two rib-roughened opposite walls were determined via the napthalene sublimation technique. The top, bottom, inner (divider), and outer walls of the test channel were napthalene-coated surfaces. For the ribbed channel tests, square, transverse, brass ribs were attached to the top and bottom walls of the channel in alignment. The rib height-to-hydraulic diameter ratios (e/D) were 0.063 and 0.094; the rib pitch-to-height ratios (P/e) were 10 and 20. Experiments were conducted for three Reynolds numbers of 15,000, 30,000 and 60,000. Results show that the Sherwood numbers on the top, outer, and inner walls around the turn in the rib-roughened channel are higher than the corresponding Sherwood numbers around the turn in the smooth channel. For both the smooth and the ribbed channels, the Sherwood numbers after the sharp turn are higher than those before the turn. The regional averages of the local Sherwood numbers are correlated and compared with published heat transfer data.

  18. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Bessie's Biofuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  19. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Algae Biofuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Seward HS in Seward, AK, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  20. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Biofuel Acts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  1. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Comparison of Bio-fuels to Other Commonly Used Forms of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  2. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Biofuels Sustainable Transportation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  3. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Algae Biofuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  4. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: History of Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  5. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: The History of Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  6. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Energy from Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  7. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: From Fish Food to Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from LISD TECH Center in Adrian, MI, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  8. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: A "Biomassive" Innovation: Fueling Life in Appalachia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Belfry School in Belfry, KY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  9. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Corn to Ethanol the Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  10. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: BIOfuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  11. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: History of Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Troy High School in Troy, MI, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  12. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Bioenergy News Today

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from The Preuss School in La Jolla, CA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  13. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Bioenergy: Why is it important?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from The Preuss School in La Jolla, CA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  14. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: What is Biomass?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  15. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Iowa Ethanol Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  16. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Biomass Reduces Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  17. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: History of Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  18. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: What is Biogas?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  19. Biofuel from Bacteria and Sunlight: Shewanella as an Ideal Platform for Producing Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Minnesota is developing clean-burning, liquid hydrocarbon fuels from bacteria. The University is finding ways to continuously harvest hydrocarbons from a type of bacteria called Shewanella by using a photosynthetic organism to constantly feed Shewanella the sugar it needs for energy and hydrocarbon production. The two organisms live and work together as a system. Using Shewanella to produce hydrocarbon fuels offers several advantages over traditional biofuel production methods. First, it eliminates many of the time-consuming and costly steps involved in growing plants and harvesting biomass. Second, hydrocarbon biofuels resemble current petroleum-based fuels and would therefore require few changes to the existing fuel refining and distribution infrastructure in the U.S.

  20. Inoculation of beef with lactic-acid bacteria prior to vacuum packaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Lester Cedric

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    d of Department ) (Member) August 1978 ABSTRACT Inoculation of Beef with Lactic-Acid Bacteria Prior to Vacuum Packaging. (August 1978) Lester Cedric Hall, B. S. , Texas A&M University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. G. C. Smith and Dr Z... packaging was rapidly becoming an established business and would revolu- tionize the future of the wholesale beef market. Vacuum packaging is advantageous in that it (a) reduces weight losses from evaporation and trimming, (b) preserves meat color, (c...

  1. Improved oil recovery using bacteria isolated from North Sea petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davey, R.A.; Lappin-Scott, H. [Univ. of Exeter (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During secondary oil recovery, water is injected into the formation to sweep out the residual oil. The injected water, however, follows the path of least resistance through the high-permeability zones, leaving oil in the low-permeability zones. Selective plugging of these their zones would divert the waterflood to the residual oil and thus increase the life of the well. Bacteria have been suggested as an alternative plugging agent to the current method of polymer injection. Starved bacteria can penetrate deeply into rock formations where they attach to the rock surfaces, and given the right nutrients can grow and produce exo-polymer, reducing the permeability of these zones. The application of microbial enhanced oil recovery has only been applied to shallow, cool, onshore fields to date. This study has focused on the ability of bacteria to enhance oil recovery offshore in the North Sea, where the environment can be considered extreme. A screen of produced water from oil reservoirs (and other extreme subterranean environments) was undertaken, and two bacteria were chosen for further work. These two isolates were able to grow and survive in the presence of saline formation waters at a range of temperatures above 50{degrees}C as facultative anaerobes. When a solution of isolates was passed through sandpacks and nutrients were added, significant reductions in permeabilities were achieved. This was confirmed in Clashach sandstone at 255 bar, when a reduction of 88% in permeability was obtained. Both isolates can survive nutrient starvation, which may improve penetration through the reservoir. Thus, the isolates show potential for field trials in the North Sea as plugging agents.

  2. Impact of elevated nitrate on sulfate-reducing bacteria: A comparative study of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Q.; He, Z.; Joyner, D.C.; Joachimiak, M.; Price, M.N.; Yang, Z.K.; Yen, H.-C. B.; Hemme, C. L.; Chen, W.; Fields, M.; Stahl, D. A.; Keasling, J. D.; Keller, M.; Arkin, A. P.; Hazen, T. C.; Wall, J. D.; Zhou, J.

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been extensively studied for their potential in heavy-metal bioremediation. However, the occurrence of elevated nitrate in contaminated environments has been shown to inhibit sulfate reduction activity. Although the inhibition has been suggested to result from the competition with nitrate-reducing bacteria, the possibility of direct inhibition of sulfate reducers by elevated nitrate needs to be explored. Using Desulfovibrio vulgaris as a model sulfate-reducing bacterium, functional genomics analysis reveals that osmotic stress contributed to growth inhibition by nitrate as shown by the upregulation of the glycine/betaine transporter genes and the relief of nitrate inhibition by osmoprotectants. The observation that significant growth inhibition was effected by 70 mM NaNO{sub 3} but not by 70 mM NaCl suggests the presence of inhibitory mechanisms in addition to osmotic stress. The differential expression of genes characteristic of nitrite stress responses, such as the hybrid cluster protein gene, under nitrate stress condition further indicates that nitrate stress response by D. vulgaris was linked to components of both osmotic and nitrite stress responses. The involvement of the oxidative stress response pathway, however, might be the result of a more general stress response. Given the low similarities between the response profiles to nitrate and other stresses, less-defined stress response pathways could also be important in nitrate stress, which might involve the shift in energy metabolism. The involvement of nitrite stress response upon exposure to nitrate may provide detoxification mechanisms for nitrite, which is inhibitory to sulfate-reducing bacteria, produced by microbial nitrate reduction as a metabolic intermediate and may enhance the survival of sulfate-reducing bacteria in environments with elevated nitrate level.

  3. Factors affecting the recovery of bacteria in freeze-dried model systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Custer, Carl Steven

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cellulose, and subsequently freeze-dried. The influences of the rate of freezing, time and atmosphere of storage, position of the bacteria within the model system and condition of incubation upon the survival and metabolic injury of the freeze-dried... storage. The type of atmosphere in which freeze-dried preparations were stored was important to bacterial survival. Nitrogen was less damaging to freeze-dried cells than air. Strata studies indicated that the viable bacterial population density...

  4. Effects of UV Light Disinfection on Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria in Wastewater Effluents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childress, Hannah

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    and support. I would also like to thank Bailey Sullivan for teaching lab procedures, and the operators at the wastewater treatment plant for their assistance. I am grateful to the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering for providing a... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Biological and Agricultural Engineering EFFECTS OF UV LIGHT DISINFECTION ON TETRACYCLINE RESISTANT BACTERIA IN WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS A Thesis by HANNAH...

  5. Diffusive transport without detailed balance in motile bacteria: Does microbiology need statistical physics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cates, M E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbiology is the science of microbes, particularly bacteria. Many bacteria are motile: they are capable of self-propulsion. Among these, a significant class execute so-called run-and-tumble motion: they follow a fairly straight path for a certain distance, then abruptly change direction before repeating the process. This dynamics has something in common with Brownian motion (it is diffusive at large scales), and also something in contrast. Specifically, motility parameters such as the run speed and tumble rate depend on the local environment and hence can vary in space. When they do so, even if a steady state is reached, this is not generally invariant under time-reversal: the principle of detailed balance, which restores the microscopic time-reversal symmetry of systems in thermal equilibrium, is mesoscopically absent in motile bacteria. This lack of detailed balance (allowed by the flux of chemical energy that drives motility) creates pitfalls for the unwary modeller. Here I review some statistical mecha...

  6. Diffusive transport without detailed balance in motile bacteria: Does microbiology need statistical physics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. E. Cates

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbiology is the science of microbes, particularly bacteria. Many bacteria are motile: they are capable of self-propulsion. Among these, a significant class execute so-called run-and-tumble motion: they follow a fairly straight path for a certain distance, then abruptly change direction before repeating the process. This dynamics has something in common with Brownian motion (it is diffusive at large scales), and also something in contrast. Specifically, motility parameters such as the run speed and tumble rate depend on the local environment and hence can vary in space. When they do so, even if a steady state is reached, this is not generally invariant under time-reversal: the principle of detailed balance, which restores the microscopic time-reversal symmetry of systems in thermal equilibrium, is mesoscopically absent in motile bacteria. This lack of detailed balance (allowed by the flux of chemical energy that drives motility) creates pitfalls for the unwary modeller. Here I review some statistical mechanical models for bacterial motility, presenting them as a paradigm for exploring diffusion without detailed balance. I also discuss the extent to which statistical physics is useful in understanding real or potential microbiological experiments.

  7. Isolation of butyrate-utilizing bacteria from thermophilic and mesophilic methane-producing ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henson, J.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of various ecosystems to convert butyrate to methane was studied in order to isolate the bacteria responsible for the conversion. When thermophilic digester sludge was enriched with butyrate, methane was produced without a lag period. Marine sediments enriched with butyrate required a 2-week incubation period before methanogenesis began. A thermophilic digester was studied in more detail and found by most-probable-number enumeration to have ca. 5 x 10/sup 6/ butyrate-utilizing bactera/ml of sludge. A thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium was isolated in coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and a Methanosarcina sp. This bacterium was a gram-negative, slightly curved rod that occurred singly, was nonmotile, and did not appear to produce spores. The thermophilic digester was infused with butyrate at the rate of 10 ..mu..moles/ml of sludge per day. Biogas production increased by 150%, with the percentage of methane increasing from 58% to 68%. Acetate, propionate, and butyrate did not accumulate. Butyrate-utilizing enrichments from mesophilic ecosystems were used in obtaining cocultures of butyrate-utilizing bacteria. These cocultures served as inocula for attempts to isolate pure cultures of butyrate-utilizing bacteria by use of hydrogenase-containing membrane fragments of Escherichia coli. After a 3-week incubation period, colonies appeared only in inoculated tubes that contained membrane fragments and butyrate.

  8. Sources of Nutrients and Fecal Indicator Bacteria to Nearshore Waters on the North Shore of Kaua`i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    indicator bacteria (FIB, i.e., enterococci and Escherichia coli) in nearshore waters and spurred concern :J. H. Street :A. Paytan Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064

  9. Bacteria in Ballast Water: The Shipping Industry's Contributions to the Transport and Distribution of Microbial Species in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyland, Elizabeth B.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation of organisms in the ballast water of cargo ships has been recognized as a source of invasive species despite current control measures. Pathogenic bacteria in the ballast tank have been studied but the total diversity...

  10. Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallivan, Justin [Emory University] [Emory University

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Justin Gallivan, of Emory University presents a talk titled "Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  11. Functional characterization of flavobacteria rhodopsins reveals a unique class of light-driven chloride pump in bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshizawa, Susumu

    Light-activated, ion-pumping rhodopsins are broadly distributed among many different bacteria and archaea inhabiting the photic zone of aquatic environments. Bacterial proton- or sodium-translocating rhodopsins can convert ...

  12. www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 341 23 AUGUST 2013 833 BACTERIA MAY NOT ELICIT MUCH SYMPA-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . thermophilus breaks down the milk sugar lactose into tangy lactic acid. But certain viruses--bacterio- phages tar- geted genes in human cells, mice, rats, zebra- fish, bacteria, fruit flies, yeast, nematodes

  13. Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gallivan, Justin [Emory University

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Justin Gallivan, of Emory University presents a talk titled "Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  14. Bacteria in Ballast Water: The Shipping Industry's Contributions to the Transport and Distribution of Microbial Species in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyland, Elizabeth B.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation of organisms in the ballast water of cargo ships has been recognized as a source of invasive species despite current control measures. Pathogenic bacteria in the ballast tank have been studied but the total diversity...

  15. Occurrence, Prevalence, and Disinfection Potential of Tetracycline Resistance Genes and Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria in a Subtropical Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Bailey Ann

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    . The objective of this dissertation research was to gain a better understanding of anthropogenic influences on occurrence of tetracycline resistance and use of traditional disinfection methods for the reduction of tetracycline resistant bacteria and genes...

  16. The Chips game -Dynamic programming activity This is a game between two players. It starts with two piles of chips, ten chips per pile. On each turn, a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zirbel, Craig L.

    with two piles of chips, ten chips per pile. On each turn, a player may take one chip from one pile, or two chips, one from each pile. If one pile is empty, you can only take one chip from the other pile chip from each pile, your opponent becomes the first player in the "9-9" game. If you take one chip

  17. The study of waves is clearly an important subject in acoustics because sound energy is transmitted by waves traveling though air. Furthermore, it turns out that the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, William

    Waves The study of waves is clearly an important subject in acoustics because sound energy, wavelength and speed of all types of waves, not only sound. In the case of sound waves in air the wave speed is transmitted by waves traveling though air. Furthermore, it turns out that the properties of waves on strings

  18. DES 192 INTERNSHIP DOCUMENTATION INSTRUCTIONS Paperwork must be completed, signed, and turned in to the Advising Office in order to obtain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernes, Peter J.

    DES 192 INTERNSHIP DOCUMENTATION INSTRUCTIONS Paperwork must be completed, signed, and turned of the quarter) OBJECTIVES OF DESIGN INTERNSHIP CREDIT: Encourage students to obtain applied learning experience's personal and educational goals. To obtain academic credit (units) for an internship, you must: · Have

  19. Dynamic turning of 13 cm robot comparing tail and differential drive A.O. Pullin N.J. Kohut D. Zarrouk and R. S. Fearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fearing, Ron

    , and hence fine control for steering. The lateral leg stability model has been used by [6], [18] to explain. OctoRoACH robot with independent drive of each side. to control yaw rate. The two steering methods are compared using a sinusoidal steering command. A. Previous work in Dynamic Turning Control There have a been

  20. Jordan Boyd-Graber and David M. Blei. PUTOP: Turning Predominant Senses into a Topic Model for WSD. 4th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluations, 2007.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd-Graber, Jordan

    Jordan Boyd-Graber and David M. Blei. PUTOP: Turning Predominant Senses into a Topic Model for WSD. 4th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluations, 2007. @inproceedings{Boyd-Graber:Blei-2007, Author = {Jordan Boyd-Graber and David M. Blei}, Booktitle = {4th International Workshop on Semantic

  1. Poor and In Poor Health Bottom Line: In the United States, discussion about how to improve health often turns to either access to care or health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    often turns to either access to care or health behaviors like smoking or diet. These things matter children not re- ceiving any health care in a given year is twice that of higher-income children. Another and changes rapidly during the first few years of life. U.S. Health Care The U.S. health care system includes

  2. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) Thermal Control Systems (TCS) operate by applying an electric field to a dielectric fluid that, in turn, generates a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) Thermal Control Systems (TCS) operate by applying an electric field to a dielectric fluid that, in turn, generates a force that can be used to pump fluids and separate liquid Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) Based Thermal Control Subsytems at NASAGSFC Jeffrey R. Didion Mathew Showalter NASA Goddard

  3. MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frischer, Marc E. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

    2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

  4. Exploration of Simple Analytical Approaches for Rapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salma Rahman

    2005-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the current methods for pathogenic bacterial detection require long sample-preparation and analysis time, as well as complex instrumentation. This dissertation explores simple analytical approaches (e.g., flow cytometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy) that may be applied towards ideal requirements of a microbial detection system, through method and instrumentation development, and by the creation and characterization of immunosensing platforms. This dissertation is organized into six sections. In the general Introduction section a literature review on several of the key aspects of this work is presented. First, different approaches for detection of pathogenic bacteria will be reviewed, with a comparison of the relative strengths and weaknesses of each approach, A general overview regarding diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is then presented. Next, the structure and function of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed from organosulfur molecules at gold and micrometer and sub-micrometer patterning of biomolecules using SAMs will be discussed. This section is followed by four research chapters, presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 1 describes the efforts and challenges towards the creation of imunosensing platforms that exploit the flexibility and structural stability of SAMs of thiols at gold. 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyl-1-thiol SAM (PFDT) and dithio-bis(succinimidyl propionate)-(DSP)-derived SAMs were used to construct the platform. Chapter 2 describes the characterization of the PFDT- and DSP-derived SAMs, and the architectures formed when it is coupled to antibodies as well as target bacteria. These studies used infrared reflection spectroscopy (IRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), Chapter 3 presents a new sensitive, and portable diffuse reflection based technique for the rapid identification and quantification of pathogenic bacteria. Chapter 4 reports research efforts in the construction and evaluation of a prototype flow cytometry based cell detector and enumerator. This final research chapter is followed by a general summation and future prospectus section that concludes this dissertation.

  5. Soft inertial microfluidics for high throughput separation of bacteria from human blood cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Zhigang; Willing, Ben; Bjerketorp, Joakim; Jansson, Janet K.; Hjort, Klas

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a new approach to separate bacteria from human blood cells based on soft inertial force induced migration with flow defined curved and focused sample flow inside a microfluidic device. This approach relies on a combination of an asymmetrical sheath flow and proper channel geometry to generate a soft inertial force on the sample fluid in the curved and focused sample flow segment to deflect larger particles away while the smaller ones are kept on or near the original flow streamline. The curved and focused sample flow and inertial effect were visualized and verified using a fluorescent dye primed in the device. First the particle behavior was studied in detail using 9.9 and 1.0 {micro}m particles with a polymer-based prototype. The prototype device is compact with an active size of 3 mm{sup 2}. The soft inertial effect and deflection distance were proportional to the fluid Reynolds number (Re) and particle Reynolds number (Re{sub p}), respectively. We successfully demonstrated separation of bacteria (Escherichia coli) from human red blood cells at high cell concentrations (above 10{sup 8}/mL), using a sample flow rate of up to 18 {micro}L/min. This resulted in at least a 300-fold enrichment of bacteria at a wide range of flow rates with a controlled flow spreading. The separated cells were proven to be viable. Proteins from fractions before and after cell separation were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and staining to verify the removal of red blood cell proteins from the bacterial cell fraction. This novel microfluidic process is robust, reproducible, simple to perform, and has a high throughput compared to other cell sorting systems. Microfluidic systems based on these principles could easily be manufactured for clinical laboratory and biomedical applications.

  6. Production of extracellular nucleic acids by genetically altered bacteria in aquatic-environment microcosms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, J.H.; David, A.W.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors which affect the production of extracellular DNA by genetically altered strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas cepacia, and Bradyrhizobium japonicum in aquatic environments were investigated. The presence or absence of the ambient microbial community had little effect on the production of extracellular DNA. Results indicate the extracellular-DNA production by genetically altered bacteria released into aquatic environments is more strongly influenced by physiochemical factors than biotic factors; extracellular-DNA production rates are usually greater for organisms released in freshwater than marine environments; and ambient microbial populations can readily utilize materials released by these organisms.

  7. Light-harvesting in bacteria exploits a critical interplay between transport and trapping dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felipe Caycedo-Soler; Ferney J. Rodriguez; Luis Quiroga; Neil F. Johnson

    2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Light-harvesting bacteria Rhodospirillum Photometricum were recently found to adopt strikingly different architectures depending on illumination conditions. We present analytic and numerical calculations which explain this observation by quantifying a dynamical interplay between excitation transfer kinetics and reaction center cycling. High light-intensity membranes (HLIM) exploit dissipation as a photo-protective mechanism, thereby safeguarding a steady supply of chemical energy, while low light-intensity membranes (LLIM) efficiently process unused illumination intensity by channelling it to open reaction centers. More generally, our analysis elucidates and quantifies the trade-offs in natural network design for solar energy conversion.

  8. A technique for quantitative and qualitative viewing of aquatic bacteria using scanning electron microscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreier, Thomas Michael

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    microscopic enumeration techniques. Water samples are concentrated on pre-wetted (Triton X-100) Nuclepore filters (0. 2 um pore size) to prov1de a uniform distri- bution of bacteria on the filter surface and vacuum filtered (660 Torr). The filter... is transferred to a petri dish containing filter paper soaked 1n 2% glutaraldehyde and the bacter1a are fixed for one hour. Dehydration 1s performed by transferr1ng the filters through a series of petri dishes conta1ning filter paper saturated with 25, 50, 75...

  9. A technique for quantitative and qualitative viewing of aquatic bacteria using scanning electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreier, Thomas Michael

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    microscopic enumeration techniques. Water samples are concentrated on pre-wetted (Triton X-100) Nuclepore filters (0. 2 um pore size) to prov1de a uniform distri- bution of bacteria on the filter surface and vacuum filtered (660 Torr). The filter... is transferred to a petri dish containing filter paper soaked 1n 2% glutaraldehyde and the bacter1a are fixed for one hour. Dehydration 1s performed by transferr1ng the filters through a series of petri dishes conta1ning filter paper saturated with 25, 50, 75...

  10. The Revenge of the Market on the Rentiers: Why neo-liberal Reports of the end of history turned out to be premature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palma, J G

    government transfers (such as social security, unemployment benefits, welfare payments, etc.), and before individual income taxes and employees' payroll taxes (but after employers’ payroll taxes and corporate income taxes). 24 In turn, including capital... ; the value of private and government debt securities from US$9 to US$80 trillion; and bank assets from US$11 to US$96 trillion (on the latter number, see notes below Figure 1; all figures in US$ at 2007 value). 3 FIGURE 1 ? (a...

  11. Structural similarities between biogenic uraninites produced by phylogenetically and metabolically diverse bacteria.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, Jonathan; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Veeramani, Harish; Suvorova, Elena; Kennedy, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Mehta, Apurva; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the product of microbial uranium reduction is often reported to be“UO2”, a comprehensive characterization including stoichiometry and unit cell determination is available for only one Shewanella species. Here, we compare the products of batch uranyl reduction by a collection of dissimilatory metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genera Shewanella, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfovibrio under similar laboratory conditions. Our results demonstrate that U(VI) bioreduction by this assortment of commonly studied, environmentally relevant bacteria leads to the precipitation of uraninite with a composition between UO2.00 and UO2.075, regardless of phylogenetic or metabolic diversity. Coupled analyses, including electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and powder diffraction, confirm that structurally and chemically analogous uraninite solids are produced. These biogenic uraninites have particle diameters of about 2-3 nm and lattice constants consistent with UO2.0 and exhibit a high degree of intermediate-range order. Results indicate that phylogenetic and metabolic variability within delta- and gamma-proteobacteria has little effect on nascent biouraninite structure or crystal size under the investigated conditions.

  12. Chemotactic behavior of deep subsurface bacteria toward carbohydrates, amino acids and a chlorinated alkene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez de Victoria, G. (Puerto Rico Univ., Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico). Dept. of Biology)

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemotactic behavior of deep terrestrial subsurface bacteria toward amino acids, carbohydrates and trichloroethylene was assayed using a modification of the capillary method and bacterial enumeration by acridine orange direct counts. Eleven isolates of bacteria isolated from six different geological formations were investigated. A bimodal response rather than an absolute positive or negative response was observed in most assays. Most of the isolates were positively chemotactic to low concentrations of substrates and were repelled by high concentrations of the same substrate. However, this was not the case for trichloroethylene (TCE) which was mostly an attractant and elicited the highest responses in all the isolates when compared with amino acids and carbohydrates. The movement rates of these isolates in aseptic subsurface sediments in the absence and presence of TCE were also determined using a laboratory model. All of the isolates showed distinct response range, peak, and threshold concentrations when exposed to the same substrates suggesting that they are possibly different species as has been inferred from DNA homology studies. 101 refs., 4 figs., 57 tabs.

  13. Long-term developments in Her X-1: Correlation between the histories of the 35 day turn-on cycle and the 1.24 sec pulse period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Staubert; S. Schandl; D. Klochkov; J Wilms; K. Postnov; N. Shakura

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the long-term (1971-2005) behaviour of the 1.24 sec pulse period and the 35 day precession period of Her X-1 and show that both periods vary in a highly correlated way (see also Staubert et al. 1997 and 2000). When the spin-up rate decreases, the 35 day turn-on period shortens.This correlation is most evident on long time scales (~2000 days),e.g.around four extended spin-down episodes, but also on shorter time scales (a few 100 days) on which quasi-periodic variations are apparent. We argue that the likely common cause is variations of the mass accretion rate onto the neutron star.The data since 1991 allow a continuous sampling and indicate a lag between the turn-on behaviour and the spin behaviour, in the sense that changes are first seen in the spin, about one cycle later in the turn-on. Both the coronal wind model (Schandl & Meyer 1994) as well as the stream-disk model (Shakura et al.999) predict this kind of behaviour.

  14. ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENT LAKE SEDIMENT: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jerry; McCarthy, E.D.; Van Hoeven Jr., William; Calvin, Melvin; Bradley, W. H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    significantly to the hydrocarbons of higher molecular weightDISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA,T E DISTRIBUTION O ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS H F A PRELIMINARY

  15. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C.; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Comolli, Luis R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III) bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Further, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated 2- and 3- dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Most cells had their outer membranes decorated with up to 150 nm diameter aggregates composed of a few nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell-surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  16. Determination of kinetic coefficients for the simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, M.D.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium contamination of groundwaters and surface waters near abandoned mill tailings piles is a serious concern in many areas of the western United States. Uranium usually exists in either the U(IV) or the U(VI) oxidation state. U(VI) is soluble in water and, as a result, is very mobile in the environment. U(IV), however, is generally insoluble in water and, therefore, is not subject to aqueous transport. In recent years, researchers have discovered that certain anaerobic microorganisms, such as the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, can mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). Although the ability of this microorganism to reduce U(VI) has been studied in some detail by previous researchers, the kinetics of the reactions have not been characterized. The purpose of this research was to perform kinetic studies on Desulfovibrio desulficans bacteria during simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium and to determine the phase in which uranium exists after it has been reduced and precipitated from solution. The studies were conducted in a laboratory-scale chemostat under substrate-limited growth conditions with pyruvate as the substrate. Kinetic coefficients for substrate utilization and cell growth were calculated using the Monod equation. The maximum rate of substrate utilization (k) was determined to be 4.70 days{sup {minus}1} while the half-velocity constant (K{sub s}) was 140 mg/l COD. The yield coefficient (Y) was determined to be 0.17 mg cells/mg COD while the endogenous decay coefficient (k{sub d}) was calculated as 0.072 days{sup {minus}1}. After reduction, U(IV) Precipitated from solution in the uraninite (UO{sub 2}) phase. Uranium removal efficiency as high as 90% was achieved in the chemostat.

  17. Making more efficient fuel cells 08.09.2009 -Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells to provide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Making more efficient fuel cells 08.09.2009 - Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells to provide power in remote environments or to convert waste power in fuel cells than bacteria with a smooth surface. The team's findings were reported

  18. Digestion of milk protein and methanol-grown bacteria protein in the preruminant calf. I. Kinetics and balance in the terminal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Digestion of milk protein and methanol-grown bacteria protein in the preruminant calf. I. Kinetics the digestion of two milk replacers (control and bacteria), containing different protein sources, in the end of the small intestine and of the digestive tract in the preruminant calf. The protein in the control diet

  19. Protecting Our Water: Tracking Sources of Bacterial Contamination Numerous surface waterbodies in Texas are classified as having high levels of fecal coliform bacteria, an indicator of fecal pollution.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Texas are classified as having high levels of fecal coliform bacteria, an indicator of fecal pollution. coli and other fecal coliform bacteria do not provide information on whether the source of pollution of pollution need to be identified to implement effective pollution control strategies to improve water quality

  20. Bugs boost Cold War clean-up: Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago. updated at midnight GMTtoday is friday, november 14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    2003 · Fungus catches radioactive fallout 8 May 2002 · Depleted uranium soils battlefields 12 MarchBugs boost Cold War clean-up: Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago boost Cold War clean-up Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago. 13 October

  1. When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Howard E.

    ABSTRACT When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic compounds in the fish and the fish becomes spoiled. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy neural network (ANN) for the development of an ANN based FT-IR Screening System for fish

  2. Bacteria and Surface Water Quality Standards Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act requires that each state set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bodies that support oyster harvesting, called oyster waters, have four clas- sifications which determineBacteria and Surface Water Quality Standards Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act requires that each state set water quality standards to ensure all uses of a water body have the ap- propriate water

  3. Corrosion Protection due to Bacteria /Metal Interactions E. Kus1, K. H. Nealson2 and F. Mansfeld1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Corrosion Protection due to Bacteria /Metal Interactions E. Kus1, K. H. Nealson2 and F. Mansfeld1 1. Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory (CEEL) The Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) refers to the increase of the corrosion rate of metals due to microbial

  4. University of Minnesota study of exposure of animal manure applicators to bacteria (S. aureus, MRSA) of swine origin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    University of Minnesota study of exposure of animal manure applicators to bacteria (S. aureus, MRSA to certain antibiotics, and those resistant to the drug methicillin (known as MRSA ­ methicillin resistant S be a reservoir of MRSA. Furthermore, people with direct swine contact have an increased high likelihood

  5. Evaluating the role of sediment-bacteria interactions on Escherichia coli concentrations at beaches in southern Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's ability to describe the multiple short-duration, low-intensity resuspension events at our sampling sites. A major resuspension event was noted during the simulation period but the sampling frequency during]. Resuspension of sediment- bound bacteria under favorable conditions can increase the levels of bacterial

  6. Use of Disinfectants and Cleaners to Reduce Bacteria on Poultry Transportation Coops with a Compressed Air Foam System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinojosa-Garza, Carolee A.

    2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    and disinfect poultry transport coops. The objective of this study was to evaluate treatments consisting of a low-pressure water rinse (LPWR), a foaming additive alone, foaming cleaner or peroxyacetic acid with a foaming additive to reduce bacteria on broiler...

  7. Detecting bacteria and Determining Their Susceptibility to Antibiotics by Stochastic Confinement in Nanoliter Droplets using Plug-Based Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boedicker, J.; Li, L; Kline, T; Ismagilov, R

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes plug-based microfluidic technology that enables rapid detection and drug susceptibility screening of bacteria in samples, including complex biological matrices, without pre-incubation. Unlike conventional bacterial culture and detection methods, which rely on incubation of a sample to increase the concentration of bacteria to detectable levels, this method confines individual bacteria into droplets nanoliters in volume. When single cells are confined into plugs of small volume such that the loading is less than one bacterium per plug, the detection time is proportional to plug volume. Confinement increases cell density and allows released molecules to accumulate around the cell, eliminating the pre-incubation step and reducing the time required to detect the bacteria. We refer to this approach as stochastic confinement. Using the microfluidic hybrid method, this technology was used to determine the antibiogram - or chart of antibiotic sensitivity - of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to many antibiotics in a single experiment and to measure the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drug cefoxitin (CFX) against this strain. In addition, this technology was used to distinguish between sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus in samples of human blood plasma. High-throughput microfluidic techniques combined with single-cell measurements also enable multiple tests to be performed simultaneously on a single sample containing bacteria. This technology may provide a method of rapid and effective patient-specific treatment of bacterial infections and could be extended to a variety of applications that require multiple functional tests of bacterial samples on reduced timescales.

  8. The evolution of stellar metallicity gradients of the Milky Way disk from LSS-GAC main sequence turn-off stars: a two-phase disk formation history?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang, M -S; Yuan, H -B; Huang, Y; Wang, C; Ren, J -J; Chen, B -Q; Sun, N -C; Zhang, H -W; Huo, Z -Y; Rebassa-Mansergas, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use 297 042 main sequence turn-off stars selected from the LSS-GAC to determine the radial and vertical gradients of stellar metallicity of the Galactic disk in the anti-center direction. We determine ages of those turn-off stars by isochrone fitting and measure the temporal variations of metallicity gradients. Our results show that the gradients, both in the radial and vertical directions, exhibit significant spatial and temporal variations. The radial gradients yielded by stars of oldest ages (>11 Gyr) are essentially zero at all heights from the disk midplane, while those given by younger stars are always negative. The vertical gradients deduced from stars of oldest ages (>11Gyr) are negative and show only very weak variations with the Galactocentric distance in the disk plane, $R$, while those yielded by younger stars show strong variations with $R$. After being essentially flat at the earliest epochs of disk formation, the radial gradients steepen as age decreases, reaching a maxima (steepest) at age ...

  9. In-Situ Survival Mechanisms of U and Tc Reducing Bacteria in Contaminated Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are model subsurface organisms for studying genes involving in situ radionuclide transformation and sediment survival. Our research objective for this project has been to develop a signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) procedure and use it to identify mutants in genes of these subsurface bacteria involved in sediment survival and radionuclide reduction. The mutant genes identified in these studies allow us for the first time to describe at the genetic level microbial processes that are actually being used by environmental bacteria while growing in their natural ecosystems. Identification of these genes revealed facets of microbial physiology and ecology that are not accessible through laboratory studies. Ultimately, this information may be used to optimize bioremediation or other engineered microbial processes. Furthermore, the identification of a mutant in a gene conferring multidrug resistance in strain MR-1 shows that this widespread mechanism of antibiotic resistance, likely has its origins as a mechanism of bacterial defense against naturally occurring toxins. Studies with D. desulfuricans G20: The STM procedure first involved generating a library of 5760 G20 mutants and screening for potential non-survivors in subsurface sediment microcosms. After two rounds of screening, a total of 117 mutants were confirmed to be true non-survivors. 97 transposon insertion regions have been sequenced to date. Upon further analysis of these mutants, we classified the sediment survival genes into COG functional categories. STM mutant insertions were located in genes encoding proteins related to metabolism (33%), cellular processes (42%), and information storage and processing (17%). We also noted 8% of STM mutants identified had insertions in genes for hypothetical proteins or unknown functions. Interestingly, at least 64 of these genes encode cytoplasmic proteins, 46 encode inner membrane proteins, and only 7 encode periplasmic space and outer membrane associated proteins. Through blast search analysis, we also showed that 81 out of 94 proteins shown to be important in sediment survival have homologs in D. vulgaris, 70 have homologs in Geobacter metallireducens, and 69 have homologs in Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Some interesting proteins include ribonucleotide reductase and chemotaxis related proteins. Ribonucleotide reductase catalyzes the reductive synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides from their corresponding ribonucleotides, providing the precursors necessary for DNA synthesis. Two ribonucleotide reductase genes (nrdE, nrdD) were found to be essential for G20 survival in the sediment, but not essential for growth in the lactate-sulfate medium. Bacterial methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCP) respond to changes in the concentration of attractants and repellents in the environment.

  10. Metabolic Engineering and Modeling of Metabolic Pathways to Improve Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Navid, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Rising energy demands and the imperative to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are driving research on biofuels development. Hydrogen gas (H2) is one of the most promising biofuels and is seen as a future energy carrier by virtue of the fact that 1) it is renewable, 2) does not evolve the “greenhouse gas” CO2 in combustion, 3) liberates large amounts of energy per unit weight in combustion (having about 3 times the energy content of gasoline), and 4) is easily converted to electricity by fuel cells. Among the various bioenergy strategies, environmental groups and others say that the concept of the direct manufacture of alternative fuels, such as H2, by photosynthetic organisms is the only biofuel alternative without significant negative criticism [1]. Biological H2 production by photosynthetic microorganisms requires the use of a simple solar reactor such as a transparent closed box, with low energy requirements, and is considered as an attractive system to develop as a biocatalyst for H2 production [2]. Various purple bacteria including Rhodopseudomonas palustris, can utilize organic substrates as electron donors to produce H2 at the expense of solar energy. Because of the elimination of energy cost used for H2O oxidation and the prevention of the production of O2 that inhibits the H2-producing enzymes, the efficiency of light energy conversion to H2 by anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria is in principle much higher than that by green algae or cyanobacteria, and is regarded as one of the most promising cultures for biological H2 production [3]. Here implemented a simple and relatively straightforward strategy for hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms using sunlight, sulfur- or iron-based inorganic substrates, and CO2 as the feedstock. Carefully selected microorganisms with bioengineered beneficial traits act as the biocatalysts of the process designed to both enhance the system efficiency of CO2 fixation and the net hydrogen production rate. Additionally we applied metabolic engineering approaches guided by computational modeling for the chosen model microorganisms to enable efficient hydrogen production.

  11. Active transport, substrate specificity, and methylation of Hg(II) in anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schasfer, Jeffra [Princeton University; Rocks, Sara [Princeton University; Zheng, Wang [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Morel, Francois M [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of methylmercury (MeHg), which is biomagnified in aquatic food chains and poses a risk to human health, is effected by some iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (FeRB and SRB) in anaerobic environments. However, very little is known regarding the mechanism of uptake of inorganic Hg by these organisms, in part because of the inherent difficulty in measuring the intracellular Hg concentration. By using the FeRB Geobacter sulfurreducens and the SRB Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as model organisms, we demonstrate that Hg(II) uptake occurs by active transport. We also establish that Hg(II) uptake by G. sulfurreducens is highly dependent on the characteristics of the thiols that bind Hg(II) in the external medium, with some thiols promoting uptake and methylation and others inhibiting both. The Hg(II) uptake system of D. desulfuricans has a higher affinity than that of G. sulfurreducens and promotes Hg methylation in the presence of stronger complexing thiols. We observed a tight coupling between Hg methylation and MeHg export from the cell, suggesting that these two processes may serve to avoid the build up and toxicity of cellular Hg. Our results bring up the question of whether cellular Hg uptake is specific for Hg(II) or accidental, occurring via some essential metal importer. Our data also point at Hg(II) complexation by thiols as an important factor controlling Hg methylation in anaerobic environments.

  12. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of aerosolized bacteria collected from African dust events

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brigmon, Robin L.; Wilson, Christina A.; Yeager, Chris; Smith, Garriet W.; Polson, Shawn W.

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Twenty-one bacteria were isolated and characterized from air samples collected in Africa and the Caribbean by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Isolates were selected based on preliminary characterization as possible pathogens. Identification of the bacterial isolates was 25 achieved using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) profiling, the BIOLOG Microlog® System (carbon substrate assay), and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP)-PCR analysis. The majority of isolates (18/21) were identified as species of the genus Bacillus. Three isolates were classified within the Bacillus cereus senso lato group, which includes Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus cereus strains. Onemore »isolate was identified as a Staphylococcus sp., 30 most closely related to species (i.e Staphylococcus kloosii, Staphylococcus warneri) that are commonly associated with human or animal skin, but can also act as opportunistic pathogen. Another isolate was tentatively identified as Tsukamurella inchonensis, a known respiratory pathogen, and was resistant to the ten antibiotics tested including vancomycin.« less

  13. Sulfide controls on mercury speciation and bioavailability to methylating bacteria in sediment pore waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benoit, J.M. [Academy of Natural Sciences, St. Leonard, MD (United States). Estuarine Research Center] [Academy of Natural Sciences, St. Leonard, MD (United States). Estuarine Research Center; [Univ. of Maryland, Solomons, MD (United States); Gilmour, C.C.; Heyes, A. [Academy of Natural Sciences, St. Leonard, MD (United States). Estuarine Research Center] [Academy of Natural Sciences, St. Leonard, MD (United States). Estuarine Research Center; Mason, R.P. [Univ. of Maryland, Solomons, MD (United States)] [Univ. of Maryland, Solomons, MD (United States)

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical equilibrium model for Hg complexation in sediments with sulfidic pore waters is presented. The purpose of the model was to explain observed relationships between pore water sulfide, dissolved inorganic Hg (Hg{sub D}), and bulk methylmercury (MeHg) in surficial sediments of two biogeochemically different ecosystems, the Florida Everglades and Patuxent River, MD. The model was constructed to test the hypothesis that the availability of Hg for methylation in sediments is a function of the concentration of neutral dissolved Hg complexes rather than Hg{sup 2+} or total Hg{sub D}. The model included interaction of mercury with solids containing one or two sulfide groups, and it was able to reproduce observed Hg{sub D} and bulk MeHg trends in the two ecosystems. The model is consistent with HgS{sup 0} as the dominant neutral Hg complex and the form of Hg accumulated by methylating bacteria in sulfidic pore waters. The model-estimated decline in HgS{sup 0} with increasing sulfide was consistent with the observed decline in bulk sediments MeHg. Since bacterial Hg uptake rate is one of the factors affecting methylation rate, Hg complexation models such as the one presented are helpful in understanding the factors that control MeHg production and accumulation in aquatic ecosystems.

  14. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of aerosolized bacteria collected from African dust events

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brigmon, Robin L. [Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States); Wilson, Christina A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States); Yeager, Chris [Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States); Smith, Garriet W. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States); Polson, Shawn W. [Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States). Hollings Marine Lab.

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Twenty-one bacteria were isolated and characterized from air samples collected in Africa and the Caribbean by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Isolates were selected based on preliminary characterization as possible pathogens. Identification of the bacterial isolates was 25 achieved using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) profiling, the BIOLOG Microlog® System (carbon substrate assay), and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP)-PCR analysis. The majority of isolates (18/21) were identified as species of the genus Bacillus. Three isolates were classified within the Bacillus cereus senso lato group, which includes Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus cereus strains. One isolate was identified as a Staphylococcus sp., 30 most closely related to species (i.e Staphylococcus kloosii, Staphylococcus warneri) that are commonly associated with human or animal skin, but can also act as opportunistic pathogen. Another isolate was tentatively identified as Tsukamurella inchonensis, a known respiratory pathogen, and was resistant to the ten antibiotics tested including vancomycin.

  15. Diversity and characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in groundwater at a uranium mill tailings site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun-juan Chang; Aaron D. Peacock; Philip E. Long; John R. Stephen; James P. Mckinley; Sarah J. Macnaughton; A. K. M. Anwar Hussain; Arnold M. Saxton; David C. White

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plays a role in both natural attenuation and accelerated bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites. To realize bioremediation potential and accurately predict natural attenuation, it is important to first understand the microbial diversity of such sites. In this paper, the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in contaminated groundwater associated with a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Shiprock, N.Mex., was investigated. Two culture-independent analyses were employed: sequencing of clone libraries of PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) gene fragments and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarker analysis. A remarkable diversity among the DSR sequences was revealed, including sequences from ?-Proteobacteria, gram-positive organisms, and the Nitrospira division. PLFA analysis detected at least 52 different mid-chain-branched saturate PLFA and included a high proportion of 10me16:0. Desulfotomaculum and Desulfotomaculum-like sequences were the most dominant DSR genes detected. Those belonging to SRB within ?-Proteobacteria were mainly recovered from low-uranium (1,500 ppb) sites. Logistic regression showed a significant influence of uranium concentration over the dominance of this cluster of sequences (P ? 0.0001). This strong association indicates that Desulfotomaculum has remarkable

  16. Changes in Translational Efficiency is a Dominant Regulatory Mechanism in the Environmental Response of Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Ronald C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Serres, Margrethe H.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Hill, Eric A.; Romine, Margaret F.; Lipton, Mary S.; Wiley, H. S.

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand how cell physiological state affects mRNA translation, we used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 grown under steady state conditions at either aerobic or suboxic conditions. Using a combination of quantitative proteomics and RNA-Seq, we generated high-confidence data on >1000 mRNA and protein pairs. By using a steady state model, we found that differences in protein-mRNA ratios were primarily caused by differences in the translational efficiency of specific genes. When oxygen levels were lowered, 28% of the proteins showed at least a 2-fold change in expression. Altered transcription levels appeared responsible for 26% of the protein changes, altered translational efficiency appeared responsible for 46% and a combination of both were responsible for the remaining 28%. Changes in translational efficiency were significantly correlated with the codon usage pattern of the genes and measurable tRNA pools changed in response to altered O2 levels. Our results suggest that changes in the translational efficiency of proteins, in part caused by altered tRNA pools, is a major determinant of regulated protein expression in bacteria.

  17. Technique development for uiper critical field studies of SmFeAs(O,F) in the 300T single turn system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcdonald, Ross D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balakirev, F. F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Altarawneh, M. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Betts, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moll, Philip Jw [ETH ZURICH; Zhigadlo, N D [ETH ZURICH; Karpinski, J [ETH ZURICH; Batlogg, B. [ETH ZURICH

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In high temperature superconductors, such as the most recent class of iron pnictides, extremely high upper critical fields H{sub c2} are common. The determination of H{sub c2}(T) is crucial to understand the detailed nature of the superconductor, in particular H{sub c2}(T = 0K) is of great interest. It is not only related to fundamental properties of the system, it is furthermore of great importance for materials science, as it is the ultimate limit of applicability of this superconductor in high field applications. However, this important quantity can only be estimated by extrapolation, as H{sub c2}(T = 0K) well exceeds hundreds of Tesla in optimally doped SillFeAs(O,F). We are developing methods to measure Ha(T) in direct transport in the extreme magnetic fields generated by the LANL single turn magnet.

  18. What Employees Need (and Want) to Hear When Justifying the Suspension of a Regulated Metals Plan for the Processing of Drums Containing Metal Turnings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd Potts, T. [WESKEM, LLC, Oak Ridge Turnpike, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hylko, J.M. [Paducah Remediation Services, LLC, Kevil, KY (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Regulated Metals Plan (RMP) was implemented for outdoor work activities involving the removal and disposition of approximately 4,000 deteriorated waste drums containing 236 metric tonnes (260 tons) of lead turnings from various, unspecified machine shop facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Until exposure monitoring could prove otherwise, the work area established for processing the drums was conservatively defined as a Lead Regulated Area (LRA) subject to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Lead Standard found in Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1910.1025. The vast majority of the analytical results for the industrial hygiene breathing zone samples collected and tested for arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, selenium, silver, and thallium using the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's analytical method 7300 were equivalent to the laboratory detection limits for each analyte. All results were less than 6% of their respective Permissible Exposure Limits (PEL), except for one nickel result that was approximately 17% of its PEL. The results provided justification to eventually down-post the LRA to existing employee protection requirements. In addition to removing the deteriorated drums and accompanying debris, the success of this project was quantified in terms of zero recordable injuries. The primary contributor in achieving this success was the sharing and communication of information between management, safety, and the field teams. Specifically, this was what the employees needed (and wanted) to hear when justifying the suspension of the RMP for the processing of drums containing metal turnings. Daily briefings on the status of the project and field monitoring results were just as important as maintaining budget and schedule milestones. Also, the Environmental, Safety and Health organization maintained its presence by continuing to monitor evolving field conditions to ensure the effectiveness of its plans and procedures. (authors)

  19. Turning greenhouse gases into gold

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of electricity, the CO2 could be transformed into formic acid, formaldehyde and methanol. Now simulations conducted on NERSC supercomputers explain why. Image: V. Batista...

  20. Composition, Reactivity, and Regulations of Extracellular Metal-Reducing Structures (Bacterial Nanowires) Produced by Dissimilatory Metal Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholten, Johannes

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research proposal seeks to describe the composition and function of electrically conductive appendages known as bacterial nanowires. This project targets bacterial nanowires produced by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria Shewanella and Geobacter. Specifically, this project will investigate the role of these structures in the reductive transformation of iron oxides as solid phase electron acceptors, as well as uranium as a dissolved electron acceptor that forms nanocrystalline particles of uraninite upon reduction.