Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Infill drilling enhances waterflood recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sets of west Texas carbonate reservoir and waterflood data were studied to evaluate the impact of infill drilling on waterflood recovery. Results show that infill drilling enhanced the current and projected waterflood recovery from most of the reservoirs. The estimated ultimate and incremental infill-drilling waterflood recovery was correlated with well spacing and other reservoir and process parameters. Results of the correlation indicate that reducing well spacing from 40 to 20 acres (16 to 8 ha) per well would increase the oil recovery by 8 to 9% of the original oil in place (OOIP). Because of the limited data base and regressional nature of the correlation models, the infill-drilling recovery estimate must be used with caution.

Wu, C.H.; Jardon, M. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Laughlin, B.A. (Union Pacific Research Co. (US))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Field Demonstration of Horizontal Infill Drilling Using Cost-effective Integrated Reservoir Modeling--Mississippian Carbonates, Central Kansas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mississippian carbonate reservoirs have produced in excess of 1 billion barrels of oil in Kansas accounting for over 16% of the state's production. With declining production from other age reservoirs, the contribution of Mississippian reservoirs to Kansas's oil production has risen to 43% as of 2004. However, solution-enhanced features such as vertical shale intervals extending from the karst erosional surface at the top introduce complexities/compartmentalizations in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs. Coupled with this, strong water drives charge many of these reservoirs resulting in limited drainage from vertical wells due to high water cuts after an initial period of low water production. Moreover, most of these fields are operated by small independent operators without access to the knowledge bank of modern research in field characterization and exploitation/development practices. Thus, despite increasing importance of Mississippian fields to Kansas production, these fields are beset with low recovery factors and high abandonment rates leaving significant resources in the ground. Worldwide, horizontal infill wells have been successful in draining compartmentalized reservoirs with limited pressure depletion. The intent of this project was to demonstrate the application of horizontal wells to successfully exploit the remaining potential in mature Mississippian fields of the mid-continent. However, it is of critical importance that for horizontal wells to be economically successful, they must be selectively targeted. This project demonstrated the application of initial and secondary screening methods, based on publicly available data, to quickly shortlist fields in a target area for detailed studies to evaluate their potential to infill horizontal well applications. Advanced decline curve analyses were used to estimate missing well-level production data and to verify if the well produced under unchanging bottom-hole conditions--two commonly occurring data constraints afflicting mature Mississippian fields. A publicly accessible databank of representative petrophysical properties and relationships was developed to overcome the paucity of such data that is critical to modeling the storage and flow in these reservoirs. Studies in 3 Mississippian fields demonstrated that traditional reservoir models built by integrating log, core, DST, and production data from existing wells on 40-acre spacings are unable to delineate karst-induced compartments, thus making 3D-seismic data critical to characterize these fields. Special attribute analyses on 3D data were shown to delineate reservoir compartments and predict those with pay porosities. Further testing of these techniques is required to validate their applicability in other Mississippian reservoirs. This study shows that detailed reservoir characterization and simulation on geomodels developed by integrating wireline log, core, petrophysical, production and pressure, and 3D-seismic data enables better evaluation of a candidate field for horizontal infill applications. In addition to reservoir compartmentalization, two factors were found to control the economic viability of a horizontal infill well in a mature Mississippian field: (a) adequate reservoir pressure support, and (b) an average well spacing greater than 40-acres.

Saibal Bhattacharya

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

An integrated approach to characterize reservoir connectivity to improve waterflood infill drilling recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infill drilling can significantly improve reservoir interwell connectivity in heterogeneous reservoirs, thereby enhances the waterflood recovery. This study defines and investigates the Hydraulic Interwell Connectivity (HIC) concept to characterize and estimate the reservoir connectivity, quantitatively. This approach is an integrated study of reservoir characterization, geostatistics, production performance and reservoir engineering. In this study HIC is quantitatively defined as the ratio of observed fluid flow rate to a maximum possible (ideal) flow rate between any combination of any two wells in the producing unit. The spatial distribution of HIC can be determined for different layers or total net pay of the reservoir. Geostatistics is used to evaluate the horizontal and vertical variation of HIC in the reservoir. The spatial variation of HIC can be used to describe the degree of communication between injectors and producers. This spatial distribution of HIC can also serve as a guide for selecting infill well locations. A West Texas producing unit, JL Johnson "AB", with average reservoir permeability of 0.90 md, is used as an example to illustrate the application of this approach. The waterflood infill drilling recovery is improved by incorporating the HIC in simulation study. It is a practical approach which facilitates and eases the implementation of targeted infill drilling. This approach makes targeted infill drilling more economical over pattern infill drilling by eliminating the drilling of poor injectors and producers. It is found to be a useful concept and procedure to design, implement and optimize infill drilling programs.

Malik, Zaheer Ahmad

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Socioeconomic impact of infill drilling recovery from carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, West Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This investigative study presents results on the socioeconomic impact of infill drilling recovery from carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin. The amount of incremental oil and gas production from infill drilling in 37 carbonate reservoir units is established using decline curve analysis. The increase in incremental recovery is used to compute the amount of increased revenue and taxes (local, state and federal). A job market analysis is performed to determine the impact of these increased revenues on primary jobs in the oil industry and secondary jobs in the community. Secondary jobs are generated by oil industry workers spending money in the community. The appropriation of the estimated taxes is analyzed to determine which government agencies benefit most from the infill drilling. The observations from this research are that most of the San Andres and Clearfork carbonate reservoir units in the Permian Basin are potentially profitable to infill drill. The incremental oil and gas production from infill drilling could maintain or create many primary jobs within the local oil industry and also secondary jobs in the community. The incremental production could generate taxes which would greatly benefit certain local, state, and federal government agencies. This research proposal presents a methodology to calculate the amount of incremental oil and gas production from infill drilling, calculate the amount of revenue and taxes generated from the incremental production, determine how the increased reserves affects the job market in the communities and how the increased taxes help government agencies. These results could be helpful in bolstering the oil industries image in local town meetings, in government permitting processes, and in lobbying state and federal congresses to acquire investment aid or tax breaks for oil field investment projects. The technical contributions of this research proposal are as follows: (1) presents a methodology including the parameters used in determining profitable infill drilling projects in the San Andres and Clearfork units of the Permian Basin, (2) develops a correlation local town meetings, in lobbying state and aid or tax breaks for oil between the increased revenues of infill drilling and between the increased revenues of infill drilling and the creation of jobs in the Permian basin communities, and (3) develops a correlation between the increased tax revenues of infill drilling recovery and the benefits to local, state, and federal agencies.

Jagoe, Bryan Keith

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infill drilling if wells on a uniform spacing without regard to reservoir performance and characterization foes not optimize reservoir development because it fails to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. New and emerging technologies, such as geostatistical modeling, rigorous decline curve analysis, reservoir rock typing, and special core analysis can be used to develop a 3-D simulation model for prediction of infill locations.

None

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Horizontal drilling method and apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes an apparatus for drilling a highly deviated well into a petroleum formation the apparatus comprising a drill pipe extending from a surface location to a down-hole drilling assembly through a curved wellbore. It comprises a down-hole motor attached to a bit at a first end, the down-hole motor having a bent housing; a bent sub in the down-hole drilling assembly located above the motor; and a pony collar located between the motor and the bent sub, the pony collar having sufficient mass to substantially hold the motor against a wellbore wall during drilling operations.

Rehm, W.A.; Trunk, T.D.; Baseflug, T.D.; Cromwell, S.L.; Hickman, G.A.; Nickel, R.D.; Lyons, M.S.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

Portable top drive cuts horizontal drilling costs  

SciTech Connect

Economic analysis of a seven-well, long-reach horizontal drilling program into an unconsolidated, heavy-oil-bearing reservoir in Winter field near the Alberta/Saskatchewan border in Canada reveals that -- in the right application -- renting a portable top drive drilling system can reduce total drilling costs. Use of the portable top drive combined with other cost-saving measures enabled Saskoil, one of Canada`s larger independents, to drill more cheaply, on a cost-per-meter basis, in 1993 than in 1992. This was despite significant rental rates for drilling rigs and directional drilling services caused by increased demand in Western Canada. Total cost savings of 10% on wells that would otherwise cost in the (C) $500,000 range are believed realistic. Based on this year`s performance, Saskoil recommends top drive for the company`s future horizontal wells in this area. This article describes the operator`s horizontal well program, advantages of top drive in that program and how it was installed and applied. Estimated time savings for six wells, plus other ways top drive can cut costs and improve operations are discussed.

Jackson, B. [Saskoil, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Yager, D. [Tesco Drilling Tech., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Horizontal drilling boosts Pennsylvania’s natural gas production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Between 2009 and 2011, Pennsylvania's natural gas production more than quadrupled due to expanded horizontal drilling combined with hydraulic fracturing.

10

Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

Venable, S.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

Venable, S.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Horizontal flow drilling requires focus on well control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal wells drilled underbalanced or while flowing must have surface equipment and a blow-out preventer stack specially designed for circulating operations. Functional well control methods for drilling horizontal wells have been developed in specific regions worldwide. Special safety equipment and procedures, however, are still required in most horizontal development applications. The challenge for horizontal drilling development and underbalanced drilling is to overcome the obstacles of government regulation, reduce pollution dangers, and improve personnel and equipment safety. Well control techniques tailored to the demands of each field can help overcome these challenges. Several well control elements must be addressed carefully on each horizontal well: drilling fluid requirements, well control procedures and equipment, and surface equipment and special considerations for handling hydrocarbons produced while drilling. The paper discusses each of these elements for underbalanced horizontal drilling.

Tangedahl, M.J. (RBOP Oil Tools International Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

13

Shallow horizontal drilling in unconsolidated sands offshore California  

SciTech Connect

Four shallow horizontal wells were drilled from Platform C in Dos Cuadras field offshore California to recover reserves inaccessible with conventional drilling techniques. The wells had true vertical depths (TVD's) ranging from 746 to 989 ft with total horizontal displacements from 1,613 to 3,788 ft. The wells had horizontal displacement TVD ratios up to 3.95. The targets were unconsolidated, high-permeability sands. This paper details well planning, drilling, and completion.

Payne, J.D.; Bunyak, M.J. (Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Huston, C.W. (Smith International Inc., Tyler, TX (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Guided Horizontal Drilling: A Primer for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is intended to be an introduction to guided horizontal drilling, also termed horizontal directional drilling (HDD), as an alternative construction method to open trenching for the installation of underground power cables, pipes, ducts, or conduits. It is written for an audience that includes electric power engineers, designers, operations and procurement personnel. The document introduces guided horizontal drilling technology, the equipment, and several critical aspects of operating the equ...

1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

Drilling Sideways -- A Review of Horizontal Well Technology and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-TR-0565 Distribution Category UC-950 Drilling Sideways -- A Review of Horizontal Well Technology and Its Domestic Application April 1993 Energy Information ...

16

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Annual report, June 13, 1994--June 12, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This project has used a multi-disciplinary approach employing geology, geophysics, and engineering to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and management activities to design and implement an optimized infill drilling program at the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit in Gaines County, Texas. The activities during the first Budget Period have consisted of developing an integrated reservoir description from geological, engineering, and geostatistical studies, and using this description for reservoir flow simulation. Specific reservoir management activities are being identified and tested. The geologically targeted infill drilling program will be implemented using the results of this work. A significant contribution of this project is to demonstrate the use of cost-effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability shallow-shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. The techniques that are outlined for the formulation of an integrated reservoir description apply to all oil and gas reservoirs, but are specifically tailored for use in the heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs of West Texas.

Pande, P.K.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Drilling Sideways - A Review of Horizontal Well Technology and Its Domestic Application  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Focuses primarily on domestic horizontal drilling applications, past and present, and on salient aspects of current and near-future horizontal drilling and completion technology.

Robert F. King

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Crosswell Imaging Technology & Advanced DSR Navigation for Horizontal Directional Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Phase II is to develop and demonstrate real-time measurement-while-drilling (MWD) for guidance and navigation of drill strings during horizontal drilling operations applicable to both short and long holes. The end product of Phase II is a functional drill-string assembly outfitted with a commercial version of Drill String Radar (DSR). Project Objectives Develop and demonstrate a dual-phase methodology of in-seam drilling, imaging, and structure confirmation. This methodology, illustrated in Figure 1, includes: (1) Using RIM to image between drill holes for seam thickness estimates and in-seam structures detection. Completed, February 2005; and (2) Using DSR for real-time MWD guidance and navigation of drillstrings during horizontal drilling operations. Completed, November 2008. As of November 2008, the Phase II portion of Contract DE-FC26-04NT42085 is about 99% complete, including milestones and tasks original outlined as Phase II work. The one percent deficiency results from MSHA-related approvals which have yet to be granted (at the time of reporting). These approvals are pending and are do not negatively impact the scope of work or project objectives.

Larry Stolarczyk

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

19

Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling  

SciTech Connect

Initial drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to reservoir performance and characterization, must become a process of the past. Such efforts do not optimize reservoir development as they fail to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. These reservoirs are typically characterized by: o Large, discontinuous pay intervals o Vertical and lateral changes in reservoir properties o Low reservoir energy o High residual oil saturation o Low recovery efficiency

P. K. Pande

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

20

Demonstration of a utility industry horizontal drilling system: Horizontal well AMH-5 installation report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development initiated an integrated demonstration of innovative technologies and systems for cleanup of VOCs in soils and groundwater at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1989. The overall goal of the program is demonstration of multiple technologies and systems in the fields of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation at a single test bed. Innovative technologies are compared to one another and to baseline technologies in terms of technical performance and cost effectiveness. Transfer of successfully demonstrated technologies and systems to DOE environmental restoration organizations, to other government agencies, and to industry is a critical part of the program. Directional drilling has been shown to be a successful technique for enhancing access to the subsurface, thus improving remediation systems, especially remediation systems which perform in situ. Demonstration of an innovative directional drilling system at the Integrated Demonstration Site at the SRS, was initiated in June of 1992. The directional drilling system was designed to install an in situ remediation system. The drilling system is an experimental compaction/dry drilling technique developed by Charles Machine Works (Ditch Witch{reg_sign}) of Perry, Oklahoma. A horizontal well was installed in the M Area of the SRS below and parallel to an abandoned tile process sewer line. The installation of the horizontal well was a two-part process. Part one consisted of drilling the borehole, and part two was the horizontal well completion.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Horizontal underbalanced drilling of gas wells with coiled tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coiled tubing drilling technology is gaining popularity and momentum as a significant and reliable method of drilling horizontal underbalanced wells. It is quickly moving into new frontiers. To this point, most efforts in the Western Canadian Basin have been focused towards sweet oil reservoirs in the 900--1300 m true vertical depth (TVD) range, however there is an ever-increasing interest in deeper and gas-producing formations. Significant design challenges on both conventional and coiled tubing drilling operations are imposed when attempting to drill these formations underbalanced. Coiled tubing is an ideal technology for underbalanced drilling due to its absence of drillstring connections resulting in continuous underbalanced capabilities. This also makes it suitable for sour well drilling and live well intervention without the risk of surface releases of reservoir gas. Through the use of pressure deployment procedures it is possible to complete the drilling operation without need to kill the well, thereby maintaining underbalanced conditions right through to the production phase. The use of coiled tubing also provides a means for continuous wireline communication with downhole steering, logging and pressure recording devices.

Cox, R.J.; Li, J.; Lupick, G.S.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drillings. Annual technical progress report, June 13, 1996 to June 12, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infill drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to reservoir performance and characterization, does not optimize reservoir development because it fails to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. New and emerging technologies, such as geostatistical modeling, rigorous decline curve analysis, reservoir rock typing, and special core analysis can be used to develop a 3-D simulation model for prediction of infill locations. Other technologies, such as inter-well injection tracers and magnetic flow conditioners, can also aid in the efficient evaluation and operation of both injection and producing wells. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate useful and cost effective methods of exploitation of the shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs of the Permian Basin located in West Texas.

Nevans, Jerry W.; Blasingame, Tom; Doublet, Louis; Kelkar, Mohan; Freeman, George; Callard, Jeff; Moore, David; Davies, David; Vessell, Richard; Pregger, Brian; Dixon, Bill

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

23

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Quarterly progress report, June 13, 1996--September 12, 1996  

SciTech Connect

At this time, eighteen (18) 10-acre infill wells have been drilled as part of the Field Demonstration phase of the project. Of the fourteen producing wells drilled to date, twelve are currently on production, and ten are pumped-off and producing at stable rates. Current Unit production is approximately 3,600-3,700 STBO/D, and approximately 850 STBO/D incremental production has been added to date. The remaining producing well and four injection wells are currently being completed. A change in the Statement of Work has been approved so that we can drill additional 10-acre infill wells during the next quarter as budget constraints allow. Production flowlines are laid for each new producing well as they are put on production. Injection lines are being laid for the injection wells as they are completed. All data required for the validation of the Budget Period I Reservoir Characterization, Reservoir Management, and Reservoir Simulation Studies are being acquired and analyzed during the Field Demonstration Period.

NONE

1996-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

24

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Quarterly technical progress report, September 13--December 12, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The eighteen 10-acre infill wells which were drilled as part of the field demonstration portion of the project are all currently in service with no operational problems. These wells consist of fourteen producing wells and four injection wells. The producing wells are currently producing a total of approximately 450 bopd, down from a peak rate of 900 bopd. Unit production is currently averaging approximately 2,700 bopd, 12,000 bwpd and 18,000 bwipd. The paper describes progress on hydraulic fracture design, reservoir surveillance, data analysis procedures, and deterministic modeling and simulation.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Site selection, drilling, and completion of two horizontal wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the geologic site selection studies, planning, drilling, completing, stimulating, and testing of two horizontal wells drilled in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Each horizontal well was designed and managed by BDM as the prime contractor to the Department of Energy. The first well was drilled with industry partner Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation in Putnam County, West Virginia. The second well was drilled with Consolidated Natural Gas Company in Calhoun County, West Virginia. This report summarizes four reports prepared by BDM which detail the site selection rationale and the drilling and completion operations of each well. Each horizontal well is currently producing commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The successful application of horizontal well technology represent continued development of the technology for application to tight and unconventional natural gas resources of the United States. Continued technology development is expected to ultimately result in commercial horizontal well drilling activity by industry in the Appalachian Basin.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir engineering, and seismic surveys; and future work on drilling location selection, drilling, and well completion. (AT)

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir engineering, and seismic surveys; and future work on drilling location selection, drilling, and well completion. (AT)

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Identifying Infill Locations and Underperformer Wells in Mature Fields using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying Infill Locations and Underperformer Wells in Mature Fields using Monthly Production wells rather than the entire field. #12;Introduction Objective Methodology Results Conclusion Objective field. Identify opportunities in mature fields: Sweet spots for infill drilling. Underperformer wells

Mohaghegh, Shahab

29

Technology assessment of vertical and horizontal air drilling potential in the United States. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the research was to assess the potential for vertical, directional and horizontal air drilling in the United States and to evaluate the current technology used in air drilling. To accomplish the task, the continental United States was divided into drilling regions and provinces. The map in Appendix A shows the divisions. Air drilling data were accumulated for as many provinces as possible. The data were used to define the potential problems associated with air drilling, to determine the limitations of air drilling and to analyze the relative economics of drilling with air versus drilling mud. While gathering the drilling data, operators, drilling contractors, air drilling contractors, and service companies were contacted. Their opinion as to the advantages and limitations of air drilling were discussed. Each was specifically asked if they thought air drilling could be expanded within the continental United States and where that expansion could take place. The well data were collected and placed in a data base. Over 165 records were collected. Once in the data base, the information was analyzed to determine the economics of air drilling and to determine the limiting factors associated with air drilling.

Carden, R.S.

1993-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

30

Analysis of Parameters Affecting Costs of Horizontal Directional Drilling Projects in the United States for Municipal Infrastructure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) is a growing and expanding trenchless method utilized to install pipelines from 2 to 60 inch diameters for lengths over 10,000… (more)

Vilfrant, Emmania Claudyne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Site selection, drilling, and completion of two horizontal wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the geologic site selection studies, planning, drilling, completing, stimulating, and testing of two horizontal wells drilled in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Each horizontal well was designed and managed by BDM as the prime contractor to the Department of Energy. The first well was drilled with industry partner Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation in Putnam County, West Virginia. The second well was drilled with Consolidated Natural Gas Company in Calhoun County, West Virginia. This report summarizes four reports prepared by BDM which detail the site selection rationale and the drilling and completion operations of each well. Each horizontal well is currently producing commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The successful application of horizontal well technology represent continued development of the technology for application to tight and unconventional natural gas resources of the United States. Continued technology development is expected to ultimately result in commercial horizontal well drilling activity by industry in the Appalachian Basin.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Applicability of petroleum horizontal drilling technology to hazardous waste site characterization and remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal wells have the potential to become an important tool for use in characterization, remediation and monitoring operations at hazardous waste disposal, chemical manufacturing, refining and other sites where subsurface pollution may develop from operations or spills. Subsurface pollution of groundwater aquifers can occur at these sites by leakage of surface disposal ponds, surface storage tanks, underground storage tanks (UST), subsurface pipelines or leakage from surface operations. Characterization and remediation of aquifers at or near these sites requires drilling operations that are typically shallow, less than 500-feet in depth. Due to the shallow nature of polluted aquifers, waste site subsurface geologic formations frequently consist of unconsolidated materials. Fractured, jointed and/or layered high compressive strength formations or compacted caliche type formations can also be encountered. Some formations are unsaturated and have pore spaces that are only partially filled with water. Completely saturated underpressured aquifers may be encountered in areas where the static ground water levels are well below the ground surface. Each of these subsurface conditions can complicate the drilling and completion of wells needed for monitoring, characterization and remediation activities. This report describes some of the equipment that is available from petroleum drilling operations that has direct application to groundwater characterization and remediation activities. A brief discussion of petroleum directional and horizontal well drilling methodologies is given to allow the reader to gain an understanding of the equipment needed to drill and complete horizontal wells. Equipment used in river crossing drilling technology is also discussed. The final portion of this report is a description of the drilling equipment available and how it can be applied to groundwater characterization and remediation activities.

Goranson, C.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A parametric study on the benefits of drilling horizontal and multilateral wells in coalbed methane reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent years have witnessed a renewed interest in development of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs. Optimizing CBM production is of interest to many operators. Drilling horizontal and multilateral wells is gaining Popularity in many different coalbed reservoirs, with varying results. This study concentrates on variations of horizontal and multilateral-well configurations and their potential benefits. In this study, horizontal and several multilateral drilling patterns for CBM reservoirs are studied. The reservoir parameters that have been studied include gas content, permeability, and desorption characteristics. Net present value (NPV) has been used as the yard stick for comparing different drilling configurations. Configurations that have been investigated are single-, dual-, tri-, and quad-lateral wells along with fishbone (also known as pinnate) wells. In these configurations, the total length of horizontal wells and the spacing between laterals (SBL) have been studied. It was determined that in the cases that have been studied in this paper (all other circumstances being equal), quadlateral wells are the optimum well configuration.

Maricic, N.; Mohaghegh, S.D.; Artun, E. [Chevron Energy Technology Co., Houston, TX (USA)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Method and apparatus for drilling horizontal holes in geological structures from a vertical bore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a method and apparatus for drilling horizontal holes in geological strata from a vertical position. The geological structures intended to be penetrated in this fashion are coal seams, as for in situ gasification or methane drainage, or in oil-bearing strata for increasing the flow rate from a pre-existing well. Other possible uses for this device might be for use in the leaching of uranium ore from underground deposits or for introducing horizontal channels for water and steam injections.

Summers, David A. (Rolla, MO); Barker, Clark R. (Rolla, MO); Keith, H. Dean (Rolla, MO)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Method and application of horizontal slice volumetrics to waterflood management and horizontal drilling  

SciTech Connect

A computer mapping program was used to make horizontal slices of pore volume. The goal was to create maps that showed the distribution of pore volume vertically and laterally throughout the reservoir. That information was used for studying waterflood feasibility, monitoring an existing waterflood, and planning a horizontal well. This work was done at the United States Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills, CA. The reservoirs are the Miocene aged Northwest Stevens A sands and T N sands. These sands are a series of stacked deep water turbidites draped across the western nose of a plunging anticline. To determine the reservoir sensitivity to the approach used to calculate horizontal slice volume, two methods were tested. The first involves creation of four isochores, bounded above by the sand top or base and below by the slice top or base, whose volumes are combined to give the slice volume. The second involves creation of a grid of the slice itself from which slice volume is calculated.

Deshpande, A.; Flemings, P.B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)); Huang, J. (Exxon Production Research Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

APPLICATION OF WATER-JET HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNOLOGY TO DRILL AND ACIDIZE HORIZONTAL DRAIN HOLES, TEDBIT (SAN ANDRES) FIELD, GAINES COUNTY, TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

The San Andres Formation is one of the major hydrocarbon-producing units in the Permian Basin, with multiple reservoirs contained within the dolomitized subtidal portions of upward shoaling carbonate shelf cycles. The test well is located in Tedbit (San Andres) Field in northeastern Gaines County, Texas, in an area of scattered San Andres production associated with local structural highs. Selected on the basis of geological and historical data, the Oil and Gas Properties Wood No. 1 well is considered to be typical of a large number of San Andres stripper wells in the Permian Basin. Thus, successful completion of horizontal drain holes in this well would demonstrate a widely applicable enhanced recovery technology. Water-jet horizontal drilling is an emerging technology with the potential to provide significant economic benefits in marginal wells. Forecast benefits include lower recompletion costs and improved hydrocarbon recoveries. The technology utilizes water under high pressure, conveyed through small-diameter coiled tubing, to jet horizontal drain holes into producing formations. Testing of this technology was conducted with inconclusive results. Paraffin sludge and mechanical problems were encountered in the wellbore, initially preventing the water-jet tool from reaching the kick-off point. After correcting these problems and attempting to cut a casing window with the water-jet milling assembly, lateral jetting was attempted without success.

Michael W. Rose

2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

37

Underbalanced coiled-tubing-drilled horizontal well in the North Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maersk Olie and Gas A/S (Maersk Oil) has drilled a 3,309-ft-long near-horizontal drainhole with coiled tubing to a total measured depth (MD) of 11,000 ft in the Danish sector of the North Sea. The well was completed in may 1994 as a 3{1/2}-in. openhole producer in the Gorm field chalk reservoir. Part of the well was drilled at underbalanced conditions, and oil production rates of up to 1,100 STB/D were reached during drilling. Conventional well-test equipment was used for handling returns. A nearby process facilities platform supplied lift gas and received the produced hydrocarbons during the drilling phase. Worth noting are the penetration of several chert layers, the fairly long reach, and the application of geosteering. Indications were that the well productivity was significantly improved compared with that of a conventionally drilled well, but problems were experienced with borehole stability in a fractured region.

Wodka, P.; Tirsgaard, H.; Damgaard, A.P. [Maersk Oil, Copenhagen (Denmark); Adamsen, C.J. [Maersk Oil, Esbjerg (Denmark)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Evaluation of polymer free drill-in fluids for use in high productivity, horizontal well completions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advancements in deepwater drilling have necessitated the use of more specialized reservoir drill-in fluids (RDIF). These RDIFs must exhibit unique rheological properties while minimizing formation damage. Xanthan gum biopolymer is generally used as a primary viscosifier in RDIFs. In high salinity brines the high shear rate viscosity that xanthan gum provides can approach levels that could exceed the fracture gradient of the well. Therefore, it is important to maintain a xanthan gum concentration that keeps the equivalent circulating density at a modest level. Reducing the xanthan gum level, however, compromises the hole cleaning properties that the low- shear-rate viscosity provides. Xanthan gum biopolymers are also associated with formation damage, which inhibits the flow of oil and gas during production. A new RDIF, which utilizes no xanthan gum biopolymer, has been recently developed. The new product uses a starch instead of polymer to develop rheological properties. This fluid will primarily be targeted for production zone drilling in highly deviated and horizontal wells. This research focused on filtercake cleanup and the reduced formation damage associated with this biopolymer-free fluid. The behavior of the polymer free fluid was analyzed developing tests at different temperatures, at different drill solids content, and with different treatment fluids. The laboratory methods used were a ceramic disc cell and a linear flow cell. The former will permit an analysis of the time that a certain cleaning treatment takes to flow through a filter cake. The latter simulates well completions in unconsolidated horizontal well reservoirs permitting the estimation of formation damage produced by drilling and completion fluids and the effectiveness of the cleaning treatment applied. Multivariate statistical analysis was performed with the experimental results obtained. Comparison with conventional RDIF data from polymer carbonate and sized salt fluids provided informative contrasts in performance.

Falla Ramirez, Jorge H

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Improved recovery using horizontal drilling in the Dundee Formation Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to demonstrate that oil production from selected fields in the Dundee Formation (Dev.) of Michigan can be substantially increased, perhaps restored to near--original production levels in some fields in Michigan, by utilizing horizontal drain wells. Devonian rocks have been the most prolific hydrocarbon producers of any system in the Michigan Basin. The Traverse, Dundee, and Lucas Formations have produced nearly all of the 525 Mbbls of oil and 150 Bcf of gas since the late 1920`s, 50% of the state`s oil and 7% of the state`s natural gas production. The Dundee Formation is Michigan`s all-time leader with 352 million barrels of oil and 42 billion cubic feet of gas. Crystal Field in Montcalm County, MI, selected as a field trial for this project is such a field. Analysis of production data for Crystal Field suggests that an additional 200,000 bbls of oil can be produced using 1 strategically located horizontal well. Total addition production from the Crystal Field could be as much as 6-8 Mbbls. Spin-offs from the technology developed in this project to other fields has the potential to increase Dundee production in Michigan by 35%, adding 80-100 Mbbls to the cumulative production. The approach combines proven, cost-effective horizontal drilling technology with modern reservoir characterization and management. A total of 30 Dundee fields will be characterized including the Crystal Field. Well logs, other well data, drilling, and production data and rock samples from the Dundee Fm. will be obtained, assembled, and input into digital databases designed for this project. Computer models describing the diagenetic, stratigraphic and thermal evolution of the Michigan Basin will be developed and applied to the Crystal Field reservoir. A post-mortem study is scheduled to monitor the effect of the horizontal well on Crystal Field production.

Harrison, W.B. III; Wood, J.R.; Huntoon, J.E.; Pennington, W.; Tester, C.; Taylor, E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Quarterly technical progress report, March 13, 1996--June 12, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At this stage, the main emphasis is on the Field Demonstration phase of the project. The drilling portion of the Field Demonstration has been divided into two separate phases. We are currently proceeding with the drilling and completion of the first eleven Phase I wells. Locations for the additional seven Phase III wells were chosen at a Technical Committee meeting during the first week of June. Preliminary results have been very encouraging as all the wells are producing at or above their forecasted rates. Phase I includes the drilling of four producers and one injection well (10-acre nominal spacing) in both the Section 329 study area and the Section 326/327 study area, as well as one producing well in Section 362. Phase I will be completed during the first week of July. Phase II drilling will involve the completion of the waterflood patterns to the west of the Phase I areas in Sections 329 and 327, consisting of two producers and one injection well in each area. The final Phase II well will be located near the southwest corner of Section 324, in an area of the Unit that remains relatively undrained. Producer-injection well conversions will be performed in this area, as well as other peripheral areas of the Unit to add needed water injection.

NONE

1996-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Drilling Sideways -- A Review of Horizontal Well Technology and Its Domestic Application  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

TR-0565 TR-0565 Distribution Category UC-950 Drilling Sideways -- A Review of Horizontal Well Technology and Its Domestic Application April 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, under the general direction of Diane W. Lique, Director of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Craig H. Cranston, Chief of the Reserves and Production Branch, and David F. Morehouse, Senior Supervisory Geologist. Information regarding

42

Geological aspects of drilling horizontal wells in steam flood reservoirs, west side, southern San Joaquin Valley, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shell Western E P Inc. has drilled 11 horizontal wells in four mature steam floods in the Coalinga, South Belridge, and Midway-Sunset fields. Two medium radius wells are producing from the Pliocene Etchegoin Formation in Coalinga. One medium radius well is producing from the Pleistocene Tulare Formation in South Belridge field. Three short radius and five medium radius wells are producing from the upper Miocene, Sub-Hoyt and Potter sands in Midway-Sunset field. Horizontal wells at the base of these reservoirs and/or structurally downdip near the oil-water contact are ideally suited to take advantage of the gravity drainage production mechanism. Reservoir studies and production experience have shown these horizontal wells should increase reserves, improve recovery efficiency, improve the oil-steam ratio, and improve project profitability. Geological considerations of targeting the wells vary between fields because of the different depositional environments and resulting reservoir characteristics. The thin sands and semicontinuous shales in the Tulare Formation and the Etchegoin Formation require strict structural control on the top and base of the target sand. In the Sub-Hoyt and Potter sands, irregularities of the oil-water contact and sand and shale discontinuities must be understood. Logging and measurement while drilling provide geosteering capability in medium radius wells. Teamwork between all engineering disciplines and drilling and producing operations has been critical to horizontal well success.

Crough, D.D.; Holman, M.L.; Sande, J.J. (Shell Western E P Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

PREDICTION OF CUTTINGS BED HEIGHT WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS IN DRILLING HORIZONTAL AND HIGHLY DEVIATED WELLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND HIGHLY DEVIATED WELLS Doguhan Yilmaz, Mayang Tyagi Craft & Hawkins Department of Petroleum Engineering Louisiana State University Abstract In oil well drilling, the efficient transport of drilled cuttings from the well bottom to the surface is an important process affecting the overall drilling performance

Ullmer, Brygg

44

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated June 23, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/publications/EPreports/Shale_Gas_Primer_2009.pdf Good of shale gas drilling in New York State, as well as the most comprehensive collection of data and consultant-supplied analyses Addressing the Environmental Risks from Shale Gas Development (2010) Worldwatch

45

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers research activities for the second half of the second project year (October 6, 2001, through April 5, 2002). This work includes description and analysis of cores, correlation of geophysical well logs, reservoir mapping, petrographic description of thin sections, cross plotting of permeability and porosity data, and development of horizontal drilling strategies for the Little Ute and Sleeping Ute fields in Montezuma County, Colorado. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative core, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells.

Wray, Laura L.; Eby, David E.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.

2002-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

46

Laboratory tests to evaluate and study formation damage with low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) for horizontal well completions in low pressure and depleted reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing number of open hole horizontal well completions in low-pressure and depleted reservoirs requires the use of non-damaging low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) to avoid formation damage and realize optimum well productivity. To address this need we have formulated new LDDIFS with specific density lower than 1.0 sg (8.34 ppg) specifically to drill and complete low pressure and depleted reservoirs with minimum formation damage and maximum production. These materials exhibit typical drilling fluid characteristics, allowing the well to be safely drilled (0 required well depth but also perform as completion fluids, lessening formation damage to a greater extent than fluids with greater density and higher wellbore pressures. The new LDDIF incorporates low-density hollow glass spheres (HGS) to allow near-balanced drilling in low pressure and depleted reservoirs. The LDDIF uses potassium chloride (KCI) brine as the base fluid because of its low density and inhibition of clay hydration and employs low concentrations of the HGS so that fluid rheology is not altered. We have conducted extensive laboratory testing to compare performance of the HGS LDDIF with that of conventional horizontal well DIFs. Experiments consisted of permeability regain tests on unconsolidated sands with sand control screens. Test variables included temperature, concentration of drill solids cleanup technique and HGS concentration. Test results have shown that the new fluids are up to 50% easier to remove from the wellbore formation faces and provide higher productivity than higher density fluids. Such results indicate that higher well productivity from wells with less impairment would offset any added costs of HGS additives in the fluids.

Chen, Guoqiang

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Horizontal well construction/completion process in a Gulf of Mexico unconsolidated sand: development of baseline correlations for improved drill-in fluid cleanup practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines, in detail, the procedures and practices undertaken in the drilling and completion phases of a Gulf of Mexico horizontal well in an unconsolidated sand. In particular, this thesis presents a detailed case history analysis of well planning, completion and cleanup operations. Our objectives are to present a complete examination of the openhole horizontal well construction/completion process using a new drill-in fluid (DIF). Further, we will establish data critical to development of new cleanup correlation techniques (the continuing goal of the CEA-73 industry consortium). Project results are intended to advance the technology progression of cleanup in horizontal welts by using a "Best Completion Practices'' well to establish a baseline analysis for development of rigsite DIF cleanup correlations. Presented in this thesis are: * Completion specifics of subject well * Audit of horizontal well design/well construction process * Documentation (on-location) of lignite practices * Laboratory analyses of DO cleanup * Well performance analysis Well audit results show that prudent DIF selection requires a thorough understanding of formation and reservoir specifics, along with completion and cleanup operations. Adequate pre-planning by lignite personnel for handling, weather problems, storage/mixing requirements and fluid property maintenance are very important for successful operations using DIF. Proper maintenance of solids control systems is essential for quality control of DIF properties. Detailed well planning by the operator (Vastar Resources), coupled with a conscientious mud service company (TBC-Brinadd, Houston), led to smooth execution of well completion/cleanup operations.aboratory analyses of field DIF samples taken during drilling show that entrained drill solids in DIF can greatly impact mudcaps removal during cleanup. However, well performance was roughly three times original expectations, achieving a stabilized gas flow rate of approximately 34 MMCF/D. Horizontal well decline type curve techniques and a proprietary analysis method developed by Conoco were used to estimate formation properties, using only wellhead production rates and pressures. Using these results, we estimated DIF cupcake removal for various reservoir permeability scenarios. Results suggest that a high percentage of DIF filtercake removal was achieved only if reservoir permeability was less than the permeability range (100-500 md) initially estimated by the operator.

Lacewell, Jason Lawrence

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

50

USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Proper planning improves flow drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced operations reduce formation damage, especially in horizontal wells where zones are exposed to mud for longer time periods. Benefits, risks, well control concerns, equipment and issues associated with these operations are addressed in this paper. Flow drilling raises many concerns, but little has been published on horizontal well control and flow drilling operations. This article covers planning considerations for flow drilling, but does not address horizontal ''overbalanced'' drilling because considerations and equipment are the same as in vertical overbalanced drilling and many references address that subject. The difference in well control between vertical and horizontal overbalanced drilling is fluid influx behavior and how that behavior affects kill operations.

Collins, G.J. (Marathon Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the second half of the third project year (October 6, 2002, through April 5, 2003). The primary work included describing and mapping regional facies of the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Regional cross sections show the development of ''clean carbonate'' packages that contain all of the productive reservoir facies. These clean carbonates abruptly change laterally into thick anhydrite packages that filled several small intra-shelf basins in the upper Ismay zone. Examination of upper Ismay cores identified seven depositional facies: open marine, middle shelf, inner shelf/tidal flat, bryozoan mounds, phylloid-algal mounds, quartz sand dunes, and anhydritic salinas. Lower Desert Creek facies include open marine, middle shelf, protomounds/collapse breccia, and phylloid-algal mounds. Mapping the upper Ismay zone facies delineates very prospective reservoir trends that contain porous, productive buildups around the anhydrite-filled intra-shelf basins. Facies and reservoir controls imposed by the anhydritic intra-shelf basins should be considered when selecting the optimal location and orientation of any horizontal drilling from known phylloidalgal reservoirs to undrained reserves, as well as identifying new exploration trends. Although intra-shelf basins are not present in the lower Desert Creek zone of the Blanding sub-basin, drilling horizontally along linear shoreline trends could also encounter previously undrilled, porous intervals and buildups. Technology transfer activities consisted of a technical presentation at a Class II Review conference sponsored by the National Energy Technology Laboratory at the Center for Energy and Economic Diversification in Odessa, Texas. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

54

Formation damage studies of lubricants used with drill-in fluids systems on horizontal open-hole wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of lubricants in formation damage. Two types of lubricants were tested along with two types of drill-in fluids. The DIF's tested included a sized-calcium carbonate (SCC) and a sized-salt (SS). Also a set of variables including drill solids content (2%-6%), hydrochloric acid concentration (2%-10%), and temperature (110°F-160°F) were changed during the testing procedure. A matrix design was used to determine the behavior in regain permeability and break through time depending on the different variables in the testing, and two devices were used to measure responses, Conoco cell and ceramic disc cell respectively. Results have shown that regain permeability and break through time responses are not affected in a greater degree when lubricants (Idlube or Mil-Lube) are added to the DIF systems (SS and SCC). When comparing results between lubricants, Idlube gives a higher regain permeability percentage and faster break through time at higher concentrations than Mil-Lube in both DIF systems. Overall, sized calcium carbonate seems to be a better DIF system than Sized salt for these types of experiments, being much more efficient in reducing break through times than in increasing regain permeability.

Gutierrez, Fernando A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Feasibility of Optimizing Recovery and Reserves from a Mature and Geological Complex Multiple Turbidite Offshore Calif. Reservoir through the Drilling and Completion of a Trilateral Horizontal Well, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this project was to increase production and extend the economic life of this mature field through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and drilling technology, demonstrating the efficacy of these technologies to other small operators of aging fields. Two study periods were proposed; the first to include data assimilation and reservoir characterization and the second to drill the demonstration well. The initial study period showed that a single tri-lateral well would not be economically efficient in redevelopment of Carpinteria's multiple deep water turbidite sand reservoirs, and the study was amended to include the drilling of a series of horizontal redrills from existing surplus well bores on Pacific Operators' Platform Hogan.

Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc.

2001-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

56

Affordable Cold Climate Infill Housing with Hybrid Insulation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with Hybrid Insulation Approach Affordable Cold Climate Infill Housing with Hybrid Insulation Approach, Wyandotte, Michigan (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study:...

57

Method for drilling directional wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described of locating a substantially horizontal bed of interest in a formation and maintaining a drill string therein during the drilling operation, said drill string including a measurement-while-drilling (MWD) electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor, comprising the steps of: drilling a substantially vertical offset well in a formation having at least one selected substantially horizontal bed therein; measuring resistivity in the formation at the offset well to provide a first resistivity log as a function of depth; modeling the substantially horizontal bed to provide a modeled resistivity log indicative of the resistivity taken along the substantially horizontal bed, said modeling being based on said first resistivity log; drilling a directional well in said formation near said offset well, a portion of said directional well being disposed in said substantially horizontal bed; measuring resistivity in said directional well using the MWD electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor to provide a second log of resistivity taken substantially horizontally; comparing said second log to said modeled log to determine the location of said directional well; and adjusting the directional drilling operation so as to maintain said drill string within said substantially horizontal bed during the drilling of said directional well in response to said comparing step.

Wu, Jianwu; Wisler, M.M.

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

58

Evaluating water-based drill-in fluids for horizontal completions. Part 1: Results of eight extensive lab tests are presented for use when assessing and selecting these special fluids  

SciTech Connect

The use of horizontal wells to obtain more cost-effective production from unconsolidated sandstones has become very popular. Since these wells employ open hole completions, success often depends on the fluid system used during drilling and completion. A lab study of three drill-in fluid systems was performed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of each. Intent of the study was not to recommend one fluid over another, but to make available the data necessary for picking the optimum fluid for a particular application. Parameters evaluated and discussed in Part 1 include rheology, lubricity, size distribution of bridging particles, API fluid loss, high-temperature fluid loss, filter cake characteristics, SEM analysis of filter cake and static breaker tests. Part 2 will describe return permeability tests. All were evaluated with 9, 10.5 and 14 ppg muds.

Ali, S.A. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., New Orleans, LA (United States); Dearing, H.L. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Feasibility of optimizing recovery and reserves from a mature and geological complex multiple turbidite offshore California reservoir through the drilling and completion of a trilateral horizontal well. Annual report, September 1, 1995--December 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this project is to devise an effective re-development strategy to combat producibility problems related to the Repetto turbidite sequences of the Carpinteria Field. The lack of adequate reservoir characterization, high-water cut production, and scaling problems have in the past contributed to the field`s low productivity. To improve productivity and enhance recoverable reserves, the following specific goals were proposed: develop an integrated database of all existing data from work done by the former ownership group; expand reservoir drainage and reduce sand problems through horizontal well drilling and completion; operate and validate reservoir`s conceptual model by incorporating new data from the proposed trilateral well; and transfer methodologies employed in geologic modeling and drilling multilateral wells to other operators with similar reservoirs. A computer based data retrieval system was developed to convert hard copy documents containing production, well completion and well log data into easily accessible on-line format. To ascertain the geological framework of the reservoir, a thorough geological modeling and subsurface mapping of the Carpinteria field was developed. The model is now used to examine the continuity of the sands, characteristics of the sub-zones, nature of water influx and transition intervals in individual major sands. The geological model was then supplemented with a reservoir engineering study of spatial distribution of voidage in individual layers using the production statistics and pressure surveys. Efforts are continuing in selection of optimal location for drilling and completion of probing wells to obtain new data about reservoir pressure, in-situ saturation and merits of drilling a series of horizontal wells.

Coombs, S.; Edwards, E.; Fleckenstein, W.; Ershaghi, I.; Sobbi, F.; Coombs, S.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

PAO lubricant inhibits bit balling, speeds drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For drilling operations, a new polyalphaolefin (PAO) lubricant improves penetration rates by reducing bit balling tendencies in water-based mud. The additive also reduces drillstring drag. This enables the effective transmission of weight to the bit and thereby increases drilling efficiency in such applications as directional and horizontal drilling. The paper describes drilling advances, bit balling, laboratory testing, and test analysis.

Mensa-Wilmot, G. [GeoDiamond, Houston, TX (United States); Garrett, R.L. [Garrett Fluid Technology, The Woodlands, TX (United States); Stokes, R.S. [Coastal Superior Solutions Inc., Lafayette, LA (United States)

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fundamentals of horizontal well completions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas wells are drilled horizontally for a variety of reasons, chiefly to improve production without drilling multiple vertical wells and to prevent water or gas coning. Benefits of horizontal drilling are well documented. This article addresses the fundamentals of completing a horizontal well, discussing completion by (1) open hole, (2) casing packers, (3) slotted or perforated liner, and (4) cemented casing/liner. Completion methods 1 through 3 are generally known as ''drain hole'' completions, and method 4 is commonly called the ''case hole'' or ''stimulated'' completion.

Austin, C.; Zimmerman, C.; Sullaway, B.; Sabins, F.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Drainhole drilling projects under way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that many operators are taking advantage of continued developments in drainhole drilling technology to increase productivity in certain fields. Previously untapped prospects are under renewed scrutiny to determine if drainhole and horizontal drilling can make them more attractive. Producing properties are being reevaluated as well. Drainhole drilling typically involves reentering an existing well and cutting through the casing to drill a relatively short length of horizontal wellbore. Although separating drainhole and horizonal or extended-reach drilling is somewhat of a gray area, one difference is that a drainhole well turns to the horizontal much quicker. The radius of turn to 90/sup 0/ can be as little as 30 to 50 ft. Additionally, the length of horizontal kick in a drainhole well is typically in the 300- to 500-ft range compared to 1000 ft or more in extended-reach drilling. A final separating characteristic is that drainhole drilling can be associated with several horizontal lengths of wellbore coming off a single vertical hole.

Burton, B.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

An innovative drilling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal project objectives were the following: To demonstrate the capability of the Ultrashort Radius Radial System to drill and complete multiple horizontal radials in a heavy oil formation which had a production history of thermal operations. To study the effects that horizontal radials have on steam placement at specific elevations and on reducing gravity override. To demonstrate that horizontal radials could be utilized for cyclic production, i.e. for purposes of oil production as well as for steam injection. Each of these objectives was successfully achieved in the project. Early production results indicate that radials positively influenced cyclic performance. This report documents those results. 15 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

Nees, J.; Dickinson, E.; Dickinson, W.; Dykstra, H.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Analysis of wellbore instability in vertical, directional, and horizontal wells using field data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of wellbore instability in vertical, directional, and horizontal wells using field data M and directional wells is being redeveloped by drilling horizontal wells. The experience gained while drilling vertical and directional wells is not useful for drilling horizontal wells, as the failure rate is 1 in 3

Al-Majed, Abdulaziz Abdullah

65

Drill report  

SciTech Connect

North Slope drilling activity is described. As of November 14, 1984, four rigs were actively drilling in the Kuparuk River field with another two doing workovers. Only one rig was drilling in the Prudhoe Bay field, with another doing workovers and one on standby.

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Horizontal completions challenge for industry  

SciTech Connect

As the technology to drill horizontal wells continues to evolve, the problem of efficiently and cost-effectively completing such wells grows. The economics of applying horizontal technology in high-productivity reservoirs demands both increased production and lower development costs. Such high productivity reservoirs are typical of the Gulf of Mexico, North Sea, South China basin, and other areas. Lowering development costs is achieved by drilling fewer wells and in the offshore environment by reducing the number of platforms and other well structures. Specifically addressed in this article are the problems of achieving high efficiency, long lasting completions while controlling costs in unconsolidated and poorly consolidated sandstone reservoirs.

Zaleski, T.E. Jr.; Spatz, E.

1988-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

67

HIGH-POWER TURBODRILL AND DRILL BIT FOR DRILLING WITH COILED TUBING  

SciTech Connect

Commercial introduction of Microhole Technology to the gas and oil drilling industry requires an effective downhole drive mechanism which operates efficiently at relatively high RPM and low bit weight for delivering efficient power to the special high RPM drill bit for ensuring both high penetration rate and long bit life. This project entails developing and testing a more efficient 2-7/8 in. diameter Turbodrill and a novel 4-1/8 in. diameter drill bit for drilling with coiled tubing. The high-power Turbodrill were developed to deliver efficient power, and the more durable drill bit employed high-temperature cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. This project teams Schlumberger Smith Neyrfor and Smith Bits, and NASA AMES Research Center with Technology International, Inc (TII), to deliver a downhole, hydraulically-driven power unit, matched with a custom drill bit designed to drill 4-1/8 in. boreholes with a purpose-built coiled tubing rig. The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory has funded Technology International Inc. Houston, Texas to develop a higher power Turbodrill and drill bit for use in drilling with a coiled tubing unit. This project entails developing and testing an effective downhole drive mechanism and a novel drill bit for drilling 'microholes' with coiled tubing. The new higher power Turbodrill is shorter, delivers power more efficiently, operates at relatively high revolutions per minute, and requires low weight on bit. The more durable thermally stable diamond drill bit employs high-temperature TSP (thermally stable) diamond cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. Expectations are that widespread adoption of microhole technology could spawn a wave of 'infill development' drilling of wells spaced between existing wells, which could tap potentially billions of barrels of bypassed oil at shallow depths in mature producing areas. At the same time, microhole coiled tube drilling offers the opportunity to dramatically cut producers' exploration risk to a level comparable to that of drilling development wells. Together, such efforts hold great promise for economically recovering a sizeable portion of the estimated remaining shallow (less than 5,000 feet subsurface) oil resource in the United States. The DOE estimates this U.S. targeted shallow resource at 218 billion barrels. Furthermore, the smaller 'footprint' of the lightweight rigs utilized for microhole drilling and the accompanying reduced drilling waste disposal volumes offer the bonus of added environmental benefits. DOE analysis shows that microhole technology has the potential to cut exploratory drilling costs by at least a third and to slash development drilling costs in half.

Robert Radtke; David Glowka; Man Mohan Rai; David Conroy; Tim Beaton; Rocky Seale; Joseph Hanna; Smith Neyrfor; Homer Robertson

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling, Class II  

SciTech Connect

The major purpose of this project was to demonstrate the use of cost effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs such as the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit.

Bergeron, Jack; Blasingame, Tom; Doublet, Louis; Kelkar, Mohan; Freeman, George; Callard, Jeff; Moore, David; Davies, David; Vessell, Richard; Pregger, Brian; Dixon, Bill; Bezant, Bryce

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

69

Application of geostatistical reservoir description for maximizing waterflood infill drilling recovery from La Cira Field, Colombia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??One of the prospective ways to increase the oil production is to maximize the oil recovery from mature oil fields. In this study we apply… (more)

Cubillos Gutierrez, Helber

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Status Report A Review of Slimhole Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 1994 report reviews the various applications of slimhole technology including for exploration in remote areas, low-cost development wells, reentering existing wells, and horizontal and multilateral drilling. Advantages of slimholes to regular holes are presented. Limitations and disadvantages of slimholes are also discussed. In 1994, slimhole drilling was still an ongoing development technology. (DJE 2005)

Zhu, Tao; Carroll, Herbert B.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Dynamic Analysis of Reinforced Brick Masonry Infilled RC Frames Using 3D Elements under Seismic Loading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Masonry walls are provided basically for the purpose of partitioning and covering but they impart considerable strength and stiffness to the building frame for resisting loads. The strength and stiffness contribution of infill masonry is generally ignored ... Keywords: Masonry, Infill, Frame, Finite Element Analysis

Ramesh S. Manoli; D. S. Prakash

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Continental drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Workshop on Continental Drilling was convened to prepare a report for submission to the US Geodynamics Committee with respect to the contribution that could be made by land drilling to resolve major problems of geodynamics and consider the mechanisms by which the responsibility for scientific planning, establishment of priorities, administration, and budgeting for a land-drilling program within the framework of the aims of the Geodynamics Project would best be established. A new and extensive program to study the continental crust is outlined in this report. The Workshop focused on the following topics: processes in the continental crust (mechanism of faulting and earthquakes, hydrothermal systems and active magma chambers); state and structure of the continental crust (heat flow and thermal structure of the crust; state of ambient stress in the North American plate; extent, regional structure, and evolution of crystalline continental crust); short hole investigations; present state and needs of drilling technology; drill hole experimentation and instrumentation; suggestions for organization and operation of drilling project; and suggested level of effort and funding. Four recommendations are set down. 8 figures, 5 tables. (RWR)

Shoemaker, E.M. (ed.)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

State-of-the-art in coalbed methane drilling fluids  

SciTech Connect

The production of methane from wet coalbeds is often associated with the production of significant amounts of water. While producing water is necessary to desorb the methane from the coal, the damage from the drilling fluids used is difficult to assess, because the gas production follows weeks to months after the well is drilled. Commonly asked questions include the following: What are the important parameters for drilling an organic reservoir rock that is both the source and the trap for the methane? Has the drilling fluid affected the gas production? Are the cleats plugged? Does the 'filtercake' have an impact on the flow of water and gas? Are stimulation techniques compatible with the drilling fluids used? This paper describes the development of a unique drilling fluid to drill coalbed methane wells with a special emphasis on horizontal applications. The fluid design incorporates products to match the delicate surface chemistry on the coal, a matting system to provide both borehole stability and minimize fluid losses to the cleats, and a breaker method of removing the matting system once drilling is completed. This paper also discusses how coal geology impacts drilling planning, drilling practices, the choice of drilling fluid, and completion/stimulation techniques for Upper Cretaceous Mannville-type coals drilled within the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A focus on horizontal coalbed methane (CBM) wells is presented. Field results from three horizontal wells are discussed, two of which were drilled with the new drilling fluid system. The wells demonstrated exceptional stability in coal for lengths to 1000 m, controlled drilling rates and ease of running slotted liners. Methods for, and results of, placing the breaker in the horizontal wells are covered in depth.

Baltoiu, L.V.; Warren, B.K.; Natras, T.A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List This list is in no way exhaustive. Rather, it attempts to provide a set of primary references that offer key pieces of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development Impact Assessment of Natural Gas Production in the New York City Water Supply Watershed (2009). NYCDEP http://home2.nyc.gov/html/dep/html/news/natural_gas_drilling.shtml Review of water related and infiltration events Short Scholarly Features Natural Gas Plays in the Marcellus Shale: Challenges & Potential

Wang, Z. Jane

75

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maximum Pressure Average Pressure In-situ Pressure CO 2 Injection Vertical Infilling Waterflood Horizontal Drilling Analysis of Pressure History * Assessing initial pre-CO 2...

76

Integrating surface systems with downhole data improves underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated approach of using special downhole sensors and transmission capabilities in conjunction with a surface drilling optimization system has improved the management and understanding of the underbalanced drilling environment within a closed loop system. Improving the underbalanced drilling operation and obtaining quality data in real time can help eliminate damage to the formation and increase ultimate production. Recent advances in drilling technology have made it possible to drill horizontal wells underbalanced more safely and effectively. This technology has greatly reduced the potential for skin damage to the bore hole. Experience from western Canadian underbalanced horizontal drilling clearly demonstrates that a well bore`s initial productive potential is very accurately predicted from its productive behavior during drilling operations.

Comeau, L. [Sperry-Sun Drilling Services, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1997-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

77

Underbalanced drilling guidelines improve safety, efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In underbalanced drilling, the primary means of well control, the hydrostatic head of the drilling fluid, is lost either unavoidably because of hole problems (such as abnormally high pressure or lost circulation) or intentionally because of economics or to prevent formation damage. Because of complications with underbalanced drilling, however, several rigs have been destroyed by fire. Operational guidelines are being developed in close cooperation with industry. The final guidelines will be consistent with the existing standards of well control practices in Alberta, yet applicable for underbalanced drilling operations world-wide. Until formal guidelines are completed in Alberta, operators interested in underbalanced drilling should work closely with the Energy Resources Conservation Board in preparing site-specific programs. Although underbalanced drilling is often associated with horizontal wells, the majority of underbalanced drilling operations in Alberta are conducted on vertical wells. The paper describes underbalanced drilling, blowout prevention, surface BOP equipment (stripper, annular pack off, rotating head, rotating BOP, coiled tubing), subsurface BOP, drilling fluids, nitrified drilling fluids, surface equipment, well-site supervision, well control equipment, and the surface handling of fluids.

Eresman, D. (Energy Resources Conservation Board, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

Cementing horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

Since the introduction of horizontal drilling, most completions have been open hole. Open-hole or slotted-liner completions may be satisfactory in straight, thick formations, if stimulation is not required. But if the wellbore wanders out of the reservoir, whether due to loss of directional control or spotty knowledge of formation dimensions, casing becomes a necessity. In addition, a wellbore that stays in the formation but comes uncomfortably close to the water-oil contact or gas cap requires casing to prevent coning. Further, if stimulation is anticipated, or may become a necessity, it is essential that the hole be cased and cemented. Otherwise, there is no control of the stimulation treatment. Even if the horizontal wellbore itself does not require casing, intermediate casing in the high-angle hole is needed. This is especially critical in open-hole completions below a gas cap, for example. The keys to effective horizontal cementing are fundamentally the same as for cementing vertical wells: proper centralization of casing in the bore-hole to ensure efficient mud removal and well-designed cement slurries.

Baret, F.; Griffin, T.J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Drilling optimization using drilling simulator software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drilling operations management will face hurdles to reduce costs and increase performance, and to do this with less experience and organizational drilling capacity. A technology called Drilling Simulators Software has shown an extraordinary potential to improve the drilling performance and reduce risk and cost. Different approaches have been made to develop drilling-simulator software. The Virtual Experience Simulator, geological drilling logs, and reconstructed lithology are some of the most successful. The drilling simulations can run multiple scenarios quickly and then update plans with new data to improve the results. Its storage capacity for retaining field drilling experience and knowledge add value to the program. This research shows the results of using drilling simulator software called Drilling Optimization Simulator (DROPS®) in the evaluation of the Aloctono block, in the Pirital field, eastern Venezuela. This formation is characterized by very complex geology, containing faulted restructures, large dips, and hard and abrasive rocks. The drilling performance in this section has a strong impact in the profitability of the field. A number of simulations using geological drilling logs and the concept of the learning curve defined the optimum drilling parameters for the block. The result shows that DROPS® has the capability to simulate the drilling performance of the area with reasonable accuracy. Thus, it is possible to predict the drilling performance using different bits and the learning-curve concept to obtain optimum drilling parameters. All of these allow a comprehensive and effective cost and drilling optimization.

Salas Safe, Jose Gregorio

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Turnkey drilling  

SciTech Connect

The recent surge in the popularity of turnkey drilling has produced a number of questions about turnkey operations from both operators and contractors. The International Association of Drilling Contractors (IADC) has no approved turnkey contract (although several of the member districts have printed one), leaving the parties participating in a turnkey well unsure of their responsibilities and obligations. Additionally, operators are finding liens filed against turnkey wells they thought were paid for. The term turnkey itself is often misunderstood and applied to a variety of guaranteed well commitments. Some turnkeys require the contractor to provide everything from location preparation to final production pipe or plugs. Others allow contingencies for stuck pipe, lost circulation, kicks and bad storms.

Pierce, D.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Drill string enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

Jorgensen, Douglas K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kuhns, Douglass J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wiersholm, Otto (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Timothy A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Drill string enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

Jorgensen, D.K.; Kuhns, D.J.; Wiersholm, O.; Miller, T.A.

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

83

Case history of an opposed-bore, dual horizontal well in the Austin Chalk formation of south Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petro-Hunt Corp. used a unique horizontal-well design to optimize development of an irregularly shaped lease in the Austin chalk formation in Texas. Two medium-radius horizontal bores were drilled in opposite directions from one vertical hole to maximize horizontal displacement in the lease. Underbalanced drilling techniques were used to prevent formation damage. The well design resulted in a significant cost savings per horizontal foot compared with 24 offset wells that the operator drilled. This paper reviews well planning and drilling and emphasizes techniques used to intersect thin horizontal targets and to initiate the second horizontal bore. Production results and drilling economics are discussed briefly, and ideas on future dual-horizontal-well applications are presented.

Cooney, M.F.; Rogers, C.T.; Stacey, E.S.; Stephens, R.N.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation is exposed to a series of fluids and operations that can reduce its productive capacity. Any process that causes a loss in the productivity of an oil-, gas-, or water-saturated formation has a damaging effect on the reservoir. These damage mechanisms predominantly fall into three major classifications: mechanical, chemical, and biological. Underbalanced drilling operations involve drilling a portion of the wellbore at fluid pressures less than that of the target formation. This technology has been used to prevent or minimize problems associated with invasive formation damage, which often greatly reduces the productivity of oil and gas reservoirs, mainly in openhole horizontal-well applications. Underbalanced drilling is not a solution for all formation-damage problems. Damage caused by poorly designed and/or executed underbalanced drilling programs can equal or exceed that which may occur with a well-designed conventional overbalanced drilling program. Four techniques are currently available to achieve underbalanced conditions while drilling. These include using lightweight drilling fluids, injecting gas down the drillpipe, injecting gas into a parasite string, and using foam. This study provides an analysis of a number of potential damage mechanisms present when drilling underbalanced. It describes each one and its influence on the productivity of a well. Additionally it presents a general description of the different techniques that can be applied to carry out successful, cost-effective UBD operations, and discusses how these techniques may be used to reduce or eliminate formation damage.

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Underbalanced drilling: Praises and perils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling (UBD) has been used with increasing frequency to minimize problems associated with invasive formation damage, which often greatly reduce the productivity of oil and gas reservoirs, particularly in openhole horizontal well applications. UBD, when properly designed and executed, minimizes or eliminates problems associated with the invasion of particulate matter into the formation as well as a multitude of other problems such as adverse clay reactions, phase trapping, precipitation, and emulsification, which can be caused by the invasion of incompatible mud filtrates in an overbalanced condition. In many UBD operations, additional benefits are seen because of a reduction in drilling time, greater rates of penetration, increased bit life, a rapid indication of productive reservoir zones, and the potential for dynamic flow testing while drilling. Potential downsides and damage mechanisms associated with UBD will be discussed. These include the following: (1) Increased cost and safety concerns; (2) Difficulty in maintaining a continuously underbalanced condition; (3) Spontaneous inhibition and countercurrent inhibition effects; (4) Glazing, mashing, and mechanically induced wellbore damage; (5) Macroporosity gravity-induced invasion; (6) Difficulty of application in zones of extreme pressure and permeability; and (7) Political/career risk associated with championing a new and potentially risky technology. The authors discuss reservoir parameters required to design an effective underbalanced or overbalanced drilling program, laboratory screening procedures to ascertain the effectiveness of UBD in a specific application and review the types of reservoirs that often present good applications for UBD technology.

Bennion, D.B.; Thomas, F.B.; Bietz, R.F.; Bennion, D.W. [Hycal Energy Research Labs., Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Optimizing drilling performance using a selected drilling fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To improve drilling performance, a drilling fluid is selected based on one or more criteria and to have at least one target characteristic. Drilling equipment is used to drill a wellbore, and the selected drilling fluid is provided into the wellbore during drilling with the drilling equipment. The at least one target characteristic of the drilling fluid includes an ability of the drilling fluid to penetrate into formation cuttings during drilling to weaken the formation cuttings.

Judzis, Arnis (Salt Lake City, UT); Black, Alan D. (Coral Springs, FL); Green, Sidney J. (Salt Lake City, UT); Robertson, Homer A. (West Jordan, UT); Bland, Ronald G. (Houston, TX); Curry, David Alexander (The Woodlands, TX); Ledgerwood, III, Leroy W. (Cypress, TX)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

Energy week `96: Conference papers. Book 3: Drilling and production economics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The papers of Section 1, Drilling Technology, relate to advanced materials for downhole tools, underbalanced drilling, horizontal drilling technology/new trajectory control device, horizontal drilling HP/HT well control, advances in drill bits, slim-hole drill bits and tubulars, novel/scientific drilling, and coiled tubing/slim-hole drilling/short radius. The topics of Section 2, Ocean Engineering, include marine pollution and diving equipment. Section 3, Petroleum Production Technology, relate to what`s new in regulations and standards in petroleum production. Papers in Section 4, Offshore and Arctic Operations, cover offshore platforms, floating production systems, offshore pipelines, offshore construction and installation, offshore facilities, and environmental and safety issues. Most papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Advanced Drilling through Diagnostics-White-Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-speed data link that would provide dramatically faster communication from downhole instruments to the surface and back again has the potential to revolutionize deep drilling for geothermal resources through Diagnostics-While-Drilling (DWD). Many aspects of the drilling process would significantly improve if downhole and surface data were acquired and processed in real-time at the surface, and used to guide the drilling operation. Such a closed-loop, driller-in-the-loop DWD system, would complete the loop between information and control, and greatly improve the performance of drilling systems. The main focus of this program is to demonstrate the value of real-time data for improving drilling. While high-rate transfer of down-hole data to the surface has been accomplished before, insufficient emphasis has been placed on utilization of the data to tune the drilling process to demonstrate the true merit of the concept. Consequently, there has been a lack of incentive on the part of industry to develop a simple, low-cost, effective high-speed data link. Demonstration of the benefits of DWD based on a high-speed data link will convince the drilling industry and stimulate the flow of private resources into the development of an economical high-speed data link for geothermal drilling applications. Such a downhole communication system would then make possible the development of surface data acquisition and expert systems that would greatly enhance drilling operations. Further, it would foster the development of downhole equipment that could be controlled from the surface to improve hole trajectory and drilling performance. Real-time data that would benefit drilling performance include: bit accelerations for use in controlling bit bounce and improving rock penetration rates and bit life; downhole fluid pressures for use in the management of drilling hydraulics and improved diagnosis of lost circulation and gas kicks; hole trajectory for use in reducing directional drilling costs; and downhole weight-on-bit and drilling torque for diagnosing drill bit performance. In general, any measurement that could shed light on the downhole environment would give us a better understanding of the drilling process and reduce drilling costs.

FINGER,JOHN T.; GLOWKA,DAVID ANTHONY; LIVESAY,BILLY JOE; MANSURE,ARTHUR J.; PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

89

Geothermal drilling technology update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories conducts a comprehensive geothermal drilling research program for the US Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies. The program currently includes seven areas: lost circulation technology, hard-rock drill bit technology, high-temperature instrumentation, wireless data telemetry, slimhole drilling technology, Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) projects, and drilling systems studies. This paper describes the current status of the projects under way in each of these program areas.

Glowka, D.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Drill string enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a drill string enclosure which consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

Jorgensen, D.K.; Kuhns, D.J.; Wiersholm, O.; Miller, T.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Drilling for energy resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling is integral to the exploration, development, and production of most energy resources. Oil and natural gas, which are dependent on drilling technology, together account for about 77% of the energy sources consumed in the US. Thus, the limitations of current drilling technology also restrict the rate at which new energy supplies can be found, extracted, and brought to the marketplace. The purpose of the study reported was to examine current drilling technology, suggest areas where additional research and development (R and D) might significantly increase drilling rates and capabilities, and suggest a strategy for improving drilling technology. An overview is provided of the US drilling industry. The drilling equipment and techniques now used for finding and recovering oil, natural gas, coal, shale oil, nuclear fuels, and geothermal energy are described. Although by no means exhaustive, these descriptions provide the background necessary to adequately understand the problems inherent in attempts to increase instantaneous and overall drilling rates.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Navigation drilling technology progresses  

SciTech Connect

This article reports that navigation drilling - an approach that combines advanced drill bit, downhole motor, measurement-while-drilling, and well planning technology into an integrated, steerable drilling system - has reduced drilling time for operating companies worldwide. A major operating advantage of navigation drilling is the ability to drill both straight and directional intervals with a single assembly. In conventional directional drilling, a bent sub and downhole motor (or a bent housing motor) are used to initiate kick-offs and make course corrections. The bent sub is made-up above the motor, tilting the motor's axis 1 to 3 degrees compared to the axis of the drill string. The assembly toolface can be aligned in the desired direction with a single-shot, a steering tool or an MWD system.

Bayne, R.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Well drilling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Well drilling rates may be increased by impelling projectiles to fracture rock formations and drilling with rock drill bits through the projectile fractured rock.

Alvis, Robert L. (Albuquerque, NM); Newsom, Melvin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY Drilling for seawater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies to obtain thermal energy (and other benefits) from a large body of water #12;Microgrid Customer ENERGY : Underground Technologies #12;#12;Microgrid Customer Facilities Drilled Hydrothermal Energy Plant;#12;Microgrid Customer Facilities Drilled Hydrothermal Energy Plant Cooling Power Biofuel / H2 Fresh Water

95

Drilling Fluid Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Drilling fluid corrosion control troubleshooting chart...Table 8 Drilling fluid corrosion control troubleshooting chart Corrosion cause Primary source Identification Major corrosion forms Remedies Oxygen Atmosphere, mud conditioning, equipment, oxidizing

96

Hydromechanical drilling device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydromechanical drilling tool which combines a high pressure water jet drill with a conventional roller cone type of drilling bit. The high pressure jet serves as a tap drill for cutting a relatively small diameter hole in advance of the conventional bit. Auxiliary laterally projecting jets also serve to partially cut rock and to remove debris from in front of the bit teeth thereby reducing significantly the thrust loading for driving the bit.

Summers, David A. (Rolla, MO)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

HydroPulse Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tempress HydroPulse{trademark} tool increases overbalanced drilling rates by generating intense suction pulses at the drill bit. This report describes the operation of the tool; results of pressure drilling tests, wear tests and downhole drilling tests; and the business case for field applications. The HydroPulse{trademark} tool is designed to operate on weighted drilling mud at conventional flow rates and pressures. Pressure drilling tests confirm that the HydroPulse{trademark} tool provides 33% to 200% increased rate of penetration. Field tests demonstrated conventional rotary and mud motor drilling operations. The tool has been operated continuous for 50 hours on weighted mud in a wear test stand. This level of reliability is the threshold for commercial application. A seismic-while-drilling version of the tool was also developed and tested. This tool was used to demonstrate reverse vertical seismic profiling while drilling an inclined test well with a PDC bit. The primary applications for the HydroPulse{trademark} tool are deep onshore and offshore drilling where rate of penetration drives costs. The application of the seismic tool is vertical seismic profiling-while-drilling and look-ahead seismic imaging while drilling.

J.J. Kolle

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Pioneering work, economic factors provide insights into Russian drilling technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Russia and America, individual ingenuity and economic forces have produced a variety of drilling technologies, resulting in the development of disparate drilling systems. Endeavors by the US Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Sandia Laboratories, and private industry have promoted exchanges of knowledge since the 1980s, and now that the barriers to technology transfer are being lifted, engineers from both countries have the opportunity to exchange knowledge and incorporate the best of both. The Russian drilling industry, like the Russian space program, has achieved tremendous success in implementing product and process innovations including the first directional (1940s), horizontal (1950s), and multilateral (1950s) wells. In addition, Russian engineers built the first turbodrills, electrodrills, novel drills (lasers, explosives), aluminum drill pipe, downhole electric submersible pumps, and mud hammers. This first part of a two-part series describes the achievements of Russian engineers in horizontal and multilateral drilling technologies followed by a discussion of the economic differences that led Russian and American drillers to develop dissimilar drilling systems. The second part describes a variety of innovative Russian technologies and provides details on the technical advantages they offer for the drilling process.

Gaddy, D.E.

1998-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

99

Microhole Drilling Tractor Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to increase the U.S. energy reserves and lower costs for finding and retrieving oil, the USDOE created a solicitation to encourage industry to focus on means to operate in small diameter well-Microhole. Partially in response to this solicitation and because Western Well Tool's (WWT) corporate objective to develop small diameter coiled tubing drilling tractor, WWT responded to and was awarded a contract to design, prototype, shop test, and field demonstrate a Microhole Drilling Tractor (MDT). The benefit to the oil industry and the US consumer from the project is that with the MDT's ability to facilitate Coiled Tubing drilled wells to be 1000-3000 feet longer horizontally, US brown fields can be more efficiently exploited resulting in fewer wells, less environmental impact, greater and faster oil recovery, and lower drilling costs. Shortly after award of the contract, WWT was approached by a major oil company that strongly indicated that the specified size of a tractor of 3.0 inches diameter was inappropriate and that immediate applications for a 3.38-inch diameter tractor would substantially increase the usefulness of the tool to the oil industry. Based on this along with an understanding with the oil company to use the tractor in multiple field applications, WWT applied for and was granted a no-cost change-of-scope contract amendment to design, manufacture, assemble, shop test and field demonstrate a prototype a 3.38 inch diameter MDT. Utilizing existing WWT tractor technology and conforming to an industry developed specification for the tool, the Microhole Drilling Tractor was designed. Specific features of the MDT that increase it usefulness are: (1) Operation on differential pressure of the drilling fluid, (2) On-Off Capability, (3) Patented unique gripping elements (4) High strength and flexibility, (5) Compatibility to existing Coiled Tubing drilling equipment and operations. The ability to power the MDT with drilling fluid results in a highly efficient tool that both delivers high level of force for the pressure available and inherently increases downhole reliability because parts are less subject to contamination. The On-Off feature is essential to drilling to allow the Driller to turn off the tractor and pull back while circulating in cleanout runs that keep the hole clean of drilling debris. The gripping elements have wide contact surfaces to the formation to allow high loads without damage to the formation. As part of the development materials evaluations were conducted to verify compatibility with anticipated drilling and well bore fluids. Experiments demonstrated that the materials of the tractor are essentially undamaged by exposure to typical drilling fluids used for horizontal coiled tubing drilling. The design for the MDT was completed, qualified vendors identified, parts procured, received, inspected, and a prototype was assembled. As part of the assembly process, WWT prepared Manufacturing instructions (MI) that detail the assembly process and identify quality assurance inspection points. Subsequent to assembly, functional tests were performed. Functional tests consisted of placing the MDT on jack stands, connecting a high pressure source to the tractor, and verifying On-Off functions, walking motion, and operation over a range of pressures. Next, the Shop Demonstration Test was performed. An existing WWT test fixture was modified to accommodate operation of the 3.38 inch diameter MDT. The fixture simulated the tension applied to a tractor while walking (pulling) inside 4.0 inch diameter pipe. The MDT demonstrated: (1) On-off function, (2) Pulling forces proportional to available differential pressure up to 4000 lbs, (3) Walking speeds to 1100 ft/hour. A field Demonstration of the MDT was arranged with a major oil company operating in Alaska. A demonstration well with a Measured Depth of approximately 15,000 ft was selected; however because of problems with the well drilling was stopped before the planned MDT usage. Alternatively, functional and operational tests were run with the MDT insi

Western Well Tool

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

100

Challenges of deep drilling  

SciTech Connect

Deep drilling poses major problems when high temperatures, high pressures, and acid gases are encountered. A combination of these items usually requires extensive planning, exotic materials, long drilling times, and heavy expenditures. Only 2 wells have been drilled below 30,000 ft in the US, the deeper a 31,441-ft hole in 1974. The deepest well in the world is reported to be in the Soviet Union, recently drilled below 34,895 ft, with a target depth of 15,000 m (49,212 ft). A review of current deep drilling technology and its capabilities is given.

Chadwick, C.E.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Advanced drilling systems study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work was initiated as part of the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) Program. It is being performed through joint finding from the Department of Energy Geothermal Division and the Natural Gas Technology Branch, Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Interest in advanced drilling systems is high. The Geothermal Division of the Department of Energy has initiated a multi-year effort in the development of advanced drilling systems; the National Research Council completed a study of drilling and excavation technologies last year; and the MIT Energy Laboratory recently submitted a proposal for a national initiative in advanced drilling and excavation research. The primary reasons for this interest are financial. Worldwide expenditures on oil and gas drilling approach $75 billion per year. Also, drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing electricity from geothermal energy. There is incentive to search for methods to reduce the cost of drilling. Work on ideas to improve or replace rotary drilling technology dates back at least to the 1930`s. There was a significant amount of work in this area in the 1960`s and 1970`s; and there has been some continued effort through the 1980`s. Undoubtedly there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied; however, it is almost certain that new efforts to initiate work on advanced drilling systems will build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems provide the basis for the current study of advanced drilling.

Pierce, K.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Horizontal drilling boosts Pennsylvania’s natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home; Browse by Tag; Most Popular Tags. electricity; oil/petroleum; liquid fuels; ... Privacy/Security Copyright & Reuse Accessibility. Related Sites U.S. Department ...

103

Method of deep drilling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Deep drilling is facilitated by the following steps practiced separately or in any combination: (1) Periodically and sequentially fracturing zones adjacent the bottom of the bore hole with a thixotropic fastsetting fluid that is accepted into the fracture to overstress the zone, such fracturing and injection being periodic as a function of the progression of the drill. (2) Casing the bore hole with ductile, pre-annealed casing sections, each of which is run down through the previously set casing and swaged in situ to a diameter large enough to allow the next section to run down through it. (3) Drilling the bore hole using a drill string of a low density alloy and a high density drilling mud so that the drill string is partially floated.

Colgate, Stirling A. (4616 Ridgeway, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Remote drill bit loader  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill bit loader is described for loading a tapered shank of a drill bit into a similarly tapered recess in the end of a drill spindle. The spindle has a transverse slot at the inner end of the recess. The end of the tapered shank of the drill bit has a transverse tang adapted to engage in the slot so that the drill bit will be rotated by the spindle. The loader is in the form of a cylinder adapted to receive the drill bit with the shank projecting out of the outer end of the cylinder. Retainer pins prevent rotation of the drill bit in the cylinder. The spindle is lowered to extend the shank of the drill bit into the recess in the spindle and the spindle is rotated to align the slot in the spindle with the tang on the shank. A spring unit in the cylinder is compressed by the drill bit during its entry into the recess of the spindle and resiliently drives the tang into the slot in the spindle when the tang and slot are aligned. In typical remote drilling operations, whether in hot cells or water pits, drill bits have been held using a collet or end mill type holder with set screws. In either case, to load or change a drill bit required the use master-slave manipulators to position the bits and tighten the collet or set screws. This requirement eliminated many otherwise useful work areas because they were not equipped with slaves, particularly in water pits.

Dokos, J.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Geothermal Drilling Organization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), founded in 1982 as a joint Department of Energy (DOE)-Industry organization, develops and funds near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling costs. Sandia National Laboratories administers DOE funds to assist industry critical cost-shared projects and provides development support for each project. GDO assistance to industry is vital in developing products and procedures to lower drilling costs, in part, because the geothermal industry is small and represents a limited market.

Sattler, A.R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Drilling in the Rockies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite rugged drilling conditions and high drilling costs, rig employment and drilling operations in the Rocky Mountain region of the Overthrust Belt have increased significantly since 1979. Rate of rig employment, well depths, and number of operating companies and contractors in the area are reported. By October 1980, more than 500 active rigs were working in the region, 30% more than were working during the entirety of 1979. (3 photos)

Peacock, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Acid Placement in Acid Jetting Treatments in Long Horizontal Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Middle East, extended reach horizontal wells (on the order of 25,000 feet of horizontal displacement) are commonly acid stimulated by jetting acid out of drill pipe. The acid is jetted onto the face of the openhole wellbore as the drill pipe is withdrawn from the well. The jetting action helps to remove the drilling fluid filter cake and promote the acid to penetrate into the formation and form wormholes to stimulate the well. However, with very long sections of wellbore open to flow, the acid placement and subsequent wormhole distribution and penetration depths are uncertain. This study has modeled the acid jetting process using a comprehensive model of acid placement and wormhole propagation in a horizontal well. It is presumed that the acid jetting tool removes the drilling mud filter cake, so that no filter cake exists between the end of the drill pipe and the toe of the well. Correspondingly, the model also assumes that there is an intact, low-permeability filter cake on the borehole wall between the end of the drill pipe and the heel of the well. The drill pipe is modeled as being withdrawn from the well during the acid jetting treatment, as is done in practice. The acidizing simulator predicts the distribution of acid and the depths of wormholes formed as functions of time and position during the acid jetting treatment. The model shows that the acid jetting process as typically applied in these wells preferentially stimulates the toe region of the horizontal well. Comparisons of the simulation predictions with published data for acid jetting treatments in such wells showed good general agreement. Based on the simulation study, this study presents recommendations for improved acid jetting treatment procedures to improve the distribution of acid injected into the formation.

Sasongko, Hari

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Drill Press Speed Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operating speeds (RPM) Accessory Softwood (Pine) Hardwood (Hard Maple) Acrylic Brass Aluminum Steel Shop Notes Twist drill bits 116" - 316" 14" - 38" 716"- 58" 11...

109

Drilling motor deviation tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extension for a down hole drilling motor is described, which adapts the motor for selective configuration for straight hole drilling or directional drilling, selectively. It consists of: an elongated generally tubular body, adapted at a first end to rigidly attach to the lower end of a down hole drilling motor housing, the body having an opening extending along the general centerline of the body; fluid channel means situated in the opening to conduct drilling fluid from the motor fluid output means to a downwardly continuing drill string element; output shaft means situated in the body and extending from a second end of the body, the output shaft adapted at the extended extreme for attachment to a downwardly continuing drill string element; selector valve means situated in the body, operatively associated with drilling fluid channels in the body, responsive to drilling fluid flow to produce a first output signal in response to fluid flow manipulations having a first characteristic and to produce a second output signal in response to fluid flow manipulations having a second characteristic; and driveshaft connector means in the opening, operatively associated with the output shaft of the motor and the output shaft means to connect the two for sympathetic rotation.

Falgout, T.E.; Schoeffler, W.N.

1989-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

110

Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managed Pressure Drilling now at the pinnacle of the 'Oil Well Drilling' evolution tree, has itself been coined in 2003. It is an umbrella term for a few new drilling techniques and some preexisting drilling techniques, all of them aiming to solve several drilling problems, including non-productive time and/or drilling flat time issues. These techniques, now sub-classifications of Managed Pressure Drilling, are referred to as 'Variations' and 'Methods' of Managed Pressure Drilling. Although using Managed Pressure Drilling for drilling wells has several benefits, not all wells that seem a potential candidate for Managed Pressure Drilling, need Managed Pressure Drilling. The drilling industry has numerous simulators and software models to perform drilling hydraulics calculations and simulations. Most of them are designed for conventional well hydraulics, while some can perform Underbalanced Drilling calculations, and a select few can perform Managed Pressure Drilling calculations. Most of the few available Managed Pressure Drilling models are modified Underbalanced Drilling versions that fit Managed Pressure Drilling needs. However, none of them focus on Managed Pressure Drilling and its candidate selection alone. An 'Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection Model and software' that can act as a preliminary screen to determine the utility of Managed Pressure Drilling for potential candidate wells are developed as a part of this research dissertation. The model and a flow diagram identify the key steps in candidate selection. The software performs the basic hydraulic calculations and provides useful results in the form of tables, plots and graphs that would help in making better engineering decisions. An additional Managed Pressure Drilling worldwide wells database with basic information on a few Managed Pressure Drilling projects has also been compiled that can act as a basic guide on the Managed Pressure Drilling variation and project frequencies and aid in Managed Pressure Drilling candidate selection.

Nauduri, Anantha S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Horizontal natural gas storage caverns and methods for producing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides caverns and methods for producing caverns in bedded salt deposits for the storage of materials that are not solvents for salt. The contemplated salt deposits are of the bedded, non-domed variety, more particularly salt found in layered formations that are sufficiently thick to enable the production of commercially usefully sized caverns completely encompassed by walls of salt of the formation. In a preferred method, a first bore hole is drilled into the salt formation and a cavity for receiving insolubles is leached from the salt formation. Thereafter, at a predetermined distance away from the first bore hole, a second bore hole is drilled towards the salt formation. As this drill approaches the salt, the drill assumes a slant approach and enters the salt and drills through it in a horizontal direction until it intersects the cavity for receiving insolubles. This produces a substantially horizontal conduit from which solvent is controlledly supplied to the surrounding salt formation, leaching the salt and producing a concentrated brine which is removed through the first bore hole. Insolubles are collected in the cavity for receiving insolubles. By controlledly supplying solvent, a horizontal cavern is produced with two bore holes extending therefrom.

Russo, Anthony (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fraced horizontal well shows potential of deep tight gas  

SciTech Connect

Successful completion of a multiple fraced, deep horizontal well demonstrated new techniques for producing tight gas sands. In Northwest Germany, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH drilled, cased, and fraced the world`s deepest horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand at 15,687 ft (4,783 m) true vertical depth. The multiple frac concept provides a cost-efficient method to economically produce significant gas resources in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand. Besides the satisfactory initial gas production rate, the well established several world records, including deepest horizontal well with multiple fracs, and proved this new technique to develop ultra-tight sands.

Schueler, S. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany); Santos, R. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

113

Advanced drilling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling is ubiquitous in oil, gas, geothermal, minerals, water well, and mining industries. Drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing power from geothermal energy. Reduced drilling costs will reduce the cost of electricity produced from geothermal resources. Undoubtedly, there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied. However, the breadth and depth of previous efforts in this area almost guarantee that any new efforts will at least initially build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts, coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems, provide the basis for this study.

Pierce, K.G.; Finger, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Advanced drilling systems study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study of advanced drilling concepts conducted jointly for the Natural Gas Technology Branch and the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of alternative rock cutting concepts and drilling systems are examined. The systems cover the range from current technology, through ongoing efforts in drilling research, to highly speculative concepts. Cutting mechanisms that induce stress mechanically, hydraulically, and thermally are included. All functions necessary to drill and case a well are considered. Capital and operating costs are estimated and performance requirements, based on comparisons of the costs for alternative systems to conventional drilling technology, are developed. A number of problems common to several alternatives and to current technology are identified and discussed.

Pierce, Kenneth G.; Livesay, Billy Joe; Finger, John Travis (Livesay Consultants, Encintas, CA)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Computers aid drilling planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that computers are rapidly becoming an indispensable tool for the drilling engineer both in town and at the wellsite. Two factors have contributed to the sudden increase in their use. The first is the need to cut drilling costs. Engineers have been forced to take a more critical look at plans and past experience. The second is the falling price (and increased portability) of hardware and software. Several major operators have demonstrated that careful planning of drilling operations based on local knowledge and data from offset wells can reduce the drilling learning curve substantially. Computers make it possible to retrieve and process offset well data rapidly and efficiently. They also offer powerful mathematical models which describe complicated aspects of drilling.

Burgess, T.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Drill drive mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill drive mechanism is especially adapted to provide both rotational drive and axial feed for a drill of substantial diameter such as may be used for drilling holes for roof bolts in mine shafts. The drill shaft is made with a helical pattern of scroll-like projections on its surface for removal of cuttings. The drill drive mechanism includes a plurality of sprockets carrying two chains of drive links which are arranged to interlock around the drill shaft with each drive link having depressions which mate with the scroll-like projections. As the chain links move upwardly or downwardly the surfaces of the depressions in the links mate with the scroll projections to move the shaft axially. Tangs on the drive links mate with notch surfaces between scroll projections to provide a means for rotating the shaft. Projections on the drive links mate together at the center to hold the drive links tightly around the drill shaft. The entire chain drive mechanism is rotated around the drill shaft axis by means of a hydraulic motor and gear drive to cause rotation of the drill shaft. This gear drive also connects with a differential gearset which is interconnected with a second gear. A second motor is connected to the spider shaft of the differential gearset to produce differential movement (speeds) at the output gears of the differential gearset. This differential in speed is utilized to drive said second gear at a speed different from the speed of said gear drive, this speed differential being utilized to drive said sprockets for axial movement of said drill shaft.

Dressel, Michael O. (Englewood, CO)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Noble Drilling DRILLING, COMPLETION AND STIMULATION PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Friendly Drilling Systems" Environmental issues are a significant part of every energy industry endeavor challenges facing the energy industry but also the considerable resources of the University and industry Petroleum and other industry sponsors from the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI) to identify

118

Drilling Waste Management Technology Descriptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skip navigation Drilling Waste Management Information System: The information resource for better management of drilling wastes DWM Logo Search Search you are in this section...

119

Drilling Waste Management Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Drilling Waste Management Information System is an online resource for technical and regulatory information on practices for managing drilling muds and cuttings, including...

120

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations  

SciTech Connect

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Drilling Practices That Minimize  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Practices Drilling Practices Fact Sheet - Drilling Practices That Minimize Generation of Drilling Wastes How Are Wells Typically Drilled? The conventional process of drilling oil and gas wells uses a rotary drill bit that is lubricated by drilling fluids or muds. As the drill bit grinds downward through the rock layers, it generates large amounts of ground-up rock known as drill cuttings. This section of the Drilling Waste Management Information System website discusses several alternative drilling practices that result in a lower volume of waste being generated. Oil and gas wells are constructed with multiple layers of pipe known as casing. Traditional wells are not drilled from top to bottom at the same diameter but rather in a series of progressively smaller-diameter intervals. The top interval is drilled starting at the surface and has the largest diameter hole. Drill bits are available in many sizes to drill different diameter holes. The hole diameter can be 20" or larger for the uppermost sections of the well, followed by different combinations of progressively smaller diameters. Some of the common hole diameters are: 17.5", 14.75", 12.25", 8.5", 7.875", and 6.5".

122

Drill pipe protector development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), formed in the early 1980s by the geothermal industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Division, sponsors specific development projects to advance the technologies used in geothermal exploration, drilling, and production phases. Individual GDO member companies can choose to participate in specific projects that are most beneficial to their industry segment. Sandia National Laboratories is the technical interface and contracting office for the DOE in these projects. Typical projects sponsored in the past have included a high temperature borehole televiewer, drill bits, muds/polymers, rotary head seals, and this project for drill pipe protectors. This report documents the development work of Regal International for high temperature geothermal pipe protectors.

Thomerson, C.; Kenne, R. [Regal International Corp., Corsicanna, TX (United States); Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [ed.] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Thermal spallation drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal spallation drilling is an underdeveloped process with great potential for reducing the costs of drilling holes and mining shafts and tunnels in most very hard rocks. Industry has used this process to drill blast holes for emplacing explosives and to quarry granite. Some theoretical work has been performed, and many signs point to a great future for this process. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has studied the theory of the spallation process and is conducting experiments to prove out the system and to adapt it for use with a conventional rotary rig. This report describes work that has been accomplished at the Laboratory on the development of thermal spallation drilling and some work that is projected for the future on the system. 3 references, 3 figures.

Williams, R.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Subsurface drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill string comprises a first drill string member having a male end; and a second drill string member having a female end configured to be joined to the male end of the first drill string member, the male end having a threaded portion including generally square threads, the male end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the threaded portion, and the male end further having a bearing surface, the female end having a female threaded portion having corresponding female threads, the female end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the female threaded portion, and the female end having a bearing surface. Installation methods, including methods of installing instrumented probes are also provided.

Casper, William L. (Rigby, ID); Clark, Don T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grover, Blair K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mathewson, Rodney O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seymour, Craig A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

Update on slimhole drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories manages the US Department of Energy program for slimhole drilling. The principal objective of this program is to expand proven geothermal reserves through increased exploration made possible by lower-cost slimhole drilling. For this to be a valid exploration method, however, it is necessary to demonstrate that slimholes yield enough data to evaluate a geothermal reservoir, and that is the focus of Sandia`s current research.

Finger, J.T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Properly designed underbalanced drilling fluids can limit formation damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drilling fluids for underbalanced operations require careful design and testing to ensure they do not damage sensitive formations. In addition to hole cleaning and lubrication functions, these fluids may be needed as kill fluids during emergencies. PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd. used a systematic approach in developing and field testing a nondamaging drilling fluid. It was for use in underbalanced operations in the Glauconitic sandstone in the Westerose gas field in Alberta. A lab study was initiated to develop and test a non-damaging water-based drilling fluid for the horizontal well pilot project. The need to develop an inexpensive, nondamaging drilling fluid was previously identified during underbalanced drilling operations in the Weyburn field in southeastern Saskatchewan. A non-damaging fluid is required for hole cleaning, for lubrication of the mud motor, and for use as a kill fluid during emergencies. In addition, a nondamaging fluid is required when drilling with a conventional rig because pressure surges during connections and trips may result in the well being exposed to short periods of near balanced or overbalanced conditions. Without the protection of a filter cake, the drilling fluid will leak off into the formation, causing damage. The amount of damage is related to the rate of leak off and depth of invasion, which are directly proportional to the permeability to the fluid.

Churcher, P.L.; Yurkiw, F.J. [PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Bietz, R.F.; Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

127

Horizontal well improves oil recovery from polymer flood--  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal drilling associated with an injection scheme appears to be highly promising for obtaining additional oil recovery. Horizontal well CR 163H, in the Chateaurenard field is discussed. It demonstrated that a thin unconsolidated sand can be successfully drilled and cased. The productivity index (PI) of the well was much greater than vertical wells, and an unproduced oil bank was successfully intersected. On the negative side, it was necessary to pump low in a very deviated part of the well, and the drilling cost was high compared to an onshore vertical well. CR 163H was the fifth and probably most difficult horizontal well drilled by Elf Aquitaine. Located within a polymer-flood project, the target was a 7-m thick sand reservoir at a vertical depth of 590:0080 m. In this inverted seven-spot configuration with one injector in the center and six producers at a distance of 400 m, a polymer solution was injected from 1977 to 1983, followed by water injection.

Bruckert, L. (Elf Aquitaine, Boussens, (FR))

1989-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

128

Development and testing of underbalanced drilling products. Topical report, September 1994--September 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling is experiencing growth at a rate that rivals that of horizontal drilling in the mid-1980s. Problems remain, however, for applying underbalanced drilling in a wider range of geological settings and drilling environments. This report addresses the development and testing of two products designed to advance the application of underbalanced drilling techniques. A user-friendly foam fluid hydraulics model (FOAM) was developed for a PC Windows environment. The program predicts pressure and flow characteristics of foam fluids used in underbalanced drilling operations. FOAM is based on the best available mathematical models, and was validated through comparison to existing models, laboratory test well measurements, and field data. This model does not handle air or mist drilling where the foam quality is above 0.97. An incompressible drilling fluid was developed that utilizes lightweight solid additives (hollow glass spheres) to reduce the density of the mud to less than that of water. This fluid is designed for underbalanced drilling situations where compressible lightweight fluids are inadequate. In addition to development of these new products, an analysis was performed to determine the market potential of lightweight fluids, and a forecast of underbalanced drilling in the USA over the next decade was developed. This analysis indicated that up to 12,000 wells per year (i.e., 30 percent of all wells) will be drilled underbalanced in the USA within the next ten years.

Medley, G.H., Jr; Maurer, W.C.; Liu, G.; Garkasi, A.Y.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Horizontal Plate Plate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Horizontal Plate Plate Horizontal Plate Plate Metadata also available as Metadata: Identification_Information Data_Quality_Information Spatial_Data_Organization_Information Spatial_Reference_Information Entity_and_Attribute_Information Distribution_Information Metadata_Reference_Information Identification_Information: Citation: Citation_Information: Originator: Ray George Publication_Date: Unknown Title: Horizontal Plate Plate Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: vector digital data Online_Linkage: Description: Abstract: Monthly and annual average solar resource potential for the lower 48 states Purpose: Provide information on the solar resource potential for the lower 48

130

On-site generated nitrogen cuts cost of underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of on-site generated nitrogen, instead of liquid nitrogen, has reduced the cost of drilling underbalanced horizontal wells in Canada and the western US. Because nitrogen is inert and inflammable, it is the preferred gas for underbalanced drilling. Nitrogen can be supplied for oil field use by three different methods: cryogenic liquid separation, pressure swing adsorption, and hollow fiber membranes. The selection of nitrogen supply from one of these methods depends on the cost of delivered nitrogen, the required flow rates and pressure, the required nitrogen purity, and the availability and reliability of the equipment for nitrogen generation. These three methods are described, as well as the required equipment.

Downey, R.A. [Energy Ingenuity Co., Englewood, CO (United States)

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

Drilling technology/GDO  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Technology Division of the US Department of Energy is sponsoring two programs related to drilling technology. The first is aimed at development of technology that will lead to reduced costs of drilling, completion, and logging of geothermal wells. This program has the official title ''Hard Rock Penetration Mechanics.'' The second program is intended to share with private industry the cost of development of technology that will result in solutions to the near term geothermal well problems. This program is referred to as the ''Geothermal Drilling Organization''. The Hard Rock Penetration Mechanics Program was funded at $2.65M in FY85 and the GDO was funded at $1.0M in FY85. This paper details the past year's activities and accomplishments and projects the plans for FY86 for these two programs.

Kelsey, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

EIA Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drilling Productivity Report Drilling Productivity Report For Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources Adam Sieminski, EIA Drilling Productivity Report October 29, 2013 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (MT & ND) Granite Wash (OK & TX) Bonespring (TX Permian) Wolfcamp (TX Permian) Spraberry (TX Permian) Niobrara-Codell (CO) Woodford (OK)

133

DEVELOPMENT OF NEW DRILLING FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the project has been to develop new types of drill-in fluids (DIFs) and completion fluids (CFs) for use in natural gas reservoirs. Phase 1 of the project was a 24-month study to develop the concept of advanced type of fluids usable in well completions. Phase 1 tested this concept and created a kinetic mathematical model to accurately track the fluid's behavior under downhole conditions. Phase 2 includes tests of the new materials and practices. Work includes the preparation of new materials and the deployment of the new fluids and new practices to the field. The project addresses the special problem of formation damage issues related to the use of CFs and DIFs in open hole horizontal well completions. The concept of a ''removable filtercake'' has, as its basis, a mechanism to initiate or trigger the removal process. Our approach to developing such a mechanism is to identify the components of the filtercake and measure the change in the characteristics of these components when certain cleanup (filtercake removal) techniques are employed.

David B. Burnett

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Mechanical drill string jar  

SciTech Connect

An improved mechanical drill string jar is described that allows uninhibited telescoping movement to the normal drilling condition. The drill string jar consists of: (a) an elongated, generally cylindrical, body usable as a drill string element; (b) axial motion resistance means situated in the annular opening; (c) bias means operatively associated with at least one element of the splined pair to rotate the pair out of alignment when the splined pair is rotationally disengaged; (d) opposed cooperating surfaces on at least two of the spline teeth situated such that forced axial relative motion of the splined pair will produce opposed radial forces on the teeth; (e) means intrinsic to at least one element of the splined pair to permit resisted radial displacement of the spline teeth when forced axial relative motion occurs, to permit one element to move axially through the other; (f) cam surfaces on at least one of the teeth situated to force rotational alignment of the splined pair when telescoping movement is from a jarring condition toward the normal drilling condition; (g) relative rotation resistance means situated in the annular opening, structurally engaged with the pair of telescoping members such that relative rotation therebetween will be resisted; (h) striker and anvil means situated in the annular opening, operatively associated with the telescoping pair of elements, such that axial relative movement therebetween will be solidly stopped at the axial extreme condition; (i) a flow-through fluid channel means extending between the means to attach to the continuing drill string; and (j) seal means situated in the annular opening, operatively associated with the telescoping pair of members, to provide fluid tightness therebetween.

Buck, D.A.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

Nonlinear Horizontal Diffusion for GCMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixing-length-based parameterization of horizontal diffusion, which was originally proposed by Smagorinsky, is revisited. The complete tendencies of horizontal momentum diffusion, the associated frictional heating, and horizontal diffusion of ...

Erich Becker; Ulrike Burkhardt

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Critique of Drilling Research  

SciTech Connect

For a number of years the Department of Energy has been funding research to reduce the cost of drilling geothermal wells. Generally that research has been effective and helped to make geothermal energy economically attractive to developers. With the increased competition for the electrical market, geothermal energy needs every advantage it can acquire to allow it to continue as a viable force in the marketplace. In drilling related research, there is essentially continuous dialogue between industry and the national laboratories. Therefore, the projects presented in the Program Review are focused on subjects that were previously recommended or approved by industry.

Hamblin, Jerry

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

137

Deepwater drilling riser system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal focus of this paper is to discuss and summarize, from the manufacturer's perspective, the primary milestones in the development of the marine riser system used to drill in record water depths off the U.S. east coast. This riser system is unique in that it used advanced designs, material technology, and quality control to enable safe operation in water depths beyond the capability of conventional drilling riser systems. Experience and research have led to design improvements that are now being incorporated in new riser systems that have the potential of expanding the frontiers to increasingly deeper water.

Chastain, T.; Stone, D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

ARM - Measurement - Horizontal wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsHorizontal wind govMeasurementsHorizontal wind ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Horizontal wind The horizontal wind in terms of either speed and direction, or the zonal (u) and meridional (v) components. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer

139

NETL: News Release - Carbon Fiber Drill Pipe Performs Flawlessly in First  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 9, 2003 January 9, 2003 Carbon Fiber Drill Pipe Performs Flawlessly in First Field Test Private Company to Use DOE-Sponsored Technology To Help Restore Domestic Production from Older Oil Wells TULSA COUNTY, OK - A new lightweight, flexible drill pipe engineered from space-age composites rather than steel has passed an important field test in a U.S. Department of Energy project and is now being readied for its first commercial use. - Photo - Composite Drill Pipe Being Bent - The advanced composite drill pipe could enable drillers in the future to bore sharply-curved "short radius" horizontal wells without creating fatigue stress on the drill pipe. The Energy Department's National Energy Technology Laboratory announced that the drill pipe, made from carbon fiber resins by Advanced Composite

140

Combination drilling and skiving tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination drilling and skiving tool including a longitudinally extending hollow skiving sleeve slidably and concentrically mounted on a right-handed twist drill. Dogs or pawls provided on the internal periphery of the skiving sleeve engage with the helical grooves of the drill. During a clockwise rotation of the tool, the drill moves downwardly and the sleeve translates upwardly, so that the drill performs a drilling operation on a workpiece. On the other hand, the drill moves upwardly and the sleeve translates downwardly, when the tool is rotated in a counter-clockwise direction, and the sleeve performs a skiving operation. The drilling and skiving operations are separate, independent and exclusive of each other.

Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Foam drilling simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the use of compressible drilling fluids is experiencing growth, the flow behavior and stability properties of drilling foams are more complicated than those of conventional fluids. In contrast with conventional mud, the physical properties of foam change along the wellbore. Foam physical and thermal properties are strongly affected by pressure and temperature. Many problems associated with field applications still exist, and a precise characterization of the rheological properties of these complex systems needs to be performed. The accurate determination of the foam properties in circulating wells helps to achieve better estimation of foam rheology and pressure. A computer code is developed to process the data and closely simulate the pressure during drilling a well. The model also offers a detailed discussion of many aspects of foam drilling operations and enables the user to generate many comparative graphs and tables. The effects of some important parameters such as: back-pressure, rate of penetration, cuttings concentration, cuttings size, and formation water influx on pressure, injection rate, and velocity are presented in tabular and graphical form. A discretized heat transfer model is formulated with an energy balance on a control volume in the flowing fluid. The finite difference model (FDM) is used to write the governing heat transfer equations in discretized form. A detailed discussion on the determination of heat transfer coefficients and the solution approach is presented. Additional research is required to analyze the foam heat transfer coefficient and thermal conductivity.

Paknejad, Amir Saman

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Horizontal Devonian shale well, Columbia Natural Resources, Inc.`s, Pocohontas Development Corp. Well 21747, Martin County, Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Columbia Gas and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have successfully completed field work on a horizontally drilled Devonian shale well located in Martin County, Kentucky. The objective of this cofunded project is to assess the effectiveness and economic feasibility of applying horizontal drilling and hydraulically fracturing stimulation techniques to enhance the extraction of natural gas from the Devonian shale. The well is comprised of three segments: a conventional vertical section, an angle build section and a horizontal section. The well reached a measured depth (MD) of 6263 feet, 3810 feet true vertical depth (TVD), with a horizontal displacement of 2812 feet achieved in the desired direction of N10{degrees}W. Both air and foam were used as drilling fluids. The vertical, lateral and tangent sections were drilled using conventional rotary drilling methods. Downhole motors were used to build angle. A total combined final open flow of 3.1 MMcfd was measured from all zones. Total well expenditures are approximately $1,460,000. Of this amount, $700,000 is directly related to the research and learning curve experience aspects. It is projected that the same horizontal well could be drilled with existing technology for $700,000. If advanced can be made in MWD systems for air drilling environments, wells of this type could be drilled routinely for $500,000. It appears that application of horizontal drilling will result in at least acceleration of gas production and possibly the addition of recoverable reserves from the Devonian shale. Production data, necessary to validate this statement, are also required to determine the economics. As we gain experience and technology advances, cost reductions will occur; this will result in economic improvement.

Koziar, G.; Ahmad, M.M.; Friend, L.L.; Friend, M.L.; Rothman, E.M.; Stollar, R.L. [Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)] [Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Horizontal Devonian shale well, Columbia Natural Resources, Inc. 's, Pocohontas Development Corp. Well 21747, Martin County, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Columbia Gas and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have successfully completed field work on a horizontally drilled Devonian shale well located in Martin County, Kentucky. The objective of this cofunded project is to assess the effectiveness and economic feasibility of applying horizontal drilling and hydraulically fracturing stimulation techniques to enhance the extraction of natural gas from the Devonian shale. The well is comprised of three segments: a conventional vertical section, an angle build section and a horizontal section. The well reached a measured depth (MD) of 6263 feet, 3810 feet true vertical depth (TVD), with a horizontal displacement of 2812 feet achieved in the desired direction of N10{degrees}W. Both air and foam were used as drilling fluids. The vertical, lateral and tangent sections were drilled using conventional rotary drilling methods. Downhole motors were used to build angle. A total combined final open flow of 3.1 MMcfd was measured from all zones. Total well expenditures are approximately $1,460,000. Of this amount, $700,000 is directly related to the research and learning curve experience aspects. It is projected that the same horizontal well could be drilled with existing technology for $700,000. If advanced can be made in MWD systems for air drilling environments, wells of this type could be drilled routinely for $500,000. It appears that application of horizontal drilling will result in at least acceleration of gas production and possibly the addition of recoverable reserves from the Devonian shale. Production data, necessary to validate this statement, are also required to determine the economics. As we gain experience and technology advances, cost reductions will occur; this will result in economic improvement.

Koziar, G.; Ahmad, M.M.; Friend, L.L.; Friend, M.L.; Rothman, E.M.; Stollar, R.L. (Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)) [Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Strontium Distribution Coefficients of Basalt and Sediment Infill Samples from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey and Idaho State University, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, are conducting a study to determine and evaluate strontium distribution coefficients (Kds) of subsurface materials at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose of this study is to aid in assessing the variability of strontium Kds at the INEEL as part of an ongoing investigation of chemical transport of strontium-90 in the Snake River Plain aquifer. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine Kds of six basalt core samples, five samples of sediment infill of vesicles and fractures, and six standard material samples. Analyses of data from these experiments indicate that the Kds of the sediment infill samples are significantly larger than those of the basalt samples. Quantification of such information is essential of furthering the understanding of transport processes of strontium-90 in the Snake River Plain aquifer and in similar environments.

M. N. Pace; R. C. Bartholomay (USGS); J. J. Rosentreter (ISU)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Case Study: Passive Solar Concepts Adapted to In-Fill Housing in a Hot, Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-fill housing for central city areas appears to be an answer to the continuing need for compact, affordable dwelling unite that will improve the neighborhood environment. There exist many central city areas in Louisiana where lots are unusually narrow but zoned for residential use. As a result of current building code improvement programs, there are numerous vacant lots in the prime downtown locations. Owners and builders seem to be poorly equipped to deal with the design constraints inherent in architectural proposals for contemporary housing design in these areas. Thin investigation considers the development of a case study that involves the planning and design of a compact, solar multi-family residential unit for a central city site condition. Emphasis will be placed on developing units that are highly energy conserving and have potential for one of three levels of passive solar technology--from a sun-tempered unit to a dominant passive solar system. The case study also focuses on the optional mix relationship between conservation options and passive system size. The site study area, a neighborhood in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is distinctive in that narrow 40 x 100 feet lots predominate. Many are vacant.

McQueen, T. M.; White, J. T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Advanced Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An advanced mud system was designed and key components were built that augment a coiled tubing drilling (CTD) rig that is designed specifically to drill microholes (less than 4-inch diameter) with advanced drilling techniques. The mud system was tailored to the hydraulics of the hole geometries and rig characteristics required for microholes and is capable of mixing and circulating mud and removing solids while being self contained and having zero discharge capability. Key components of this system are two modified triplex mud pumps (High Pressure Slurry Pumps) for advanced Abrasive Slurry Jetting (ASJ) and a modified Gas-Liquid-Solid (GLS) Separator for well control, flow return and initial processing. The system developed also includes an additional component of an advanced version of ASJ which allows cutting through most all materials encountered in oil and gas wells including steel, cement, and all rock types. It includes new fluids and new ASJ nozzles. The jetting mechanism does not require rotation of the bottom hole assembly or drill string, which is essential for use with Coiled Tubing (CT). It also has low reactive forces acting on the CT and generates cuttings small enough to be easily cleaned from the well bore, which is important in horizontal drilling. These cutting and mud processing components and capabilities compliment the concepts put forth by DOE for microhole coiled tubing drilling (MHTCTD) and should help insure the reality of drilling small diameter holes quickly and inexpensively with a minimal environmental footprint and that is efficient, compact and portable. Other components (site liners, sump and transfer pumps, stacked shakers, filter membranes, etc.. ) of the overall mud system were identified as readily available in industry and will not be purchased until we are ready to drill a specific well.

Kenneth Oglesby

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Development Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Development Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(9) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

148

Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Drilling Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling‎ Parent Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole

149

Cost effectiveness of sonic drilling  

SciTech Connect

Sonic drilling (combination of mechanical vibrations and rotary power) is an innovative environmental technology being developed in cooperation with DOE`s Arid-Site Volatile Organic Compounds Integrated Demonstration at Hanford and the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration at Sandia. This report studies the cost effectiveness of sonic drilling compared with cable-tool and mud rotary drilling. Benefit of sonic drilling is its ability to drill in all types of formations without introducing a circulating medium, thus producing little secondary waste at hazardous sites. Progress has been made in addressing the early problems of failures and downtime.

Masten, D.; Booth, S.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Horizontal Advanced Tensiometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An horizontal advanced tensiometer is described that allows the monitoring of the water pressure of soil positions, particularly beneath objects or materials that inhibit the use of previous monitoring wells. The tensiometer includes a porous cup, a pressure transducer (with an attached gasket device), an adaptive chamber, at least one outer guide tube which allows access to the desired horizontal position, a transducer wire, a data logger and preferably an inner guide tube and a specialized joint which provides pressure on the inner guide tube to maintain the seal between the gasket of the transducer and the adaptive chamber.

Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

151

Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Technical progress report, April--June 1994  

SciTech Connect

Thousands of horizontal wells are being drilled each year in the U.S.A. and around the world. Horizontal wells have increased oil and gas production rates 3 to 8 times those of vertical wells in many areas and have converted non-economic oil reserves to economic reserves. However, the use of horizontal technology in various formation types and applications has not always yielded anticipated success. The primary objective of this project is to examine factors affecting technical and economic success of horizontal well applications. The project`s goals will be accomplished through six tasks designed to evaluate the technical and economic success of horizontal drilling, highlight current limitations, and outline technical needs to overcome these limitations. Data describing operators` experiences throughout the domestic oil and gas industry will be gathered and organized. Canadian horizontal technology will also be documented with an emphasis on lessons the US industry can learn from Canada`s experience. MEI databases containing detailed horizontal case histories will also be used. All these data will be categorized and analyzed to assess the status of horizontal well technology and estimate the impact of horizontal wells on present and future domestic oil recovery and reserves.

McDonald, W.J.

1993-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

152

Drill bit assembly for releasably retaining a drill bit cutter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill bit assembly is provided for releasably retaining a polycrystalline diamond compact drill bit cutter. Two adjacent cavities formed in a drill bit body house, respectively, the disc-shaped drill bit cutter and a wedge-shaped cutter lock element with a removable fastener. The cutter lock element engages one flat surface of the cutter to retain the cutter in its cavity. The drill bit assembly thus enables the cutter to be locked against axial and/or rotational movement while still providing for easy removal of a worn or damaged cutter. The ability to adjust and replace cutters in the field reduces the effect of wear, helps maintains performance and improves drilling efficiency.

Glowka, David A. (Austin, TX); Raymond, David W. (Edgewood, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Feasibility of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide as a Drilling Fluid for Deep Underbalanced Drilling Operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Feasibility of drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide to serve the needs of deep underbalanced drilling operations has been analyzed. A case study involving underbalanced drilling… (more)

Gupta, Anamika

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Pad drilling and rig mobility lead to more efficient drilling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... Pad drilling allows producers to target a significant area of underground resources while minimizing impact on the surface.

155

Drilling and general petroleum engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forty-nine papers are included in the Drilling and General Petroleum Engineering Volume of the SPE Annual Conference and Exhibition proceedings. The conference was held in New Orleans, Louisiana, September 25-28, 1994. The papers cover such topics as: extended reach well drilling, development of marginal satellite fields, slim hole drilling, pressure loss predictions, models for cuttings transport, ester-based drilling fluid systems, borehole stability, cementing, operations, bit failures, roller core bits, well tracking techniques, nitrogen drilling systems, plug failures, drill bit and drillstring dynamics, slim hole vibrations, reserve estimates, enhanced recovery methods, waste disposal, and engineering salary trends. A separate abstract and indexing was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Apparatus in a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus in a drill string comprises an internally upset drill pipe. The drill pipe comprises a first end, a second end, and an elongate tube intermediate the first and second ends. The elongate tube and the ends comprising a continuous an inside surface with a plurality of diameters. A conformable spirally welded metal tube is disposed within the drill pipe intermediate the ends thereof and terminating adjacent to the ends of the drill pipe. The conformable metal tube substantially conforms to the continuous inside surface of the metal tube. The metal tube may comprise a non-uniform section which is expanded to conform to the inside surface of the drill pipe. The non-uniform section may comprise protrusions selected from the group consisting of convolutions, corrugations, flutes, and dimples. The non-uniform section extends generally longitudinally along the length of the tube.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Alpine, UT); Hall, Jr., Tracy H. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Lehi, UT); Pixton, David S. (Provo, UT)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

157

High speed drilling research advances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that the Amoco Production Company's Tulsa Research Center is developing a High Speed Drilling System (HSDS) to improve drilling economics for both exploration and development wells. The system is targeted for areas where historically the drilling rate is less than 25 ft/hr over a large section of hole. Designed as a five-year development program, work began on the system in late 1984. A major service company is participating in the project. The objective of the HSDS project is to improve drilling efficiency by developing improvements in the basic mechanical drilling system. The HSDS approach to improved drilling economics is via the traditional routes of increasing penetration rate (ROP) and bit life, increasing hole stability and reducing trouble time.

Warren, T.M.; Canson, B.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Drill string gas data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data and supporting documentation were compiled and analyzed for 26 cases of gas grab samples taken during waste-tank core sampling activities between September 1, 1995 and December 31, 1997. These cases were tested against specific criteria to reduce uncertainties associated with in-tank sampling location and conditions. Of the 26 possible cases, 16 qualified as drill-string grab samples most likely to represent recently released waste gases. The data from these 16 ``confirmed`` cases were adjusted to remove non-waste gas contributions from core-sampling activities (argon or nitrogen purge), the atmospheric background, and laboratory sampler preparation (helium). The procedure for subtracting atmospheric, laboratory, and argon purge gases was unambiguous. No reliable method for determining the exact amount of nitrogen purge gas was established. Thus, the final set of ``Adjusted`` drill string gas data for the 6 nitrogen-purged cases had a greater degree of uncertainty than the final results for the 10 argon-purged cases. Including the appropriate amounts of uncertainty, this final set of data was added to the set of high-quality results from the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), and good agreement was found for the N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O mole fractions sampled from common tanks. These results indicate that under favorable sampling conditions, Drill-String (DS) grab samples can provide reasonably accurate information about the dominant species of released gas. One conclusion from this set of total gas data is that the distribution of the H{sub 2} mole fractions is bimodal in shape, with an upper bound of 78%.

Siciliano, E.R.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

159

Drilling Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Systems Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Drilling Systems 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Drilling Systems Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Drilling Systems Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

160

Managing pressure during underbalanced drilling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? AbstractUnderbalanced drilling has received more and more attention in recent years. The reason for that may be because many oil fields, especially on the… (more)

Råen, Jostein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Underbalanced drilling solves difficult drilling problems and enhances production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternate approach to drilling, completing and working over new and existing wells has dramatically improved the efficiency of these operations. This method is called underbalanced drilling (UBD). Improvements in both the equipment and technique during the past 5 years have made this process economical and necessary to solve many difficult drilling problems. Additionally, by reducing drilling or workover damage, dramatic improvements in oil and gas production rates and ultimate reserves are realized, resulting in extra profits for today`s operators. This article will detail the advantages of UBD and give specific examples of its applications, A series of related articles will follow, including: new UBD equipment, land and off-shore case histories, coiled tubing drilling, underbalanced workovers, software technology and subsea applications to examine the reality and future of this technology.

Cuthbertson, R.L.; Vozniak, J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Electric drill-string telemetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We design a numerical algorithm for simulation of low-frequency electric-signal transmission through a drill string. This is represented by a transmission line with varying geometrical and electromagnetic properties versus depth, depending on the characteristics ... Keywords: drill string, low frequency, simulation, transmission line, voltage

José M. Carcione; Flavio Poletto

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee formation using horizontal drains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and economic success of producing oil from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. A site for a horizontal well was selected in Crystal Field, a nearly-abandoned Dundee oil field in Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well was drilled as a field demonstration pilot, funded through this DOE project, and was immensely successful. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The horizontal well was brought on production at a rate of 100 bbls/day and is probably capable of producing at a higher rate. `The addition of several horizontal wells, similar to the demonstration well, will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. The presence of untapped oil in this Dundee field was dramatically demonstrated and the favorable economics were made clearly evident. Additional project work comprises characterization of 30 Dundee fields in Michigan to aid in determining appropriate candidates for development through horizontal drilling. Further quantification of reservoir parameters such as importance of fracturing, fracture density, and irregularity of the dolomitized surface at the top of the reservoir will help in designing the optimal strategy for horizontal drilling. Technical progress is presented for the following tasks: project management; reservoir characterization; data measurement and analysis; database management; geochemical and basin modeling; and technology transfer.

Wood, J.R.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

Drilling Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drilling Methods Drilling Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Methods Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Drilling Methods: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Document # Analysis Type Applicant Geothermal Area Lead Agency District Office Field Office Mineral Manager Surface Manager Development Phase(s) Techniques CA-170-02-15 EA Mammoth Pacific Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area BLM BLM Central California District Office BLM Bishop Field Office BLM Geothermal/Exploration Drilling Methods

165

Hydraulic Pulse Drilling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REV DATE DESCRIPTION ORIGINATOR REVIEWED DATE REV DATE DESCRIPTION ORIGINATOR REVIEWED DATE 0 4/13/2004 Final Report Author: J. Kolle Hunter/Theimer 4/13/2004 Document No.: TR- 053 HydroPulse(tm) Drilling Final Report Prepared by J.J. Kolle April 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Development Agreement No. DE-FC26-FT34367 Tempress Technologies, Inc. 18858 - 72 ND Ave S. Kent, WA 98032 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

166

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using a section of drill-in casing connected to a free-fall reentry cone. This hole was drilled to 95

167

Establishing nuclear facility drill programs  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of DOE Handbook, Establishing Nuclear Facility Drill Programs, is to provide DOE contractor organizations with guidance for development or modification of drill programs that both train on and evaluate facility training and procedures dealing with a variety of abnormal and emergency operating situations likely to occur at a facility. The handbook focuses on conducting drills as part of a training and qualification program (typically within a single facility), and is not intended to included responses of personnel beyond the site boundary, e.g. Local or State Emergency Management, Law Enforcement, etc. Each facility is expected to develop its own facility specific scenarios, and should not limit them to equipment failures but should include personnel injuries and other likely events. A well-developed and consistently administered drill program can effectively provide training and evaluation of facility operating personnel in controlling abnormal and emergency operating situations. To ensure the drills are meeting their intended purpose they should have evaluation criteria for evaluating the knowledge and skills of the facility operating personnel. Training and evaluation of staff skills and knowledge such as component and system interrelationship, reasoning and judgment, team interactions, and communications can be accomplished with drills. The appendices to this Handbook contain both models and additional guidance for establishing drill programs at the Department`s nuclear facilities.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Acoustical properties of drill strings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recovery of petrochemical and geothermal resources requires extensive drilling of wells to increasingly greater depths. Real-time collection and telemetry of data about the drilling process while it occurs thousands of feet below the surface is an effective way of improving the efficiency of drilling operations. Unfortunately, due to hostile down-hole environments, telemetry of this data is an extremely difficult problem. Currently, commercial systems transmit data to the surface by producing pressure pulses within the portion of the drilling mud enclosed in the hollow steel drill string. Transmission rates are between two and four data bits per second. Any system capable of raising data rates without increasing the complexity of the drilling process will have significant economic impact. One alternative system is based upon acoustical carrier waves generated within the drill string itself. If developed, this method would accommodate data rates up to 100 bits per second. Unfortunately, the drill string is a periodic structure of pipe and threaded tool joints, the transmission characteristics are very complex and exhibit a banded and dispersive structure. Over the past forty years, attempts to field systems based upon this transmission method have resulted in little success. This paper examines this acoustical transmission problem in great detail. The basic principles of acoustic wave propagation in the periodic structure of the drill string are examined through theory, laboratory experiment, and field test. The results indicate the existence of frequency bands which are virtually free of attenuation and suitable for data transmission at high bit rates. 9 refs., 38 figs., 2 tabs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Volume 2: Applications overview, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal technology has been applied in over 110 formations in the USA. Volume 1 of this study addresses the overall success of horizontal technology, especially in less-publicized formations, i.e., other than the Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara. Operators in the USA and Canada were surveyed on a formation-by-formation basis by means of a questionnaire. Response data were received describing horizontal well projects in 58 formations in the USA and 88 in Canada. Operators` responses were analyzed for trends in technical and economic success based on lithology (clastics and carbonates) and resource type (light oil, heavy oil, and gas). The potential impact of horizontal technology on reserves was also estimated. A forecast of horizontal drilling activity over the next decade was developed.

Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Knoll, R.G.; Springer, S.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slurry Injection Slurry Injection Fact Sheet - Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes Underground Injection of Drilling Wastes Several different approaches are used for injecting drilling wastes into underground formations for permanent disposal. Salt caverns are described in a separate fact sheet. This fact sheet focuses on slurry injection technology, which involves grinding or processing solids into small particles, mixing them with water or some other liquid to make a slurry, and injecting the slurry into an underground formation at pressures high enough to fracture the rock. The process referred to here as slurry injection has been given other designations by different authors, including slurry fracture injection (this descriptive term is copyrighted by a company that provides slurry injection services), fracture slurry injection, drilled cuttings injection, cuttings reinjection, and grind and inject.

171

Underbalanced drilling in remedial operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operators are finding additional applications for underbalanced drilling (UBD) technology that deliver benefits besides faster, more trouble-free drilling and improved well productivity. Underbalanced workovers, completions and re-drills are being performed with impressive results. This article will describe some of the jobs and applications, and detail the special surface equipment being used to make this a success. This is the fifth in a series of articles on UBD technology and its rapid development in this field. The paper discusses deep gas wells in the Texas Panhandle, gas and condensate wells near Mobile, Alabama, and the Austin Chalk wells in Texas and Louisiana.

Cuthbertson, R.L.; Vozniak, J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(20) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

173

HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

Treshow, M.

1958-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

174

Casing pull tests for directionally drilled environmental wells  

SciTech Connect

A series of tests to evaluate several types of environmental well casings have been conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and it`s industrial partner, The Charles Machine Works, Inc. (CMW). A test bed was constructed at the CMW test range to model a typical shallow, horizontal, directionally drilled wellbore. Four different types of casings were pulled through this test bed. The loads required to pull the casings through the test bed and the condition of the casing material were documented during the pulling operations. An additional test was conducted to make a comparison of test bed vs actual wellbore casing pull loads. A directionally drilled well was emplaced by CMW to closely match the test bed. An instrumented casing was installed in the well and the pull loads recorded. The completed tests are reviewed and the results reported.

Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Layne, R.R. [Charles Machine Works, Inc., Perry, OK (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 158 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Français

176

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

177

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

178

Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Chemical damage due to drilling operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of geothermal wells can result in near wellbore damage of both the injection wells and production wells if proper precautions are not taken. Very little specific information on the chemical causes for drilling damage that can directly be applied to the drilling of a geothermal well in a given situation is available in the literature. As part of the present work, the sparse literature references related to the chemical aspects of drilling damage are reviewed. The various sources of chemically induced drilling damages that are related to drilling operations are summarized. Various means of minimizing these chemical damages during and after the drilling of a geothermal well are suggested also.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

Managed pressure drilling techniques and tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The economics of drilling offshore wells is important as we drill more wells in deeper water. Drilling-related problems, including stuck pipe, lost circulation, and excessive mud cost, show the need for better drilling technology. If we can solve these problems, the economics of drilling the wells will improve, thus enabling the industry to drill wells that were previously uneconomical. Managed pressure drilling (MPD) is a new technology that enables a driller to more precisely control annular pressures in the wellbore to prevent these drillingrelated problems. This paper traces the history of MPD, showing how different techniques can reduce drilling problems. MPD improves the economics of drilling wells by reducing drilling problems. Further economic studies are necessary to determine exactly how much cost savings MPD can provide in certain situation. Furter research is also necessary on the various MPD techniques to increase their effectiveness.

Martin, Matthew Daniel

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Rotary steerable motor system for underground drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preferred embodiment of a system for rotating and guiding a drill bit in an underground bore includes a drilling motor and a drive shaft coupled to drilling motor so that drill bit can be rotated by the drilling motor. The system further includes a guidance module having an actuating arm movable between an extended position wherein the actuating arm can contact a surface of the bore and thereby exert a force on the housing of the guidance module, and a retracted position.

Turner, William E. (Durham, CT); Perry, Carl A. (Middletown, CT); Wassell, Mark E. (Kingwood, TX); Barbely, Jason R. (Middletown, CT); Burgess, Daniel E. (Middletown, CT); Cobern, Martin E. (Cheshire, CT)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

182

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Quarterly report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and economic success of producing oil from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. A site for a horizontal well was selected in Crystal Field, a nearly-abandoned Dundee oil field in Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well was drilled as a field demonstration pilot, funded through this DOE project, and was immensely successful. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The horizontal well was brought on production at a rate of 100 bbls/day and is probably capable of producing at a higher rate. The addition of several horizontal wells, similar to the demonstration well, will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. The presence of untapped oil in this Dundee field was dramatically demonstrated and the favorable economics were made clearly evident. If other abandoned Dundee fields are re-developed in a similar manner, the additional oil produced could exceed 80 Trillion barrels. Horizontal drilling will likely revolutionize the development of old carbonate fields such as those in the Dundee of Michigan.

Wood, J.R.

1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Newberry Exploratory Slimhole: Drilling And Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During July-November, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with CE Exploration, drilled a 5360' exploratory slimhole (3.895" diameter) in the Newberry Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Bend, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia's program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling we performed numerous temperature logs, and at the completion of drilling attempted to perform injection tests. In addition to these measurements, the well's data set includes: over 4000' of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Newberry KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for ...

John Finger Ronald; Ronald D. Jacobson; Charles E. Hickox

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Downhole Temperature Prediction for Drilling Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unusually high temperatures are encountered during drilling of a geothermal well. These temperatures affect every aspect of drilling, from drilling fluid properties to cement formulations. Clearly, good estimates of downhole temperatures during drilling would be helpful in preparing geothermal well completion designs, well drilling plans, drilling fluid requirements, and cement formulations. The thermal simulations in this report were conducted using GEOTEMP, a computer code developed under Sandia National Laboratories contract and available through Sandia. Input variables such as drilling fluid inlet temperatures and circulation rates, rates of penetration, and shut-in intervals were obtained from the Imperial Valley East Mesa Field and the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Project. The results of several thermal simulations are presented, with discussion of their impact on drilling fluids, cements, casing design, and drilling practices.

Mitchell, R. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Smaller Footprint Drilling System for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-03NT15401 Final Report Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling Submitted by: TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company 1935 Fremont Drive Salt Lake City, UT 84104 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 2 February 2010 Office of Fossil Energy Feasibility of Ultra-High Speed Diamond Drilling DE-FC26-03NT15401 ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

186

RECIPIENT:Potter Drilling Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potter Drilling Inc Potter Drilling Inc u.s. DEPARTUEN T OF ENERG¥ EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENT ER NEPA DEIERl\IINATION PROJECr TITLE: Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Page 1 0[2 STATE: CA Funding Opportunity Announ<:ement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number OE·PS36-09G099016 OE· EE0002746 ~FO . 10 - [r,,~ G02746 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA ComplianC:f Offkrr (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex. EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited 10, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

187

Horizontal well success spurs more Devonian work in Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this DOE-sponsored project was to drill a horizontal demonstration well in order to test the viability of using horizontal wells to recover bypassed oil from the Dundee reservoir in Crystal field. In addition, a modern log suite through the entire Dundee formation and a conventional core through the productive interval, the oil/water contact, and the upper part of the water leg were to be obtained. During the early years of Dundee development in central Michigan, it was common practice to drill only a short distance below the cap limestone into the top of the Dundee porosity zone before completing a well in order to prevent lost circulation and blowouts in vuggy and fractured dolomites and to avoid penetration of the oil/water contact and minimize water coning. As a result, the characteristics of the Dundee reservoir in central Michigan are poorly known and the decision to attempt an improved recovery program in Crystal field had to be based on field volumetrics, individual well productivities, and well development/abandonment histories. The new core and log data from the demonstration well will provide an important anchor point for regional Dundee reservoir characterization studies.

Wood, J.R.; Allan, J.R.; Huntoon, J.E.; Pennington, W.D. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Harrison, W.B. III [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Taylor, E.; Tester, C.J. [Cronus Development Corp., Traverse City, MI (United States)

1996-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

188

Near-Term Developments in Geothermal Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling geothermal wells. Current projects include: R & D in lost circulation control, high temperature instrumentation, underground imaging with a borehole radar insulated drill pipe development for high temperature formations, and new technology for data transmission through drill pipe that can potentially greatly improve data rates for measurement while drilling systems. In addition to this work, projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization are managed. During 1988, GDO projects include developments in five areas: high temperature acoustic televiewer, pneumatic turbine, urethane foam for lost circulation control, geothermal drill pipe protectors, an improved rotary head seals.

Dunn, James C.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

189

Assembly for directional drilling of boreholes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a drilling assembly for directional drilling of boreholes in subsurface formations. The assembly comprising a downhole drilling motor. The motor having an output shaft which is suitable to drive a rotary drill bit and a motor housing which is suitable to be arranged at the lower end of a drill string; stabilizing means for stabilizing the assembly; means in the assembly for permanently tilting the central axis of the output shaft with respect to the longitudinal axis of the drill string in the borehole. It is characterized in that the stabilizing means include a lower-most stabilizer which is secured to and rotates with the output shaft.

Steiginga, A.; Worrall, R.N.

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

190

Great Plaines installs directionally drilled crossings in Texas  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on installing a five- line wide, one-line long products system for ARCO Pipe Line Co. (APLC) in a crowded utility right of way required Great Plains Pipeline Construction Co. to complete three directionally drilled crossings and over 50 conventional bored crossings in the Channelview, Texas area. The pipe line route closely parallels a 4-mi ROW section of Houston Power and Light Co. (HP and L) and about 4 mi of Union Pacific Railroad tracks. Due to overhead towers carrying high-voltage electric transmission lines, Great Plains bored under the existing towers in HP and L's easement to preserve the right of way for future tower expansion. Laney, Inc., subcontracted the conventional bores underneath towers and minor roads. Laney Directional Drilling Co. was the prime contractor for two horizontal directionally drilled crossings of the Houston Ship Channel and Carpenter's Bayou. Great Plains, with its own crew, completed three roadway crossings in high-traffic areas. Engineering and material procurement was handled by APLC.

Thiede, K.L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

A site for horizontal well was selected in Crystal Field, a nearly-abandoned Dundee oil field in Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well was drilled as a field demonstration pilot, funded through this DOE project, and was immensely successful. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The horizontal well was brought on production at a rate of 100 bbls/day and is probably capable of producing at a higher rate. The addition of several horizontal wells, similar to the demonstration well, will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. The presence of untapped oil in this Dundee field was dramatically demonstrated and the favorable economics were made clearly evident. If other abandoned Dundee fields are re-developed in a similar manner, the additional oil produced could exceed 80 million barrels. Horizontal drilling will likely revolutionize the development of old carbonate fields such as those in the Dundee of Michigan. Additional project work comprises characterization of 30 other Dundee fields in Michigan to aid in determining appropriate candidates for development through horizontal drilling. Further quantification of reservoir parameters such as importance of fracturing, fracture density, and irregularity of the dolomitized surface at the top of the reservoir will help in designing the optimal strategy for horizontal drilling.

Wood, J.R.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Definition: Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Drilling Techniques There are a variety of drilling techniques which can be used to sink a borehole into the ground. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, in terms of the depth to which it can drill, the type of sample returned, the costs involved and penetration rates achieved. There are two basic types of drills: drills which produce rock chips, and drills which produce core samples.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Well drilling is the process of drilling a hole in the ground for the extraction of a natural resource such as ground water, brine, natural gas, or petroleum, for the injection of a fluid from surface to a subsurface reservoir or for subsurface formations evaluation or monitoring.

193

Acoustic data transmission through a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acoustical signals are transmitted through a drill string by canceling upward moving acoustical noise and by preconditioning the data in recognition of the comb filter impedance characteristics of the drill string. 5 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

Well descriptions for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Generic well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. They were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. Their nature, their construction, and their validation are discussed.

Carson, C.C.; Livesay, B.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation (DCS) Project focuses on advanced, non-damaging technology systems and equipment for improving gas recovery from conventional and nonconventional reservoirs. As operators move from development of current day economically attractive gas-field development to the lower permeability geologic regions of domestic onshore plays, increasing the emphasis on minimum formation damage DCS will permit economic development of gas reserves. The objective of the Project is to develop and demonstrate cost-effective, advanced technology to accelerate widespread use and acceptance of minimum formation damage DCS systems. The goal of this product development effort is to reduce costs and improve the overall efficiency of vertical, directional, and horizontally drilled wells in gas formations throughout the US. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche

197

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche

198

Downhole drilling network using burst modulation techniques  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole drilling system is disclosed in one aspect of the present invention as including a drill string and a transmission line integrated into the drill string. Multiple network nodes are installed at selected intervals along the drill string and are adapted to communicate with one another through the transmission line. In order to efficiently allocate the available bandwidth, the network nodes are configured to use any of numerous burst modulation techniques to transmit data.

Hall; David R. (Provo, UT), Fox; Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

199

Graphene Compositions And Drilling Fluids Derived Therefrom ...  

Drilling fluids comprising graphenes and nanoplatelet additives and methods for production thereof are disclosed. Graphene includes graphite oxide, graphene oxide ...

200

Directional drilling and equipment for hot granite wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following drilling equipment and experience gained in drilling to date are discussed: positive displacement motors, turbodrills, motor performance experience, rotary-build and rotary-hold results, steering devices and surveying tools, shock absorbers, drilling and fishing jars, drilling bits, control of drill string drag, and control of drill string degradation. (MHR)

Williams, R.E.; Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

High-temperature directional drilling turbodrill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a high-temperature turbodrill for directional drilling of geothermal wells in hard formations is summarized. The turbodrill may be used for straight-hole drilling but was especially designed for directional drilling. The turbodrill was tested on a dynamometer stand, evaluated in laboratory drilling into ambient temperature granite blocks, and used in the field to directionally drill a 12-1/4-in.-diam geothermal well in hot 200/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) granite at depths to 10,5000 ft.

Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Downhole mud properties complicate drilling hydraulics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explains that wellsite parameters such as penetration rate, hole cleaning, hole erosion and overall wellbore stability are directly related to the hydraulic conditions occurring while drilling. Drilling hydraulics, in turn, are largely a function of the drilling mud's properties, primarily viscosity and density. Accurate pressure loss calculations are necessary to maximize bit horse-power and penetration rates. Also, annular pressure loss measurements are important to record equivalent circulating densities, particularly when drilling near balanced formation pressures or when approaching formation fracture pressures. Determination of the laminar, transitional or turbulent flow regimes will help ensure the mud will remove drill cuttings from the wellbore and minimize hole erosion.

Leyendecker, E.A.; Bruton, J.R.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Conformable apparatus in a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus in a drill string comprises an internally upset drill pipe. The drill pipe comprises a first end, a second end, and an elongate tube intermediate the first and second ends. The elongate tube and the ends comprising a continuous an inside surface with a plurality of diameters. A conformable metal tube is disposed within the drill pipe intermediate the ends thereof and terminating adjacent to the ends of the drill pipe. The conformable metal tube substantially conforms to the continuous inside surface of the metal tube. The metal tube may comprise a non-uniform section which is expanded to conform to the inside surface of the drill pipe. The non-uniform section may comprise protrusions selected from the group consisting of convolutions, corrugations, flutes, and dimples. The non-uniform section extends generally longitudinally along the length of the tube. The metal tube may be adapted to stretch as the drill pipes stretch.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

205

Innovative techniques cut costs in wetlands drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on an approach to drilling oil and gas wells in sensitive wetlands areas contributed to a savings of over $1.2 million on a three-well, $3 million drilling project in south Louisiana. ARCO Oil and Gas Co. drilled a three-well project in the Bayou Sale field with a truck-mounted workover rig and a modified solids-control system. This smaller equipment eliminated the need to build a large location in the marsh. Traditional drilling techniques require a large drillsite to accommodate all the equipment of a modern drilling complex. However, recently imposed environmental regulations substantially limit, and in some cases prohibit, the use of these conventional techniques for drilling wells in wetlands areas. Based on the potentially huge economic and operational impact on the drilling industry because of these stricter regulations, alternatives to these traditional practices are essential.

Navarro, A.R. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Lafayette, LA (US))

1991-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

206

Underbalanced drilling with air offers many pluses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pressure overbalance during conventional drilling can cause significant fluid filtrate invasion and lost circulation. Fluid invasion into the formation can lead to formation damage, high mud costs, a need for expensive completions, and well productivity impairment. Because underbalanced drilling creates a natural tendency for fluid and gas to flow from the formation to the borehole, successful underbalanced drilling depends upon the appropriate selection of circulating fluid. The use of a compressible fluid in the circulating system, referred to as air drilling, lowers the downhole pressure, allowing drilling into and beyond these sensitive formations. The paper discusses the equipment needed; well control; downhole air requirements; air drilling techniques using dry air, air-mist, stable foam, stiff foam, and aerated-fluid; downhole fires; directional air drilling; and well completions.

Shale, L. [Baker Hughes Inteq, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

207

Chemical Speciation of Chromium in Drilling Muds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drilling muds are made of bentonite and other clays, and/or polymers, mixed with water to the desired viscosity. Without the drilling muds, corporations could not drill for oil and gas and we would have hardly any of the fuels and lubricants considered essential for modern industrial civilization. There are hundreds of drilling muds used and some kinds of drilling muds contain chromium. The chemical states of chromium in muds have been studied carefully due to concerns about the environmental influence. However it is difficult to determine the chemical state of chromium in drilling muds directly by conventional analytical methods. We have studied the chemical form of chromium in drilling muds by using a laboratory XAFS system and a synchrotron facility.

Taguchi, Takeyoshi [X-ray Research Laboratory, RIGAKU Corporation, 3-9-12 Matsubara-cho, Akishima-shi, Tokyo 196-8666 (Japan); Yoshii, Mitsuru [Mud Technical Center, Telnite Co., Ltd., 1-2-14 Ohama, Sakata-shi, Yamagata 998-0064 (Japan); Shinoda, Kohzo [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

208

:- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'Xxy";^ ...... ' '. .- -- Metals, Ceramics, and Materials. : . - ,.. ; - . _ : , , ' z . , -, .- . >. ; . .. :- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A .-... r .. .. i ' LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER 4 r . _.i'- ' ...... ' -'".. :-'' ,' :... : , '.- ' ;BY R.' J. ' ANSEN .AEC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT PERSONAL PROPERTY OF J. F. Schlltz .:- DECLASSIFIED - PER AUTHORITY OF (DAlE) (NhTI L (DATE)UE) FEED MATERIALS PRODUCTION CENTER NATIONAL LFE A COMPANY OF OHIO 26 1 3967 3035406 NLCO - 886 Metals, Ceramics and Materials (TID-4500, 22nd Ed.) DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER By R. J. Jansen* TECHNICAL DIVISION NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO Date of Issuance: September 13, 1963 Approved By: Approved By: Technical Director Head, Metallurgical Department *Mr. Jansen is presently

209

Filter for a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A filter for a drill string comprises a perforated receptacle having an open end and a perforated end and first and second mounting surfaces are adjacent the open end. A transmission element is disposed within each of the first and second mounting surfaces. A capacitor may modify electrical characteristics of an LC circuit that comprises the transmission elements. The respective transmission elements are in communication with each other and with a transmission network integrated into the drill string. The transmission elements may be inductive couplers, direct electrical contacts, or optical couplers. In some embodiments of the present invention, the filter comprises an electronic component. The electronic component may be selected from the group consisting of a sensor, a router, a power source, a clock source, a repeater, and an amplifier.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); McPherson, James (Sandy, UT)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

210

Indonesian drilling maintains steady pace  

SciTech Connect

Offshore drilling activity in Indonesia increased nominally the first quarter of 1985 to an average 29 rigs. Barring any further problems with oil prices and markets, operators are expected to maintain essentially the current general level of appraisal/development work for the rest of this year. There are still a number of prospective regions to be explored in Southeast Asia. Regional developments are described for the South China Sea area, the Java Sea, South Sumatra, Kalimantan, Irian Jaya and the Malacca Strait.

Not Available

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Slant rigs offer big payoffs in shallow drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Slant hole drilling technology can result in considerable savings over conventionally drilled deviated holes because mud motors and deviation control with measurement while drilling tools are usually unnecessary. The benefits of using slant hole rigs for development drilling improve after the bit walk tendencies and the correct bottom hole assemblies have been determined for a particular area. This article discusses three recent drilling operations that successfully used slant drilling technology on land-based projects: drilling for heavy oil in Alberta, drilling for gas in Alberta, and drilling a river crossing for a gas pipeline in British Columbia. These examples demonstrate the flexibility of slant drilling technology.

Smith, J. (George E. Failing Co., Enid, OK (US)); Edwards, B. (Sierra Drilling Co., Calgary (CA))

1992-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF UNDERBALANCED DRILLING PRODUCTS. Final Report, Oct 1995 - July 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling is experiencing growth at a rate that rivals that of horizontal drilling in the mid-1980s and coiled-tubing drilling in the 1990s. Problems remain, however, for applying underbalanced drilling in a wider range of geological settings and drilling environments. This report addresses developments under this DOE project to develop products aimed at overcoming these problems. During Phase I of the DOE project, market analyses showed that up to 12,000 wells per year (i.e., 30% of all wells) will be drilled underbalanced in the U.S.A. within the next ten years. A user-friendly foam fluid hydraulics model (FOAM) was developed for a PC Windows environment during Phase I. FOAM predicts circulating pressures and flow characteristics of foam fluids used in underbalanced drilling operations. FOAM is based on the best available mathematical models, and was validated through comparison to existing models, laboratory test data and field data. This model does not handle two-phase flow or air and mist drilling where the foam quality is above 0.97. This FOAM model was greatly expanded during Phase II including adding an improved foam rheological model and a ''matching'' feature that allows the model to be field calibrated. During Phase I, a lightweight drilling fluid was developed that uses hollow glass spheres (HGS) to reduce the density of the mud to less than that of water. HGS fluids have several advantages over aerated fluids, including they are incompressible, they reduce corrosion and vibration problems, they allow the use of mud-pulse MWD tools, and they eliminate high compressor and nitrogen costs. Phase II tests showed that HGS significantly reduce formation damage with water-based drilling and completion fluids and thereby potentially can increase oil and gas production in wells drilled with water-based fluids. Extensive rheological testing was conducted with HGS drilling and completion fluids during Phase II. These tests showed that the HGS fluids act similarly to conventional fluids and that they have potential application in many areas, including underbalanced drilling, completions, and riserless drilling. Early field tests under this project are encouraging. These led to limited tests by industry (which are also described). Further field tests and cost analyses are needed to demonstrate the viability of HGS fluids in different applications. Once their effectiveness is demonstrated, they should find widespread application and should significantly reduce drilling costs and increase oil and gas production rates. A number of important oilfield applications for HGS outside of Underbalanced Drilling were identified. One of these--Dual Gradient Drilling (DGD) for deepwater exploration and development--is very promising. Investigative work on DGD under the project is reported, along with definition of a large joint-industry project resulting from the work. Other innovative products/applications are highlighted in the report including the use of HGS as a cement additive.

William C. Maurer; William J. McDonald; Thomas E. Williams; John H. Cohen

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Quarterly report, October 1 - December 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and economic success of producing oil from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. A site for a horizontal well was selected in Crystal Field, a nearly-abandoned Dundee oil field in Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well was drilled as a field demonstration pilot, funded through this DOE project, and was successful. It has produced over 37,000 bbls of oil as of December 31, 1996 at sustained rate of {approximately}100 bbls/day. At a nominal wellhead price of $20/bbl, this well has made about $750,000 and is still going strong. Two additional horizontal wells have just been completed and are on test. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The horizontal well was brought on production at a rate of 100 bbls/day and is probably capable of producing at a higher rate. The addition of several horizontal wells, similar to the demonstration well, will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. The presence of untapped oil in this Dundee field was dramatically demonstrated and the favorable economics were made clearly evident. If other abandoned Dundee fields are re-developed in a similar manner, the additional oil produced could exceed 80 million barrels. Horizontal drilling will likely revolutionize the development of old carbonate fields such as those in the Dundee of Michigan.

Wood, J.R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated December 7, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.state.nj.us/drbc/ Hydrologic conditions #12; Policies & regulations Natural gas related water withdrawal information associated with the industry The Future of Natural Gas (2011) MIT http://web.mit.edu/mitei/research/studies/natural-gas-2011.shtml An analysis of the role of natural gas in our energy future under a variety of possible

Manning, Sturt

215

A Parametric Study on the Benefits of Drilling Multilateral and Horizontal Wells in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production from natural fractures... Gas desorption from coal surface... Molecular diffusion through the coal into the cleat system. - Also known as sorption time, and an important parameter for time-to peak-gas. - May vary characteristics. - A significant amount of gas is stored in the coal rock, rather than the pore space. - CBM

Mohaghegh, Shahab

216

Reservoir screening criteria for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properly designed and executed underbalanced drilling operations can eliminate or significantly reduce formation damage, mud or drill solids invasion, lost circulation, fluid entrainment and trapping effects, and potential adverse reactions of drilling fluids with the reservoir matrix or in-situ reservoir fluids. The key to selecting appropriate reservoir candidates is achieving a balance of technical, safety and economic factors. Not every reservoir is an ideal candidate for an underbalanced drilling operation and in some cases distinct disadvantages may exist in trying to execute an underbalanced drilling operation in comparison to a simpler more conventional overbalanced application. Extensive field experience has played an important role in determining the following key criteria and design considerations that should be examined when evaluating a well. Screening criteria are also provided to help operators ascertain if a given formation is, in fact, a viable underbalanced drilling candidate.

Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Advanced Seismic While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Quarterly report, 4th quarter, FY 1994  

SciTech Connect

Well data, including drillers` logs, wireline logs, and seismic data, from the Crystal and other Dundee hydrocarbon fields in the Michigan basin, have been acquired. Digitized logs of 342 wells that currently produce or have produced from the Dundee Formation in the seven-county study area have been purchased from Maness Petroleum Company. Multiple logs exist for each well, and include gamma ray, caliper, lithodensity, neutron porosity, various types of resistivity, and some sonic logs. Twenty to thirty cores of the Dundee Formation from throughout the state of Michigan are currently available. Cuttings samples are also available from 60 to 100 Michigan wells. The storage locations of many of these core and cuttings samples have been identified, but sampling has not yet begun. A well has been designed and permitted and will soon be drilled. This well will have both a horizontal and a vertical leg. The vertical leg well will be cored through the producing interval of the Dundee Formation and the cores will be analyzed for porosity, permeability, and fluid saturations. A full set of well logs will be run, including gamma ray, porosity, resistivity, and geochemistry logs. This data will be incorporated into the existing database for the project area and used to calibrate the MWD (Measurement While Drilling) logs which will be run during the drilling of the horizontal leg. The horizontal leg will be drilled as a sidetrack from the vertical test well. If commercial amounts of hydrocarbons are encountered, the horizontal well will be placed on production. Drilling is expected to commence in late 1994 or early 1995, after completion of an environmental survey.

Wood, J.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Diffusion bonding of Stratapax for drill bits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process has been developed for the diffusion bonding of General Electric's Stratapax drill blanks to support studs for cutter assemblies in drill bits. The diffusion bonding process is described and bond strength test data are provided for a variety of materials. The extensive process details, provided in the Appendices, should be sufficient to enable others to successfully build diffusion-bonded drill bit cutter assemblies.

Middleton, J.N.; Finger, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A model for matrix acidizing of long horizontal well in carbonate reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal wells are drilled to achieve improved reservoir coverage, high production rates, and to overcome water coning problems, etc. Many of these wells often produce at rates much below the expected production rates. Low productivity of horizontal wells is attributed to various factors such as drilling induced formation damage, high completion skins, and variable formation properties along the length of the wellbore as in the case of heterogeneous carbonate reservoirs. Matrix acidizing is used to overcome the formation damage by injecting the acid into the carbonate rock to improve well performance. Designing the matrix acidizing treatments for horizontal wells is a challenging task because of the complex process. The estimation of acid distribution along wellbore is required to analyze that the zones needing stimulation are receiving enough acid. It is even more important in cases where the reservoir properties are varying along the length of the wellbore. A model is developed in this study to simulate the placement of injected acid in a long horizontal well and to predict the subsequent effect of the acid in creating wormholes, overcoming damage effects, and stimulating productivity. The model tracks the interface between the acid and the completion fluid in the wellbore, models transient flow in the reservoir during acid injection, considers frictional effects in the tubulars, and predicts the depth of penetration of acid as a function of the acid volume and injection rate at all locations along the completion. A computer program is developed implementing the developed model. The program is used to simulate hypothetical examples of acid placement in a long horizontal section. A real field example of using the model to history match actual treatment data from a North Sea chalk well is demonstrated. The model will help to optimize acid stimulation in horizontal wells.

Mishra, Varun

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

global horizontal | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

87 87 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278787 Varnish cache server global horizontal Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Documentation of the satellite-based high resolution solar resource assessment for Ghana provided by DLR. The high resolution solar data (10kmx10km) provide country maps of the annual and monthly sums of hourly global horizontal and direct normal irradiance (GHI and DNI) for the year 2000, 2001 and 2002. Additionally, for selected sites hourly values of GHI and DNI are provided.The Documentation gives an overview about the used input data and used methodology, shows example maps and describes a comparison with ground data (if provided by the country)

222

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 103 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 103 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS GALICIA BANK Gilbert Boillot Edward L of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

223

Vale exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing  

SciTech Connect

During April-May, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation, drilled a 5825{prime} exploratory slimhole (3.85 in. diameter) in the Vale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Vale, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During drilling we performed several temperature logs, and after drilling was complete we performed injection tests, bailing from a zone isolated by a packer, and repeated temperature logs. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: 2714{prime} of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid records; numerous temperature logs; pressure shut-in data from injection tests; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Vale KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.; Hickox, C.E.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Driltac (Drilling Time and Cost Evaluation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The users manual for the drill tech model for estimating the costs of geothermal wells. The report indicates lots of technical and cost detail. [DJE-2005

None

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Alloy Development for Measurement While Drilling Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, For oil and gas drilling applications, one of the giant technical ... of Type 2507 Duplex Stainless Steel in Synthetic Seawater and Hydraulic Fluids.

226

Loaded Transducer Fpr Downhole Drilling Component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force," urging them closer together.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

227

Quantifying Edge Defects in Drilled FRP Composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drilling of Aramid and Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites”,the Exit Defects in Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Plateswith a High Modulus CFRP (Carbon- Fiber Reinforced Polymer)

Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David; Dharan, C. K. Hari

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Specific energy for pulsed laser rock drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of advanced high power laser technology to oil and gas well drilling has been attracting significant research interests recently among research institutes

Z. Xu; C. B. Reed; G. Konercki; R. A. Parker; B. C. Gahan; S. Batarseh; R. M. Graves; H. Figueroa; N. Skinner

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity Period: Download Series History: Definitions, Sources & Notes: Data Series: Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 ...

230

Strong growth projected for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of underbalanced drilling technology should grow steadily during the next decade. The projected growth is primarily driven by increased concern about formation damage, the potential for higher penetration rates, and the ability to reduce lost circulation in depleted reservoirs. The Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center manages a portfolio of drilling-related research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) projects designed to reduce costs and improve efficiencies. The Department of Energy sponsored Maurer Engineering Inc. (MEI) to develop a user-friendly foam drilling model that can accurately predict pressure drops, cuttings lifting velocities, foam quality, and other foam drilling variables. A second objective of the project was to develop a light-weight drilling fluid that would allow underbalanced drilling in low-pressure reservoirs without the limitations commonly associated with existing light-weight fluids. Maurer performed a study to gauge the potential for light-weight drilling fluids and the extent of underbalanced drilling activity in the US. Data from many industry sources, including recent publications on the potential for air drilling, were evaluated and incorporated into this study. This paper discusses the findings from this survey.

Duda, J.R. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States); Medley, G.H. Jr.; Deskins, W.G. [Maurer Engineering Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

231

Category:Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Category:Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the...

232

The Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS) took place in spring 2007 and is the third in the series of Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (HATS) experiments. The HATS experiments have been instrumental in testing and developing subfilterscale (...

Edward G. Patton; Thomas W. Horst; Peter P. Sullivan; Donald H. Lenschow; Steven P. Oncley; William O. J. Brown; Sean P. Burns; Alex B. Guenther; Andreas Held; Thomas Karl; Shane D. Mayor; Luciana V. Rizzo; Scott M. Spuler; Jielun Sun; Andrew A. Turnipseed; Eugene J. Allwine; Steven L. Edburg; Brian K. Lamb; Roni Avissar; Ronald J. Calhoun; Jan Kleissl; William J. Massman; Kyaw Tha Paw U; Jeffrey C. Weil

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Foam computer model helps in analysis of underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new mechanistic model attempts to overcome many of the problems associated with existing foam flow analyses. The model calculates varying Fanning friction factors, rather than assumed constant factors, along the flow path. Foam generated by mixing gas and liquid for underbalanced drilling has unique rheological characteristics, making it very difficult to accurately predict the pressure profile. A user-friendly personal-computer program was developed to solve the mechanical energy balance equation for compressible foam flow. The program takes into account influxes of gas, liquid, and oil from formations. The pressure profile, foam quality, density, and cuttings transport are predicted by the model. A sensitivity analysis window allows the user to quickly optimize the hydraulics program by selecting the best combination of injection pressure, back pressure, and gas/liquid injection rates. This new model handles inclined and horizontal well bores and provides handy engineering and design tools for underbalanced drilling, well bore cleanout, and other foam operations. The paper describes rheological models, foam flow equations, equations of state, mechanical energy equations, pressure drop across nozzles, influx modeling, program operation, comparison to other models, to lab data, and to field data, and results.

Liu, G.; Medley, G.H. Jr. [Maurer Engineering Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Growing Nanowires Horizontally Yields New Benefit: 'Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growing Nanowires Horizontally Yields New Benefit: 'Nano-LEDs'. ... Optical microscope image of “nano LEDs” emitting light. ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

235

Definition: Global horizontal irradiance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Normal Irradiance (DNI) and Diffuse Horizontal Irradiance (DIF).1 Related Terms DNI, Solar radiation, Concentrating solar power, Photovoltaics References http:...

236

Numerical Simulation Study to Investigate Expected Productivity Improvement Using the "Slot-Drill" Completion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The "slot-drill" completion method, which utilizes a mechanically cut high-conductivity "slot" in the target formation created using a tensioned abrasive cable, has been proposed as an alternative stimulation technique for shale-gas and other low/ultra-low permeability formations. This thesis provides a comprehensive numerical simulation study on the "slot drill" completion technique. Using a Voronoi gridding scheme, I created representative grid systems for the slot-drill completion, as well as for the case of a vertical well with a single fracture, the case of a horizontal well with multiple hydraulic fractures, and various combinations of these completions. I also created a rectangular slot configuration, which is a simplified approximation of the actual "slot-drill" geometry, and investigated the ability of this rectangular approximation to model flow from the more complicated (actual) slot-drill configuration(s). To obtain the maximum possible diagnostic and analytical value, I simulated up to 3,000 years of production, allowing the assessment of production up to the point of depletion (or boundary-dominated flow). These scenarios provided insights into all the various flow regimes, as well as provided a quantitative evaluation of all completion schemes considered in the study. The results of my study illustrated that the "slot-drill" completion technique was not, in general, competitive in terms of reservoir performance and recovery compared to the more traditional completion techniques presently in use. Based on my modeling, it appears that the larger surface area to flow that multistage hydraulic fracturing provides is much more significant than the higher conductivity achieved using the slot-drill technique. This work provides quantitative results and diagnostic interpretations of productivity and flow behavior for low and ultra-low permeability formations completed using the slot-drill method. The results of this study can be used to (a) help evaluate the possible application of the "slot-drill" technique from the perspective of performance and recovery, and (b) to establish aggregated economic factors for comparing the slot-drill technique to more conventional completion and stimulation techniques applied to low and ultra-low permeability reservoirs.

Odunowo, Tioluwanimi Oluwagbemiga

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

NETL Extreme Drilling Laboratory Studies High Pressure High Temperature Drilling Phenomena  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established an Extreme Drilling Lab to engineer effective and efficient drilling technologies viable at depths greater than 20,000 feet. This paper details the challenges of ultra-deep drilling, documents reports of decreased drilling rates as a result of increasing fluid pressure and temperature, and describes NETL’s Research and Development activities. NETL is invested in laboratory-scale physical simulation. Their physical simulator will have capability of circulating drilling fluids at 30,000 psi and 480 °F around a single drill cutter. This simulator will not yet be operational by the planned conference dates; therefore, the results will be limited to identification of leading hypotheses of drilling phenomena and NETL’s test plans to validate or refute such theories. Of particular interest to the Extreme Drilling Lab’s studies are the combinatorial effects of drilling fluid pressure, drilling fluid properties, rock properties, pore pressure, and drilling parameters, such as cutter rotational speed, weight on bit, and hydraulics associated with drilling fluid introduction to the rock-cutter interface. A detailed discussion of how each variable is controlled in a laboratory setting will be part of the conference paper and presentation.

Lyons, K.D.; Honeygan, S.; Moroz, T

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

NETL Extreme Drilling Laboratory Studies High Pressure High Temperature Drilling Phenomena  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established the Extreme Drilling Laboratory to engineer effective and efficient drilling technologies viable at depths greater than 20,000 ft. This paper details the challenges of ultradeep drilling, documents reports of decreased drilling rates as a result of increasing fluid pressure and temperature, and describes NETL's research and development activities. NETL is invested in laboratory-scale physical simulation. Its physical simulator will have capability of circulating drilling fluids at 30,000 psi and 480°F around a single drill cutter. This simulator is not yet operational; therefore, the results will be limited to the identification of leading hypotheses of drilling phenomena and NETL's test plans to validate or refute such theories. Of particular interest to the Extreme Drilling Laboratory's studies are the combinatorial effects of drilling fluid pressure, drilling fluid properties, rock properties, pore pressure, and drilling parameters, such as cutter rotational speed, weight on bit, and hydraulics associated with drilling fluid introduction to the rock-cutter interface. A detailed discussion of how each variable is controlled in a laboratory setting will be part of the conference paper and presentation.

Lyons, K.D.; Honeygan, S.; Moroz, T.H.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Slim-hole Measurement While Drilling (MWD) system for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to make commercially available, wireless Measurement-while-drilling tools to reliably operate in air, air-mist, air-foam, and other unbalanced drilling environments during oil and gas directional drilling operations in conjunction with down-hole motors or other assemblies. Progress is described.

Harrison, W.H.; Harrison, J.D.; Rubin, L.A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

From: Development of New Types of Non-Damaging Drill-in and Completion Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of the project has been to develop new types of drill-in fluids (DIFs) and completion fluids (CFs) for use in natural gas reservoirs. Phase 1 of the project was a 24month study to develop the concept of advanced type of fluids usable in well completions. Phase 1 tested this concept and created a kinetic mathematical model to accurately track the fluid’s behavior under downhole conditions. Phase 2 includes tests of the new materials and practices. Work includes the preparation of new materials and the deployment of the new fluids and new practices to the field. This is the final report on a program that has been operating for 7 years, including the last four years under the sponsorship of the U.S. DOE. Accomplishments of Research Program The project addresses the special problem of formation damage issues related to the use of CFs and DIFs in open hole horizontal well completions. The concept of a “removable filtercake ” has, as its basis, a mechanism to initiate or trigger the removal process. Our approach to developing such a mechanism is to identify the components of the filtercake and measure the change in the characteristics of these components when certain cleanup (filtercake removal) techniques are employed. The program has been an unqualified success. We have accomplished the following: Development of New Laboratory Testing Practices Established standard testing practices Identification of key factors involved in formation damage Established appropriate cleanup practices for removal of formation damage to optimize productivity. DE26-98FT34174.000 Development of New Drilling Fluids Established New Guidelines for horizontal well completion practices Drill in fluid design and maintenance Cleanup fluid design and use Development of new well drill in fluids Low solids polymer carbonate DIFs Polymer free high density DIFs Low Density Drill in fluid design

David B. Burnett Harold Vance

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Field development options for a waterflooded heavy-oil reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Battrum Unit 4 is a moderately heavy-oil reservoir in Saskatchewan producing under waterflood from a thin sand. This paper describes a history match of previous field behavior and systematically analyzes through the use of numerical simulation the potential benefits to production of further waterflooding (with and without infill drilling), steamflooding, and horizontal drilling. It is found that the remaining oil recovery potential of a steamflood with horizontal well is significantly higher than that of any of the waterflood options.

Kasraie, M. (Petroleum Recovery Inst., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Sammon, P.H. (Computer Modelling Group, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Jespersen, P.J. (Sceptre Resources Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

Kolle , Jack J. (Seattle, WA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute- GRI) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). When compared to its competitors; the HPFL represents a technology that is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. Work performed under this contract included design and implementation of laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of high power laser energy on a variety of rock types. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation or side tracking prototype tool. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on laser/rock interaction under confining pressure as would be the case for all drilling and completion operations. As such, the results would be applicable to drilling, perforation, and side tracking applications. In the past, several combinations of laser and rock variables were investigated at standard conditions and reported in the literature. More recent experiments determined the technical feasibility of laser perforation on multiple samples of rock, cement and steel. The fiber laser was capable of penetrating these materials under a variety of conditions, to an appropriate depth, and with reasonable energy requirements. It was determined that fiber lasers are capable of cutting rock without causing damage to flow properties. Furthermore, the laser perforation resulted in permeability improvements on the exposed rock surface. This report has been prepared in two parts and each part may be treated as a stand-alone document. Part 1 (High Energy Laser Drilling) includes the general description of the concept and focuses on results from experiments under the ambient lab conditions. Part 2 (High Energy Laser Perforation and Completion Techniques) discusses the design and development of a customized laser pressure cell; experimental design and procedures, and the resulting data on pressure-charged samples exposed to the laser beam. An analysis provides the resulting effect of downhole pressure conditions on the laser/rock interaction process.

Iraj A. Salehi; Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD) development for air drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When downhole contact between the BHA and formation was optimum, as it was during rotation, high signal levels were experienced. Survey data acquired at the connections, when the BHA was totally at rest, is excellent. GEC intends modifying the system to optimize operations consistent with these disparate factors. A Mean-Time-To-Failure (MTTF) of 89.9 hours appears reasonable from the data. It is not possible to infer an MTBF figure from this test. It is quite obvious, however, that the system reliability performance has been significantly improved since FT {number_sign}5 was performed almost two years earlier. Based on the above results, GEC concludes that it is certainly feasible to attain 100 hours MTBF, for the Model 27, in any and all situations, and hence to provide a reliable MWD for air-drilling.

Harrison, W.A.; Rubin, L.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a recently acquired 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). The HPFL represents a potentially disruptive technology that, when compared to its competitors, is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. To determine how this promising laser compares with other lasers used in past experimental work, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on completion and perforation applications, although the results and techniques apply to well construction and other rock cutting applications. Variables investigated include laser power, beam intensity, external purging of cut materials, sample orientation, beam duration, beam shape, and beam frequency. The investigation also studied the thermal effects on the two sample rock types and their methods of destruction: spallation for sandstone, and thermal dissociation for limestone. Optimal operating conditions were identified for each rock type and condition. As a result of this experimental work, the HPFL has demonstrated a better capability of cutting and drilling limestone and sandstone when compared with other military and industrial lasers previously tested. Consideration should be given to the HPFL as the leading candidate for near term remote high power laser applications for well construction and completion.

Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

Multi-gradient drilling method and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-gradient system for drilling a well bore from a surface location into a seabed includes an injector for injecting buoyant substantially incompressible articles into a column of drilling fluid associated with the well bore. Preferably, the substantially incompressible articles comprises hollow substantially spherical bodies.

Maurer, William C. (Houston, TX); Medley, Jr., George H. (Spring, TX); McDonald, William J. (Houston, TX)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Electro jet drilling using hybrid NNGA approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a hybrid neural network and genetic algorithm (NNGA) approach for the multi-response optimization of the electro jet drilling (EJD) process. The approach first uses a neural network model to predict the response parameters of the ... Keywords: Electro jet drilling, Electrochemical machining, Genetic algorithm, Multi-response, Neural network, Optimization

Mohan Sen; H. S. Shan

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 153 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA by the Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University, as an account of work performed under the international of the National Science Foundation, the participating agencies, Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., Texas A&M

249

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 138 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA, Texas A&M University, as an account of work performed under the international Ocean Drilling Program Foundation, the participating agencies, Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., Texas A&M University

250

Balanced pressure techniques applied to geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study is to evaluate balanced pressure drilling techniques for use in combating lost circulation in geothermal drilling. Drilling techniques evaluated are: aerated drilling mud, parasite tubing, concentric drill pipe, jet sub, and low density fluids. Based on the present state of the art of balanced pressure drilling techniques, drilling with aerated water has the best overall balance of performance, risk, availability, and cost. Aerated water with a 19:1 free air/water ratio reduce maximum pressure unbalance between wellbore and formation pressures from 1000 psi to 50 psi. This pressure unbalance is within acceptable operating limits; however, air pockets could form and cause pressure surges in the mud system due to high percent of air. Low density fluids used with parasite tubing has the greatest potential for combating lost circulation in geothermal drilling, when performance only is considered. The top portion of the hole would be aerated through the parasite tube at a 10:1 free air/mud ratio and the low density mud could be designed so that its pressure gradient exactly matches the formation pore pressure gradient. The main problem with this system at present is the high cost of ceramic beads needed to produce low density muds.

Dareing, D.W.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Scientific drilling technologies for hostile environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper briefly reviews the current United States Department of Energy Continental Scientific Drilling Program for Thermal Regimes and the related technologies being developed for geothermal drilling. Plans for penetrating into a molten magma body at temperatures from 800 to 1000{degree}C are also reviewed. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Traeger, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Interpretation of drill cuttings from geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Problems in interpreting drill cuttings, as opposed to drill cores, and methods to solve these problems are outlined. The following are covered: identification of lithology; recognition of faults and fractures; interpretation of hydrothermal alteration; geochemistry; sample collection; sample preparple examination; and sample storage. (MHR)

Hulen, J.B.; Sibbett, B.S.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

IMPROVED MISCIBLE NITROGEN FLOOD PERFORMANCE UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL LATERALS IN A CLASS I RESERVOIR - EAST BINGER (MARCHAND) UNIT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first horizontal well ever in the Marchand sandstone has been drilled. Although major difficulties arose with certain aspects of the drilling operation, a horizontal section of approximately 1300 was drilled. The section was left open hole as planned. The shales just above and between the Marchand sands appear to be very water-sensitive, requiring careful drilling practices. These shales were encountered in the middle part of the curve (45{sup o}-60{sup o}), which can be the most difficult part of a directional well to clean. Difficulties with these shales and cleaning this section led to a parted drill string, requiring a sidetrack. There were no major geologic ''surprises'', such as formation tops coming in much shallower or deeper than expected, or unexpected faults. Thin kaolinite beds were encountered in the horizontal section of the well. Previous descriptions of the mineralogy of this formation did not mention any kaolinite. The lateral extent of these beds is unknown. Completion of the well is under way. One additional injection profile was gathered during the quarter. Results are consistent with other recently profiles that show gas within the C Sand is overriding the oil and failing to sweep the deeper parts of the reservoir. International Reservoir Technologies, Inc. has completed the construction of the pilot area reservoir simulation model and the updating of historical production and injection data. They have begun fine-tuning the history match to better match production data and recently acquired pressure and profile data.

Joe Sinner

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

254

Chemical wellbore plug for zone isolation in horizontal wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new technique for zone isolation in horizontal wells has been proposed. The new technique consists of three sequential stages: (i) setting a chemical wellbore plug in the horizontal section upstream of the zone to be isolated, (ii) spotting a gel just downstream of the wellbore plug and squeezing the gel into the zone to be isolated, and (iii) washing or drilling through excess gel and the wellbore plug to clean the borehole prior to production. The main objective of this research is to investigate the feasibility of setting a chemical wellbore plug in a horizontal wellbore. Two main problems associated with the wellbore plug were investigated: (a) method of placement of the plug so that slumping would not occur, and (b) selection and testing of chemicals that could be used to make wellbore plugs with sufficiently high holding pressures. Three chemicals, used in the oil industry for gas and/or water shut-off, were selected for the study. The commercial names of these chemicals were SEAL, PERMASEAL and TEXPLUG. Experimental apparatus were designed and constructed to study placement techniques and to measure the holding pressures of the wellbore plugs. The horizontal wellbore models consisted of PVC pipes internally lined with sand. The X-ray CT scanner was used to obtain cross-sectional images of the plug to help understand the shear mechanisms involved. The experimental results indicate that a plug could be placed in a horizontal wellbore with minimum slumping, if the plug is introduced into a viscous completion brine pill. For TEXPLUG, a suitable completion brine would contain 100,000 ppm NaCi and 4 lb/bbl CMC (carboxyl methyl cellulose). Further, results indicate that only TEXPLUG has a sufficiently high holding pressure (about 340 psi for 37 in. long, 1 in. I.D. plug) necessary for a wellbore plug. Based on experimental results, the proposed new isolation technique appears to be viable. However, further experimental studies are required, particularly to evaluate the effectiveness of the wellbore plug in conjunction with displacement of formation gels.

Saavedra, Nestor Fernando

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Alpine Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Drilling Geothermal Drilling Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Alpine Geothermal Drilling Name Alpine Geothermal Drilling Address PO Box 141 Place Kittredge, Colorado Zip 80457 Sector Geothermal energy Product Geothermal drilling solutions, subsidiary of Rocky Mountain GeoExploration Inc Website http://www.alpinegeothermal.co Coordinates 39.64888°, -105.2984842° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.64888,"lon":-105.2984842,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

256

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/14/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) [Internet]. 09/14/2009. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management,

257

Definition: Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Drilling Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Exploration Drilling Exploratory drilling is the Initial phase of drilling for the purpose of determining the physical properties and boundaries of a reservoir. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Geothermal Exploration is the exploration of the subsurface in search of viable active geothermal regions with the goal of building a geothermal power plant, where hot fluids drive turbines to create electricity. Exploration methods include a broad range of disciplines including geology, geophysics, geochemistry and engineering. Geothermal regions with adequate heat flow to fuel power plants are found in rift zones, subduction zones and mantle plumes. Hot spots are characterized by four geothermal elements. An active region will have: Heat Source - Shallow

258

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development  

SciTech Connect

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. Sandia Laboratories has been selected to manage this technology development program, and this paper presents an overview of the program. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies in current rotary drilling techniques for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.; Stoller, H.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Integrated approach towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the progress during the first year of the project on Integrated Approach Towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance. This project is funded under the Department of Energy`s Class I program which is targeted towards improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in fluvial-dominated deltaic deposits. The project involves an integrated approach to characterize the reservoir followed by drilling of horizontal injection wells to improve production performance. The type of data the authors intend to integrate includes cross bore hole seismic surveys, geological interpretation based on logs and cores, and engineering information. This report covers the first phase of the project which includes a detailed reservoir description of the field based on the available information, followed by flow simulation of the Self Unit to compare the simulated result with the historical performance. Based on the simulated results, a vertical test well was drilled to validate this reservoir description. The well will also be used as a source well for a cross bore hole seismic survey. This report discusses the related geophysical, geological and engineering activities leading to the drilling of the vertical test well. The validation phase and the collection of the cross bore hole survey has just begun, and the results will be presented in the next annual report.

Kelkar, M.; Liner, C.; Kerr, D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Comparative analysis of core drilling and rotary drilling in volcanic terrane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initially, the goal of this report is to compare and contrast penetration rates of rotary-mud drilling and core drilling in young volcanic terranes. It is widely recognized that areas containing an abundance of recent volcanic rocks are excellent targets for geothermal resources. Exploration programs depend heavily upon reliable subsurface information, because surface geophysical methods may be ineffective, inconclusive, or both. Past exploration drilling programs have mainly relied upon rotary-mud rigs for virtually all drilling activity. Core-drilling became popular several years ago, because it could deal effectively with two major problems encountered in young volcanic terranes: very hard, abrasive rock and extreme difficulty in controlling loss of circulation. In addition to overcoming these difficulties, core-drilling produced subsurface samples (core) that defined lithostratigraphy, structure and fractures far better than drill-chips. It seemed that the only negative aspect of core drilling was cost. The cost-per-foot may be two to three times higher than an ''initial quote'' for rotary drilling. In addition, penetration rates for comparable rock-types are often much lower for coring operations. This report also seeks to identify the extent of wireline core drilling (core-drilling using wireline retrieval) as a geothermal exploration tool. 25 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Wallace, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee formation using horizontal drains. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and economic success of producing oil from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. A site for a horizontal well was selected in Crystal Field, a nearly-abandoned Dundee oil field in Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well was drilled as a field demonstration pilot, funded through this DOE project, and was immensely successful. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The horizontal well was brought on production at a rate of 100 bbls/day and is probably capable of producing at a higher rate. The addition of several horizontal wells, similar to the demonstration well, will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. The presence of untapped oil in this Dundee field was dramatically demonstrated and the favorable economics were made clearly evident. If other abandoned Dundee fields are re-developed in a similar manner, the additional oil produced domestically will probably be about 80 to 100 million bbls.

Wood, J.R.

1996-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission: February 2011 Drilling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Conservation Commission: February 2011 Drilling & Permit Records This dataset contains oil and gas drilling and permit records for February 2011. State oil and gas...

263

State-of-the-art of drilling thrusters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several different concepts for applying force or thrust to drill bits are identified. Recommendations for further studies of drilling thrusters are made.

Dareing, D.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Eligibility...

265

Google.org-Backed Potter Drilling Blazing Geothermal Trail |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Google.org-Backed Potter Drilling Blazing Geothermal Trail Google.org-Backed Potter Drilling Blazing Geothermal Trail September 22, 2010...

266

NNSA Small Business Week Day 2: United Drilling, Inc. | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

business based in Roswell, N.M. United Drilling drills oil, gas, water, geothermal, and environmental wells throughout the southwestern U.S. The small business has...

267

Geotechnical Drilling in New-Zealand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geotechnical Drilling in New-Zealand Citation SonicSampDrill. Geotechnical...

268

Water Wells and Drilled or Mined Shafts (Texas) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Wells and Drilled or Mined Shafts (Texas) Water Wells and Drilled or Mined Shafts (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial...

269

NETL: News Release - DOE-Industry Breakthrough Turns Drilling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30, 2002 DOE-Industry Breakthrough Turns Drilling System Into Lightning Fast Computer Network Energy Department Cites Remarkable Advance In 'Smart' Oil, Gas Drilling SAN ANTONIO,...

270

Improved Bottomhole Pressure Control for Underbalanced Drilling Operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Maintaining underbalanced conditions from the beginning to the end of the drilling process is necessary to guarantee the success of jointed-pipe underbalanced drilling (UBD) operations… (more)

Perez-Tellez, Carlos

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

Gas Technology Institute (GTI), in partnership with Dennis Tool Company (DTC), has worked to develop an advanced drill bit system to be used with microhole drilling assemblies. One of the main objectives of this project was to utilize new and existing coiled tubing and slimhole drilling technologies to develop Microhole Technology (MHT) so as to make significant reductions in the cost of E&P down to 5000 feet in wellbores as small as 3.5 inches in diameter. This new technology was developed to work toward the DOE's goal of enabling domestic shallow oil and gas wells to be drilled inexpensively compared to wells drilled utilizing conventional drilling practices. Overall drilling costs can be lowered by drilling a well as quickly as possible. For this reason, a high drilling rate of penetration is always desired. In general, high drilling rates of penetration (ROP) can be achieved by increasing the weight on bit and increasing the rotary speed of the bit. As the weight on bit is increased, the cutting inserts penetrate deeper into the rock, resulting in a deeper depth of cut. As the depth of cut increases, the amount of torque required to turn the bit also increases. The Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System (CRTMDS) was planned to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) resulting in the reduction of the drilling cost. The system includes two counter-rotating cutter systems to reduce or eliminate the reactive torque the drillpipe or coiled tubing must resist. This would allow the application of maximum weight-on-bit and rotational velocities that a coiled tubing drilling unit is capable of delivering. Several variations of the CRTDMS were designed, manufactured and tested. The original tests failed leading to design modifications. Two versions of the modified system were tested and showed that the concept is both positive and practical; however, the tests showed that for the system to be robust and durable, borehole diameter should be substantially larger than that of slim holes. As a result, the research team decided to complete the project, document the tested designs and seek further support for the concept outside of the DOE.

Kent Perry

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

Steamboat Hills exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During July-September, 1993, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Far West Capital, drilled a 4000 feet exploratory slimhole (3.9 inch diameter) in the Steamboat Hills geothermal field near Reno, Nevada. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed four series of production and injection tests while taking downhole (pressure-temperature-spinner) and surface (wellhead pressure and temperature, flow rate) data. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: continuous core (with detailed log); borehole televiewer images of the wellbore`s upper 500 feet; daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; numerous temperature logs; and comparative data from production and injection wells in the same field. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, F.D.; Hickox, C.E.; Eaton, R.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Development and testing of underbalanced drilling products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first objective of this project is to develop a user-friendly, PC, foam drilling computer model, FOAM, which will accurately predict frictional pressure drops, cuttings lifting velocity, foam quality, and other drilling variables. The model will allow operating and service companies to accurately predict pressures and flow rates required at the surface and downhole to efficiently drill oil and gas wells with foam systems. The second objective of this project is to develop a lightweight drilling fluid that utilizes hollow glass spheres to reduce the density of the fluid and allow drilling underbalanced in low-pressure reservoirs. Since the resulting fluid will be incompressible, hydraulics calculations are greatly simplified, and expensive air compressors and booster pumps are eliminated. This lightweight fluid will also eliminate corrosion and downhole fire problems encountered with aerated fluids. Many tight-gas reservoirs in the US are attractive targets for underbalanced drilling because they are located in hard-rock country where tight, low-permeability formations compound the effect of formation damage encountered with conventional drilling fluids.

Maurer, W.; Medley, G. Jr.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Drilling operations at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Operations Office (NV) is responsible for supporting the nuclear test programs of the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. This support includes the drilling of test holes for nuclear device testing a the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The purpose of this audit was to assess the effectiveness of the Department of Energy's management of test hole inventories at the NTS. Our audit disclosed that NV accumulated a large inventory of unused test holes and approved drilling additional holes for which neither laboratory (Los Alamos nor Livermore) had identified a need. The overdrilling of test holes occurred because NV did not comply with good inventory practices that would have had NV's approving official question the need for, and the timing of, the laboratories' drilling requests. Instead, NV gave perfunctory approval to the laboratories' work orders for drilling test holes, and emphasized keeping two drill rig crews busy and satisfying the laboratories' demands for dedicated drilling personnel. Although NV did not agree that overdrilling had occurred, it has cut back its drilling activities and estimated that this will save abut $7.6 million annually. NV agreed with the recommendations in the report and has taken corrective actions.

1990-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

275

Application of coiled-tubing-drilling technology on a deep underpressured gas reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upper-Mississippian Elkton formation is a dolomitized shallow-water carbonate consisting of dense limestones and porous dolomites. The Elkton was deposited in an open-shelf environment as crinoid grainstones, coral packstones, and lime muds. Deposition of impermeable shales and siltstones of the Lower Cretaceous created the lateral and updip seals. Reservoir thickness can be up to 20 m, with porosities reaching 20% and averaging 10%. The reservoir gas contains approximately 0.5% hydrogen sulfide. Well 11-18 was to be completed in the Harmatten Elkton pool. The pool went on production in 1967 at an initial pressure of 23,500 kPa. At the current pressure of 16,800 kPa, the remaining reserves are underpressured at 6.5 kPa/m, and underbalanced horizontal drilling was selected as the most suitable technique for exploiting remaining reserves. Coiled-tubing (CT) technology was selected to ensure continuous underbalanced conditions and maintain proper well control while drilling. The paper describes the equipment, CT drilling summary, and drilling issues.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Development and Testing of Insulated Drill Pipe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has comprised design, analysis, laboratory testing, and field testing of insulated drill pipe (IDP). This paper will briefly describe the earlier work, but will focus on results from the recently-completed field test in a geothermal well. Field test results are consistent with earlier analyses and laboratory tests, all of which support the conclusion that insulated drill pipe can have a very significant effect on circulating fluid temperatures. This will enable the use of downhole motors and steering tools in hot wells, and will reduce corrosion, deterioration of drilling fluids, and heat-induced failures in other downhole components.

Champness, T.; Finger, J.; Jacobson, R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

277

Horizontal wells in the Java Sea  

SciTech Connect

The utilization of the Navigation Drilling System in recent drilling activity has established that: Continuous build rates as high as 6.75 degrees/100 ft are achievable (with a .74 degree DTU), making possible the tapping of near platform reserves. The system provides the flexibility necessary to drill a continuous curve or an irregular path without bottomhole assembly changes. The system provides the flexibility for sidetracks to the ''low side'' of the well bore without coming out of the hole for bottomhole assembly changes or a cement plug. Geological objectives can be reached with a high degree of accuracy. The system greatly reduces the costly learning curve associated with rotary bottomhole assemblies and substantially increases the confidence of the operator. Significant drilling cost reductions resulted from the use of the system. The cost per foot was further reduced as additional familiarity with the equipment was gained.

Barrett, S.L.; Lyon, R.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Annual report, March 1996--March 1997  

SciTech Connect

This Class II field project has demonstrated that economic quantities of hydrocarbons can be produced from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. The site selected for the demonstration horizontal well was Crystal Field, a nearly abandoned Dundee oil field in Montcalm County, Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well, the TOW 1-3, drilled as a field demonstration pilot was successful, producing at rate of 100 bbls of oil per day with a zero water cut. Although the well is capable of producing at a of 500+ bbls/day, the production rate is being kept low deliberately to try to prevent premature water coning. Cumulative production exceeded 50,000 bbls of oil by the end of April, 1997 and lead to the permitting and licensing of several dozen Dundee wells by project end. Twelve of these permits were for continued development of Crystal Field. Two long horizontal wells were drilled successfully in Crystal after the TOW 1-3, but were disappointing economically. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The addition of several horizontal wells will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. If other abandoned Dundee fields are re-developed in a similar manner, the additional oil produced could exceed 80 million barrels.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Test report for core drilling ignitability testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Testing was carried out with the cooperation of Westinghouse Hanford Company and the United States Bureau of Mines at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania under the Memorandum of Agreement 14- 09-0050-3666. Several core drilling equipment items, specifically those which can come in contact with flammable gasses while drilling into some waste tanks, were tested under conditions similar to actual field sampling conditions. Rotary drilling against steel and rock as well as drop testing of several different pieces of equipment in a flammable gas environment were the specific items addressed. The test items completed either caused no ignition of the gas mixture, or, after having hardware changes or drilling parameters modified, produced no ignition in repeat testing.

Witwer, K.S.

1996-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

280

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 170 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany Cypionka Microbiologist Institut für Chemie und Biologie Des Meeres (ICBM) Carl von Ossietzky Universität

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 197 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche.edu Marcel Regelous Petrologist Abteilung Geochemie Max-Planck-Institüt für Chemie Johannes J-Becherweg 27

282

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 176 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany Geochemist Institut für Chemie und Biologie des Meeres (ICBM) Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg

283

Investigation of percussion drills for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of tests was conducted to provide data for an economic evaluation of percussion drilling in geothermal reservoirs. Penetration rate, operation on aqueous foam, and high temperature vulnerabilities of downhole percussion tools are described.

Finger, J.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

April 25, 1997: Yucca Mountain exploratory drilling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

April 25, 1997Workers complete drilling of the five-mile long, horseshoe-shaped exploratory tunnel through Yucca Mountain at the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository in Nevada.

285

Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production increases are anticipated to come from onshore enhanced oil recovery projects, shale oil plays, and deepwater drilling in the Gulf of Mexico. They also project that U.S....

286

Underbalanced drilling benefits now available offshore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Offshore underbalanced drilling (UBD) is a reality. Applications in older, partially depleted fields and new fields are being considered. However, low productivity reservoirs and fields with sub normal pressures causing drilling problems are currently the main targets for offshore UBD. With proper planning and the correct technique, both jointed pipe and coiled tubing UBD drilling operations have been carried out offshore with success. The main concerns for offshore UBD have been altered drilling practices and surface production system operation. These issues have been examined and equipment has been designed and tested to address them. Environmental, safety and health issues are paramount and have been studied carefully. Detailed well planning, engineering, and flow modeling have proven critical for successful offshore UBD operations. Examples are given from oil and gas fields.

Vozniak, J.P.; Cuthbertson, B.; Nessa, D.O.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Field results document underbalanced drilling success  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many different techniques are used to maintain underbalanced conditions at the toolface. Whether the operator is trying to avoid drilling problems or prevent formation damage, the key to a safe, successful operation is a reliable method of sealing around the tubulars at the surface for continuous well control. Globally, underbalanced drilling (UBD) is emerging as an important technology to improve production and solve drilling problems with success in many applications with different reservoirs. Improvements in initial flow rates using UBD are being supported by longer term production. UBD techniques and processes are improving through experience and implementation. UBD is becoming a more economical means to optimize reservoir management than conventional overbalanced operations. UBD operations are proving to be safer than conventional overbalanced drilling.

Vozniak, J.; Cuthbertson, R.L.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Designing BHAs for better drilling jar performance  

SciTech Connect

Jars are a major component in drill string design, but considerations for proper placement often are neglected. The main purpose of running drilling jars is to provide an immediate jarring action when pipe becomes stuck. This report considers some of the mechanics of pipe sticking and why it must be considered in jar placement. It also focuses on their placement in the bottomhole assembly and the advantages of certain types of jars.

Schmid, J.T.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Challenges of deep drilling. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

This installment delineates current deep drilling technology limitations and discusses needed advances for the future. Problem areas are identified as material and seal problems in wellhead equipment, new fluid carriers for well stimulation, quality control/inspection/testing for equipment and performance flaws, arctic environment conditions, and experienced personnel. The main factors of operating environment that challenge advanced deep drilling are identified as temperature extremes, pressure extremes, acid gases, and deep-water presence.

Chadwick, C.E.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 155 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 155 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS AMAZON DEEP-SEA FAN Dr. Roger D. Flood Co of Canada P.O. Box 1006 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia Canada B2Y4A2 Dr. Adam Klaus Staff Scientist, Leg l55 Ocean and handling. D I S C L A I M E R This publication was prepared by the Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A

291

Study on an Electric Drilling Rig with Hydraulic Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electric drilling rig with hydraulic energy storage is researched. This rig can recover the potential energy of the drill stem lowered and owns remarkable energy-saving effect. The mathematical model of the new rig lifting the drill stem was deduced ... Keywords: electric drilling rig, energy-recovering, energy-saving

Zhang Lujun

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/small diameter drill collars/connections capable of surviving rotation above the seafloor without lateral support

293

Affordable Cold Climate Infill Housing with Hybrid Insulation Approach, Wyandotte, Michigan (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Affordable Affordable Cold Climate Infill Housing with Hybrid Insulation Approach Wyandotte, Michigan PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: New home Type: Single-family, affordable Builder: City of Wyandotte with various local homebuilders www.wyandotte.net Size: 1,150 to 1,500 ft 2 Price Range: $113,000-$138,000 Date completed: 2012 Climate Zone: Cold PERFORMANCE DATA HERS index: * 2009 IECC = 102 * Case study house 1,475 ft 2 * With renewables = NA * Without renewables = 75 Projected annual energy cost savings: $604 Incremental cost of energy efficiency measures: $30,947 (including GSHP and well) Incremental annual mortgage: $2,631/yr Annual cash flow: -$1,375 Billing data: Not available Even builders who are relatively new to energy-efficient construction can

294

Impedance matched joined drill pipe for improved acoustic transmission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An impedance matched jointed drill pipe for improved acoustic transmission. A passive means and method that maximizes the amplitude and minimize the temporal dispersion of acoustic signals that are sent through a drill string, for use in a measurement while drilling telemetry system. The improvement in signal transmission is accomplished by replacing the standard joints in a drill string with joints constructed of a material that is impedance matched acoustically to the end of the drill pipe to which it is connected. Provides improvement in the measurement while drilling technique which can be utilized for well logging, directional drilling, and drilling dynamics, as well as gamma-ray spectroscopy while drilling post shot boreholes, such as utilized in drilling post shot boreholes.

Moss, William C. (San Mateo, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Integrated Approach Towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the progress during the six year of the project on ''Integrated Approach Towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance.'' This report is funded under the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Class I program which is targeted towards improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in fluvially-dominated deltaic deposits. The project involves using an integrated approach to characterize the reservoir followed by drilling of horizontal injection wells to improve production performance. The project was divided into two budget periods. In the first budget period, many modern technologies were used to develop a detailed reservoir management plan; whereas, in the second budget period, conventional data was used to develop a reservoir management plan. The idea was to determine the cost effectiveness of various technologies in improving the performance of mature oil fields.

Kelkar, Mohan; Liner, Chris; Kerr, Dennis

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Interim report for SNL/NM environmental drilling project  

SciTech Connect

Concern for the environment and cost reduction are the driving forces for a broad effort in government and the private sector to develop new, more cost-effective technologies for characterizing, monitoring and remediating environmental sites. Secondary goals of the characterization, monitoring and remediation (CMR) activity are: minimize secondary waste generation, minimize site impact, protect water tables, and develop methods/strategies to apply new technologies. The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) project in directional boring for CMR of waste sites with enhanced machinery from the underground utility installation industry was initiated in 1990. Preliminary activities included surveying the directional drilling access needs of various DOE sites, identifying an existing class of machinery that could be enhanced for environmental work through development, and establishing a mutually beneficial working relationship with an industry partner. Since that time the project has tested a variety of prototype machinery and hardware built by the industrial partner, and SNL. The project continues to test and develop the machinery and technique refinements needed for future applications at DOE, DOD, and private sector sites. The original goal of cost-effectiveness is being met through innovation, adaptation, and application of fundamental concepts. Secondary goals are being met via a basic philosophy of ``cut/thrust and compact cuttings without adding large quantities of fluid`` to an environmental problem site. Technology transfer to the private sector is ongoing and ultimately should result in commercial availability of the machinery. Education of regulatory agencies resulting in restructuring appropriate regulatory standards for specification of the horizontal drilling techniques will be a final project goal.

Wemple, R.P.; Meyer, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Layne, R.R. [Charles Machine Works, Inc., Perry, OK (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Gravel packing feasible in horizontal well completions  

SciTech Connect

Successful completion of horizontal wells in unconsolidated formations depends on proper equipment selection and installation method balanced with reservoir objectives, formation parameters, and costs. The guidelines for designing these completions are based on generalized field experience, including horizontal cases where applicable.

Zaleski, T.E. Jr.; Ashton, J.P. (Baker Sand Control, Houston, TX (US))

1990-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

298

Use of Downhole Motors in Geothermal Drilling in the Philippines  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the use of downhole motors in the Tiwi geothermal field in the Philippines, The discussion includes the application Of a Dyna-Drill with insert-type bits for drilling through surface alluvium. The economics of this type of drilling are compared to those of conventional rotary drilling. The paper also describes the use of a turbodrill that drills out scale as the well produces geothermal fluids.

Pyle, D. E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a recently acquired 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). The HPFL represents a potentially disruptive technology that, when compared to its competitors, is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on completion and perforation applications, although the results and techniques apply to well construction and other rock cutting applications. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation prototype tool. In the past, several combinations of laser and rock variables were investigated at standard conditions and reported in the literature. More recent experiments determined the technical feasibility of laser perforation on multiple samples of rock, cement and steel. The fiber laser was capable of penetrating these materials under a variety of conditions, to an appropriate depth, and with reasonable energy requirements. It was determined that fiber lasers are capable of cutting rock without causing damage to flow properties. Furthermore, the laser perforation resulted in permeability improvements on the exposed rock surface. This report discusses the design and development of a customized laser pressure cell; experimental design and procedures, and the resulting data on pressure-charged samples exposed to the laser beam. An analysis provides the resulting effect of downhole pressure conditions on the laser/rock interaction process.

Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

global horizontal irradiance | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

horizontal irradiance horizontal irradiance Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Global Horizontal IrradianceNASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Jan 2008)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005) Parameter: Insolation Incident On A Horizontal Surface (kWh/m^2/day) Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/ Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections online Note 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords GHI GIS global horizontal irradiance NASA solar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. 2nd Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A meeting of project personnel was held in Traverse City, MI, on June 8, 1994 to initiate the DOE contract. The drilling program, which will be the project`s first major undertaking, was discussed in detail. Data from 12 Dundee fields, including Crystal Field, have been entered in a computer database by project staff at WMU. Structure contour maps and isopach maps have been generated for all horizons in these fields using Terrasciences` TerraStation computer program. Arrangements have been made to purchase digitized logs of every well that produces or has produced from the Dundee Formation in the state of Michigan. Twenty to thirty cores of the Dundee Formation from wells throughout the state of Michigan are currently available. Cuttings samples are also available from 60 to 100 Michigan wells. A well in the project area has been designed and permitted and will soon be drilled. The well will have both a horizontal and a vertical leg. The vertical leg well will be cored through the producing interval of the Dundee Formation and the cores analyzed for porosity, permeability, and fluid saturations. A full set of well logs will be run, including gamma ray, porosity, resistivity, and geochemical logs. The horizontal leg will be drilled as a sidetrack from the vertical test well. If commercial amounts of hydrocarbons are encountered, the horizontal well will be placed on production. It is expected that drilling will commence in August, 1994, and will take 10 to 12 days to complete.

Wood, J.R.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Final report for SNL/NM environmental drilling project  

SciTech Connect

Concern for the environment and cost reduction are driving forces for a broad effort in government and the private sector to develop new, more cost-effective technologies for characterizing, monitoring and remediating environmental sites. Secondary goals of the characterization, monitoring and remediation (CMR) activity are: minimize secondary waste generation, minimize site impact, protect water tables, and develop methods/strategies to apply new technologies. The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) project in directional boring for CMR of waste sites with enhanced machinery from the underground utility installation industry was initiated in 1990. The project has tested a variety of prototype machinery and hardware built by the industrial partner, Charles Machine Works (CMW), and SNL at several sites (Savannah River Site (SRS), Hanford, SNL, Kirtland AFB (KAFB), CMW), successfully installed usable horizontal environmental test wells at SRS and SNL/KAFB, and functioned as a clearing house for information regarding application of existing commercial machinery to a variety of governmental and commercial sites. The project has continued to test and develop machinery in FY 94. The original goal of cost-effectiveness is being met through innovation, adaptation, and application of fundamental concepts. Secondary goals are being met via a basic philosophy of {open_quotes}cut/thrust and compact cuttings without adding large quantities of fluid{close_quotes} to an environmental problem site. This technology will be very cost-effective where applicable. Technology transfer and commercialization by CMW is ongoing and will continue into FY 95. Technology transfer to the private sector is ongoing and reflected in increasing machinery sales to environmental contractors. Education of regulatory agencies resulting in restructuring of appropriate regulatory standards for specification of the horizontal drilling techniques continues to be a long-range goal.

Wemple, R.P.; Meyer, R.D.; Staller, G.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Layne, R.R. [Charles Machine Works, Inc., Perry, OK (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

Rowley, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Drilling costs drop 7% in 1985  

SciTech Connect

Drilling costs dropped about 7% last year. This decline cancels a slight increase in 1984. Total costs to drill now run about 59% of the 1981 highs. Comparable figures for the previous 2 years are 63 and 61%. Deeper wells showed the biggest drops. Shallow well costs fell about 6%. Energy Information Administration (EIA) indexes drilling costs on a 1976 base year. Costs for shallow wells (5,000 ft or less) show an index about 138. Deeper wells have an index around 149. Cost declines were the greatest in West and North Texas and the Rockies, of 11%. The Northeast and Western areas showed greater than average declines, 9% or so. The High Plains, New Mexico, and Midcontinent areas recorded near the average 7% decline. Costs in South Louisiana, the Southeast, and Ark-La-Tex 2%. West Central Texas costs were off only 1%. The Southeast was essentially unchanged. Indexes by area show generally that drilling costs have declined since 1983. The summary here comes from EIA's ''Indexes and Estimates of Domestic Well Drilling Costs 1984 and 1985''. That report covers oil, gas, and dry hole costs, cost components, and overall costs.

Anderson, T.; Funk, V.

1986-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

305

Method and apparatus of assessing down-hole drilling conditions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for use in assessing down-hole drilling conditions are disclosed. The apparatus includes a drill string, a plurality of sensors, a computing device, and a down-hole network. The sensors are distributed along the length of the drill string and are capable of sensing localized down-hole conditions while drilling. The computing device is coupled to at least one sensor of the plurality of sensors. The data is transmitted from the sensors to the computing device over the down-hole network. The computing device analyzes data output by the sensors and representative of the sensed localized conditions to assess the down-hole drilling conditions. The method includes sensing localized drilling conditions at a plurality of points distributed along the length of a drill string during drilling operations; transmitting data representative of the sensed localized conditions to a predetermined location; and analyzing the transmitted data to assess the down-hole drilling conditions.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehl, UT); Johnson, Monte L. (Orem, UT); Bartholomew, David B. (Springville, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

306

Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields  

SciTech Connect

In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

307

Method for laser drilling subterranean earth formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser drilling of subterranean earth formations is efficiently accomplished by directing a collimated laser beam into a bore hole in registry with the earth formation and transversely directing the laser beam into the earth formation with a suitable reflector. In accordance with the present invention, the bore hole is highly pressurized with a gas so that as the laser beam penetrates the earth formation the high pressure gas forces the fluids resulting from the drilling operation into fissures and pores surrounding the laser-drilled bore so as to inhibit deleterious occlusion of the laser beam. Also, the laser beam may be dynamically programmed with some time dependent wave form, e.g., pulsed, to thermally shock the earth formation for forming or enlarging fluid-receiving fissures in the bore.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Data transmission element for downhole drilling components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Directional Drilling Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Directional Drilling Systems Directional Drilling Systems Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Directional Drilling Systems Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":14,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

310

Drilling in 2000 taps technology explosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While major oil and gas companies all but ended research and development programs, the burden for technological advancement fell to service companies. And service companies allotted their R and D investment to activities whose return they could fairly predict. But even as cost-cutting measured devastated engineering staffs, a profit-growth strategy was forming that understood that profit could be enhanced by not just cutting the per barrel cost to producers but by producing more barrels per investment dollar. In other words, get more oil and gas from the same well through applied drilling and production technology. In the drilling industry all things technical revolve around six areas of expertise: bits, rotation systems, tripping systems, control systems, information systems and direction drilling systems. The paper discusses these six technologies.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Horizontal well taps bypassed Dundee oil in Crystal field, Mich.  

SciTech Connect

The Dundee formation (Middle Devonian) has yielded more oil than any other producing interval in Michigan. The Dundee trend, which forms an east-west band across the central Michigan basin, consists of 137 fields which together have yielded more than 350 million bbl of oil. The first commercial Dundee production was established at Mt. Pleasant field in 1928, and most Dundee fields were discovered and brought on production during the 1930s--40s. Wells in many of the fields had very high initial production (IP) rates. IPs in excess of 1,000 b/d of oil were common, with values as high as 9,000 b/d reported. These high flow rates, combined with a thin (10--30 ft) oil column and a strong water drive, resulted in water coning that left significant volumes of oil unrecovered in some fields. One such field, Crystal field in Montcalm County, is the focus of a US Department of energy (DOE) Class 2 Reservoir Demonstration Project designed to demonstrate that horizontal drilling can recover significant volumes of this bypassed oil. The paper describes the demonstration project, regional setting, and the history of the Crystal field.

Wood, J.R.; Allan, J.R.; Huntoon, J.E.; Pennington, W.D. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Harrison, W.B. III [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Taylor, E.; Tester, C.J. [Cronus Development Corp., Traverse City, MI (United States)

1996-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California's Forests and Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kmichaud@umail.ucsb.edu Abstract: Offshore oil drilling hasto attitudes toward offshore oil drilling. This implies thats Forests and Parks 1 Offshore oil drilling has been a

Smith, Eric R.A.N.; Carlisle, Juliet; Michaud, Kristy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Statistics & Analysis Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report The six regions analyzed in this report accounted for nearly 90% of domestic oil production growth and virtually all domestic natural gas production growth during 2011-12. December 2013 For key tight oil and shale gas regions U.S. Energy Information Administration Contents Year-over-year summary 2 Bakken 3 Eagle Ford 4 Haynesville 5 Marcellus 6 Niobrara 7 Permian 8 Explanatory notes 9 Sources 10 Bakken Marcellus Niobrara Haynesville Eagle Ford Permian U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville

314

Geothermal wells: a forecast of drilling activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numbers and problems for geothermal wells expected to be drilled in the United States between 1981 and 2000 AD are forecasted. The 3800 wells forecasted for major electric power projects (totaling 6 GWe of capacity) are categorized by type (production, etc.), and by location (The Geysers, etc.). 6000 wells are forecasted for direct heat projects (totaling 0.02 Quads per year). Equations are developed for forecasting the number of wells, and data is presented. Drilling and completion problems in The Geysers, The Imperial Valley, Roosevelt Hot Springs, the Valles Caldera, northern Nevada, Klamath Falls, Reno, Alaska, and Pagosa Springs are discussed. Likely areas for near term direct heat projects are identified.

Brown, G.L.; Mansure, A.J.; Miewald, J.N.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

New surface equipment for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perhaps the single most exciting development in the area of new drilling technology in this decade is underbalanced drilling (UBD). This category includes both jointed pipe and coiled tubing applications. Each has advantages and disadvantages in UBD operations. Regardless of the method selected for a particular UBD application, equipment similarities exist. The surface control and production equipment must be correctly sized and designed for the overall total UBD engineering solution. This article describes the various types, applications and purposes of special surface equipment needed in underbalanced operations. This is the second in a series of articles on UBD technology and its rapid development is this field.

Cuthbertson, R.L.; Vozniak, J.; Kinder, J.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Proper centralizers can improve horizontal well cementing  

SciTech Connect

The selection and spacing of appropriate centralizers can improve the cementation of high-angle and horizontal wells. Mud removal is one of the most important factors in obtaining a good cement job. Effective centralization assists in mud removal and helps ensure an even cement coat around the casing. Centralizers for horizontal wells have to fulfill two requirements: They should have a high restoring capability and a low moving force, and they should allow pipe rotation and reciprocation. Conventional bow-type centralizers have been used successfully in some horizontal wells. But as the horizontal section length increases, special centralizers, such as low-moving-force, bow-type centralizers and rigid centralizers, may be necessary. The paper describes the following: cementing liners, centralization, torque and drag, centralizer placement, the bow-type centralizer, the rigid centralizer, and the downhole activated centralizer.

Kinzel, H. (Weatherford Oil Tool, Langenhagen (Germany))

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

317

Horizontal Roll Vortices and Crown Fires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational evidence from nine crown fires suggests that horizontal roll vortices are a major mechanism in crown-fire spread. Post-burn aerial photography indicates that unburned tree-crown streets are common with crown fire. Investigation of ...

Donald A. Haines

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Marketing Strategies for Horizontal Axis Washers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal axis washing machines provide superior washing quality and gentleness as well as reduced energy use. This EPRI guide describes how utilities can effectively engage the horizontal axis washing machine market and the strategic and load-related reasons they should be interested in doing so. The guide covers topics ranging from a detailed overview of the marketplace to specific tactical advice that offers practical insights for any utility considering entering this new market.

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

319

Development plan for an advanced drilling system with real-time diagnostics (Diagnostics-While-Drilling)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This proposal provides the rationale for an advanced system called Diagnostics-while-drilling (DWD) and describes its benefits, preliminary configuration, and essential characteristics. The central concept is a closed data circuit in which downhole sensors collect information and send it to the surface via a high-speed data link, where it is combined with surface measurements and processed through drilling advisory software. The driller then uses this information to adjust the drilling process, sending control signals back downhole with real-time knowledge of their effects on performance. The report presents background of related previous work, and defines a Program Plan for US Department of Energy (DOE), university, and industry cooperation.

FINGER,JOHN T.; MANSURE,ARTHUR J.; PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.; GLOWKA,D.A.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger, and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Development and Application of Insulated Drill Pipe for High Temperature, High Pressure Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project aimed to extend the insulated drill pipe (IDP) technology already demonstrated for geothermal drilling to HTHP drilling in deep gas reservoirs where temperatures are high enough to pose a threat to downhole equipment such as motors and electronics. The major components of the project were: a preliminary design; a market survey to assess industry needs and performance criteria; mechanical testing to verify strength and durability of IDP; and development of an inspection plan that would quantify the ability of various inspection techniques to detect flaws in assembled IDP. This report is a detailed description of those activities.

Tom Champness; Tony Worthen; John Finger

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

A Proposal for an Advanced Drilling System with Real-Time Diagnostics (Diagnostics-While-Drilling)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, we summarize the rationale for an advanced system called Diagnostics-While-Drilling (DWD) and describe its benefits, preliminary configuration, and essential characteristics. The central concept is a closed data circuit in which downhole sensors collect information and send it to the surface via a high-speed data link, where it is combined with surface measurements and processed through drilling advisory software. The driller then uses this information to adjust the drilling process, sending control signals back downhole with real-time knowledge of their effects on performance. We outline a Program Plan for DOE, university, and industry to cooperate in the development of DWD technology.

Finger, J.T.; Mansure, A.J.; Prairie, M.R.

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

323

Economic viability of multiple-lateral horizontal wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Horizontal wells are gaining popularity throughout the petroleum industry as a means to increase well productivity and enhance incremental economics. Horizontal wells provide greater reservoir… (more)

Smith, Christopher Jason

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of BDM/CNGD Well 3997, Lee District, Calhoun County, West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, casing, completing, and stimulating the Hunter Bennett No. 3997 well located in Lee District, Calhoun County West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with CNG Development Company. The well was spudded on November 9, 1990, and drilling was completed on December 14, 1990. The well was drilled on an average asmuth of 312 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2459 feet. The well was turned to a 90 degree inclination from the vertical over a measured course length of 1216 feet. Approximately 1381 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2179 feet had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Each zone is a little more than 300 feet long. The well was stimulated with nitrogen gas in zones one and two. Early production results are encouraging. The BDM/CNGD horizontal well averaged 147 mcfd of gas over the first week of production and, in week five, began to produce oil at a rate of about 2 bbl/day.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of BDM/CNGD Well 3997, Lee District, Calhoun County, West Virginia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, casing, completing, and stimulating the Hunter Bennett No. 3997 well located in Lee District, Calhoun County West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with CNG Development Company. The well was spudded on November 9, 1990, and drilling was completed on December 14, 1990. The well was drilled on an average asmuth of 312 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2459 feet. The well was turned to a 90 degree inclination from the vertical over a measured course length of 1216 feet. Approximately 1381 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2179 feet had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Each zone is a little more than 300 feet long. The well was stimulated with nitrogen gas in zones one and two. Early production results are encouraging. The BDM/CNGD horizontal well averaged 147 mcfd of gas over the first week of production and, in week five, began to produce oil at a rate of about 2 bbl/day.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Self-lubricated transport of aqueous foams in horizontal conduits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in under-balanced drilling, for reservoir clean-up and for enhanced oil recovery in porous sand foams for underbalanced drilling. In: SPE International Symposium on Oilfield Chemistry, paper SPE 64999

Joseph, Daniel D.

327

Materials to Support High Pressure, High Temperature (HPHT) Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... HPHT drilling and the drill pipe materials currently available on the market. ... Computational Phase Studies in the (La,Sr)(Ga,Mg)O3-d System for IT-SOFC ...

328

Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling [Laser Applications Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Today, a typical land-based oil or gas well costs around 400,000 to drill, while costs for an offshore well average...

329

Oil and Gas Well Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Well Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Oil and Gas Well Drilling Author Jeff Tester Published NA, 2011 DOI Not...

330

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Onsite Burial (Pits, Landfills...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

management. During most U.S. onshore drilling operations, the cuttings separated by the shale shaker are sent to a pit called the reserve pit located near the drill rig. The pit is...

331

Analyzing the dynamic behavior of downhole equipment during drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced geothermal drilling systems will require a bottom hole assembly (BHA) which utilizes sophisticated electronic and mechanical equipment to accomplish faster, more trouble free, smarter drilling. The bit-drill string/formation interaction during drilling imposes complex, intermittent dynamic loading on the downhole equipment. A finite element computer code, GEODYN, is being developed to allow analysis of the structural response of the downhole equipment during drilling and to simulate the drilling phenomena (i.e. penetration, direction, etc.). Phase 1 GEODYN, completed early in 1984, provides the capability to model the dynamic response of a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit interacting with a non-homogeneous formation. Succeeding development phases will allow inclusion of stabilizers and, eventually, the entire drill string in addition to facilitating drill ahead simulation.

Baird, J.A.; Caskey, B.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Monitoring downhole pressures and flow rates critical for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

True underbalanced drilling, and not just flow drilling, requires thorough engineering and monitoring of downhole pressures and flow rates to ensure the formations are drilled without formation damage. Underbalanced drilling involves intentionally manipulating the bottom hole circulating pressure so that it is less than static reservoir pressure. This underbalanced pressure condition allows reservoir fluids to enter the well bore while drilling continues, preventing fluid loss and many causes of formation damage. Applied correctly, this technology can address problems of formation damage, lost circulation, and poor penetration rates. Another important benefit of drilling underbalanced is the ability to investigate the reservoir in real time. The paper discusses the reasons for under balanced drilling, creating underbalance, well site engineering, fluids handling, rotating flow divertor injection gas, survey techniques, data acquisition, operations, maintaining under-balance, routine drilling, rate of penetration, misconceptions, and economics.

Butler, S.D.; Rashid, A.U.; Teichrob, R.R. [Flow Drilling Engineering Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

333

Coiled tubing drilling requires economic and technical analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field experience has proven that coiled tubing drilling is a technical and economic option on some wells; however, coiled tubing drilling is not the solution to every drilling prospect or production-enhancement job. To determine if coiled tubing drilling is viable, the geographic, technical, and economic aspects of each project must be considered in detail. Generally, with some limitations, coiled tubing drilling is feasible primarily when jointed pipe cannot be used effectively. Also, coiled tubing drilling may be more appropriate because of some special well site requirements, such as environmental regulations requiring less surface disturbance. The paper discusses technical considerations which need to be considered, economic feasibility, limitations of well types (new shallow wells, conventional reentry, through-tubing reentry, and underbalanced drilling), and outlook for further growth in the coiled tubing drilling industry.

Gary, S.C. (Schlumberger Dowell, Sugar Land, TX (United States))

1995-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

David Burnett

2009-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Drilling and operating geothermal wells in California  

SciTech Connect

The following procedural points for geothermal well drilling and operation are presented: geothermal operators, definitions, geothermal unit, agent, notice of intention, fees, report on proposed operations, bonds, well name and number, well and property sale on transfer, well records, and other agencies. (MHR)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 176 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Canada-Chinese Taipei-Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany 68588-0340, U.S.A.; E-mail: nlg@unlinfo.unl.edu) Andreas Lückge, Organic Geochemist (Institut für Chemie

337

Practical applications of a drilling data center  

SciTech Connect

Tenneco Oil is using a real-time drilling-data acquisition, telemetry, data base, and applications-program system for Gulf of Mexico operations. The system provides for data acquisition in real time from commercially available logging units. The data are transmitted into a central office onshore via microwave or satellite telemetry links. Up to 352 drilling parameters are transmitted from each computerized logging unit and archived in the data base every 20 sec. Parameters can include measurement-while-drilling (MWD) data as well as mud-logging data. Applications programs utilizing these parameters are available in the central site data center (CSDC) and in locations throughout Tenneco's facilities in Lafayette, La. Access to the CSDC and its computing power is also available on the offshore rig. Backup surveillance of critical drilling parameters is provided through alarms and continuous monitoring of the parameters, thus providing for a safer operation. Rig efficiency has also been improved through analysis of the data and comparison of the data between various rig operations and rigs. Both tangible and intangible cost savings are discussed.

Graff, R.L.; Segrest, R.P.

1986-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 182 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rain has built a mound over geologic time of almost pure calcareous and siliceous sediments stretching of this northward plate motion: (1) the thickest part of the equatorial mound of biogenic sediment is displaced drilling and coring of the central Pacific equatorial mound of sediments (e.g., DSDP Legs 5, 8, 9, and 16

339

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 169 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rain has built a mound over geologic time of almost pure calcareous and siliceous sediments stretching of this northward plate motion: (1) the thickest part of the equatorial mound of biogenic sediment is displaced drilling and coring of the central Pacific equatorial mound of sediments (e.g., DSDP Legs 5, 8, 9, and 16

340

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 101 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rickenbacker Causeway Miami, FL 33139 Amanda A. Palmer Staff Science Representative, Leg 101 Ocean Drilling Schlager (Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Miami, Florida) Co-Chief Scientist Paul of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Miami, Florida) Gregor Eberli (Geologisches Institute, ETH

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 119 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program, Texas A&M University, as an account of work performed under the international Ocean Drilling sheet, including the 3000-m-high subglacial Gamburtsev Mountains. The glacier follows the line ice drainage basin is believed to be long-lived because of this structural control, and Prydz Bay

342

Impedance-matched drilling telemetry system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole telemetry system that uses inductance or capacitance as a mode through which signal is communicated across joints between assembled lengths of pipe wherein efficiency of signal propagation through a drill string, for example, over multiple successive pipe segments is enhanced through matching impedances associated with the various telemetry system components.

Normann, Randy A. (Edgewood, NM); Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

343

Forecast of geothermal-drilling activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The number of geothermal wells that will be drilled to support electric power production in the United States through 2000 A.D. are forecasted. Results of the forecast are presented by 5-year periods for the five most significant geothermal resources.

Mansure, A.J.; Brown, G.L.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Personnel 17 1. Laboratory Officer 17 2. Technicians 17 3. Computer System Manager 17 4. Curatorial. Logging Depth Measurements 34 D. Coring and Drilling Equipment and Usage 34 1. Rotary Coring (RCB) System 34 2. Advanced Piston Coring (APC) System 36 3. Extended Core Barrel (XCB) 37 4. Motor-Driven Core

345

Laser Drilling with Gated High Power Fiber Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Laser Applications in Materials Processing. Presentation Title, Laser Drilling ...

346

Drilling for Geothermal Resources Rules - Idaho | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Resources Rules - Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Drilling for Geothermal Resources Rules - Idaho Details...

347

Liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation examines liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps and discusses them in relation to two recent cases that arose in Ventura County, California. Following a brief history of regulatory interest in oil drilling mud and its common hazardous substances, various cause of action arising from oil drilling mud deposits are enumerated, followed by defenses to these causes of action. Section 8002 (m) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is mentioned, as are constituents of oil and gas waste not inherent in petroleum and therefore not exempt from regulation under the petroleum exclusion in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act. Key legal words such as hazardous substance, release, public and private nuisance, trespass, responsible parties, joint and several liability, negligence, and strict liability are explained. The effects on liability of knowledge of the deposits, duty to restore land to its original condition, consent to the deposit of oil drilling mud, and noncompliance and compliance with permit conditions are analyzed. The state-of-the-art defense and research to establish this defense are mentioned. The newly created cause of action for fear of increased risk of cancer is discussed. Issues on transfer of property where oil drilling mud has been deposited are explored, such as knowledge of prior owners being imputed to later owners, claims of fraudulent concealment, and as is' clauses. The effects on the oil and gas industry of the California Court of Appeals for the Second District rulings in Dolan v. Humacid-MacLeod and Stevens v. McQueen are speculated.

Dillon, J.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Design and Analysis of a Test Rig for Modeling the Bit/Formation Interface in Petroleum Drilling Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equipment failure and well deviations are prevailing contributors to production delays within the petroleum industry. Particular monetary focus is given to the drilling operations of wells to overcome these deficits, in order to extract natural resources as efficiently, and as safely, as possible. The research presented here focuses on minimizing vibrations of the drill string near the bottom-hole assembly (BHA) by identifying the cause of external forcing on the drillstring in vertical and horizontal wells and measuring the effects of various factors on the stability of perturbations on the system. A test rig concept has been developed to accurately measure the interaction forces and torques between the bit, formation and fluids during drilling in order to clearly define a bit/formation interface law (BFIL) for the purpose vibrational analysis. As a secondary function, the rig will be able to measure the potential inputs to a drilling simulation code that can be used to model drillstring vibrations. All notable quantities will be measured including torque on bit (TOB), weight on bit (WOB), lateral impact loads (LIL), formation stiffness, bit specific properties, fluid damping coefficients and rate of penetration (ROP). The conceptual design has been analyzed and refined, in detail, to verify its operational integrity and range of measurement error. The operational envelope of the rig is such that a drill bit of up to 8 ½ inches in diameter can be effectively tested at desired operational parameters (WOB: 0-55,000 lbf, RPM: 60-200) with various rock formations and multiple fluid types. Future use and design possibilities are also discussed to enhance the functionality of the rig and the potential for further research in the area of oil and gas drilling and vibrational modeling.

Wilson, Joshua Kyle

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Progress Toward an Advanced Geothermal Deep-Drilling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A previously developed concept for an advanced geothermal drilling system (AGDS) has been extended toward a feasibility design stage. Hardware projects for two percussion, air and hydraulic, hammer drills are underway. Two drill string options and an unique nitrogen supply system are described.

Rowley, J.; Saito, S.; Long, R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

An Intelligent System for Petroleum Well Drilling Cutting Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cutting analysis is a important and crucial task task to detect and prevent problems during the petroleum well drilling process. Several studies have been developed for drilling inspection, but none of them takes care about analysing the generated cutting ... Keywords: Cutting analysis, petroleum well drilling monitoring, optimum-path forest

Aparecido N. Marana; Giovani Chiachia; Ivan R. Guilherme; João P. Papa

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Surface control bent sub for directional drilling of petroleum wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Directional drilling apparatus for incorporation in a drill string, wherein a lower apparatus section is angularly deviated from vertical by cam action and wherein rotational displacement of the angularly deviated apparatus section is overcome by additional cam action, the apparatus being operated by successive increases and decreases of internal drill string pressure.

Russell, Larry R. (6025 Edgemoor, Suite C, Houston, TX 77081)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Suggested drilling research tasks for the Federal Government  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief summary discussion of drilling, drilling research and the role of the government in drilling research is presented. Specific research and development areas recommended for federal consideration are listed. The technical nature of the identified tasks is emphasized. The Appendices present the factual basis for the discussion and recommendations. Numerous references are noted in the Appendices.

Carson, C.C.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Screening criteria help select formations for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certain laboratory screening procedures can help determine the effectiveness of underbalanced drilling in a specific application. These screening criteria can help in analyzing the types of reservoirs which present good applications for underbalanced drilling technology. This paper discusses the types of information that should be obtained for any reservoir prior to designing the underbalanced drilling program for optimum performance.

Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

354

Finite element analysis of the electro jet drilling process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electro jet drilling (EJD) process is gaining prominence in the machining of micro and macro holes in difficult-to-machine materials used in aerospace, electronics and computers, medical, and automobile industries. As the trend towards miniaturization ... Keywords: electro jet drilling, electrochemical drilling, finite element method, radial overcut

M. Sen; H. S. Shan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A deep drilling research program titled 'An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration' was conducted at TerraTek's Drilling and Completions Laboratory. Drilling tests were run to simulate deep drilling by using high bore pressures and high confining and overburden stresses. The purpose of this testing was to gain insight into practices that would improve rates of penetration and mechanical specific energy while drilling under high pressure conditions. Thirty-seven test series were run utilizing a variety of drilling parameters which allowed analysis of the performance of drill bits and drilling fluids. Five different drill bit types or styles were tested: four-bladed polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC), 7-bladed PDC in regular and long profile, roller-cone, and impregnated. There were three different rock types used to simulate deep formations: Mancos shale, Carthage marble, and Crab Orchard sandstone. The testing also analyzed various drilling fluids and the extent to which they improved drilling. The PDC drill bits provided the best performance overall. The impregnated and tungsten carbide insert roller-cone drill bits performed poorly under the conditions chosen. The cesium formate drilling fluid outperformed all other drilling muds when drilling in the Carthage marble and Mancos shale with PDC drill bits. The oil base drilling fluid with manganese tetroxide weighting material provided the best performance when drilling the Crab Orchard sandstone.

TerraTek

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Sand-control alternatives for horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that it has been well documented that horizontal completions increase production rates, as much as two to five times those of conventional techniques, because more of the producing formation is exposed to the wellbore. Although productivity improvements are highly sensitive to reservoir parameters, it is becoming generally accepted that optimum horizontal lengths will be 2,000 to 4,000 ft. The length of these completions generally causes the velocity of the fluid at the sandface to be an order of magnitude less than that observed in conventional completions. Because drag forces contributed to sand production, horizontal wells can produce at higher sand-free flow rates than conventional completions in the same reservoir. While it is frequently argued that horizontal wells do not need sand control, the potential for sand production increases significantly as reserves deplete and rock stresses increase. This is becoming more evident today in several major North Sea oil fields with conventional completions. Also, many unconsolidated formations produce sand for the first time with the onset of water production, a typical problem in such areas as the Gulf of Mexico. Operators must decide whether to implement sand control in the original horizontal-completion program because of an immediate concern or because the potential exists for a problem to arise as the well matures.

Zaleski, T.E. Jr. (Baker Sand Control (US))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Horizontal stirring in the global ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal mixing and the distribution of coherent structures in the global ocean are analyzed using Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLE), computed for the surface velocity field derived from the Ocean general circulation model For the Earth Simulator (OFES). FSLEs measure horizontal stirring and dispersion; additionally, the transport barriers which organize the oceanic flow can roughly be identified with the ridges of the FSLE field. We have performed a detailed statistical study, particularizing for the behaviour of the two hemispheres and different ocean basins. The computed Probability Distributions Functions (PDFs) of FSLE are broad and asymmetric. Horizontal mixing is generally more active in the northern hemisphere than in the southern one. Nevertheless the Southern Ocean is the most active ocean, and the Pacific the less active one. A striking result is that the main currents can be classified in two 'activity classes': Western Boundary Currents, which have broad PDFs with large FSLE values, and Eas...

Hernández-Carrasco, I; Hernández-García, E; Turiel, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

High pressure drilling system triples ROPS, stymies bit wear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent West Texas field tests of an experiental high-pressure drilling system have nearly tripled typical penetration rates in hard dolomite while putting virtually no visible wear on the bits, even those designed for much softer formations. With this drilling system, developed by FlowDril Corp. of Kent, Wash., and their joint-venture partner Grace Drilling Co., clarified drilling fluids (minimum solids) are pressurized to nearly 30,000 psi and directed to the bottom of the hole through a special nozzle attached to the drill bit. The action of this high pressure stream augments the bit's job, resulting in higher ROPs and decreased bit wear.

Killalea, M.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

GRR/Section 5 - Drilling Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5 - Drilling Overview GRR/Section 5 - Drilling Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5 - Drilling Overview 05DrillingPermittingOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies BLM Regulations & Policies 30 USC § 1001 Triggers None specified On top of acquiring the correct drilling permits a developer needs to consider issues such as land and mineral ownership and right of way access. 05DrillingPermittingOverview.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative 5.1 - Review Potential Construction Permits In addition to drilling permits, the developer may require other

360

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: Liner Drilling Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liner Drilling Date: Liner Drilling Date: 4-5-10 DOE Code: 71092 Cont ractor Code: 8067-766 Project Lead: Frank Ingham Project Overview Nothing out of the ordinary for drilling an existing location 1. What are the environmental impacts? NE SW Sec 21 , T39N, R78W (45-3-X-21 well) 2. What is the legal location? 3. What is the duration of the project? Approximately a week 4 . What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig, drilling rig, Drilling Rig etc.)? Will Drill out of 9 5/8 caslng with liner drillng assembly. After drilling approximately 750 to 1000 ft, will test liner hanging assembly set and retrieve multiple times. The table b elow is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialis t and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

GRAIN-SCALE FAILURE IN THERMAL SPALLATION DRILLING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal power promises clean, renewable, reliable and potentially widely-available energy, but is limited by high initial capital costs. New drilling technologies are required to make geothermal power financially competitive with other energy sources. One potential solution is offered by Thermal Spallation Drilling (TSD) - a novel drilling technique in which small particles (spalls) are released from the rock surface by rapid heating. While TSD has the potential to improve drilling rates of brittle granitic rocks, the coupled thermomechanical processes involved in TSD are poorly described, making system control and optimization difficult for this drilling technology. In this paper, we discuss results from a new modeling effort investigating thermal spallation drilling. In particular, we describe an explicit model that simulates the grain-scale mechanics of thermal spallation and use this model to examine existing theories concerning spalling mechanisms. We will report how borehole conditions influence spall production, and discuss implications for macro-scale models of drilling systems.

Walsh, S C; Lomov, I; Roberts, J J

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

Handbook 1: Introduction to drilling mud systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first of the 11 handbook that make up the IADC Mud Equipment Manual. The manual is designed to provide information on all pieces of drilling rig equipment from the flow line to the mud pump section. This book focuses on drilling fluids and their properties and treatment, and thoroughly examines mud solid characteristics. Methods of controlling formation pore pressure, and cut points, as well as cuttings removal (viscosity, yield point, gel strengths, hole cleaning, etc.), are followed by a discussion of solid sizes and solid size distribution. Special features include a glossary of mud terms, a section on ''hard-to-find'' information such as gold concentration, wind forces, and AC motor current requirements, and a comprehensive index for all 11 handbooks.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

How borehole ballooning alters drilling responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From field observations of drilling and hole instability problems over a 30-year period, a new and more complete understanding of plastic well-bore behavior - under certain pressure imbalance conditions - is being developed and verified with detailed well histories. Rock mechanics theory, thus far primarily concerned with plastic behavior and borehole collapse on the underbalanced side, is in at least partial agreement with these observations. This article further elaborates on the pressure-responsive plastic behavior of shales under tremendous downhole stresses, particularly in the overbalanced, ballooning mode. The primary subject matter of the article is divided into the following areas: Stable operating margin; Plastic behavior region; Wellbore wall yields; Brittle sloughings; Loss of mud; Gain of mud; Shut-in pressure; Reflex gas; Charged RFT's; Preexisting balloon; Drilling rate.

Gill, J.A.

1989-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

364

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make-up water for successive fracs. RFW, however, contains dissolved salts, suspended sediment and oils that may interfere with fracking fluids and/or clog fractures. This would lead to impaired well productivity. The major technical constraints to recycling RFW involves: identification of its composition, determination of industry standards for make-up water, and development of techniques to treat RFW to acceptable levels. If large scale RFW recycling becomes feasible, the industry will realize lower transportation and disposal costs, environmental conflicts, and risks of interruption in well development schedules.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

Microhole Wireless Steering While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

A background to Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies (CT-BHA) is given, and the development of a bi-directional communications and power module (BCPM)component is described. The successful operation of this component in both the laboratory and field environment is described. The primary conclusion of this development is that the BCPM component operates as anticipated within the CT-BHA, and significantly extends the possibility of drilling with coiled tubing in the microhole environment.

John Macpherson; Thomas Gregg

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Middle East: Output expansions boost drilling  

SciTech Connect

Iraqi exports may return to the market in limited fashion, but none of the region`s producers seems particularly concerned. They believe that global oil demand is rising fast enough to justify their additions to productive capacity. The paper discusses exploration, drilling and development, and production in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Oman, Iran, Iraq, Yemen, Qatar, Syria, Turkey, and Sharjah. The paper also briefly mentions activities in Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, and Ras al Khaimah.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Self propelled drilling rig starts offshore exploration  

SciTech Connect

Ocean Drilling and Exploration Co. recently commissioned its new $12 million self-propelled, semisubmersible drilling rig, Ocean Prospector, at Mitsubishi Shipyard, Japan, where the rig was built. Initial trail runs completed adjacent to the shipyard indicated that the ship has a speed of 7 kn ahead and 3 kn astern. Steering also is reported to be excellent. The rig has a minimum turning radius of approx. 2 barge lengths and shows instant response. This rig is powered by 4 Fairbanks Morse, 10-cylinder opposed piston, model 38D8-1/8 diesel engines. Each engine is rated at 1,600 hp at 720 rpm and they drive eight 1,600 kw, traction type D-C generators and two 1,000 kw A-C generators. The rated operating depth of the unit afloat is 600 ft of water. The overall length of Ocean Prospector is just over 344 ft, with the beam measuring 263-1/2 ft. During transit, when the rig will be completely deballasted, it will have a draft of approx. 20 ft. When it reaches the drilling site, ballast water will be pumped into the 18 ballast tanks until the draft is increased to 70 ft. At this point, the underside of the main deck will be 50 ft above the mean surface of the sea. Drilling operations will be conducted while the rig is at the 70 ft draft. The mooring system will consist of eight 2-3/4 in. chains, each measuring 3,300 ft in length and connected to a 15-ton anchor.

1971-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Research drilling in young silicic volcanoes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magmatic activity, and particularly silicic magmatic activity, is the fundamental process by which continental crust forms and evolves. The transport of magma from deep crustal reservoirs to the surface is a neglected but important aspect of magmatic phenomena. It encompasses problems of eruptive behavior, hydrothermal circulation, and ore deposition, and must be understood in order to properly interpret deeper processes. Drilling provides a means for determining the relationship of shallow intrusive processes to eruption processes at young volcanoes where eruptions are best understood. Drilling also provides a means for directly observing the processes of heat and mass transfer by which recently emplaced intrusions approach equilibrium with their new environment. Drilling in the Inyo Chain, a 600-year-old chain of volcanic vents in California, has shown the close relationship of silicic eruption to shallow dike emplacement, the control of eruptive style by shallow porous-flow degassing, the origin of obsidian by welding, the development of igneous zonation by viscosity segregation, and the character and size of conduits in relation to well-understood magmatic and phreatic eruptions. 36 refs., 9 figs.

Eichelberger, J.C.

1989-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Evaluation of commercially available geothermal drilling fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of geothermal drilling in the United States has revealed that serious problems are being encountered with corrosion and degradation of drilling fluids in high temperature wells. The best high temperature drilling fluids that could be formulated from commercially available materials were obtained from the five largest mud companies. These included samples of 9 and 18 lb/gal water muds and 18 lb/gal oil muds. Over 4,000 tests were conducted on these muds to evaluate their performance at high temperature. This included testing at temperatures to 550/sup 0/F and pressures to 15,000 psi. These tests revealed that most of the water muds had high viscosity, high filtration rates and poor corrosivity characteristics at temperatures above 350/sup 0/F. Although the oil muds performed better than water muds at high temperatures, some problems were encountered with viscosity at temperatures above 450/sup 0/F and with filtration at temperatures above 500/sup 0/F. Generally the corrosivity characteristics of the oil muds were much better than those of the water muds. Overall, oil muds have better temperature stability than water muds but their use is often limited because of problems with surface pollution, contamination of water zones and reservoir damage. Biodegradable oil mud systems would overcome some of these limitations.

Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; McDonald, W.J.; Maurer, W.C.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Borehole measurements while drilling: systems and activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Attention is focused on all potential methods of drilling safer and cheaper. Real time data from the bit offers the greatest potential for meeting these needs. As a result, numerous companies are actively competing to develop this oil field service capability and to capture a world wide market. Two basic categories of service are sought. The first, and highest priority, is drilling safety and efficiency; the second is real-time logging, or formation evaluation. This study addresses the types of systems being studied, describes company activity and projects underway, estimates the practical potential for success and considers the commercial market for successful systems. The need for research data on bit hydraulics and drill string dynamics, special deep, hot or sour gas situations and other relatively unusual requirements may become exceptions to the general conclusions that are drawn. Historical and present activity are documented through presenting the results of extensive literature and patent researches. A breakdown is presented of activity by company along with names and addresses for further contact.

McDonald, W.J.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Distribution of Cloud Horizontal Sizes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud horizontal size distributions from near-global satellite data, from aircraft, and from a global high-resolution numerical weather prediction model, are presented for the scale range 0.1–8000 km and are shown to be well-represented using a ...

Robert Wood; Paul R. Field

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Drilling Systems Project Description Potter Drilling has recently demonstrated hydrothermal spallation drilling in the laboratory. Hydrothermal spallation drilling creates boreholes using a focused jet of superheated water, separating individual grains ("spalls") from the rock surface without contact between the rock and the drill head. This process virtually eliminates the need for tripping. Previous tests of flame-jet spallation achieved ROP of 50 ft/hr and higher in hard rock with minimal wear on the drilling assembly, but operating this technology in an air-filled borehole created challenges related to cuttings transport and borehole stability. The Potter Drilling system uses a water based jet technology in a fluid-filled borehole and as a result has the potential to achieve similarly high ROP that is uncompromised by stability or cuttings transport issues.

373

Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe  

SciTech Connect

This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005 and contains the following discussions: (1) Qualification Testing; (2) Prototype Development and Testing of ''Smart Design'' Configuration; (3) Field Test Demonstration; and (4) Commercial order for SR-CDP from Torch International. The objective of this contract is to develop and demonstrate ''cost effective'' Composite Drill Pipe. It is projected that this drill pipe will weigh less than half of its steel counter part. The resultant weight reduction will provide enabling technology that will increase the lateral distance that can be reached from an offshore drilling platform and the depth of water in which drilling and production operations can be carried out. Further, composite drill pipe has the capability to carry real time signal and power transmission within the pipe walls. CDP can also accommodate much shorter drilling radius than is possible with metal drill pipe. As secondary benefits, the lighter weight drill pipe can increase the storage capability of floating off shore drilling platforms and provide substantial operational cost savings.

James C. Leslie; James C. Leslie II; Lee Truong; James T. Heard; Steve Loya

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

374

Workshop on magma/hydrothermal drilling and instrumentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discussions, conclusions, and recommendations of the Magma/Hydrothermal Drilling and Instrumentation Workshop, Albuquerque, NM, May 31--June 2, 1978 are summarized. Three working groups were organized as follows: Drilling Location and Environment, Drilling and Completion Technology, and Logging and Instrumentation Technology. The first group discussed potential drilling sites and the environment that could be expected in drilling to magma depth at each site. Sites suggested for early detailed evaluation as candidate drilling sites were The Geysers-Clear Lake, CA, Kilauea, HI, Long Valley-Mono Craters, CA, and Yellowstone, WY. Magma at these sites is expected to range from 3 to 10 km deep with temperatures of 800 to 1100{sup 0}C. Detailed discussions of the characteristics of each site are given. In addition, a list of geophysical measurements desired for the hole is presented. The Drilling and Completion Group discussed limitations on current rotary drilling technology as a function of depth and temperature. The group concluded that present drilling systems can be routinely used to temperatures of 200{sup 0}C and depths to 10 km; drilling to 350{sup 0}C can be accomplished with modifications of present techniques, drilling at temperatures from 350{sup 0}C to 1100{sup 0}C will require the development of new drilling techniques. A summary of the limiting factors in drilling systems is presented, and recommendations for a program directed at correcting these limitations is described. The third group discussed requirements for instrumentation and established priorities for the development of the required instruments. Of highest priority for development were high resolution temperature tools, sampling techniques (core, formation fluids), chemical probes, and communications techniques. A description of instrumentation requirements for the postulated hole is given, and the tasks necessary to develop the required devices are delineated.

Varnado, S.G.; Colp, J.L. (eds.)

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Horizontal Wavenumber Spectra of Vertical Vorticity and Horizontal Divergence in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author shows that the horizontal two-point correlations of vertical vorticity and the associated vorticity wavenumber spectrum can be constructed from previously measured velocity structure functions in the upper troposphere and lower ...

Erik Lindborg

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Quarterly report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to consider the enhanced recovery of petroleum from the Dundee Formation using horizontal wells. This report contains summaries of the following tasks: project management; reservoir characterization; database management; drilling; and technology transfer. Some of the highlights are: well and log data sets and production data sets for all 30 fields are now complete and are stored in the TerraSciences` database at WMU; tops have been picked on all formations in all wells; well location and formation tops data sets are also now complete; The GeoGraphix Exploration System (GES) software package was acquired this quarter and installed on a PC in the Subsurface Laboratory at MTU.

Wood, J.R.

1995-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

377

NETL: News Release - New Projects to Investigate Smart Drilling Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 20, 2004 February 20, 2004 New Projects to Investigate "Smart Drilling" Options Promise Lower Cost, More Reliable Gas Drilling Two additional projects have been selected under a Department of Energy solicitation designed to advance performance when drilling for natural gas. The projects are a key component of the Department's gas exploration and production research program, and support the President's National Energy Policy, which calls for boosting domestic production of natural gas to ensure an adequate future supply at reasonable prices. With shallow and conventional natural gas resources in the United States being depleted, drillers must reach for gas miles below the earth's surface, where temperatures run up to 450 EF and pressures are hundreds of times greater than atmospheric pressure. "Smart drilling" options can increase productivity, improve drilling safety, and lower costs when drilling for these hard-to-reach deep gas supplies.

378

Development and Manufacture of Cost-Effective Composite Drill Pipe  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Composite Products and Technology, Inc. (ACPT) has developed composite drill pipe (CDP) that matches the structural and strength properties of steel drill pipe, but weighs less than 50 percent of its steel counterpart. Funding for the multiyear research and development of CDP was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy through the Natural Gas and Oil Projects Management Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Composite materials made of carbon fibers and epoxy resin offer mechanical properties comparable to steel at less than half the weight. Composite drill pipe consists of a composite material tube with standard drill pipe steel box and pin connections. Unlike metal drill pipe, composite drill pipe can be easily designed, ordered, and produced to meet specific requirements for specific applications. Because it uses standard joint connectors, CDP can be used in lieu of any part of or for the entire steel drill pipe section. For low curvature extended reach, deep directional drilling, or ultra deep onshore or offshore drilling, the increased strength to weight ratio of CDP will increase the limits in all three drilling applications. Deceased weight will reduce hauling costs and increase the amount of drill pipe allowed on offshore platforms. In extreme extended reach areas and high-angle directional drilling, drilling limits are associated with both high angle (fatigue) and frictional effects resulting from the combination of high angle curvature and/or total weight. The radius of curvature for a hole as small as 40 feet (12.2 meters) or a build rate of 140 degrees per 100 feet is within the fatigue limits of specially designed CDP. Other properties that can be incorporated into the design and manufacture of composite drill pipe and make it attractive for specific applications are corrosion resistance, non-magnetic intervals, and abrasion resistance coatings. Since CDP has little or no electromagnetic force fields up to 74 kilohertz (KHz), a removable section of copper wire can be placed inside the composite pipe to short the tool joints electrically allowing electromagnetic signals inside the collar to induce and measure the same within the rock formation. By embedding a pair of wires in the composite section and using standard drill pipe box and pin ends equipped with a specially developed direct contact joint electrical interface, power can be supplied to measurement-while-drilling (MWD) and logging-while-drilling (LWD) bottom hole assemblies. Instantaneous high-speed data communications between near drill bit and the surface are obtainable utilizing this 'smart' drilling technology. The composite drill pipe developed by ACPT has been field tested successfully in several wells nationally and internationally. These tests were primarily for short radius and ultra short radius directional drilling. The CDP in most cases performed flawlessly with little or no appreciable wear. ACPT is currently marketing a complete line of composite drill collars, subs, isolators, casing, and drill pipe to meet the drilling industry's needs and tailored to replace metal for specific application requirements.

James C. Leslie

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Review of the Drilling R and D Program at Sandia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling projects conducted for the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) and the Office of Energy Research (OER), both of the Department of Energy (DOE), are described. The DGE Well Technology Program includes drilling, well completion, and high temperature logging instrumentation R and D for geothermal applications. Accomplishments to date include successful laboratory testing of the continuous chain drill and development of temperature, pressure, and flow sondes capable of operation at 275/sup 0/C. Efforts are also under way to develop high-temperature, high-performance bits, high-temperature drilling fluids, and high-temperature downhole motors. Bearings, seals, and lubricants for use in high-temperature bits and motors are also being developed and tested. Recent results are presented. An OER drilling experiment into a lava lake at Kilauea Iki, Hawaii, is being conducted. Materials and techniques for drilling into an active magma/hydrothermal system are in a preliminary phase of study.

Stoller, H.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Qualification of a computer program for drill string dynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A four point plan for the qualification of the GEODYN drill string dynamics computer program is described. The qualification plan investigates both modal response and transient response of a short drill string subjected to simulated cutting loads applied through a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit. The experimentally based qualification shows that the analytical techniques included in Phase 1 GEODYN correctly simulate the dynamic response of the bit-drill string system. 6 refs., 8 figs.

Stone, C.M.; Carne, T.G.; Caskey, B.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Underbalanced drilling in the Piceance basin. Final report, June 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling technology is established and fairly well understood in some areas in the U.S. such as Appalachia. The primary objective of this cooperative project in the Piceance Basin was to use underbalanced drilling technologies to reduce rates of penetration such that significant cost reductions could occur. Fluids evaluated included air/mist, stiff foams and aerated muds. Underbalanced drilling was successful particularly in the surface hole; however, heaving shales in the Wasatch section were problematic.

Lewis, C.A.; Graham, R.L.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Development of drilling foams for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of foam drilling fluids in geothermal applications is addressed. A description of foams - what they are, how they are used, their properties, equipment required to use them, the advantages and disadvantages of foams, etc. - is presented. Geothermal applications are discussed. Results of industry interviews presented indicate significant potential for foams, but also indicate significant technical problems to be solved to achieve this potential. Testing procedures and results of tests on representative foams provide a basis for work to develop high-temperature foams.

McDonald, W.J.; Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; Chenevert, M.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Rig scarcity prompts innovative drilling solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unable to locate a shallow-water offshore rig for its program in Indonesia, British Gas International developed an innovative pad/ballasted barge configuration to utilize a land rig, which was available. Many non-typical problems were encountered and solved to establish the drilling location 600 m (2,000 ft) from the shore in Bintuni Bay in Irian Jaya, eastern Indonesia. The final hybrid configuration has sparked interesting debate as to whether the operation should be designated as onshore or offshore. The paper discusses the project overview, concept development, construction, and operations.

Lattimore, G.M.; Gott, T.; Feagin, J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Sound Coiled-Tubing Drilling Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Coiled-Tubing Drilling (CTD) Sound Practices Manual provides tools needed by CTD engineers and supervisors to plan, design and perform safe, successful CTD operations. As emphasized throughout, both careful planning and attention to detail are mandatory for success. A bibliography of many useful CTD references is presented in Chapter 6. This manual is organized according to three processes: 1) Pre-Job Planning Process, 2) Operations Execution Process, and 3) Post-Job Review Process. Each is discussed in a logical and sequential format.

Williams, Thomas; Deskins, Greg (Maurer Technology Inc.); Ward, Stephen L. (Advantage Energy Services Ltd); Hightower, Mel

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Natural Gas Horizontal Well Control Act (West Virginia) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

drilling method, and which disturbs three acres or more of surface, excluding pipelines, gathering lines and roads, or utilizes more than two hundred ten thousand gallons...

386

Kick circulation analysis for extended reach and horizontal wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Well control is of the utmost importance during drilling operations. Numerous well control incidents occur on land and offshore rigs. The consequences of a loss… (more)

Long, Maximilian Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

By Matthew J. Kotchen o drill or not to drill? That is the ques-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. But conflict re- mains about whether to allow drilling in the federal portion of ANWR. While ANWR is thought in North America. Thus, the ANWR question is typically cast in symbolic terms -- "big oil" looking to cash a simple thought ex- periment to help cut through the symbol- ism. Imagine that ANWR -- both the region

Kotchen, Matthew J.

388

Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K. (eds.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Engineered Infills for Concrete Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... INEEL Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory ... a 240 MW thermal sodium–cooled, graphite ... for cement based waste forms which ...

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

390

Engineered Infills for Concrete Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2.2.1 Nuclear Facility Decommissioning and Closures ... The Hallam Nuclear Power Facility, Hallam ... was authorized to decommission and dismantle ...

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

391

Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared Spectroscopy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared Spectroscopy Abstract Infrared spectroscopy is particularly good at identifying awide variety of hydrothermally altered minerals with no samplepreparation, and is especially helpful in discrimination amongclay minerals. We have performed several promising pilot studieson geothermal drill core and cuttings that suggest the efficiencyof the technique to sample continuously and provide alterationlogs similar to geophysical logs. We have successfully identifiedlayered silicates, zeolites, opal, calcite, and iron oxides and

392

Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

major contributor for electricity generation, namely: (1) reduce costs for drilling and well completion and (2) increase the volume of hot rock from which heat can be extracted....

393

Challenges in Applying Diamond Coatings to Carbide Twist Drills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite of the attractive advantage of applying diamond coating to drills, ... Investigation of a Hybrid Cutting Tool Design for Shearing Operations of Sheet Metals.

394

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

December 2013 December 2013 Explanatory notes Drilling Productivity Report The Drilling Productivity Report uses recent data on the total number of drilling rigs in operation along with estimates of drilling productivity and estimated changes in production from existing oil and natural gas wells to provide estimated changes in oil and natural gas production for six key fields. EIA's approach does not distinguish between oil-directed rigs and gas-directed rigs because once a well is completed it may produce both oil and gas; more than half of the wells do that. Monthly additions from one average rig Monthly additions from one average rig represent EIA's estimate of an average rig's

395

Corrosion Resistant Metallic Materials for Ultra-deep Well Drilling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... corrosion fatigue, etc., can be a primary cause of catastrophic degradation of tubular components during ultra-deep drilling of oil and natural gas shale.

396

Corrosion Control Methods of Drilling Tools – Effectiveness and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and high temperature, makes corrosion of drilling tools a major concern. In this paper ... Nanocrystalline and Nanotwinned Metals under Extreme Environment.

397

Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems Geothermal Lab Call...

398

NETL: News Release - Drilling Operators Receive Boost from New...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Operators Receive Boost from New Database to Weigh Options Regarding Waste Management Interactive Website Provides Easy Access to Technological, Environmental, and...

399

High Temperature 300°C Directional Drilling System Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and DevelopmentAnalysis Project Type Topic 2 Directional Drilling Systems Project Description The development plan...

400

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Chapter 6. Drilling and Well...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Chapter 6. Drilling and Well Construction Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Pressure Sensor and Telemetry Methods for Measurement While Drilling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MWD Tools for Directional Drilling Project Description - Phase I: Integrate and test pressure sensor system consisting of a commercial off the shelf silicon-on-sapphire...

402

Drilling often results in both oil and natural gas production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Solar › Energy in Brief ... Btu = British thermal units. ... A future Today in Energy article will focus on how drilling efficiency relates to ...

403

Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production...

404

NETL: News Release - DOE-Funded 'Microhole' Drilling Rig Demonstrated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rig Demonstrated Successfully in Midcontinent New Technology Initiative Slashes Drilling Costs, Benefits Environment, Energy Security WASHINGTON, DC - A U.S. Department of...

405

Safety Measures a hinder for Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Safety Measures a hinder for Geothermal Drilling Citation Renewable Power...

406

Chesapeake Bay, Drilling for Oil or Gas Prohibited (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Drilling for oil or gas in the waters or within 500 hundred feet from the shoreline of the Chesapeake Bay or any of its tributaries is prohibited.

407

Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this technology in an air-filled borehole created challenges related to cuttings transport and borehole stability. The Potter Drilling system uses a water based jet technology...

408

Laser Drilling of a Superalloy Coated with Ceramic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser drilling has been developed in advanced aircraft industry in particular to achieve the intricate hole network of the combustion chamber because of several .

409

Drilling Operations Plan for the Magma Energy Exploratory Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is a summary of the proposed drilling plan for the first phase (to 2500 feet depth) of the Magma Energy Exploratory Well. The drilling program comprises four phases, spaced approximately one year apart, which culminate in a large-diameter well to a total depth near 20,000 feet. Included here are descriptions of the well design, predictions of potential drilling problems, a list of restrictions imposed by regulatory agencies, an outline of Sandia's management structure, and an explanation of how the magma energy technology will benefit from this drilling.

Finger, John T.; Livesay, Bill J.; Ash, Don

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

410

Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Temperatures,...

411

Trends in Eagle Ford drilling highlight the search for oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... In major shale plays, drilling activity depends largely on the resource mix and relative fuel ...

412

EIA Corrects Errors in Its Drilling Activity Estimates Series  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

gas and oil wells relative to total wells, improved greatly as early as 1986 as seen in the revised drilling statistics. The prior well data series did

413

Compendium of regulatory requirements governing underground injection of drilling waste.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large quantities of waste are produced when oil and gas wells are drilled. The two primary types of drilling wastes include used drilling fluids (commonly referred to as muds), which serve a variety of functions when wells are drilled, and drill cuttings (rock particles ground up by the drill bit). Some oil-based and synthetic-based muds are recycled; other such muds, however, and nearly all water-based muds, are disposed of. Numerous methods are employed to manage drilling wastes, including burial of drilling pit contents, land spreading, thermal processes, bioremediation, treatment and reuse, and several types of injection processes. This report provides a comprehensive compendium of the regulatory requirements governing the injection processes used for disposing of drilling wastes; in particular, for a process referred to in this report as slurry injection. The report consists of a narrative discussion of the regulatory requirements and practices for each of the oil- and gas-producing states, a table summarizing the types of injection processes authorized in each state, and an appendix that contains the text of many of the relevant state regulations and policies. The material included in the report was derived primarily from a review of state regulations and from interviews with state oil and gas regulatory officials.

Puder, M. G.; Bryson, B.; Veil, J. A.

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

414

Estimators for the Standard Deviation of Horizontal Wind Direction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standard deviation of horizontal wind direction is a central quantity in the description of atmospheric turbulence and of great practical use in dispersion models. As horizontal wind direction is a circular variable, its standard deviation ...

Rudolf O. Weber

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

High accuracy diffuse horizontal irradiance measurements without a shadowband  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The standard method for measuring diffuse horizontal irradiance uses a fixed shadowband to block direct solar radiation. This method requires a correction for the excess skylight blocked by the band, and this correction varies with sky conditions. Alternately, diffuse horizontal irradiance may be calculated from total horizontal and direct normal irradiance. This method is in error because of angular (cosine) response of the total horizontal pyranometer to direct beam irradiance. This paper describes an improved calculation of diffuse horizontal irradiance from total horizontal and direct normal irradiance using a predetermination of the angular response of the total horizontal pyranometer. We compare these diffuse horizontal irradiance calculations with measurements made with a shading-disk pyranometer that shields direct irradiance using a tracking disk. Results indicate significant improvement in most cases. Remaining disagreement most likely arises from undetected tracking errors and instrument leveling.

Schlemmer, J.A; Michalsky, J.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Drilling Waste Management Technology Identification Module  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

you are in this section Technology Identification you are in this section Technology Identification Home » Technology Identification Drilling Waste Management Technology Identification Module The Technology Identification Module is an interactive tool for identifying appropriate drilling waste management strategies for a given well location and circumstances. The Technology Identification Module follows the philosophy of a waste management hierarchy. Waste management options with the lowest environmental impacts are encouraged ahead of those with more significant environmental impacts. The Technology Identification Module helps identify waste management options, but users should also consider their own site-specific costs and waste volumes. How it Works Users will be asked to answer a series of questions about the location of the well site, physical features of the site that may allow or inhibit the use of various options, whether the regulatory agency with jurisdiction allows or prohibits particular options, and whether cost or the user's company policy would preclude any options. Nearly all questions are set up for only "yes" or "no" responses. Depending on how the initial questions are answered, users will face from 15 to 35 total questions. Some of these can be answered immediately, while others may require some additional investigation of other portions of this web site or external information. Suitable options will be identified as users complete the questions, and users will be able to print out a summary of suitable options when the process is completed.

417

Bachaquero-01 reservoir, Venezuela-increasing oil production by switching from cyclic steam injection to steamflooding using horizontal wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bachaquero-01 reservoir of the Lagunillas field is located in the eastern part of the Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela. The field is operated by the national oil company of Venezuela, PDVSA (Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A.). The Bachaquero-01 heavy oil reservoir lies at about 3,000 ft. ss. and contains 7.037 BSTB of 1 1.7 degrees API gravity oil with an in-situ viscosity of 635 cp. Cold production began in 1960, but since 1971 the reservoir was produced under a massive cyclic steam injection system. To-date some 370 cyclic-steam injection welts have produced from the reservoir, yielding a cumulative oil recovery of only about 5.6% of initial oil-in-place. The reservoir pressure has dropped from an initial 1,370 psia to its present value of about 700 psia. Maximum oil production peaked at 45.0 MSTB/D in 1991, and has since continued to decline. To arrest production decline, three horizontal cyclic-steam injection wells were drilled and completed in the reservoir in 1995-1997. The horizontal sections were from 1,280 to 1,560 ft long and were drilled in locations with existing vertical cyclic steam injection welts. Three-dimensional thermal-compositional simulation studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of the three horizontal welts under cyclic steam injection and steamflooding. The Cartesian model dimensions of the three horizontal welts were 11x22x4, 11x27x5, and 12x20x5. In the steamflooding scheme investigated, the existing horizontal welts were used as injectors while existing (and new) vertical welts surrounding the horizontal welts were used as producers. Simulation results indicate oil recovery under cyclic steam injection to be about 15% of initial oil-in-place, compared to about 25% under steamflooding with no new producers, and about 50% under steamflooding with additional producers. The main advantages of steamflooding over cyclic steam injection were in the re-pressurization and improved thermal efficiency for the Bachaquero-01 reservoir. Higher oil recovery with additional wells resulted from improved areal sweep efficiency. Further study is planned to investigate steamflooding for the rest of the reservoir.

Rodriguez, Manuel Gregorio

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Directional Drilling and Equipment for Hot Granite Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Directional drilling technology was extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, hot dry rock (HDR) experimental site. Borehole geometries, extremely hard and abrasive granite rock, and high formation temperatures combined to provide a challenging environment for directional drilling tools and instrumentation. Completing the first of the two-wellbore HDR system resulted in the definition of operation limitations of -many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation, and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-21), to a measured depth of 4.7 km (15,300 ft) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 320 C (610 F) required the development of a new high-temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 2.6 km (8,500 ft) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35{sup o} from the vertical at the controlled azimuthal orientation. Data were collected to optimize the drilling procedures far the programmed directional drilling of well EE-3 parallel to, and 370 metres (1,200 ft) above, Drilling equipment and techniques used in drilling wellbores for extraction of geothermal energy from hot granite were generally similar to those that are standard and common to hydrocarbon drilling practices. However, it was necessary to design some new equipment for this program: some equipment was modified especially for this program and some was operated beyond normal ratings. These tools and procedures met with various degrees of success. Two types of shock subs were developed and tested during this project. However, downhole time was limited, and formations were so varied that analysis of the capabilities of these items is not conclusive. Temperature limits of the tools were exceeded. EE-2. Commercial drilling and fishing jars were improved during the drilling program. Three-cone, tungsten-carbide insert bit performance with downhole motors was limited by rapid gauge wear. Rotary drilling was optimized for wells EE-2 and EE-3 using softer (IADS 635 code) bits and provided a balance between gauge,. cutting structure, and bearing life. Problems of extreme drill string drag, drill string twist-off, and corrosion control are discussed.

Williams, R. E.; Neudecker, J. W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA, Texas A&M University, as an account of work performed under the international Ocean Drilling Program Foundation, the participating agencies, Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., Texas A&M University

420

Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and Production Processes in the Mid-Atlantic Region: Marcellus shale drilling in progress, Beaver Run Reservoir, Westmoreland County. Credit: Robert Donnan. Gas in the Marcellus shale natural gas industry in the Mid-Atlantic region. Using publicly available information, we

Maranas, Costas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "infill drilling horizontal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in transmitting acoustic waves propated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting a resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

Nardi, Anthony P. (Burlington, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in transmitting acoustic waves propagated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

Kent, William H. (Westford, MA); Mitchell, Peter G. (Concord, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Marcellus Shale Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing; Technicalities and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marcellus Shale Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing; Technicalities and Controversies Kyle J Ferrar;UNITED STATES SHALE BASINS Modern Shale Gas Development in the U.S.: A Primer, (2009) U.S. Dept of Energy Development http://www.secinfo.com/DB/SEC/2007 #12;Where to Drill? Harper, John A. (2008). The Marcellus Shale

Sibille, Etienne

424

Evaluation of slurry injection technology for management of drilling wastes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, thousands of new oil and gas wells are drilled in the United States and around the world. The drilling process generates millions of barrels of drilling waste each year, primarily used drilling fluids (also known as muds) and drill cuttings. The drilling wastes from most onshore U.S. wells are disposed of by removing the liquids from the drilling or reserve pits and then burying the remaining solids in place (called pit burial). This practice has low cost and the approval of most regulatory agencies. However, there are some environmental settings in which pit burial is not allowed, such as areas with high water tables. In the U.S. offshore environment, many water-based and synthetic-based muds and cuttings can be discharged to the ocean if discharge permit requirements are met, but oil-based muds cannot be discharged at all. At some offshore facilities, drilling wastes must be either hauled back to shore for disposal or disposed of onsite through an injection process.

Veil, J. A.; Dusseault, M. B.

2003-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

425

Integrated approach towards the application of horizontal wells to improve waterflooding performance. Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of the proposed project is to improve secondary recovery performance of a marginal oil field through the use of a horizontal injection well. The location and direction of the well will be selected based on the detailed reservoir description using integrated approach. The authors expect that 2 to 5 % of original oil in place will be recovered using this method. This should extend the life of the reservoir by at least 10 years. To accomplish the goals of the project, it is divided into two stages. In Stage 1, they will select part of the Glenn Pool field (William B. Self Unit), and collect additional reservoir data by conducting cross bore hole tomography surveys and formation micro scanner logs through newly drilled well. In addition, they will also utilize analogous outcrop data. By combining the state of the art data with conventional core and log data, they will develop a detailed reservoir description based on integrated approach. After conducting extensive reservoir simulation studies, they will select a location and direction of a horizontal injection well. The well will be drilled based on optimized design, and the field performance will be monitored for at least six months. If the performance is encouraging, they will enter into second budget period of the project. This progress report is divided into three sections. In the first section, they discuss the preliminary results based on the cross bore hole seismic surveys. In the second section, they discuss the geological description of the Self Unit. In the last section, they present petrophysical properties description of the reservoir followed by the flow simulation results. Based on a thorough evaluation of the geological and flow simulation results, they finalized the initial test well location followed by drilling of the well in late Dec.

Kelkar, B.G.; Liner, C.; Kerr, D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Heavy crude and tar sands: Hydrocarbons for the 21st century. Volume 2, Reservoir behavior, drilling and production  

SciTech Connect

Volume 2 is devoted to heavy oil reservoir behavior, production, and the drilling and completion of wells to meet the special needs of these fascinating but difficult oils and bitumens. The volume begins with four papers describing approaches to the recovery of heavy oil and to two fields subject to different recovery mechanisms. Although most heavy oil fields are produced with the assistance of steam stimulation, which commenced in Venezuela, or steam flood, many other methods for the improvement of recovery are potentially applicable. The seven reports on pilot projects examine mostly the results of studies on the dominant thermal recovery methods - steam stimulation, steam flood, and in situ combustion. The behavior of reservoirs under development through use of horizontal wells is the subject of three reports, of vertical wells, nine papers. Much is still to be teamed concerning the relative advantages of these two distinctive methods of reservoir development. The 18 reports on drilling and production are of great importance to the science and engineering of heavy oil because of the problems heavy oil causes after it is induced to flow to the well bore. Artificial lifting of the oil has traditionally centered on the use of sucker rods, but other methods, such as chamber or cavity-pump lift may prove to be efficacious. Horizontal well drilling is a logical approach to maximizing the amount of reservoir exposed to the well bore but this entails special problems in bore-hole clean-up. Heavy oils, too, pose special, frequently very difficult gravel packing problems. Sand production with heavy oil has always posed both economic and technological difficulties and major effort is devoted to overcoming them, as evidenced by the reports in this section. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Meyer, R.F. [ed.] [Geological Survey, Washington, DC (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Drilling through gas hydrates formations: possible problems and suggested solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas hydrate research in the last two decades has taken various directions ranging from ways to understand the safe and economical production of this enormous resource to drilling problems. as more rigs and production platforms move into deeper waters to its environmental impact on global warming and cooling. Gas hydrates are ice-like structures of a water lattice with cavities, which contain guest gases. Gas hydrates are stable at low temperatures and high pressures. The amount of energy trapped in gas hydrates all over the world is about twice the amount found in all recoverable fossil fuels today. This research identifies the problems facing the oil and gas industry as it drills in deeper waters where gas hydrates are present and suggests solutions to some of the problems. The problems considered in this research have been approached from a drilling point of view. Hence, the parameters investigated and discussed are drilling controlled parameters. They include rate of penetration, circulation rate and drilling fluid density. The rate of penetration in offshore wells contributes largely to the final cost of the drilling process. These 3 parameters have been linked in the course of this research in order to suggest an optimum rate of penetration. The results show the rate of penetration is directly proportional to the amount of gas released when drilling through gas hydrate. As the volume of gas released increases, the problems facing the drilling rigs, drilling crew and environment is seen to increase. The results also show the extent of risk to be expected while drilling through gas hydrate formations. A chart relating the rate of penetration, circulation rate and effective mud weight was used to select the optimum drilling rate within the drilling safety window. Finally, future considerations and recommendations in order to improve the analyses presented in this work are presented. Other drilling parameters proposed for future analysis include drill bit analysis with respect to heat transfer and the impact of dissociation of gas hydrate around the wellbore and seafloor stability.

Amodu, Afolabi Ayoola

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California's Forests and Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009 "Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California’s5180 www.ucei.org Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling inAbstract: Offshore oil drilling has been controversial in

Smith, Eric R.A.N.; Carlisle, Juliet; Michaud, Kristy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Illinois. The injection well is being drilled into a test area...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

option for CO 2 storage. This is the first drilling into the Mount Simon Sandstone since oil and gas exploratory drilling was conducted some 15 to 40 years ago. Drilling...

430

Learning by Drilling: Inter-Firm Learning and Relationship Persistence in the Texas Oilpatch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high-frequency data from oil and gas drilling. I find thatan examination of the oil and gas drilling industry. I findvertical integration. The oil and gas drilling industry is

KELLOGG, RYAN M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Support for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling among the California Public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

005 "Support for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling Among theSupport for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling among theSupport for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling among the

Smith, Eric R.A.N.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California's Forests and Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009 "Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California’sPublic Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California’sPublic Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California’s

Smith, Eric R.A.N.; Carlisle, Juliet; Michaud, Kristy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Offsite Disposal at Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Disposal Facilities Commercial Disposal Facilities Fact Sheet - Commercial Disposal Facilities Although drilling wastes from many onshore wells are managed at the well site, some wastes cannot be managed onsite. Likewise, some types of offshore drilling wastes cannot be discharged, so they are either injected underground at the platform (not yet common in the United States) or are hauled back to shore for disposal. According to an American Petroleum Institute waste survey, the exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generated more than 360 million barrels (bbl) of drilling wastes in 1985. The report estimates that 28% of drilling wastes are sent to offsite commercial facilities for disposal (Wakim 1987). A similar American Petroleum Institute study conducted ten years later found that the volume of drilling waste had declined substantially to about 150 million bbl.

434

Geothermal gradient drilling, north-central Cascades of Oregon, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geothermal gradient drilling program was conducted on the western flank of the north-central Cascade Mountains in Oregon. Six wells were drilled during this program, although in effect seven were drilled, as two wells were drilled at site 3, the second well, however, actually going to a lesser depth than the first. Three of the wells (3, 4, and 5) were drilled in areas which topographically are subject to strong throughflows of ground water. None of these wells reached the regional water table, and all showed essentially isothermal geothermal gradients. The single well which was started essentially at the water table (well 6) shows a linear temperature rise with depth essentially from the top of the well bore. Well No. 2 shows an isothermal gradient down to the level of the regional water table and then shows a linear gradient of about 70/sup 0/C/km from the regional water table to total depth.

Youngquist, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Slimhole Drilling, Logging, and Completion Technology - An Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using slim holes (diameter < 15 cm) for geothermal exploration and small-scale power production can produce significant cost savings compared to conventional rotary-drilling methods. In addition, data obtained from slim holes can be used to lower the risks and costs associated with the drilling and completion of large-diameter geothermal wells. As a prime contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Sandia National Laboratories has worked with industry since 1992 to develop and promote drilling, testing, and logging technology for slim holes. This paper describes the current status of work done both in-house and contracted to industry. It focuses on drilling technology, case histories of slimhole drilling projects, data collection and rig instrumentation, and high-temperature logging tools.

FINGER,JOHN T.; JACOBSON,RONALD D.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

Feasibility study of a hybrid erosion drilling concept  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a system analysis of the ERODRILL concept are presented. ERODRILL is an erosion drilling technique that uses a stream of propellant capsules carried in the drilling mud and ignited near the bottom of the drill hole to provide a fluid jet on the rock face. The concept evaluated in this study was a hybrid system using the erosion drill to cut a kerf for a conventional rotary drill to break to. A preliminary design was made and a hypergolic propellant, Hercules HES 6573, was chosen. The background and rationale for this program are presented. The system, from its initial conception to its current hybrid design, is described. The propellant selection process is presented. The hazard evaluation, reliability analysis, and the economic analysis are given. Conclusions and recommendations are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Sandia/DOE geothermal drilling and completion technology development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs 25% by 1982 and 50% by 1986. Sandia Laboratories has managed this technology development program since October 1977, and this paper presents an overview of the program. A statement of program goals and structure is given. The content of the FY-79 program is presented and recent results of R and D projects are given. Plans for development of an advanced drilling and completion system are discussed.

Barnette, J.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Drilling, Completing, and Maintaining Geothermal Wells in Baca, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 55-MWe power plant is planned for development in the Baca location in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. Union Geothermal has contracted to provide the steam for the power plant. This paper uses Baca Well No. 13 as a case history to describe the drilling methods, casing program, cementing program, and completion methods used by Union. The discussion includes aerated-water drilling and the methods of solving corrosion problems in aerated water. lost circulation control in mud drilling and its effect on the subsequent casing cementing program are discussed. The paper also includes a case history of scale removal methods u