National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for inertial fusion energy

  1. LBNL perspective on inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bangerter, Roger O.

    1995-01-01

    LBNL Perspective on Inertial Fusion Energy Roger Bangerter1990) and the last Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (1993)year 2005, the Inertial Fusion Energy Program must grow to

  2. Krypton Fluoride Laser Driven Inertial Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems San Ramon CA January 29, 2011 presented by John Sethian1 Krypton Fluoride Laser Driven Inertial Fusion Energy Presented to NAS Committee on the Prospects POWER PLANT: Attractive Technology #12;6 Outline S. ObenschainVision of R&D path to Inertial Fusion

  3. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    x NOMENCLATURE ICF Inertial Confinement Fusion IFE InertialJ.D. Lindl. Inertial Confinement Fusion. Springer-Verlag,for the laser inertial confinement Fusion-Fission energy (

  4. Progress in heavy ion drivers inertial fusion energy: From scaled experiments to the integrated research experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    ION DRIVEN INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY: FROM SCALED EXPERIMENTSThe promise of inertial fusion energy driven by heavy ionleading to an inertial fusion energy power plant. The focus

  5. Studies of fast electron transport in the problems of inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frolov, Boris K.

    2006-01-01

    Problems of Inertial Fusion Energy by Boris K. Frolov DoctorProblems of Inertial Fusion Energy A dissertation submitted

  6. Road to Inertial Fusion Energy Fusion Power Associates Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Crack is clear through 5 mm thick deck plate #12;Coal-fired and KrF laser fusion power power plants have-electron-beams-nrl-to-clean-up- nox-emissions-from-coal-power-plant NRL has a Cooperative Research and Development AgreementRoad to Inertial Fusion Energy Fusion Power Associates Meeting Washington DC 16 December 2014

  7. Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 18, No. 4, 1999 Report of the FEAC Inertial Fusion Energy Review Panel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 18, No. 4, 1999 Report of the FEAC Inertial Fusion Energy Review. S. Department of Energy Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC) review of its Inertial Fusion Energy of California at San Diego. KEY WORDS: Fusion; fusion science; fusion energy; inertial fusion energy. I. SUMMARY

  8. Progress in heavy ion driven inertial fusion energy: From scaled experiments to the integrated research experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    The promise of inertia! fusion energy driven by heavy ionleading to an inertial fusion energy power plant. The focusIRE. 1 INTRODUCTION Inertial fusion energy targets require

  9. Review of the Inertial Fusion Energy Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-03-29

    Igniting fusion fuel in the laboratory remains an alluring goal for two reasons: the desire to study matter under the extreme conditions needed for fusion burn, and the potential of harnessing the energy released as an attractive energy source for mankind. The inertial confinement approach to fusion involves rapidly compressing a tiny spherical capsule of fuel, initially a few millimeters in radius, to densities and temperatures higher than those in the core of the sun. The ignited plasma is confined solely by its own inertia long enough for a significant fraction of the fuel to burn before the plasma expands, cools down and the fusion reactions are quenched. The potential of this confinement approach as an attractive energy source is being studied in the Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) program, which is the subject of this report. A complex set of interrelated requirements for IFE has motivated the study of novel potential solutions. Three types of “drivers” for fuel compression are presently studied: high-averagepower lasers (HAPL), heavy-ion (HI) accelerators, and Z-Pinches. The three main approaches to IFE are based on these drivers, along with the specific type of target (which contains the fuel capsule) and chamber that appear most promising for a particular driver.

  10. Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, C; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Edwards, O; Lagin, L; Van Arsdall, P

    2011-03-18

    A Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) facility point design is being developed at LLNL to support an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) based energy concept. This will build upon the technical foundation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system. NIF is designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. The LIFE control systems will have an architecture partitioned by sub-systems and distributed among over 1000's of front-end processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. LIFE's automated control subsystems will require interoperation between different languages and target architectures. Much of the control system will be embedded into the subsystem with well defined interface and performance requirements to the supervisory control layer. An automation framework will be used to orchestrate and automate start-up and shut-down as well as steady state operation. The LIFE control system will be a high parallel segmented architecture. For example, the laser system consists of 384 identical laser beamlines in a 'box'. The control system will mirror this architectural replication for each beamline with straightforward high-level interface for control and status monitoring. Key technical challenges will be discussed such as the injected target tracking and laser pointing feedback. This talk discusses the the plan for controls and information systems to support LIFE.

  11. ION BEAM HEATED TARGET SIMULATIONS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER PHYSICS AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    PHYSICS AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY J. J. Barnard 1 , J.dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-targetas drivers for inertial fusion energy (IFE), for their high

  12. U.S. Heavy Ion Beam Science towards inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    Science towards Inertial Fusion Energy B.G. Logan 1), D.Ion Fusion in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program [25].activities for inertial fusion energy at Lawrence Livermore

  13. A Review of the U.S. Department of Energy's Inertial Fusion Energy Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    FESAC's response to that charge. KEY WORDS: Fusion energy; inertial confinement fusion. EXECUTIVE the energy released as an attractive energy source for mankind. The inertial confinement approach to fusionA Review of the U.S. Department of Energy's Inertial Fusion Energy Program Rulon Linford,1

  14. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01

    from present practice. Inertial Confinement Fusion While forReactors for Inertial Confinement Fusion, K.A. Brueckner (

  15. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-01-01

    A. Moses, “Inertial fusion energy target output and chamberA. J. Schmitt, et al. , “Fusion energy research with lasers,o?s for inertial fusion energy power plants,” presented at

  16. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    1.1.3.2 Fusion Energy . . . . . . . . . 1.1.3.3 Fission-aspects of magnetic fusion energy, September 1989. 1.1.3.2 [based on laser inertial fusion energy (LIFE). Fusion Science

  17. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    1.1.3.2 Fusion Energy . . . . . . . . . 1.1.3.3 Fission-Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy 2.1 Potentialaspects of magnetic fusion energy, September 1989. 1.1.3.2 [

  18. Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

    2010-11-30

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  19. Self-pinched beam transport experiments Relevant to Heavy Ion Driven inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998-01-01

    Heavy Ion Driven Inertial Fusion Energy January 30, 1998 W.C. L . Olson, J. Fusion Energy 1, 309 (1982). "Filamentationof Energy Research [Office of Fusion Energy Science], U . S.

  20. Self-pinched beam transport experiments Relevant to Heavy Ion Driven inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998-01-01

    C. L . Olson, J. Fusion Energy 1, 309 (1982). "FilamentationHeavy Ion Driven Inertial Fusion Energy January 30, 1998 W.of Energy Research [Office of Fusion Energy Science], U . S.

  1. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    fusion plasma confinement are known: gravita- tional, magnetic andConfinement Fusion IFE Inertial Fusion Energy IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change MCNP Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code MFE Magnetic

  2. ORIGINAL PAPER The Rationale for an Expanded Inertial Fusion Energy Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and technological achievements of the inertial confinement fusion program over the past several decades are immenseORIGINAL PAPER The Rationale for an Expanded Inertial Fusion Energy Program Stephen O. Dean for an expanded effort on the development of inertial fusion as an energy source is dis- cussed. It is argued

  3. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-01-01

    A. Moses, “Inertial fusion energy target output and chamberA. J. Schmitt, et al. , “Fusion energy research with lasers,and focusing,” J. Fusion Energy 1, 309 (1982). [35] D. R.

  4. ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faltens, A.

    2010-01-01

    AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION Andris Faltens,ENERGY PRODUCTION VIA INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSIONFor inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to lead to net energy

  5. Gas Transport and Control in Thick-Liquid Inertial Fusion Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debonnel, Christophe Sylvain

    2006-01-01

    Fusion Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fusion Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of Energy’s inertial fusion energy program. Journal of

  6. Simulations for experimental study of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy applications on NDCX-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    MATTER AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY APPLICATIONS ON NDCX-II Byof Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S.matter and inertial fusion energy applications on NDCX-II J.

  7. Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 15, Nos. 3/4, 1996 Report of the FESAC Inertial Fusion Energy Review Panel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 15, Nos. 3/4, 1996 Report of the FESAC Inertial Fusion Energy Review Marshall Rosenbluth, H,~3 William Tang, 12 and Ernest Valeo 12 Dr. Robert W. Conn, Chair Fusion Energy on a specific recommendation made by your Committee in its report, "A Restructured Fusion Energy Sciences Pro

  8. Tutorial on the Physics of Inertial Confinement Fusion for energy applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tutorial on the Physics of Inertial Confinement Fusion for energy applications R. Betti University of Rochester and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 3rd Meeting of the NAS panel on Inertial Fusion Energy · The implications of ignition to fusion ENERGY production Does the NIF address all the plasma-target PHYSICS issues

  9. Studies of fast electron transport in the problems of inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frolov, Boris K.

    2006-01-01

    approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) [1-3] is Fastrelated to the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) [2]. Toscheme of the Inertial Confinement Fusion [5] to medicine [

  10. Prospects for inertial fusion as an energy source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, W.J.

    1989-06-26

    Progress in the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program has been very rapid in the last few years. Target physics experiments with laboratory lasers and in underground nuclear tests have shown that the drive conditions necessary to achieve high gain can be achieved in the laboratory with a pulse-shaped driver of about 10 MJ. Requirements and designs for a Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) have been formulated. Research on driver technology necessary for an ICF reactor is making progress. Prospects for ICF as an energy source are very promising. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  11. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01

    Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

  12. Target Physics Scaling for Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratories (United States)

    2005-05-15

    The Z-pinch fusion energy power plant concept is based upon an X-ray driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule having a hypothetical yield of 3 GJ with an overall target gain in the range of 50-100. In the present paper, a combination of analytic arguments, results of radiation-hydrodynamic computational simulations, and empirical scalings from Z-pinch hohlraum experiments are used to demonstrate that the absorption of approximately 6 MJ of X-ray energy by the capsule and 26 MJ by the hohlraum walls of an ICF target ({approx} 32 MJ total X-ray input) will be adequate to provide a 3 GJ yield. As a result, it appears that the Ref. 1 assumption of a 3 GJ thermonuclear yield with an overall target gain approaching 100 is conceptually feasible.

  13. Rugged Packaging for Damage Resistant Inertial Fusion Energy Optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stelmack, Larry

    2003-11-17

    The development of practical fusion energy plants based on inertial confinement with ultraviolet laser beams requires durable, stable final optics that will withstand the harsh fusion environment. Aluminum-coated reflective surfaces are fragile, and require hard overcoatings resistant to contamination, with low optical losses at 248.4 nanometers for use with high-power KrF excimer lasers. This program addresses the definition of requirements for IFE optics protective coatings, the conceptual design of the required deposition equipment according to accepted contamination control principles, and the deposition and evaluation of diamondlike carbon (DLC) test coatings. DLC coatings deposited by Plasma Immersion Ion Processing were adherent and abrasion-resistant, but their UV optical losses must be further reduced to allow their use as protective coatings for IFE final optics. Deposition equipment for coating high-performance IFE final optics must be designed, constructed, and operated with contamination control as a high priority.

  14. Progress on Z-pinch inertial fusion energy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Craig Lee

    2004-09-01

    The goal of z-pinch inertial fusion energy (IFE) is to extend the single-shot z-pinch inertial confinement fusion (ICF) results on Z to a repetitive-shot z-pinch power plant concept for the economical production of electricity. Z produces up to 1.8 MJ of x-rays at powers as high as 230 TW. Recent target experiments on Z have demonstrated capsule implosion convergence ratios of 14-21 with a double-pinch driven target, and DD neutron yields up to 8x10exp10 with a dynamic hohlraum target. For z-pinch IFE, a power plant concept is discussed that uses high-yield IFE targets (3 GJ) with a low rep-rate per chamber (0.1 Hz). The concept includes a repetitive driver at 0.1 Hz, a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the driver to the target, high-yield targets, and a thick-liquid wall chamber. Recent funding by a U.S. Congressional initiative for $4M for FY04 is supporting research on RTLs, repetitive pulsed power drivers, shock mitigation, full RTL cycle planned experiments, high-yield IFE targets, and z-pinch power plant technologies. Recent results of research in all of these areas are discussed, and a Road Map for Z-Pinch IFE is presented.

  15. Progress in Z-pinch inertial fusion energy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weed, John Woodruff

    2010-03-01

    The goal of z-pinch inertial fusion energy (IFE) is to extend the single-shot z-pinch inertial confinement fusion (ICF) results on Z to a repetitive-shot z-pinch power plant concept for the economical production of electricity. Z produces up to 1.8 MJ of x-rays at powers as high as 230 TW. Recent target experiments on Z have demonstrated capsule implosion convergence ratios of 14-21 with a double-pinch driven target, and DD neutron yields up to 8x10exp10 with a dynamic hohlraum target. For z-pinch IFE, a power plant concept is discussed that uses high-yield IFE targets (3 GJ) with a low rep-rate per chamber (0.1 Hz). The concept includes a repetitive driver at 0.1 Hz, a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the driver to the target, high-yield targets, and a thick-liquid wall chamber. Recent funding by a U.S. Congressional initiative for $4M for FY04 is supporting research on RTLs, repetitive pulsed power drivers, shock mitigation, full RTL cycle planned experiments, high-yield IFE targets, and z-pinch power plant technologies. Recent results of research in all of these areas are discussed, and a Road Map for Z-Pinch IFE is presented.

  16. Rep-Rated Target Injection for Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, D.T.; Goodin, D.T.; Stemke, R.W.; Petzoldt, R.W.; Drake, T.J.; Egli, W.; Vermillion, B.A.; Klasen, R.; Cleary, M.M

    2005-05-15

    Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) with laser drivers is a pulsed power generation system that relies on repetitive, high-speed injection of targets into a fusion reactor. To produce an economically viable IFE power plant the targets must be injected into the reactor at a rate between 5 and 10 Hz.To survive the injection process, direct drive (laser fusion) targets (spherical capsules) are placed into protective sabots. The sabots separate from the target and are stripped off before entering the reactor chamber. Indirect drive (heavy ion fusion) utilizes a hohlraum surrounding the spherical capsule and enters the chamber as one piece.In our target injection demonstration system, the sabots or hohlraums are injected into a vacuum system with a light gas gun using helium as a propellant. To achieve pulsed operation a rep-rated injection system has been developed. For a viable power plant we must be able to fire continuously at 6 Hz. This demonstration system is currently set up to allow bursts of up to 12 targets at 6 Hz. Using the current system, tests have been successfully run with direct drive targets to show sabot separation under vacuum and at barrel exit velocities of {approx}400 m/s.The existing revolver system along with operational data will be presented.

  17. Optimizing High-Z Coatings for Inertial Fusion Energy Shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Elizabeth H.; Nikroo, Abbas; Goodin, Daniel T.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.

    2003-05-15

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactors require shells with a high-Z coating that is both permeable, for timely filling with deuterium-tritium, and reflective, for survival in the chamber. Previously, gold was deposited on shells while they were agitated to obtain uniform, reproducible coatings. However, these coatings were rather impermeable, resulting in unacceptably long fill times. We report here on an initial study on Pd coatings on shells in the same manner. We have found that these palladium-coated shells are substantially more permeable than gold. Pd coatings on shells remained stable on exposure to deuterium. Pd coatings had lower reflectivity compared to gold that leads to a lower working temperature, and efficiency, of the proposed fusion reactor. Seeking to combine the permeability of Pd coatings and high reflectivity of gold, AuPd-alloy coatings were produced using a cosputtering technique. These alloys demonstrated higher permeability than Au and higher reflectivity than Pd. However, these coatings were still less reflective than the gold coatings. To improve the permeability of gold's coatings, permeation experiments were performed at higher temperatures. With the parameters of composition, thickness, and temperature, we have the ability to comply with a large target design window.

  18. Development and validation of compressible mixture viscous fluid algorithm applied to predict the evolution of inertial fusion energy chamber gas and the impact of gas on direct-drive target survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Robert Scott

    2011-01-01

    and technologies for fusion energy with lasers and direct-direct drive inertial fusion energy targets. Report 06-02,Improved Inertial Fusion Energy Chamber Inter-Shot

  19. National Academies Committee on the Prospects for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. usage, it makes the DoD the single largest energy user in the country." Energy Sources · Laser FusionNational Academies Committee on the Prospects for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems Tour.S. Naval Research Laboratory Research supported by the Department of Energy, NNSA Presented by Steve

  20. Inertial Confinement Fusion, High Energy Density Plasmas and an Energy Source on Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inertial Confinement Fusion, High Energy Density Plasmas and an Energy Source on Earth Max Tabak ignition robust burn Supernova core MFE ICF ignition requires large energy and power densities Log10 Achieving the necessary multiplication of power,energy and mass densities requires a well controlled

  1. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01

    along the road to useful energy is "scientific-breakeven"then the promise of useful energy from inertial fusionstill farther from useful net energy production). Scientific

  2. Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments & Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments & Modeling Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Thin Does Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Work? A spherical capsule filled with fuel (deuterium Laboratory) #12;Outline I. What is Fusion? II. How does Inertial Fusion work? The physics of indirect

  3. Prediction of inertial confinement fusion chamber gas evolution using multi-species computational fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Robert Scott

    2007-01-01

    to the pro- duction of fusion energy for power generation.injection in an inertial fusion energy chamber, Fusionas Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (Laser IFE), the ability to

  4. Status of inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schriever, R.L. (Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (USA))

    1987-12-01

    Technical, institutional, and financial assessments are made of inertial confinement fusion programs in the United States. Among the programs discussed are the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator at Sandia, the AURORA facility at Los Alamos, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the OMEGA glass laser system and facility, and the fusion research program at the University of Rochester. Target, diagnostic, heating, and other areas of research are discussed. Prospects for the future of fusion research within the context of the current energy scenario in the country are evaluated.

  5. Semiconductor Laser Diode Pumps for Inertial Fusion Energy Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deri, R J

    2011-01-03

    Solid-state lasers have been demonstrated as attractive drivers for inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and at the Omega Facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in Rochester, NY. For power plant applications, these lasers must be pumped by semiconductor diode lasers to achieve the required laser system efficiency, repetition rate, and lifetime. Inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants will require approximately 40-to-80 GW of peak pump power, and must operate efficiently and with high system availability for decades. These considerations lead to requirements on the efficiency, price, and production capacity of the semiconductor pump sources. This document provides a brief summary of these requirements, and how they can be met by a natural evolution of the current semiconductor laser industry. The detailed technical requirements described in this document flow down from a laser ampl9ifier design described elsewhere. In brief, laser amplifiers comprising multiple Nd:glass gain slabs are face-pumped by two planar diode arrays, each delivering 30 to 40 MW of peak power at 872 nm during a {approx} 200 {micro}s quasi-CW (QCW) pulse with a repetition rate in the range of 10 to 20 Hz. The baseline design of the diode array employs a 2D mosaic of submodules to facilitate manufacturing. As a baseline, they envision that each submodule is an array of vertically stacked, 1 cm wide, edge-emitting diode bars, an industry standard form factor. These stacks are mounted on a common backplane providing cooling and current drive. Stacks are conductively cooled to the backplane, to minimize both diode package cost and the number of fluid interconnects for improved reliability. While the baseline assessment in this document is based on edge-emitting devices, the amplifier design does not preclude future use of surface emitting diodes, which may offer appreciable future cost reductions and increased reliability. The high-level requirements on the semiconductor lasers involve reliability, price points on a price-per-Watt basis, and a set of technical requirements. The technical requirements for the amplifier design in reference 1 are discussed in detail and are summarized in Table 1. These values are still subject to changes as the overall laser system continues to be optimized. Since pump costs can be a significant fraction of the overall laser system cost, it is important to achieve sufficiently low price points for these components. At this time, the price target for tenth-of-akind IFE plant is $0.007/Watt for packaged devices. At this target level, the pumps account for approximately one third of the laser cost. The pump lasers should last for the life of the power plant, leading to a target component lifetime requirement of roughly 14 Ghosts, corresponding to a 30 year plant life and 15 Hz repetition rate. An attractive path forward involes pump operation at high output power levels, on a Watts-per-bar (Watts/chip) basis. This reduces the cost of pump power (price-per-Watt), since to first order the unit price does not increase with power/bar. The industry has seen a continual improvement in power output, with current 1 cm-wide bars emitting up to 500 W QCW (quasi-continuous wave). Increased power/bar also facilitates achieving high irradiance in the array plane. On the other hand, increased power implies greater heat loads and (possibly) higher current drive, which will require increased attention to thermal management and parasitic series resistance. Diode chips containing multiple p-n junctions and quantum wells (also called nanostack structures) may provide an additional approach to reduce the peak current.

  6. The US inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition programme and the inertial fusion energy (IFE) programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindl, J.D.; Hammel, B.A.; Logan, B. Grant; Meyerhofer, David D.; Payne, S.A.; Sethisn, John D.

    2003-11-13

    This paper describes international experience with the use of Voluntary Agreements for increasing industrial sector energy-efficiency, drawing lessons learned regarding the essential elements of the more successful programs. The paper focuses on a pilot project for implementation of a Voluntary Agreement with two steel mills in Shandong Province that was developed through international collaboration with experts in China, the Netherlands, and the U.S. Designing the pilot project involved development of approaches for energy-efficiency potential assessments for the steel mills, target-setting to establish the Voluntary Agreement energy-efficiency goals, preparing energy-efficiency plans for implementation of energy-saving technologies and measures, and monitoring and evaluating the project's energy savings.

  7. Integrated Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latkowski, J F; Kramer, K J; Abbott, R P; Morris, K R; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G; Reyes, S; Moses, G A; Fratoni, M; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Rhodes, M; Kane, J; Scott, H; Kramer, R; Pantano, C; Scullard, C; Sawicki, R; Wilks, S; Mehl, M

    2010-12-07

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. The present work details the chamber design for the pure fusion option. The fusion chamber consists of the first wall and blanket. This integrated system must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated LIFE design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  8. The National Ignition Facility - Applications for Inertial Fusion Energy and High Energy Density Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.

    1999-08-12

    Over the past several decades, significant and steady progress has been made in the development of fusion energy and its associated technology and in the understanding of the physics of high-temperature plasmas. While the demonstration of net fusion energy (fusion energy production exceeding that required to heat and confine the plasma) remains a task for the next millennia and while challenges remain, this progress has significantly increased confidence that the ultimate goal of societally acceptable (e.g. cost, safety, environmental considerations including waste disposal) central power production can be achieved. This progress has been shared by the two principal approaches to controlled thermonuclear fusion--magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF). ICF, the focus of this article, is complementary and symbiotic to MFE. As shown, ICF invokes spherical implosion of the fuel to achieve high density, pressures, and temperatures, inertially confining the plasma for times sufficient long (t {approx} 10{sup -10} sec) that {approx} 30% of the fuel undergoes thermonuclear fusion.

  9. Neutronics Assessment of Blanket Options for the HAPL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Neutronics Assessment of Blanket Options for the HAPL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Chamber M-cooled lithium blanket, a helium-cooled solid breeder blanket, and a dual-coolant lithium lead blanket; nuclear heating I. INTRODUCTION The High Average Power Laser (HAPL) program led by the Naval Research

  10. Research and Development Assessments for Prometheus Heavy Ion and Laser Driven Inertial Fusion Energy Reactor Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    station electric power plants have been conceptually designed and analyzed in the Prometheus[1] study led by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. These plants use inertial fusion energy (IFE) technologies by employing with a list of important R&D tasks that need to be conducted, and (3) identify areas of R&D that are common

  11. Addressing the issues of target fabrication and injection for inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    survive injection into the target chamber without damage. An example of a recent direct drive IFE targetAddressing the issues of target fabrication and injection for inertial fusion energy D.T. Goodin a, CA 92024, USA Abstract Addressing the issues associated with target fabrication and injection

  12. Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Energy: Summaries of Program Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Kaganovich, I; Seidl, P A; Briggs, R J; Faltens, A; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Logan, B G

    2011-02-28

    The goal of the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is to apply high-current accelerator technology to IFE power production. Ion beams of mass {approx}100 amu and kinetic energy {>=} 1 GeV provide efficient energy coupling into matter, and HIF enjoys R&D-supported favorable attributes of: (1) the driver, projected to be robust and efficient; see 'Heavy Ion Accelerator Drivers.'; (2) the targets, which span a continuum from full direct to full indirect drive (and perhaps fast ignition), and have metal exteriors that enable injection at {approx}10 Hz; see 'IFE Target Designs'; (3) the near-classical ion energy deposition in the targets; see 'Beam-Plasma Interactions'; (4) the magnetic final lens, robust against damage; see 'Final Optics-Heavy Ion Beams'; and (5) the fusion chamber, which may use neutronically-thick liquids; see 'Liquid-Wall Chambers.' Most studies of HIF power plants have assumed indirect drive and thick liquid wall protection, but other options are possible.

  13. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Accelerators for Inertial Confinement Fusion,” Proc. IAEAbriefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the

  14. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S.of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S.option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper

  15. Z-inertial fusion energy: power plant final report FY 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Mark (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kulcinski, Gerald (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Zhao, Haihua (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Olson, Craig Lee; Sierra, Dannelle P.; Meier, Wayne (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories); McConnell, Paul E.; Ghiaasiaan, M. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Kern, Brian (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Tajima, Yu (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Campen, Chistopher (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Sketchley, Tomas (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Moir, R (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories); Bardet, Philippe M. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Durbin, Samuel; Morrow, Charles W.; Vigil, Virginia L (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Modesto-Beato, Marcos A.; Franklin, James Kenneth (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Smith, James Dean; Ying, Alice (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Cook, Jason T.; Schmitz, Lothar (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Abdel-Khalik, S. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Abdou, Mohamed A. (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Bonazza, Riccardo (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rodriguez, Salvador B.; Sridharan, Kumar (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rochau, Gary Eugene; Gudmundson, Jesse (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Peterson, Per F. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Marriott, Ed (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Oakley, Jason (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI)

    2006-10-01

    This report summarizes the work conducted for the Z-inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) late start Laboratory Directed Research Project. A major area of focus was on creating a roadmap to a z-pinch driven fusion power plant. The roadmap ties ZIFE into the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative through the use of high energy fusion neutrons to burn the actinides of spent fuel waste. Transmutation presents a near term use for Z-IFE technology and will aid in paving the path to fusion energy. The work this year continued to develop the science and engineering needed to support the Z-IFE roadmap. This included plant system and driver cost estimates, recyclable transmission line studies, flibe characterization, reaction chamber design, and shock mitigation techniques.

  16. Copyright National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Interim Report-Status of the Study "An Assessment of the Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Interim Report-Status of the Study "An Assessment of the Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy" Interim Report--Status of the Study "An Assessment of the Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy" Committee on the Prospects for Inertial Confinement

  17. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    of Con- trolled Nuclear Fusion, CONF-760975-P3, pages 1061–more effective solution, nuclear fusion. Fission Energy Thethe development of nuclear fusion weapons, humankind has

  18. Fusion Energy Program Presentation to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physics GPPJPrograrn Direction TotalMFE Inertial Fusion Energy Less ProductivitySavings TotalFusion Energy

  19. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System by Kevinof a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System by Kevinof a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System by Kevin

  20. Timely Delivery of Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Presentation prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    must directly address the end-user requirement for commercial power 3 Plant Primary Criteria (partialAmerican Energy Company · Wisconsin Energy · Nuclear Management Company · Constellation Energy · Dominion plant design · Delivery soon enough to make a difference to global energy imperatives. · Design based

  1. TIMELY DELIVERY OF LASER INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY (LIFE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunne, A M

    2010-11-30

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A key goal of the NIF is to demonstrate fusion ignition for the first time in the laboratory. Its flexibility allows multiple target designs (both indirect and direct drive) to be fielded, offering substantial scope for optimization of a robust target design. In this paper we discuss an approach to generating gigawatt levels of electrical power from a laser-driven source of fusion neutrons based on these demonstration experiments. This 'LIFE' concept enables rapid time-to-market for a commercial power plant, assuming success with ignition and a technology demonstration program that links directly to a facility design and construction project. The LIFE design makes use of recent advances in diode-pumped, solid-state laser technology. It adopts the paradigm of Line Replaceable Units utilized on the NIF to provide high levels of availability and maintainability and mitigate the need for advanced materials development. A demonstration LIFE plant based on these design principles is described, along with the areas of technology development required prior to plant construction. A goal-oriented, evidence-based approach has been proposed to allow LIFE power plant rollout on a time scale that meets policy imperatives and is consistent with utility planning horizons. The system-level delivery builds from our prior national investment over many decades and makes full use of the distributed capability in laser technology, the ubiquity of semiconductor diodes, high volume manufacturing markets, and U.S. capability in fusion science and nuclear engineering. The LIFE approach is based on the ignition evidence emerging from NIF and adopts a line-replaceable unit approach to ensure high plant availability and to allow evolution from available technologies and materials. Utilization of a proven physics platform for the ignition scheme is an essential component of an acceptably low-risk solution. The degree of coupling seen on NIF between driver and target performance mandates that little deviation be adopted from the NIF geometry and beamline characteristics. Similarly, the strong coupling between subsystems in an operational power plant mandates that a self-consistent solution be established via an integrated facility delivery project. The benefits of separability of the subsystems within an IFE plant (driver, chamber, targets, etc.) emerge in the operational phase of a power plant rather than in its developmental phase. An optimized roadmap for IFE delivery needs to account for this to avoid nugatory effort and inconsistent solutions. For LIFE, a system design has been established that could lead to an operating power plant by the mid-2020s, drawing from an integrated subsystem development program to demonstrate the required technology readiness on a time scale compatible with the construction plan. Much technical development work still remains, as does alignment of key stakeholder groups to this newly emerging development option. If the required timeline is to be met, then preparation of a viable program is required alongside the demonstration of ignition on NIF. This will enable timely analysis of the technical and economic case and establishment of the appropriate delivery partnership.

  2. Magneto-inertial Fusion: An Emerging Concept for Inertial Fusion and Dense Plasmas in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thio, Francis Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the U.S. program in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is given in terms of its technical rationale, scientific goals, vision, research plans, needs, and the research facilities currently available in support of the program. Magneto-inertial fusion is an emerging concept for inertial fusion and a pathway to the study of dense plasmas in ultrahigh magnetic fields (magnetic fields in excess of 500 T). The presence of magnetic field in an inertial fusion target suppresses cross-field thermal transport and potentially could enable more attractive inertial fusion energy systems. A vigorous program in magnetized high energy density laboratory plasmas (HED-LP) addressing the scientific basis of magneto-inertial fusion has been initiated by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy involving a number of universities, government laboratories and private institutions.

  3. Inertial fusion energy: A clearer view of the environmental and safety perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latkowski, J.F.

    1996-11-01

    If fusion energy is to achieve its full potential for safety and environmental (S&E) advantages, the S&E characteristics of fusion power plant designs must be quantified and understood, and the resulting insights must be embodied in the ongoing process of development of fusion energy. As part of this task, the present work compares S&E characteristics of five inertial and two magnetic fusion power plant designs. For each design, a set of radiological hazard indices has been calculated with a system of computer codes and data libraries assembled for this purpose. These indices quantify the radiological hazards associated with the operation of fusion power plants with respect to three classes of hazard: accidents, occupational exposure, and waste disposal. The three classes of hazard have been qualitatively integrated to rank the best and worst fusion power plant designs with respect to S&E characteristics. From these rankings, the specific designs, and other S&E trends, design features that result in S&E advantages have been identified. Additionally, key areas for future fusion research have been identified. Specific experiments needed include the investigation of elemental release rates (expanded to include many more materials) and the verification of sequential charged-particle reactions. Improvements to the calculational methodology are recommended to enable future comparative analyses to represent more accurately the radiological hazards presented by fusion power plants. Finally, future work must consider economic effects. Trade-offs among design features will be decided not by S&E characteristics alone, but also by cost-benefit analyses. 118 refs., 35 figs., 35 tabs.

  4. The National Ignition Facility and the Promise of Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E I

    2010-12-13

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational. The NIF is the world's most energetic laser system capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in planetary interiors and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, the first integrated ignition experiment was conducted, demonstrating the successful coordination of the laser, cryogenic target system, array of diagnostics and infrastructure required for ignition demonstration. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and international communities are examining the implication of NIF ignition for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a laser with 10% electrical-optical efficiency, as well as further development and advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in the 10- to 15-year time frame. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Engine (LIFE) concept and examining in detail various technology choices, as well as the advantages of both pure fusion and fusion-fission schemes. This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF and the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition. The paper will conclude with a discussion about the need to build on the progress on NIF to develop an implementable and effective plan to achieve the promise of LIFE as a source of carbon-free energy.

  5. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    4.3.3.4 Chamber Radius and Fusion Neutron Flux . . . . .1.1.3.2 Fusion Energy . . . . . . . . .1.1.3.3 Fission-Fusion Hybrids . . . . 1.2 Scope and Purpose

  6. Homodyne target tracking for direct drive laser inertial fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spalding, Jon David

    2009-01-01

    direct drive inertial confinement fusion experiments, asto be used in >>>Inertial Confinement Fusion, as a means of

  7. The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2011-03-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to researchers around the world. The paper will conclude with a discussion of LIFE, its development path and potential to enable a carbon-free clean energy future.

  8. A Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycle Based on Laser Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Storm, E; Latkowski, J; Farmer, J; Abbott, R; Kramer, K; Peterson, P; Shaw, H; Lehman II, R

    2009-05-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, will soon be completed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in 2010, using laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 35 MJ are expected soon thereafter. They propose that a laser system capable of generating fusion yields of 35 to 75 MJ at 10 to 15 Hz (i.e., {approx} 350- to 1000-MW fusion and {approx} 1.3 to 3.6 x 10{sup 20} n/s), coupled to a compact subdritical fission blanket, could be used to generate several GW of thermal power (GWth) while avoiding carbon dioxide emissions, mitigating nuclear proliferation concerns and minimizing the concerns associated with nuclear safety and long-term nuclear waste disposition. this Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) based system is a logical extension of the NIF laser and the yields expec ted from the early ignition experiments on NIF. The LIFE concept is a once-through,s elf-contained closed fuel cycle and would have the following characteristics: (1) eliminate the need for spent fuel chemical separation facilities; (4) maintain the fission blanket subcritical at all times (k{sub eff} < 0.90); and (5) minimize future requirements for deep underground geological waste repositories and minimize actinide content in the end-of-life nuclear waste below the Department of Energy's (DOE's) attractiveness Level E (the lowest). Options to burn natural or depleted U, Th, U/Th mixtures, Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) without chemical separations of weapons-attractive actinide streams, and excess weapons Pu or highly enriched U (HEU) are possible and under consideration. Because the fission blanket is always subcritical and decay heat removal is possible via passive mechanisms, the technology is inherently safe. Many technical challenges must be met, but a LIFE solution could provide a sustainable path for worldwide growth of nuclear powr for electricity production and hydrogen generation.

  9. Grazing incidence liquid metal mirrors (GILMM) for radiation hardened final optics for laser inertial fusion energy power plants*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    1 Grazing incidence liquid metal mirrors (GILMM) for radiation hardened final optics for laser final optics in a laser inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. The amount of laser light the GILMM substrate, adaptive (deformable) optics, surface tension and low Reynolds number, laminar flow in the film

  10. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-12-01

    In heavy ion inertial fusion energy systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. In this paper, we examine three different modes of beam propagation: neutralized ballistic transport, assisted pinched transport, and self-pinched transport. The status of our understanding of these three modes is summarized, and the constraints imposed by beam propagation upon the chamber environment, as well as their compatibility with various chamber and target concepts, are considered. We conclude that, on the basis of our present understanding, there is a reasonable range of parameter space where beams can propagate in thick-liquid wall, wetted-wall, and dry-wall chambers.

  11. Magneto-Inertial Fusion (Magnetized Target Fusion)( g g )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LA-UR-11-01898 #12;Magneto-inertial fusion: A hybrid approach to fusion....ICF with a twistMagneto-Inertial Fusion (Magnetized Target Fusion)( g g ) or "why should we bother with another ICF boost performance (LLE, Omega) ·Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) demonstration, FRCHX at AFRL

  12. Heat transfer in inertial confinement fusion reactor systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovingh, J.

    1980-04-23

    The short time and deposition distance for the energy from inertial fusion products results in local peak power densities on the order of 10/sup 18/ watts/m/sup 3/. This paper presents an overview of the various inertial fusion reactor designs which attempt to reduce these peak power intensities and describes the heat transfer considerations for each design.

  13. Survey of Laser Markets Relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy Drivers, information for National Research Council

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayramian, A J; Deri, R J; Erlandson, A C

    2011-02-24

    Development of a new technology for commercial application can be significantly accelerated by leveraging related technologies used in other markets. Synergies across multiple application domains attract research and development (R and D) talent - widening the innovation pipeline - and increases the market demand in common components and subsystems to provide performance improvements and cost reductions. For these reasons, driver development plans for inertial fusion energy (IFE) should consider the non-fusion technology base that can be lveraged for application to IFE. At this time, two laser driver technologies are being proposed for IFE: solid-state lasers (SSLs) and KrF gas (excimer) lasers. This document provides a brief survey of organizations actively engaged in these technologies. This is intended to facilitate comparison of the opportunities for leveraging the larger technical community for IFE laser driver development. They have included tables that summarize the commercial organizations selling solid-state and KrF lasers, and a brief summary of organizations actively engaged in R and D on these technologies.

  14. Direct drive heavy-ion-beam inertial fusion at high coupling efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B.G.

    2008-01-01

    J. D. Lindl, Inertial Confinement Fusion: The Quest forusing the LASNEX inertial confinement fusion target physics

  15. Fluid Dynamic Aspects of the Porous Wetted Wall Protection Scheme for Inertial Fusion Energy Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, S.; Abdelall, F.; Juric, D.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Yoda, M.; Sadowski, D. [Georgia Institute of Technology (United States)

    2003-05-15

    A numerical and experimental investigation has been conducted to analyze the fluid dynamic aspects of the porous wetted wall protection scheme for inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor first walls. A level contour reconstruction method has been used to track the three-dimensional evolution of the liquid film surface on porous downward-facing walls with different initial film thickness, liquid injection velocity through the porous wall, surface disturbance amplitude, configuration and mode number, liquid properties, and surface inclination angle. Generalized charts for the computed droplet detachment time, detached droplet equivalent diameter, and minimum film thickness during the transient for various design parameters and coolant properties are presented.In order to validate the numerical results over a wide range of parameters, an experimental test facility has been designed and constructed to simulate the hydrodynamics of downward-facing porous wetted walls. Nondimensionalization of the model shows that water can be adequately used as a simulant to validate the numerical results. Preliminary experimental results show good agreement with model predictions. The results of this investigation should allow designers of conceptual IFE reactors to identify appropriate 'windows' for successful operation of the porous wetted wall protection concept for different coolants.

  16. Development and validation of compressible mixture viscous fluid algorithm applied to predict the evolution of inertial fusion energy chamber gas and the impact of gas on direct-drive target survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Robert Scott

    2011-01-01

    2010 “Prediction of Inertial Confinement Fusion Chamber GasBarodiffusion on the Inertial Confinement Fusion Database. [barodiffusion in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions:

  17. Ion Fast Ignition-Establishing a Scientific Basis for Inertial Fusion Energy --- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Richard Burnite; Foord, Mark N.; Wei, Mingsheng; Beg, Farhat N.; Schumacher, Douglass W.

    2013-10-31

    The Fast Ignition (FI) Concept for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has the potential to provide a significant advance in the technical attractiveness of Inertial Fusion Energy reactors. FI differs from conventional ?central hot spot? (CHS) target ignition by decoupling compression from heating: using a laser (or heavy ion beam or Z pinch) drive pulse (10?s of nanoseconds) to create a dense fuel and a second, much shorter (~10 picoseconds) high intensity pulse to ignite a small volume within the dense fuel. The compressed fuel is opaque to laser light. The ignition laser energy must be converted to a jet of energetic charged particles to deposit energy in the dense fuel. The original concept called for a spray of laser-generated hot electrons to deliver the energy; lack of ability to focus the electrons put great weight on minimizing the electron path. An alternative concept, proton-ignited FI, used those electrons as intermediaries to create a jet of protons that could be focused to the ignition spot from a more convenient distance. Our program focused on the generation and directing of the proton jet, and its transport toward the fuel, none of which were well understood at the onset of our program. We have developed new experimental platforms, diagnostic packages, computer modeling analyses, and taken advantage of the increasing energy available at laser facilities to create a self-consistent understanding of the fundamental physics underlying these issues. Our strategy was to examine the new physics emerging as we added the complexity necessary to use proton beams in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) application. From the starting point of a proton beam accelerated from a flat, isolated foil, we 1) curved it to focus the beam, 2) attached the foil to a superstructure, 3) added a side sheath to protect it from the surrounding plasma, and finally 4) studied the proton beam behavior as it passed through a protective end cap into plasma. We built up, as we proceeded, a self-consistent picture of the quasi-neutral plasma jet that is the proton beam that, for the first time, included the role of the hot electrons in shaping the jet. Controlling them?through design of the accelerating surface and its connection to the surrounding superstructure?is critical; their uniform spread across the proton accelerating area is vital, but their presence in the jet opposes focus; their electron flow away from the acceleration area reduces conversion efficiency but can also increase focusing ability. The understanding emerging from our work and the improved simulation tools we have developed allow designing structures that optimize proton beams for focused heating. Our findings include: ? The achievable focus of proton beams is limited by the thermal pressure gradient in the laser-generated hot electrons that drive the process. This bending can be suppressed using a controlled flow of hot electrons along the surrounding cone wall, which induces a local transverse focusing sheath electric field. The resultant (vacuum-focused) spot can meet IFE requirements. ? Confinement of laser-generated electrons to the proton accelerating area can be achieved by supporting targets on thin struts. That increases laser-to-proton conversion energy by ~50%. As noted above, confinement should not be total; necessary hot-electron leakage into the surrounding superstructure for proton focusing can be controlled by with the strut width/number. ? Proton jets are further modified as they enter the fuel through the superstructure?s end cap. They can generate currents during that transit that further focus the proton beams. We developed a new ion stopping module for LSP code that properly accounted for changes in stopping power with ionization (e.g. temperature), and will be using it in future studies. The improved understanding, new experimental platforms, and the self-consistent modeling capability allow researchers a new ability to investigate the interaction of large ion currents with warm dense matter. That is of direct importance to the creation and investiga

  18. Possible energy gain for a plasma-liner-driven magneto-inertial fusion concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, C. E.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.

    2014-07-15

    A one-dimensional parameter study of a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) concept indicates that significant gain may be achievable. This concept uses a dynamically formed plasma shell with inwardly directed momentum to drive a magnetized fuel to ignition, which in turn partially burns an intermediate layer of unmagnetized fuel. The concept is referred to as Plasma Jet MIF or PJMIF. The results of an adaptive mesh refinement Eulerian code (Crestone) are compared to those of a Lagrangian code (LASNEX). These are the first published results using the Crestone and LASNEX codes on the PJMIF concept.

  19. Stability of shocks relating to the shock ignition inertial fusion energy scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davie, C. J. Bush, I. A.; Evans, R. G.

    2014-08-15

    Motivated by the shock ignition approach to improve the performance of inertial fusion targets, we make a series of studies of the stability of shock waves in planar and converging geometries. We examine stability of shocks moving through distorted material and driving shocks with non-uniform pressure profiles. We then apply a fully 3D perturbation, following this spherically converging shock through collapse to a distorted plane, bounce and reflection into an outgoing perturbed, broadly spherical shock wave. We find broad shock stability even under quite extreme perturbation.

  20. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  1. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

    1987-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reactions accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  2. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), now being constructed in Caderache, France [5]. In contrast, inertial fusion

  3. Developing a commercial production process for 500,000 targets per day: A key challenge for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodin, D.T.; Alexander, N.B.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Bozek, A.S.; Brown, L.C.; Flint, G.W.; Kilkenny, J.D.; McQuillan, B.W.; Nikroo, A.; Paguio, R.R.; Petzoldt, R.W.; Schroen, D.G.; Sheliak, J.D.; Vermillion, B.A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Carlson, L.C.; Goodman, P.; Maksaereekul, W.; Raffray, R.; Spalding, J.; Tillack, M.S. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92023 (United States)] (and others)

    2006-05-15

    As is true for current-day commercial power plants, a reliable and economic fuel supply is essential for the viability of future Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) [Energy From Inertial Fusion, edited by W. J. Hogan (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1995)] power plants. While IFE power plants will utilize deuterium-tritium (DT) bred in-house as the fusion fuel, the 'target' is the vehicle by which the fuel is delivered to the reaction chamber. Thus the cost of the target becomes a critical issue in regard to fuel cost. Typically six targets per second, or about 500 000/day are required for a nominal 1000 MW(e) power plant. The electricity value within a typical target is about $3, allocating 10% for fuel cost gives only 30 cents per target as-delivered to the chamber center. Complicating this economic goal, the target supply has many significant technical challenge - fabricating the precision fuel-containing capsule, filling it with DT, cooling it to cryogenic temperatures, layering the DT into a uniform layer, characterizing the finished product, accelerating it to high velocity for injection into the chamber, and tracking the target to steer the driver beams to meet it with micron-precision at the chamber center.

  4. Recent U.S. advances in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    physics and heavy ion fusion energy drivers, including bothoptions towards inertial fusion energy. Acknowledgements:fusion drivers for inertial fusion energy. 1. Introduction A

  5. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    HIFAN 1830 INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMSAC02-05CH11231. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION467 (1992). [38] R. W. Moir, Fusion Tech. 25, 5 (1994) [39

  6. US Heavy Ion Beam Research for Energy Density Physics Applications and Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    heavy ion inertial fusion energy. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Thisheavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralizedto drift axially). For fusion energy applications, either

  7. Neutronics Design of a Thorium-Fueled Fission Blanket for LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, J; Abbott, R; Fratoni, M; Kramer, K; Latkowski, J; Seifried, J; Taylor, J

    2010-03-08

    The Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE) project at LLNL includes development of hybrid fusion-fission systems for energy generation. These hybrid LIFE engines use high-energy neutrons from laser-based inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical blanket of fission fuel that surrounds the fusion chamber. The fission blanket contains TRISO fuel particles packed into pebbles in a flowing bed geometry cooled by a molten salt (flibe). LIFE engines using a thorium fuel cycle provide potential improvements in overall fuel cycle performance and resource utilization compared to using depleted uranium (DU) and may minimize waste repository and proliferation concerns. A preliminary engine design with an initial loading of 40 metric tons of thorium can maintain a power level of 2000 MW{sub th} for about 55 years, at which point the fuel reaches an average burnup level of about 75% FIMA. Acceptable performance was achieved without using any zero-flux environment 'cooling periods' to allow {sup 233}Pa to decay to {sup 233}U; thorium undergoes constant irradiation in this LIFE engine design to minimize proliferation risks and fuel inventory. Vast reductions in end-of-life (EOL) transuranic (TRU) inventories compared to those produced by a similar uranium system suggest reduced proliferation risks. Decay heat generation in discharge fuel appears lower for a thorium LIFE engine than a DU engine but differences in radioactive ingestion hazard are less conclusive. Future efforts on development of thorium-fueled LIFE fission blankets engine development will include design optimization, fuel performance analysis work, and further waste disposal and nonproliferation analyses.

  8. Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

    2008-10-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

  9. Energy deposition of MeV electrons in compressed targets of fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.K.; Petrasso, R.D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    Energy deposition of MeV electrons in dense plasmas, important for fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion, is modeled analytically. It is shown that classical stopping and scattering dominate electron transport and energy deposition when the electrons reach the dense plasmas in the cores of compressed targets, while 'anomalous' stopping associated with self-generated fields and micro-instabilities (suggested by previous simulations) might initially play an important role in the lower-density plasmas outside the dense core. For MeV electrons in precompressed deuterium-tritium fast-ignition targets, the initial penetration results in approximately uniform energy deposition but the latter stages of penetration involve mutual couplings of energy loss, straggling, and blooming that lead to enhanced, nonuniform energy deposition. This model can be used for quantitatively assessing ignition requirements for fast ignition.

  10. www.postersession.com Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion for Spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and inertial confinement fusion. Both of these approaches show promise for future sources of energy low in the foreseeable future. Consequently, we are investigating a very low-mass alternative type and useful source of energy for both Earth-based and space-based power systems. This hypothetical

  11. An Assessment of Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Physics A Panel on Fusion Target Physics ("the Panel") will serve as a technical resource to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Assessment of Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Physics A Panel on Fusion Target Physics ("the ON INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION TARGET PHYSICS John Ahearne, Chair Sigma Xi Robert Dynes University Panel") will serve as a technical resource to the Committee on Inertial Confinement Energy Systems ("the

  12. Monochromatic x-ray radiography for areal-density measurement of inertial fusion energy fuel in fast ignition experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tanabe, Minoru; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Ohira, Shinji; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Inubushi, Yuichi

    2010-10-15

    Ultrafast, two-dimensional x-ray imaging is an important diagnostics for the inertial fusion energy research, especially in investigating implosion dynamics at the final stage of the fuel compression. Although x-ray radiography was applied to observing the implosion dynamics, intense x-rays emitted from the high temperature and dense fuel core itself are often superimposed on the radiograph. This problem can be solved by coupling the x-ray radiography with monochromatic x-ray imaging technique. In the experiment, 2.8 or 5.2 keV backlight x-rays emitted from laser-irradiated polyvinyl chloride or vanadium foils were selectively imaged by spherically bent quartz crystals with discriminating the out-of-band emission from the fuel core. This x-ray radiography system achieved 24 {mu}m and 100 ps of spatial and temporal resolutions, respectively.

  13. Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion Summary Report of the Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    ion inertial fusion," Nuclear Fusion, Vol. 33, No. 4 (1993)ion inertial fusion energy,” Nuclear Fusion 45 (2005) S291–

  14. Nuclear diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, T.J.

    1997-11-01

    This abstract contains viewgraphs on nuclear diagnostic techniques for inertial confinement fusion implosions. The viewgraphs contain information on: reactions of interest in ICF; advantages and disadvantages of these methods; the properties nuclear techniques can measure; and some specifics on the detectors used.

  15. Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, P.

    2012-08-29

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the world’s largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

  16. Overview of US heavy-ion fusion progress and plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    linac-driven inertial fusion energy and high energy densitytargets for inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by inductionIBX and future inertial fusion energy drivers, current HIF-

  17. On Stimulated Scattering of Laser Light in Inertial Fusion Energy Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolic, Ljubomir; Skoric, Milos M.; Ishiguro, Seiji; Sato, Tetsuya

    2003-05-15

    Propagation of a laser light through regions of an underdense plasma is an active research topic in laser fusion. In particular, a large effort has been invested in studies of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), which can reflect laser energy and produce energetic particles to preheat a fusion energy target. Experiments, theory, and simulations agree on a complex interplay between various laser-plasma instabilities. By particle-in-cell simulations of an underdense electron plasma, apart from the standard SRS, a strong backscattering was found near the electron plasma frequency at densities beyond the quarter critical. This novel instability, recognized in recent experiments as stimulated laser scattering on a trapped electron-acoustic mode (SEAS), is absent from a classical theory of laser-parametric instabilities. A parametric excitation of SEAS instability is explained by a three-wave resonant decay of the incident laser light into a standing backscattered wave and a slow trapped electron-acoustic wave ({omega} <{omega}{sub p}). Large SEAS pulsations, eventually suppressed by relativistic heating of electrons, are observed in these simulations. This phenomenon seems relevant to future hohlraum target and fast ignition experiments.

  18. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    and Hydroelectric 1.1.3 Nuclear Energy . . . . . . . . .Gain GNEP Global Nuclear Energy Partnership HEU HighlyIn Progress in Nuclear Energy, 17. Pergamon Press, 1986.

  19. Review of Heavy-Ion Inertial Fusion Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata1, S; Ogoyski, A I

    2015-01-01

    In this review paper on heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), the state-of-the-art scientific results are presented and discussed on the HIF physics, including physics of the heavy ion beam (HIB) transport in a fusion reactor, the HIBs-ion illumination on a direct-drive fuel target, the fuel target physics, the uniformity of the HIF target implosion, the smoothing mechanisms of the target implosion non- uniformity and the robust target implosion. The HIB has remarkable preferable features to release the fusion energy in inertial fusion: in particle accelerators HIBs are generated with a high driver efficiency of ~ 30-40%, and the HIB ions deposit their energy inside of materials. Therefore, a requirement for the fusion target energy gain is relatively low, that would be ~50-70 to operate a HIF fusion reactor with the standard energy output of 1GW of electricity. The HIF reactor operation frequency would be ~10~15 Hz or so. Several- MJ HIBs illuminate a fusion fuel target, and the fuel target is imploded to about a...

  20. FPEOS: A First-Principles Equation of State Table of Deuterium for Inertial Confinement Fusion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    FPEOS: A First-Principles Equation of State Table of Deuterium for Inertial Confinement Fusion) Understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through radiation- hydrodynamics. To minimize the drive energy for ignition, the imploding shell of DT- fuel needs to be kept as cold

  1. Inertial Fusion Energy reactor design studies: Prometheus-L, Prometheus-H. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waganer, L.M.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Lee, V.D.

    1992-03-01

    This report contains a review of design studies for inertial confinement reactors. The first of three volumes briefly discusses the following: Introduction; Key objectives, requirements, and assumptions; Systems modeling and trade studies; Prometheus-L reactor plant design overview; Prometheus-H reactor plant design overview; Key technical issues and R&D requirements; Comparison of IFE designs; and study conclusions.

  2. Inertial Fusion Energy reactor design studies: Prometheus-L, Prometheus-H. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waganer, L.M.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Lee, V.D.

    1992-03-01

    This report contains a review of design studies for Inertial Confinement reactor. This second of three volumes discussions is some detail the following: Objectives, requirements, and assumptions; rationale for design option selection; key technical issues and R&D requirements; and conceptual design selection and description.

  3. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  4. FEASIBILITY OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING LASER INERTIAL FUSION AS THE PRIMARY ENERGY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorensek, M

    2006-11-03

    The High Average Power Laser (HAPL) program is developing technology for Laser IFE with the goal of producing electricity from the heat generated by the implosion of deuterium-tritium (DT) targets. Alternatively, the Laser IFE device could be coupled to a hydrogen generation system where the heat would be used as input to a water-splitting process to produce hydrogen and oxygen. The production of hydrogen in addition to electricity would allow fusion energy plants to address a much wider segment of energy needs, including transportation. Water-splitting processes involving direct and hybrid thermochemical cycles and high temperature electrolysis are currently being developed as means to produce hydrogen from high temperature nuclear fission reactors and solar central receivers. This paper explores the feasibility of this concept for integration with a Laser IFE plant, and it looks at potential modifications to make this approach more attractive. Of particular interest are: (1) the determination of the advantages of Laser IFE hydrogen production compared to other hydrogen production concepts, and (2) whether a facility of the size of FTF would be suitable for hydrogen production.

  5. Lasers and Inertial Confinement Fusion in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermonuclear device began the Inertial Confinement Fusion Era I1860 · StanislawUlamandEdward Teller developedLasers and Inertial Confinement Fusion in the United States R. L. McCrory Director and Vice Provost confinement fusion (ICF) has grown as successively larger lasers have been built I1859 · The

  6. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bock, R.; Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D.

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF? (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration? (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues? (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral? (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF? The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  7. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. ); Bangerter, R.O. ); Bock, R. ); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. )

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  8. Inertial Confinement Fusion R&D and Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2011-04-28

    In a few months, or a few years, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory may achieve fusion gain using 192 powerful lasers to generate x-rays that will compress and heat a small target containing isotopes of hydrogen. This event would mark a major milestone after decades of research on inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It might also mark the beginning of an accelerated global effort to harness fusion energy based on this science and technology. Unlike magnetic confinement fusion (ITER, 2011), in which hot fusion fuel is confined continuously by strong magnetic fields, inertial confinement fusion involves repetitive fusion explosions, taking advantage of some aspects of the science learned from the design and testing of hydrogen bombs. The NIF was built primarily because of the information it would provide on weapons physics, helping the United States to steward its stockpile of nuclear weapons without further underground testing. The U.S. National Academies' National Research Council is now hosting a study to assess the prospects for energy from inertial confinement fusion. While this study has a classified sub-panel on target physics, it has not been charged with examining the potential nuclear proliferation risks associated with ICF R&D. We argue here that this question urgently requires direct and transparent examination, so that means to mitigate risks can be assessed, and the potential residual risks can be balanced against the potential benefits, now being assessed by the NRC. This concern is not new (Holdren, 1978), but its urgency is now higher than ever before.

  9. DEMONSTRATING A TARGET SUPPLY FOR INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY D.T. Goodin,1 N.B. Alexander,1 L.C. Brown,1 D.A. Callahan,2 P. Ebey,3 D.T. Frey,1 R. Gallix,1 D. Geller,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    DEMONSTRATING A TARGET SUPPLY FOR INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY D.T. Goodin,1 N.B. Alexander,1 L.C. Brown-5608 A central feature of an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plant is a target that has been compressed and heated to fusion conditions by the energy input of the driver. The technology to economically manufacture

  10. The Complete Burning of Weapons Grade Plutonium and Highly Enriched Uranium with (Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy) LIFE Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Moses, E

    2008-12-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission blanket in a fusion-fission hybrid system is subcritical, a LIFE engine can burn any fertile or fissile nuclear material, including unenriched natural or depleted U and SNF, and can extract a very high percentage of the energy content of its fuel resulting in greatly enhanced energy generation per metric ton of nuclear fuel, as well as nuclear waste forms with vastly reduced concentrations of long-lived actinides. LIFE engines could thus provide the ability to generate vast amounts of electricity while greatly reducing the actinide content of any existing or future nuclear waste and extending the availability of low cost nuclear fuels for several thousand years. LIFE also provides an attractive pathway for burning excess weapons Pu to over 99% FIMA (fission of initial metal atoms) without the need for fabricating or reprocessing mixed oxide fuels (MOX). Because of all of these advantages, LIFE engines offer a pathway toward sustainable and safe nuclear power that significantly mitigates nuclear proliferation concerns and minimizes nuclear waste. An important aspect of a LIFE engine is the fact that there is no need to extract the fission fuel from the fission blanket before it is burned to the desired final level. Except for fuel inspection and maintenance process times, the nuclear fuel is always within the core of the reactor and no weapons-attractive materials are available outside at any point in time. However, an important consideration when discussing proliferation concerns associated with any nuclear fuel cycle is the ease with which reactor fuel can be converted to weapons usable materials, not just when it is extracted as waste, but at any point in the fuel cycle. Although the nuclear fuel remains in the core of the engine until ultra deep actinide burn up is achieved, soon after start up of the engine, once the system breeds up to full power, several tons of fissile material is present in the fission blanket. However, this fissile material is widely dispersed in millions of fuel pebbles, which can be tagged as individual accountable items, and thus made difficult to diver

  11. Fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15

    Results of studies on fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are reviewed. The aspects of the fast ignition concept, which consists in the separation of the processes of target ignition and compression due to the synchronized action of different energy drivers, are considered. Criteria for the compression ratio and heating rate of a fast ignition target, the energy balance, and the thermonuclear gain are discussed. The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the heating of a compressed target by various types of igniting drivers, namely, beams of fast electrons and light ions produced under the action of a petawatt laser pulse on the target, a heavy-ion beam generated in the accelerator, an X-ray pulse, and a hydrodynamic flow of laser-accelerated matter, are analyzed. Requirements to the igniting-driver parameters that depend on the fast ignition criteria under the conditions of specific target heating mechanisms, as well as possibilities of practical implementation of these requirements, are discussed. The experimental programs of various laboratories and the prospects of practical implementation of fast ignition of ICF targets are reviewed. To date, fast ignition is the most promising method for decreasing the ignition energy and increasing the thermonuclear gain of an ICF plasma. A large number of publications have been devoted to investigations of this method and adjacent problems of the physics of igniting drivers and their interaction with plasma. This review presents results of only some of these studies that, in the author's opinion, allow one to discuss in detail the main physical aspects of the fast ignition concept and understand the current state and prospects of studies in this direction.

  12. ACCELERATION SYSTEMS FOR HEAVY-ION BEAMS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faltens, A.

    2010-01-01

    ION BEAMS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION A. Fa1tens, D. L.ION BEAMS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION A. Faltens, D.L.generation through inertial confinement fusion have been set

  13. Inertial confinement fusion method producing line source radiation fluence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rose, Ronald P. (Peters Township, Washington County, PA)

    1984-01-01

    An inertial confinement fusion method in which target pellets are imploded in sequence by laser light beams or other energy beams at an implosion site which is variable between pellet implosions along a line. The effect of the variability in position of the implosion site along a line is to distribute the radiation fluence in surrounding reactor components as a line source of radiation would do, thereby permitting the utilization of cylindrical geometry in the design of the reactor and internal components.

  14. Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield The Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield (ICF) program supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) physics for the validation of codes and models necessary to maintain a safe, secure, and effective nuclear is essential to having confidence in them. More than 99 percent of the energy from a nuclear weapon Ignition and High Yield (ICF) program supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national security

  15. Summary of progress in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younger, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Progress in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been very rapid over the past two years. Significant advances have been made in the production of smooth laser beams, the focusing of light ions beams, and the development of heavy ion accelerators. The availability of advanced target diagnostics on several major drivers has resulted in an extensive database of target performance over a wide range of conditions. Theoretical models of ICF targets are approaching the predictive level with two and even three dimensional calculations becoming routine. Within the next several years information should be available to allow confident extrapolation to ignition on the next generation driver.

  16. Tertiary proton diagnostics in future inertial confinement fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tertiary proton diagnostics in future inertial confinement fusion experiments S. Cremera) and C. P energetic up to 31 MeV tertiary protons produced during the final stage of inertial confinement fusion the elastic scattering of 14.1 MeV neutrons, is a source of very energetic protons capable of escaping from

  17. Joining techniques for a reduced activation 12Cr steel for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, R. M.; El-Dasher, B.; Choi, B. W.; Torres, S. G.

    2014-10-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are developing a reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel that is based on the ferritic martensitic steel HT-9. As a part of the development of this steel, we tested a series of welding processes for characterization, including conventional welds (electron beam, tungsten inert gas, and laser) as well as solid-state welds (hot isostatic pressing). We also heat treated the joints at various temperatures between 750 °C and 1050 °C to find a suitable normalization scheme. The modified HT-9 reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel appears highly suitable to welding and diffusion bonding. All welds showed good quality fusion zones with insignificant cracking or porosity. Additionally, a heat treatment schedule of 950 °C for one hour caused minimal grain growth while still converging the hardness of the base metal with that of the fusion and heat-affected zones. Also, modified HT-9 diffusion bonds that were created at temperatures of at least 950 °C for two hours at 103 MPa had interface tensile strengths of greater than 600 MPa. The diffusion bonds showed no evidence of increased hardness nor void formation at the diffusion bonded interface.

  18. Species separation in inertial confinement fusion fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellei, C.; Amendt, P. A.; Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Haines, M. G. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Welch, D. R. [Voss Scientic, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    It is shown by means of multi-fluid particle-in-cell simulations that convergence of the spherical shock wave that propagates through the inner gas of inertial confinement fusion-relevant experiments is accompanied by a separation of deuterium (D) and tritium (T) ions across the shock front. Deuterons run ahead of the tritons due to their lower mass and higher charge-to-mass ratio and can reach the center several tens of picoseconds before the tritons. The rising edge of the DD and TT fusion rate is also temporally separated by the same amount, which should be an observable in experiments and would be a direct proof of the 'stratification conjecture' on the shock front [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056308 (2011)]. Moreover, dephasing of the D and T shock components in terms of density and temperature leads to a degradation of the DT fusion yield as the converging shock first rebounds from the fuel center (shock yield). For the parameters of this study, the second peak in the fusion yield (compression yield) is strongly dependent on the choice of the flux limiter.

  19. Measuring time of flight of fusion products in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device for spatial profiling of fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, D. C.; Boris, D. R.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.; Piefer, G. R.

    2013-03-15

    A new diagnostic has been developed that uses the time of flight (TOF) of the products from a nuclear fusion reaction to determine the location where the fusion reaction occurred. The TOF diagnostic uses charged particle detectors on opposing sides of the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device that are coupled to high resolution timing electronics to measure the spatial profile of fusion reactions occurring between the two charged particle detectors. This diagnostic was constructed and tested by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Group in the IEC device, HOMER, which accelerates deuterium ions to fusion relevant energies in a high voltage ({approx}100 kV), spherically symmetric, electrostatic potential well [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley, D. R. Boris, B. B. Cipiti, S. K. Murali, G. R. Piefer, R. F. Radel, T. E. Radel, and A. L. Wehmeyer, Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 1238 (2005)]. The TOF diagnostic detects the products of D(d,p)T reactions and determines where along a chord through the device the fusion event occurred. The diagnostic is also capable of using charged particle spectroscopy to determine the Doppler shift imparted to the fusion products by the center of mass energy of the fusion reactants. The TOF diagnostic is thus able to collect spatial profiles of the fusion reaction density along a chord through the device, coupled with the center of mass energy of the reactions occurring at each location. This provides levels of diagnostic detail never before achieved on an IEC device.

  20. Ion beam heated target simulations for warm dense matter physics and inertial fusion energy$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single-pulse planar metallic solid and foam, and a breeder of the tritium component of the fuel. Because of high accelerator efficiency, both indirect drive coupling efficiency (ratio of fuel kinetic energy to beam energy) because of the energy penalty

  1. Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2009-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY2010 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

  2. Fuel Target Implosion in Ion beam Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    The numerical results for the fuel target implosion are presented in order to clarify the target physics in ion beam inertial fusion. The numerical analyses are performed for a direct-driven ion beam target. In the paper the following issues are studied: the beam obliquely incidence on the target surface, the plasma effect on the beam-stopping power, the beam particle energy, the beam time duration, the target radius, the beam input energy and the non-uniformity effect on the fuel target performance. In this paper the beam ions are protons.

  3. Gas Transport and Control in Thick-Liquid Inertial Fusion Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debonnel, Christophe Sylvain

    2006-01-01

    Fusion Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fusion Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vortex shielding for fusion energy applications. Fusion

  4. Shock convergence and mix dynamics in inertial confinement fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rygg, James Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the phenomena of shock propagation and of turbulent mix induced by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth is of critical importance for ignition and high gain in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Capsule ...

  5. Summary talk to 21st IAEA FEC, Chendu, 2006 Inertial fusion advance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scheme V. heavy ion fusion scheme VI. Other miscellanies VII. Brief remarks #12;Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) parallel to magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) is an alternative approach to gain inertialSummary talk to 21st IAEA FEC, Chendu, 2006 Inertial fusion advance towards ignition and gain X. T

  6. Inertial Fusion Program. Progress report, July 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skoberne, F. (comp.) [comp.

    1981-10-01

    Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements in the Los Alamos National Laboratory eight-beam Helios system are described. These improvements increased the reliability of the laser and permitted the firing of 290 shots, most of which delivered energies of approximately 8 kJ to the target. Modifications to Gemini are outlined, including the installation of a new target-insertion mechanism. The redirection of the Antares program is discussed in detail, which will achieve a total energy of approximatey 40 kJ with two beams. This redirection will bring Antares on-line almost two years earlier than was possible with the full six-beam system, although at a lower energy. Experiments with isentropically imploded Sirius-B targets are discussed, and x-ray radiation-loss data from gold microballoons are presented, which show that these results are essentially identical with those obtained at glass-laser wavelengths. Significant progress in characterizing laser fusion targets is reported. New processes for fabricating glass miroballoon x-ray diagnostic targets, the application of high-quality metallic coatings, and the deposition of thick plastic coatings are described. Results in the development of x-ray diagnostics are reported, and research in the Los Alamos heavy-ion fusion program is summarized. Results of investigations of phase-conjugation research of gaseous saturable absorbers and of the use of alkali-halide crystals in a new class of saturable absorbers are summarized. New containment-vessel concepts for Inertial Confinement Fusion reactors are discussed, and results of a scoping study of four fusion-fission hybrid concepts are presented.

  7. Progress in the pulsed power Inertial Confinement Fusion program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintenz, J.P.; Matzen, M.K.; Mehlhorn, T.A. [and others

    1996-12-01

    Pulsed power accelerators are being used in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. In order to achieve our goal of a fusion yield in the range of 200 - 1000 MJ from radiation-driven fusion capsules, it is generally believed that {approx}10 MJ of driver energy must be deposited within the ICF target in order to deposit {approx}1 MJ of radiation energy in the fusion capsule. Pulsed power represents an efficient technology for producing both these energies and these radiation environments in the required short pulses (few tens of ns). Two possible approaches are being developed to utilize pulsed power accelerators in this effort: intense beams of light ions and z- pinches. This paper describes recent progress in both approaches. Over the past several years, experiments have successfully answered many questions critical to ion target design. Increasing the ion beam power and intensity are our next objectives. Last year, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator H (PBFA II) was modified to generate ion beams in a geometry that will be required for high yield applications. This 2048 modification has resulted in the production of the highest power ion beam to be accelerated from an extraction ion diode. We are also evaluating fast magnetically-driven implosions (z-pinches) as platforms for ICF ablator physics and EOS experiments. Z-pinch implosions driven by the 20 TW Saturn accelerator have efficiently produced high x- ray power (> 75 TW) and energy (> 400 kJ). Containing these x-ray sources within a hohlraum produces a unique large volume (> 6000 mm{sup 3}), long lived (>20 ns) radiation environment. In addition to studying fundamental ICF capsule physics, there are several concepts for driving ICF capsules with these x-ray sources. Progress in increasing the x-ray power on the Saturn accelerator and promise of further increases on the higher power PBFA II accelerator will be described.

  8. A novel technique for single-shot energy-resolved 2D x-ray imaging of plasmas relevant for the inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labate, L.; Koester, P.; Levato, T.; Gizzi, L. A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    A novel x-ray diagnostic of laser-fusion plasmas is described, allowing 2D monochromatic images of hot, dense plasmas to be obtained in any x-ray photon energy range, over a large domain, on a single-shot basis. The device (named energy-encoded pinhole camera) is based upon the use of an array of many pinholes coupled to a large area CCD camera operating in the single-photon mode. The available x-ray spectral domain is only limited by the quantum efficiency of scientific-grade x-ray CCD cameras, thus extending from a few keV up to a few tens of keV. Spectral 2D images of the emitting plasma can be obtained at any x-ray photon energy provided that a sufficient number of photons had been collected at the desired energy. Results from recent inertial confinement fusion related experiments will be reported in order to detail the new diagnostic.

  9. Development of KrF lasers for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J.A.; Harris, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    Recent reviews of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program have resulted in recommendations that promise to focus the research effort on the examination of the feasibility of pellet ignition at 1 MJ of energy on target. If successful, the next major step in the program has been defined to be the construction of an Ignition Facility. Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a plan to reach single-pulse multimegajoule ICF facilities using the electron-beam-pumped KrF laser. The Los Alamos plan, its relation to the development of ICF for energy production, and the major features and design issues associated with ICF drivers will be covered in this presentation. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions using fusion burn imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions using on the ignition and burn of inertial confinement fusion targets: A multi-scale approach Phys. Plasmas 21, 122709 (2014); 10.1063/1.4904212 Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosionsa

  11. Status of and prospects for the fast ignition inertial fusion concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Key, M. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    Fast ignition is an alternate concept in inertial confinement fusion, which has the potential for easier ignition and greater energy multiplication. If realized, it could improve the prospects for inertial fusion energy. It poses stimulating challenges in science and technology, and the research is approaching a key stage in which the feasibility of fast ignition will be determined. This review covers the concepts, the state of the science and technology, the near-term prospects, and the challenges and risks involved in demonstrating high-gain fast ignition.

  12. Magneto-inertial fusion with laser compression of a magnetized spherical target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostyukov, I. Yu., E-mail: kost@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Federation); Ryzhkov, S. V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    The paper is devoted to the principles of magneto-inertial fusion and laser-plasma methods of generation of a Megagauss field during spherical implosion of a magnetized target. A model based on a magnetic confinement system, namely, a cusp configuration with inertial compression of the target by a laser driver, is developed. The dynamics of plasma in a cusp compressed under the effect of laser beams is precalculated. Analytical and numerical estimates of the particle number and magnetic field intensity during magneto-inertial plasma compression are obtained. The problems of irradiation of a spherically closed volume by a high-energy laser pulse are discussed.

  13. The role of nuclear reactions and -particle transport in the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion capsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    The role of nuclear reactions and -particle transport in the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion capsules Josselin Garnier1,a and Catherine Cherfils-Clérouin2 1 Laboratoire de Probabilités et the energy released by nuclear reactions, a nonlocal model for the -particle energy deposition process

  14. Inertial Confinement Fusion: Quarterly report, April-June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correll, D.

    1996-06-01

    The lead article, `Ion-beam propagation in a low-density reactor chamber for heavy-ion inertial fusion` (p. 89), explores the ability of heavy-ion beams to be adequately transported and focused in an IFE reactor. The next article, `Efficient production and applications of 2- to 10-keV x rays by laser-heated underdense radiators` (p. 96), explores the ability of the NIF to produce sufficient high-energy x rays for diagnostic backlighting, target preheating, or uniform irradiation of large test objects for Nuclear Weapons Effects Testing. For capsule implosion experiments, the increasing energies and distances involved in the NIF compared to Nova require the development of new diagnostics methods. The article `Fusion reaction-rate measurements--Nova and NIF` (p. 115) first reviews the use of time-resolved neutron measurements on Nova to monitor fusion burn histories and then explores the limitations of that technique, principally Doppler broadening, for the proposed NIF. It also explores the use of gamma rays on Nova, thereby providing a proof-of-principle for using gamma rays for monitoring fusion burn histories on the NIF. The articles `The energetics of gas-filled hohlraums` (p. 110) and `Measurements of laser- speckle-induced perturbations in laser-driven foils` (p. 123) report measurements on Nova of two important aspects of implosion experiments. The first characterizes the amount of energy lost from a hohlraum by stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering as a function of gas fill and laser-beam uniformity. The second of these articles shows that the growth of density nonuniformities implanted on smooth capsule surfaces by laser speckle can be correlated with the effects of physical surface roughness. The article `Laser-tissue interaction modeling with the LATIS computer program` (p. 103) explores the use of modeling to enhance the effectiveness--maximize desired effects and minimize collateral damage--of lasers for medical purposes.

  15. Innovative approaches to inertial confinement fusion reactors: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourque, R.F.; Schultz, K.R.

    1986-11-01

    Three areas of innovative approaches to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor design are given. First, issues pertaining to the Cascade reactor concept are discussed. Then, several innovative concepts are presented which attempt to directly recover the blast energy from a fusion target. Finally, the Turbostar concept for direct recovery of that energy is evaluated. The Cascade issues discussed are combustion of the carbon granules in the event of air ingress, the use of alternate granule materials, and the effect of changes in carbon flow on details of the heat exchanger. Carbon combustion turns out to be a minor problem. Four ICF innovative concepts were considered: a turbine with ablating surfaces, a liquid piston system, a wave generator, and a resonating pump. In the final analysis, none show any real promise. The Turbostar concept of direct recovery is a very interesting idea and appeared technically viable. However, it shows no efficiency gain or any decrease in capital cost compared to reactors with conventional thermal conversion systems. Attempts to improve it by placing a close-in lithium sphere around the target to increase gas generation increased efficiency only slightly. It is concluded that these direct conversion techniques require thermalization of the x-ray and debris energy, and are Carnot limited. They therefore offer no advantage over existing and proposed methods of thermal energy conversion or direct electrical conversion.

  16. Integrated diagnostic analysis of inertial confinement fusion capsule performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerjan, Charles; Springer, Paul T.; Sepke, Scott M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    A conceptual model is developed for typical inertial confinement fusion implosion conditions that integrates available diagnostic information to determine the stagnation properties of the interior fill and surrounding shell. Assuming pressure equilibrium at peak compression and invoking radiative and equation-of-state relations, the pressure, density, and electron temperature are obtained by optimized fitting of the experimental output to smooth, global functional forms. Typical observational data that may be used includes x-ray self-emission, directional neutron time-of-flight signals, neutron yield, high-resolution x-ray spectra, and radiographic images. This approach has been validated by comparison with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, producing semi-quantitative agreement. Model results implicate poor kinetic energy coupling to the hot core as the primary cause of the observed low thermonuclear burn yields.

  17. KULL: LLNL's ASCI Inertial Confinement Fusion Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathkopf, J. A.; Miller, D. S.; Owen, J. M.; Zike, M. R.; Eltgroth, P. G.; Madsen, N. K.; McCandless, K. P.; Nowak, P. F.; Nemanic, M. K.; Gentile, N. A.; Stuart, L. M.; Keen, N. D.; Palmer, T. S.

    2000-01-10

    KULL is a three dimensional, time dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulation code under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), KULL's purpose is to simulate the physical processes in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets. The National Ignition Facility, where ICF experiments will be conducted, and ASCI are part of the experimental and computational components of DOE's Stockpile Stewardship Program. This paper provides an overview of ASCI and describes KULL, its hydrodynamic simulation capability and its three methods of simulating radiative transfer. Particular emphasis is given to the parallelization techniques essential to obtain the performance required of the Stockpile Stewardship Program and to exploit the massively parallel processor machines that ASCI is procuring.

  18. An Inertial-Fusion Z-Pinch Power Plant Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DERZON,MARK S.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; DEGROOT,J.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; PETERSON,P.; PETERSON,R.R.; SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.; ZAMORA,ANTONIO J.

    2000-12-15

    With the promising new results of fast z-pinch technology developed at Sandia National Laboratories, we are investigating using z-pinch driven high-yield Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) as a fusion power plant energy source. These investigations have led to a novel fusion system concept based on an attempt to separate many of the difficult fusion engineering issues and a strict reliance on existing technology, or a reasonable extrapolation of existing technology, wherever possible. In this paper, we describe the main components of such a system with a focus on the fusion chamber dynamics. The concept works with all of the electrically-coupled ICF proposed fusion designs. It is proposed that a z-pinch driven ICF power system can be feasibly operated at high yields (1 to 30 GJ) with a relatively low pulse rate (0.01-0.1 Hz). To deliver the required current from the rep-rated pulse power driver to the z-pinch diode, a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) and the integrated target hardware are fabricated, vacuum pumped, and aligned prior to loading for each power pulse. In this z-pinch driven system, no laser or ion beams propagate in the chamber such that the portion of the chamber outside the RTL does not need to be under vacuum. Additionally, by utilizing a graded-density solid lithium or fluorine/lithium/beryllium eutectic (FLiBe) blanket between the source and the first-wall the system can breed its own fuel absorb a large majority of the fusion energy released from each capsule and shield the first-wall from a damaging neutron flux. This neutron shielding significantly reduces the neutron energy fluence at the first-wall such that radiation damage should be minimal and will not limit the first-wall lifetime. Assuming a 4 m radius, 8 m tall cylindrical chamber design with an 80 cm thick spherical FLiBe blanket, our calculations suggest that a 20 cm thick 6061-T6 Al chamber wall will reach the equivalent uranium ore radioactivity level within 100 years after a 30 year plant operation. The implication of this low radioactivity is that a z-pinch driven power plant may not require deep geologic waste storage.

  19. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA, 063502 (2014) A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited)a) Rev. Sci. Instrum

  20. Inertial confinement fusion implosions with imposed magnetic field compression using the OMEGA Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inertial confinement fusion implosions with imposed magnetic field compression using the OMEGA of solid and gaseous samples to diagnose inertial confinement fusion implosions Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83://pop.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Inertial confinement fusion implosions with imposed magnetic field compression using the OMEGA

  1. The potential role of electric fields and plasma barodiffusion on the inertial confinement fusion database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The potential role of electric fields and plasma barodiffusion on the inertial confinement fusion. Related Articles Investigating inertial confinement fusion target fuel conditions through x://pop.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;The potential role of electric fields and plasma barodiffusion on the inertial confinement fusion

  2. Basics of Inertial Confinement Fusion NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basics of Inertial Confinement Fusion John Lindl NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist - Boston #12;#12;Outline · The challenge of Inertial Confinement Fusion · Development of the science basis to compression in Inertial Confinement Fusion Direct Drive DT gas 2.5 mm 0.1 mm 10 mm #12;The scale of ICF

  3. Progress in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, S.J.; Skupsky, S.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Keck, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Marciante, J.; Marozas, J.a.; Marshall, F.J.; Maximov, A.V.; McKenty, P.W.; Morse, S.F.B.; Myatt, J.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2006-06-28

    Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is expected to demonstrate high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in the next decade and is a leading candidate for inertial fusion energy production. The NIF will initially be configured for x-ray drive and with no beams placed at the target equator to provide a symmetric irradiation of a direct-drive capsule. LLE is developing the “polar-direct-drive” (PDD) approach that repoints beams toward the target equator. Initial 2-D simulations have shown ignition. A unique “Saturn-like” plastic ring around the equator refracts the laser light incident near the equator toward the target, improving the drive uniformity.

  4. Inertial confinement fusion based on the ion-bubble trigger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafari, S. Nilkar, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Mehdian, H.

    2014-10-15

    Triggering the ion-bubble in an inertial confinement fusion, we have developed a novel scheme for the fast ignition. This scheme relies on the plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense laser pulse to generate an ion-bubble. The bubble acts both as an intense electron accelerator and as an electron wiggler. Consequently, the accelerated electrons trapped in the bubble can emit an intense tunable laser light. This light can be absorbed by an ablation layer on the outside surface of the ignition capsule, which subsequently drills it and thereby produces a guide channel in the pellet. Finally, the relativistic electron beam created in the bubble is guided through the channel to the high density core igniting the fusion fuel. The normalized beam intensity and beam energy required for triggering the ignition have been calculated when core is heated by the e-beam. In addition, through solving the momentum transfer, continuity and wave equations, a dispersion relation for the electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been analytically derived. The variations of growth rate with the ion-bubble density and electron beam energy have been illustrated. It is found that the growth rates of instability are significantly controlled by the ions concentration and the e-beam energy in the bubble.

  5. Observation of strong electromagnetic fields around laser-entrance holes of ignition-scale hohlraums in inertial-confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, C. K.

    Energy spectra and spectrally resolved one-dimensional fluence images of self-emitted charged-fusion products (14.7 MeV D[superscript 3]He protons) are routinely measured from indirectly driven inertial-confinement fusion ...

  6. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  7. Atomic scale mixing for inertial confinement fusion associated hydro instabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    Atomic scale mixing for inertial confinement fusion associated hydro instabilities J. Melvina, , P Alamos, NM 87545, USA Abstract Hydro instabilities have been identified as a potential cause- able. We find numerical convergence for this important quantity, in a purely hydro study, with only

  8. Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

    1994-01-01

    Lithium- Injection Fusion-Energy (HYLIFE)Reactor," UCRL-Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy," Lawrence Livermorefor the Inertial Fusion Energy Experiments," proceedings of

  9. Laser Fusion Energy The High Average Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laser Fusion Energy and The High Average Power Program John Sethian Naval Research Laboratory Dec for Inertial Fusion Energy with lasers, direct drive targets and solid wall chambers Lasers DPPSL (LLNL) Kr posters Snead Payne #12;Laser(s) Goals 1. Develop technologies that can meet the fusion energy

  10. TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (laser-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to produce

  11. Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,ImpactScientific andIndividualEvent SignIndustrialInertial

  12. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craxton, R. S.; Anderson, K. S.; Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J. F.; Schmitt, A. J.; Sethian, J. D.; Short, R. W.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Kruer, W. L.; Tanaka, K.; Betti, R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Hu, S. X.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Michel, D. T.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Solodov, A. A.; Soures, J. M.; Stoeckl, C.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-11-25

    In this study, the direct-drive, laser-based approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is reviewed from its inception following the demonstration of the first laser to its implementation on the present generation of high-power lasers. The review focuses on the evolution of scientific understanding gained from target-physics experiments in many areas, identifying problems that were demonstrated and the solutions implemented. The review starts with the basic understanding of laser–plasma interactions that was obtained before the declassification of laser-induced compression in the early 1970s and continues with the compression experiments using infrared lasers in the late 1970s that produced thermonuclear neutrons. The problem of suprathermal electrons and the target preheat that they caused, associated with the infrared laser wavelength, led to lasers being built after 1980 to operate at shorter wavelengths, especially 0.35 um—the third harmonic of the Nd:glass laser—and 0.248 um (the KrF gas laser). The main physics areas relevant to direct drive are reviewed. The primary absorption mechanism at short wavelengths is classical inverse bremsstrahlung. Nonuniformities imprinted on the target by laser irradiation have been addressed by the development of a number of beam-smoothing techniques and imprint-mitigation strategies. The effects of hydrodynamic instabilities are mitigated by a combination of imprint reduction and target designs that minimize the instability growth rates. Several coronal plasma physics processes are reviewed. The two-plasmon–decay instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (together with cross-beam energy transfer), and (possibly) stimulated Raman scattering are identified as potential concerns, placing constraints on the laser intensities used in target designs, while other processes (self-focusing and filamentation, the parametric decay instability, and magnetic fields), once considered important, are now of lesser concern for mainline direct-drive target concepts. Filamentation is largely suppressed by beam smoothing. Thermal transport modeling, important to the interpretation of experiments and to target design, has been found to be non-local in nature. Advances in shock timing and equation-of-state measurements relevant to direct-drive ICF are reported. Room-temperature implosions have provided an increased understanding of the importance of stability and uniformity. The evolution of cryogenic implosion capabilities, leading to an extensive series carried out on the 60-beam OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], is reviewed together with major advances in cryogenic target formation. A polar-drive concept has been developed that will enable direct-drive–ignition experiments to be performed on the National Ignition Facility [C. A. Haynam et al., Appl. Opt. 46 (16), 3276 (2007)]. The advantages offered by the alternative approaches of fast ignition and shock ignition and the issues associated with these concepts are described. The lessons learned from target-physics and implosion experiments are taken into account in ignition and high-gain target designs for laser wavelengths of 1/3 um and 1/4 um. Substantial advances in direct-drive inertial fusion reactor concepts are reviewed. Overall, the progress in scientific understanding over the past five decades has been enormous, to the point that inertial fusion energy using direct drive shows significant promise as a future environmentally attractive energy source.

  13. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion: A review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Craxton, R. S.; Anderson, K. S.; Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J. F.; et al

    2015-11-25

    In this study, the direct-drive, laser-based approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is reviewed from its inception following the demonstration of the first laser to its implementation on the present generation of high-power lasers. The review focuses on the evolution of scientific understanding gained from target-physics experiments in many areas, identifying problems that were demonstrated and the solutions implemented. The review starts with the basic understanding of laser–plasma interactions that was obtained before the declassification of laser-induced compression in the early 1970s and continues with the compression experiments using infrared lasers in the late 1970s that produced thermonuclear neutrons. Themore »problem of suprathermal electrons and the target preheat that they caused, associated with the infrared laser wavelength, led to lasers being built after 1980 to operate at shorter wavelengths, especially 0.35 um—the third harmonic of the Nd:glass laser—and 0.248 um (the KrF gas laser). The main physics areas relevant to direct drive are reviewed. The primary absorption mechanism at short wavelengths is classical inverse bremsstrahlung. Nonuniformities imprinted on the target by laser irradiation have been addressed by the development of a number of beam-smoothing techniques and imprint-mitigation strategies. The effects of hydrodynamic instabilities are mitigated by a combination of imprint reduction and target designs that minimize the instability growth rates. Several coronal plasma physics processes are reviewed. The two-plasmon–decay instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (together with cross-beam energy transfer), and (possibly) stimulated Raman scattering are identified as potential concerns, placing constraints on the laser intensities used in target designs, while other processes (self-focusing and filamentation, the parametric decay instability, and magnetic fields), once considered important, are now of lesser concern for mainline direct-drive target concepts. Filamentation is largely suppressed by beam smoothing. Thermal transport modeling, important to the interpretation of experiments and to target design, has been found to be non-local in nature. Advances in shock timing and equation-of-state measurements relevant to direct-drive ICF are reported. Room-temperature implosions have provided an increased understanding of the importance of stability and uniformity. The evolution of cryogenic implosion capabilities, leading to an extensive series carried out on the 60-beam OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], is reviewed together with major advances in cryogenic target formation. A polar-drive concept has been developed that will enable direct-drive–ignition experiments to be performed on the National Ignition Facility [C. A. Haynam et al., Appl. Opt. 46 (16), 3276 (2007)]. The advantages offered by the alternative approaches of fast ignition and shock ignition and the issues associated with these concepts are described. The lessons learned from target-physics and implosion experiments are taken into account in ignition and high-gain target designs for laser wavelengths of 1/3 um and 1/4 um. Substantial advances in direct-drive inertial fusion reactor concepts are reviewed. Overall, the progress in scientific understanding over the past five decades has been enormous, to the point that inertial fusion energy using direct drive shows significant promise as a future environmentally attractive energy source.« less

  14. Linear relaxation to planar Travelling Waves in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monsaingeon, Léonard

    2012-01-01

    We study linear stability of planar travelling waves for a scalar reaction-diffusion equation with non-linear anisotropic diffusion. The mathematical model is derived from the full thermo-hydrodynamical model describing the process of Inertial Confinement Fusion. We show that solutions of the Cauchy problem with physically relevant initial data become planar exponentially fast with rate $s(\\eps',k)>0$, where $\\eps'=\\frac{T_{min}}{T_{max}}\\ll 1$ is a small temperature ratio and $k\\gg 1$ the transversal wrinkling wavenumber of perturbations. We rigorously recover in some particular limit $(\\eps',k)\\rightarrow (0,+\\infty)$ a dispersion relation $s(\\eps',k)\\sim \\gamma_0 k^{\\alpha}$ previously computed heuristically and numerically in some physical models of Inertial Confinement Fusion.

  15. MULTI-OBJECTIVE SPECTROSCOPIC DATA ANALYSIS OF INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION IMPLOSION CORES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Sushil J.

    MULTI-OBJECTIVE SPECTROSCOPIC DATA ANALYSIS OF INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION IMPLOSION CORES: PLASMA the implosion of an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) deuterium-filled plastic-microballoon can provide critical confinement fusion implosion cores based on the self-consistent analysis of simultaneous narrow-band X

  16. Self-consistent analysis of the hot spot dynamics for inertial confinement fusion capsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    Self-consistent analysis of the hot spot dynamics for inertial confinement fusion capsules J. Sanz Hydrodynamic stability of inertial confinement fusion ICF capsules during the deceleration stage has been re October 2005; published online 11 November 2005 In the context of the French Laser-Mégajoule fusion

  17. Fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baylor, Larry

    2014-05-02

    Larry Baylor explains how the US ITER team is working to prevent solar flare-like events at a fusion energy reactor that will be like a small sun on earth

  18. Fusion energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Baylor, Larry

    2014-05-23

    Larry Baylor explains how the US ITER team is working to prevent solar flare-like events at a fusion energy reactor that will be like a small sun on earth

  19. Progress in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Betti, R.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Short, R. W.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-05-15

    Significant progress in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research has been made since the completion of the 60-beam, 30-kJ{sub UV} OMEGA Laser System [Boehly, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] in 1995. A theory of ignition requirements, applicable to any ICF concept, has been developed. Detailed understanding of laser-plasma coupling, electron thermal transport, and hot-electron preheating has lead to the measurement of neutron-averaged areal densities of {approx}200 mg/cm{sup 2} in cryogenic target implosions. These correspond to an estimated peak fuel density in excess of 100 g/cm{sup 3} and are in good agreement with hydrodynamic simulations. The implosions were performed using an 18-kJ drive pulse designed to put the converging fuel on an adiabat of two. The polar-drive concept will allow direct-drive-ignition research on the National Ignition Facility while it is configured for indirect drive. Advanced ICF ignition concepts - fast ignition [Tabak et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1626 (1994)] and shock ignition [Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 155001 (2007)] - have the potential to significantly reduce ignition driver energies and/or provide higher target gain.

  20. Professor Richard D. Hazeltine, Chair Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Professor Richard D. Hazeltine, Chair Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Institute, and include both magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE), as both MFE and IFE provide major opportunities for moving forward with fusion energy. The report would be most helpful if it could

  1. Compression and combustion of non-cryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Zmitrenko, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    Variants of a target with a solid thermonuclear fuel in the form of deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals for an inertial fusion have been proposed. The laser-pulse-induced compression of non-cryogenic targets, as well as ignition and combustion of such targets, has been examined. The numerical calculations show that, despite a decrease in the caloric content of the fuel and an increase in the energy losses on intrinsic radiation in the target containing deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals as compared to the target containing deuterium-tritium ice, the non-cryogenic target can ensure the fusion gain sufficient for its use in the energy cycle of a thermonuclear power plant based on the inertial plasma confinement method.

  2. Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and reliability of the Nation's nuclear weapons without nuclear testing. The program provides this capability of the energy from a nuclear weapon is generated while in the high energy density (HED) state. High thermonuclear ignition to the national nuclear weapons program was one of the earliest motivations of the ICF

  3. Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a safe, secure, and reliable nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. Science-based weapons under extreme conditions that approach the high energy density (HED) environments found in a nuclear in HED science and support broader national science goals. Virtually all of the energy from a nuclear

  4. OSIRIS and SOMBRERO Inertial Fusion Power Plant Designs, Volume 2: Designs, Assessments, and Comparisons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W. R.; Bieri, R. L.; Monsler, M. J.; Hendricks, C. D.; Laybourne, P.; Shillito, K. R.

    1992-03-01

    This is a comprehensive design study of two Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) electric power plants. Conceptual designs are presented for a fusion reactor (called Osiris) using an induction-linac heavy-ion beam driver, and another (called SOMBRERO) using a KrF laser driver. The designs covered all aspects of IFE power plants, including the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, balance-of-plant facilities, target fabrication, target injection and tracking, as well as the heavy-ion and KrF drivers. The point designs were assessed and compared in terms of their environmental & safety aspects, reliability and availability, economics, and technology development needs.

  5. Fusion in a magnetically-shielded-grid inertial electrostatic confinement device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedditch, John; Khachan, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented that shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively-biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  6. Improving Particle Confinement in Inertial Electrostatic Fusion for Spacecraft Power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improving Particle Confinement in Inertial Electrostatic Fusion for Spacecraft Power and Propulsion;2 (This page intentionally left blank) #12;3 Abstract Improving Particle Confinement in Inertial reactors like ITER and inertial confinement reactors like NIF) require very large and heavy structures

  7. Development of backlighting sources for a Compton Radiography diagnostic of Inertial Confinement Fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tommasini, R

    2010-04-23

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion is time-resolved imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. Here we report on the source and diagnostic development of hard x-ray radiography and on the first radiographs of direct drive implosions obtained at photon energies up to about 100keV, where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the shell opacity. The radiographs of direct drive, plastic shell implosions obtained at the OMEGA laser facility have a spatial resolution of {approx}10um and a temporal resolution of {approx}10ps. This novel Compton Radiography is an invaluable diagnostic tool for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets, and will be integrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  8. Inertial Fusion Program. Progress report, January-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This report summarizes research and development effort in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program, including absorption measurements with an integrating sphere, generation of high CO/sub 2/-laser harmonics in the backscattered light from laser plasmas, and the effects of hydrogen target contamination on the hot-electron temperature and transport. The development of new diagnostics is outlined and measurements taken with a proximity-focused x-ray streak camera are presented. High gain in phase conjugation using germanium was demonstrated, data were obtained on retropulse isolation by plasmas generated from metal shutters, damage thresholds for copper mirrors at high fluences were characterized, and phase conjugation in the ultraviolet was demonstrated. Significant progress in the characterization of targets, new techniques in target coating, and important advances in the development of low-density, small-cell-size plastic foam that permit highly accurate machining to any desired shape are presented. The results of various fusion reactor system studies are summarized.

  9. Role of hydrodynamic instability growth in hot-spot mass gain and fusion performance of inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2014-10-15

    In an inertial confinement fusion target, energy loss due to thermal conduction from the hot-spot will inevitably ablate fuel ice into the hot-spot, resulting in a more massive but cooler hot-spot, which negatively impacts fusion yield. Hydrodynamic mix due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the gas-ice interface can aggravate the problem via an increased gas-ice interfacial area across which energy transfer from the hot-spot and ice can be enhanced. Here, this mix-enhanced transport effect on hot-spot fusion-performance degradation is quantified using contrasting 1D and 2D hydrodynamic simulations, and its dependence on effective acceleration, Atwood number, and ablation speed is identified.

  10. Radiation sources with planar wire arrays and planar foils for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Astanovitsky, A.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Weller, M. E.; Keim, S.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.

    2014-03-15

    This article reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research, each of them being a multi-year international effort. One of these is the development of innovative sources, such as planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator, which act mainly as a resistor, even though the physical mechanism of efficient magnetic energy conversion into radiation still remains unclear. We review the results of our extensive studies of PWAs. We also report the new results of the experimental comparison PWAs with planar foil liners (another promising alternative to wire array loads at multi-mega-ampere generators). Pioneered at UNR, the PWA Z-pinch loads have later been tested at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on the Saturn generator, on GIT-12 machine in Russia, and on the QiangGuang-1 generator in China, always successfully. Another of these is the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, which started in early 1980s with Zucker's experiments at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Successful continuation of this approach was the Load Current Multiplier (LCM) proposed by Chuvatin in collaboration with Rudakov and Weber from NRL. The 100?ns LCM was integrated into the Zebra generator, which almost doubled the plasma load current, from 0.9 to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum radiation source for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR [Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The first successful proof-of-the-principle experimental implementation of new hohlraum concept at university-scale generator Zebra/LCM is demonstrated. A numerical simulation capability with VisRaD code (from PRISM Co.) established at UNR allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics and provides the possibility of optimization of a new hohlraum. Future studies are discussed.

  11. Octahedral spherical hohlraum and its laser arrangement for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan, Ke; He, Xian-Tu; Liu, Jie [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zheng, Wudi; Lai, Dongxian [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2014-05-15

    A recent publication [K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010704 (2014)] proposed a spherical hohlraum with six laser entrance holes of octahedral symmetry at a specific hohlraum-to-capsule radius ratio of 5.14 for inertial fusion study, which has robust high symmetry during the capsule implosion and superiority on low backscatter without supplementary technology. This paper extends the previous one by studying the laser arrangement and constraints of octahedral hohlraum in detail. As a result, it has serious beam crossing at ?{sub L}?45°, and ?{sub L}=50° to 60° is proposed as the optimum candidate range for the golden octahedral hohlraum, here ?{sub L} is the opening angle that the laser quad beam makes with the Laser Entrance Hole (LEH) normal direction. In addition, the design of the LEH azimuthal angle should avoid laser spot overlapping on hohlraum wall and laser beam transferring outside hohlraum from a neighbor LEH. The octahedral hohlraums are flexible and can be applicable to diverse inertial fusion drive approaches. This paper also applies the octahedral hohlraum to the recent proposed hybrid indirect-direct drive approach.

  12. Inertial confinement fusion. 1995 ICF annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is a Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Program research and advanced technology development program focused on the goal of demonstrating thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory. During FY 1995, the ICF Program continued to conduct ignition target physics optimization studies and weapons physics experiments in support of the Defense Program`s stockpile stewardship goals. It also continued to develop technologies in support of the performance, cost, and schedule goals of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The NIF is a key element of the DOE`s Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program. In addition to its primary Defense Program goals, the ICF Program provides research and development opportunities in fundamental high-energy-density physics and supports the necessary research base for the possible long-term application to inertial fusion energy (IFE). Also, ICF technologies have had spin-off applications for industrial and governmental use. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Research Opportunities in High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas on the NDCX-II Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, John

    2009-01-01

    of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S.density physics and inertial fusion energy science. Thesedrivers for inertial fusion energy applications. Experiments

  14. Seminar -1. letnik bolonjske magistrske stopnje Inertial confinement fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    ................................................................................................................................12 #12;Introduction Mankind has always dreamed about producing energy in a way the sun does. For over 100 years we have known how ­ how the sun produces energy, but it has always been too difficult how manage to achieve and sustain energy fusion for energy production. In this seminar I will discuss what

  15. Laser-driven proton fast ignition of inertial fusion: concepts, issues and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badziak, J.; Jablonski, S.; Wolowski, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Honrubia, J. [GIFI, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-03-19

    Fast ignition (FI) is a novel approach to inertial confinement fusion, which has the potential for higher energy gain at lower overall driver energy and cost. This paper is a brief review of basic FI concepts and issues, with a particular emphasis on FI with laser-generated proton beams. General requirements for the DT fuel and the ignitor (particle beam) as well as for the laser drivers are discussed. Key issues related to proton FI are considered and selected results of experimental and numerical studies are described. A progress in development of laser facilities for FI research and prospects for FI experiments are outlined.

  16. Micro-engineered first wall tungsten armor for high average power laser fusion energy systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    Micro-engineered first wall tungsten armor for high average power laser fusion energy systems is developing an inertial fusion energy demonstration power reactor with a solid first wall chamber. The first is a coordinated effort to develop laser inertial fusion energy [1]. The first stage of the HAPL program

  17. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    ion drivers for inertial confinement fusion, was achieved.ion driver beams for inertial confinement fusion, they weredriver beams for inertial confinement fusion were successful

  18. Multiple-beam laser–plasma interactions in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myatt, J. F. Zhang, J.; Maximov, A. V.; Short, R. W.; Seka, W.; Edgell, D. H.; Michel, D. T.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Froula, D. H.; Hinkel, D. E.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.

    2014-05-15

    The experimental evidence for multiple-beam laser-plasma instabilities of relevance to laser driven inertial confinement fusion at the ignition scale is reviewed, in both the indirect and direct-drive approaches. The instabilities described are cross-beam energy transfer (in both indirectly driven targets on the NIF and in direct-drive targets), multiple-beam stimulated Raman scattering (for indirect-drive), and multiple-beam two-plasmon decay instability (in direct drive). Advances in theoretical understanding and in the numerical modeling of these multiple beam instabilities are presented.

  19. An improved version of the view factor method for simulating inertial confinement fusion hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basko, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    A modified version of the view factor equations is proposed which improves the accuracy of the description of temporal effects in energy redistribution by thermal radiation in cavities driven by power pulses typical for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The method is applied to analyze the process of radiative symmetrization in the simplest type of closed cylindrical hohlraums heated by two x-ray rings on the sidewall of the hohlraum case. Such hohlraums may be used in certain types of ICF targets driven by ion beams. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

    1994-01-01

    California 9~516 This work explores the economy of scale for multi- unit inertial fusion energy power plants

  1. Advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2009-10-15

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory - temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  2. Fusion Energy Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fusion Energy Sciences Fusion Energy Sciences Expanding the fundamental understanding of matter at very high temperatures and densities and to build the scientific foundation...

  3. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 39, NO. 4, APRIL 2011 1007 Inertial Confinement Fusion Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 39, NO. 4, APRIL 2011 1007 Inertial Confinement Fusion in this paper are available online at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org. Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/TPS.2011

  4. Thin Shell, High Velocity Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, T.

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing inertial confinement fusion capsule ablators that are 175 and 165???m in thickness, 10% and 15% thinner, respectively, than the nominal ...

  5. Self-Similar Structure and Experimental Signatures of Suprathermal Ion Distribution in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kagan, Grigory

    The distribution function of suprathermal ions is found to be self-similar under conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion hot spots. By utilizing this feature, interference between the hydrodynamic instabilities ...

  6. Determination of the deuterium-tritium branching ratio based on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael Jonathan

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) ?-to-neutron branching ratio [[superscript 3]H(d,?)[superscript 5]He/[superscript 3]H(d,n)[superscript 4]He] was determined under inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions, where the ...

  7. Proton emission imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCiantis, Joseph Loreto

    2005-01-01

    A proton core imaging system has been developed and extensively used for measuring the nuclear burn regions of inertial confinement fusion implosions. These imaging cameras, mounted to the 60-beam OMEGA laser facility, use ...

  8. Driving high-gain shock-ignited inertial confinement fusion targets by green laser light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atzeni, Stefano; Marocchino, Alberto; Schiavi, Angelo [Dipartimento SBAI, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' and CNISM, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, I-00161 Roma (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Standard direct-drive inertial confinement fusion requires UV light irradiation in order to achieve ignition at total laser energy of the order of 1 MJ. The shock-ignition approach opens up the possibility of igniting fusion targets using green light by reducing the implosion velocity and laser-driven ablation pressure. An analytical model is derived, allowing to rescale UV-driven targets to green light. Gain in the range 100-200 is obtained for total laser energy in the range 1.5-3 MJ. With respect to the original UV design, the rescaled targets are less sensitive to irradiation asymmetries and hydrodynamic instabilities, while operating in the same laser-plasma interaction regime.

  9. Sean Finnegan & Ann Satsangi Fusion Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    meter (e.g., the energy density of a hydrogen molecule). This corresponds to a pressure of approximately Associates15 December 2011 Comments on the DOE-SC Program in High Energy Density Laboratory Plasma Science research community in High Energy Density Laboratory Plasma (HEDLP) science including Inertial Fusion

  10. Parametic Study of the current limit within a single driver-scale transport beam line of an induction Linac for Heavy Ion Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prost, Lionel Robert

    2007-01-01

    Ion Injector for the Fusion Energy Research Program, inPotential of Magnetic Fusion Energy: The Interaction ofProgram, Inertial fusion energy: Opportunity for fusion

  11. ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faltens, A.

    2010-01-01

    and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Brussels, Belgium,of the Heavy Ion Fusion Workshop held at Brookhaven NationalReport, Hearthfire Heavy Ion Fusion, October 1, 1979 - March

  12. Research and Development of Compact Neutron Sources based on Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masuda, Kai; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Nagasaki, Kazunobu [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Takamatsu, Teruhisa; Fujimoto, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Tomoya; Kajiwara, Taiju [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Shiroya, Seiji; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2009-03-10

    Recent progress is described in the research and development of an inertial-electrostatic confinement fusion (IECF) device. Use of a water-cooling jacket with non-uniform thickness shows promising success for landmine detection application, such as effective channeling of neutron flux toward the target and a very stable dc yield in excess of 10{sup 7} D-D neutrons/sec. Addition of an ion source to the conventional glow-discharge-driven IECF enhances the converging deuterium ion energy distribution by allowing a lower operating gas pressure. Improvement in normalized neutron yield, which corresponds to the fusion cross-section averaged over the device radius, by a factor often has been observed.

  13. Ways towards pure deuterium inertial confinement fusion through the attainment of gigavolt potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2008-01-01

    The attainment of ultrahigh electric potentials by suppressing the stepped leader breakdown of a highly charged conductor levitated in a spiraling Taylor flow opens up the possibility of order of magnitude larger driver energies for the ignition of thermonuclear reactions by inertial confinement. In reaching gigavolt potentials, intense 1016 Watt, GeV ion beams become possible. Together with their large self-magnetic field, these beams should be powerful enough to launch a thermonuclear micro-detonation into pure deuterium, compressed and ignited by such beams. In high gain laser fusion the proton flash from the micro-explosion is likely to destroy the optical laser ignition apparatus, and it is not explained how to avoid this danger. The possible attainment of gigavolt potentials could make laser fusion obsolete.

  14. Inertial fusion program. Progress report, July 1-December 31, 1978

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, R.B.

    1980-11-01

    Progress at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements to LASL's two-beam system, Gemini, are outlined and experimental results are discussed. Our eight-beam system, Helios, was fired successfully on target for the first time, and became the world's most powerful gas laser for laser fusion studies. Work on Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is summarized, indicating that design work and building construction are 70 and 48% complete, respectively. A baseline design for automatic centering of laser beams onto the various relay mirrors and the optical design of the Antares front end are discussed. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, as well as investigations of synthetic-fuel production through application of fusion energy to hydrogen production by thermochemical water splitting. Studies on increased efficiency of energy extraction in CO/sub 2/ lasers and on lifetimes of cryogenic pellets in a reactor environment are summarized, as well as the results of studies on pellet injection, tracking, and beam synchronization.

  15. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-fusion have opposite strategies for meeting this criterion. Magnetic confinement

  16. Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2014-01-01

    Division, and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences. This isFusion Energy Sciences NetworkRequirements Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Energy

  17. Inertial fusion program, January 1-June 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skoberne, F.

    1981-06-01

    Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse carbon dioxide laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements are outlined for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Gemini System, which permitted over 500 shots in support of 10 different target experiments; the transformation of our eight-beam system, Helios, from a developmental to an operational facility that is capable of irradiating targets on a routine basis is described; and progress made toward completion of Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is detailed. Investigations of phenomena such as phase conjugation by degenerate four-wave mixing and its applicability to laser fusion systems, and frequency multiplexing as a means toward multipulse energy extraction are summarized. Also discussed are experiments with targets designed for adiabatic compression. Progress is reported in the development of accurate diagnostics, especially for the detection of expanding ions, of neutron yield, and of x-ray emission. Significant advances in our theoretical efforts are summarized, such as the adaptation of our target design codes for use with the CRAY-1 computer, and new results leading to a better understanding of implosion phenomena are reported. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, including the development of an ICF reactor blanket that offers a promising alternative to the usual lithium blanket, and the formulation of a capital-cost data base for laser fusion reactors to permit meaningful comparisons with other technologies.

  18. Production and measurement of engineered surfaces for inertial confinement fusion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hatch, Douglas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rivera, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-19

    Inertial Confinement Fusion uses the optical energy from a very high power laser to implode spherical capsules that contain a fuel mixture of deuterium and tritium. The capsules are made of either Beryllium, plastic, or glass and range from 0.1 mm to 2 mm in diameter. As a capsule implodes, thereby compressing the fuel to reach nuclear fusion conditions, it achieves temperatures of millions of degrees Centigrade and very high pressures. In this state, the capsule materials act like fluids and often a low density fluidic material will push on a higher density material which can be a very unstable condition depending upon the smoothness of the interface between the two materials. This unstable condition is called a hydrodynamic instabillity which results in the mixing of the two materials. If the mixing occurs between the fuel and a non-fuel material, it can stop the fusion reaction just like adding significant amounts of water to gasoline can stop the operation of an automobile. Another region in the capsule where surface roughness can cause capsule performance degradation is at a joint. For instance, many capsules are made of hemispheres that are joined together. If the joint surfaces are too rough, then there will an effective reduction in density at the joint. This density reduction can cause a non-uniform implosion which will reduce the fusion energy coming out of the capsule.

  19. Pre-Amplifier Module for Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heebner, J E; Bowers, M W

    2008-02-06

    The Pre-Amplifier Modules (PAMs) are the heart of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), providing most of the energy gain for the most energetic laser in the world. Upon completion, NIF will be the only laboratory in which scientists can examine the fusion processes that occur inside stars, supernovae, and exploding nuclear weapons and that may someday serve as a virtually inexhaustible energy source for electricity. Consider that in a fusion power plant 50 cups of water could provide the energy comparable to 2 tons of coal. Of paramount importance for achieving laser-driven fusion ignition with the least energy input is the synchronous and symmetric compression of the target fuel--a condition known as laser power balance. NIF's 48 PAMs thus must provide energy gain in an exquisitely stable and consistent manner. While building one module that meets performance requirements is challenging enough, our design has already enabled the construction and fielding of 48 PAMs that are stable, uniform, and interchangeable. PAM systems are being tested at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and the Atomic Weapons Enterprise of Great Britain has purchased the PAM power system.

  20. Proton core imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proton core imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion implosions J. L. De; published online 7 April 2006 A proton emission imaging system has been developed and used extensively the penetrating 14.7 MeV protons produced from D 3 He fusion reactions to produce emission images of the nuclear

  1. Comment on 'Species separation in inertial confinement fusion fuels'[Phys. Plasmas 20, 012701 (2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larroche, O. [CEA DIF, Bruyeres le Chatel, 91297 Arpajon Cedex (France)

    2013-04-15

    A recent paper presents numerical simulations of shock waves in a two-ion-component plasma, investigating how species separation occurring in the latter can affect the nuclear fusion yield of inertial confinement fusion targets. Here, it is shown that an important physical mechanism has obviously been omitted in those calculations, which thus lead to significantly overestimated results.

  2. Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, April--June 1995. Volume 5, No. 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The ICF Quarterly Reports is published four times each fiscal year by the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The journal reports selected current research within the ICF Program. Major areas of investigation presented here include fusion target theory and design, target fabrication, target experiments, and laser and optical science and technology.

  3. Osiris and SOMBRERO inertial confinement fusion power plant designs. Volume 1, Executive summary and overview, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W.R.; Bieri, R.L.; Monsler, M.J.

    1992-03-01

    Conceptual designs and assessments have been completed for two inertial fusion energy (IFE) electric power plants. The detailed designs and results of the assessment studies are presented in this report. Osiris is a heavy-ion-beam (HIB) driven power plant and SOMBRERO is a Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) laser-driven power plant. Both plants are sized for a net electric power of 1000 MWe.

  4. Advances in compact proton spectrometers for inertial-confinement fusion and plasma nuclear science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seguin, F. H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Sangster, T. C.; Roberts, S. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Compact wedge-range-filter proton spectrometers cover proton energies {approx}3-20 MeV. They have been used at the OMEGA laser facility for more than a decade for measuring spectra of primary D{sup 3}He protons in D{sup 3}He implosions, secondary D{sup 3}He protons in DD implosions, and ablator protons in DT implosions; they are now being used also at the National Ignition Facility. The spectra are used to determine proton yields, shell areal density at shock-bang time and compression-bang time, fuel areal density, and implosion symmetry. There have been changes in fabrication and in analysis algorithms, resulting in a wider energy range, better accuracy and precision, and better robustness for survivability with indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion experiments.

  5. A novel technique for single-shot energy-resolved 2D X-ray imaging of plasmas relevant for the Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Labate; P. Koester; T. Levato; L. A. Gizzi

    2012-11-02

    A novel X-ray diagnostic of laser-fusion plasmas is described, allowing 2D monochromatic images of hot, dense plasmas to be obtained in any X-ray photon energy range, over a large domain, on a single-shot basis. The device (named Energy-encoded Pinhole Camera - EPiC) is based upon the use of an array of many pinholes coupled to a large area CCD camera operating in the single-photon mode. The available X-ray spectral domain is only limited by the Quantum Efficiency of scientific-grade X-ray CCD cameras, thus extending from a few keV up to a few tens of keV. Spectral 2D images of the emitting plasma can be obtained at any X-ray photon energy provided that a sufficient number of photons had been collected at the desired energy. Results from recent ICF related experiments will be reported in order to detail the new diagnostic.

  6. A novel technique for single-shot energy-resolved 2D X-ray imaging of plasmas relevant for the Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labate, L; Levato, T; Gizzi, L A

    2012-01-01

    A novel X-ray diagnostic of laser-fusion plasmas is described, allowing 2D monochromatic images of hot, dense plasmas to be obtained in any X-ray photon energy range, over a large domain, on a single-shot basis. The device (named Energy-encoded Pinhole Camera - EPiC) is based upon the use of an array of many pinholes coupled to a large area CCD camera operating in the single-photon mode. The available X-ray spectral domain is only limited by the Quantum Efficiency of scientific-grade X-ray CCD cameras, thus extending from a few keV up to a few tens of keV. Spectral 2D images of the emitting plasma can be obtained at any X-ray photon energy provided that a sufficient number of photons had been collected at the desired energy. Results from recent ICF related experiments will be reported in order to detail the new diagnostic.

  7. Fatigue cracking of a bare steel first wall in an inertial confinement fusion chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, R. M.; Abbott, R. P.; Havstad, M. A.; Dunne, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    Inertial confinement fusion power plants will deposit high energy X-rays onto the outer surfaces of the first wall many times a second for the lifetime of the plant. These X-rays create brief temperature spikes in the first few microns of the wall, which cause an associated highly compressive stress response on the surface of the material. The periodicity of this stress pulse is a concern due to the possibility of fatigue cracking of the wall. We have used finite element analyses to simulate the conditions present on the first wall in order to evaluate the driving force of crack propagation on fusion-facing surface cracks. Analysis results indicate that the X-ray induced plastic compressive stress creates a region of residual tension on the surface between pulses. This tension film will likely result in surface cracking upon repeated cycling. Additionally, the compressive pulse may induce plasticity ahead of the crack tip, leaving residual tension in its wake. However, the stress amplitude decreases dramatically for depths greater than 80–100 ?m into the fusion-facing surface. Crack propagation models as well as stress-life estimates agree that even though small cracks may form on the surface of the wall, they are unlikely to propagate further than 100 ?m without assistance from creep or grain erosion phenomena.

  8. Effect of experimentally observed hydrogenic fractionation on inertial confinement fusion ignition target performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenty, P. W.; Wittman, M. D.; Harding, D. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2006-10-01

    The need of cryogenic hydrogenic fuels in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition targets has been long been established. Efficient implosion of such targets has mandated keeping the adiabat of the main fuel layer at low levels to ensure drive energies are kept at reasonable minima. The use of cryogenic fuels helps meet this requirement and has therefore become the standard in most ICF ignition designs. To date most theoretical ICF ignition target designs have assumed a homogeneous layer of deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel kept slightly below the triple point. However, recent work has indicated that, as cryogenic fuel layers are formed inside an ICF capsule, isotopic dissociation of the tritium (T), deuterium (D), and DT takes place leading to a 'fractionation' of the final ice layer. This paper will numerically investigate the effects that various scenarios of fractionation have on hot-spot formation, ignition, and burn in ICF ignition target designs.

  9. Diagnosing indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion implosions with charged particles This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diagnosing indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion implosions with charged particles.1088/0741-3335/52/12/124027 Diagnosing indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion implosions with charged particles C K Li1 , F H S are in colour only in the electronic version) 1. Introduction Achieving inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF

  10. He-proton emission imaging for inertial-confinement-fusion experiments (invited)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D3 He-proton emission imaging for inertial-confinement-fusion experiments (invited) F. H. Séguin, Livermore, California 94550 (Presented on 19 April 2004; published 5 October 2004) Proton emission imaging cameras, in combination with proton spectrometers and a proton temporal diagnostic, provide a great deal

  11. D-T gamma-to-neutron branching ratio determined from inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D-T gamma-to-neutron branching ratio determined from inertial confinement fusion plasmas Y. Kim, J. M. Mack, H. W. Herrmann, C. S. Young, G. M. Hale et al. Citation: Phys. Plasmas 19, 056313 (2012 in ignition-scale implosions on the NIF Phys. Plasmas 19, 056307 (2012) Experimental and theoretical

  12. Damage production and accumulation in SiC structures in inertial and magnetic fusion systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    damage and helium production on defect accumulation in SiC/SiC composites are also discussed. Ó 2010Damage production and accumulation in SiC structures in inertial and magnetic fusion systems M spectrum, and pulsed nature of neutron production result in significant differences in damage parameters

  13. Implosion Experiments using Glass Ablators for Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smalyuk, V. A.

    Direct-drive implosions with 20-?m-thick glass shells were conducted on the Omega Laser Facility to test the performance of high-Z glass ablators for direct-drive, inertial confinement fusion. The x-ray signal caused by ...

  14. Neutron penumbral imaging simulation and reconstruction for Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xian-You Wang; Zhen-yun Fang; Yun-qing Tang; Zhi-Cheng Tang; Hong Xiao; Ming Xu

    2012-07-08

    Neutron penumbral imaging technique has been successfully used as the diagnosis method in Inertial Con?ned Fusion. To help the design of the imaging systems in the future in CHINA. We construct the Monte carlo imaging system by Geant4. Use the point spread function from the simulation and decode algorithm (Lucy-Rechardson algorithm) we got the recovery image.

  15. Neutron penumbral imaging simulation and reconstruction for Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xian-You; Tang, Yun-qing; Tang, Zhi-Cheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Neutron penumbral imaging technique has been successfully used as the diagnosis method in Inertial Con?ned Fusion. To help the design of the imaging systems in the future in CHINA. We construct the Monte carlo imaging system by Geant4. Use the point spread function from the simulation and decode algorithm (Lucy-Rechardson algorithm) we got the recovery image.

  16. (Experimental development, testing and research work in support of the inertial confinement fusion program)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; Luckhardt, R.; Terry, N.; Drake, D.; Gaines, J. (eds.)

    1990-04-27

    This KMS Fusion Semi-Annual Technical Report covers the period October 1989 through March 1990. It contains a review of work performed by KMS Fusion, Inc. (KMSF), in support of the national program to achieve inertially confined fusion (ICF). A major section of the report is devoted to target technology, a field which is expected to play an increasingly important role in the overall KMSF fusion effort. Among the highlights of our efforts in this area covered in this report are: improvements and new developments in target fabrication techniques, including a discussion of techniques for introducing gaussian bumps and bands on target surfaces. Development of a single automated system for the interferometric characterization of transparent shells. Residual gas analysis of the blowing gases contained in glass shells made from xerogels. These usually include CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, and are objectionable because they dilute the fuel. Efforts to observe the ice layers formed in the {beta}-layering process in cryogenic targets, and to simulate the formation of these layers. In addition to our work on target technology, we conducted experiments with the Chroma laser and supported the ICF effort at other labs with theoretical and computational support as well as diagnostic development. Included in the work covered in this report are: experiments on Chroma to study interpenetration of and ionization balance in laser generated plasmas. Diagnostic development, including an optical probe for the Aurora laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and a high energy x-ray continuum spectrograph for Aurora. Investigation of the radiation cooling instability as a possible mechanism for the generation of relatively cold, dense jets observed in ICF experiments.

  17. Simultaneous usage of pinhole and penumbral apertures for imaging small scale neutron sources from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guler, N.; Volegov, P.; Danly, C. R.; Grim, G. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to understand the basic principles of creating self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic capsules. The neutron imaging diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by observing neutron images in two different energy bands for primary (13-17 MeV) and down-scattered (6-12 MeV) neutrons. From this, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. These experiments provide small sources with high yield neutron flux. An aperture design that includes an array of pinholes and penumbral apertures has provided the opportunity to image the same source with two different techniques. This allows for an evaluation of these different aperture designs and reconstruction algorithms.

  18. Study of fusion regimes in an inertial electrostatic confinement device using the new eclipse disk diagnostic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murali, S. Krupakar; Cipiti, B.B.; Santarius, J.F.; Kulcinski, G.L. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    New diagnostics are required to understand the physics operation of an inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device. In an attempt to understand the fusion source regimes within the IEC device, a new diagnostic called the eclipse disk has been introduced. This diagnostic was used to exploit the byproduct protons' energy difference between the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium--an isotope of helium with two protons and one neutron (D-{sup 3}He) reactions to study the contributions of the protons generated from various source regimes. These source regimes are divided into five categories namely: converged core, embedded, beam background, volume, and wall-surface sources. The eclipse disk diagnostic has provided the first confirmed evidence that D-{sup 3}He reactions are predominantly embedded reactions. It has been observed that at the present operating power levels (6-10 kW) most of the D-D reactions occur in the volume of the chamber caused by the charge exchanged neutrals, and the converged core contribution is significant only for D-D reactions. Since the branching ratio for the proton and neutron generation in a D-D fusion reaction is {approx}50%, it is inferred that the proton to neutron count ratio is a better parameter to monitor than either proton or neutron counts measured alone while studying the source regimes. This parameter may also be used for studying the potential wells within the cathode grid.

  19. Inertial Fusion Power Plant Concept of Operations and Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anklam, T.; Knutson, B.; Dunne, A. M.; Kasper, J.; Sheehan, T.; Lang, D.; Roberts, V.; Mau, D.

    2015-01-15

    Parsons and LLNL scientists and engineers performed design and engineering work for power plant pre-conceptual designs based on the anticipated laser fusion demonstrations at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Work included identifying concepts of operations and maintenance (O&M) and associated requirements relevant to fusion power plant systems analysis. A laser fusion power plant would incorporate a large process and power conversion facility with a laser system and fusion engine serving as the heat source, based in part on some of the systems and technologies advanced at NIF. Process operations would be similar in scope to those used in chemical, oil refinery, and nuclear waste processing facilities, while power conversion operations would be similar to those used in commercial thermal power plants. While some aspects of the tritium fuel cycle can be based on existing technologies, many aspects of a laser fusion power plant presents several important and unique O&M requirements that demand new solutions. For example, onsite recovery of tritium; unique remote material handling systems for use in areas with high radiation, radioactive materials, or high temperatures; a five-year fusion engine target chamber replacement cycle with other annual and multi-year cycles anticipated for major maintenance of other systems, structures, and components (SSC); and unique SSC for fusion target waste recycling streams. This paper describes fusion power plant O&M concepts and requirements, how O&M requirements could be met in design, and how basic organizational and planning issues can be addressed for a safe, reliable, economic, and feasible fusion power plant.

  20. ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 79 - SEPT. 80

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    and D. Keefe, "Inertial Confinement Fusion Systems Usingpresented at the Inertial Confinement Fusion Conf. , Sanapplication to inertial confinement fusion. Betatrons

  1. Fusion Energy Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017 The NERSC Program Requirements Review "Large Scale Production Computing and...

  2. How Fusion Energy Works

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fusion energy is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. As part of How Energy Works, we'll cover everything from fuel sources to plasma physics and beyond.

  3. Improving particle confinement in inertial electrostatic fusion for spacecraft power and propulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Carl, 1977-

    2007-01-01

    Fusion energy is attractive for use in future spacecraft because of improved fuel energy density and reduced radioactivity compared with fission power. Unfortunately, the most promising means of generating fusion power on ...

  4. Metrics for long wavelength asymmetries in inertial confinement fusion implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kritcher, A. L.; Town, R.; Bradley, D.; Clark, D.; Spears, B.; Jones, O.; Haan, S.; Springer, P. T.; Lindl, J.; Callahan, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Scott, R. H. H. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)] [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    We investigate yield degradation due to applied low mode P2 and P4 asymmetries in layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. This study has been performed with a large database of >600 2D simulations. We show that low mode radiation induced drive asymmetries can result in significant deviation between the core hot spot shape and the fuel ?R shape at peak compression. In addition, we show that significant residual kinetic energy at peak compression can be induced by these low mode asymmetries. We have developed a metric, which is a function of the hot spot shape, fuel ?R shape, and residual kinetic energy at peak compression, that is well correlated to yield degradation due to low mode shape perturbations. It is shown that the ?R shape and residual kinetic energy cannot, in general, be recovered by inducing counter asymmetries to make the hot core emission symmetric. In addition, we show that the yield degradation due to low mode asymmetries is well correlated to measurements of time dependent shape throughout the entire implosion, including early time shock symmetry and inflight fuel symmetry.

  5. Index of light ion inertial confinement fusion publications and presentations January 1989 through December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    This report lists publications and presentations that are related to inertial confinement fusion and were authored or coauthored by Sandians in the Pulsed Power Sciences Center from 1989 through 1993. The 661 publications and presentations are categorized into the following general topics: (1) reviews, (2) ion sources, (3) ion diodes, (4) plasma opening switches, (5) ion beam transport, (6) targets and deposition physics, (7) advanced driver and pulsed power technology development, (8) diagnostics, and (9) code development. Research in these areas is arranged by topic in chronological order, with the early efforts under each topic presented first. The work is also categorized alphabetically by first author. A list of acronyms, abbreviations, and definitions of use in understanding light ion inertial confinement fusion research is also included.

  6. Simulating the magnetized liner inertial fusion plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    The recently proposed magnetized liner inertial fusion approach to a Z-pinch driven fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] is based on the use of an axial magnetic field to provide plasma thermal insulation from the walls of the imploding liner. The characteristic plasma transport regimes in the proposed approach cover parameter domains that have not been studied yet in either magnetic confinement or inertial confinement experiments. In this article, an analysis is presented of the scalability of the key physical processes that determine the plasma confinement. The dimensionless scaling parameters are identified and conclusion is drawn that the plasma behavior in scaled-down experiments can correctly represent the full-scale plasma, provided these parameters are approximately the same in two systems. This observation is important in that smaller-scale experiments typically have better diagnostic access and more experiments per year are possible.

  7. Investigating inertial confinement fusion target fuel conditions through x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Stephanie B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are designed to produce hot, dense fuel in a neutron-producing core that is surrounded by a shell of compressing material. The x-rays emitted from ICF plasmas can be analyzed to reveal details of the temperatures, densities, gradients, velocities, and mix characteristics of ICF targets. Such diagnostics are critical to understand the target performance and to improve the predictive power of simulation codes.

  8. Mode 1 drive asymmetry in inertial confinement fusion implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spears, Brian K. Edwards, M. J.; Hatchett, S.; Kritcher, A.; Lindl, J.; Munro, D.; Patel, P.; Robey, H. F.; Town, R. P. J.; Kilkenny, J.; Knauer, J.

    2014-04-15

    Mode 1 radiation drive asymmetry (pole-to-pole imbalance) at significant levels can have a large impact on inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This asymmetry distorts the cold confining shell and drives a high-speed jet through the hot spot. The perturbed hot spot shows increased residual kinetic energy and reduced internal energy, and it achieves reduced pressure and neutron yield. The altered implosion physics manifests itself in observable diagnostic signatures, especially the neutron spectrum which can be used to measure the neutron-weighted flow velocity, apparent ion temperature, and neutron downscattering. Numerical simulations of implosions with mode 1 asymmetry show that the resultant simulated diagnostic signatures are moved toward the values observed in many NIF experiments. The diagnostic output can also be used to build a set of integrated implosion performance metrics. The metrics indicate that P{sub 1} has a significant impact on implosion performance and must be carefully controlled in NIF implosions.

  9. Optimized beryllium target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simakov, Andrei N., E-mail: simakov@lanl.gov; Wilson, Douglas C.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Kline, John L.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, Daniel S.; Milovich, Jose L.; Salmonson, Jay D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    For indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, Beryllium (Be) ablators offer a number of important advantages as compared with other ablator materials, e.g., plastic and high density carbon. In particular, the low opacity and relatively high density of Be lead to higher rocket efficiencies giving a higher fuel implosion velocity for a given X-ray drive; and to higher ablation velocities providing more ablative stabilization and reducing the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on the implosion performance. Be ablator advantages provide a larger target design optimization space and can significantly improve the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] ignition margin. Herein, we summarize the Be advantages, briefly review NIF Be target history, and present a modern, optimized, low adiabat, Revision 6 NIF Be target design. This design takes advantage of knowledge gained from recent NIF experiments, including more realistic levels of laser-plasma energy backscatter, degraded hohlraum-capsule coupling, and the presence of cross-beam energy transfer.

  10. Self-similar structure and experimental signatures of suprathermal ion distribution in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kagan, Grigory; Rinderknecht, H G; Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Huang, C -K

    2015-01-01

    The distribution function of suprathermal ions is found to be self-similar under conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion hot-spots. By utilizing this feature, interference between the hydro-instabilities and kinetic effects is for the first time assessed quantitatively to find that the instabilities substantially aggravate the fusion reactivity reduction. The ion tail depletion is also shown to lower the experimentally inferred ion temperature, a novel kinetic effect that may explain the discrepancy between the exploding pusher experiments and rad-hydro simulations and contribute to the observation that temperature inferred from DD reaction products is lower than from DT at National Ignition Facility.

  11. Self-similar structure and experimental signatures of suprathermal ion distribution in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kagan, Grigory; Svyatskiy, D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Huang, C. -K.; McDevitt, C. J.

    2015-09-03

    The distribution function of suprathermal ions is found to be self-similar under conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion hot spots. By utilizing this feature, interference between the hydrodynamic instabilities and kinetic effects is for the first time assessed quantitatively to find that the instabilities substantially aggravate the fusion reactivity reduction. Thus, the ion tail depletion is also shown to lower the experimentally inferred ion temperature, a novel kinetic effect that may explain the discrepancy between the exploding pusher experiments and rad-hydro simulations and contribute to the observation that temperature inferred from DD reaction products is lower than from DT atmore »the National Ignition Facility.« less

  12. The 2002 Fusion Summer Study will be a forum for the critical assessment of major next-steps in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to the long range planning to examine goals and proposed initiatives in burning plasma science in magnetic fusion energy and integrated research experiments in inertial fusion energy. This meeting is open to every member of the fusion energy

  13. Ion microtomography and particle-induced x-ray emission analysis of direct drive inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antolak, A.J.; Pontau, A.E.; Morse, D.H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)); Weirup, D.L.; Heikkinen, D.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)); Cholewa, M.; Bench, G.S.; Legge, G.J.F. (Micro Analytical Research Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia))

    1992-07-01

    The complementary techniques of ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are used to provide submicron-scale characterization of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets for density uniformity, sphericity, and trace-element spatial distributions. ICF target quality control in the laser fusion program is important to ensure that the energy deposition from the lasers results in uniform compression and minimization of Rayleigh--Taylor instabilities. We obtain 1% total electron density determinations using IMT with spatial resolution approaching 2 {mu}m. Utilizing PIXE, we can map out dopant and impurity distributions with elemental detection sensitivities on the order of a few parts per million. We present examples of ICF target characterization by IMT and PIXE in order to demonstrate their potential impact in assessing target fabrication processes.

  14. Fusion Energy Sciences Program Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Energy Sciences Program Mission The Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) program leads the national for an economically and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. The National Energy Policy states that fusion power has the long-range potential to serve as an abundant and clean source of energy and recommends

  15. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-10-20

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply methods would be required to embark on a serious R&D program for this application.

  16. Real viscosity effects in inertial confinement fusion target deuterium–tritium micro-implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R. J., E-mail: rodmason01@msn.com; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Faehl, R. J. [Research Applications Corporation, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)] [Research Applications Corporation, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    We report on numerical studies of real viscous effects on the implosion characteristics of imploded DT micro-targets. We use the implicit ePLAS code to perform 2D simulations of spherical and slightly ellipsoidal DT shells on DT gas filled ?40??m diameter voids. Before their final implosions the shells have been nearly adiabatically compressed up to 10{sup 2} or 10{sup 3}?g/cm{sup 3} densities. While the use of conventional artificial viscosity can lead to high central densities for initially spherical shells, we find that a real physical viscosity from ion-ion collisions can give a high (>20?keV) central temperature but severely reduced central density (<200?g/cm{sup 3}), while the elliptical shells evidence p?=?2 distortion of the heated central fuel region. These results suggest that the general use of artificial viscosities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) modeling may have lead to overly optimistic yields for current NIF targets and that polar direct drive with more energy for the imploding capsule may be needed for ultimate ICF success.

  17. Novel free-form hohlraum shape design and optimization for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei Ding, Yongkun; Huang, Yunbao

    2014-10-15

    The hohlraum shape attracts considerable attention because there is no successful ignition method for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility. The available hohlraums are typically designed with simple conic curves, including ellipses, parabolas, arcs, or Lame curves, which allow only a few design parameters for the shape optimization, making it difficult to improve the performance, e.g., the energy coupling efficiency or radiation drive symmetry. A novel free-form hohlraum design and optimization approach based on the non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model is proposed. In the present study, (1) all kinds of hohlraum shapes can be uniformly represented using NURBS, which is greatly beneficial for obtaining the optimal available hohlraum shapes, and (2) such free-form uniform representation enables us to obtain an optimal shape over a large design domain for the hohlraum with a more uniform radiation and higher drive temperature of the fuel capsule. Finally, a hohlraum is optimized and evaluated with respect to the drive temperature and symmetry at the Shenguang III laser facility in China. The drive temperature and symmetry results indicate that such a free-form representation is advantageous over available hohlraum shapes because it can substantially expand the shape design domain so as to obtain an optimal hohlraum with high performance.

  18. Behavior of Elemental Tritium in Atmospheric Diffusion in Inertial Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velarde, Marta; Perlado, Jose Manuel [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    2003-05-15

    The evaluation of the radiological environmental impact of tritium emission to the atmosphere from inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactors has different chronological phases. In the release primary phase, the important factors are the boundary conditions: atmospheric and geometric grid from the point of emission. The second phase occurs when the tritium is deposited in the ground. This phase is important in order to account for the dosimetric effects of tritium, and it is a key factor in the chronic and collective doses of the population.The final internal irradiation dose is calculated as the addition of doses by ingestion, by inhalation of the primary plume, by absorption on the skin, and inhalation by reemission to the atmosphere.Each of the two chemical forms (HT and HTO) of tritium present in the environment from potential IFE reactor releases contributes in different ways to the most exposed individual and the committed effective dose equivalent (50-CEDE). The HTO presents a much larger percentage of the internal irradiation from inhalation and absorption through the skin than HT. However, in releases where HT represents 100%, the contributions to the total effective dose by ingestion and reemission are important.

  19. Comparison of electric and magnetic quadrupole focusing for the low energy end of an induction-linac-ICF (Inertial-Confinement-Fusion) driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, C.H.

    1987-04-01

    This report compares two physics designs of the low energy end of an induction linac-ICF driver: one using electric quadrupole focusing of many parallel beams followed by transverse combining; the other using magnetic quadrupole focusing of fewer beams without beam combining. Because of larger head-to-tail velocity spread and a consequent rapid current amplification in a magnetic focusing channel, the overall accelerator size of the design using magnetic focusing is comparable to that using electric focusing.

  20. Species separation and modification of neutron diagnostics in inertial-confinement fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inglebert, Aurelie; Larroche, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The different behaviours of deuterium (D) and tritium (T) in the hot spot of marginally-igniting cryogenic DT inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) targets are investigated with an ion Fokker-Planck model. With respect to an equivalent single-species model, a higher density and a higher temperature are found for T in the stagnation phase of the target implosion. In addition, the stagnating hot spot is found to be less dense but hotter than in the single-species case. As a result, the fusion reaction yield in the hot spot is significantly increased. Fusion neutron diagnostics of the implosion find a larger ion temperature as deduced from DT reactions than from DD reactions, in good agreement with NIF experimental results. ICF target designs should thus definitely take ion-kinetic effects into account.

  1. Homodyne target tracking for direct drive laser inertial fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spalding, Jon David

    2009-01-01

    thermonuclear burn. This implosion is repeated several times per second within a chamber that recovers excess energy

  2. The mitigating effect of magnetic fields on Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2013-05-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at interfaces of disparate mass densities have long been known to generate magnetic fields during inertial confinement fusion implosions. An externally applied magnetic field can also be efficiently amplified by RT instabilities. The focus here is on magnetic field generation and amplification at the gas-ice interface which is RT unstable during the deceleration phase of the implosion. RT instabilities lead to undesirable mix of hot and cold plasmas which enhances thermal energy loss and tends to produce a more massive warm-spot instead of a hot-spot. Two mechanisms are shown here to mitigate the thermal energy loss from the hot-spot. The first mechanism is the reduction of electron thermal conductivity with interface-aligned magnetic fields. This can occur through self-generated magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect as well as through externally applied magnetic fields that undergo an exponential growth via the stretch-and-fold magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. Self-generated magnetic fields during RT evolution can result in a factor of 2?10 decrease in the electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface, while externally applied magnetic fields that are compressed to 6–1000 T at the onset of deceleration (corresponding to pre-implosion external fields of 0.06–10 T) could result in a factor of 2–500 reduction in electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface. The second mechanism to mitigate thermal energy loss from the hot-spot is to decrease the interface mixing area between the hot and cold plasmas. This is achieved through large external magnetic fields of 1000 T at the onset of deceleration which damp short-wavelength RT modes and long-wavelength Kelvin-Helmholtz modes thus significantly slowing the RT growth and reducing mix.

  3. Suggested Path to Develop Inertial Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    experiments NIF Polar DD and LPI experiments Nike LPI and hydro experiments 3-5 kJ full intensity KrF IFE beamline ~20 kJ on target full intensity & large plasma Simulations & Theory 2D hydro-implosions Develop better physics models. Simulations & theory 3D hydro-implosions Improved LPI simulations Present & near

  4. Thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion and comparison with magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betti, R.; Chang, P. Y.; Anderson, K. S.; Nora, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fusion Science Center for Extreme States of Matter, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Spears, B. K.; Edwards, J.; Lindl, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fatenejad, M. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); McCrory, R. L. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Shvarts, D. [NRCN, Negev and Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84015 (Israel)

    2010-05-15

    The physics of thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is presented in the familiar frame of a Lawson-type criterion. The product of the plasma pressure and confinement time Ptau for ICF is cast in terms of measurable parameters and its value is estimated for cryogenic implosions. An overall ignition parameter chi including pressure, confinement time, and temperature is derived to complement the product Ptau. A metric for performance assessment should include both chi and Ptau. The ignition parameter and the product Ptau are compared between inertial and magnetic-confinement fusion. It is found that cryogenic implosions on OMEGA[T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have achieved Ptauapprox1.5 atm s comparable to large tokamaks such as the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] where Ptauapprox1 atm s. Since OMEGA implosions are relatively cold (Tapprox2 keV), their overall ignition parameter chiapprox0.02-0.03 is approx5x lower than in JET (chiapprox0.13), where the average temperature is about 10 keV.

  5. Alternative hot spot formation techniques using liquid deuterium-tritium layer inertial confinement fusion capsules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Leeper, R. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    The baseline DT ice layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition capsule design requires a hot spot convergence ratio of ?34 with a hot spot that is formed from DT mass originally residing in a very thin layer at the inner DT ice surface. In the present paper, we propose alternative ICF capsule designs in which the hot spot is formed mostly or entirely from mass originating within a spherical volume of DT vapor. Simulations of the implosion and hot spot formation in two DT liquid layer ICF capsule concepts—the DT wetted hydrocarbon (CH) foam concept and the “fast formed liquid” (FFL) concept—are described and compared to simulations of standard DT ice layer capsules. 1D simulations are used to compare the drive requirements, the optimal shock timing, the radial dependence of hot spot specific energy gain, and the hot spot convergence ratio in low vapor pressure (DT ice) and high vapor pressure (DT liquid) capsules. 2D simulations are used to compare the relative sensitivities to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries in the DT ice and DT liquid capsules. It is found that the overall thermonuclear yields predicted for DT liquid layer capsules are less than yields predicted for DT ice layer capsules in simulations using comparable capsule size and absorbed energy. However, the wetted foam and FFL designs allow for flexibility in hot spot convergence ratio through the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density, with a potentially improved robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetry.

  6. Plasma Jet Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy applications focus of this talk Accretion disk experiment using ~12 plasma guns, with goal): subset of guns fire DT jets forming target shell immediately followed by remainder of guns firing DT/Xe composite jets forming afterburner and heavy liner to compress DT target Option (2): all guns fire

  7. Prospects for x-ray polarimetry measurements of magnetic fields in magnetized liner inertial fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Alan G. Gilmore, Mark

    2014-11-15

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments, where a metal liner is imploded to compress a magnetized seed plasma may generate peak magnetic fields ?10{sup 4} T (100 Megagauss) over small volumes (?10{sup ?10}m{sup 3}) at high plasma densities (?10{sup 28}m{sup ?3}) on 100 ns time scales. Such conditions are extremely challenging to diagnose. We discuss the possibility of, and issues involved in, using polarimetry techniques at x-ray wavelengths to measure magnetic fields under these extreme conditions.

  8. Magnetic Probe to Study Plasma Jets for Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martens, Daniel; Hsu, Scott C.

    2012-08-16

    A probe has been constructed to measure the magnetic field of a plasma jet generated by a pulsed plasma rail-gun. The probe consists of two sets of three orthogonally-oriented commercial chip inductors to measure the three-dimensional magnetic field vector at two separate positions in order to give information about the magnetic field evolution within the jet. The strength and evolution of the magnetic field is one of many factors important in evaluating the use of supersonic plasma jets for forming imploding spherical plasma liners as a standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion.

  9. A Concept Exploration Program in Fast Ignition Inertial Fusion — Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Richarad Burnite; Freeman, Richard R.; Van Woekom, L. D.; Key, M.; MacKinnon, Andrew J.; Wei, Mingsheng

    2014-02-27

    The Fast Ignition (FI) approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) holds particular promise for fusion energy because the independently generated compression and ignition pulses allow ignition with less compression, resulting in (potentially) higher gain. Exploiting this concept effectively requires an understanding of the transport of electrons in prototypical geometries and at relevant densities and temperatures. Our consortium, which included General Atomics (GA), The Ohio State University (OSU), the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), University of California, Davis (UC-Davis), and Princeton University under this grant (~$850K/yr) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under a companion grant, won awards in 2000, renewed in 2005, to investigate the physics of electron injection and transport relevant to the FI concept, which is crucial to understand electron transport in integral FI targets. In the last two years we have also been preparing diagnostics and starting to extend the work to electron transport into hot targets. A complementary effort, the Advanced Concept Exploration (ACE) program for Fast Ignition, was funded starting in 2006 to integrate this understanding into ignition schemes specifically suitable for the initial fast ignition attempts on OMEGA and National Ignition Facility (NIF), and during that time these two programs have been managed as a coordinated effort. This result of our 7+ years of effort has been substantial. Utilizing collaborations to access the most capable laser facilities around the world, we have developed an understanding that was summarized in a Fusion Science & Technology 2006, Special Issue on Fast Ignition. The author lists in the 20 articles in that issue are dominated by our group (we are first authors in four of them). Our group has published, or submitted 67 articles, including 1 in Nature, 2 Nature Physics, 10 Physical Review Letters, 8 Review of Scientific Instruments, and has been invited to give numerous talks at national and international conferences (including APS-DPP, IAEA, FIW). The advent of PW capabilities – at Rutherford Appleton Lab (UK) and then at Titan (LLNL) (2005 and 2006, respectively), was a major step toward experiments in ultra-high intensity high-energy FI relevant regime. The next step comes with the activation of OMEGA EP at LLE, followed shortly by NIF-ARC at LLNL. These capabilities allow production of hot dense material for electron transport studies. In this transitional period, considerable effort has been spent in developing the necessary tools and experiments for electron transport in hot and dense plasmas. In addition, substantial new data on electron generation and transport in metallic targets has been produced and analyzed. Progress in FI detailed in §2 is related to the Concept Exploration Program (CEP) objectives; this section is a summary of the publications and presentations listed in §5. This work has benefited from the synergy with work on related Department of Energy (DOE) grants, the Fusion Science Center and the Fast Ignition Advanced Concept Exploration grant, and from our interactions with overseas colleagues, primarily at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, and the Institute for Laser Engineering in Japan.

  10. ITER Fusion Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Norbert Holtkamp

    2010-01-08

    ITER (in Latin ?the way?) is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier over one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen ? deuterium and tritium ? fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q ? 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). The ITER Organization was officially established in Cadarache, France, on 24 October 2007. The seven members engaged in the project ? China, the European Union, India, Japan, Korea, Russia and the United States ? represent more than half the world?s population. The costs for ITER are shared by the seven members. The cost for the construction will be approximately 5.5 billion Euros, a similar amount is foreseen for the twenty-year phase of operation and the subsequent decommissioning.

  11. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoffman, Nelson M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)] (ORCID:000000030178767X); Zimmerman, George B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Molvig, Kim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rinderknecht, Hans G. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Albright, B. J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Simakov, Andrei N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sio, Hong [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:000000017274236X); Zylstra, Alex B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Johnson, Maria Gatu [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Séguin, Fredrick H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Frenje, Johan A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000168460378); Li, C. K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Petrasso, Richard D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000258834054); Higdon, David M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Srinivasan, Gowri [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Glebov, Vladimir Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Stoeckl, Christian [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Seka, Wolf [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Sangster, T. Craig [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)] (ORCID:0000000340402672)

    2015-05-01

    “Reduced” (i.e., simplified or approximate) ion-kinetic (RIK) models in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations permit a useful description of inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) implosions where kinetic deviations from hydrodynamic behavior are important. For implosions in or near the kinetic regime (i.e., when ion mean free paths are comparable to the capsule size), simulations using a RIK model give a detailed picture of the time- and space-dependent structure of imploding capsules, allow an assessment of the relative importance of various kinetic processes during the implosion, enable explanations of past and current observations, and permit predictions of the results of future experiments. The RIK simulation method described here uses moment-based reduced kinetic models for transport of mass, momentum, and energy by long-mean-free-path ions, a model for the decrease of fusion reactivity owing to the associated modification of the ion distribution function, and a model of hydrodynamic turbulent mixing. The transport models are based on local gradient-diffusion approximations for the transport of moments of the ion distribution functions, with coefficients to impose flux limiting or account for transport modification. After calibration against a reference set of ICF implosions spanning the hydrodynamic-to-kinetic transition, the method has useful, quantifiable predictive ability over a broad range of capsule parameter space. Calibrated RIK simulations show that an important contributor to ion species separation in ICF capsule implosions is the preferential flux of longer-mean-free-path species out of the fuel and into the shell, leaving the fuel relatively enriched in species with shorter mean free paths. Also, the transport of ion thermal energy is enhanced in the kinetic regime, causing the fuel region to have a more uniform, lower ion temperature, extending over a larger volume, than implied by clean simulations. We expect that the success of our simple approach will motivate continued theoretical research into the development of first-principles-based, comprehensive, self-consistent, yet useable models of kinetic multispecies ion behavior in ICF plasmas.

  12. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoffman, Nelson M.; Zimmerman, George B.; Molvig, Kim; Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, Michael J.; Albright, B. J.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Sio, Hong; Zylstra, Alex B.; Johnson, Maria Gatu; et al

    2015-05-19

    “Reduced” (i.e., simplified or approximate) ion-kinetic (RIK) models in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations permit a useful description of inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) implosions where kinetic deviations from hydrodynamic behavior are important. For implosions in or near the kinetic regime (i.e., when ion mean free paths are comparable to the capsule size), simulations using a RIK model give a detailed picture of the time- and space-dependent structure of imploding capsules, allow an assessment of the relative importance of various kinetic processes during the implosion, enable explanations of past and current observations, and permit predictions of the results of future experiments. The RIK simulation method describedmore »here uses moment-based reduced kinetic models for transport of mass, momentum, and energy by long-mean-free-path ions, a model for the decrease of fusion reactivity owing to the associated modification of the ion distribution function, and a model of hydrodynamic turbulent mixing. The transport models are based on local gradient-diffusion approximations for the transport of moments of the ion distribution functions, with coefficients to impose flux limiting or account for transport modification. After calibration against a reference set of ICF implosions spanning the hydrodynamic-to-kinetic transition, the method has useful, quantifiable predictive ability over a broad range of capsule parameter space. Calibrated RIK simulations show that an important contributor to ion species separation in ICF capsule implosions is the preferential flux of longer-mean-free-path species out of the fuel and into the shell, leaving the fuel relatively enriched in species with shorter mean free paths. Also, the transport of ion thermal energy is enhanced in the kinetic regime, causing the fuel region to have a more uniform, lower ion temperature, extending over a larger volume, than implied by clean simulations. We expect that the success of our simple approach will motivate continued theoretical research into the development of first-principles-based, comprehensive, self-consistent, yet useable models of kinetic multispecies ion behavior in ICF plasmas.« less

  13. Ion beam requirements for fast ignition of inertial fusion targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honrubia, J J

    2015-01-01

    Ion beam requirements for fast ignition are investigated by numerical simulation taking into account new effects such as ion beam divergence not included before. We assume that ions are generated by the TNSA scheme in a curved foil placed inside a re-entrant cone and focused on the cone apex or beyond. From the focusing point to the compressed core ions propagate with a given divergence angle. Ignition energies are obtained for two compressed fuel configurations heated by proton and carbon ion beams. The dependence of the ignition energies on the beam divergence angle and on the position of the ion beam focusing point have been analysed. Comparison between TNSA and quasi-monoenergetic ions is also shown.

  14. Magnetic-compression/magnetized-target fusion (MAGO/MTF): A marriage of inertial and magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    Intermediate between magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF) in time and density scales is an area of research now known in the US as magnetized target fusion (MTF) and in Russian as MAGO (MAGnitnoye Obzhatiye--magnetic compression). MAGO/MTF uses a magnetic field and preheated, wall-confined plasma fusion fuel within an implodable fusion target. The magnetic field suppresses thermal conduction losses in the fuel during the target implosion and hydrodynamic compression heating process. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (i.e., ICF), MAGO/MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm (e.g., 100 eV or higher), magnetized (e.g., 100 kG) plasma within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression by an imploding pusher, of which a magnetically driven imploding liner is one example. In this paper, the authors present ongoing activities and potential future activities in this relatively unexplored area of controlled thermonuclear fusion.

  15. On the change in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions upon using an ab initio multiphase DT equation of state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caillabet, Laurent; Salin, Gwenaël; Mazevet, Stéphane; Loubeyre, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Improving the description of the equation of state (EoS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target (Hu et al., PRL 104, 235003 (2010)). We use here an advanced multi-phase equation of state (EoS), based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over possible uncertainties of the EoS. Two different target designs are discussed, for shock ignition and self-ignition. In the first case, the areal density and thermonuclear energy can be recovered by slightly increasing the laser energy. In the second case, a lower in-flight adiabat is needed, leading to a significant delay (3ns) in the shock timing of the implosion.

  16. Manufactured solutions for the three-dimensional Euler equations with relevance to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, J., E-mail: jwaltz@lanl.gov [Computational Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Canfield, T.R. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Morgan, N.R. [Computational Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Risinger, L.D.; Wohlbier, J.G. [Computational and Computer Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-06-15

    We present a set of manufactured solutions for the three-dimensional (3D) Euler equations. The purpose of these solutions is to allow for code verification against true 3D flows with physical relevance, as opposed to 3D simulations of lower-dimensional problems or manufactured solutions that lack physical relevance. Of particular interest are solutions with relevance to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules. While ICF capsules are designed for spherical symmetry, they are hypothesized to become highly 3D at late time due to phenomena such as Rayleigh–Taylor instability, drive asymmetry, and vortex decay. ICF capsules also involve highly nonlinear coupling between the fluid dynamics and other physics, such as radiation transport and thermonuclear fusion. The manufactured solutions we present are specifically designed to test the terms and couplings in the Euler equations that are relevant to these phenomena. Example numerical results generated with a 3D Finite Element hydrodynamics code are presented, including mesh convergence studies.

  17. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, April--June 1994. Volume 4, Number 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, M.J. [ed.

    1994-06-01

    This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains six articles covering a wide range of activities within the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. It concentrates on target design; theoretical spectral analysis of ICF capsule surfaces; laser fusion experimental methods; and an alternative ICF design, based on ultrafast, ultrapowerful lasers. A key issue for the success of the ICF process is the hydrodynamic stability of the imploding capsule. There are two primary sources of instability growth in the ICF process: (1) asymmetries in the x-ray flux that drive the compression lead to asymmetric in the imploding surface; (2) imperfections on the capsule surface can grow into large perturbations, degrading the capsule performance. In recent years, a great deal of effort, both experimentally and theoretically, has been spent to enhance the Program`s ability to measure, model, and minimize instability growth during an implosion. Four the articles in this issue discuss this subject.

  18. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Battaglia, J.M.; Buksa, J.J.; Creedson, R.L.; Erlandson, O.D.; Levine, H.E.; Roelant, D.F.; Sanchez, H.W.; Schrader, S.A.

    1984-09-01

    GA Technologies has developed a conceptual ICF reactor system based on the Cascade rotating-bed reaction chamber concept. Unique features of the system design include the use of low activation SiC in a reaction chamber constructed of box-shaped tiles held together in compression by prestressing tendons to the vacuum chamber. Circulating Li/sub 2/O granules serve as the tritium breeding and energy transport material, cascading down the sides of the reaction chamber to the power conversion system. The total tritium inventory of the system is 6 kg; tritium recovery is accomplished directly from the granules via the vacuum system. A system for centrifugal throw transport of the hot Li/sub 2/O granules from the reaction chamber to the power conversion system has been developed. A number of issues were evaluated during the course of this study. These include the response of first-layer granules to the intense microexplosion surface heat flux, cost effective fabrication of Li/sub 2/O granules, tritium inventory and recovery issues, the thermodynamics of solids-flow options, vacuum versus helium-medium heat transfer, and the tradeoffs of capital cost versus efficiency for alternate heat exchange and power conversion system option. The resultant design options appear to be economically competitive, safe, and environmentally attractive.

  19. Drift compression and final focus systems for heavy ion inertial fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Hoon, M.J.L.

    2001-01-01

    cheapest source of energy; an a?ordable cost of electricitycheapest source of energy in the near future, partic- ularly heavy ion fusion is expected to be able to provide electricity

  20. Direct-Drive Inertial Fusion Research at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, S.J.; Skupsky, S.; Bahr, R.E.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Craxton, R.S.; Collins, T.J.B.; Delettrez, J.A.; Donaldson, W.R.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Keck, R.L.; Kelly, J.H.; Kessler, T.J.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Lund, L.D.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Marshall, F.J.; Morse, S.F.B.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Roberts, S.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Thorp, K.A.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2010-04-16

    This paper reviews the status of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). LLE's goal is to demonstrate direct-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by 2014. Baseline "all-DT" NIF direct-drive ignition target designs have been developed that have a predicted gain of 45 (1-D) at a NIF drive energy of ~1.6 MJ. Significantly higher gains are calculated for targets that include a DT-wicked foam ablator. This paper also reviews the results of both warm fuel and initial cryogenic-fuel spherical target implosion experiments carried out on the OMEGA UV laser. The results of these experiments and design calculations increase confidence that the NIF direct-drive ICF ignition goal will be achieved.

  1. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule Nelson M. Hoffman, George B. Zimmerman, Kim Molvig, Hans G. Rinderknecht, Michael J. Rosenberg, B. J.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions on the ignition and burn of inertial confinement fusion targets: A multi-scale approach Phys. Plasmas 21, 122709 (2014); 10.1063/1.4904212 Metrics for long wavelength asymmetries in inertial confinement fusion

  2. Electric field and ionization-gradient effects on inertial-confinement-fusion implosions This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electric field and ionization-gradient effects on inertial-confinement-fusion implosions.1088/0741-3335/51/12/124048 Electric field and ionization-gradient effects on inertial-confinement-fusion implosions P A Amendt1 , J L-generated electric fields (108 ­109 V m-1 ) in direct-drive, inertial-confinement-fusion capsules has been reported

  3. Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosionsa) H. G. Rinderknecht, H. Sio, C. K. Li, N. Hoffman, A. B. Zylstra, M. J. Rosenberg, J. A. Frenje, M. Gatu Johnson,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosionsa) H. G. Rinderknecht (2013); 10.1063/1.4805081 On the transport coefficients of hydrogen in the inertial confinement fusion in inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGAa) Phys. Plasmas 14, 056306 (2007); 10.1063/1.2671761 Laser

  4. LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anklam, T; Simon, A J; Powers, S; Meier, W R

    2010-11-30

    This paper presents the case for early commercialization of laser inertial fusion energy (LIFE). Results taken from systems modeling of the US electrical generating enterprise quantify the benefits of fusion energy in terms of carbon emission, nuclear waste and plutonium production avoidance. Sensitivity of benefits-gained to timing of market-entry is presented. These results show the importance of achieving market entry in the 2030 time frame. Economic modeling results show that fusion energy can be competitive with other low-carbon energy sources. The paper concludes with a description of the LIFE commercialization path. It proposes constructing a demonstration facility capable of continuous fusion operations within 10 to 15 years. This facility will qualify the processes and materials needed for a commercial fusion power plant.

  5. Update and Outlook for theUpdate and Outlook for the Fusion Energy SciencesFusion Energy SciencesFusion Energy SciencesFusion Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Update and Outlook for theUpdate and Outlook for the Fusion Energy SciencesFusion Energy SciencesFusion Energy SciencesFusion Energy Sciences E J SynakowskiE.J. Synakowski Associate Director, Office of Science F i E S iFusion Energy Sciences For the University Fusion Associates Town Hall Meeting APS DPP P id

  6. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (IFC) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; et al

    2015-06-02

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurementsmore »of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.« less

  7. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; et al

    2015-06-02

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurementsmore »of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.« less

  8. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (IFC) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Séguin, F. H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Amendt, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Atzeni, S. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” and CNISM, Roma (Italy); Rinderknecht, H. G. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hoffman, N. M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)] (ORCID:000000030178767X); Zylstra, A. B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Li, C. K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sio, H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:000000017274236X); Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Frenje, J. A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000168460378); Petrasso, R. D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000258834054); Glebov, V. Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Stoeckl, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Seka, W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Marshall, F. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Delettrez, J. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)] (ORCID:0000000340402672); Betti, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pino, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kagan, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.

  9. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support. Annual report, January 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  10. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 42 (2002) 13511356 PII: S0029-5515(02)54166-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    2002-01-01

    in an inertial fusion energy power plant R.W. Petzoldt1 , D.T. Goodin1 , A. Nikroo1 , E. Stephens1 , N. Siegel2 (IFE) power plant designs, the fuel is a spherical layer of frozen DT contained in a target fusion energy (IFE) power plant, the fuel is solid DT at 18 K encapsulated inside a target

  11. ARIES Inertial Fusion Chamber Assessment M. S. Tillack*, F. Najmabadi, L. A. El-Guebaly, D. Goodin, W. R. Meier,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    commissioned two large, multi-institutional IFE power plant design studies: Prometheus [1] and OSIRIS/ER-54101) March 1992. [2] W. R. MEIER, et al., "OSIRIS and SOMBRERO Inertial Fusion Power Plant Designs components (i.e., final optics, final focus magnets), chamber physics (particle and radiation transport, gas

  12. A review of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), ICF reactors, and the HYLIFE-II concept using liquid FLiBe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moir, R.W.

    1989-09-25

    This paper reviews Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) reactor designs and discusses their safety, environmental impact, and economic prospects. The emphasis is on designs carried out at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) because of the author's familiarity with them; the omission of other designs should not necessarily be taken as disparaging towards those designs. 18 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. An accelerator based fusion-product source for development of inertial confinement fusion nuclear diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . A National Instruments NI FieldPoint system has been in- stalled and programed to control and monitor-particle spectrometry program F. H. Seguin et al., Rev. Sci Instrum. 75, 3520 2004 and the magnetic recoil neutron. as a neutron generator,1 it was converted for use as a fusion- product source, as described in Ref. 2. Since

  14. Liquid Vortex Shielding for Fusion Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardet, Philippe M. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Supiot, Boris F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Peterson, Per F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Savas, Oemer [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

    2005-05-15

    Swirling liquid vortices can be used in fusion chambers to protect their first walls and critical elements from the harmful conditions resulting from fusion reactions. The beam tube structures in heavy ion fusion (HIF) must be shielded from high energy particles, such as neutrons, x-rays and vaporized coolant, that will cause damage. Here an annular wall jet, or vortex tube, is proposed for shielding and is generated by injecting liquid tangent to the inner surface of the tube both azimuthally and axially. Its effectiveness is closely related to the vortex tube flow properties. 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) is being conducted to precisely characterize its turbulent structure. The concept of annular vortex flow can be extended to a larger scale to serve as a liquid blanket for other inertial fusion and even magnetic fusion systems. For this purpose a periodic arrangement of injection and suction holes around the chamber circumference are used, generating the layer. Because it is important to match the index of refraction of the fluid with the tube material for optical measurement like PIV, a low viscosity mineral oil was identified and used that can also be employed to do scaled experiments of molten salts at high temperature.

  15. Block Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) with Condensed Matter Cluster Type Targets for p-B11 Powered Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, George H. [University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, NPL Associates 216 Talbot Laboratory 104 S. Wright St. Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hora, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of New South Wales Sydney (Australia); Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Sheng Zhengming [Beijing National Laboratory for CondensedMatter Physics Institute of Physics Chinese Academy of ScienceBeijing 100080 (China); Zhang Jie [School of Computer Sciences, University of Western Sydney, Penrith (Australia); Osman, F. [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Zhang Weiyan [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing (China); Tuhe Xia [Institute of Physics, Academy of Science, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2009-03-16

    The use of laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) for space propulsion has been the subject of several earlier conceptual design studies, (see: Orth, 1998; and other references therein). However, these studies were based on older ICF technology using either 'direct' or 'in-direct x-ray driven' type target irradiation. Important new directions have opened for laser ICF in recent years following the development of 'chirped' lasers capable of ultra short pulses with powers of TW up to few PW which leads to the concept of 'fast ignition (FI)' to achieve higher energy gains from target implosions. In a recent publication the authors showed that use of a modified type of FI, termed 'block ignition' (Miley et al., 2008), could meet many of the requirements anticipated (but not then available) by the designs of the Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Applications (VISTA) ICF fusion propulsion ship (Orth, 2008) for deep space missions. Subsequently the first author devised and presented concepts for imbedding high density condensed matter 'clusters' of deuterium into the target to obtain ultra high local fusion reaction rates (Miley, 2008). Such rates are possible due to the high density of the clusters (over an order of magnitude above cryogenic deuterium). Once compressed by the implosion, the yet higher density gives an ultra high reaction rate over the cluster volume since the fusion rate is proportional to the square of the fuel density. Most recently, a new discovery discussed here indicates that the target matrix could be composed of B{sup 11} with proton clusters imbedded. This then makes p-B{sup 11} fusion practical, assuming all of the physics issues such as stability of the clusters during compression are resolved. Indeed, p-B{sup 11} power is ideal for fusion propulsion since it has a minimum of unwanted side products while giving most of the reaction energy to energetic alpha particles which can be directed into an exhaust (propulsion) nozzle. Power plants using p-B{sup 11} have been discussed for such applications before, but prior designs face formidable physics/technology issues, largely overcome with the present approach.

  16. 50 Years of Fusion Research Fusion Innovation Research and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , .... · Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential ­ Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion demonstrated in 19521 50 Years of Fusion Research Dale Meade Fusion Innovation Research and Energy® Princeton, NJ SOFE 2009 June 1, 2009 San Diego, CA 92101 #12;2 #12;2 #12;3 Fusion Prior to Geneva 1958 · A period of rapid

  17. Development of a Bayesian method for the analysis of inertial confinement fusion experiments on the NIF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffney, Jim A; Sonnad, Vijay; Libby, Stephen B

    2013-01-01

    The complex nature of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments results in a very large number of experimental parameters that are only known with limited reliability. These parameters, combined with the myriad physical models that govern target evolution, make the reliable extraction of physics from experimental campaigns very difficult. We develop an inference method that allows all important experimental parameters, and previous knowledge, to be taken into account when investigating underlying microphysics models. The result is framed as a modified $\\chi^{2}$ analysis which is easy to implement in existing analyses, and quite portable. We present a first application to a recent convergent ablator experiment performed at the NIF, and investigate the effect of variations in all physical dimensions of the target (very difficult to do using other methods). We show that for well characterised targets in which dimensions vary at the 0.5% level there is little effect, but 3% variations change the results of i...

  18. A new ignition scheme using hybrid indirect-direct drive for inertial confinement fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Zhengfeng; Dai, Zhensheng; Cai, Hong-bo; Zhu, Shao-ping; Zhang, W Y; He, X T

    2013-01-01

    A new hybrid indirect-direct-drive ignition scheme is proposed for inertial confinement fusion: a cryogenic capsule encased in a hohlraum is first compressed symmetrically by indirect-drive x-rays, and then accelerated and ignited by both direct-drive lasers and x-rays. A steady high-density plateau newly formed between the radiation and electron ablation fronts suppresses the rarefaction at the radiation ablation front and greatly enhances the drive pressure. Meanwhile, multiple shock reflections at the fuel/hot-spot interface are prevented during capsule deceleration. Thus rapid ignition and burn are realized. In comparison with the conventional indirect drive, the hybrid drive implodes the capsule with a higher velocity ($\\sim4.3\\times10^7$ cm/s) and a much lower convergence ratio ($\\sim$25), and the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities is significantly reduced, especially at the fuel/hot-spot interface.

  19. Radiochemical determination of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule compression at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaughnessy, D. A., E-mail: shaughnessy2@llnl.gov; Moody, K. J.; Gharibyan, N.; Grant, P. M.; Gostic, J. M.; Torretto, P. C.; Wooddy, P. T.; Bandong, B. B.; Cerjan, C. J.; Hagmann, C. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Yeamans, C. B.; Bernstein, L. A.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Despotopulos, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Radiochemistry Program, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    We describe a radiochemical measurement of the ratio of isotope concentrations produced in a gold hohlraum surrounding an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We relate the ratio of the concentrations of (n,?) and (n,2n) products in the gold hohlraum matrix to the down-scatter of neutrons in the compressed fuel and, consequently, to the fuel's areal density. The observed ratio of the concentrations of {sup 198m+g}Au and {sup 196g}Au is a performance signature of ablator areal density and the fuel assembly confinement time. We identify the measurement of nuclear cross sections of astrophysical importance as a potential application of the neutrons generated at the NIF.

  20. Solid Deuterium-Tritium Surface Roughness In A Beryllium Inertial Confinement Fusion Shell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Moody, J D; Montgomery, D S; Gautier, C

    2006-04-19

    Solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layers for inertial confinement fusion experiments were formed inside of a 2 mm diameter beryllium shell and were characterized using phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging. The solid D-T surface roughness is found to be 0.4 {micro}m for modes 7-128 at 1.5 K below the melting temperature. The layer roughness is found to increase with decreasing temperature, in agreement with previous visible light characterization studies. However, phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging provides a more robust surface roughness measurement than visible light methods. The new x-ray imaging results demonstrate clearly that the surface roughness decreases with time for solid D-T layers held at 1.5 K below the melting temperature.

  1. Dynamic response of materials on subnanosecond time scales, and beryllium properties for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, Damian C.; Tierney, Thomas E.; Luo Shengnian; Paisley, Dennis L.; Kyrala, George A.; Hauer, Allan; Greenfield, Scott R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Lorenzana, Hector E.; Kalantar, Daniel; Remington, Bruce A.; Peralta, Pedro; Loomis, Eric

    2005-05-15

    During the past few years, substantial progress has been made in developing experimental techniques capable of investigating the response of materials to dynamic loading on nanosecond time scales and shorter, with multiple diagnostics probing different aspects of the behavior. These relatively short time scales are scientifically interesting because plastic flow and phase changes in common materials with simple crystal structures--such as iron--may be suppressed, allowing unusual states to be induced and the dynamics of plasticity and polymorphism to be explored. Loading by laser-induced ablation can be particularly convenient: this technique has been used to impart shocks and isentropic compression waves from {approx}1 to 200 GPa in a range of elements and alloys, with diagnostics including line imaging surface velocimetry, surface displacement (framed area imaging), x-ray diffraction (single crystal and polycrystal), ellipsometry, and Raman spectroscopy. A major motivation has been the study of the properties of beryllium under conditions relevant to the fuel capsule in inertial confinement fusion: magnetically driven shock and isentropic compression shots at Z were used to investigate the equation of state and shock melting characteristics, complemented by laser ablation experiments to investigate plasticity and heterogeneous response from the polycrystalline microstructure. These results will help to constrain acceptable tolerances on manufacturing, and possible loading paths, for inertial fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Laser-based techniques are being developed further for future material dynamics experiments, where it should be possible to obtain high quality data on strength and phase changes up to at least 1 TPa.

  2. Osiris and SOMBRERO inertial confinement fusion power plant designs. Volume 2, Designs, assessments, and comparisons, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W.R.; Bieri, R.L.; Monsler, M.J.

    1992-03-01

    The primary objective of the of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was to provide the Office of Fusion Energy with an evaluation of the potential of inertial fusion for electric power production. The term reactor studies is somewhat of a misnomer since these studies included the conceptual design and analysis of all aspects of the IFE power plants: the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, other balance of plant facilities, target systems (including the target production, injection, and tracking systems), and the two drivers. The scope of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was quite ambitious. The majority of our effort was spent on the conceptual design of two IFE electric power plants, one using an induction linac heavy ion beam (HIB) driver and the other using a Krypton Fluoride (KrF) laser driver. After the two point designs were developed, they were assessed in terms of their (1) environmental and safety aspects; (2) reliability, availability, and maintainability; (3) technical issues and technology development requirements; and (4) economics. Finally, we compared the design features and the results of the assessments for the two designs.

  3. Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy Fusion Power Associates Annual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    architecture for a high yield facility Maturity Double-Ended Hohlraum Ready for Next Step ~400 MJ ~100 MJ Prime · Linear Transformer Driver technology · Pulsed power IFE #12;3 We were required to demonstrate 3 and exciting experiments in high-pressure material dynamics · Future direction will be to couple advanced

  4. A Pilot Plant: The Fastest Path to Commercial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2010-03-03

    Considerable effort has been dedicated to determining the possible properties of a magneticconfinement fusion power plant, particularly in the U.S.1, Europe2 and Japan3. There has also been some effort to detail the development path to fusion energy, particularly in the U.S.4 Only limited attention has been given, in Japan5 and in China6, to the options for a specific device to form the bridge from the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, ITER, to commercial fusion energy. Nor has much attention been paid, since 2003, to the synergies between magnetic and inertial fusion energy development. Here we consider, at a very high level, the possibility of a Qeng ? 1 Pilot Plant, with linear dimensions ~ 2/3 the linear dimensions of a commercial fusion power plant, as the needed bridge. As we examine the R&D needs for such a system we find significant synergies between the needs for the development of magnetic and inertial fusion energy.

  5. NIF: A Path to Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2007-06-01

    Fusion energy has long been considered a promising, clean, nearly inexhaustible source of energy. Power production by fusion micro-explosions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been a long-term research goal since the invention of the first laser in 1960. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is poised to take the next important step in the journey by beginning experiments researching ICF ignition. Ignition on NIF will be the culmination of over thirty years of ICF research on high-powered laser systems such as the Nova laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester, as well as smaller systems around the world. NIF is a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility at LLNL that is more than 90% complete. The first cluster of 48 beams is operational in the laser bay, the second cluster is now being commissioned, and the beam path to the target chamber is being installed. The Project will be completed in 2009, and ignition experiments will start in 2010. When completed, NIF will produce up to 1.8 MJ of 0.35-{micro}m light in highly shaped pulses required for ignition. It will have beam stability and control to higher precision than any other laser fusion facility. Experiments using one of the beams of NIF have demonstrated that NIF can meet its beam performance goals. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been established to manage the ignition effort on NIF. NIC has all of the research and development required to execute the ignition plan and to develop NIF into a fully operational facility. NIF will explore the ignition space, including direct drive, 2{omega} ignition, and fast ignition, to optimize target efficiency for developing fusion as an energy source. In addition to efficient target performance, fusion energy requires significant advances in high-repetition-rate lasers and fusion reactor technology. The Mercury laser at LLNL is a high-repetition-rate Nd-glass laser for fusion energy driver development. Mercury uses state-of-the-art technology such as ceramic laser slabs and light diode pumping for improved efficiency and thermal management. Progress in NIF, NIC, Mercury, and the path forward for fusion energy will be presented.

  6. Production and Metrology of Cylindrical Inertial Confinement Fusion Targets with Sinusoidal Perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balkey, M.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Day, R.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Batha, S.H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Elliot, N.E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Pierce, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Sandoval, D.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Garrard, K.P. [North Carolina State University (United States); Sohn, A. [North Carolina State University (United States)

    2004-03-15

    Shock waves generated during inertial confinement fusion implosions propagate toward the center of the capsule encountering interfaces between materials with different densities, such as between the ablator and the DT fuel. These interactions are hydrodynamically unstable and the resulting instability causes mixing of the materials at the interface, which is predicted to have detrimental effects on fusion burn. In this experiment, the growth of a single-mode perturbation machined into a radiographically opaque marker layer, driven by a strong shock, is measured during a cylindrically symmetric implosion. These measurements are used to validate simulations and theories of the complex hydrodynamics. Since any perturbation on the marker layer surface will lead to instability growth, precise knowledge of the initial conditions is critical. The targets used in this experiment have up to a 3.0-{mu}m-amplitude, mode 28 ({lambda} = 98 {mu}m) sinusoidal perturbation machined into a 438-{mu}m-outerradius aluminum band with a nominal thickness of 8 {mu}m. The perturbations were machined using a fast-tool servo [B. JARED and T. A. DOW, Precision Engineering Center Annual Report, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC, p. 123 (1996)] and were metrologized using a linear variable differential transformer [FRANK J. OLIVER, Practical Instrumentation Tranducers, p. 42-45, Hayden Book Company (1971)]. In this paper, the importance of metrology is discussed and is shown to be critical to the interpretation of experimental results.

  7. Application of spatially resolved high resolution crystal spectrometry to inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Zhang, L.

    2012-10-15

    High resolution ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}{approx} 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-{mu}m {sup 55}Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10{sup -8}-10{sup -6} times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

  8. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 44 (2004) S254S265 PII: S0029-5515(04)88685-X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    2004-01-01

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 44 (2004) S254­S265 PII: S0029-5515(04)88685-X A cost-effective target supply for inertial fusion energy D.T. Goodin1 , N.B. Alexander1 , L.C. Brown1 , D.T. Frey1 , R. Gallix1 , C.R. Gibson1 , J

  9. Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion Summary Report of the Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    Molten-Salt Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant Design— FinalTargets for Heavy Ion Fusion Energy," http:// ahif.lbl.gov/to develop heavy-ion fusion energy. 3. Economy of scale

  10. An improved method for measuring the absolute DD neutron yield and calibrating neutron time-of-flight detectors in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waugh, C. (Caleb Joseph)

    2014-01-01

    Since the establishment of nuclear physics in the early 1900's and the development of the hydrogen bomb in the 1950's, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been an important field in physics. Funded largely though the ...

  11. Studies of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF and magnetic reconnection using laser-produced plasmas at OMEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Studies of ion kinetic effects during the shock-convergence phase of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions and magnetic reconnection in strongly-driven, laser-produced plasmas have been facilitated by the use of ...

  12. Fusion Energy Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunities Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home AboutFusion Energy

  13. "50" Years of Fusion Research Fusion Innovation Research and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Classified US Program on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Project Sherwood) carried out until 1958 when"50" Years of Fusion Research Dale Meade Fusion Innovation Research and Energy® Princeton, NJ Fi P th SFusion Fire Powers the Sun "W d t if k f i k ""We need to see if we can make fusion work

  14. Theory of hydro-equivalent ignition for inertial fusion and its applications to OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Christopherson, A. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and/or Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Anderson, K. S.; Shvydky, A.; Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); McCrory, R. L. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and/or Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The theory of ignition for inertial confinement fusion capsules [R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] is used to assess the performance requirements for cryogenic implosion experiments on the Omega Laser Facility. The theory of hydrodynamic similarity is developed in both one and two dimensions and tested using multimode hydrodynamic simulations with the hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] of hydro-equivalent implosions (implosions with the same implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity). The theory is used to scale the performance of direct-drive OMEGA implosions to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) energy scales and determine the requirements for demonstrating hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA. Hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA is represented by a cryogenic implosion that would scale to ignition on the NIF at 1.8?MJ of laser energy symmetrically illuminating the target. It is found that a reasonable combination of neutron yield and areal density for OMEGA hydro-equivalent ignition is 3 to 6?×?10{sup 13} and ?0.3?g/cm{sup 2}, respectively, depending on the level of laser imprinting. This performance has not yet been achieved on OMEGA.

  15. The impact of laser plasma interactions on three-dimensional drive symmetry in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J. L., E-mail: peterson76@llnl.gov; Michel, P.; Thomas, C. A.; Town, R. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Achieving symmetric hohlraum radiation drive is an important aspect of indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments. However, when experimentally delivered laser powers deviate from ideal conditions, the resultant radiation field can become asymmetric. Two situations in which this may arise are random uncorrelated fluctuations, in as-delivered laser power and laser beams that do not participate in the implosion (either intentionally or unintentionally). Furthermore, laser plasma interactions in the hohlraum obfuscate the connection between laser powers and radiation drive. To study the effect of these situations on drive symmetry, we develop a simplified model for crossed-beam energy transfer, laser backscatter, and plasma absorption that can be used in conjunction with view factor calculations to expediently translate laser powers into three-dimensional capsule flux symmetries. We find that crossed-beam energy transfer can alter both the statistical properties of uncorrelated laser fluctuations and the impact of missing laser beams on radiation symmetry. A method is proposed to mitigate the effects of missing laser beams.

  16. THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEAVY-ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIALLY CONFINED FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.b.

    2010-01-01

    29 The Fission-fusion Hybrid - iii - General DiscussionInteraction in Heavy Ion Fusion BIBLIOGRAPHY HEAVY IONReactor Designs . . . 27 Pure Fusion Power Reactor Tritium

  17. Culham Centre for Fusion Energy Fusion -A clean future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culham Centre for Fusion Energy Fusion - A clean future FUSION REACTION Research at Culham Centre that drives the sun ­ could play a big part in our sustainable energy future. Around the globe, scientists are divided over whether to include nuclear fission in their energy portfolios; and renewable sources

  18. Realization of Fusion Energy: An alternative fusion roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Realization of Fusion Energy: An alternative fusion roadmap Farrokh Najmabadi Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering Director, Center for Energy Research UC San Diego International Fusion Road of emerging nations, energy use is expected to grow ~ 4 fold in this century (average 1.6% annual growth rate

  19. Dynamic symmetry of indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion capsules on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Town, R. P. J., E-mail: town2@llnl.gov; Bradley, D. K.; Kritcher, A.; Jones, O. S.; Rygg, J. R.; Tommasini, R.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Döppner, T.; Dewald, E. L.; Eder, D. C.; Field, J. E.; Glenn, S. M.; Izumi, N.; Haan, S. W.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15

    In order to achieve ignition using inertial confinement fusion it is important to control the growth of low-mode asymmetries as the capsule is compressed. Understanding the time-dependent evolution of the shape of the hot spot and surrounding fuel layer is crucial to optimizing implosion performance. A design and experimental campaign to examine sources of asymmetry and to quantify symmetry throughout the implosion has been developed and executed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. We have constructed a large simulation database of asymmetries applied during different time intervals. Analysis of the database has shown the need to measure and control the hot-spot shape, areal density distribution, and symmetry swings during the implosion. The shape of the hot spot during final stagnation is measured using time-resolved imaging of the self-emission, and information on the shape of the fuel at stagnation can be obtained from Compton radiography [R. Tommasini et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056309 (2011)]. For the first time on NIF, two-dimensional inflight radiographs of gas-filled and cryogenic fuel layered capsules have been measured to infer the symmetry of the radiation drive on the capsule. These results have been used to modify the hohlraum geometry and the wavelength tuning to improve the inflight implosion symmetry. We have also expanded our shock timing capabilities by the addition of extra mirrors inside the re-entrant cone to allow the simultaneous measurement of shock symmetry in three locations on a single shot, providing asymmetry information up to Legendre mode 4. By diagnosing the shape at nearly every step of the implosion, we estimate that shape has typically reduced fusion yield by about 50% in ignition experiments.

  20. Ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) analysis direct drive of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antolak, A.J.; Pontau, A.E.; Morse, D.H. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)); Weirup, D.L.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Hornady, R.S. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Cholewa, M.; Bench, G.S.; Legge, G.J.F. (Melbourne Univ. (Australia). Micro Analytical Research Centre)

    1991-11-20

    The complementary techniques of ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are used to provide micro-characterization of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets for density uniformity, sphericity, and trace element spatial distributions. ICF target quality control in the laser fusion program is important to ensure that the energy deposition from the lasers results in uniform compression and minimization of Taylor-Rayleigh instabilities. We obtain 1% density determinations using IMT with spatial resolution approaching two microns. Utilizing PIXE, we can map out dopant and impurity distributions with elemental detection sensitivities on the order of a few ppm. We present examples of IMT and PIXE analyses performed on several ICF targets.

  1. Inertial confinement fusion. ICF quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993, Volume 4, Number 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, H.T.; Schleich, D.P.; Murphy, P.W. [eds.

    1994-05-01

    In the 1990 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report of its review of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, it was recommended that a high priority be placed on completing the Precision Nova Project and its associated experimental campaign. Since fiscal year 1990, the lab has therefore campaigned vigorously on Nova and in its supporting laboratories to develop the Precision Nova capabilities needed to perform the stressful target experiments recommended in the 1990 NAS report. The activities to enable these experiments have been directed at improvements in three areas - the Nova laser, target fabrication capabilities, and target diagnostics. As summarized in the five articles in this report, the Precision Nova improvements have been successfully completed. These improvements have had a positive impact on target performance and on the ability to diagnose the results, as evidenced by the HEP-1 experimental results. The five articles generally concentrate on improvements to the capabilities rather than on the associated target physics experiments. Separate abstracts are included for each paper.

  2. Investigation of radial wire arrays for inertial confinement fusion and radiation effects science.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrano, Jason Dimitri; Bland, Simon Nicholas (Imperial College, London); McBride, Ryan D.; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London); Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco Andres (Imperial College, London); Jennings, Christopher A.; Hall, Gareth Neville (Imperial College, London); Ampleford, David J.; Peyton, Bradley Philip; Lebedev, Sergey V. (Imperial College, London); Cleveland, Monica; Rogers, Thomas John; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Jones, Michael C.

    2010-02-01

    Radial wire arrays provide an alternative x-ray source for Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion. These arrays, where wires are positioned radially outwards from a central cathode to a concentric anode, have the potential to drive a more compact ICF hohlraum. A number of experiments were performed on the 7MA Saturn Generator. These experiments studied a number of potential risks in scaling radial wire arrays up from the 1MA level, where they have been shown to provide similar x-ray outputs to larger diameter cylindrical arrays, to the higher current levels required for ICF. Data indicates that at 7MA radial arrays can obtain higher power densities than cylindrical wire arrays, so may be of use for x-ray driven ICF on future facilities. Even at the 7MA level, data using Saturn's short pulse mode indicates that a radial array should be able to drive a compact hohlraum to temperatures {approx}92eV, which may be of interest for opacity experiments. These arrays are also shown to have applications to jet production for laboratory astrophysics. MHD simulations require additional physics to match the observed behavior.

  3. Indirect-direct hybrid-drive work-dominated hotspot ignition for inertial confinement fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, X T; Li, J W; Liu, J; Lan, K; Wu, J F; Wang, L F; Ye, W H

    2015-01-01

    An indirect-direct hybrid-drive work-dominated hotspot ignition scheme for inertial confinement fusion is proposed: a layered fuel capsule inside a spherical hohlraum with an octahedral symmetry is compressed first by indirect-drive soft-x rays (radiation) and then by direct-drive lasers in last pulse duration. In this scheme, an enhanced shock and a follow-up compression wave for ignition with pressure far greater than the radiation ablation pressure are driven by the direct-drive lasers, and provide large pdV work to the hotspot to perform the work-dominated ignition. The numerical simulations show that the enhanced shock stops the reflections of indirect-drive shock at the main fuel-hotspot interface, and therefore significantly suppresses the hydrodynamic instabilities and asymmetry. Based on the indirect-drive implosion dynamics the hotspot is further compressed and heated by the enhanced shock and follow-up compression wave, resulting in the work-dominated hotspot ignition and burn with a maximal implos...

  4. X-ray ablation rates in inertial confinement fusion capsule materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, R. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Leeper, R. J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    X-ray ablation rates have been measured in beryllium, copper-doped beryllium, germanium-doped plastic (Ge-doped CH), and diamondlike high density carbon (HDC) for radiation temperatures T in the range of 160-260 eV. In beryllium, the measured ablation rates range from 3 to 12 mg/cm{sup 2}/ns; in Ge-doped CH, the ablation rates range from 2 to 6 mg/cm{sup 2}/ns; and for HDC, the rates range from 2 to 9 mg/cm{sup 2}/ns. The ablation rates follow an approximate T{sup 3} dependence and, for T below 230 eV, the beryllium ablation rates are significantly higher than HDC and Ge-doped CH. The corresponding implied ablation pressures are in the range of 20-160 Mbar, scaling as T{sup 3.5}. The results are found to be well predicted by computational simulations using the physics packages and computational techniques employed in the design of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion capsules. An iterative rocket model has been developed and used to compare the ablation rate data set to spherical indirect-drive capsule implosion experiments and to confirm the validity of some aspects of proposed full-scale National Ignition Facility ignition capsule designs.

  5. On the transport coefficients of hydrogen in the inertial confinement fusion regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, Flavien; Recoules, Vanina; Decoster, Alain; Clerouin, Jean [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Desjarlais, Michael [Pulsed Power Sciences Center, Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Ab initio molecular dynamics is used to compute the thermal and electrical conductivities of hydrogen from 10 to 160 g cm{sup -3} and temperatures up to 800 eV, i.e., thermodynamical conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ionic structure is obtained using molecular dynamics simulations based on an orbital-free treatment for the electrons. The transport properties were computed using ab initio simulations in the DFT/LDA approximation. The thermal and electrical conductivities are evaluated using Kubo-Greenwood formulation. Particular attention is paid to the convergence of electronic transport properties with respect to the number of bands and atoms. These calculations are then used to check various analytical models (Hubbard's, Lee-More's and Ichimaru's) widely used in hydrodynamics simulations of ICF capsule implosions. The Lorenz number, which is the ratio between thermal and electrical conductivities, is also computed and compared to the well-known Wiedemann-Franz law in different regimes ranging from the highly degenerate to the kinetic one. This allows us to deduce electrical conductivity from thermal conductivity for analytical model. We find that the coupling of Hubbard and Spitzer models gives a correct description of the behavior of electrical and thermal conductivities in the whole thermodynamic regime.

  6. First-principles equation of state of polystyrene and its effect on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kress, J. D.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2015-10-14

    Obtaining an accurate equation of state (EOS) of polystyrene (CH) is crucial to reliably design inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules using CH/CH-based ablators. Thus, with first-principles calculations, we have investigated the extended EOS of CH over a wide range of plasma conditions (? = 0.1 to 100 g/cm3 and T = 1,000 to 4,000,000 K). When compared with the widely used SESAME-EOS table, the first-principles equation of state (FPEOS) of CH has shown significant differences in the low-temperature regime, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy play an essential role in determining plasma properties. Hydrodynamic simulations of cryogenic target implosionsmore »on OMEGA using the FPEOS table of CH have predicted ~5% reduction in implosion velocity and ~30% decrease in neutron yield in comparison with the usual SESAME simulations. This is attributed to the ~10% lower mass ablation rate of CH predicted by FPEOS. Simulations using CH-FPEOS show better agreement with measurements of Hugoniot temperature and scattered lights from ICF implosions.« less

  7. Mechanism for magnetic field generation and growth in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang Xianzhu [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields at the gas-ice interface and at the ice-ablator interface. The focus here is on the gas-ice interface where the temperature gradient is the largest. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the magnetic field generation and growth for 2-D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma, the two fluids being ions and electrons. Self-generated magnetic fields are observed and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the {nabla}n{sub e} Multiplication-Sign {nabla}T{sub e} term in the generalized Ohm's law. Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] present results of the magnetic field generation and growth, and some scaling studies in 2-dimensions. The results presented here study the mechanism behind the magnetic field generation and growth, which is related to fluid vorticity generation by RTI. The magnetic field wraps around the bubbles and spikes and concentrates in flux bundles at the perturbed gas-ice interface where fluid vorticity is large. Additionally, the results of Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] are described in greater detail. Additional scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, perturbation wavelength, Atwood number, and ion mass.

  8. Pulsed power considerations for electron beam pumped krypton fluoride lasers for inertial confinement fusion applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, E.A.; McDonald, T.E.; Rosocha, L.A.; Harris, D.B.; Sullivan, J.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Smith, I.D. (Pulse Sciences, Inc., San Leandro, CA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program is developing the krypton-fluoride excimer laser for use as an ICF driver. The KrF laser has a number of inherent characteristics that make it a promising driver candidate, such as short wavelength (0.25 {mu}m), broad bandwidth to target (>100 cm{sup {minus}1}), pulse-shaping with high dynamic range, and the potential for high overall efficiency (>5%) and repetitive operation. The large KrF laser amplifiers needed for ICF drivers are electron-beam pumped. A key issue for all laser ICF drivers is cost, and a leading cost component of a KrF laser driver is associated with the pulsed power and electron diode. Therefore, the efficient generation of electron beams is a high priority. The Los Alamos ICF program is investigating pulsed-power and diode designs and technologies to further the development of affordable KrF laser ICF drivers. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Development of the large neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Kime, S.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.

    2012-03-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) requires a high resolution ({approx}10 {mu}m) neutron imaging system to observe deuterium and tritium (DT) core implosion asymmetries. A new large (150 mm entrance diameter: scaled for Laser MegaJoule [P. A. Holstein, F. Chaland, C. Charpin, J. M. Dufour, H. Dumont, J. Giorla, L. Hallo, S. Laffite, G. Malinie, Y. Saillard, G. Schurtz, M. Vandenboomgaerde, and F. Wagon, Laser and Particle Beams 17, 403 (1999)]) neutron imaging detector has been developed for such ICF experiments. The detector has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source. A penumbral aperture was used to observe DT-gas-filled target implosions performed on the OMEGA laser facility. [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, R. L. Keck, J. P. Knauer, J. H. Kelly, T. J. Kessler, S. A. Kumpan, S. J. Loucks, S. A. Letzring, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, S. F. B. Morse, W. Seka, J. M. Soures, and C. P. Verdon, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] Neutron core images of 14 MeV with a resolution of 15 {mu}m were obtained and are compared to x-ray images of comparable resolution.

  10. Fusion Electricity A roadmap to the realisation of fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Electricity A roadmap to the realisation of fusion energy #12;28 European countries signed to fusion energy. With this objective EFDA has elaborated the present roadmap. ITER is the key facility in the roadmap: ITER construction is fostering industrial innovation on a number of enabling technologies. Its

  11. Recycling issues facing target and RTL materials of inertial fusion designs L. El-Guebaly, P. Wilson, M. Sawan, D. Henderson, A. Varuttamaseni,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    . Wilson, M. Sawan, D. Henderson, A. Varuttamaseni, and the ARIES and Z-Pinch Teams Fusion Technology (608) 263-4499 elguebaly@engr.wisc.edu Abstract Designers of heavy ion (HI) and Z-pinch inertial fusion. On the contrary, RTL recycling is a "must" requirement for the Z-pinch concept in order to minimize the RTL

  12. Macron Formed Liner Compression as a Practical Method for Enabling Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slough, John

    2011-12-10

    The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. The main impediment for current nuclear fusion concepts is the complexity and large mass associated with the confinement systems. To take advantage of the smaller scale, higher density regime of magnetic fusion, an efficient method for achieving the compressional heating required to reach fusion gain conditions must be found. The very compact, high energy density plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) provides for an ideal target for this purpose. To make fusion with the FRC practical, an efficient method for repetitively compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. A novel approach to be explored in this endeavor is to remotely launch a converging array of small macro-particles (macrons) that merge and form a more massive liner inside the reactor which then radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target FRC plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining liner significantly lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. With the momentum flux being delivered by an assemblage of low mass, but high velocity macrons, many of the difficulties encountered with the liner implosion power technology are eliminated. The undertaking to be described in this proposal is to evaluate the feasibility achieving fusion conditions from this simple and low cost approach to fusion. During phase I the design and testing of the key components for the creation of the macron formed liner have been successfully carried out. Detailed numerical calculations of the merging, formation and radial implosion of the Macron Formed Liner (MFL) were also performed. The phase II effort will focus on an experimental demonstration of the macron launcher at full power, and the demonstration of megagauss magnetic field compression by a small array of full scale macrons. In addition the physics of the compression of an FRC to fusion conditions will be undertaken with a smaller scale MFL. The timescale for testing will be rapidly accelerated by taking advantage of other facilities at MSNW where the target FRC will be created and translated inside the MFL just prior to implosion of the MFL. Experimental success would establish the concept at the �proof of principle� level and the following phase III effort would focus on the full development of the concept into a fusion gain device. Successful operation would lead to several benefits in various fields. It would have application to high energy density physics, as well as nuclear waste transmutation and alternate fission fuel cycles. The smaller scale device could find immediate application as an intense source of neutrons for diagnostic imaging and non-invasive object interrogation.

  13. Glossary of fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitson, M.O.

    1982-01-01

    This glossary gives brief descriptions of approximately 400 terms used by the fusion community. Schematic diagrams and photographs of the major US experiments are also included. (MOW)

  14. Development of a neutron imaging diagnostic for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, G. L.; Berggren, R. R.; Bradley, P. A.; Cverna, F. H.; Faulkner, J. R.; Gobby, P. L.; Oertel, J. A.; Swenson, F. J.; Tegtmeier, J. A.; Walton, R. B.

    2001-01-01

    Pinhole imaging of the neutron production in laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiments can provide important information about the performance of various capsule designs. This requires the development of systems capable of spatial resolutions on the order of 5 {mu}m or less for source strengths of 10{sup 15} and greater. We have initiated a program which will lead to the achievement of such a system to be employed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) facility. Calculated neutron output distributions for various capsule designs will be presented to illustrate the information which can be gained from neutron imaging and to demonstrate the requirements for a useful system. We will describe the lines-of-sight available at NIF for neutron imaging and explain how these can be utilized to reach the required parameters for neutron imaging. We will describe initial development work to be carried out at the Omega facility and the path which will lead to systems to be implemented at NIF. Beginning this year, preliminary experiments will be aimed at achieving resolutions of 30--60 {mu}m for direct-drive capsules with neutron outputs of about 10{sup 14}. The main thrust of these experiments will be to understand issues related to the fabrication and alignment of small diameter pinhole systems as well as the problems associated with signal-to-background ratios at the image plane. Subsequent experiments at Omega will be described. These efforts will be aimed at achieving resolutions of about 10 {mu}m. Proposed developments for new imaging systems as well as further refinement of pinhole techniques will be presented.

  15. Beryllium liner implosion experiments on the Z accelerator in preparation for magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, R. D.; Martin, M. R.; Lemke, R. W.; Jennings, C. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Slutz, S. A.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Davis, J.-P.; Flicker, D. G.; Rogers, T. J.; Robertson, G. K.; Kamm, R. J.; Smith, I. C.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Jones, M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); and others

    2013-05-15

    Multiple experimental campaigns have been executed to study the implosions of initially solid beryllium (Be) liners (tubes) on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The implosions were driven by current pulses that rose from 0 to 20 MA in either 100 or 200 ns (200 ns for pulse shaping experiments). These studies were conducted in support of the recently proposed Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], as well as for exploring novel equation-of-state measurement techniques. The experiments used thick-walled liners that had an aspect ratio (initial outer radius divided by initial wall thickness) of either 3.2, 4, or 6. From these studies, we present three new primary results. First, we present radiographic images of imploding Be liners, where each liner contained a thin aluminum sleeve for enhancing the contrast and visibility of the liner's inner surface in the images. These images allow us to assess the stability of the liner's inner surface more accurately and more directly than was previously possible. Second, we present radiographic images taken early in the implosion (prior to any motion of the liner's inner surface) of a shockwave propagating radially inward through the liner wall. Radial mass density profiles from these shock compression experiments are contrasted with profiles from experiments where the Z accelerator's pulse shaping capabilities were used to achieve shockless (“quasi-isentropic”) liner compression. Third, we present “micro-B-dot ” measurements of azimuthal magnetic field penetration into the initially vacuum-filled interior of a shocked liner. Our measurements and simulations reveal that the penetration commences shortly after the shockwave breaks out from the liner's inner surface. The field then accelerates this low-density “precursor” plasma to the axis of symmetry.

  16. Integrated two-dimensional simulations of dynamic hohlraum driven inertial fusion capsule implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slutz, S. A.; Peterson, K. J.; Vesey, R. A.; Lemke, R. W.; Bailey, J. E.; Varnum, W.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Chandler, G. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Mehlhorn, T. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1186 (United States)

    2006-10-15

    Simulations have been useful for improving the design of dynamic hohlraums for the purpose of imploding inertial fusion capsules [S. A. Slutz, J. E. Bailey, G. A. Chandler et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 1875 (2003)]. These design changes, which have resulted in capsule implosions with hot dense cores [J. E. Bailey, G. A. Chandler, S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 085002 (2004)] and the production of thermonuclear neutrons [C. L. Ruiz, G. Cooper, S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 015001 (2005)], were based primarily on a series of one-dimensional numerical simulations, which treated the dynamic hohlraum and the capsule implosion separately. In this paper we present simulations which are fully integrated to include the implosion of wire arrays onto foam convertors, the implosion of the capsule imbedded in the foam, and the absorption of radiation into the electrodes. These simulations yield predictions that are in remarkably good agreement with measured values considering the complexity of the problem, which spans more than 100 ns of wire implosion with the subsequent capsule implosion on a few ns timescale. For example, the predicted neutron yields are less than a factor of 2 higher than the measured values, while the predicted shock velocity is about 30% higher than the measured value. The spectroscopically inferred imploded capsule gas core temperatures are somewhat lower than predicted by the simulations, while the gas densities are about a factor of 2 higher. Simulations indicate that a more slowly rising radiation drive temperature yields higher core densities and lower temperatures and thus better agreement with experimental measurements. Possible reasons for a more slowly rising radiation drive are discussed.

  17. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ?R are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mrosenbe@mit.edu; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Yeamans, C. B.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Talison, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (?R) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF.

  18. Direct Drive Heavy-Ion-Beam Inertial Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B. Grant

    2008-01-01

    11] G. R. Magelssen, Nuclear Fusion 24, No.12, p. 1527,2004) [17] M . Tabak, Nuclear Fusion 36, No 2 (1996) [18] S.Atzeni and C. Ciampi, Nuclear Fusion 37, 1665 (1997) [19] R.

  19. Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2006 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    community. Benefits Fusion is the energy source that powers the sun and stars. In the fusion process, formsScience/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2006 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile Adjustments FY 2005 Comparable Appropriation FY 2006 Request Fusion Energy Sciences Science

  20. Direct asymmetry measurement of temperature and density spatial distributions in inertial confinement fusion plasmas from pinhole space-resolved spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagayama, T; Florido, R; Mayes, D; Tommasini, R; Koch, J A; Delettrez, J A; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional space-resolved temperature and density images of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion core have been diagnosed for the first time. Argon-doped, direct-drive ICF experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility and a collection of two-dimensional space-resolved spectra were obtained from an array of gated, spectrally resolved pinhole images recorded by a multi-monochromatic x-ray imager. Detailed spectral analysis revealed asymmetries of the core not just in shape and size but in the temperature and density spatial distributions, thus characterizing the core with an unprecedented level of detail.

  1. Direct asymmetry measurement of temperature and density spatial distributions in inertial confinement fusion plasmas from pinhole space-resolved spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagayama, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Florido, R.; Mayes, D. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Tommasini, R.; Koch, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Two-dimensional space-resolved temperature and density images of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion core have been diagnosed for the first time. Argon-doped, direct-drive ICF experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility and a collection of two-dimensional space-resolved spectra were obtained from an array of gated, spectrally resolved pinhole images recorded by a multi-monochromatic x-ray imager. Detailed spectral analysis revealed asymmetries of the core not just in shape and size but in the temperature and density spatial distributions, thus characterizing the core with an unprecedented level of detail.

  2. ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PROJECT STAFF

    2001-09-01

    OAK A271 ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY. The General Atomics (GA) Advanced Fusion Technology Program seeks to advance the knowledge base needed for next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately for an economical and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. To achieve this objective, they carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and they conduct research to develop basic and applied knowledge about these technologies. GA's Advanced Fusion Technology program derives from, and draws on, the physics and engineering expertise built up by many years of experience in designing, building, and operating plasma physics experiments. The technology development activities take full advantage of the GA DIII-D program, the DIII-D facility and the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and the ICF Target Fabrication facility.

  3. Production of direct drive cylindrical targets for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, N. E. (Norman E.); Day, R. D. (Robert D.); Hatch, D. J. (Douglas J.); Sandoval, D. L. (David L.); Gomez, V. M. (Veronica M.); Pierce, T. H. (Timothy H.); Elliott, J. E. (Joyce E.); Manzanares, R. (Ruben)

    2002-01-01

    We have made targets with cylindrical geometry for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments. These targets are used in hydrodynamic experiments on the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester. The cylindrical design allows the study of three dimensional hydrodynamic effects in a pseudo 2D mode, simplifying data gathering and analysis. Direct drive refers to the fact that the target is illuminated directly by approximately 50 laser beams and is imploded by the material pressure generated from ablation of the outside of the target. The production of cylindrical targets involves numerous steps. These steps are shared in common with many other types of ICF targets but no other single target type encompasses such a wide range of fabrication techniques. These targets consist of a large number of individual parts, all fabricated from commercially purchased raw material, requiring many machining, assembly, electroplating and chemical process steps. Virtually every manufacturing and assembly process we currently possess is involved in the production of these targets. The generic target consists of a plastic cylinder (ablator) that is roughly lmm in diameter by 2.25mm long. The wall of the cylinder is roughly 0.07mm thick. There is an aluminum cylinder 0.5mm wide and O.Olmm thick centered on the inside of the plastic cylinder and coaxial with the outside plastic cylinder. The outside of this aluminum band has surface finishes of differing random average roughness. The required average surface roughness is determined in advance by experimental design based on the amount of turbulent mix to be observed. The interior of the cylinder is filled with low density polystyrene foam that is made in house. To produce a finished target additional features are added to each target. X-ray backlighters are cantilevered off the target that allow time resolved x-ray images of the imploding target to be recorded during the experiment. The x-ray backlighters are driven by additional laser beams that are delayed to record an image at the appropriate time after the main beams are fired. An aperture to limit the area imaged and reduce x-ray background is placed on the target opposite the backlighters. Finally, alignment fibers that allow the target to be located precisely in three dimensional space before being shot are placed in several locations on the outside of the target.

  4. U. S. Fusion Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John A. Schmidt; Dan Jassby; Scott Larson; Maria Pueyo; Paul H. Rutherford

    2000-10-12

    Fusion implementation scenarios for the US have been developed. The dependence of these scenarios on both the fusion development and implementation paths has been assessed. A range of implementation paths has been studied. The deployment of CANDU fission reactors in Canada and the deployment of fission reactors in France have been assessed as possible models for US fusion deployment. The waste production and resource (including tritium) needs have been assessed. The conclusion that can be drawn from these studies is that it is challenging to make a significant impact on energy production during this century. However, the rapid deployment of fission reactors in Canada and France support fusion implementation scenarios for the US with significant power production during this century. If the country can meet the schedule requirements then the resource needs and waste production are found to be manageable problems.

  5. Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20) ANL/FPP/TM-175 ANL/FPP/TM--175 DE83 015751 THERMAL HYDRAULIC AND STRESS ANALYSIS 15 7.0 LIFETIME ANALYSIS 19 8 . 0 StttMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS-1 Vaporization thickness as a function of energy density for a 1 us disruption 8 4-2 Melt layer thickness

  6. Direct Drive Heavy-Ion-Beam Inertial Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B. Grant

    2008-01-01

    Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency B.G. Logan 1, L.J.fusion at high coupling efficiency B. G. Logan , L . J.Issues with coupling efficiency, beam illumination symmetry

  7. Fusion Energy: Visions of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy conversion Direct energy conversion No $$$ turbines Why Is Aneutronic Fusion Cheap? #12;Dense Star Formation REPRODUCING NATURAL INSTABILITIES Solar Flares #12;Energy (X-rays, Ion Beams) CaptureFusion Energy: Visions of the Future Dec. 10-11, 2013 FOCUS FUSION Cheap, Clean, Safe & Unlimited

  8. Observation of inertial energy cascade in interplanetary space plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Sorriso-Valvo; Raffaele Marino; Vincenzo Carbone; Fabio Lepreti; Pierluigi Veltri; Alain Noullez; Roberto Bruno; Bruno Bavassano; Ermanno Pietropaolo

    2007-02-09

    We show in this article direct evidence for the presence of an inertial energy cascade, the most characteristic signature of hydromagnetic turbulence (MHD), in the solar wind as observed by the Ulysses spacecraft. After a brief rederivation of the equivalent of Yaglom's law for MHD turbulence, we show that a linear relation is indeed observed for the scaling of mixed third order structure functions involving Els\\"asser variables. This experimental result, confirming the prescription stemming from a theorem for MHD turbulence, firmly establishes the turbulent character of low-frequency velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind plasma.

  9. A 20-year Vision for the UK Contribution to Fusion as an Energy Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    following ITER. The role for the UK in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) over the next 20 years is strongly fusion (MCF) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) - the full list of which is given in Annex B programme over the next 20 years is given below. In magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) the continued

  10. (Fusion energy research)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

  11. Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2007 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2007 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile Adjustments FY 2006 Current Appropriation FY 2007 Request Fusion Energy Sciences Science,182 Total, Fusion Energy Sciences........... 266,947b 290,550 -2,906 287,644 318,950 Public Law

  12. Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2011 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2011 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile FY 2010 Current Appropriation FY 2011 Request Fusion Energy Sciences Science 163,479 +57,399 182, Fusion Energy Sciences 394,518b +91,023 426,000 380,000 Public Law Authorizations: Public Law 95

  13. Fusion Engineering and Design 81 (2006) 16391645 Thermo-mechanical analysis of a micro-engineered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2006-01-01

    Fusion Engineering and Design 81 (2006) 1639­1645 Thermo-mechanical analysis of a micro laser (HAPL) program goal is to develop a laser inertial fusion reactor using a solid first wall (FW). The FW of the inertial fusion energy (IFE) chamber is exposed to high energy photon, particle

  14. Research Needs Workshop for Magnetic Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ReNeW Research Needs Workshop for Magnetic Fusion Energy June 7-13, 2009 Richard Hazeltine, ReNeW for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland ­ June 8-12, 2009 OFFICE OF FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES Wednesday, November 25, 2009 #12;Acknowledgements ReNeW

  15. Status of target physics for inertial confinement fusion: Report on the review at DOE Headquarters, Germantown, MD on November 14--17, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-09

    A four day review to assess the status of target physics of inertial confinement fusion was held at US Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters on November 14--17, 1988. This review completes the current series of reviews of the inertial fusion program elements to assess the status of the data base for a decision to proceed with the proposed Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) that is being planned. In addition to target physics, the program elements that have been reviewed previously include the driver technology development for KrF and solid-state lasers, and the light-on beam pulsed power system. This series of reviews was undertaken for internal DOE assessment in anticipation of the ICF program review mandated by the Congress in 1988 to be completed in 1990 to assess the significance and implications of the progress that has been realized in the laboratory and the underground Halite/Centurion experiments. For this target physics review, both the direct and the indirect drive approaches were considered. The principal issues addressed in this review were: Is the present target physics data base adequate for a decision to proceed with design and construction of LMF now as opposed to continue planning activities at this time What specific additional target physics data are desirable to reduce the risk for a DOE decision to construct an LMF What is the role for continuation of Halite/Centurion experiments What priority should be given to the direct drive approach Are the program elements optimally structured to resolve the critical issues for an LMF decision Specific findings relating to these five issues are summarized in the following.

  16. Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20) D383 005P43 ANL/FPP/TM-165 ARGONNE NATIONAL of Nuclear Data for Science and Technology, September 6-10, 1982, Antwerp, Belgium. #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS References 49 iii #12;LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE NO. TITLE PAGE 1 17Li-83Pb liquid alloy breeder first wall

  17. California's Energy Future - The View to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    View to 2050 Laser Fusion Energy a Potential Game Changerworld leader in laser fusion energy—a potential game changera Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) power plant would be

  18. Time-Dependent Nuclear Measurements of Mix in Inertial Confinement Fusion J. R. Rygg, J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, F. H. Seguin, and R. D. Petrasso*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time-Dependent Nuclear Measurements of Mix in Inertial Confinement Fusion J. R. Rygg, J. A. Frenje (Received 19 January 2007; published 24 May 2007) The first time-dependent nuclear measurements of turbulent reaction to proceed. The time necessary for Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth to induce mix delays peak nuclear

  19. Evidence for Stratification of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey, Daniel Thomas

    Measurements of the D(d,p)T (dd) and T(t,2n)[superscript 4]He (tt) reaction yields have been compared with those of the D(t,n)[superscript 4]He (dt) reaction yield, using deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement ...

  20. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fieldsof Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S.Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

  1. Using fusion-product spectroscopy to study inertial fusion implosions, stopping power, and astrophysical nucleosynthesis at OMEGA and the NIF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zylstra, Alex B

    2015-01-01

    By measuring energetic charged-particle products from fusion reactions occurring in plasmas, nuclear diagnostics can be used to study the properties of the burning plasma, as a probe of the plasma, or of the fundamental ...

  2. The National Ignition Facility and the Path to Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2011-07-26

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is operational and conducting experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy, over 60 times more energy than any previous laser system. The NIF can create temperatures of more than 100 million degrees and pressures more than 100 billion times Earth's atmospheric pressure. These conditions, similar to those at the center of the sun, have never been created in the laboratory and will allow scientists to probe the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes, and other phenomena. The NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to the conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. Experiments on the NIF are focusing on demonstrating fusion ignition and burn via inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ignition program is conducted via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) - a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and General Atomics. The NIC program has also established collaborations with the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom, Commissariat a Energie Atomique in France, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and many others. Ignition experiments have begun that form the basis of the overall NIF strategy for achieving ignition. Accomplishing this goal will demonstrate the feasibility of fusion as a source of limitless, clean energy for the future. This paper discusses the current status of the NIC, the experimental steps needed toward achieving ignition and the steps required to demonstrate and enable the delivery of fusion energy as a viable carbon-free energy source.

  3. How does Casimir energy fall? III. Inertial forces on vacuum energy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milton, Kim

    How does Casimir energy fall? III. Inertial forces on vacuum energy. K V Shajesh, Kimball A Milton, Prachi Parashar and Jeffrey A Wagner Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics and Homer L. Dodge@nhn.ou.edu Date: 7 November 2007 Abstract. We have recently demonstrated that Casimir energy due to parallel

  4. Measurements of the T(t,2n)4He Neutron Spectrum at Low Reactant Energies from Inertial Confinement Implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey, Daniel Thomas

    Measurements of the neutron spectrum from the T(t,2n)[superscript 4]He (tt) reaction have been conducted using inertial confinement fusion implosions at the OMEGA laser facility. In these experiments, deuterium-tritium ...

  5. Effects of Nonuniform Illumination on Implosion Asymmetry in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion C. K. Li, F. H. Se´guin, J. A. Frenje, and R. D. Petrasso* Plasma Science and Fusion Center York 14623, USA (Received 29 April 2003; published 19 May 2004) Target areal density (R) asymmetries is the capsule radius); thereafter they grow linearly [6]. Low-mode-number asymmetries (` 10) result primar- ily

  6. Megajoule-class single-pulse KrF laser test facility as a logical step toward inertial fusion commercialization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, D.B.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The cost and efficiency of megajoule-class KrF laser single pulse test facilities have been examined. A baseline design is described which illuminates targets with 5 MJ with shaped 10-ns pulses. The system uses 24 main amplifiers and operates with an optics operating fluence of 4.0 J/cm/sup 2/. This system has 9.0% efficiency and costs $200/joule. Tradeoff studies indicate that large amplifier modules and high fluences lead to the lowest laser system costs, but that only a 20% cost savings can be realized by going to amplifier modules larger than 200 kJ and/or fluences greater than 4 J/cm/sup 2/. The role of the megajoule-class single-pulse test facility towards inertial fusion commercialization will also be discussed.

  7. Refraction-Enhanced X-ray Radiography for Inertial Confinement Fusion and Laser-Produced Plasma Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Kozioziemski, B J; Izumi, N; Dewald, E L; Salmonson, J D; Hammel, B A

    2008-08-26

    We explore various laser-produced plasma and inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) applications of phase-contrast x-ray radiography, and we show how the main features of these enhancements can be considered from a geometrical optics perspective as refraction enhancements. This perspective simplifies the analysis, and often permits simple analytical formulae to be derived that predict the enhancements. We explore a raytrace approach to various material interface applications, and we explore a more general example of refractive bending of x-rays by an implosion plasma. We find that refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography of implosions may provide a means to quantify density differences across shock fronts as well as density variations caused by local heating due to high-Z dopants. We also point out that refractive bending by implosions plasmas can blur fine radiograph features, and can also provide misleading contrast information in area-backlit pinhole imaging experiments unless its effects are taken into consideration.

  8. On the Loss of Wind-Induced Near-Inertial Energy to Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    On the Loss of Wind-Induced Near-Inertial Energy to Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean XIAOMING received 27 March 2009, in final form 23 June 2009) ABSTRACT Wind-induced near-inertial energy has been find that nearly 70% of the wind-induced near-inertial energy at the sea surface is lost to turbulent

  9. Fusion EnergyFusion Energy Powering the XXI centuryPowering the XXI century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion EnergyFusion Energy Powering the XXI centuryPowering the XXI century Carlos Matos FerreiraInstituto SuperiorSuperior TTéécnicocnico,, LisboaLisboa, Portugal, Portugal 20th International Atomic Energy Agency, Fusion Energy Conference, Vilamoura, Portugal #12;OutlineOutline ·· World Energy ConsumptionWorld Energy

  10. Dynamic response of materials on sub-nanosecond time scales, and beryllium properties for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, D C; Tierney, T E; Luo, S N; Paisley, D L; Kyrala, G A; Hauer, A; Greenfield, S R; Koskelo, A C; McClellan, K J; Lorenzana, H E; Knudson, M D; Peralta, P P; Loomis, E

    2004-12-09

    During the past few years, substantial progress has been made in developing experimental techniques capable of investigating the response of materials to dynamic loading on nanosecond time scales and shorter, with multiple diagnostics probing different aspects of the behavior. these relatively short time scales are scientifically interesting because plastic flow and phase changes in common materials with simple crystal structures--such as iron--may be suppressed, allowing unusual states to be induced and the dynamics of plasticity and polymorphism to be explored. Loading by laser ablation can be particularly convenient. The TRIDENT laser has been used to impart shocks and isentropic compression waves from {approx}1 to 200GPa in a range of elements and alloys, with diagnostics including surface velocimetry (line-imaging VISAR), surface displacement (framed area imaging), x-ray diffraction (single crystal and polycrystal), ellipsometry, and Raman spectroscopy. A major motivation has been the study of the properties of beryllium under conditions relevant to the fuel capsule in inertial confinement fusion: magnetically-driven shock and isentropic compression shots at Z were used to investigate the equation of state and shock melting characteristics, complemented by laser ablation experiments to investigate plasticity and heterogeneous response. These results will help to constrain acceptable tolerances on manufacturing, and possible loading paths, for inertial fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Laser-based techniques are being developed further for future material dynamics experiments, where it should be possible to obtain high quality data on strength and phase changes up to at least 1TPa.

  11. Estimation of Human Energy Expenditure Using Inertial Sensors and Heart Rate Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu?trek, Mitja

    Estimation of Human Energy Expenditure Using Inertial Sensors and Heart Rate Sensor Bozidara, we tested a combination of thigh inertial sensor with hart rate monitor, usually worn by athletes and availability and ease of development. Average smart phone has a rather powerful processing unit. It comes

  12. Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2008 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Department of Energy, has the potential to provide a significant fraction of the world's energy needsScience/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2008 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile by Subprogram (dollars in thousands) FY 2006 Current Appropriation FY 2007 Request FY 2008 Request Fusion Energy

  13. RENEWABLE ENERGY GROUPS COVET FUSION'S BUDGET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RENEWABLE ENERGY GROUPS COVET FUSION'S BUDGET A group called the Energy Efficiency Education billion in the DOE budget out of fusion, fission and fossil energy research and into "more cost-effective and environmentally sound energy- efficiency and renewable energy programs." Rep. Philip R. Sharp (D-IN) and chair

  14. S a n d i a N a t i o n a l L a b o r a t o r i e s Pulsed Power Inertial Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /integration issues 3 Drivers Pulsed power magnetic pressure Pulsed power x-rays Fast Ignition Laser Heavy Ion Policy and Politics Energy rich Low cost Reliability Ease of licensing High gain Credible, rapid Acceptabilty of local or global environmental impact Scalable/flexible Credible, rapid, deployment path to mass

  15. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) A Path to Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2006-11-27

    Fusion energy has long been considered a promising clean, nearly inexhaustible source of energy. Power production by fusion micro-explosions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been a long term research goal since the invention of the first laser in 1960. The NIF is poised to take the next important step in the journey by beginning experiments researching ICF ignition. Ignition on NIF will be the culmination of over thirty years of ICF research on high-powered laser systems such as the Nova laser at LLNL and the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester as well as smaller systems around the world. NIF is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility at LLNL that is more than 90% complete. The first cluster of 48 beams is operational in the laser bay, the second cluster is now being commissioned, and the beam path to the target chamber is being installed. The Project will be completed in 2009 and ignition experiments will start in 2010. When completed NIF will produce up to 1.8 MJ of 0.35 {micro}m light in highly shaped pulses required for ignition. It will have beam stability and control to higher precision than any other laser fusion facility. Experiments using one of the beams of NIF have demonstrated that NIF can meet its beam performance goals. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been established to manage the ignition effort on NIF. NIC has all of the research and development required to execute the ignition plan and to develop NIF into a fully operational facility. NIF will explore the ignition space, including direct drive, 2{omega} ignition, and fast ignition, to optimize target efficiency for developing fusion as an energy source. In addition to efficient target performance, fusion energy requires significant advances in high repetition rate lasers and fusion reactor technology. The Mercury laser at LLNL is a high repetition rate Nd-glass laser for fusion energy driver development. Mercury uses state-o-the art technology such as ceramic laser slabs and light diode pumping for improved efficiency and thermal management. Progress in NIF, NIC, Mercury, and the path forward for fusion energy will be presented.

  16. Parametic Study of the current limit within a single driver-scale transport beam line of an induction Linac for Heavy Ion Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prost, Lionel Robert

    2007-01-01

    Drive Approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion and the Targetthat determine inertial confinement fusion target gain and18] D. Keefe, Inertial confinement fusion, Annual Review of

  17. Fusion Development Path Panel Preliminary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    demonstration devices will be built around the world. In order for a future US fusion industry to be competitive facilities around the world, and include both magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE Laboratory, New Mexico · Stewart Prager, University of Wisconsin · Ned Sauthoff, Princeton Plasma Physics

  18. A Strategic Program Plan for Fusion Energy Sciences Fusion Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Strategic Program Plan for Fusion Energy Sciences 1 Fusion Energy Sciences #12;2 Bringing with our dependence on oil and other fossil fuels will largely disap- pear. We will have achieved energy independence. Fusion power plants will provide economical and abundant energy without greenhouse gas emissions

  19. JJ, IAP Cambridge January 20101 Fusion Energy & ITER:Fusion Energy & ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billions ITERITER startsstarts DEMODEMO decisiondecision:: Fusion impact? Energy without greenEnergyJJ, IAP Cambridge January 20101 Fusion Energy & ITER:Fusion Energy & ITER: Challenges without green house gashouse gas #12;JJ, IAP Cambridge January 20103 3 D + T + He ++ n U235 n n Neutrons

  20. California’s Energy Future: The View to 2050 - Summary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    View to 2050 Laser Fusion Energy a Potential Game Changerworld leader in laser fusion energy—a potential game changera Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) power plant would be

  1. Scientific Breakeven for Fusion Energy For the past 40 years, the IFE fusion research community has adopted: achieving a fusion gain of 1 as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scientific Breakeven for Fusion Energy For the past 40 years, the IFE fusion research community has as fusion energy produced divided the external energy incident on the fusion reaction chamber. Typical fusion power plant design concepts require a fusion gain of 30 for MFE and 70 for IFE. Fusion energy

  2. Measurements of R asymmetries at burn time in inertial-confinement-fusion capsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . K. Li, J. A. Frenje, S. Kurebayashi, and R. D. Petrassoa) Plasma Science and Fusion Center Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 146211 Received 5 March 2002 include exponentially-growing Rayleigh­Taylor RT instabilities and linearly growing secular modes, either

  3. Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, Julien

    2006-10-01

    From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size, and their partial or total evaporation in the expanding flow.

  4. Design, fabrication and measurement of a novel cooling arm for fusion energy source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Shui-Dong; Mei, Jia-Bin; Yang, Bin; Yang, Chun-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    The issues of energy and environment are the main constraint of sustainable development in worldwide. Nuclear energy source is one important optional choice for long term sustainable development. The nuclear energy consists of fusion energy and fission energy. Compared with fission, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is a kind of clean fusion energy and can generate large energy and little environmental pollution. ICF mainly consists of peripheral driver unit and target. The cooling arm is an important component of the target, which cools the hohlraum to maintain the required temperature and positions the thermal-mechanical package (TMP) assembly. This paper mainly investigates the cooling arm, including the structural design, the verticality of sidewall and the mechanical properties. The TMP assembly is uniformly clamped in its radial when using (111) crystal orientation silicon to fabricate cooling arm. The finite element method is used to design the structure of cooling arm with 16 clamping arms, and the ME...

  5. LANL Fusion Energy Sciences ResearchLANL Fusion Energy Sciences Research G. A. Wurden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LANL Fusion Energy Sciences ResearchLANL Fusion Energy Sciences Research G. A. Wurden Fusion Power for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA UNCLASSIFIED #12;| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Abstract (LANL/PPPL/ORNL) on the W7 X stellarator in Greifswald, Germany, principally edge plasma control

  6. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Strategic Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D R A F T Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Report on Strategic Planning: Priorities Assessment and Budget Scenarios September 21, 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science #12; ii ............................................................................................................... 68 #12; iii Preface Fusion, the energy source that powers our sun and the stars

  7. LANL | Physics | Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the world's most powerful lasers, Physics Division scientists are aiming to create thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. The experimental research of the Physics Division's...

  8. Pathways to Inertial Fusion Energy Laser Direct Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    * 2 focal diameter zooms during implosion #12;Simulations predict enough gain for a power plant (90,000 shots) Gas recirculator Pulsed power Laser gas cell #12;Electra diode provides >75% E- beam transmission into laser gas Compact 200 kV, 4.5 kA Solid State Pulse Generator Integra

  9. Summary of Assessment of Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production 1: Total systemsSuccess StoriesPlasma Physics

  10. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Dr. N. Anne Davies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciences February 28, 2006 Fusion Energy Sciences Program Update www.ofes.fusion.doe.gov U.S. DepartmentFusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Dr. N. Anne Davies Associate Director for Fusion Energy of Energy's Office of Science #12;Fusion is part of SC's part of the American Competitiveness Initiative

  11. Comment on 'Evidence for Stratification of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua Zheng; Aldo Bonasera

    2013-03-19

    Recent implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility reported by Casey et al.[1], displayed an anomalously low dd proton yield and a high tt neutron yield as compared to dt fusion reactions, explained as a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. We suggest that in the com- pression stage the fuel is out of equilibrium. Ions are inward accelerated to a velocity v0 independent on the particle type. Yield ratios are simply given by the ratios of fusion cross-sections obtained at the same velocity. A 'Hubble' type model gives also a reasonable description of the data. These considerations might be relevant for implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility as well.

  12. Comment on 'Evidence for Stratification of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Recent implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility reported by Casey et al.[1], displayed an anomalously low dd proton yield and a high tt neutron yield as compared to dt fusion reactions, explained as a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. We suggest that in the com- pression stage the fuel is out of equilibrium. Ions are inward accelerated to a velocity v0 independent on the particle type. Yield ratios are simply given by the ratios of fusion cross-sections obtained at the same velocity. A 'Hubble' type model gives also a reasonable description of the data. These considerations might be relevant for implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility as well.

  13. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, October--December 1992. Volume 3, No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixit, S.N. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The Beamlet Front End: Prototype of a new pulse generation system;imaging biological objects with x-ray lasers; coherent XUV generation via high-order harmonic generation in rare gases; theory of high-order harmonic generation; two-dimensional computer simulations of ultra- intense, short-pulse laser-plasma interactions; neutron detectors for measuring the fusion burn history of ICF targets; the recirculator; and lasnex evolves to exploit computer industry advances.

  14. EPRI Fusion Energy Assessment July 19, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPRI Fusion Energy Assessment July 19, 2011 Palo Alto, CA Roadmapping an MFE Strategy R.J. Fonck program whenever desired ­ An accelerated roadmap can make ITER the "penultimate" step to fusion energy · Demonstrating advanced plasma performance at DEMO-scale · Making electricity from the process heat #12;Roadmap

  15. Nuclear Fusion Energy Research Ghassan Antar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Nuclear Fusion Energy Research at AUB Ghassan Antar Physics Department American University of Beirut #12;Laboratory for Plasma and Fluid Dynamics [LPFD) Dr. G. Antar 2 Students: - R. Hajjar [Physics Advantages of Fusion on other ways to Produce Energy · Abundant Fuel Supply on Earth and Beyond · No Risk

  16. National Research Council AssessmentNational Research Council Assessment --Prospects for Inertial Fusion EnergyProspects for Inertial Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the preparation of an R&D roadmap aimed at developing thepreparation of an R&D roadmap aimed at developing

  17. Elliptical magnetic mirror generated via resistivity gradients for fast ignition inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)] [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    The elliptical magnetic mirror scheme for guiding fast electrons for Fast Ignition proposed by Schmitz et al. (Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 085016 (2012)) is studied for conditions on the multi-kJ scale which are much closer to full-scale Fast Ignition. When scaled up, the elliptical mirror scheme is still highly beneficial to Fast Ignition. An increase in the coupling efficiency by a factor of 3–4 is found over a wide range of fast electron divergence half-angles.

  18. Process for manufacture of inertial confinement fusion targets and resulting product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masnari, Nino A. (Ann Arbor, MI); Rensel, Walter B. (Ann Arbor, MI); Robinson, Merrill G. (Ann Arbor, MI); Solomon, David E. (Ann Arbor, MI); Wise, Kensall D. (Ann Arbor, MI); Wuttke, Gilbert H. (Ypsilanti Township, Washtenaw County, MI)

    1982-01-01

    An ICF target comprising a spherical pellet of fusion fuel surrounded by a concentric shell; and a process for manufacturing the same which includes the steps of forming hemispheric shells of a silicon or other substrate material, adhering the shell segments to each other with a fuel pellet contained concentrically therein, then separating the individual targets from the parent substrate. Formation of hemispheric cavities by deposition or coating of a mold substrate is also described. Coatings or membranes may also be applied to the interior of the hemispheric segments prior to joining.

  19. A Plan for the Development of Fusion Energy. Final Report to Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, Fusion Development Path Panel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2003-03-05

    This report presents a plan for the deployment of a fusion demonstration power plant within 35 years, leading to commercial application of fusion energy by mid-century. The plan is derived from the necessary features of a demonstration fusion power plant and from the time scale defined by President Bush. It identifies critical milestones, key decision points, needed major facilities and required budgets.

  20. Questions and answers about ITER and fusion energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    QA & What is fusion? Fusion, the energy source of the sun and stars, is the most efficient process for converting mass into energy (E mc 2 ). The fusion process is...

  1. Update for the Drag Force on an Injected Pellet and Target Fabrication for Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Nagai, Keiji; Takeda, Tetsuji; Mima, Kunioki; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko [Osaka University (Japan)

    2003-05-15

    To create a conceptual design of a tracking system of a target injected into a wet-walled, laser-fusion reactor, the influence of residual gas on the target trajectory is discussed based on a kinetic model, assuming all of the impinging molecules are adsorbed on the target surface. The model targets are a high-gain target for central ignition and a fast-ignition target with a cone as an optical guide for an additional heating laser. In the case of a fast-ignition target, tracking in the reactor might be skipped, depending on its condition, because of the heavy cone. Recent activities in fabrication of the fast-ignition target are briefly mentioned.

  2. Dependence of Shell Mix on Feedthrough in Direct Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion S. P. Regan, J. A. Delettrez, V. N. Goncharov, F. J. Marshall, J. M. Soures, V. A. Smalyuk, P. B. Radha, B. Yaakobi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dependence of Shell Mix on Feedthrough in Direct Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion S. P. Regan, J 87545, USA J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, and F. H. Se´guin Plasma Science and Fusion Center May 2004) The mixing of cold, high-density shell plasma with the low-density, hot spot plasma

  3. Sandia Energy - Fusion Energy Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen GenerationTechnologiesEnergy ConversionEngine

  4. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J. [ed.

    1998-12-01

    During this period, General Atomics (GA) and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 17 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``On-site Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). They fabricated and delivered over 1,200 hohlraum mandrels and numerous other micromachined components to LLNL, LANL, and SNLA. They produced more than 1,300 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA, and the University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). They also delivered nearly 2,000 various target foils and films for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY98. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. During FY98, great progress was made by the GA/Schafer-UR/LLE-LANL team in the design, procurement, installation, and testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System (OCTS) that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. The design phase was concluded for all components of the OCTS and all major components were procured and nearly all were fabricated. Many of the components were assembled and tested, and some have been shipped to UR/LLE. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. They are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. They also contributed cryogenic support and developed concepts for NIF cryogenic targets. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  5. Design of an electronic charged particle spectrometer to measure S R< on inertial fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G permanent magnet, this instrument will uniquely determine particle identities and measure particle energies or more different positions are used simultaneously . The main reactions generating such charged particles

  6. The New Charge for NonFusionEnergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The New Charge for NonFusionEnergy FES Applications James W. Van Dam on behalf of Fusion Energy of fusion energy sciences to scientific discovery and the development and deployment of new technologies beyond possible applications in fusion energy. 3 #12;Charge to FESAC · Charge letter to FESAC from

  7. Structures in high-energy fusion data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Esbensen

    2012-06-05

    Structures observed in heavy-ion fusion cross sections at energies above the Coulomb barrier are interpreted as caused by the penetration of centrifugal barriers that are well-separated in energy. The structures are most pronounced in the fusion of lighter, symmetric systems, where the separation in energy between successive angular momentum barriers is relatively large. It is shown that the structures or peaks can be revealed by plotting the first derivative of the energy weighted cross section. It is also shown how an orbital angular momentum can be assign to the observed peaks by comparing to coupled-channels calculations. This is illustrated by analyzing high-energy fusion data for $^{12}$C+$^{16}$O and $^{16}$O+$^{16}$O, and the possibility of observing similar structures in the fusion of heavier systems is discussed.

  8. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and pR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Yeamans, C. B.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Talison, B.; Casey, D. T.; Landen, O. L.; Moran, M. J.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-10-10

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (?R) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF

  9. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and pR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Zylstra, A. B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Frenje, J. A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Rinderknecht, H. G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu Johnson, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Waugh, C. J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Seguin, F. H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Sio, H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Sinenian, N. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Li, C. K. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Glebov, V. Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Hohenberger, M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Stoeckl, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Yeamans, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mackinnon, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bionta, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Talison, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moran, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zacharias, R. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (?R) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF

  10. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and pR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; et al

    2014-10-10

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (?R) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in themore »filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±« less

  11. Fusion Energy An Industry-Led Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    business not big science InternationalCompetitivenessissue - $26T/yr energy market with $300B/yr futureFusion Energy An Industry-Led Initiative September 10,1993 ATeam Effort TRW General Dynamics;Energy Supply and Needs Global per capita energy usage Global Per Capita energy usage will increase even

  12. THE CONCEPT OF ISOCHORIC CENTRAL SPARK IGNITION AND ITS FUEL GAIN IN INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -1914, Rasht , Iran ( Islamic Republic of ) Corresponding author email: ghasemi@guilan.ac.ir ABSTRACT One for functioning a nuclear power plant that compression and ignition in it is done by laser beam is [1]: He fe el energy entering to the laser system, el is the transformation coefficient of entering electric energy

  13. SUPPORT FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES IN FY 2013 HELP THE UNITED STATES REMAIN A WORLD LEADER IN FUSION RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ON THE U.S. FUSION PROGRAM Fusion energy is the power source of our sun and the stars. ItsSUPPORT FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES IN FY 2013 HELP THE UNITED STATES REMAIN A WORLD LEADER IN FUSION fusion researchers, and prepare for the commercialization of fusion energy, the U.S. must have its own

  14. Fusion Energy 101 Jeff Freidberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : · Huge resources ­ a renewable · No CO2 emissions · No pollution · Inherently safe · No proliferation of a plasma 17 #12;Properties of a fusion plasma · We need enough plasma: (air/100,000) · At a high enough temperature: (air x million) · Holding its heat for a long enough time: · For a sustained fusion plasma

  15. Initial experiments on the shock-ignition inertial confinement fusion concepta...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pro- posed by Betti et al.4,5 It promises to achieve ignition with 3-times-lower driver energy than and the energy gain G scales as G /vi 1.25 Ref. 9 , where is the burn up fraction that increases with R Ref. 2-averaged ar- eal density of 0.13 g/cm2 and peak R of 0.24 g/cm2 Ref. 10 . In fast ignition, the implosion

  16. MSc in Plasma Physics & Applications Laser Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    . Thermonuclear fusion provides unlimited energy for all the world which is clean from long lived radioactiveMSc in Plasma Physics & Applications Laser Fusion Energy Why laser fusionDescription of the course fusion for energy production. This unique training scheme involves eight leading European centres

  17. HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Decreases Bending Energy and Promotes Curved Fusion Intermediates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Decreases Bending Energy and Promotes Curved Fusion Intermediates Stephanie in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is fusion between the viral envelope and the T x-ray scattering is that the bending modulus KC is greatly reduced upon addition of the HIV fusion

  18. A roadmap to the realiza/on of fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A roadmap to the realiza/on of fusion energy Francesco Romanelli, EFDA STAC #12;Why a roadmap · The need for a long-term strategy on energy Strategic Energy Technology plan, Energy Roadmap 2050 · In this context, Fusion must

  19. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H. W.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; McCluskey, M.; Mastrosimone, D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-06-01

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility [T. Boehly et al. , Opt. Commun.133, 495 (1997)]. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is currently capable of measuring the yield to ~±10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ~±50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energy uncertainty to ±15-20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ~±25-40 km/s.

  20. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@mit.edu; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H. W.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); McCluskey, M.; Mastrosimone, D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility [T. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is currently capable of measuring the yield to ?±10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ?±50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energy uncertainty to ±15?20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ?±25?40 km/s.

  1. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H. W.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; McCluskey, M.; Mastrosimone, D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-06-01

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is currently capable of measuring the yield to ~±10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ~±50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energy uncertainty to ±15-20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ~±25-40 km/s.

  2. Hot Electron Propagation and Imposed Magnetic Field in Inertial Fusion Hohlraums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strozzi, D J; Marinak, M M; Larson, D J; Koning, J M; Logan, B G

    2015-01-01

    Simulations with the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA of a low-adiabat ignition design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), with and without an imposed axial magnetic field, are presented. We also study superthermal, or "hot," electron dynamics with the hybrid-PIC code ZUMA, using plasma conditions from HYDRA. During the early-time laser picket, when hot electrons from the window are a concern, we find ~2E-3 of the hot electron energy in a source consistent with two-plasmon decay (80 keV temperature) in the laser entrance hole deposits in the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel, while most of the energy deposits in the high-Z wall. A 70 Tesla field, which may improve capsule performance, magnetizes hot electrons in the hohlraum fill gas, guides them to the capsule, and increases the DT deposition 12x. Early in peak laser power, electrons with >125 keV reach the DT fuel, and those with ~185 keV deposit the largest fraction of their energy (13%) in DT. HYDRA magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with an initial...

  3. High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrest, C. J.; Radha, P. B.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gardner, S.

    2012-10-15

    The areal density ({rho}R) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative {rho}R measurements and 1-D simulations.

  4. Bayesian inference of inaccuracies in radiation transport physics from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffney, Jim A; Sonnad, Vijay; Libby, Stephen B

    2013-01-01

    First principles microphysics models are essential to the design and analysis of high energy density physics experiments. Using experimental data to investigate the underlying physics is also essential, particularly when simulations and experiments are not consistent with each other. This is a difficult task, due to the large number of physical models that play a role, and due to the complex (and as a result, noisy) nature of the experiments. This results in a large number of parameters that make any inference a daunting task; it is also very important to consistently treat both experimental and prior understanding of the problem. In this paper we present a Bayesian method that includes both these effects, and allows the inference of a set of modifiers which have been constructed to give information about microphysics models from experimental data. We pay particular attention to radiation transport models. The inference takes into account a large set of experimental parameters and an estimate of the prior kno...

  5. Bayesian Analysis of Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffney, J A; Sonnad, V; Libby, S B

    2012-01-01

    We develop a Bayesian inference method that allows the efficient determination of several interesting parameters from complicated high-energy-density experiments performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The model is based on an exploration of phase space using the hydrodynamic code HYDRA. A linear model is used to describe the effect of nuisance parameters on the analysis, allowing an analytic likelihood to be derived that can be determined from a small number of HYDRA runs and then used in existing advanced statistical analysis methods. This approach is applied to a recent experiment in order to determine the carbon opacity and X-ray drive; it is found that the inclusion of prior expert knowledge and fluctuations in capsule dimensions and chemical composition significantly improve the agreement between experiment and theoretical opacity calculations. A parameterisation of HYDRA results is used to test the application of both Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and genetic algorithm (GA) techniques to e...

  6. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H. W.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; McCluskey, M.; et al

    2014-06-04

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is capable of measuring the yield to ~±10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ~±50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energymore »uncertainty to ±15-20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ~±25-40 km/s.« less

  7. Compact Torus Accelerator Driven Inertial Confinement Fusion Power Plant HYLIFE-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, B G; Moir, R W; Tabak, M; Bieri, R L; Hammer, J H; Hartman, C W; Hoffman, M A; Leber, R L; Petzoldt, R W; Tobin, M T

    2005-03-30

    A Compact Torus Accelerator (CTA) is used to accelerate a Compact Torus (CT) to 35 MJ kinetic energy which is focused to a 20 mm diameter where its kinetic energy is converted to a shaped x-ray pulse of 30 MJ. The capsule yield with a prescribed radiation profile is calculated to be (gain 60 times 30 MJ) 1.8 GJ. Schemes for achieving this profile are described. The CT is accelerated in a length of 30 m within an annulus of 150 mm ID and 300 mm OD where the maximum magnetic field is 28 T. A 2.5 m conical taper reduces the mean diameter of the CT from 225 mm to 20 mm. The conical section is made out of solid Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}. The target with its frozen conical guide section is accurately placed at the end of the accelerator about once per second. The reactor called HYLIFE uses liquid jets to attenuate blast effects including shrapnel from the shattered conical guide section and radiation so that the vessel is expected to last 30 years. The calculated cost of electricity is estimated (in constant 1988 dollars) to be about 4.8 cents/kW {center_dot} h compared to the future cost of nuclear and coal of 4.3 to 5.8 cents/kW {center_dot} h. The CT driver contributes 17% to the cost of electricity. Present CT's make 2 x 10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2}; the goal of experiments in progress is 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2} with further modifications to allow 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}, whereas the reactor requires 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} in a shaped pulse.

  8. Technical Feasibility of Fusion Energy Extension of the Fusion Program and Basic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    translation by JAERI #12;i Contents Introduction 1 Part 1 Technical Feasibility of Fusion Energy 2 1. Future Generation 28 1.3.2.5 Suppression of Global Warming Using Renewable Energy 28 1.3.3 Safety viewed fromi Report on Technical Feasibility of Fusion Energy and Extension of the Fusion Program and Basic

  9. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01

    simulations of fusion and energy systems with unprecedentedRequirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences   14 General  and  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences  

  10. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences:  Target  2017  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences:  Target  and  Context   DOE’s  Fusion  Energy  Sciences  program  

  11. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01

    and  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences   14 General  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences   i  

  12. HEDP and new directions for fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, Ronald C

    2009-01-01

    The Quest for fusion energy has a long history and the demonstration of thermonuclear energy release in 1951 represented a record achievement for high energy density. While this first demonstration was in response to the extreme fears of mankind, it also marked the beginning of a great hope that it would usher in an era of boundless cheap energy. In fact, fusion still promises to be an enabling technology that can be compared to the prehistoric utilization of fire. Why has the quest for fusion energy been so long on promises and so short in fulfillment? This paper briefly reviews past approaches to fusion energy and suggests new directions. By putting aside the old thinking and vigorously applying our experimental, computational and theoretical tools developed over the past decades we should be able to make rapid progress toward satisfying an urgent need. Fusion not only holds the key to abundant green energy, but also promises to enable deep space missions and the creation of rare elements and isotopes for wide-ranging industrial applications and medical diagnostics.

  13. Fusion cross sections at deep subbarrier energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hagino; N. Rowley; M. Dasgupta

    2003-02-12

    A recent publication reports that heavy-ion fusion cross sections at extreme subbarrier energies show a continuous change of their logarithmic slope with decreasing energy, resulting in a much steeper excitation function compared with theoretical predictions. We show that the energy dependence of this slope is partly due to the asymmetric shape of the Coulomb barrier, that is its deviation from a harmonic shape. We also point out that the large low-energy slope is consistent with the surprisingly large surface diffusenesses required to fit recent high-precision fusion data.

  14. Alternative pathways to fusion energy (focus on Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alternative pathways to fusion energy (focus on Department of Energy Innovative Confinement for a restructured fusion energy science program [5] 1996 | FESAC: Opportunities in Alternative Confinement Concepts, suggests program for Innovative Concepts [1] 1995 | OTA TPX and the Alternates [2] 1995 | PCAST (given flat

  15. Grid Inertial Response-Based Probabilistic Determination of Energy Storage System Capacity Under High Solar Penetration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Meng; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2015-07-01

    It is well-known that responsive battery energy storage systems (BESSs) are an effective means to improve the grid inertial response to various disturbances including the variability of the renewable generation. One of the major issues associated with its implementation is the difficulty in determining the required BESS capacity mainly due to the large amount of inherent uncertainties that cannot be accounted for deterministically. In this study, a probabilistic approach is proposed to properly size the BESS from the perspective of the system inertial response, as an application of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). The proposed approach enables a risk-informed decision-making processmore »regarding (1) the acceptable level of solar penetration in a given system and (2) the desired BESS capacity (and minimum cost) to achieve an acceptable grid inertial response with a certain confidence level.« less

  16. Grid Inertial Response-Based Probabilistic Determination of Energy Storage System Capacity Under High Solar Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, Meng; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2015-07-01

    It is well-known that responsive battery energy storage systems (BESSs) are an effective means to improve the grid inertial response to various disturbances including the variability of the renewable generation. One of the major issues associated with its implementation is the difficulty in determining the required BESS capacity mainly due to the large amount of inherent uncertainties that cannot be accounted for deterministically. In this study, a probabilistic approach is proposed to properly size the BESS from the perspective of the system inertial response, as an application of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). The proposed approach enables a risk-informed decision-making process regarding (1) the acceptable level of solar penetration in a given system and (2) the desired BESS capacity (and minimum cost) to achieve an acceptable grid inertial response with a certain confidence level.

  17. Laser Intertial Fusion Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, K

    2010-04-08

    This study investigates the neutronics design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission energy system called the Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LFFH). A LFFH combines current Laser Inertial Confinement fusion technology with that of advanced fission reactor technology to produce a system that eliminates many of the negative aspects of pure fusion or pure fission systems. When examining the LFFH energy mission, a significant portion of the United States and world energy production could be supplied by LFFH plants. The LFFH engine described utilizes a central fusion chamber surrounded by multiple layers of multiplying and moderating media. These layers, or blankets, include coolant plenums, a beryllium (Be) multiplier layer, a fertile fission blanket and a graphite-pebble reflector. Each layer is separated by perforated oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel walls. The central fusion chamber is surrounded by an ODS ferritic steel first wall. The first wall is coated with 250-500 {micro}m of tungsten to mitigate x-ray damage. The first wall is cooled by Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83} eutectic, chosen for its neutron multiplication and good heat transfer properties. The {sub 17}Pb{sub 83} flows in a jacket around the first wall to an extraction plenum. The main coolant injection plenum is immediately behind the Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83}, separated from the Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83} by a solid ODS wall. This main system coolant is the molten salt flibe (2LiF-BeF{sub 2}), chosen for beneficial neutronics and heat transfer properties. The use of flibe enables both fusion fuel production (tritium) and neutron moderation and multiplication for the fission blanket. A Be pebble (1 cm diameter) multiplier layer surrounds the coolant injection plenum and the coolant flows radially through perforated walls across the bed. Outside the Be layer, a fission fuel layer comprised of depleted uranium contained in Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles having a packing fraction of 20% in 2 cm diameter fuel pebbles. The fission blanket is cooled by the same radial flibe flow that travels through perforated ODS walls to the reflector blanket. This reflector blanket is 75 cm thick comprised of 2 cm diameter graphite pebbles cooled by flibe. The flibe extraction plenum surrounds the reflector bed. Detailed neutronics designs studies are performed to arrive at the described design. The LFFH engine thermal power is controlled using a technique of adjusting the {sup 6}Li/{sup 7}Li enrichment in the primary and secondary coolants. The enrichment adjusts system thermal power in the design by increasing tritium production while reducing fission. To perform the simulations and design of the LFFH engine, a new software program named LFFH Nuclear Control (LNC) was developed in C++ to extend the functionality of existing neutron transport and depletion software programs. Neutron transport calculations are performed with MCNP5. Depletion calculations are performed using Monteburns 2.0, which utilizes ORIGEN 2.0 and MCNP5 to perform a burnup calculation. LNC supports many design parameters and is capable of performing a full 3D system simulation from initial startup to full burnup. It is able to iteratively search for coolant {sup 6}Li enrichments and resulting material compositions that meet user defined performance criteria. LNC is utilized throughout this study for time dependent simulation of the LFFH engine. Two additional methods were developed to improve the computation efficiency of LNC calculations. These methods, termed adaptive time stepping and adaptive mesh refinement were incorporated into a separate stand alone C++ library name the Adaptive Burnup Library (ABL). The ABL allows for other client codes to call and utilize its functionality. Adaptive time stepping is useful for automatically maximizing the size of the depletion time step while maintaining a desired level of accuracy. Adaptive meshing allows for analysis of fixed fuel configurations that would normally require a computationally burdensome number of depletion zones. Alternatively, Adaptive M

  18. Converting energy from fusion into useful forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovari, M; Jenkins, I; Kiely, C

    2014-01-01

    If fusion power reactors are to be feasible, it will still be necessary to convert the energy of the nuclear reaction into usable form. The heat produced will be removed from the reactor core by a primary coolant, which might be water, helium, molten lithium-lead, molten lithium-containing salt, or CO2. The heat could then be transferred to a conventional Rankine cycle or Brayton (gas turbine) cycle. Alternatively it could be used for thermochemical processes such as producing hydrogen or other transport fuels. Fusion presents new problems because of the high energy neutrons released. These affect the selection of materials and the operating temperature, ultimately determining the choice of coolant and working cycle. The limited temperature ranges allowed by present day irradiated structural materials, combined with the large internal power demand of the plant, will limit the overall thermal efficiency. The operating conditions of the fusion power source, the materials, coolant, and energy conversion system w...

  19. Placing Fusion in the spectrum of energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Placing Fusion in the spectrum of energy development programs Niek Lopes Cardozo #12;Niek Lopes Cardozo, Placing fusion in the energy development spectrum Put fusion in same plot with other energy to other energy sources in development. This comparison should be based on an existing representation

  20. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 48 (2006) B153B163 doi:10.1088/0741-3335/48/12B/S15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    -drive). If the thermonuclear fuel is ignited and a burn wave propagates through the dense core, the fusion energy produced canINSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion for direct-drive and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion R Betti1,2,3 , K Anderson1,3 , T R Boehly3

  1. Particle radiography of high energy density plasmas Supervisors: M. Borghesi (QUB), M. Hill (AWE plc)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    of relevance to fundamental plasma physics, to schemes for energy production via thermonuclear fusion (Inertial Fusion Energy, IFE), and to laboratory-based studies of astrophysical phenomena. The extreme acceleration, and filamentation, which are of relevance to areas such as Inertial Confinement Fusion

  2. 50 Years of Fusion Research Fusion Innovation Research and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of experiments were tried and ended up far from fusion conditions ­ Magnetic Fusion research in the U radioactive waste - tritium breeding (TBR > 1) to complete the fuel cycle · Fusion Power Densities ( ~ 5 MWm-3 diffusion." · Model C was built to reduce complications of impurities (divertor) and wall neutrals ( a = 5

  3. Fast ignition when heating the central part of an inertial confinement fusion target by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gus’kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Zmitrenko, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Technical University (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    We investigate the ignition and burning of a precompressed laser fusion target when it is rapidly heated by an ion beam with the formation of a temperature peak in the central part of the target. We present the results of our comprehensive numerical simulations of the problem that include the following components: (1) the target compression under the action of a profiled laser pulse, (2) the heating of the compressed target with spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a beam of high-energy ions, and (3) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum target compression and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of the compressed-target heating by an ion beam. The dependences of the threshold energies of the igniting ion beam and the thermonuclear gain on the width of the Gaussian beam ion energy spectrum have been established. The peculiarities of fast ignition by an ion beam related to the spatial distribution of parameters for the target precompressed by a laser pulse are discussed.

  4. FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES SUMMER STUDY 2002 Gerald Navratil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLANS FOR FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES SUMMER STUDY 2002 Gerald Navratil Columbia University American-steps in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to the long range planning to examine goals and proposed initiatives in burning plasma science in magnetic fusion energy and integrated

  5. Energy Efficient Routing with Adaptive Data Fusion in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yonghe

    Energy Efficient Routing with Adaptive Data Fusion in Sensor Networks Hong Luo College of Computer Adaptive Fusion Steiner Tree (AFST), for energy efficient data gathering in sensor networks that jointly, other networks may require complex operations for data fusion1 . Energy consumption of beamforming

  6. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting Gaithersburg Hilton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting Gaithersburg Hilton 620 Perry Parkway Director for Fusion Energy Sciences 10:20 Meeting Agenda and Logistics Professor Stewart Prager, FESAC. N. Anne Davies, Associate Director for Fusion Energy Sciences 12:30 Lunch 01:30 OMB Perspective Joel

  7. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting January 31, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting January 31, 2013 Agenda Time Topic Speaker 9 Energy Sciences 10:15 Break 10:45 Briefing from the Subcommittee on Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of Technology 9:05 FES Perspectives Dr. Ed Synakowski, Associate Director of the Office of Science, for Fusion

  8. Update and Outlook for the Fusion Energy Sciences Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Update and Outlook for the Fusion Energy Sciences Program E.J. Synakowski Associate Director, Office of Science Fusion Energy Sciences Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting Washington, D.C. December Energy Sciences 3D topologies Samuel Barish, Lead,: Validation Platforms, Stellarators Steve Eckstrand

  9. The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -consistent power plant design for a multi- beam induction linac, final focus and chamber propagationThe Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy Grant Logan Director Heavy-Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory Presented to FESAC Workshop on Development Paths

  10. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hules, John A.

    2008-01-01

    concept for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). ICF is theStorage System Inertial confinement fusion Institute of

  11. A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight detector response in current mode to inertial confinement fusion experiments (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, A. J.; Cooper, G. W. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Ruiz, C. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Fehl, D. L.; Hahn, K. D.; Leeper, R. J.; Smelser, R.; Torres, J. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight (nTOF) detector response in current mode for inertial confinement fusion experiments has been applied to the on-axis nTOF detectors located in the basement of the Z-Facility. It will be shown that this method can identify sources of neutron scattering, and is useful for predicting detector responses in future experimental configurations, and for identifying potential sources of neutron scattering when experimental set-ups change. This method can also provide insight on how much broadening neutron scattering contributes to the primary signals, which is then subtracted from them. Detector time responses are deconvolved from the signals, allowing a transformation from dN/dt to dN/dE, extracting neutron spectra at each detector location; these spectra are proportional to the absolute yield.

  12. Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions spanning the fusion barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Xizhen Wu; Enguang Zhao

    2006-01-25

    The Skyrme energy density functional has been applied to the study of heavy-ion fusion reactions. The barriers for fusion reactions are calculated by the Skyrme energy density functional with proton and neutron density distributions determined by using restricted density variational (RDV) method within the same energy density functional together with semi-classical approach known as the extended semi-classical Thomas-Fermi method. Based on the fusion barrier obtained, we propose a parametrization of the empirical barrier distribution to take into account the multi-dimensional character of real barrier and then apply it to calculate the fusion excitation functions in terms of barrier penetration concept. A large number of measured fusion excitation functions spanning the fusion barriers can be reproduced well. The competition between suppression and enhancement effects on sub-barrier fusion caused by neutron-shell-closure and excess neutron effects is studied.

  13. A Phase Diagram Unifies Energy Dissipation, Kinetics, and Rheology in Inertial Granular Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. DeGiuli; J. N. McElwaine; M. Wyart

    2015-09-11

    Flows of hard granular materials depend strongly on the interparticle friction coefficient $\\mu_p$ and on the inertial number ${\\cal I}$, which characterizes proximity to the jamming transition where flow stops. Guided by numerical simulations, we derive the phase diagram of dense inertial flow of spherical particles, finding three regimes for $10^{-4} \\lesssim {\\cal I} \\lesssim 0.1$: frictionless, frictional sliding, and rolling. These are distinguished by the dominant means of energy dissipation, changing from collisional to sliding friction, and back to collisional, as $\\mu_p$ increases from zero at constant ${\\cal I}$. The three regimes differ in their kinetics and rheology; in particular, the velocity fluctuations and the stress anisotropy both display non-monotonic behavior with $\\mu_p$, corresponding to transitions between the three regimes of flow. We characterize the scaling properties of these regimes, show that energy balance yields scaling relations for each of them, and explain why friction qualitatively affects flow.

  14. Distribution Categories: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Distribution Categories: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20) MFE--Plasma Systems (UC-20a) MFE for Chapter 3 3-38 4. THERMAL HYDRAULIC AND THERMAL STORAGE SYSTEM ANALYSIS 4-1 4.1 Introduction 4-1 4 CYCLE EFFECTS 6-1 6.1 Burn Cycle and Energy Transfer System 6-1 6.2 Conventional Cycle 6-2 6

  15. Energy Scaling Laws for Distributed Inference in Random Fusion Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yukich, Joseph E.

    1 Energy Scaling Laws for Distributed Inference in Random Fusion Networks Animashree Anandkumar Abstract--The energy scaling laws of multihop data fusion networks for distributed inference are considered. The fusion network consists of randomly located sensors distributed i.i.d. according to a general spatial

  16. Bold Step by the World to Fusion Energy: ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bold Step by the World to Fusion Energy: ITER Gerald A. Navratil 2006 Con Edison Lecture Fu electrically charged particles at very high energy: Threshold temperature for most reactive fusion reaction' FUSION PLASMA REGIME. · US WORKING WITH INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY IS NOW READY TO BUILD THE WORLDS FIRST

  17. IOP PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 51 (2009) 014005 (9pp) doi:10.1088/0741-3335/51/1/014005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    2009-01-01

    IOP PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 51 (2009) 014005 to inertial fusion [1] concerns the propagation and energy deposition of a fast electron beam in strongly change produced in the target material by the shock wave. While the initially cold solid target

  18. Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 19, No. 1, March 2000 ( 2001) Review of the Fusion Materials Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    , Livermore, CA 94551. 6 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706. 7 Columbia University, New York, NY 10027Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 19, No. 1, March 2000 ( 2001) Review of the Fusion Materials.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Panel on the Review of the Fusion

  19. Design, fabrication and measurement of a novel cooling arm for fusion energy source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shui-Dong Jiang; Jing-Quan Liu; Jia-Bin Mei; Bin Yang; Chun-Sheng Yang

    2012-07-05

    The issues of energy and environment are the main constraint of sustainable development in worldwide. Nuclear energy source is one important optional choice for long term sustainable development. The nuclear energy consists of fusion energy and fission energy. Compared with fission, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is a kind of clean fusion energy and can generate large energy and little environmental pollution. ICF mainly consists of peripheral driver unit and target. The cooling arm is an important component of the target, which cools the hohlraum to maintain the required temperature and positions the thermal-mechanical package (TMP) assembly. This paper mainly investigates the cooling arm, including the structural design, the verticality of sidewall and the mechanical properties. The TMP assembly is uniformly clamped in its radial when using (111) crystal orientation silicon to fabricate cooling arm. The finite element method is used to design the structure of cooling arm with 16 clamping arms, and the MEMS technologies are employed to fabricate the micro-size cooling arm structure with high vertical sidewall. Finally, the mechanical test of cooling arm is taken, and the result can meet the requirement of positioning TMP assembly.

  20. Fusion Power Associates Meeting 1 December 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    growth of hydro-instability Higher energy gain Use of less laser energy implosion #12;KrF Light helps Research and the U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA. #12;Opening remarks on path towards Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) · Community needs to work together to provide the technical case for funding an IFE program

  1. How low-energy fusion can occur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ivlev

    2012-12-04

    Fusion of two deuterons of room temperature energy is discussed. The nuclei are in vacuum with no connection to any external source (electric or magnetic field, illumination, surrounding matter, traps, etc.) which may accelerate them. The energy of two nuclei is conserved and remains small during the motion through the Coulomb barrier. The penetration through this barrier, which is the main obstacle for low-energy fusion, strongly depends on a form of the incident flux on the Coulomb center at large distances from it. In contrast to the usual scattering, the incident wave is not a single plane wave but the certain superposition of plane waves of the same energy and various directions, for example, a convergent conical wave. The wave function close to the Coulomb center is determined by a cusp caustic which is probed by de Broglie waves. The particle flux gets away from the cusp and moves to the Coulomb center providing a not small probability of fusion (cusp driven tunneling). Getting away from a caustic cusp also occurs in optics and acoustics.

  2. Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF): Principles, Status, and International Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-11-16

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is an approach to thermonuclear fusion that is intermediate between the two extremes of inertial and magnetic confinement. Target plasma preparation is followed by compression to fusion conditions. The use of a magnetic field to reduce electron thermal conduction and potentially enhance DT alpha energy deposition allows the compression rate to be drastically reduced relative to that for inertial confinement fusion. This leads to compact systems with target driver power and intensity requirements that are orders of magnitude lower than for ICF. A liner on plasma experiment has been proposed to provide a firm proof of principle for MTF.

  3. Sub-barrier Fusion Cross Sections with Energy Density Formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Muhammad Zamrun; K. Hagino; N. Takigawa

    2006-06-07

    We discuss the applicability of the energy density formalism (EDF) for heavy-ion fusion reactions at sub-barrier energies. For this purpose, we calculate the fusion excitation function and the fusion barrier distribution for the reactions of $^{16}$O with $^{154,}$$^{144}$Sm,$^{186}$W and $^{208}$Pb with the coupled-channels method. We also discuss the effect of saturation property on the fusion cross section for the reaction between two $^{64}$Ni nuclei, in connection to the so called steep fall-off phenomenon of fusion cross sections at deep sub-barrier energies.

  4. DANCING WITH THE STARSDANCING WITH THE STARS QUEST FOR FUSION ENERGYQUEST FOR FUSION ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the =Sun 264 10 Watts× Potential energy Solar power out Su pu n's lifetime t 14 6 10 .sec= ×= The Sun wouldDANCING WITH THE STARSDANCING WITH THE STARS QUEST FOR FUSION ENERGYQUEST FOR FUSION ENERGY Abhay AS A COAL POWER PLANTTHE SUN AS A COAL POWER PLANT What is the mass of the Sun ?? What is the power output

  5. multiscale analysis the hotspot dynamics during the deceleration phase of inertial confinement capsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    multiscale analysis the hotspot dynamics during the deceleration phase of inertial confinement December 2004) paper is devoted study deceleration phase inertial confinement capsules. First self. [DOI: 10.1063/1.1825389] INTRODUCTION dynamics the deceleration phase inertial con­ finement fusion

  6. China To Build Its Own Fusion Reactor ENERGY TECH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project reached agreement in Moscow Tuesday to construct the first fusion devices in thermonuclear reaction," and that "Chinese scientists started to develop a fusion operationChina To Build Its Own Fusion Reactor ENERGY TECH by Edward Lanfranco Beijing (UPI) July 1, 2005

  7. LLE 1998 annual report, October 1997--September 1998. Inertial fusion program and National Laser Users` Facility program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), the operation of the National Laser Users` Facility (NLUF), and programs involving the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students for FY98. Research summaries cover: progress in laser fusion; diagnostic development; laser and optical technology; and advanced technology for laser targets.

  8. FES Science Network Requirements - Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2008-01-01

    Division, and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences.Requirements Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences NetworkRequirements Workshop Fusion Energy Sciences Program Office,

  9. Measurements of the Differential Cross Sections for the Elastic n-{sup 3}H and n-{sup 2}H Scattering at 14.1 MeV by Using an Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; McNabb, D. P.; Navratil, P.; Quaglioni, S.; Sangster, T. C.; Glebov, V. Yu; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2011-09-16

    For the first time the differential cross section for the elastic neutron-triton (n-{sup 3}H) and neutron-deuteron (n-{sup 2}H) scattering at 14.1 MeV has been measured by using an inertial confinement fusion facility. In these experiments, which were carried out by simultaneously measuring elastically scattered {sup 3}H and {sup 2}H ions from a deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion, the differential cross section for the elastic n-{sup 3}H scattering was obtained with significantly higher accuracy than achieved in previous accelerator experiments. The results compare well with calculations that combine the resonating-group method with an ab initio no-core shell model, which demonstrate that recent advances in ab initio theory can provide an accurate description of light-ion reactions.

  10. Reports of the Fusion Energy Science Advisory Committee Strategic Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Planning for U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program of recommended strategic initiatives and associated program-wide FES investments. FESAC recommends more extensive

  11. Scientists discuss progress toward magnetic fusion energy at...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists discuss progress toward magnetic fusion energy at 2013 AAAS annual meeting February 21, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Scientists participating in...

  12. On_the_implementation_of_the_conditions_of_Inertial_Confinement_ Fusion by bombarding the target a macro particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolya, S N

    2013-01-01

    The acceleration of lithium tube segments with the length one centimeter, diameter sixteen microns wall thickness one nanometer is considered. These segments are electrically charged by proton beams produced by an electron beam source. Then, they are accelerated by the traveling wave field in a spiral waveguide. The segments are next sent to a target where they are compressed by three hundred times in the longitudinal direction and compressing target radially, so the conditions for thermonuclear fusion are realized.

  13. REPORT FROM THE PLANNING WORKSHOP FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a workshop to chart the short and medium term future of the nation's fusion energy science program-reaching benefits to the nation in the near term, and progress toward a renewable and attractive energy sourceREPORT FROM THE PLANNING WORKSHOP FOR THE FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES PROGRAM (October 22 - 24, 1996

  14. Photons & Fusion Newsletter - 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery Science on NIF: Exploring the Physics of Star Formation Article on MOIRE Optics on Cover of Applied Optics Mode 1 Drive Asymmetry in NIF Inertial Confinement Fusion...

  15. Photons & Fusion Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Senior Research Scientist Richard Petrasso's group at the MIT center has been creating detection techniques for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments for more than a...

  16. An in-flight radiography platform to measure hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion capsules at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, K. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; Haan, S. W.; Hurricane, O. A.; Kroll, J. J.; Peterson, J. L.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Landen, O. L.; Marinak, M. M.; Munro, D. H.; Salmonson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hoover, D. E.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Peterson, K. J. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87125 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    A new in-flight radiography platform has been established at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure Rayleigh–Taylor and Richtmyer–Meshkov instability growth in inertial confinement fusion capsules. The platform has been tested up to a convergence ratio of 4. An experimental campaign is underway to measure the growth of pre-imposed sinusoidal modulations of the capsule surface, as a function of wavelength, for a pair of ignition-relevant laser drives: a “low-foot” drive representative of what was fielded during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] and the new high-foot [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014)] pulse shape, for which the predicted instability growth is much lower. We present measurements of Legendre modes 30, 60, and 90 for the NIC-type, low-foot, drive, and modes 60 and 90 for the high-foot drive. The measured growth is consistent with model predictions, including much less growth for the high-foot drive, demonstrating the instability mitigation aspect of this new pulse shape. We present the design of the platform in detail and discuss the implications of the data it generates for the on-going ignition effort at NIF.

  17. Mitigation of two-plasmon decay in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion through the manipulation of ion-acoustic and Langmuir wave damping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.; Maximov, A. V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Vu, H. X. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0407 (United States)] [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0407 (United States); DuBois, D. F.; Russell, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, 2400 Central Avenue, P-5, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States)] [Lodestar Research Corporation, 2400 Central Avenue, P-5, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States); Zhang, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States) [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    The extended Zakharov model of the two-plasmon decay instability in an inhomogeneous plasma [D. F. DuBois et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 3983 (1995); D. A. Russell and D. F. DuBois, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 428 (2001)] is further generalized to include the evolution of the electron distribution function in the quasi-linear approximation [cf., e.g., K. Y. Sanbonmatsu et al. Phys. Plasmas 7, 2824 (2000); D. A. Russell et al., paper presented at the Workshop on SRS/SBS Saturation, Wente Vineyards, Livermore, CA, 2–5 April 2002]. This makes it possible to investigate anomalous absorption of laser light and hot electron production due to the two-plasmon decay instability of multiple overlapping electromagnetic waves. Scalings of hot-electron production in the (stationary) nonlinearly saturated regime relevant to recent experiments [B. Yaakobi et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 012704 (2012); D. H. Froula et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165003 (2012)] have been obtained. They indicate a sensitivity to ion-acoustic wave (IAW) damping and to the collisional absorption of Langmuir waves. Such a sensitivity might be exploited in inertial confinement fusion target design by the use of mid-Z ablators.

  18. Fast Pb-glass neutron-to-light converter for ICF (inertial confinement fusion) target burn history measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerche, R.A.; Cable, M.D.; Phillion, D.W.

    1990-09-01

    We are developing a streak camera based instrument to diagnose the fusion reaction rate (burn history) within laser-driven ICF targets filled with D-T fuel. Recently, we attempted measurements using the 16.7-MeV gamma ray emitted in the T(d,{gamma}){sup 5}He fusion reaction. Pb glass which has a large cross section for pair production acts as a gamma-ray-to-light converter. Gamma rays interact within the glass to form electron-positron pairs that produce large amounts (1000 photons/gamma ray) of prompt (<10 ps) Cerenkov light as they slow down. In our experimental instrument, an f/10 Cassegrain telescope optically couples light produced within the converter to a streak camera having 20-ps resolution. Experiments using high-yield (10{sup 13} D-T neutrons), direct-drive targets at Nova produced good signals with widths of 200 ps. Time-of-flight measurements show the signals to be induced by neutrons rather than gamma rays. The Pb glass appears to act as a fast neutron-to-light converter. We continue to study the interactions process and the possibility of using the 16.7-MeV gamma rays for burn time measurements.

  19. The Energy-Momentum Tensor in General Relativity and in Alternative Theories of Gravitation, and the Gravitational vs. Inertial Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohanian, Hans C

    2010-01-01

    We establish a general relation between the canonical energy-momentum tensor and the tensor that acts as the source of the gravitational field in Einstein's equations. In General Relativity, we use this relation to give a general proof of the exact equality of the gravitational and inertial masses for any arbitrary system of matter and gravitational fields, regardless of the presence of nonminimal couplings. In the Brans-Dicke scalar field theory, we establish that the nonminimal coupling of the scalar field leads to an inequality between the gravitational and inertial masses, and we derive an exact formula for this inequality and confirm that it is approximately proportional to the gravitational self-energy (the Nordvedt effect), but with a constant of proportionality different from what is claimed in the published literature in calculations based on the PPN scheme. Similar inequalities of gravitational and inertial masses are expected to occur in other scalar and vector theories.

  20. Magne&c fusion energy from physics to DEMO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    challenges R. Stambaugh 10:40 Roadmap to DEMO R. Fonck 11:25 Discussion 12:00 Adjourn start Roadmap to DEMO Burning plasmas Harness fusion energy all themes #12;ITER ~ 2035 start Roadmap to DEMO Burning plasmas Harness fusion energy all themes #12

  1. Key Points of STFC and EPSRC's Fusion for Energy EPSRC and STFC Councils have agreed a revised strategy for fusion for energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key Points of STFC and EPSRC's Fusion for Energy Strategy EPSRC and STFC Councils have agreed a revised strategy for fusion for energy research: 1) EPSRC and STFC will support fusion research as a long and demonstrating leadership to realise the goal of fusion energy. 2) EPSRC will develop a long term base funding

  2. Development of aerogel-lined targets for inertial confinement...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ThesisDissertation: Development of aerogel-lined targets for inertial confinement fusion experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of aerogel-lined...

  3. Development of aerogel-lined targets for inertial confinement...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    aerogel-lined targets for inertial confinement fusion experiments Braun, T 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE Abstract not provided Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA...

  4. The Energy-Momentum Tensor in General Relativity and in Alternative Theories of Gravitation, and the Gravitational vs. Inertial Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans C. Ohanian

    2013-02-28

    We establish a general relation between the canonical energy-momentum tensor of Lagrangian dynamics and the tensor that acts as the source of the gravitational field in Einstein's equations, and we show that there is a discrepancy between these tensors when there are direct nonminimal couplings between matter and the Riemann tensor. Despite this discrepancy, we give a general proof of the exact equality of the gravitational and inertial masses for any arbitrary system of matter and gravitational fields, even in the presence of nonminimal second-derivative couplings and-or linear or nonlinear second-derivative terms of any kind in the Lagrangian. The gravitational mass is defined by the asymptotic Newtonian potential at large distance from the system, and the inertial mass is defined by the volume integral of the energy density determined from the canonical energy-momentum tensor. In the Brans-Dicke scalar field theory, we establish that the nonminimal coupling and long range of the scalar field leads to an inequality between the gravitational and inertial masses, and we derive an exact formula for this inequality and confirm that it is approximately proportional to the gravitational self-energy (the Nordvedt effect), but with a constant of proportionality different from what is claimed in the published literature in calculations based on the PPN scheme. Similar inequalities of gravitational and inertial masses are expected to occur in other scalar and vector theories.

  5. Status of Safety and Environmental Activities in the US Fusion Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Petti; Susana Reyes; Lee C. Cadwallader; Jeffery F. Latkowski

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of recent safety efforts in both magnetic and inertial fusion energy. Safety has been a part of fusion design and operations since the inception of fusion research. Safety research and safety design support have been provided for a variety of experiments in both the magnetic and inertial fusion programs. The main safety issues are reviewed, some recent safety highlights are discussed and the programmatic impacts that safety research has had are presented. Future directions in the safety and environmental area are proposed.

  6. Fusion-fission energy systems evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Aase, D.T.; Bickford, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    This report serves as the basis for comparing the fusion-fission (hybrid) energy system concept with other advanced technology fissile fuel breeding concepts evaluated in the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP). As such, much of the information and data provided herein is in a form that meets the NASAP data requirements. Since the hybrid concept has not been studied as extensively as many of the other fission concepts being examined in NASAP, the provided data and information are sparse relative to these more developed concepts. Nevertheless, this report is intended to provide a perspective on hybrids and to summarize the findings of the rather limited analyses made to date on this concept.

  7. Please cite this article in press as: K.J. Boehm, et al., Modeling results for mass production layering in a fluidized bed, Fusion Eng. Des. (2011), doi:10.1016/j.fusengdes.2010.08.004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    2011-01-01

    production layering device for inertial fusion energy (IFE) fuel pellets are presented. In an IFE power plant GModel FUSION-5362; No.of Pages11 Fusion Engineering and Design xxx (2011) xxx­xxx Contents lists.B. Alexanderb , D.T. Goodinb a Center for Energy Research, M/C 0438 460D EBU II, University of California, San

  8. Masked-backlighter technique used to simultaneously image x-ray absorption and x-ray emission from an inertial confinement fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, F. J., E-mail: fredm@lle.rochester.edu; Radha, P. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A method to simultaneously image both the absorption and the self-emission of an imploding inertial confinement fusion plasma has been demonstrated on the OMEGA Laser System. The technique involves the use of a high-Z backlighter, half of which is covered with a low-Z material, and a high-speed x-ray framing camera aligned to capture images backlit by this masked backlighter. Two strips of the four-strip framing camera record images backlit by the high-Z portion of the backlighter, while the other two strips record images aligned with the low-Z portion of the backlighter. The emission from the low-Z material is effectively eliminated by a high-Z filter positioned in front of the framing camera, limiting the detected backlighter emission to that of the principal emission line of the high-Z material. As a result, half of the images are of self-emission from the plasma and the other half are of self-emission plus the backlighter. The advantage of this technique is that the self-emission simultaneous with backlighter absorption is independently measured from a nearby direction. The absorption occurs only in the high-Z backlit frames and is either spatially separated from the emission or the self-emission is suppressed by filtering, or by using a backlighter much brighter than the self-emission, or by subtraction. The masked-backlighter technique has been used on the OMEGA Laser System to simultaneously measure the emission profiles and the absorption profiles of polar-driven implosions.

  9. Effects of non-local electron transport in one-dimensional and two-dimensional simulations of shock-ignited inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marocchino, A.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” and CNISM, Roma 00161 (Italy)] [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” and CNISM, Roma 00161 (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    In some regions of a laser driven inertial fusion target, the electron mean-free path can become comparable to or even longer than the electron temperature gradient scale-length. This can be particularly important in shock-ignited (SI) targets, where the laser-spike heated corona reaches temperatures of several keV. In this case, thermal conduction cannot be described by a simple local conductivity model and a Fick's law. Fluid codes usually employ flux-limited conduction models, which preserve causality, but lose important features of the thermal flow. A more accurate thermal flow modeling requires convolution-like non-local operators. In order to improve the simulation of SI targets, the non-local electron transport operator proposed by Schurtz-Nicolaï-Busquet [G. P. Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] has been implemented in the DUED fluid code. Both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) simulations of SI targets have been performed. 1D simulations of the ablation phase highlight that while the shock profile and timing might be mocked up with a flux-limiter; the electron temperature profiles exhibit a relatively different behavior with no major effects on the final gain. The spike, instead, can only roughly be reproduced with a fixed flux-limiter value. 1D target gain is however unaffected, provided some minor tuning of laser pulses. 2D simulations show that the use of a non-local thermal conduction model does not affect the robustness to mispositioning of targets driven by quasi-uniform laser irradiation. 2D simulations performed with only two final polar intense spikes yield encouraging results and support further studies.

  10. Anomalous electron-ion energy coupling in electron drift wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Lei

    a Century of Magnetic Confinement Fusion Research, Instituteto realize fusion are magnetic and inertial confinement. The

  11. Thermonuclear Fusion Energy : Assessment and Next Step Ren Pellat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermonuclear Fusion Energy : Assessment and Next Step René Pellat High Commissioner at the French 2000, Rome Abstract Fifty years of thermonuclear fusion work with no insurmountable road blocks have is well advanced through the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme, which has

  12. Adiabatic Heavy Ion Fusion Potentials for Fusion at Deep Sub-barrier Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. S. Sastry; S. Kailas; A. K. Mohanty; A. Saxena

    2003-11-12

    The fusion cross sections from well above barrier to extreme sub-barrier energies have been analysed using the energy (E) and angular momentum (L) dependent barrier penetration model ({\\small{ELDBPM}}). From this analysis, the adiabatic limits of fusion barriers have been determined for a wide range of heavy ion systems. The empirical prescription of Wilzynska and Wilzynski has been used with modified radius parameter and surface tension coefficient values consistent with the parameterization of the nuclear masses. The adiabatic fusion barriers calculated from this prescription are in good agreement with the adiabatic barriers deduced from {\\small{ELDBPM}} fits to fusion data. The nuclear potential diffuseness is larger at adiabatic limit, resulting in a lower $\\hbar\\omega$ leading to increase of "logarithmic slope" observed at energies well below the barrier. The effective fusion barrier radius and curvature values are anomalously smaller than the predictions of known empirical prescriptions. A detailed comparison of the systematics of fusion barrier with and without L-dependence has been presented.

  13. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting March 7-8, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Associate Director for Fusion Energy Sciences 12:30 Lunch 1:30 ITER Update: Accomplishments, StatusFusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting March 7-8, 2011 Agenda DoubleTree Bethesda Hotel, and Domestic Issues Mr. Tom Vanek and Dr. John Glowienka, Fusion Energy Sciences 2:30 Fusion Energy Research

  14. Modelling Neutral Particle Analyzer Measurements of High Energy Fusion Alpha-Particle Distributions in JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling Neutral Particle Analyzer Measurements of High Energy Fusion Alpha-Particle Distributions in JET

  15. Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 17, No. 4, 1998 Status and Objectives of Tokamak Systems for Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 17, No. 4, 1998 Status and Objectives of Tokamak Systems for Fusion). It was the first comprehensive survey of the status of the tokamak fusion research concept, which was to become buildup of the U.S. tokamak program during the latter half of the 1970's and is published now to archive

  16. ICENES '91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, [mu]-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  17. Energy Subgroup B July 27, 1999 1999 Fusion Summer Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    roadmap. · Success in NIF and the IRE Program will be sufficient to proceed with the Engineering Test (ETF) for IFE · The ETF is the primary Fusion Energy Development step on the IFE roadmap · The ETF

  18. Fusion of strings and cosmic rays at ultrahigh energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Armesto; M. A. Braun; E. G. Ferreiro; C. Pajares; Yu. M. Shabelski

    1996-02-13

    It is shown that the fusion of strings is a source of particle production in nucleus--nucleus collisions outside the kinematical limits of nucleon--nucleon collisions. This fact, together with another effect of string fusion, the reduction of multiplicities, sheds some light on two of the main problems of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, the chemical composition and the energy of the most energetic detected cosmic rays.

  19. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    potentially mitigates nuclear proliferation concerns andto potentially reducing nuclear proliferation by eliminatingchallenges surrounding nuclear non-proliferation are contin-

  20. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    outlook, October 2007. 1.1 [3] Peak oil wikipedia, the freeen.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peak_oil#cite_note-mkinghubbert1956-0.

  1. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    FOM Applied to Reprocessing Schemes . 5.2 Proliferationfor fuel enrichment or reprocessing. A figure of merit ofwithout further enrichment or reprocessing. Various proposed

  2. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    of spent nuclear fuel is again in question. Reprocessing theSpent Nuclear Fuel (SNF), or fuel that cannot be consumed by the reactor without further enrichment or reprocessing.

  3. Two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear burn in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets under compressed axial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, L. J.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Werner, C. J.

    2013-07-15

    We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that explore the impact of highly compressed imposed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of perturbed spherical implosions of ignition-scale cryogenic capsules. Using perturbations that highly convolute the cold fuel boundary of the hotspot and prevent ignition without applied fields, we impose initial axial seed fields of 20–100 T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 4 × 10{sup 4} T (400 MG) under implosion, thereby relaxing hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ?50%. The compressed field is high enough to suppress transverse electron heat conduction, and to allow alphas to couple energy into the hotspot even when highly deformed by large low-mode amplitudes. This might permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities.

  4. Summary for FT, IT and SE 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary for FT, IT and SE 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference 1 - 6 November 2004 Vilamoura on Plasma Physics and controlled Nuclear Fusion Research has been changed to be IAEA Fusion Energy and should be moved to the ultimat goal of utilizing fusion energy for human being in near future

  5. Damage Threats and Response of Final Optics for Laser-Fusion Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    Damage Threats and Response of Final Optics for Laser-Fusion Power Plants M. S. Tillack1 , S. A-1597 The final optics for laser-IFE (inertial fusion energy) power plants will be exposed to a variety of damage to be the most serious concerns for a power plant. 1. Introduction Survival of the final optic is one of the most

  6. Fusion Lecture Summary Eugene S. Evans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    Fusion Lecture Summary Eugene S. Evans Physics H190, University of California, Berkeley March 31. Evans (2010) Fusion Lecture Summary March 31, 2010 1 / 15 #12;Outline 1 Overview of NIF Specifications Timeline Goals 2 Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) 3 Science at NIF 4 Fusion and the Future Laser Inertial

  7. Fusion at near-barrier energies within quantum diffusion approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Sargsyan; G. G. Adamian; N. V. Antonenko; W. Scheid; H. Q. Zhang

    2013-11-20

    The nuclear deformation and neutron-transfer process have been identified as playing a major role in the magnitude of the sub-barrier fusion (capture) cross sections. There are a several experimental evidences which confirm the importance of nuclear deformation on the fusion. The influence of nuclear deformation is straightforward. If the target nucleus is prolate in the ground state, the Coulomb field on its tips is lower than on its sides, that then increases the capture or fusion probability at energies below the barrier corresponding to the spherical nuclei. The role of neutron transfer reactions is less clear. The importance of neutron transfer with positive Q-values on nuclear fusion (capture) originates from the fact that neutrons are insensitive to the Coulomb barrier and therefore they can start being transferred at larger separations before the projectile is captured by target-nucleus. Therefore, it is generally thought that the sub-barrier fusion cross section will increase because of the neutron transfer. The fusion (capture) dynamics induced by loosely bound radioactive ion beams is currently being extensively studied. However, the long-standing question whether fusion (capture) is enhanced or suppressed with these beams has not yet been answered unambiguously. The study of the fusion reactions involving nuclei at the drip-lines has led to contradictory results.

  8. Fusion barrier distributions in systems with finite excitation energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hagino; N. Takigawa; A. B. Balantekin

    1997-06-24

    Eigen-channel approach to heavy-ion fusion reactions is exact only when the excitation energy of the intrinsic motion is zero. In order to take into account effects of finite excitation energy, we introduce an energy dependence to weight factors in the eigen-channel approximation. Using two channel problem, we show that the weight factors are slowly changing functions of incident energy. This suggests that the concept of the fusion barrier distribution still holds to a good approximation even when the excitation energy of the intrinsic motion is finite. A transition to the adiabatic tunneling, where the coupling leads to a static potential renormalization, is also discussed.

  9. Current Status of DiscussionCurrent Status of DiscussionCurrent Status of DiscussionCurrent Status of Discussion on Roadmap of Fusion Energyon Roadmap of Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Discussion on Roadmap of Fusion Energyon Roadmap of Fusion Energy Research and Development in Japan Univ.), International WorkshopInternational Workshop MFE Roadmapping in the ITER Era Princeton, 7/25 #12;Roadmap of Fusion DevelopmentRoadmap of Fusion Development in Promotion Plan of Fusion R&D by JAEC

  10. Fusion dynamics of symmetric systems near barrier energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin

    2009-09-06

    The enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross sections was explained as the lowering of the dynamical fusion barriers within the framework of the improved isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model. The numbers of nucleon transfer in the neck region are appreciably dependent on the incident energies, but strongly on the reaction systems. A comparison of the neck dynamics is performed for the symmetric reactions $^{58}$Ni+$^{58}$Ni and $^{64}$Ni+$^{64}$Ni at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. An increase of the ratios of neutron to proton in the neck region at initial collision stage is observed and obvious for neutron-rich systems, which can reduce the interaction potential of two colliding nuclei. The distribution of the dynamical fusion barriers and the fusion excitation functions are calculated and compared them with the available experimental data.

  11. Pathways to Fusion Beyond NIF: the perspective of the French Academic Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Institut Lasers Plasmas, France CEA ­ Commissariat à l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives CEA of the Physics of High Energy Density Physics, Study of Direct-Drive approach to Inertial Fusion for Energy (laser chain 28) PETAL (equatorial plane) 2 second Quads LMJ (laser chain 29) PETAL - Energy 3.5 k

  12. Fusion Engineering and Design 41 (1998) 393400 Economic goals and requirements for competitive fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    1998-01-01

    optimization and selection in mind, tradeoffs among system power density, recirculating power, plant and methodology of cost projections for magnetic-fusion-energy central-station electric power plants have been considered for both the tokamak Demo [2] and the corresponding commercial power plant [3]. Changing market

  13. Fusion Engineering and Design 41 (1998) 393400 Economic goals and requirements for competitive fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998-01-01

    )]. The cost of electricity (COE) estimate at the busbar (neglecting transmission and distribution cost components of the retail price) combines the total cost estimate with reference economic groundrules to yield and methodology of cost projections for magnetic-fusion-energy central-station electric power plants have been

  14. ICENES `91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, {mu}-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  15. INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budny, Robert

    Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA 4 Institute for Fusion Studies

  16. MagnetoInertial Fusion Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    field reversed configuration (FRC) plasma to achieve kilovolt temperatures. The Univ. of Rochester has, imploded by the Z-machine, which will compress a laser-preheated magnetized DT target plasma (MagLIF). Los array of gun-driven plasma jets to achieve assembly and implosion of a plasma liner (PLX) without

  17. Laser Inertial Fusion-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as thermal insulator to protect capsule during injection: --Radiation heating to capsule: ­ Polyimide transmits in the IR ­ Radiation shield (Al/polyimide/Al) gives 99% reflectivity --Convective heating of polyimide window dominates: ­ Heat transfer coefficient ~8 W/m2-K at window edge ­ Window heats to ~80

  18. A Fusion Development Facility on the Critical Path to Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, V. S.; Stambaugh, R

    2011-01-01

    A fusion development facility (FDF) based on the tokamak approach with normal conducting magnetic field coils is presented. FDF is envisioned as a facility with the dual objective of carrying forward advanced tokamak (AT) physics and enabling the development of fusion energy applications. AT physics enables the design of a compact steady-state machine of moderate gain that can provide the neutron fluence required for FDF's nuclear science development objective. A compact device offers a uniquely viable path for research and development in closing the fusion fuel cycle because of the demand to consume only a moderate quantity of the limited supply of tritium fuel before the technology is in hand for breeding tritium.

  19. A fusion development facility on the critical path to fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Dr. Vincent; Canik, John; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2011-01-01

    A fusion development facility (FDF) based on the tokamak approach with normal conducting magnetic field coils is presented. FDF is envisioned as a facility with the dual objective of carrying forward advanced tokamak (AT) physics and enabling the development of fusion energy applications. AT physics enables the design of a compact steady-state machine of moderate gain that can provide the neutron fluence required for FDF s nuclear science development objective. A compact device offers a uniquely viable path for research and development in closing the fusion fuel cycle because of the demand to consume only a moderate quantity of the limited supply of tritium fuel before the technology is in hand for breeding tritium.

  20. Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign The Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield (ICF) Campaign supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and effective nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. It supports stockpile assessment and information are directly applicable to assessing the health of our nuclear weapons and making decisions (SSP) has been developing advanced simulation capabilities to model nuclear weapons with sufficient