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1

Multishell inertial confinement fusion target  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Multishell inertial confinement fusion target  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reactions accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Neutron imaging with bubble chambers for inertial confinement fusion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??One of the main methods to obtain energy from controlled thermonuclear fusion is inertial confinement fusion (ICF), a process where nuclear fusion reactions are initiated… (more)

Ghilea, Marian Constantin (1973 - ); Meyerhofer, David D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Inertial confinement fusion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inertial-confinement-fusion An inertial-confinement-fusion An experimental process that uses lasers to compress plasma to sufficiently high temperatures and densities for fusion to occur. Such experiments are carried out in places such as the National Ignition Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California. en Fusion through the eyes of a veteran science journalist http://www.pppl.gov/news/2013/07/fusion-through-eyes-veteran-science-journalist-1

Author Daniel Clery recently published "A Piece of the Sun," a 320-page narrative of the history of fusion research and the

5

Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Inertial Confinement Fusion Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion

6

Species separation in inertial confinement fusion fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown by means of multi-fluid particle-in-cell simulations that convergence of the spherical shock wave that propagates through the inner gas of inertial confinement fusion-relevant experiments is accompanied by a separation of deuterium (D) and tritium (T) ions across the shock front. Deuterons run ahead of the tritons due to their lower mass and higher charge-to-mass ratio and can reach the center several tens of picoseconds before the tritons. The rising edge of the DD and TT fusion rate is also temporally separated by the same amount, which should be an observable in experiments and would be a direct proof of the 'stratification conjecture' on the shock front [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056308 (2011)]. Moreover, dephasing of the D and T shock components in terms of density and temperature leads to a degradation of the DT fusion yield as the converging shock first rebounds from the fuel center (shock yield). For the parameters of this study, the second peak in the fusion yield (compression yield) is strongly dependent on the choice of the flux limiter.

Bellei, C.; Amendt, P. A.; Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Haines, M. G. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Welch, D. R. [Voss Scientic, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

LANL | Physics | Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inertial confinement and high density Inertial confinement and high density plasma physics Using the world's most powerful lasers, Physics Division scientists are aiming to create thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. The experimental research of the Physics Division's Inertial Confinement Fusion program is conducted at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester, and the Trident Laser Facility at Los Alamos. Within inertial confinement fusion and the high energy density area, Los Alamos specializes in hohlraum energetics, symmetry tuning, warm dense matter physics, and hydrodynamics in ultra-extreme conditions. When complete, this research will enable the exploitation of fusion as an energy resource and will enable advanced research in stockpile stewardship

8

Fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of studies on fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are reviewed. The aspects of the fast ignition concept, which consists in the separation of the processes of target ignition and compression due to the synchronized action of different energy drivers, are considered. Criteria for the compression ratio and heating rate of a fast ignition target, the energy balance, and the thermonuclear gain are discussed. The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the heating of a compressed target by various types of igniting drivers, namely, beams of fast electrons and light ions produced under the action of a petawatt laser pulse on the target, a heavy-ion beam generated in the accelerator, an X-ray pulse, and a hydrodynamic flow of laser-accelerated matter, are analyzed. Requirements to the igniting-driver parameters that depend on the fast ignition criteria under the conditions of specific target heating mechanisms, as well as possibilities of practical implementation of these requirements, are discussed. The experimental programs of various laboratories and the prospects of practical implementation of fast ignition of ICF targets are reviewed. To date, fast ignition is the most promising method for decreasing the ignition energy and increasing the thermonuclear gain of an ICF plasma. A large number of publications have been devoted to investigations of this method and adjacent problems of the physics of igniting drivers and their interaction with plasma. This review presents results of only some of these studies that, in the author's opinion, allow one to discuss in detail the main physical aspects of the fast ignition concept and understand the current state and prospects of studies in this direction.

Gus'kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Hydrodynamic stability theory of double ablation front structures in inertial confinement fusion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aim of inertial confinement fusion is the production of energy by the fusion of thermonuclear fuel (deuterium-tritium) enclosed in a spherical target due to… (more)

Yáńez Vico, Carlos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Inertial-confinement fusion with fast ignition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...achieve ignition and thermonuclear burn. For a fusion power plant, gains...the ratio of the thermonuclear energy to the initial...released by the thermonuclear burn in unit mass...compressed spherical fusion fuel. Higher gain...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Inertial confinement fusion method producing line source radiation fluence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inertial confinement fusion method in which target pellets are imploded in sequence by laser light beams or other energy beams at an implosion site which is variable between pellet implosions along a line. The effect of the variability in position of the implosion site along a line is to distribute the radiation fluence in surrounding reactor components as a line source of radiation would do, thereby permitting the utilization of cylindrical geometry in the design of the reactor and internal components.

Rose, Ronald P. (Peters Township, Washington County, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Inertial confinement fusion | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with the goal of igniting a propagating thermonuclear burn wave in DT fuel leading to energy gain (defined as fusion yieldinput laser...

13

FPEOS: A First-Principles Equation of State Table of Deuterium for Inertial Confinement Fusion Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FPEOS: A First-Principles Equation of State Table of Deuterium for Inertial Confinement Fusion) Understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through radiation- hydrodynamics. To minimize the drive energy for ignition, the imploding shell of DT- fuel needs to be kept as cold

Militzer, Burkhard

14

A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited)a) Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D919 (2012); 10.1063/1.4742926 Neutron spectrometry--An essential tool for diagnosing

15

Initial experiments on the shock-ignition inertial confinement fusion concepta...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ignition is a concept for direct-drive laser inertial confinement fusion ICF Refs. 1­3 that was recently for conven- tional ignition to occur. Then a strong shock wave launched at the end of the laser pulseInitial experiments on the shock-ignition inertial confinement fusion concepta... W. Theobald,1,b R

16

HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor which will be completedDrivers and Reactors for Inertial Confinement Fusion, K.A.

Keefe, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Inertial confinement fusion based on the ion-bubble trigger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Triggering the ion-bubble in an inertial confinement fusion, we have developed a novel scheme for the fast ignition. This scheme relies on the plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense laser pulse to generate an ion-bubble. The bubble acts both as an intense electron accelerator and as an electron wiggler. Consequently, the accelerated electrons trapped in the bubble can emit an intense tunable laser light. This light can be absorbed by an ablation layer on the outside surface of the ignition capsule, which subsequently drills it and thereby produces a guide channel in the pellet. Finally, the relativistic electron beam created in the bubble is guided through the channel to the high density core igniting the fusion fuel. The normalized beam intensity and beam energy required for triggering the ignition have been calculated when core is heated by the e-beam. In addition, through solving the momentum transfer, continuity and wave equations, a dispersion relation for the electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been analytically derived. The variations of growth rate with the ion-bubble density and electron beam energy have been illustrated. It is found that the growth rates of instability are significantly controlled by the ions concentration and the e-beam energy in the bubble.

Jafari, S., E-mail: SJafari@guilan.ac.ir; Nilkar, M.; Ghasemizad, A. [Department of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht 41335-1914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehdian, H. [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Tarbiat Moallem University, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Proton emission imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A proton core imaging system has been developed and extensively used for measuring the nuclear burn regions of inertial confinement fusion implosions. These imaging cameras, mounted to the 60-beam OMEGA laser facility, use ...

DeCiantis, Joseph Loreto

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ray spectroscopy Main laser drive Rayleigh­Taylor and Bell­Plesset growth DT gas Fusion burn/ignition HotDirect-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics: Charting the Path to Thermonuclear Ignition 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference Vilamoura, Portugal 1­6 November 2004

20

HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

Keefe, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Inertial Confinement Fusion: Quarterly report, April-June 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lead article, `Ion-beam propagation in a low-density reactor chamber for heavy-ion inertial fusion` (p. 89), explores the ability of heavy-ion beams to be adequately transported and focused in an IFE reactor. The next article, `Efficient production and applications of 2- to 10-keV x rays by laser-heated underdense radiators` (p. 96), explores the ability of the NIF to produce sufficient high-energy x rays for diagnostic backlighting, target preheating, or uniform irradiation of large test objects for Nuclear Weapons Effects Testing. For capsule implosion experiments, the increasing energies and distances involved in the NIF compared to Nova require the development of new diagnostics methods. The article `Fusion reaction-rate measurements--Nova and NIF` (p. 115) first reviews the use of time-resolved neutron measurements on Nova to monitor fusion burn histories and then explores the limitations of that technique, principally Doppler broadening, for the proposed NIF. It also explores the use of gamma rays on Nova, thereby providing a proof-of-principle for using gamma rays for monitoring fusion burn histories on the NIF. The articles `The energetics of gas-filled hohlraums` (p. 110) and `Measurements of laser- speckle-induced perturbations in laser-driven foils` (p. 123) report measurements on Nova of two important aspects of implosion experiments. The first characterizes the amount of energy lost from a hohlraum by stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering as a function of gas fill and laser-beam uniformity. The second of these articles shows that the growth of density nonuniformities implanted on smooth capsule surfaces by laser speckle can be correlated with the effects of physical surface roughness. The article `Laser-tissue interaction modeling with the LATIS computer program` (p. 103) explores the use of modeling to enhance the effectiveness--maximize desired effects and minimize collateral damage--of lasers for medical purposes.

Correll, D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Basic hydrodynamics of Richtmyer–Meshkov-type growth and oscillations in the inertial confinement fusion-relevant conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...phase of inertial confinement fusion implosionsPhys. Plasmas 9...adiabat shaping in inertial fusion, implosions:the relaxation...Solodov2007Shock ignition of thermonuclear fuel with high areal densityPhys...1998Direct-drive laser fusion:status and prospectsPhys...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Engineering design of the Nova Laser Facility for inertial-confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of the Nova Laser Facility for inertial confinement fusion experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented from an engineering perspective. Emphasis is placed upon design-to-performance requirements as they impact the various subsystems that comprise this complex experimental facility.

Simmons, W W; Godwin, R O; Hurley, C A; Wallerstein, E. P.; Whitham, K.; Murray, J. E.; Bliss, E. S.; Ozarski, R. G.; Summers, M. A.; Rienecker, F.; Gritton, D. G.; Holloway, F. W.; Suski, G. J.; Severyn, J. R.

1982-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

24

Deflagration-to-detonation transition in inertial-confinement-fusion baseline targets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By means of highly resolved one-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations, we provide an understanding of the burn process in inertial-confinement-fusion baseline targets. The cornerstone of the phenomenology of propagating burn in such laser-driven capsules is shown to be the transition from a slow unsteady reaction-diffusion regime of thermonuclear combustion (some sort of deflagration) to a fast detonative one. Remarkably, detonation initiation follows the slowing down of a shockless supersonic reaction wave driven by energy redeposition from the fusion products themselves. Such a route to detonation is specific to fusion plasmas.

P. Gauthier; F. Chaland; L. Masse

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

25

Shock Ignition: A New Approach to High Gain Inertial Confinement Fusion on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shock ignition, an alternative concept for igniting thermonuclear fuel, is explored as a new approach to high gain, inertial confinement fusion targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results indicate thermonuclear yields of ?120–250??MJ may be possible with laser drive energies of 1–1.6 MJ, while gains of ?50 may still be achievable at only ?0.2??MJ drive energy. The scaling of NIF energy gain with laser energy is found to be G?126E??(MJ)0.510. This offers the potential for high-gain targets that may lead to smaller, more economic fusion power reactors and a cheaper fusion energy development path.

L. J. Perkins; R. Betti; K. N. LaFortune; W. H. Williams

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

26

Harmonic conversion of large-aperture 1.05-?m laser beams for inertial-confinement fusion research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To provide high-energy, high-power beams at short wavelengths for inertial-confinement fusion experiments, we routinely convert the 1.05-?m output of the Nova,...

Wegner, P J; Henesian, M A; Speck, D R; Bibeau, C; Ehrlich, R B; Laumann, C W; Lawson, J K; Weiland, T L

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, October--December 1994. Volume 5, No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ICF quarterly report is published by the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics included in this issue include: system description and initial performance results for beamlet, design and performance of the beamlet amplifiers and optical switch, beamlet pulse-generation and wavefront-control system, large-aperture, high- damage-threshold optics for beamlet, beamlet pulsed power system, beamlet laser diagnostics, and beam propagation and frequency conversion modeling for the beamlet laser.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to redirect High Average Power Lasers to be synergistic with NIF ignition and other defense missions #12 · Predicted gains (fusion energy produced/laser energy input) have increased · Direct drive ignition shows) Project has begun · Will add two high-energy petawatt lasers for OMEGA for advanced backlighting and fast-ignition

29

Pre-Amplifier Module for Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pre-Amplifier Modules (PAMs) are the heart of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), providing most of the energy gain for the most energetic laser in the world. Upon completion, NIF will be the only laboratory in which scientists can examine the fusion processes that occur inside stars, supernovae, and exploding nuclear weapons and that may someday serve as a virtually inexhaustible energy source for electricity. Consider that in a fusion power plant 50 cups of water could provide the energy comparable to 2 tons of coal. Of paramount importance for achieving laser-driven fusion ignition with the least energy input is the synchronous and symmetric compression of the target fuel--a condition known as laser power balance. NIF's 48 PAMs thus must provide energy gain in an exquisitely stable and consistent manner. While building one module that meets performance requirements is challenging enough, our design has already enabled the construction and fielding of 48 PAMs that are stable, uniform, and interchangeable. PAM systems are being tested at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and the Atomic Weapons Enterprise of Great Britain has purchased the PAM power system.

Heebner, J E; Bowers, M W

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

30

Magnetic-compression/magnetized-target fusion (MAGO/MTF): A marriage of inertial and magnetic confinement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intermediate between magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF) in time and density scales is an area of research now known in the US as magnetized target fusion (MTF) and in Russian as MAGO (MAGnitnoye Obzhatiye--magnetic compression). MAGO/MTF uses a magnetic field and preheated, wall-confined plasma fusion fuel within an implodable fusion target. The magnetic field suppresses thermal conduction losses in the fuel during the target implosion and hydrodynamic compression heating process. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (i.e., ICF), MAGO/MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm (e.g., 100 eV or higher), magnetized (e.g., 100 kG) plasma within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression by an imploding pusher, of which a magnetically driven imploding liner is one example. In this paper, the authors present ongoing activities and potential future activities in this relatively unexplored area of controlled thermonuclear fusion.

Lindemuth, I.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.C. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Multiple-beam laser–plasma interactions in inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental evidence for multiple-beam laser-plasma instabilities of relevance to laser driven inertial confinement fusion at the ignition scale is reviewed, in both the indirect and direct-drive approaches. The instabilities described are cross-beam energy transfer (in both indirectly driven targets on the NIF and in direct-drive targets), multiple-beam stimulated Raman scattering (for indirect-drive), and multiple-beam two-plasmon decay instability (in direct drive). Advances in theoretical understanding and in the numerical modeling of these multiple beam instabilities are presented.

Myatt, J. F., E-mail: jmya@lle.rochester.edu; Zhang, J.; Maximov, A. V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Short, R. W.; Seka, W.; Edgell, D. H.; Michel, D. T.; Igumenshchev, I. V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627-0171 (United States); Hinkel, D. E.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Demonstration of Ignition Radiation Temperatures in Indirect-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Hohlraums  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the hohlraum radiation temperature and symmetry required for ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions. Cryogenic gas-filled hohlraums with 2.2 mm-diameter capsules are heated with unprecedented laser energies of 1.2 MJ delivered by 192 ultraviolet laser beams on the National Ignition Facility. Laser backscatter measurements show that these hohlraums absorb 87% to 91% of the incident laser power resulting in peak radiation temperatures of T{sub RAD}=300 eV and a symmetric implosion to a 100 {mu}m diameter hot core.

Glenzer, S. H.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Adams, P. A.; Alfonso, J. B.; Alger, E. T.; Alherz, Z.; Alvarez, L. F.; Alvarez, S. S.; Amick, P. V.; Andersson, K. S.; Andrews, S. D.; Antonini, G. J.; Arnold, P. A.; Atkinson, D. P.; Auyang, L.; Azevedo, S. G.; Balaoing, B. N. M.; Baltz, J. A.; Barbosa, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

33

Inertial confinement fusion research and development studies. Final report, October 1979-August 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research and development studies were selected for structural, thermal, and vacuum pumping analyses in support of the High Yield Lithium Injection Fusion Energy (HYLIFE) concept development. An additional task provided an outlined program plan for an ICF Engineering Test Facility, using the HYLIFE concept as a model, although the plan is generally applicable to other ICF concepts. The HYLIFE is one promising type of ICF concept which features a falling array of liquid lithium jets. These jets surround the fusion reaction to protect the first structural wall (FSW) of the vacuum chamber by absorbing the fusion energy, and to act as the tritium breeder. The fusion energy source is a deuterium-tritium pellet injected into the chamber every second and driven by laser or heavy ion beams. The studies performed by Grumman have considered the capabilities of specific HYLIFE features to meet life requirements and the requirement to recover to preshot conditions prior to each subsequent shot. The components under investigation were the FSW which restrains the outward motion of the liquid lithium, the nozzle plate which forms the falling jet array, the graphite shield which is in direct top view of the fusion pellet, and the vacuum pumping system. The FSW studies included structural analysis, and definition of an experimental program to validate computer codes describing lithium motion and the resulting impact on the wall.

Bullis, R.; Finkelman, M.; Leng, J.; Luzzi, T.; Ojalvo, I.; Powell, E.; Sedgley, D.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Driving high-gain shock-ignited inertial confinement fusion targets by green laser light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Standard direct-drive inertial confinement fusion requires UV light irradiation in order to achieve ignition at total laser energy of the order of 1 MJ. The shock-ignition approach opens up the possibility of igniting fusion targets using green light by reducing the implosion velocity and laser-driven ablation pressure. An analytical model is derived, allowing to rescale UV-driven targets to green light. Gain in the range 100-200 is obtained for total laser energy in the range 1.5-3 MJ. With respect to the original UV design, the rescaled targets are less sensitive to irradiation asymmetries and hydrodynamic instabilities, while operating in the same laser-plasma interaction regime.

Atzeni, Stefano; Marocchino, Alberto; Schiavi, Angelo [Dipartimento SBAI, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' and CNISM, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, I-00161 Roma (Italy)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Inertial confinement fusion. 1995 ICF annual report, October 1994--September 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is a Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Program research and advanced technology development program focused on the goal of demonstrating thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory. During FY 1995, the ICF Program continued to conduct ignition target physics optimization studies and weapons physics experiments in support of the Defense Program`s stockpile stewardship goals. It also continued to develop technologies in support of the performance, cost, and schedule goals of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The NIF is a key element of the DOE`s Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program. In addition to its primary Defense Program goals, the ICF Program provides research and development opportunities in fundamental high-energy-density physics and supports the necessary research base for the possible long-term application to inertial fusion energy (IFE). Also, ICF technologies have had spin-off applications for industrial and governmental use. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Observation of strong electromagnetic fields around laser-entrance holes of ignition-scale hohlraums in inertial-confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy spectra and spectrally resolved one-dimensional fluence images of self-emitted charged-fusion products (14.7 MeV D[superscript 3]He protons) are routinely measured from indirectly driven inertial-confinement fusion ...

Li, C. K.

37

KrF laser path to high gain ICF (inertial confinement fusion) laboratory microfusion facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The krypton-fluoride laser has many desirable features for inertial confinement fusion. Because it is a gas laser capable of operation with high efficiency, it is the only known laser candidate capable of meeting the driver requirements for inertial fusion energy (IFE) production. Los Alamos National Laboratory has defined a program plan to develop KrF lasers for IFE production. This plan develops the KrF laser and demonstrates the target performance in single-pulse facilities. A 100-kJ Laser Target Test Facility (LTTF) is proposed as the next step, to be followed by a 3 to 10-MJ Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). The LTTF will resolve many target physics issues and accurately define the driver energy required for the LMF. It is also proposed that the technology development for IFE, such as the high-efficiency, high-reliability, repetitively pulsed driver, the reactor, mass production of targets, and the mechanism of injecting targets be developed in parallel with the single-pulse facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs.

Harris, D.B.; Sullivan, J.A.; Figueiro, J.F.; Cartwright, D.C.; McDonald, T.E.; Hauer, A.A.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Younger, S.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Production and measurement of engineered surfaces for inertial confinement fusion research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inertial Confinement Fusion uses the optical energy from a very high power laser to implode spherical capsules that contain a fuel mixture of deuterium and tritium. The capsules are made of either Beryllium, plastic, or glass and range from 0.1 mm to 2 mm in diameter. As a capsule implodes, thereby compressing the fuel to reach nuclear fusion conditions, it achieves temperatures of millions of degrees Centigrade and very high pressures. In this state, the capsule materials act like fluids and often a low density fluidic material will push on a higher density material which can be a very unstable condition depending upon the smoothness of the interface between the two materials. This unstable condition is called a hydrodynamic instabillity which results in the mixing of the two materials. If the mixing occurs between the fuel and a non-fuel material, it can stop the fusion reaction just like adding significant amounts of water to gasoline can stop the operation of an automobile. Another region in the capsule where surface roughness can cause capsule performance degradation is at a joint. For instance, many capsules are made of hemispheres that are joined together. If the joint surfaces are too rough, then there will an effective reduction in density at the joint. This density reduction can cause a non-uniform implosion which will reduce the fusion energy coming out of the capsule.

Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hatch, Douglas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rivera, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

39

Investigation of methods for fabricating, characterizing, and transporting cryogenic inertial-confinement-fusion tartets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to investigate methods for fabricating, characterizing and transporting cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets on a continuous basis. A microprocessor-based data acquisition system has been built that converts a complete target image to digital data, which are then analyzed by automated software procedures. The low temperatures required to freeze the hydrogen isotopes contained in a target is provided by a cryogenic cold chamber capable of attaining 15 K. A new method for target manipulation and positioning is studied that employs molecular gas beams to levitate a target and an electrostatic quadrupole structure to provide for its lateral containment. Since the electrostatic target-positioning scheme requires that the targets be charged, preliminary investigation has been carried out for a target-charging mechanism based on ion-bombardment.

Fanning, J.J.; Kim, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Change in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions upon Using an Ab Initio Multiphase DT Equation of State  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improving the description of the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an inertial confinement fusion target [S.?X. Hu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235003 (2010)]. Here we use an advanced multiphase EOS, based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over possible uncertainties of the EOS. Two different target designs are discussed, for shock ignition and self-ignition. In the first case, the areal density and thermonuclear energy can be recovered by slightly increasing the laser energy. In the second case, a lower in-flight adiabat is needed, leading to a significant delay (3 ns) in the shock timing of the implosion.

L. Caillabet; B. Canaud; G. Salin; S. Mazevet; P. Loubeyre

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Development of a Bayesian method for the analysis of inertial confinement fusion experiments on the NIF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complex nature of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments results in a very large number of experimental parameters that are only known with limited reliability. These parameters, combined with the myriad physical models that govern target evolution, make the reliable extraction of physics from experimental campaigns very difficult. We develop an inference method that allows all important experimental parameters, and previous knowledge, to be taken into account when investigating underlying microphysics models. The result is framed as a modified $\\chi^{2}$ analysis which is easy to implement in existing analyses, and quite portable. We present a first application to a recent convergent ablator experiment performed at the NIF, and investigate the effect of variations in all physical dimensions of the target (very difficult to do using other methods). We show that for well characterised targets in which dimensions vary at the 0.5% level there is little effect, but 3% variations change the results of i...

Gaffney, Jim A; Sonnad, Vijay; Libby, Stephen B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Advances in compact proton spectrometers for inertial-confinement fusion and plasma nuclear science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compact wedge-range-filter proton spectrometers cover proton energies {approx}3-20 MeV. They have been used at the OMEGA laser facility for more than a decade for measuring spectra of primary D{sup 3}He protons in D{sup 3}He implosions, secondary D{sup 3}He protons in DD implosions, and ablator protons in DT implosions; they are now being used also at the National Ignition Facility. The spectra are used to determine proton yields, shell areal density at shock-bang time and compression-bang time, fuel areal density, and implosion symmetry. There have been changes in fabrication and in analysis algorithms, resulting in a wider energy range, better accuracy and precision, and better robustness for survivability with indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion experiments.

Seguin, F. H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Sangster, T. C.; Roberts, S. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Interactive tools designed to study mix in inertial confinement fusion implosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical user interface tools have been built in IDL to study mix in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion cores. FLAME (Fall-Line Analysis Mix Evaluator), a code which investigates yield degradation due to mix , was designed to post-process 1D hydrodynamic simulation output by implementing a variety of mix models. Three of these mix models are based on the physics of the fall-line. In addition, mixing data from other sources can be incorporated into the yield degradation analysis. Two independent tools called HAME (Haan Analysis Mix Evaluator) and YAME (Youngs Analysis Mix Evaluator) were developed to calculate the spatial extent of the mix region according to the Haan saturation model and Youngs' phenomenological model, respectively. FLAME facilitates a direct comparison to experimental data. The FLAME, HAME, and YAME interfaces are user-friendly, flexible, and platform-independent.

Welser-sherrill, Leslie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Doug C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Application of spatially resolved high resolution crystal spectrometry to inertial confinement fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High resolution ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}{approx} 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-{mu}m {sup 55}Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10{sup -8}-10{sup -6} times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Pablant, N. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Beiersdorfer, P.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043-Grenoble Cedex (France); Zhang, L. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Advances in inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory—temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

Edward I. Moses

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory - temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

Moses, E

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Dynamic response of materials on subnanosecond time scales, and beryllium properties for inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past few years, substantial progress has been made in developing experimental techniques capable of investigating the response of materials to dynamic loading on nanosecond time scales and shorter, with multiple diagnostics probing different aspects of the behavior. These relatively short time scales are scientifically interesting because plastic flow and phase changes in common materials with simple crystal structures--such as iron--may be suppressed, allowing unusual states to be induced and the dynamics of plasticity and polymorphism to be explored. Loading by laser-induced ablation can be particularly convenient: this technique has been used to impart shocks and isentropic compression waves from {approx}1 to 200 GPa in a range of elements and alloys, with diagnostics including line imaging surface velocimetry, surface displacement (framed area imaging), x-ray diffraction (single crystal and polycrystal), ellipsometry, and Raman spectroscopy. A major motivation has been the study of the properties of beryllium under conditions relevant to the fuel capsule in inertial confinement fusion: magnetically driven shock and isentropic compression shots at Z were used to investigate the equation of state and shock melting characteristics, complemented by laser ablation experiments to investigate plasticity and heterogeneous response from the polycrystalline microstructure. These results will help to constrain acceptable tolerances on manufacturing, and possible loading paths, for inertial fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Laser-based techniques are being developed further for future material dynamics experiments, where it should be possible to obtain high quality data on strength and phase changes up to at least 1 TPa.

Swift, Damian C.; Tierney, Thomas E.; Luo Shengnian; Paisley, Dennis L.; Kyrala, George A.; Hauer, Allan; Greenfield, Scott R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Lorenzana, Hector E.; Kalantar, Daniel; Remington, Bruce A.; Peralta, Pedro; Loomis, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Mode 1 drive asymmetry in inertial confinement fusion implosions on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mode 1 radiation drive asymmetry (pole-to-pole imbalance) at significant levels can have a large impact on inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This asymmetry distorts the cold confining shell and drives a high-speed jet through the hot spot. The perturbed hot spot shows increased residual kinetic energy and reduced internal energy, and it achieves reduced pressure and neutron yield. The altered implosion physics manifests itself in observable diagnostic signatures, especially the neutron spectrum which can be used to measure the neutron-weighted flow velocity, apparent ion temperature, and neutron downscattering. Numerical simulations of implosions with mode 1 asymmetry show that the resultant simulated diagnostic signatures are moved toward the values observed in many NIF experiments. The diagnostic output can also be used to build a set of integrated implosion performance metrics. The metrics indicate that P{sub 1} has a significant impact on implosion performance and must be carefully controlled in NIF implosions.

Spears, Brian K., E-mail: spears9@llnl.gov; Edwards, M. J.; Hatchett, S.; Kritcher, A.; Lindl, J.; Munro, D.; Patel, P.; Robey, H. F.; Town, R. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Kilkenny, J. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)] [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Knauer, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 E. River Road Rochester, New York 14623-1212 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 E. River Road Rochester, New York 14623-1212 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Achieving competitive excellence in nuclear energy: The threat of proliferation; the challenge of inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear energy will have an expanding role in meeting the twenty-first-century challenges of population and economic growth, energy demand, and global warming. These great challenges are non-linearly coupled and incompletely understood. In the complex global system, achieving competitive excellence for nuclear energy is a multi-dimensional challenge. The growth of nuclear energy will be driven by its margin of economic advantage, as well as by threats to energy security and by growing evidence of global warming. At the same time, the deployment of nuclear energy will be inhibited by concerns about nuclear weapons proliferation, nuclear waste and nuclear reactor safety. These drivers and inhibitors are coupled: for example, in the foreseeable future, proliferation in the Middle East may undermine energy security and increase demand for nuclear energy. The Department of Energy`s nuclear weapons laboratories are addressing many of these challenges, including nuclear weapons builddown and nonproliferation, nuclear waste storage and burnup, reactor safety and fuel enrichment, global warming, and the long-range development of fusion energy. Today I will focus on two major program areas at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the development of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) energy.

Nuckolls, J.H.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Progress in laboratory high gain ICF (inertial confinement fusion): Prospects for the future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF), a thermonuclear reaction in a small (/approximately/5 mm diameter) fuel capsule filled with a few milligrams of deuterium and tritium, has been the subject of very fruitful experimentation since the early 1970's. High gain ICF is now on the threshold of practical applications. With a Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF), these applications will have major implications for national defense, basic and applied science, and power production. With a driver capable of delivering about 10 MJ in a 10-ns pulse at an intensity of /approximately/3 /times/ 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/, an appropriately configured cryogenic capsule could be compressed to a density of about 200 g/cm/sup 3/ and a temperature of 3--5 keV. Under these conditions, up to 10 mg of DT could be ignited, and with a burn efficiency of about 30%, release up to 1000 MJ of fusion energy, an energy gain of about 100. A thousand megajoules is equivalent to about one quarter ton of TNT, or about 7 gallons of oil--an amount of energy tractable under laboratory conditions and potentially very useful for a variety of applications. 61 refs., 33 figs.

Storm, E.; Lindl, J.D.; Campbell, E.M.; Bernat, T.P.; Coleman, L.W.; Emmett, J.L.; Hogan, W.J.; Hunt, J.T.; Krupke, W.F.; Lowdermilk, W.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Inertial confinement fusion. Quarterly report, July--September 1993: Volume 3, No. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following research: Diode-pumped solid- state-laser driver for inertial fusion energy power plants; Longitudinal beam dynamics in heavy ion fusion accelerators; Design of the ion sources for heavy ion fusion; Measurement of electron density in laser-produced plasma with a soft x-ray moire deflectometer; and Analysis of weakly nonlinear three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth.

Sacks, R.A.; Murphy, P.W.; Schleich, D.P. [eds.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

D-T gamma-to-neutron branching ratio determined from inertial confinement fusion plasmasa)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new deuterium-tritium (D-T)fusion gamma-to-neutron branching ratio [3H(d ?)5He/3H(d n)4He] value of (4.2?±?2.0)?×?10?5 was recently reported by this group [Y. Kim et al. Phys. Rev. C (submitted)]. This measurement conducted at the OMEGA laser facility located at the University of Rochester was made for the first time using inertial confinement fusion(ICF)plasmas. Neutron-induced backgrounds are significantly reduced in these experiments as compared to traditional beam-target accelerator-based experiments due to the short pulse nature of ICF implosions and the use of gas Cherenkov ?-ray detectors with fast temporal responses and inherent energy thresholds. It is expected that this ICF-based measurement will help resolve the large and long-standing inconsistencies in previously reported accelerator-based values which vary by a factor of approximately 30. The reported value at ICF conditions was determined by averaging the results of two methods: (1) a direct measurement of ICFD-T ?-ray and neutron emissions using absolutely calibrated detectors and (2) a separate cross-calibration against the better known D-3He gamma-to-proton branching ratio [3He(d ??)5Li/3He(d p)4He]. Here we include a detailed explanation of these results and introduce as a corroborative method an in-situ ?-ray detectorcalibration using neutron-induced ?-rays. Also by extending the established techniques to two additional series of implosions with significantly different ion temperatures we test the branching ratio dependence on ion temperature. The data show a D-T branching ratio is nearly constant over the temperature range 2–9?keV. These studies motivate further investigation into the 5He and 5Li systems resulting from D-T and D-3He fusion respectively and result in improved ICF ?-ray reaction history diagnosis at the National Ignition Facility.

Y. Kim; J. M. Mack; H. W. Herrmann; C. S. Young; G. M. Hale; S. Caldwell; N. M. Hoffman; S. C. Evans; T. J. Sedillo; A. McEvoy; J. Langenbrunner; H. H. Hsu; M. A. Huff; S. Batha; C. J. Horsfield; M. S. Rubery; W. J. Garbett; W. Stoeffl; E. Grafil; L. Bernstein; J. A. Church; D. B. Sayre; M. J. Rosenberg; C. Waugh; H. G. Rinderknecht; M. Gatu Johnson; A. B. Zylstra; J. A. Frenje; D. T. Casey; R. D. Petrasso; E. Kirk Miller; V. Yu Glebov; C. Stoeckl; T. C. Sangster

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

An improved method for measuring the absolute DD neutron yield and calibrating neutron time-of-flight detectors in inertial confinement fusion experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the establishment of nuclear physics in the early 1900's and the development of the hydrogen bomb in the 1950's, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been an important field in physics. Funded largely though the ...

Waugh, C. (Caleb Joseph)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Fast ignition of a compressed inertial confinement fusion hemispherical capsule by two proton beams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hemispherical conically guided indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion capsule has been considered. The fast ignition of the precompressed capsule driven by one or two laser-accelerated proton beams has been numerically investigated. The energy distribution of the protons is Gaussian with a mean energy of 12 MeV and a full width at half maximum of 1 MeV . A new scheme that uses two laser-accelerated proton beams is proposed. It is found that the energy deposition of 1 kJ provided by a first proton beam generates a low-density cylindrical channel and launches a forward shock. A second proton beam delayed by a few tens of ps and driving the energy of 6 kJ crosses the low-density channel and heats the dense shocked region where the ignition of the deuterium-tritium nuclear fuel is achieved. For the considered capsule this new two-beam configuration reduces the ignition energy threshold to 7 kJ .

Mauro Temporal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Optimized beryllium target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, Beryllium (Be) ablators offer a number of important advantages as compared with other ablator materials, e.g., plastic and high density carbon. In particular, the low opacity and relatively high density of Be lead to higher rocket efficiencies giving a higher fuel implosion velocity for a given X-ray drive; and to higher ablation velocities providing more ablative stabilization and reducing the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on the implosion performance. Be ablator advantages provide a larger target design optimization space and can significantly improve the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] ignition margin. Herein, we summarize the Be advantages, briefly review NIF Be target history, and present a modern, optimized, low adiabat, Revision 6 NIF Be target design. This design takes advantage of knowledge gained from recent NIF experiments, including more realistic levels of laser-plasma energy backscatter, degraded hohlraum-capsule coupling, and the presence of cross-beam energy transfer.

Simakov, Andrei N., E-mail: simakov@lanl.gov; Wilson, Douglas C.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Kline, John L.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, Daniel S.; Milovich, Jose L.; Salmonson, Jay D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Metrics for long wavelength asymmetries in inertial confinement fusion implosions on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate yield degradation due to applied low mode P2 and P4 asymmetries in layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. This study has been performed with a large database of >600 2D simulations. We show that low mode radiation induced drive asymmetries can result in significant deviation between the core hot spot shape and the fuel ?R shape at peak compression. In addition, we show that significant residual kinetic energy at peak compression can be induced by these low mode asymmetries. We have developed a metric, which is a function of the hot spot shape, fuel ?R shape, and residual kinetic energy at peak compression, that is well correlated to yield degradation due to low mode shape perturbations. It is shown that the ?R shape and residual kinetic energy cannot, in general, be recovered by inducing counter asymmetries to make the hot core emission symmetric. In addition, we show that the yield degradation due to low mode asymmetries is well correlated to measurements of time dependent shape throughout the entire implosion, including early time shock symmetry and inflight fuel symmetry.

Kritcher, A. L.; Town, R.; Bradley, D.; Clark, D.; Spears, B.; Jones, O.; Haan, S.; Springer, P. T.; Lindl, J.; Callahan, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Scott, R. H. H. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)] [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Moderate-convergence inertial confinement fusion implosions in tetrahedral hohlraums at Omega  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A highly uniform thermal x-radiation field for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions may be obtained by irradiating a four-hole, tetrahedral geometry, spherical hohlraum with all 60 Omega laser beams. Implosion studies and calculations [J. M. Wallace et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3807 (1999)] indicate a drive uniformity comparable to that expected for the National Ignition Facility [J. A. Painser et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. With 60 beams distributed over the cavity wall, tetrahedral hohlraums have a natural insensitivity to power balance and pointing errors. Standard, smooth Nova capsules imploded with this drive indicate that moderate convergence-ratio implosions, Cr{approx}18, have measured-neutron yield to calculated-clean-one-dimensional-neutronyield ratios similar to those previously investigated using the comparatively poor drive uniformity of Nova cylindrical hohlraums. This may indicate that a nonsymmetry-related neutron yield degradation mechanism, e.g., hydrodynamic mixing of cold, dense ablator material with the hot-spot region or some combination of nonsymmetry effects, is dominating in this Cr regime. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

Bennett, G. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Wallace, J. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Murphy, T. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Chrien, R. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Delamater, N. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Gobby, P. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Hauer, A. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Klare, K. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Oertel, J. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Watt, R. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States)] (and others) [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States)

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Novel free-form hohlraum shape design and optimization for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hohlraum shape attracts considerable attention because there is no successful ignition method for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility. The available hohlraums are typically designed with simple conic curves, including ellipses, parabolas, arcs, or Lame curves, which allow only a few design parameters for the shape optimization, making it difficult to improve the performance, e.g., the energy coupling efficiency or radiation drive symmetry. A novel free-form hohlraum design and optimization approach based on the non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model is proposed. In the present study, (1) all kinds of hohlraum shapes can be uniformly represented using NURBS, which is greatly beneficial for obtaining the optimal available hohlraum shapes, and (2) such free-form uniform representation enables us to obtain an optimal shape over a large design domain for the hohlraum with a more uniform radiation and higher drive temperature of the fuel capsule. Finally, a hohlraum is optimized and evaluated with respect to the drive temperature and symmetry at the Shenguang III laser facility in China. The drive temperature and symmetry results indicate that such a free-form representation is advantageous over available hohlraum shapes because it can substantially expand the shape design domain so as to obtain an optimal hohlraum with high performance.

Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei, E-mail: scmyking-2008@163.com; Ding, Yongkun [Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Huang, Yunbao, E-mail: huangyblhy@gmail.com [Mechatronics School of Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Real viscosity effects in inertial confinement fusion target deuterium–tritium micro-implosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on numerical studies of real viscous effects on the implosion characteristics of imploded DT micro-targets. We use the implicit ePLAS code to perform 2D simulations of spherical and slightly ellipsoidal DT shells on DT gas filled ?40??m diameter voids. Before their final implosions the shells have been nearly adiabatically compressed up to 10{sup 2} or 10{sup 3}?g/cm{sup 3} densities. While the use of conventional artificial viscosity can lead to high central densities for initially spherical shells, we find that a real physical viscosity from ion-ion collisions can give a high (>20?keV) central temperature but severely reduced central density (<200?g/cm{sup 3}), while the elliptical shells evidence p?=?2 distortion of the heated central fuel region. These results suggest that the general use of artificial viscosities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) modeling may have lead to overly optimistic yields for current NIF targets and that polar direct drive with more energy for the imploding capsule may be needed for ultimate ICF success.

Mason, R. J., E-mail: rodmason01@msn.com; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Faehl, R. J. [Research Applications Corporation, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)] [Research Applications Corporation, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Inertial fusion energy studies in the UK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;The types of research - Fusion ·Absorption and partition of laser energy ­ effects of laserInertial fusion energy studies in the UK Dr Kate Lancaster #12;Inertial Confinement Fusion #12 burns because the alpha particles produced deposit more energy and make more fusion reactions happen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Dynamic symmetry of indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion capsules on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to achieve ignition using inertial confinement fusion it is important to control the growth of low-mode asymmetries as the capsule is compressed. Understanding the time-dependent evolution of the shape of the hot spot and surrounding fuel layer is crucial to optimizing implosion performance. A design and experimental campaign to examine sources of asymmetry and to quantify symmetry throughout the implosion has been developed and executed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. We have constructed a large simulation database of asymmetries applied during different time intervals. Analysis of the database has shown the need to measure and control the hot-spot shape, areal density distribution, and symmetry swings during the implosion. The shape of the hot spot during final stagnation is measured using time-resolved imaging of the self-emission, and information on the shape of the fuel at stagnation can be obtained from Compton radiography [R. Tommasini et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056309 (2011)]. For the first time on NIF, two-dimensional inflight radiographs of gas-filled and cryogenic fuel layered capsules have been measured to infer the symmetry of the radiation drive on the capsule. These results have been used to modify the hohlraum geometry and the wavelength tuning to improve the inflight implosion symmetry. We have also expanded our shock timing capabilities by the addition of extra mirrors inside the re-entrant cone to allow the simultaneous measurement of shock symmetry in three locations on a single shot, providing asymmetry information up to Legendre mode 4. By diagnosing the shape at nearly every step of the implosion, we estimate that shape has typically reduced fusion yield by about 50% in ignition experiments.

Town, R. P. J., E-mail: town2@llnl.gov; Bradley, D. K.; Kritcher, A.; Jones, O. S.; Rygg, J. R.; Tommasini, R.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Döppner, T.; Dewald, E. L.; Eder, D. C.; Field, J. E.; Glenn, S. M.; Izumi, N.; Haan, S. W.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Evidence for Stratification of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of the D(d,p)T (dd) and T(t,2n)[superscript 4]He (tt) reaction yields have been compared with those of the D(t,n)[superscript 4]He (dt) reaction yield, using deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement ...

Casey, Daniel Thomas

63

Basics of Inertial Confinement Fusion NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for ignition on the Nova and Omega laser · Final steps on the path to ignition - the National Ignition Campaign/Centurion Why do we believe that ignition will work on NIF? #12;Advances in laser performance, precision) MAGNETIC FIELD ELECTRON NUCLEUS + - SUN #12;The extreme conditions required for inertial fusion ignition

64

Status of inertial fusion in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report briefly discusses the concept, progress, and direction of inertial confinement fusion in the United States. (LSP)

Coleman, L.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The mitigating effect of magnetic fields on Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at interfaces of disparate mass densities have long been known to generate magnetic fields during inertial confinement fusion implosions. An externally applied magnetic field can also be efficiently amplified by RT instabilities. The focus here is on magnetic field generation and amplification at the gas-ice interface which is RT unstable during the deceleration phase of the implosion. RT instabilities lead to undesirable mix of hot and cold plasmas which enhances thermal energy loss and tends to produce a more massive warm-spot instead of a hot-spot. Two mechanisms are shown here to mitigate the thermal energy loss from the hot-spot. The first mechanism is the reduction of electron thermal conductivity with interface-aligned magnetic fields. This can occur through self-generated magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect as well as through externally applied magnetic fields that undergo an exponential growth via the stretch-and-fold magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. Self-generated magnetic fields during RT evolution can result in a factor of 2?10 decrease in the electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface, while externally applied magnetic fields that are compressed to 6–1000 T at the onset of deceleration (corresponding to pre-implosion external fields of 0.06–10 T) could result in a factor of 2–500 reduction in electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface. The second mechanism to mitigate thermal energy loss from the hot-spot is to decrease the interface mixing area between the hot and cold plasmas. This is achieved through large external magnetic fields of 1000 T at the onset of deceleration which damp short-wavelength RT modes and long-wavelength Kelvin-Helmholtz modes thus significantly slowing the RT growth and reducing mix.

Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Simultaneous usage of pinhole and penumbral apertures for imaging small scale neutron sources from inertial confinement fusion experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to understand the basic principles of creating self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic capsules. The neutron imaging diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by observing neutron images in two different energy bands for primary (13-17 MeV) and down-scattered (6-12 MeV) neutrons. From this, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. These experiments provide small sources with high yield neutron flux. An aperture design that includes an array of pinholes and penumbral apertures has provided the opportunity to image the same source with two different techniques. This allows for an evaluation of these different aperture designs and reconstruction algorithms.

Guler, N.; Volegov, P.; Danly, C. R.; Grim, G. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Single crystal growth and formation of defects in deuterium-tritium layers for inertial confinement nuclear fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We identify vapor-etched grain boundary grooves on the solid-vapor interface as the main source of surface roughness in the deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layers, which are solidified and then cooled. Current inertial confinement fusion target designs impose stringent limits to the cross-sectional area and total volume of these grooves. Formation of these grain boundaries occurs over time scales of hours as the dislocation network anneals and is inevitable in a plastically deformed material. Therefore, either cooling on a much shorter time scale or a technique that requires no cooling after solidification should be used to minimize the roughness.

Chernov, A. A.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Koch, J. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Johnson, M. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Lugten, J. B.; Mapoles, E. A.; Moody, J. D.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sater, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

68

Single Crystal Growth and Formation of Defects in Deuterium-Tritium Ice Layers for Inertial Confinement Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We identify vapor-etched grain boundary grooves on the solid-vapor interface as the main source of surface roughness in the Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fuel layers which are solidified and then cooled. Current inertial confinement fusion target designs impose stringent limits to the cross sectional area and total volume of these grooves. Formation of these grain boundaries occurs over timescales of hours as the dislocation network anneals, and is inevitable in a plastically deformed material. Therefore, either cooling on a much shorter time scale or a technique that requires no cooling after solidification should be used to minimize the fuel layer surface roughness.

Chernov, A A; Kozioziemski, B J; Koch, J A; Atherton, L J; Johnson, M A; Hamza, A V; Kucheyev, S O; Lugten, J B; Mapoles, E A; Moody, J D; Salmonson, J D; Sater, J D

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

69

Technical risks and R and D requirements for inertial confinement fusion. Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If the technology breakthroughs and/or inventions identified in this preliminary analysis occur in a timely manner, an aggressive R and D program may allow commercial demonstration of confinement fusion within 30 years. Using an innovative interview methodology analysts have mapped out near-term and long-term R and D requirements for ICF to become a viable energy source.

McCarville, T.J.; Gordon, J.D.; Salem, S.L.; Maniscalco, J.A.; Berwald, D.H.; Sicherman, A.; Kulkarni, R.B.; Cherdack, R.N.; Lee, K.C.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Views on inertial fusion energy development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A memorial lecture reviews the inertial fusion developments. The issues of the world energy consumption the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide and the necessity of an advanced nuclear fission technology are considered. A real world wide collaboration is very important for the inertial confinement fusion program. (AIP)

S. Nakai

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

72

A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and R are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA 3 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF Rev, Livermore, California 94550, USA 4 General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186, USA (Received 5 June 2014

73

THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEAVY-ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIALLY CONFINED FUSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEAMS QF A P.ELLET FUSION REACTOR BY.fiUADRUPOLJ"DOUBLETS,prefer much smaller fusion reactors. In view of the evidencecertain that soie pure fusion reactor scenarios exist with

Herrmannsfeldt, W.b.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEAVY-ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIALLY CONFINED FUSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tion of fusion could provide the world with an energy sourcefusion power is to provide an inex­ haustible source of energy

Herrmannsfeldt, W.b.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) Program: Progress toward ignition in the Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has made substantial progress in target physics, target diagnostics, and laser science and technology. In each area, progress required the development of experimental techniques and computational modeling. The objectives of the target physics experiments in the Nova laser facility are to address and understand critical physics issues that determine the conditions required to achieve ignition and gain in an ICF capsule. The LLNL experimental program primarily addresses indirect-drive implosions, in which the capsule is driven by x rays produced by the interaction of the laser light with a high-Z plasma. Experiments address both the physics of generating the radiation environment in a laser-driven hohlraum and the physics associated with imploding ICF capsules to ignition and high-gain conditions in the absence of alpha deposition. Recent experiments and modeling have established much of the physics necessary to validate the basic concept of ignition and ICF target gain in the laboratory. The rapid progress made in the past several years, and in particular, recent results showing higher radiation drive temperatures and implosion velocities than previously obtained and assumed for high-gain target designs, has led LLNL to propose an upgrade of the Nova laser to 1.5 to 2 MJ (at 0.35 {mu}m) to demonstrate ignition and energy gains of 10 to 20 -- the Nova Upgrade.

Storm, E.; Batha, S.H.; Bernat, T.P.; Bibeau, C.; Cable, M.D.; Caird, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Campbell, J.H.; Coleman, L.W.; Cook, R.C.; Correll, D.L.; Darrow, C.B.; Davis, J.I.; Drake, R.P.; Ehrlich, R.B.; Ellis, R.J.; Glendinning, S.G.; Haan, S.W.; Haendler, B.L.; Hatcher, C.W.; Hatchett, S.P.; Hermes, G.L.; Hunt, J.P.; Kania, D.R.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Kornblum, H.N.; Kruer, W.L.; Kyrazis, D.T.; Lane, S.M.; Laumann

1990-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

76

Inertial Confinement Fusion, High Energy Density Plasmas and an Energy Source on Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driver Laser h=5-10% Heavy ion Accelerator h=15-40% Z-pinch h~15% Ignition by stagnation of convergent good progress toward achieving fusion ignition and high gain for energy applications We are making good progress toward achievingWe are making good progress toward achieving fusion ignition and high gain

77

PLASMA-PHYSICS-21 Heavy ion driven reactor-size double shell inertial fusion targets*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is considered as an alternative to Magnetic Confinement Fusion to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion. The main goal is to exploit the energy released from thermonuclear fusion reactions

M. C. Serna Moreno; N. A. Tahir; J. J. López Cela; A. R. Piriz; D. H. H. Hoffmann

78

Inertial fusion in the nineties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1980s has proven to be an exicting time for the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. Major new laser and light-ion drivers have been constructed and have produced some encouraging results. The 1990s will be a crucial time for the ICF program. A decision for proceeding with the next facility is scheduled for the early 1990s. If the decision is positive, planning and construction of this facility will occur. Depending on the time required for design and construction, this next-generation facility could become operational near the turn of the century. 21 refs., 4 figs.

Harris, D.B.; Dudziak, D.J.; Cartwright, D.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A 1.5–4 K detachable cold?sample transfer system: Application to inertially confined fusion with spin?polarized hydrogen fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A compact cold?transfer apparatus for engaging and retrieving samples at liquid?helium temperatures (1.5–4 K) maintaining the samples at such temperatures for periods of hours and subsequently inserting them in diverse apparatuses followed by disengagement is described. The properties of several thermal radiation?insulating shrouds necessary for very low sample temperatures are presented. The immediate intended application is transportable target shells containing highly spin?polarized deuterons in solid HD or D2 for inertially confined fusion experiments. The system is also valuable for unpolarized high?density fusion fuels as well as for other applications which are discussed.

N. Alexander; J. Barden; Q. Fan; A. Honig

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, October--December 1992. Volume 3, No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains papers on the following topics: The Beamlet Front End: Prototype of a new pulse generation system;imaging biological objects with x-ray lasers; coherent XUV generation via high-order harmonic generation in rare gases; theory of high-order harmonic generation; two-dimensional computer simulations of ultra- intense, short-pulse laser-plasma interactions; neutron detectors for measuring the fusion burn history of ICF targets; the recirculator; and lasnex evolves to exploit computer industry advances.

Dixit, S.N. [ed.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Elliptical magnetic mirror generated via resistivity gradients for fast ignition inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The elliptical magnetic mirror scheme for guiding fast electrons for Fast Ignition proposed by Schmitz et al. (Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 085016 (2012)) is studied for conditions on the multi-kJ scale which are much closer to full-scale Fast Ignition. When scaled up, the elliptical mirror scheme is still highly beneficial to Fast Ignition. An increase in the coupling efficiency by a factor of 3–4 is found over a wide range of fast electron divergence half-angles.

Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)] [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Computational study of laser imprint mitigation in foam-buffered inertial confinement fusion targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent experiments have shown that low density foam layers can significantly mitigate the perturbing effects of beam nonuniformities affecting the acceleration of thin shells. This problem is studied parametrically with two-dimensional LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion {bold 2}, 51 (1975)]. Foam-buffered targets are employed, consisting typically of 250 {Angstrom} of gold, and 50 {mu}m of 50mg/cm{sup 3} C{sub 10}H{sub 8}O{sub 4} foam attached to a 10 {mu}m foil. In simulation these were characteristically exposed to 1.2 ns, flat-topped green light pulses at 1.4{times}10{sup 14}W/cm{sup 2} intensity, bearing 30 {mu}m lateral perturbations of up to 60{percent} variation in intensity. Without the buffer layers the foils were severely disrupted by 1 ns. With buffering only minimal distortion was manifest at 3 ns. The smoothing is shown to derive principally from the high thermal conductivity of the heated foam. The simulation results imply that (1) the foam thickness should exceed the disturbance wavelength; (2) intensities exceeding 5{times}10{sup 13}W/cm{sup 2} are needed for assured stability beyond 2 ns; (3) longer foams at lower densities are needed for effective mitigation with shorter wavelength light; (4) the gold layer hastens conversion of the structured foam to a uniform plasma. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Mason, R.J.; Kopp, R.A.; Vu, H.X.; Wilson, D.C.; Goldman, S.R.; Watt, R.G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Dunne, M. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)] [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Willi, O. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College of Science and Technology, London SW72BZ (United Kingdom)] [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College of Science and Technology, London SW72BZ (United Kingdom)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size, and their partial or total evaporation in the expanding flow.

Armijo, Julien

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Status and Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Status and Challenges S. Prager University of Wisconsin February, 2005 #12;Two approaches to fusion Inertial confinement extremely dense, short-lived Magnetic ·Control plasma disruptions ·Develop new magnetic configurations ·Control the plasma-wall interaction

85

Dependence of Shell Mix on Feedthrough in Direct Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion S. P. Regan, J. A. Delettrez, V. N. Goncharov, F. J. Marshall, J. M. Soures, V. A. Smalyuk, P. B. Radha, B. Yaakobi,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dependence of Shell Mix on Feedthrough in Direct Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion S. P. Regan, J 87545, USA J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, and F. H. Se´guin Plasma Science and Fusion Center May 2004) The mixing of cold, high-density shell plasma with the low-density, hot spot plasma

86

Status of the US National Inertial Fusion ProgramSNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Status of the US National Inertial Fusion ProgramSNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA Presentation to the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting by: Dr. Allan A. Hauer Director, Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion March 1, 2006 #12;2 The US Inertial Fusion Program has 3 principal components · The first

87

tTOURflAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C7, suppliment au n07, Tome 40, J u i l l e t 1979, page C7-775 DIAGNOSTICSPROGRAM FOR A MAGNETICALLY INSULATED ION DIODE FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Albuquerque, flew Mexico, 87185. Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) schemes 2 require an ion power density of 1 the focused proton and carbon beam profiles via induced atomic excitation and thermal emission from targets exposure times of less than five nanoseconds. The resulting electron images were transported along a 2 k

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

88

A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight detector response in current mode to inertial confinement fusion experiments (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight (nTOF) detector response in current mode for inertial confinement fusion experiments has been applied to the on-axis nTOF detectors located in the basement of the Z-Facility. It will be shown that this method can identify sources of neutron scattering, and is useful for predicting detector responses in future experimental configurations, and for identifying potential sources of neutron scattering when experimental set-ups change. This method can also provide insight on how much broadening neutron scattering contributes to the primary signals, which is then subtracted from them. Detector time responses are deconvolved from the signals, allowing a transformation from dN/dt to dN/dE, extracting neutron spectra at each detector location; these spectra are proportional to the absolute yield.

Nelson, A. J.; Cooper, G. W. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Ruiz, C. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Fehl, D. L.; Hahn, K. D.; Leeper, R. J.; Smelser, R.; Torres, J. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Status of target physics for inertial confinement fusion: Report on the review at DOE Headquarters, Germantown, MD on November 14--17, 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A four day review to assess the status of target physics of inertial confinement fusion was held at US Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters on November 14--17, 1988. This review completes the current series of reviews of the inertial fusion program elements to assess the status of the data base for a decision to proceed with the proposed Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) that is being planned. In addition to target physics, the program elements that have been reviewed previously include the driver technology development for KrF and solid-state lasers, and the light-on beam pulsed power system. This series of reviews was undertaken for internal DOE assessment in anticipation of the ICF program review mandated by the Congress in 1988 to be completed in 1990 to assess the significance and implications of the progress that has been realized in the laboratory and the underground Halite/Centurion experiments. For this target physics review, both the direct and the indirect drive approaches were considered. The principal issues addressed in this review were: Is the present target physics data base adequate for a decision to proceed with design and construction of LMF now as opposed to continue planning activities at this time What specific additional target physics data are desirable to reduce the risk for a DOE decision to construct an LMF What is the role for continuation of Halite/Centurion experiments What priority should be given to the direct drive approach Are the program elements optimally structured to resolve the critical issues for an LMF decision Specific findings relating to these five issues are summarized in the following.

Not Available

1990-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

90

Use of Organometallic Polymers for Pre-Heat Shields for Targets in Inertial-Confinement Nuclear Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear fusion, the energy process operating in the sun ... radioactive wastes associated with nuclear fission. Harnessing nuclear fusion, however, has proven to be a...

John E. Sheats; Fred Hessel; Louis Tsarouhas…

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

An in-flight radiography platform to measure hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion capsules at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new in-flight radiography platform has been established at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure Rayleigh–Taylor and Richtmyer–Meshkov instability growth in inertial confinement fusion capsules. The platform has been tested up to a convergence ratio of 4. An experimental campaign is underway to measure the growth of pre-imposed sinusoidal modulations of the capsule surface, as a function of wavelength, for a pair of ignition-relevant laser drives: a “low-foot” drive representative of what was fielded during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] and the new high-foot [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014)] pulse shape, for which the predicted instability growth is much lower. We present measurements of Legendre modes 30, 60, and 90 for the NIC-type, low-foot, drive, and modes 60 and 90 for the high-foot drive. The measured growth is consistent with model predictions, including much less growth for the high-foot drive, demonstrating the instability mitigation aspect of this new pulse shape. We present the design of the platform in detail and discuss the implications of the data it generates for the on-going ignition effort at NIF.

Raman, K. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; Haan, S. W.; Hurricane, O. A.; Kroll, J. J.; Peterson, J. L.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Landen, O. L.; Marinak, M. M.; Munro, D. H.; Salmonson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hoover, D. E.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Peterson, K. J. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87125 (United States)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Basic hydrodynamics of Richtmyer–Meshkov-type growth and oscillations in the inertial confinement fusion-relevant conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...one-dimensional time history of the CH foil acceleration...al. 1999). The price paid for high uniformity...hohlraum is its low energy efficiency: only...ignition, fusion energy gain and, eventually, fusion energy production on NIF in the USA, LMJ in France...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Observation of strong electromagnetic fields around laser-entrance holes of ignition-scale hohlraums in inertial-confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy spectra and spectrally resolved one-dimensional fluence images of self-emitted charged-fusion products (14.7 MeV D3He protons) are routinely measured from indirectly driven inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) experiments utilizing ignition-scaled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A striking and consistent feature of these images is that the fluence of protons leaving the ICF target in the direction of the hohlraum's laser entrance holes (LEHs) is very nonuniform spatially, in contrast to the very uniform fluence of protons leaving through the hohlraum equator. In addition, the measured nonuniformities are unpredictable, and vary greatly from shot to shot. These observations were made separately at the times of shock flash and of compression burn, indicating that the asymmetry persists even at ~0.5–2.5 ns after the laser has turned off. These phenomena have also been observed in experiments on the OMEGA laser facility with energy-scaled hohlraums, suggesting that the underlying physics is similar. Comprehensive data sets provide compelling evidence that the nonuniformities result from proton deflections due to strong spontaneous electromagnetic fields around the hohlraum LEHs. Although it has not yet been possible to uniquely determine whether the fields are magnetic (B) or electric (E), preliminary analysis indicates that the strength is ~1 MG if B fields or ~109 V cm?1 if E fields. These measurements provide important physics insight into the ongoing ignition experiments at the NIF. Understanding the generation, evolution, interaction and dissipation of the self-generated fields may help to answer many physics questions, such as why the electron temperatures measured in the LEH region are anomalously large, and may help to validate hydrodynamic models of plasma dynamics prior to plasma stagnation in the center of the hohlraum.

C K Li; A B Zylstra; J A Frenje; F H Séguin; N Sinenian; R D Petrasso; P A Amendt; R Bionta; S Friedrich; G W Collins; E Dewald; T Döppner; S H Glenzer; D G Hicks; O L Landen; J D Kilkenny; A J Mackinnon; N Meezan; J Ralph; J R Rygg; J Kline; G Kyrala

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Control Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) facility point design is being developed at LLNL to support an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) based energy concept. This will build upon the technical foundation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system. NIF is designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. The LIFE control systems will have an architecture partitioned by sub-systems and distributed among over 1000's of front-end processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. LIFE's automated control subsystems will require interoperation between different languages and target architectures. Much of the control system will be embedded into the subsystem with well defined interface and performance requirements to the supervisory control layer. An automation framework will be used to orchestrate and automate start-up and shut-down as well as steady state operation. The LIFE control system will be a high parallel segmented architecture. For example, the laser system consists of 384 identical laser beamlines in a 'box'. The control system will mirror this architectural replication for each beamline with straightforward high-level interface for control and status monitoring. Key technical challenges will be discussed such as the injected target tracking and laser pointing feedback. This talk discusses the the plan for controls and information systems to support LIFE.

Marshall, C; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Edwards, O; Lagin, L; Van Arsdall, P

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

95

Plasma Barodiffusion in Inertial-Confinement-Fusion Implosions: Application to Observed Yield Anomalies in Thermonuclear Fuel Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anomalies in Thermonuclear Fuel Mixtures Peter Amendt, O. L. Landen, and H. F. Robey Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA C. K. Li and R. D. Petrasso Plasma Science and Fusion performance in general, and upcoming igni- tion tuning campaigns on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [4

96

Masked-backlighter technique used to simultaneously image x-ray absorption and x-ray emission from an inertial confinement fusion plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method to simultaneously image both the absorption and the self-emission of an imploding inertial confinement fusion plasma has been demonstrated on the OMEGA Laser System. The technique involves the use of a high-Z backlighter, half of which is covered with a low-Z material, and a high-speed x-ray framing camera aligned to capture images backlit by this masked backlighter. Two strips of the four-strip framing camera record images backlit by the high-Z portion of the backlighter, while the other two strips record images aligned with the low-Z portion of the backlighter. The emission from the low-Z material is effectively eliminated by a high-Z filter positioned in front of the framing camera, limiting the detected backlighter emission to that of the principal emission line of the high-Z material. As a result, half of the images are of self-emission from the plasma and the other half are of self-emission plus the backlighter. The advantage of this technique is that the self-emission simultaneous with backlighter absorption is independently measured from a nearby direction. The absorption occurs only in the high-Z backlit frames and is either spatially separated from the emission or the self-emission is suppressed by filtering, or by using a backlighter much brighter than the self-emission, or by subtraction. The masked-backlighter technique has been used on the OMEGA Laser System to simultaneously measure the emission profiles and the absorption profiles of polar-driven implosions.

Marshall, F. J., E-mail: fredm@lle.rochester.edu; Radha, P. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Inertial electrostatic confinement and nuclear fusion in the interelectrode plasma of a nanosecond vacuum discharge. I: Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of an aerosol substance with a high power density in the interelectrode space of a nano- second vacuum discharge are studied. The possibilities of emission and/or trapping of fast ions and hard X-rays by ensembles of clusters and microparticles are analyzed. The possibility of simultaneous partial trapping (diffusion) of X-rays and complete trapping of fast ions by a cluster ensemble is demonstrated experimentally. Due to such trapping, the aerosol ensemble transforms into a 'dusty' microreactor that can be used to investigate a certain class of nuclear processes, including collisional DD microfusion. Operating regimes of such a microreactor and their reproducibility were studied. On the whole, the generation efficiency of hard X-rays and neutrons in the proposed vacuum discharge with a hollow cathode can be higher by two orders of magnitude than that in a system 'high-power laser pulse-cluster cloud.' Multiply repeated nuclear fusion accompanied by pulsating DD neutron emission was reproducibly detected in experiment. Ion acceleration mechanisms in the interelectrode space and the fundamental role of the virtual cathode in observed nuclear fusion processes are discussed.

Kurilenkov, Yu. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Skowronek, M. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Laboratoire des Plasmas Denses (France)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Development of a polar direct-drive platform for studying inertial confinement fusion implosion mix on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments were performed to develop a platform for the simultaneous measurement of mix and its effects on fusion burn. Two polar direct drive implosions of all-plastic capsules were conducted for the first time on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To measure implosion trajectory and symmetry, area image backlighting of these capsules was also employed for the first time on NIF, an advance over previous 1-D slit imaging experiments, providing detailed symmetry data of the capsules as they imploded. The implosion trajectory and low-mode asymmetry seen in the resultant radiographs agreed with pre-shot predictions even though the 700 kJ drive energy produced laser beam intensities exceeding laser-plasma instability thresholds. Post-shot simulations indicate that the capsule yield was reduced by a factor of two compared to pre-shot predictions owing to as-shot laser drive asymmetries. The pre-shot predictions of bang time agreed within 200 ps with the experimental results. The second shot incorporated a narrow groove encircling the equator of the capsule. A predicted yield reduction factor of three was not observed.

Schmitt, Mark J.; Bradley, Paul A.; Cobble, James A.; Fincke, James R.; Hakel, Peter; Hsu, Scott C.; Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Kyrala, George A.; Magelssen, Glenn R.; Montgomery, David S.; Murphy, Thomas J.; Obrey, Kimberly A.; Shah, Rahul C.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Baumgaertel, Jessica A.; Wysocki, Frederick J.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS F699, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS F699, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Stephen Craxton, R.; McKenty, Patrick W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fitzsimmons, Paul [General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)] [General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); and others

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

THE CONCEPT OF ISOCHORIC CENTRAL SPARK IGNITION AND ITS FUEL GAIN IN INERTIAL FUSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 THE CONCEPT OF ISOCHORIC CENTRAL SPARK IGNITION AND ITS FUEL GAIN IN INERTIAL FUSION of the best methods in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is the concept of central spark ignition, consisting of two distinct regions named as hot and cold regions and formed by hydro-dynamical implosion of fuel

Boyer, Edmond

100

Damage production and accumulation in SiC structures in inertial and magnetic fusion systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Damage production and accumulation in SiC structures in inertial and magnetic fusion systems M wall in an IFE system is $10% lower than in an MFE system, while gas production and burnup rates magnetic (MFE) and inertial (IFE) confinement fusion systems. Variations in the geometry, neutron energy

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provide some operational redundancy. The essential problem for inertial fusion is depositing enough energy

Sharp, W. M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), now being constructed in Caderache, France [5]. In contrast, inertial fusion

Sharp, W. M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

First Observations of Nonhydrodynamic Mix at the Fuel-Shell Interface in Shock-Driven Inertial Confinement Implosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A strong nonhydrodynamic mechanism generating atomic fuel-shell mix has been observed in strongly shocked inertial confinement fusion implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells filled with [superscript 3]He gas. These ...

Amendt, P.

104

Status of the US program in magneto-inertial fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A status report of the current U.S. program in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) conducted by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) of the U.S. Department of Energy is given. Magneto-inertial fusion is an emerging concept for inertial fusion and a pathway to the study of dense plasmas in ultrahigh magnetic fields (magnetic fields in excess of 500 T). The presence of magnetic field in an inertial fusion target suppresses cross-field thermal transport and potentially could enable more attractive inertial fusion energy systems. The program is part of the OFES program in high energy density laboratory plasmas (HED-LP).

Y C F Thio

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Cryogenic DT and D2 targets for inertial confinement fusiona... T. C. Sangster,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designs for ignition--capsules directly il- luminated by the laser direct drive3 and capsules driven. Smalyuk, J. M. Soures, C. Stoeckl, and B. Yaakobi Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester 26 April 2007 Ignition target designs for inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition

106

Current state, problems, and prospects of thermonuclear facilities based on the magneto-inertial confinement of hot plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is an original technique of inertial thermonuclear fusion, where spherical and cylindrical gas or plasma...

S. V. Ryzhkov

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Gas Transport and Control in Thick-Liquid Inertial Fusion Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYLIFE-II inertial con?nement fusion reactor design. FusionInertial Con?nement Fusion Reactors. PhD thesis, UniversityInertial Con?nement Fusion Reactor. PhD thesis, University

Debonnel, Christophe Sylvain

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Prospects for inertial fusion as an energy source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program has been very rapid in the last few years. Target physics experiments with laboratory lasers and in underground nuclear tests have shown that the drive conditions necessary to achieve high gain can be achieved in the laboratory with a pulse-shaped driver of about 10 MJ. Requirements and designs for a Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) have been formulated. Research on driver technology necessary for an ICF reactor is making progress. Prospects for ICF as an energy source are very promising. 11 refs., 5 figs.

Hogan, W.J.

1989-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

109

First Observations of Nonhydrodynamic Mix at the Fuel-Shell Interface in Shock-Driven Inertial Confinement Implosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Wilks,2 A. Greenwood,4 and A. Nikroo4 1 Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute, California 94550, USA 3 Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 shocked inertial confinement fusion implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells filled with 3 He gas

110

Magneto-inertial Fusion: An Emerging Concept for Inertial Fusion and Dense Plasmas in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of the U.S. program in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is given in terms of its technical rationale, scientific goals, vision, research plans, needs, and the research facilities currently available in support of the program. Magneto-inertial fusion is an emerging concept for inertial fusion and a pathway to the study of dense plasmas in ultrahigh magnetic fields (magnetic fields in excess of 500 T). The presence of magnetic field in an inertial fusion target suppresses cross-field thermal transport and potentially could enable more attractive inertial fusion energy systems. A vigorous program in magnetized high energy density laboratory plasmas (HED-LP) addressing the scientific basis of magneto-inertial fusion has been initiated by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy involving a number of universities, government laboratories and private institutions.

Thio, Francis Y.C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

COST-EFFECTIVE TARGET FABRICATION FOR INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A central feature of an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plant is a target that has been compressed and heated to fusion conditions by the energy input of the driver. The IFE target fabrication programs are focusing on methods that will scale to mass production, and working closely with target designers to make material selections that will satisfy a wide range of required and desirable characteristics. Targets produced for current inertial confinement fusion experiments are estimated to cost about $2500 each. Design studies of cost-effective power production from laser and heavy-ion driven IFE have found a cost requirement of about $0.25-0.30 each. While four orders of magnitude cost reduction may seem at first to be nearly impossible, there are many factors that suggest this is achievable. This paper summarizes the paradigm shifts in target fabrication methodologies that will be needed to economically supply targets and presents the results of ''nth-of-a-kind'' plant layouts and concepts for IFE power plant fueling. Our engineering studies estimate the cost of the target supply in a fusion economy, and show that costs are within the range of commercial feasibility for laser-driven and for heavy ion driven IFE.

GOODIN,D.T; NOBILE,A; SCHROEN,D.G; MAXWELL,J.L; RICKMAN,W.S

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Rugged Packaging for Damage Resistant Inertial Fusion Energy Optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of practical fusion energy plants based on inertial confinement with ultraviolet laser beams requires durable, stable final optics that will withstand the harsh fusion environment. Aluminum-coated reflective surfaces are fragile, and require hard overcoatings resistant to contamination, with low optical losses at 248.4 nanometers for use with high-power KrF excimer lasers. This program addresses the definition of requirements for IFE optics protective coatings, the conceptual design of the required deposition equipment according to accepted contamination control principles, and the deposition and evaluation of diamondlike carbon (DLC) test coatings. DLC coatings deposited by Plasma Immersion Ion Processing were adherent and abrasion-resistant, but their UV optical losses must be further reduced to allow their use as protective coatings for IFE final optics. Deposition equipment for coating high-performance IFE final optics must be designed, constructed, and operated with contamination control as a high priority.

Stelmack, Larry

2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

113

Direct-Drive Inerital Confinement Fusion Research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics: Charting the Path to Thermonuclear Ignition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant theoretical and experimental progress continues to be made at the University of Rocheter's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), charting the path to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition. Direct drive offers the potential for higher-gain implosions than x-ray drive and is a leading candidate for an inertial fusion enery power plant.

McCrory, R.L.; Regan, S.P.; Loucks, S.J.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Skupsky, S.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Craxton, R.S.; Collins, T.J.B.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Keck, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Marciante, J.; Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; Maximov, A.V.; McKenty, P.W.; Myatt, J.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

Observation of strong electromagnetic fields around laser-entrance holes of ignition-scale hohlraums in inertial-confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA 2 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 USA 3 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM) experiments utilizing ignition-scaled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A striking

115

To: ! Members of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Prospects for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems, and the Panel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, retired, former head of the laser fusion program at the Naval Research Laboratory Date: ! December 9, 2011 Koonin, it was told to assume that the NIF (National Ignition Facility) would reach ignition. Over the past year, Dr. Koonin periodically reviewed the progress towards ignition at the NIF. In his

116

The role of the National Ignition Facility in energy production from inertial fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in IFE attractive. inertial fusion energy|laser fusion|ignition (lasers)|thermonuclear gain|National Ignition Facility...inertial fusion energy; laser fusion; ignition (lasers); thermonuclear gain; National Ignition Facility...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Progress in inertial fusion at LLNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments at LLNL using the 10 TW Novette laser have led to significantly increased understanding of laser/plasma coupling. Tests using 1.06 ..mu..m, 0.53 ..mu..m and 0.26 ..mu..m light have shown increased light absorption, increased efficiency of conversion to x-rays, and decreased production of suprathermal electrons as the wavelength of the incident light decreases. The data indicate that stimulated Raman scattering is the source of the excessive hot electrons and that the effect can be controlled by the proper selection of laser frequency and target material. The control of these effects has led to achievement of higher inertial fusion target compressions and to production of the first laboratory x-ray laser.

Storm, E.

1985-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

ILSE: The next step toward a heavy ion induction accelerator for inertial fusion energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LBL and LLNL propose to build, at LBL, the Induction Linac Systems Experiments (ILSE), the next logical step towards the eventual goal of a heavy-ion induction accelerator powerful enough to implode or drive'' inertial-confinement fusion targets. ILSE, although much smaller than a driver, will be the first experiment at full driver scale in several important parameters. Most notable among these are line charge density and beam cross section. Many other accelerator components and beam manipulations needed for an inertial fusion energy (IFE) driver will be tested. The ILSE accelerator and research program will permit experimental study of those beam manipulations required of an induction linac inertial fusion driver which have not been tested sufficiently in previous experiments, and will provide a step toward driver technology.

Fessenden, T.; Bangerter, R.; Berners, D.; Chew, J.; Eylon, S.; Faltens, A.; Fawley, W.; Fong, C.; Fong, M.; Hahn, K.; Henestroza, E.; Judd, D.; Lee, E.; Lionberger, C.; Mukherjee, S.; Peters, C.; Pike, C.; Raymond, G.; Reginato, L.; Rutkowski, H.; Seidl, P.; Smith, L.; Vanecek, D.; Yu, S. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Deadrick, F.; Friedman, A.; Griffith, L.; Hewett, D.; Newton, M.; Shay, H. (Lawrence Liver

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

ILSE: The next step toward a heavy ion induction accelerator for inertial fusion energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LBL and LLNL propose to build, at LBL, the Induction Linac Systems Experiments (ILSE), the next logical step towards the eventual goal of a heavy-ion induction accelerator powerful enough to implode or ``drive`` inertial-confinement fusion targets. ILSE, although much smaller than a driver, will be the first experiment at full driver scale in several important parameters. Most notable among these are line charge density and beam cross section. Many other accelerator components and beam manipulations needed for an inertial fusion energy (IFE) driver will be tested. The ILSE accelerator and research program will permit experimental study of those beam manipulations required of an induction linac inertial fusion driver which have not been tested sufficiently in previous experiments, and will provide a step toward driver technology.

Fessenden, T.; Bangerter, R.; Berners, D.; Chew, J.; Eylon, S.; Faltens, A.; Fawley, W.; Fong, C.; Fong, M.; Hahn, K.; Henestroza, E.; Judd, D.; Lee, E.; Lionberger, C.; Mukherjee, S.; Peters, C.; Pike, C.; Raymond, G.; Reginato, L.; Rutkowski, H.; Seidl, P.; Smith, L.; Vanecek, D.; Yu, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Deadrick, F.; Friedman, A.; Griffith, L.; Hewett, D.; Newton, M.; Shay, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Critical Science Issues for Direct Drive Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are several topics that require resolution prior to the construction of an Inertial Fusion Energy [IFE] laboratory Engineering Test Facility [ETF ... driver; a practical target injection system that provides

Jill P. Dahlburg; John H. Gardner; Andrew J. Schmitt…

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Inertial Fusion Driven by Intense Heavy-Ion Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS * W. M. Sharp # , A. Friedman, D. P. Grote, J. J. Barnard, R. H. Cohen, M. A. Dorf, S. M. Lund, L. J. Perkins, M. R. Terry, LLNL, Livermore, CA, USA B. G. Logan, F. M. Bieniosek, A. Faltens, E. Henestroza, J.-Y. Jung, J. W. Kwan, E. P. Lee, S. M. Lidia, P. A. Ni, L. L. Reginato, P. K. Roy, P. A. Seidl, J. H. Takakuwa, J.-L. Vay, W. L. Waldron, LBNL, Berkeley, CA, USA R. C. Davidson, E. P. Gilson, I. D. Kaganovich, H. Qin, E. Startsev, PPPL, Princeton, NJ, USA I. Haber, R. A. Kishek, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA A. E. Koniges, NERSC, Berkeley, CA, USA Abstract Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial

122

Inertial Confinement Fusion with Light Ion Beams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...plasma can be formed without significant contribution of the ion thermal velocity to the beam divergence. The large ionization energy...3. P. L. Dreike, C. Eichenberger, S. Humphries, R. Sudan, J. Appi. Phys. 47, 85 (1986). 4. J. D. Lindi and...

J. PACE VANDEVENDER; DONALD L. COOK

1986-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

123

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a safe, secure, and reliable nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. Science-based weapons and certify the stockpile without nuclear testing. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) extends HEDP under extreme conditions that approach the high energy density (HED) environments found in a nuclear

124

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and reliability of the Nation's nuclear weapons without nuclear testing. The program provides this capability models that are used to assess and certify the stockpile without nuclear testing. The National Ignition that approach the high-energy density (HED) environments found in a nuclear explosion. Virtually all

125

Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

advanced science and technology portfolio, the Office of ICF is working to produce thermonuclear burn conditions in the laboratory, to develop laboratory capabilities that will...

126

Magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Starting with the Lorentz force law the basic physics involved in magnetic confinement in thermonuclear reactors is reviewed. Among the topics covered are magnetic bottles tokamaks tandem mirrors and energy balance considerations.(AIP)

George Patrick Lasche

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Compression and combustion of non-cryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel for inertial fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variants of a target with a solid thermonuclear fuel in the form of deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals for an inertial fusion have been proposed. The laser-pulse-induced compression of non-cryogenic targets, as well as ignition and combustion of such targets, has been examined. The numerical calculations show that, despite a decrease in the caloric content of the fuel and an increase in the energy losses on intrinsic radiation in the target containing deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals as compared to the target containing deuterium-tritium ice, the non-cryogenic target can ensure the fusion gain sufficient for its use in the energy cycle of a thermonuclear power plant based on the inertial plasma confinement method.

Gus'kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Zmitrenko, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Timely Delivery of Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Presentation prepared for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plant design · Delivery soon enough to make a difference to global energy imperatives. · Design basedTimely Delivery of Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Presentation prepared for Town Hall meeting must directly address the end-user requirement for commercial power 3 Plant Primary Criteria (partial

129

Peter A. Norreys Professor of Inertial Fusion Science,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Campaign · "Science of Ignition on the NIF" Workshop · Central Laser Facility / ORION #12;Universities experimental checks #12;$4 Billion US National Ignition Facility 2009 Laser system completed 2010 National Leader Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Inertial Fusion Plasmas #12;Thanks

130

Ch. 37, Inertial Fusion Energy Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, and renewable energy (including biofuels) are the only energy sources capable of satisfying the Earth's need for power for the next century and beyond without the negative environmental impacts of fossil fuels. Substantially increasing the use of nuclear fission and renewable energy now could help reduce dependency on fossil fuels, but nuclear fusion has the potential of becoming the ultimate base-load energy source. Fusion is an attractive fuel source because it is virtually inexhaustible, widely available, and lacks proliferation concerns. It also has a greatly reduced waste impact, and no danger of runaway reactions or meltdowns. The substantial environmental, commercial, and security benefits of fusion continue to motivate the research needed to make fusion power a reality. Replicating the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars to meet Earth's energy needs has been a long-sought scientific and engineering challenge. In fact, this technological challenge is arguably the most difficult ever undertaken. Even after roughly 60 years of worldwide research, much more remains to be learned. the magnitude of the task has caused some to declare that fusion is 20 years away, and always will be. This glib criticism ignores the enormous progress that has occurred during those decades, progress inboth scientific understanding and essential technologies that has enabled experiments producing significant amounts of fusion energy. For example, more than 15 megawatts of fusion power was produced in a pulse of about half a second. Practical fusion power plants will need to produce higher powers averaged over much longer periods of time. In addition, the most efficient experiments to date have required using about 50% more energy than the resulting fusion reaction generated. That is, there was no net energy gain, which is essential if fusion energy is to be a viable source of electricity. The simplest fusion fuels, the heavy isotopes of hydrogen (deuterium and tritium), are derived from water and the metal lithium, a relatively abundant resource. The fuels are virtually inexhaustible and they are available worldwide. Deuterium from one gallon of seawater would provide the equivalent energy of 300 gallons of gasoline, or over a half ton of coal. This energy is released when deuterium and tritium nuclei are fused together to form a helium nucleus and a neutron. The neutron is used to breed tritium from lithium. The energy released is carried by the helium nucleus (3.5 MeV) and the neutron (14 MeV). The energetic helium nucleus heats the fuel, helping to sustain the fusion reaction. Once the helium cools, it is collected and becomes a useful byproduct. A fusion power plant would produce no climate-changing gases.

Moses, E

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

131

ORIGINAL PAPER The Rationale for an Expanded Inertial Fusion Energy Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER The Rationale for an Expanded Inertial Fusion Energy Program Stephen O. Dean for an expanded effort on the development of inertial fusion as an energy source is dis- cussed. It is argued that there should be a two-pronged, complementary approach to fusion energy development over the next two to three

132

Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy Fusion Power Associates Annual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@sandia.gov) LTD Cavity Recyclable Transmission Line Hohlraum #12;2 Outline · Refurbished Z · Pulsed power fusion 82 kV #12;7 Outline · Refurbished Z · Pulsed power fusion · Advances in pulsed power technology · Z Ray Lemke Strip-line geometry: S ~ Strip Width + AK "equivalent" AK gap d(t) from 1-D simulatio

133

Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 15, Nos. 3/4, 1996 Report of the FESAC Inertial Fusion Energy Review Panel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 15, Nos. 3/4, 1996 Report of the FESAC Inertial Fusion Energy Review Marshall Rosenbluth, H,~3 William Tang, 12 and Ernest Valeo 12 Dr. Robert W. Conn, Chair Fusion Energy on a specific recommendation made by your Committee in its report, "A Restructured Fusion Energy Sciences Pro

Abdou, Mohamed

134

Ignition on the National Ignition Facility: a path towards inertial fusion energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is nearing completion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8?MJ, 500?TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351?nm. The NIF project is scheduled for completion in March 2009. Currently, all 192 beams have been operationally qualified and have produced over 4.0?MJ of light at the fundamental wavelength of 1053?nm, making NIF the world's first megajoule laser. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium–tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader scientific applications.The plan is to begin 96-beam symmetric indirect-drive ICF experiments early in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). This national effort to achieve fusion ignition is coordinated through a detailed plan that includes the science, technology and equipment such as diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator and user optics required for ignition experiments. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility soon after project completion and to conduct a credible ignition campaign in 2010. When the NIF is complete, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustaining nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory will be much closer to realization.Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of inertial fusion energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed (Lindl 1998 Inertial Confinement Fusion: the Quest for Ignition and Energy Gain Using Indirect Drive (New York: American Institute of Physics)) and has a high probability of success. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and fast ignition concepts (Tabak et al 1994 Phys. Plasmas 1 1626–34, Tabak et al 2005 Phys. Plasmas 12 057305). Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science.This paper summarizes the design, performance and status of NIF, experimental plans for NIC, and will present laser inertial confinement fusion–fission energy (LIFE) as a path to achieve carbon-free sustainable energy.

Edward I. Moses

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Elise - the next step in development of induction heavy ion drivers for inertial fusion energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LBL, with the participation of LLNL and industry, proposes to build Elise, an electric-focused accelerator as the next logical step towards the eventual goal of a heavy-ion induction linac powerful enough to implode or {open_quotes}drive{close_quotes} inertial-confinement fusion targets. Elise will be at full driver scale in several important parameters-most notably line charge density (a function of beam size), which was not explored in earlier experiments. Elise will be capable of accelerating and electrostatically focusing four parallel, full-scale ion beams and will be designed to be extendible, by successive future construction projects, to meet the goal of the USA DOE Inertial Fusion Energy program (IFE). This goal is to address all remaining issues in heavy-ion IFE except target physics, which is currently the responsibility of DOE Defense Programs, and the target chamber. Thus Elise is the first step of a program that will provide a solid foundation of data for further progress toward a driver, as called for in the National Energy Strategy and National Energy Policy Act.

Lee, E.; Bangerter, R.O.; Celata, C.; Faltens, A.; Fessenden, T.; Peters, C.; Pickrell, J.; Reginato, L.; Seidl, P.; Yu, S. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Nuclear Fusion for Bose Nuclei Confined in Ion Traps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fusion of integer spin nuclei confined in an isotropic ion trap is investigated. Solutions of the ground state for charged bosons trapped in the isotropic harmonic oscillator potential are calculated using the equivalent linear two-body method for many-body problems, which is based on an approximate reduction of the many-body Schroedinger equation by the use of a variational principle. Using the ground-state wave function, theoretical estimates of probabilities and rates for nuclear fusion for Bose nuclei confined in ion traps are obtained. Numerical estimates for fusion rates are presented for the case of deuteron-deuteron fusion.

Kim, Yeong E.; Zubarev, Alexander L. [Purdue University (United States)

2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Progress in inertial fusion research at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Paper No. IAEA-CN-38/B-2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Inertial Confinement Fusion Program is reviewed. Experiments using the Helios CO/sub 2/ laser system delivering up to 6 kJ on target are described. Because breakeven energy estimates for laser drivers of 1 ..mu..m and above have risen and there is a need for CO/sub 2/ experiments in the tens-of-kilojoule regime as soon as practical, a first phase of Antares construction is now directed toward completion of two of the six original modules in 1983. These modules are designed to deliver 40 kJ of CO/sub 2/ laser light on target.

Perkins, R.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Progress and prospect of laser thermonuclear fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Report presented at the International Seminar on Present Status and Future Plan of Inertial Confinement Fusion, Tokyo, Japan, 26 November 1992.

N G Basov

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The little bang theory—Energy from inertial fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculations show that it may be possible to ignite small thermonuclear explosions with an ion accelerator or laser. The process involves the implosion of small targets to achieve extreme temperatures and densities. The implosion can be described as a sequence of shock waves followed by adiabatic compression. The strength and timing of the shock waves are important in achieving proper conditions for thermonuclear burn. Other important issues include the uniformity of the converging shock waves and the influence of these shock waves on fluid instabilities. These issues are not fully understood and constitute an important area of research in inertial fusion. In order to produce commercial energy it will be necessary to develop combustion chambers target fabrication factories and efficient drivers (accelerators or lasers). These will be briefly discussed. In particular acoustical phenomena will play an important role in combustion chamber design. [Research performed under the auspices of the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration under Contract No. W?7405?Eng?48.

Roger O. Bangerter

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Scenarios for multi?unit inertial fusion energy plants producing hydrogen fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is presented an extended summary for a paper describing: a) the motivation of the inertial fusion in general and particularly for the production of the hydrogen fuel powering low?emission vehicles b) the general requirements for fusion electric plants c) a comparative economic analysis concerning the design of drivers and target chambers. (AIP)

B. Grant Logan

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tritium can be bred in a fusion reactor by capturing fusionchamber. Whereas magnetic-fusion reactors typically combineProjected MFE reactors have a toroidal fusion-power core

Sharp, W. M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Inertial Confinement Fusion Program. Progress report FY 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brief description of work progress during this report period are given for: (1) acceleration of disc targets, (2) laser upgrade, (3) diagnostic development, and (4) stimulated brillouin backscatter theory.

Not Available

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, October-December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The articles in this issue report progress on: Supernova Hydrodynamics Experiments on the Nova Laser; Characterization of Laser-Driven Shock Waves Using Interferometry; Absolute Equation of State Measurements of Compressed Liquid Deuterium Using Nova; Low-Density-Foam Shells; Tetrahedral Hohlraums; The Rosseland Mean Opacity of a Composite Material at High Temperatures.

Hammer, J.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Measurements of the T(t,2n)He4 Neutron Spectrum at Low Reactant Energies from Inertial Confinement Implosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of the neutron spectrum from the T(t,2n)He4 (tt) reaction have been conducted using inertial confinement fusion implosions at the OMEGA laser facility. In these experiments, deuterium-tritium (DT) gas-filled capsules were imploded to study the tt reaction in thermonuclear plasmas at low reactant center-of-mass (c.m.) energies. In contrast to accelerator experiments at higher c.m. energies (above 100 keV), these results indicate a negligible n+He5 reaction channel at a c.m. energy of 23 keV.

D. T. Casey; J. A. Frenje; M. Gatu Johnson; M. J.-E. Manuel; N. Sinenian; A. B. Zylstra; F. H. Séguin; C. K. Li; R. D. Petrasso; V. Yu Glebov; P. B. Radha; D. D. Meyerhofer; T. C. Sangster; D. P. McNabb; P. A. Amendt; R. N. Boyd; S. P. Hatchett; S. Quaglioni; J. R. Rygg; I. J. Thompson; A. D. Bacher; H. W. Herrmann; Y. H. Kim

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

Inertial Confinement Fusion: steady progressInertial Confinement Fusion: steady progress towards ignition and high gaintowards ignition and high gain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Vilamoura, Portugal. #12;Main route to ignition: indirect laser drive with central hot-spot ignition and ignition implosion DT capsule hohlraum case ~ 30 m of Au (or Pb)µ laser beams 5.5 mm 9.5 mm ablator DT ice constantly accumulated on currently operating non- ignition-scale lasers at Rochester, LANL, ILE, UK

146

Diode-pumped solid-state laser driver experiments for inertial fusion energy applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although solid-state lasers have been the primary means by which the physics of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) have been investigated, it was previously thought that solid-state laser technology could not offer adequate efficiencies for an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. Orth and co-workers have recently designed a conceptual IFE power plant, however, with a high efficiency diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) driver that utilized several recent innovations in laser technology. It was concluded that DPSSLs could offer adequate performance for IFE with reasonable assumptions. This system was based on a novel diode pumped Yb-doped Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F (Yb:S-FAP) amplifier. Because this is a relatively new gain medium, a project was established to experimentally validate the diode-pumping and extraction dynamics of this system at the smallest reasonable scale. This paper reports on the initial experimental results of this study. We found the pumping dynamics and extraction cross-sections of Yb:S-FAP crystals to be similar to those previously inferred by purely spectroscopic techniques. The saturation fluence for pumping was measured to be 2.2 J/cm{sup 2} using three different methods based on either the spatial, temporal, or energy transmission properties of a Yb:S-FAP rod. The small signal gain implies an emission cross section of 6.0{times}10{sup {minus}20} cm{sup 2}. Up to 1.7 J/cm{sup 3} of stored energy density was achieved in a 6{times}6{times}44 mm{sup 3} Yb:S-FAP amplifier rod. In a free running configuration diode-pumped slope efficiencies up to 43% were observed with output energies up to {approximately}0.5 J per 1 ms pulse from a 3{times}3{times}30 mm{sup 3} rod. When the rod was mounted in a copper block for cooling, 13 W of average power was produced with power supply limited operation at 70 Hz with 500 {mu}s pulses.

Marshall, C.D.; Payne, S.A.; Emanuel, M.E.; Smith, L.K.; Powell, H.T.; Krupke, W.F.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

147

Inertial Fusion Energy reactor design studies: Prometheus-L, Prometheus-H. Volume 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a review of design studies for Inertial Confinement reactor. This second of three volumes discussions is some detail the following: Objectives, requirements, and assumptions; rationale for design option selection; key technical issues and R&D requirements; and conceptual design selection and description.

Waganer, L.M.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Lee, V.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interior, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmasa...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 87185-1196, USA 2 University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557, USA 3 Lawrence Livermore for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion more energy and the backlight must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self-emission

149

Simulation of transition dynamics to high confinement in fusion plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transition dynamics from the low (L) to the high (H) confinement mode in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated using a first-principles four-field fluid model. Numerical results are in close agreement with measurements from the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak - EAST. Particularly, the slow transition with an intermediate dithering phase is well reproduced by the numerical solutions. Additionally, the model reproduces the experimentally determined L-H transition power threshold scaling that the ion power threshold increases with increasing particle density. The results hold promise for developing predictive models of the transition, essential for understanding and optimizing future fusion power reactors.

Nielsen, A H; Madsen, J; Naulin, V; Rasmussen, J Juul; Wan, B N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Pathways to Inertial Fusion Energy Laser Direct Drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(NRL) Smoothing by Spectral Dispersion ­ SSD (LLE) DT ice preheated ablator (lower density) DT ice "Gain" = Fusion power OUT / laser power IN 143/572 = 25% Recirculating power (Nuclear reactions (electricity) Target "Gain" = Fusion power OUT / laser power IN 143/880 = 16% Recirculating power (Nuclear

151

Fusion Lecture Summary Eugene S. Evans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 31, 2010 2 / 15 #12;National Ignition Facility (NIF) location: Lawrence Livermore National. Evans (2010) Fusion Lecture Summary March 31, 2010 1 / 15 #12;Outline 1 Overview of NIF Specifications Timeline Goals 2 Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) 3 Science at NIF 4 Fusion and the Future Laser Inertial

Budker, Dmitry

152

Experimental Demonstration of Fusion-Relevant Conditions in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This Letter presents results from the first fully integrated experiments testing the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S.?A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], in which a cylinder of deuterium gas with a preimposed 10 T axial magnetic field is heated by Z beamlet, a 2.5 kJ, 1 TW laser, and magnetically imploded by a 19 MA, 100 ns rise time current on the Z facility. Despite a predicted peak implosion velocity of only 70??km/s, the fuel reaches a stagnation temperature of approximately 3 keV, with Te?Ti, and produces up to 2×1012 thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutrons. X-ray emission indicates a hot fuel region with full width at half maximum ranging from 60 to 120???m over a 6 mm height and lasting approximately 2 ns. Greater than 1010 secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were observed, indicating significant fuel magnetization given that the estimated radial areal density of the plasma is only 2??mg/cm2.

M.?R. Gomez et al.

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

153

Inertial fusion program, January 1-June 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse carbon dioxide laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements are outlined for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Gemini System, which permitted over 500 shots in support of 10 different target experiments; the transformation of our eight-beam system, Helios, from a developmental to an operational facility that is capable of irradiating targets on a routine basis is described; and progress made toward completion of Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is detailed. Investigations of phenomena such as phase conjugation by degenerate four-wave mixing and its applicability to laser fusion systems, and frequency multiplexing as a means toward multipulse energy extraction are summarized. Also discussed are experiments with targets designed for adiabatic compression. Progress is reported in the development of accurate diagnostics, especially for the detection of expanding ions, of neutron yield, and of x-ray emission. Significant advances in our theoretical efforts are summarized, such as the adaptation of our target design codes for use with the CRAY-1 computer, and new results leading to a better understanding of implosion phenomena are reported. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, including the development of an ICF reactor blanket that offers a promising alternative to the usual lithium blanket, and the formulation of a capital-cost data base for laser fusion reactors to permit meaningful comparisons with other technologies.

Skoberne, F. (comp.)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Impact of pulsed irradiation upon neutron activation calculations for inertial and magnetic fusion energy power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sisolak et al. defined two methods for the approximation of pulsed irradiation: the steady-state (SS) and the equivalent steady-state (ESS) methods. Both methods have been shown to greatly simplify the process of calculating radionuclide inventories. However, they are not accurate when applied to magnetic fusion energy (MFF) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) experimental facilities. In the work reported here, an attempt has been made to evaluate the accuracy of the SS and ESS methods as they might be applied to typical MFE and IFE power plants. 18 refs., 6 figs.

Latkowski, J.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Sanz, J. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Vujic, J.L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

A Concept Exploration Program in Fast Ignition Inertial Fusion — Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fast Ignition (FI) approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) holds particular promise for fusion energy because the independently generated compression and ignition pulses allow ignition with less compression, resulting in (potentially) higher gain. Exploiting this concept effectively requires an understanding of the transport of electrons in prototypical geometries and at relevant densities and temperatures. Our consortium, which included General Atomics (GA), The Ohio State University (OSU), the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), University of California, Davis (UC-Davis), and Princeton University under this grant (~$850K/yr) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under a companion grant, won awards in 2000, renewed in 2005, to investigate the physics of electron injection and transport relevant to the FI concept, which is crucial to understand electron transport in integral FI targets. In the last two years we have also been preparing diagnostics and starting to extend the work to electron transport into hot targets. A complementary effort, the Advanced Concept Exploration (ACE) program for Fast Ignition, was funded starting in 2006 to integrate this understanding into ignition schemes specifically suitable for the initial fast ignition attempts on OMEGA and National Ignition Facility (NIF), and during that time these two programs have been managed as a coordinated effort. This result of our 7+ years of effort has been substantial. Utilizing collaborations to access the most capable laser facilities around the world, we have developed an understanding that was summarized in a Fusion Science & Technology 2006, Special Issue on Fast Ignition. The author lists in the 20 articles in that issue are dominated by our group (we are first authors in four of them). Our group has published, or submitted 67 articles, including 1 in Nature, 2 Nature Physics, 10 Physical Review Letters, 8 Review of Scientific Instruments, and has been invited to give numerous talks at national and international conferences (including APS-DPP, IAEA, FIW). The advent of PW capabilities – at Rutherford Appleton Lab (UK) and then at Titan (LLNL) (2005 and 2006, respectively), was a major step toward experiments in ultra-high intensity high-energy FI relevant regime. The next step comes with the activation of OMEGA EP at LLE, followed shortly by NIF-ARC at LLNL. These capabilities allow production of hot dense material for electron transport studies. In this transitional period, considerable effort has been spent in developing the necessary tools and experiments for electron transport in hot and dense plasmas. In addition, substantial new data on electron generation and transport in metallic targets has been produced and analyzed. Progress in FI detailed in §2 is related to the Concept Exploration Program (CEP) objectives; this section is a summary of the publications and presentations listed in §5. This work has benefited from the synergy with work on related Department of Energy (DOE) grants, the Fusion Science Center and the Fast Ignition Advanced Concept Exploration grant, and from our interactions with overseas colleagues, primarily at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, and the Institute for Laser Engineering in Japan.

Stephens, Richarad Burnite [General Atomics] [General Atomics; Freeman, Richard R. [The Ohio State University] [The Ohio State University; Van Woekom, L. D. [The Ohio State University] [The Ohio State University; Key, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; MacKinnon, Andrew J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Wei, Mingsheng [General Atomics] [General Atomics

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

156

Developing high brightness beams for heavy ion driven inertial fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers require large currents and bright beams. In this paper we review the two different approaches for building HIF injectors and the corresponding ion source requirements. The traditional approach uses large aperture, low current density ion sources, resulting in a very large injector system. A more recent conceptual approach merges high current density mini-beamlets into a large current beam in order to significantly reduce the size of the injector. Experiments are being prepared to demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach.

Kwan, J.W.; Ahle, L.A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Chacon-Golcher, E.; Grote, D.P.; Henestroza, E.; Leung, K.N.; Molvik, A.W.

2001-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

157

TIMELY DELIVERY OF LASER INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY (LIFE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A key goal of the NIF is to demonstrate fusion ignition for the first time in the laboratory. Its flexibility allows multiple target designs (both indirect and direct drive) to be fielded, offering substantial scope for optimization of a robust target design. In this paper we discuss an approach to generating gigawatt levels of electrical power from a laser-driven source of fusion neutrons based on these demonstration experiments. This 'LIFE' concept enables rapid time-to-market for a commercial power plant, assuming success with ignition and a technology demonstration program that links directly to a facility design and construction project. The LIFE design makes use of recent advances in diode-pumped, solid-state laser technology. It adopts the paradigm of Line Replaceable Units utilized on the NIF to provide high levels of availability and maintainability and mitigate the need for advanced materials development. A demonstration LIFE plant based on these design principles is described, along with the areas of technology development required prior to plant construction. A goal-oriented, evidence-based approach has been proposed to allow LIFE power plant rollout on a time scale that meets policy imperatives and is consistent with utility planning horizons. The system-level delivery builds from our prior national investment over many decades and makes full use of the distributed capability in laser technology, the ubiquity of semiconductor diodes, high volume manufacturing markets, and U.S. capability in fusion science and nuclear engineering. The LIFE approach is based on the ignition evidence emerging from NIF and adopts a line-replaceable unit approach to ensure high plant availability and to allow evolution from available technologies and materials. Utilization of a proven physics platform for the ignition scheme is an essential component of an acceptably low-risk solution. The degree of coupling seen on NIF between driver and target performance mandates that little deviation be adopted from the NIF geometry and beamline characteristics. Similarly, the strong coupling between subsystems in an operational power plant mandates that a self-consistent solution be established via an integrated facility delivery project. The benefits of separability of the subsystems within an IFE plant (driver, chamber, targets, etc.) emerge in the operational phase of a power plant rather than in its developmental phase. An optimized roadmap for IFE delivery needs to account for this to avoid nugatory effort and inconsistent solutions. For LIFE, a system design has been established that could lead to an operating power plant by the mid-2020s, drawing from an integrated subsystem development program to demonstrate the required technology readiness on a time scale compatible with the construction plan. Much technical development work still remains, as does alignment of key stakeholder groups to this newly emerging development option. If the required timeline is to be met, then preparation of a viable program is required alongside the demonstration of ignition on NIF. This will enable timely analysis of the technical and economic case and establishment of the appropriate delivery partnership.

Dunne, A M

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

B.C. Stratton, M. Bitter, K.W. Hill, D.L. Hillis, and J.T. Hogan

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

159

Magnetic Probe to Study Plasma Jets for Magneto-Inertial Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A probe has been constructed to measure the magnetic field of a plasma jet generated by a pulsed plasma rail-gun. The probe consists of two sets of three orthogonally-oriented commercial chip inductors to measure the three-dimensional magnetic field vector at two separate positions in order to give information about the magnetic field evolution within the jet. The strength and evolution of the magnetic field is one of many factors important in evaluating the use of supersonic plasma jets for forming imploding spherical plasma liners as a standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion.

Martens, Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hsu, Scott C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

160

Stability of shocks relating to the shock ignition inertial fusion energy scheme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Motivated by the shock ignition approach to improve the performance of inertial fusion targets, we make a series of studies of the stability of shock waves in planar and converging geometries. We examine stability of shocks moving through distorted material and driving shocks with non-uniform pressure profiles. We then apply a fully 3D perturbation, following this spherically converging shock through collapse to a distorted plane, bounce and reflection into an outgoing perturbed, broadly spherical shock wave. We find broad shock stability even under quite extreme perturbation.

Davie, C. J., E-mail: c.davie10@imperial.ac.uk; Bush, I. A.; Evans, R. G. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnetic Confinement Fusion Magnetic Confinement Fusion FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Fusion by Magnetic Confinement The image above is an artistic rendering of a tokamak, a donut-shaped magnetic vacuum chamber in which wispy vapors of fusion fuel are

162

The National Ignition Facility and the Promise of Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational. The NIF is the world's most energetic laser system capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in planetary interiors and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, the first integrated ignition experiment was conducted, demonstrating the successful coordination of the laser, cryogenic target system, array of diagnostics and infrastructure required for ignition demonstration. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and international communities are examining the implication of NIF ignition for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a laser with 10% electrical-optical efficiency, as well as further development and advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in the 10- to 15-year time frame. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Engine (LIFE) concept and examining in detail various technology choices, as well as the advantages of both pure fusion and fusion-fission schemes. This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF and the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition. The paper will conclude with a discussion about the need to build on the progress on NIF to develop an implementable and effective plan to achieve the promise of LIFE as a source of carbon-free energy.

Moses, E I

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

163

Theory of hydro-equivalent ignition for inertial fusion and its applications to OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theory of ignition for inertial confinement fusion capsules [R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] is used to assess the performance requirements for cryogenic implosion experiments on the Omega Laser Facility. The theory of hydrodynamic similarity is developed in both one and two dimensions and tested using multimode hydrodynamic simulations with the hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] of hydro-equivalent implosions (implosions with the same implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity). The theory is used to scale the performance of direct-drive OMEGA implosions to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) energy scales and determine the requirements for demonstrating hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA. Hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA is represented by a cryogenic implosion that would scale to ignition on the NIF at 1.8?MJ of laser energy symmetrically illuminating the target. It is found that a reasonable combination of neutron yield and areal density for OMEGA hydro-equivalent ignition is 3 to 6?×?10{sup 13} and ?0.3?g/cm{sup 2}, respectively, depending on the level of laser imprinting. This performance has not yet been achieved on OMEGA.

Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Christopherson, A. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and/or Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Anderson, K. S.; Shvydky, A.; Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); McCrory, R. L. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and/or Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Formation of carbon allotrope aerosol by colliding plasmas in an inertial fusion reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Along with repeated implosions, the interior of an inertial fusion target chamber is exposed to short pulses of high-energy x-ray, unburned DT-fuel particles, He-ash and pellet debris. As a result, chamber wall materials are subjected to ablation, emitting particles in the plasma state. Ablated particles will either be re-deposited elsewhere or collide with each other, perhaps in the centre-of-symmetry region of the chamber volume. Colliding ablation plasma particles can lead to the formation of clusters to grow into aerosol, possibly floating thereafter, which can deteriorate the subsequent implosion performance via laser scattering, etc. In a laboratory-scale YAG laser setup, the formation of nano-scale aerosol has been demonstrated in vacuum at irradiation power densities of the orders of 108–10 W cm?2 at 10 Hz, each 6 ns long, simulating the high-repetition rate inertial fusion reactor situation. Interestingly, carbon aerosol formation has been observed in the form of fullerene onion, nano- and micro-tubes when laser-ablated plasma plumes of carbon collide with each other. In contrast, colliding plasma plumes of metals tend to generate aerosol in the form of droplets under identical laser irradiation conditions. An atomic and molecular reaction model is proposed to interpret the process of carbon allotrope aerosol formation.

Y. Hirooka; H. Sato; K. Ishihara; T. Yabuuchi; K.A. Tanaka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Plasma-materials interactions and impurity control in magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion machines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Progress achieved in plasma heating and magnetic confinement during the past decade has brought to the fore a number of problems which have to be solved if controlled thermonuclear fusion is to become an economic...

Dieter M. Gruen; Stanislav Vep?ek; Randy B. Wright

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) (a.k.a. Magneto-Inertial Fusion)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., Atlas $50M). The low cost and size of experimental facilities should significantly reduce fusion TEMPERATURE (eV) IONDENSITY(/cm)3 1016 1014 1018 1020 1022 1024 1026 103 104 105 Facility Cost($) = 1 TEMPERATURE (eV) 104 105 Facility Cost($) B=5 MG Operation at an intermediate density leads to reduced

167

Macron Formed Liner Compression as a Practical Method for Enabling Magneto-Inertial Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. The main impediment for current nuclear fusion concepts is the complexity and large mass associated with the confinement systems. To take advantage of the smaller scale, higher density regime of magnetic fusion, an efficient method for achieving the compressional heating required to reach fusion gain conditions must be found. The very compact, high energy density plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) provides for an ideal target for this purpose. To make fusion with the FRC practical, an efficient method for repetitively compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. A novel approach to be explored in this endeavor is to remotely launch a converging array of small macro-particles (macrons) that merge and form a more massive liner inside the reactor which then radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target FRC plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining liner significantly lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. With the momentum flux being delivered by an assemblage of low mass, but high velocity macrons, many of the difficulties encountered with the liner implosion power technology are eliminated. The undertaking to be described in this proposal is to evaluate the feasibility achieving fusion conditions from this simple and low cost approach to fusion. During phase I the design and testing of the key components for the creation of the macron formed liner have been successfully carried out. Detailed numerical calculations of the merging, formation and radial implosion of the Macron Formed Liner (MFL) were also performed. The phase II effort will focus on an experimental demonstration of the macron launcher at full power, and the demonstration of megagauss magnetic field compression by a small array of full scale macrons. In addition the physics of the compression of an FRC to fusion conditions will be undertaken with a smaller scale MFL. The timescale for testing will be rapidly accelerated by taking advantage of other facilities at MSNW where the target FRC will be created and translated inside the MFL just prior to implosion of the MFL. Experimental success would establish the concept at the �proof of principle� level and the following phase III effort would focus on the full development of the concept into a fusion gain device. Successful operation would lead to several benefits in various fields. It would have application to high energy density physics, as well as nuclear waste transmutation and alternate fission fuel cycles. The smaller scale device could find immediate application as an intense source of neutrons for diagnostic imaging and non-invasive object interrogation.

Slough, John

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

168

Direct Drive Heavy-Ion-Beam Inertial Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Issues with coupling efficiency, beam illumination symmetry and Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability are discussed for spherical heavy-ion-beam-driven targets with and without hohlraums. Efficient coupling of heavy ion beams to compress direct-drive inertial fusion targets without hohlraums is found to require ion range increasing several-fold during the drive pulse. One-dimensional implosion calculations using the LASNEX ICF target physics code shows the ion range increasing four-fold during the drive pulse to keep ion energy deposition following closely behind the imploding ablation front, resulting in high coupling efficiencies (shell kinetic energy/incident beam energy of 16 to 18%). Ways to increase beam ion range while mitigating Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are discussed for future work.

Logan, B. Grant; Logan, B. Grant; Perkins, L.J.; Barnard, J.J.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

169

Annular Vortex Generation for Inertial Fusion Energy Beam-Line Protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of swirling annular vortex flow inside beam entrance tubes can protect beam-line structural materials in chambers for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (IFE) applications. An annular wall jet, or vortex tube, is generated by injecting liquid tangent to the inner surface of a tube wall with both axially and azimuthally directed velocity components. A layer of liquid then lines the beam tube wall, which may improve the effectiveness of neutron shielding, and condenses and removes vaporized coolant that may enter the beam tubes. Vortex tubes have been constructed and tested with a thickness of three-tenths the pipe radius. Analysis of the flow is given, along with experimental examples of vortex tube fluid mechanics and an estimate of the layer thickness, based on simple mass conservation considerations.

Pemberton, Steven J.; Abbott, Ryan P.; Peterson, Per F. [University of California (United States)

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Atomic Collision Processes in Magnetic Confinement Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This NATO Advanced Study Institute is concerned with atomic and molecular processes in controlled thermonuclear fusion research. Most of our attention will be ... and planned tokamaks, since this approach to fusion

M. R. C. McDowell

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Inertial fusion energy issues of intense heavy ion and laser beams interacting with ionized matter studied at GSI-Darmstadt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

European activities on inertial fusion energy are coordinated by “keep in touch activities” of the European Fusion Programme coordinated by the European Commission. There is no general inertial fusion program in Europe. Instead, a number of activities relevant to inertial fusion are carried out by university groups and research centers. The Helmholtz-Research Center GSI-Darmstadt (Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung) operates accelerator facilities which provide the highest intensity for heavy ion beams and therefore key issues of ion beam driven fusion can be addressed. In addition to the accelerator facilities, one high-energy laser system is available (nhelix: nanosecond high-energy laser for ion experiments) and another one is under construction (PHELIX: petawatt high-energy laser for ion experiments). The heavy ion synchrotron facility, SIS18 (Schwer-Ionen-Synchrotron 18) recently delivered an intense uranium beam that deposits about 1 kJ/g specific energy in solid matter. Using this beam, experiments have been performed where solid Pb- and Ta-targets have been heated to the level of 1 eV. Experiments to study interaction mechanism of heavy ion beams with matter have been continued and are reported here.

D.H.H. Hoffmann; A. Blazevic; S. Korostiy; P. Ni; S.A. Pikuz; B. Rethfeld; O. Rosmej; M. Roth; N.A. Tahir; S. Udrea; D. Varentsov; K. Weyrich; B.Yu. Sharkov; Y. Maron

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Initial Confinement Studies of Ohmically Heated Plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Initial operation of the tokamak fusion test reactor has concentrated upon confinement studies of Ohmically heated hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Total energy confinement times (?E) are 0.1-0.2 s for a line-average density range (nŻe) of (1-2.5)×1019 m-3 with electron temperatures of Te(0)?1.2-2.2 keV, ion temperatures of Ti(0)?0.9-1.5 keV, and Zeff?3. A comparison of Princeton large torus, poloidal divertor experiment, and tokamak fusion test reactor plasma confinement supports a dimension-cubed scaling law.

P. C. Efthimion et al.

1984-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

173

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Achieving Fusion Conditions Achieving Fusion Conditions CPEP: Online Fusion Course Main Topics Energy Sources and Conversions Two Key Fusion Reactions How Fusion Reactions Work Creating the Conditions for Fusion Plasmas - the 4th State of Matter Achieving Fusion Conditions More Info About CPEP Fusion Chart Images: English + 6 More Languages Main CPEP Web Site Printed Charts in 3 Sizes Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Achieving Fusion Conditions EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS IN FUSION RESEARCH Both inertial and magnetic confinement fusion research have focused on understanding plasma confinement and heating. This research has led to increases in plasma temperature, T, density, n, and energy confinement

174

Plasma–wall interaction in laser inertial fusion reactors: novel proposals for radiation tests of first wall materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry-wall laser inertial fusion (LIF) chambers will have to withstand strong bursts of fast charged particles which will deposit tens of kJ m?2 and implant more than 1018 particles m?2 in a few microseconds at a repetition rate of some Hz. Large chamber dimensions and resistant plasma-facing materials must be combined to guarantee the chamber performance as long as possible under the expected threats: heating, fatigue, cracking, formation of defects, retention of light species, swelling and erosion. Current and novel radiation resistant materials for the first wall need to be validated under realistic conditions. However, at present there is a lack of facilities which can reproduce such ion environments.This contribution proposes the use of ultra-intense lasers and high-intense pulsed ion beams (HIPIB) to recreate the plasma conditions in LIF reactors. By target normal sheath acceleration, ultra-intense lasers can generate very short and energetic ion pulses with a spectral distribution similar to that of the inertial fusion ion bursts, suitable to validate fusion materials and to investigate the barely known propagation of those bursts through background plasmas/gases present in the reactor chamber. HIPIB technologies, initially developed for inertial fusion driver systems, provide huge intensity pulses which meet the irradiation conditions expected in the first wall of LIF chambers and thus can be used for the validation of materials too.

J Alvarez Ruiz; A Rivera; K Mima; D Garoz; R Gonzalez-Arrabal; N Gordillo; J Fuchs; K Tanaka; I Fernández; F Briones; J Perlado

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Military in clash over US nuclear fusion research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the appropriate strategy for pursuing one of the most promising paths towards a commercially-viable nuclear fusion energy programme - namely the use of inertial confinement techniques, which would harness the ...

1979-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

176

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to researchers around the world. The paper will conclude with a discussion of LIFE, its development path and potential to enable a carbon-free clean energy future.

Moses, E

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

177

Studies of fast electron transport in the problems of inertial fusion energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the existing natural fusion reactors, stars, the gravityto the construction of the fusion reactor. In the magneticwould be for real fusion reactor conditions. The analysis of

Frolov, Boris K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Drift compression and final focus systems for heavy ion inertial fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heavy ion beam driven fusion reactor study. Technical Reportheavy ion beam driven fusion reactor study. Technical Reportion beams of a pellet fusion reactor by quadrupole doublets.

de Hoon, M.J.L.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The roadmap to magnetic confinement fusion Cutaway of the ITER tokamak. ( ITER)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The roadmap to magnetic confinement fusion Cutaway of the ITER tokamak. (© ITER) There are two ways "tokamak" configuration invented by Tamm and Sakharov in 1950 and declassified in 1957 [1] . Over 198 tokamaks have been built [2] . Four large tokamak projects were built in the 1980s. Two of these

Hampshire, Damian

180

Bifurcation theory for the L-H transition in magnetically confined fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mathematical field of bifurcation theory is extended to be applicable to 1-dimensionally resolved systems of nonlinear partial differential equations, aimed at the determination of a certain specific bifurcation. This extension is needed to be able to properly analyze the bifurcations of the radial transport in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. This is of special interest when describing the transition from the low-energy-confinement state to the high-energy-confinement state of the radial transport in fusion plasmas (i.e., the L-H transition), because the nonlinear dynamical behavior during the transition corresponds to the dynamical behavior of a system containing such a specific bifurcation. This bifurcation determines how the three types (sharp, smooth, and oscillating) of observed L-H transitions are organized as function of all the parameters contained in the model.

Weymiens, W.; Blank, H. J. de; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Valenca, J. C. de [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Adjoint-Based Implicit Uncertainty Analysis for Figures of Merit in a Laser Inertial Fusion Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A primary purpose of computational models is to inform design decisions and, in order to make those decisions reliably, the confidence in the results of such models must be estimated. Monte Carlo neutron transport models are common tools for reactor designers. These types of models contain several sources of uncertainty that propagate onto the model predictions. Two uncertainties worthy of note are (1) experimental and evaluation uncertainties of nuclear data that inform all neutron transport models and (2) statistical counting precision, which all results of a Monte Carlo codes contain. Adjoint-based implicit uncertainty analyses allow for the consideration of any number of uncertain input quantities and their effects upon the confidence of figures of merit with only a handful of forward and adjoint transport calculations. When considering a rich set of uncertain inputs, adjoint-based methods remain hundreds of times more computationally efficient than Direct Monte-Carlo methods. The LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) engine is a concept being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Various options exist for the LIFE blanket, depending on the mission of the design. The depleted uranium hybrid LIFE blanket design strives to close the fission fuel cycle without enrichment or reprocessing, while simultaneously achieving high discharge burnups with reduced proliferation concerns. Neutron transport results that are central to the operation of the design are tritium production for fusion fuel, fission of fissile isotopes for energy multiplication, and production of fissile isotopes for sustained power. In previous work, explicit cross-sectional uncertainty analyses were performed for reaction rates related to the figures of merit for the depleted uranium hybrid LIFE blanket. Counting precision was also quantified for both the figures of merit themselves and the cross-sectional uncertainty estimates to gauge the validity of the analysis. All cross-sectional uncertainties were small (0.1-0.8%), bounded counting uncertainties, and were precise with regard to counting precision. Adjoint/importance distributions were generated for the same reaction rates. The current work leverages those adjoint distributions to transition from explicit sensitivities, in which the neutron flux is constrained, to implicit sensitivities, in which the neutron flux responds to input perturbations. This treatment vastly expands the set of data that contribute to uncertainties to produce larger, more physically accurate uncertainty estimates.

Seifried, J E; Fratoni, M; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Peterson, P F; Powers, J J; Taylor, J M

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

182

Gas Transport and Control in Thick-Liquid Inertial Fusion Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advanced protection concept for NIF. Fusion Technology, 30(near-target experiments in NIF. Fusion Technology, 34(3):vered ?rst-wall systems for NIF. Fusion Technology, 34(3):

Debonnel, Christophe Sylvain

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

High Current Ion Sources and Injectors for Heavy Ion Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion; Fusion Engineering and Design,Ion Inertial Fusion, Princeton, New Jersey, Sept. 6-9, 1995; in Fusion EngineeringIon Inertial Fusion, Princeton, New Jersey, Sept. 6-9, 1995; in Fusion Engineering

Kwan, Joe W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to establish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated in the plasma.

Fisch, Nathaniel J. (Cambridge, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to estalish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated inthe plasma.

Bers, Abraham (Arlington, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Vlasov simulations of kinetic enhancement of Raman backscatter in laser fusion plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is studied in plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell code ELVIS was developed and run for this purpose. Plasma waves are heavily Landau damped ...

Strozzi, D. J. (David J.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FAQ FAQ FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Fusion Research An updated, searchable Fusion FAQ is being prepared. In the meantime, the incomplete public-domain Fusion FAQ from 1994-1995 is still available

188

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Example of NIF fusion target hohlraum with multiple beamsimilar to those used on NIF. . . . . Overview of LFFHNES Nuclear Energy System NIF National Ignition Facility ODS

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, January--March 1993. Volume 3, No. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: High Fluence Third Harmonic Generation; Ultraviolet Induced Transient Absorption in KDP and Its Influence on Fourth Harmonic Frequency Conversion; Relativistic Semiclassical Atomic Transition Rates; Verification of OPAL Opacity Code Predictions for Conditions of Astrophysical Interest; Solid Hydrogen Surfaces; Large Aperture Sol-Gel Random Phase Plates for Beam Smoothing on Nova; and Neutron Time-of-Flight Ion Temperature Diagnostic for Nova.

Amendt, P.A. [ed.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The areal density ({rho}R) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative {rho}R measurements and 1-D simulations.

Forrest, C. J.; Radha, P. B.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Casey, D. T.; Gatu-Johnson, M. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Gardner, S. [Constellation Energy Nuclear Group, Ontario, New York 14519 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Spectrometry of charged particles from inertial-confinement-fusion F. H. Seguin,a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capsules with D2 , D3 He, DT, or DTH fuel in a shell of plastic, glass, or D2 ice, we now routinely make to neutrons, these reactions produce charged particles whose numbers and energy spectra are di- rectly related

192

Experimental development of nuclear pumped laser candidate inertial confinement fusion driver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report is submitted at the end of the first year of a 3-year project grant studying development of a nuclear pumped atomic iodine laser. The first section of the report will provide background on the study and briefly describe the original plans for the 3-year project. The second section will detail the work done to date. Included will be a description of the preparations made for experimentation, as well as some preliminary results recently obtained. Plans for the upcoming budget year are covered in the accompanying proposal, Project Plans for 1989--1990.''

Miley, G.H.

1989-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

D-T gamma-to-neutron branching ratio determined from inertial confinement fusion plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. M. Mack, H. W. Herrmann, C. S. Young, G. M. Hale et al. Citation: Phys. Plasmas 19, 056313 (2012) High-current discharge channel contraction in high density gas Phys. Plasmas 18, 122702 (2011,1,b) J. M. Mack,1 H. W. Herrmann,1 C. S. Young,1 G. M. Hale,1 S. Caldwell,1 N. M. Hoffman,1 S. C

194

THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEAVY-ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIALLY CONFINED FUSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1978 ]) e E HO- HIGH THERMONUCLEAR ENERGY GAINS HJT.H A. LQNfive "boilers'*, in which the thermonuclear pellet has been

Herrmannsfeldt, W.b.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Tutorial on the Physics of Inertial Confinement Fusion for energy applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermal input nuclear output Physics E E QQ == The Physics or Thermonuclear Q The Physics Q determines plasma common definition of "burning plasmas" The Physics or Thermonuclear Q #12;The Target Gain "G) Dense shell Useful kinetic energy #12;Ignition takes place in the "hot spot." The thermonuclear

196

THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEAVY-ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIALLY CONFINED FUSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEAVY ION ACCELERATORS Principal Components . . . . .Ion Sources Pre-accelerators Low-beta Accelerators Sain Accelerators Rf Linacs . . .

Herrmannsfeldt, W.b.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Electro-optical deflectors as a method of beam smoothing for Inertial Confinement Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electro-optic deflector is analyzed and compared to smoothing by spectral dispersion for efficacy as a beam smoothing method for ICF. It is found that the electro-optic deflector is inherently somewhat less efficient when compared either on the basis of equal peak phase modulation or equal generated bandwidth.

Rothenberg, J.E.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

NNSA Defense Programs Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management & ES&H Support Director Michael A. Thompson NA-117 Office of Pit Projects Director Dr. Jerry M Burn Im plosion Burn/Explosion Radiation Flow Im plosion Authority to Use SSP Programs & Facilities Provide Necessary Research Capabilities Effects Boosted Burn A rm ing,Fuzing,Firing H E D etonation

199

Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matter studies and inertial confinement fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1987. [20] CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. 1964. [21]23] CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 86th edition.

Armijo, Julien

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shock-driven implosions of thin-shell capsules, or “exploding pushers,” generate low-density, high-temperature plasmas in which hydrodynamic instability growth is negligible and kinetic effects can play an important role. Data from implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells with hydroequivalent D{sup 3}He gas fills ranging from pure deuterium to pure {sup 3}He [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 135001 (2014)] were obtained to evaluate non-hydrodynamic fuel-shell mix mechanisms. Simulations of the experiments including reduced ion kinetic models support ion diffusion as an explanation for these data. Several additional kinetic mechanisms are investigated and compared to the data to determine which are important in the experiments. Shock acceleration of shell deuterons is estimated to introduce mix less than or comparable to the amount required to explain the data. Beam-target mechanisms are found to produce yields at most an order of magnitude less than the observations.

Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hoffman, N.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Betti, R.; Yu Glebov, V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Bellei, C.; Amendt, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Diagnosing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF Using novel neutron spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel neutron spectrometer, called the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS), was designed, built, and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the neutron spectra from ...

Casey, Daniel Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Measurement on the National Ignition Facility Advance the Science of Inertial Confinement Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a 1.8 MJ, 192 beam laser designed to produce the conditions of temperature and density in compressed...

Kilkenny, Joe

203

(Experimental development, testing and research work in support of the inertial confinement fusion program)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses: Cryogenic technology; polymer shell fabrication; glass shell fabrication and characterization; coating technology; development of characterization techniques; laser technology; and plasma research and instrumentation.

Drake, D.J.; Luckhardt, R.; Moyer, S.; Armentrout, C.J.; Downs, R.L.; Moncur, K. (eds.)

1990-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

204

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 39, NO. 4, APRIL 2011 1007 Inertial Confinement Fusion Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the OMEGA Laser System P. B. Radha, R. Betti, T. R. Boehly, J. A. Delettrez, D. H. Edgell, V. N. Frenje, D. T. Casey, C. K. Li, and R. D. Petrasso Abstract--The OMEGA laser system is being used) ignition, fast ignition (FI), and shock ignition (SI). To achieve ignition, CHS requires the highly uniform

205

THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEAVY-ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIALLY CONFINED FUSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

construction, the equivalent of EDIA, in­ cluding specialof construction cost (direct plus EDIA and contingency), forcan be found from; EDIA; 24% of direct construction cost,

Herrmannsfeldt, W.b.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Dipole Fusion Confinement Concept: A White Paper for the Fusion Community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Bromberg MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center Cambridge, MA 02139 M. Mauel and D. Garnier Department Angeles, CA 90024 April 6, 1998 1 Introduction The dipole magnetic field is the simplest and most common magnetic field configuration in the universe. It is the magnetic far-field of a single, circular current

207

Recycling issues facing target and RTL materials of inertial fusion designs L. El-Guebaly, P. Wilson, M. Sawan, D. Henderson, A. Varuttamaseni,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Recycling issues facing target and RTL materials of inertial fusion designs L. El-Guebaly, P power plants have explored the potential of recycling the target and recyclable transmission line (RTL a comprehensive recycling assessment was performed on both machines with an exact pulse history. Our results offer

208

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Our Sun Our Sun FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement The Sun Runs on Fusion Energy How the sun looks through x-ray eyes! Like all stars, the sun is a huge fusion reactor, pumping out 100 million times as much energy in a single second as the entire population of Earth

209

Ignition on the National Ignition Facility: A Path Towards Inertial Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Arial 18 pt bold Name here Title or division here Date 00, 2008 LLNL-PRES-407907 #12;NIF-1208-15666.ppt Moses_Fusion Power Associates, 12/03/08 2 Two major possibilities for fusion energy #12;NIF-1208-15666.ppt Moses_Fusion Power Associates, 12/03/08 3 The NIF is nearing completion and will be conducting

210

Monochromatic x-ray radiography for areal-density measurement of inertial fusion energy fuel in fast ignition experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrafast, two-dimensional x-ray imaging is an important diagnostics for the inertial fusion energy research, especially in investigating implosion dynamics at the final stage of the fuel compression. Although x-ray radiography was applied to observing the implosion dynamics, intense x-rays emitted from the high temperature and dense fuel core itself are often superimposed on the radiograph. This problem can be solved by coupling the x-ray radiography with monochromatic x-ray imaging technique. In the experiment, 2.8 or 5.2 keV backlight x-rays emitted from laser-irradiated polyvinyl chloride or vanadium foils were selectively imaged by spherically bent quartz crystals with discriminating the out-of-band emission from the fuel core. This x-ray radiography system achieved 24 {mu}m and 100 ps of spatial and temporal resolutions, respectively.

Fujioka, Shinsuke; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tanabe, Minoru; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Ohira, Shinji; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Inubushi, Yuichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

Hamilton, G.W.

1981-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

212

Direct drive heavy-ion-beam inertial fusion at high coupling efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M J of fusion yield. This NIF capsule design ab- sorbs 200capsules the size of the NIF capsule with heavy-ion beams (designs emerge, and, if the NIF's ignition campaign is also

Logan, B.G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Direct Drive Heavy-Ion-Beam Inertial Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of fusion yield [16]. This NIF capsule design absorbs 200 kJcapsules the size of the NIF capsule with heavy ion beams (designs emerge, and, i f the NIF's ignition campaign is also

Logan, B. Grant

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Studies of fast electron transport in the problems of inertial fusion energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1-3] is Fast Ignition, in which the set of lasers is used tothe original laser fusion design, called Fast Ignition, lookignition pulse to the compressed target core. If a powerful laser

Frolov, Boris K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Glossary Glossary FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement The Glossary of Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Research Browse | Search | Submit an Entry Introduction, Sources and Contributors This Glossary seeks to provide plain-language definitions of over 3600

216

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home> Student and Teacher Resources > For Introductory Students Home> Student and Teacher Resources > For Introductory Students FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Guide to Fusion Education Resources for Introductory Physics Students This is a compilation of online and offline education resources for

217

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About Us About Us FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Webby Honoree graphic graphic Key Resource Snap editors choice new scientist DrMatrix Webby Awards Honoree, April 10, 2007 The Alchemist - WebPick, January 29, 1999 Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 October 19, 1998 - October 19, 1999 Site of the Day, September 24, 1998. Hot spot. Student Science Resource, April 16, 1997

218

The impact of pulsed irradiation upon neutron activation calculations for inertial and magnetic fusion energy power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inertial fusion energy (IFE) and magnetic fusion energy (MFE) power plants will probably operate in a pulsed mode. The two different schemes, however, will have quite different time periods. Typical repetition rates for IFE power plants will be 1-5 Hz. MFE power plants will ramp up in current for about 1 hour, shut down for several minutes, and repeat the process. Traditionally, activation calculations for IFE and MFE power plants have assumed continuous operation and used either the ``steady state`` (SS) or ``equivalent steady state`` (ESS) approximations. It has been suggested recently that the SS and ESS methods may not yield accurate results for all radionuclides of interest. The present work expands that of Sisolak, et al. by applying their formulae to conditions which might be experienced in typical IFE and MFE power plants. In addition, complicated, multi-step reaction/decay chains are analyzed using an upgraded version of the ACAB radionuclide generation/depletion code. Our results indicate that the SS method is suitable for application to MFE power plant conditions. We also find that the ESS method generates acceptable results for radionuclides with half-lives more than a factor of three greater than the time between pulses. For components that are subject to 0.05 Hz (or more frequent) irradiation (such as coolant), use of the ESS method is recommended. For components or materials that are subject to less frequent irradiation (such as high-Z target materials), pulsed irradiation calculations should be used.

Latkowski, J.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Sanz, J. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Vujic, J.L. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

1996-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

219

Chamber wall response to target implosion in inertial fusion reactors: new and critical assessments,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, A. Hassanein 1, V. Morozov Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA. The mass loss in the form Presented at the Sixth International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology by the University of Chicago as Operator of Argonne National Laboratory (`Argonne') under Contract No. W-31-109-ENG

Harilal, S. S.

220

Accelerator development for heavy ion fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerator technology development is presented for heavy ion drivers used in inertial confinement fusion. The program includes construction of low-velocity ''test bed'' accelerator facilities, development of analytical and experimental techniques to characterize ion beam behavior, and the study of ion beam energy deposition.

Talbert, W.L. Jr.; Sawyer, G.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fusion Power Associates 34th Annual Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Inertial Confinement Fusion R. Betti and D. D. Meyerhofer Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Physics us to do that? Betti et al Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010) Chang et al, Phys. Rev. Lett 104, 135002 (2010) Zhou-Betti, Phys. Plasmas 15, 102707 (2008) Can't do it Can't do it #12;Increasing the IFAR

222

Integrated process modeling for the laser inertial fusion Energy (LIFE) generation system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concept for a new fusion-fission hybrid technology is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The primary application of this technology is base-load electrical power generation. However, variants of the baseline technology can be used to 'burn' spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors or to perform selective transmutation of problematic fission products. The use of a fusion driver allows very high burn-up of the fission fuel, limited only by the radiation resistance of the fuel form and system structures. As a part of this process, integrated process models have been developed to aid in concept definition. Several models have been developed. A cost scaling model allows quick assessment of design changes or technology improvements on cost of electricity. System design models are being used to better understand system interactions and to do design trade-off and optimization studies. Here we describe the different systems models and present systems analysis results. Different market entry strategies are discussed along with potential benefits to US energy security and nuclear waste disposal. Advanced technology options are evaluated and potential benefits from additional R&D targeted at the different options is quantified.

Meier, W R; Anklam, T M; Erlandson, A C; Miles, R R; Simon, A J; Sawicki, R; Storm, E

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

223

MIT Plasma Fusion Sciences Center IAP Seminar! Jan 10th, 2012!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIT Plasma Fusion Sciences Center IAP Seminar! Jan 10th, 2012! ! ! ! ! ! Otto Landen! Associate-07NA27344 Inertial Confinement Fusion Physics and Challenges*! #12;The NIF ignition experiments-degenerate fuel Spherical collapse of the shell produces a central hot spot surrounded by cold, dense main fuel

224

IEEE thirteenth symposium on fusion engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains papers of the following topics on fusion engineering: magnet engineering; blanket engineering; electric power control; plasma engineering; vacuum systems and vessels; diagnostic systems; controls, instrumentation, and data acquisition; heating and current drive; next generation devices; health and safety; magnet materials and insulation; quality assurance and reliability; electrical generators; divertors and plasma-facing components; power systems; tritium; and inertial confinement fusion. These papers have been procedure and cataloged separately. (LSP)

Lubell, M.S.; Nestor, M.B.; Vaughan, S.F. (eds.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

IEEE thirteenth symposium on fusion engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains papers of the following topics on fusion engineering: magnetic engineering; blanket engineering; plasma engineering; vacuum systems and vessels; controls, instrumentation, and data acquisition; heating and current drive; health and safety; magnet materials and insulation; quality assurance and reliability; electrical generators; divertors and plasma-facing components; power systems; tritium; inertial confinement fusion; plasma fueling; cryogenics; commercial reactors; shielding; and design and performance. (LSP)

Lubell, M.S.; Nestor, M.B.; Vaughan, S.F. (eds.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Three dimensional simulations of space charge dominated heavy ion beams with applications to inertial fusion energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy ion fusion requires injection, transport and acceleration of high current beams. Detailed simulation of such beams requires fully self-consistent space charge fields and three dimensions. WARP3D, developed for this purpose, is a particle-in-cell plasma simulation code optimized to work within the framework of an accelerator`s lattice of accelerating, focusing, and bending elements. The code has been used to study several test problems and for simulations and design of experiments. Two applications are drift compression experiments on the MBE-4 facility at LBL and design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector for the proposed ILSE facility. With aggressive drift compression on MBE-4, anomalous emittance growth was observed. Simulations carried out to examine possible causes showed that essentially all the emittance growth is result of external forces on the beam and not of internal beam space-charge fields. Dominant external forces are the dodecapole component of focusing fields, the image forces on the surrounding pipe and conductors, and the octopole fields that result from the structure of the quadrupole focusing elements. Goal of the design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector is to produce a beam of as low emittance as possible. The simulations show that the dominant effects that increase the emittance are the nonlinear octopole fields and the energy effect (fields in the axial direction that are off-axis). Injectors were designed that minimized the beam envelope in order to reduce the effect of the nonlinear fields. Alterations to the quadrupole structure that reduce the nonlinear fields further were examined. Comparisons were done with a scaled experiment resulted in very good agreement.

Grote, D.P.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Evidence for a new path to the self-sustainment of thermonuclear fusion in magnetically confined plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we provide the first explanation for observations made in 1997 on the Joint European Torus of unexpected ion heating with fusion-born alpha particles occurring over time scales much shorter than those theoretically foreseen. We demonstrate that non-thermal alpha particles above a critical concentration stabilize ion-drift-wave turbulence, therefore significantly reducing one of the main energy loss channels for thermal ions. As such ion heating occurs over times scales much shorter than those classically predicted, this mechanism opens new prospects on additional paths for the self-sustainment of thermonuclear fusion reactions in magnetically confined plasmas.

D. Testa; M. Albergante

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

American Fusion News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

American Fusion News American Fusion News General Atomics (GA) December 4, 2012 The Scorpion's Strategy: "Catch and Subdue" December 4, 2012 Frozen Bullets Tame Unruly Edge Plasmas in Fusion Experiment February 15, 2012 General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding Plasma Confinement See All Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) April 5, 2013 Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science February 22, 2013 A Tour of Plasma Physics in Downtown Cambridge December 4, 2012 Placing Fusion Power on a Pedestal September 21, 2012 MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTUE OF TECHNOLOGY See All National Ignition Facility February 22, 2013 Summary of Assessment of Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy February 16, 2012 National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression Smashes

229

Fusion-A Potential Power Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fusion-A Potential Power Source ... Nuclear energy, fusion reactions, magnetic confinement, and tokamaks. ...

Torkil H. Jensen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Performance test of personal RF monitor for area monitoring at magnetic confinement fusion facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......fusion test facilities. INTRODUCTION For the realisation of a nuclear fusion reactor, high-temperature, high-density plasma must...range Up to 1 GHz Impedance 50 omega10 % Maximum allowable input power 200 W Uniformity of electric field distribution 4 dB......

Masahiro Tanaka; Tatsuhiko Uda; Jianqing Wang; Osamu Fujiwara

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fusion utility in the Knudsen layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In inertial confinement fusion, the loss of fast ions from the edge of the fusing hot-spot region reduces the reactivity below its Maxwellian value. The loss of fast ions may be pronounced because of the long mean free paths of fast ions, compared with those of thermal ions. We introduce a fusion utility function to demonstrate essential features of this Knudsen layer effect, in both magnetized and unmagnetized cases. The fusion utility concept is also used to evaluate the restoring reactivity in the Knudsen layer by manipulating fast ions in phase space using waves.

Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear burn in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets under compressed axial magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that explore the impact of highly compressed imposed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of perturbed spherical implosions of ignition-scale cryogenic capsules. Using perturbations that highly convolute the cold fuel boundary of the hotspot and prevent ignition without applied fields, we impose initial axial seed fields of 20–100 T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 4 × 10{sup 4} T (400 MG) under implosion, thereby relaxing hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ?50%. The compressed field is high enough to suppress transverse electron heat conduction, and to allow alphas to couple energy into the hotspot even when highly deformed by large low-mode amplitudes. This might permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities.

Perkins, L. J.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Werner, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Experimental development of nuclear pumped laser candidate inertial confinement fusion driver. Technical progress report, Phase 1, 1988--1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report is submitted at the end of the first year of a 3-year project grant studying development of a nuclear pumped atomic iodine laser. The first section of the report will provide background on the study and briefly describe the original plans for the 3-year project. The second section will detail the work done to date. Included will be a description of the preparations made for experimentation, as well as some preliminary results recently obtained. Plans for the upcoming budget year are covered in the accompanying proposal, ``Project Plans for 1989--1990.``

Miley, G.H.

1989-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Performance metrics for Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions: aspects of the technical framework for measuring progress in the National Ignition Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) uses non-igniting 'THD' capsules to study and optimize the hydrodynamic assembly of the fuel without burn. These capsules are designed to simultaneously reduce DT neutron yield and to maintain hydrodynamic similarity with the DT ignition capsule. We will discuss nominal THD performance and the associated experimental observables. We will show the results of large ensembles of numerical simulations of THD and DT implosions and their simulated diagnostic outputs. These simulations cover a broad range of both nominal and off nominal implosions. We will focus on the development of an experimental implosion performance metric called the experimental ignition threshold factor (ITFX). We will discuss the relationship between ITFX and other integrated performance metrics, including the ignition threshold factor (ITF), the generalized Lawson criterion (GLC), and the hot spot pressure (HSP). We will then consider the experimental results of the recent NIC THD campaign. We will show that we can observe the key quantities for producing a measured ITFX and for inferring the other performance metrics. We will discuss trends in the experimental data, improvement in ITFX, and briefly the upcoming tuning campaign aimed at taking the next steps in performance improvement on the path to ignition on NIF.

Spears, B K; Glenzer, S; Edwards, M J; Brandon, S; Clark, D; Town, R; Cerjan, C; Dylla-Spears, R; Mapoles, E; Munro, D; Salmonson, J; Sepke, S; Weber, S; Hatchett, S; Haan, S; Springer, P; Moses, E; Mapoles, E; Munro, D; Salmonson, J; Sepke, S

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

235

An important challenge in magnetic fusion research is to obtain high energy confinement in a stationary plasma that will be co  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ways to reduce your tokamak heating bill: Gaining control of edge transport Ways to reduce your tokamak heating bill: Gaining control of edge transport barriers on Alcator C-Mod A crucial challenge in magnetic fusion is to obtain high energy confinement in a stationary plasma that is compatible with the engineering requirements of a fusion reactor. The triggering of edge transport barriers at the boundary of confined plasma is a common approach to obtaining high energy confinement, in a regime known as H-mode, which extrapolates to high performance in ITER and other burning plasma devices. However, barriers to energy transport can sometimes be self-defeating, since they also provide a strong barrier to particle transport. This can lead to enhanced confinement of impurities in the plasma core, excessive radiated power and deterioration of performance for a given

236

Condensed hydrogen for thermonuclear fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power, in either pure fusion or fission-fusion hybrid reactors, is a possible solution for future world's energy demands. Formation of uniform layers of a condensed hydrogen fuel in ICF targets has been a long standing materials physics challenge. Here, we review the progress in this field. After a brief discussion of the major ICF target designs and the basic properties of condensed hydrogens, we review both liquid and solid layering methods, physical mechanisms causing layer nonuniformity, growth of hydrogen single crystals, attempts to prepare amorphous and nanostructured hydrogens, and mechanical deformation behavior. Emphasis is given to current challenges defining future research areas in the field of condensed hydrogens for fusion energy applications.

Kucheyev, S. O.; Hamza, A. V. [Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Modeling of a confinement bypass accident with CONSEN, a fast-running code for safety analyses in fusion reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The CONSEN (CONServation of ENergy) code is a fast running code to simulate thermal-hydraulic transients, specifically developed for fusion reactors. In order to demonstrate CONSEN capabilities, the paper deals with the accident analysis of the magnet induced confinement bypass for ITER design 1996. During a plasma pulse, a poloidal field magnet experiences an over-voltage condition or an electrical insulation fault that results in two intense electrical arcs. It is assumed that this event produces two one square meters ruptures, resulting in a pathway that connects the interior of the vacuum vessel to the cryostat air space room. The rupture results also in a break of a single cooling channel within the wall of the vacuum vessel and a breach of the magnet cooling line, causing the blow down of a steam/water mixture in the vacuum vessel and in the cryostat and the release of 4 K helium into the cryostat. In the meantime, all the magnet coils are discharged through the magnet protection system actuation. This postulated event creates the simultaneous failure of two radioactive confinement barrier and it envelopes all type of smaller \\{LOCAs\\} into the cryostat. Ice formation on the cryogenic walls is also involved. The accident has been simulated with the CONSEN code up to 32 h. The accident evolution and the phenomena involved are discussed in the paper and the results are compared with available results obtained using the MELCOR code.

Gianfranco Caruso; Fabio Giannetti; Maria Teresa Porfiri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Low radioactive and hybrid fusion – A path to clean energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Aneutronic/low radioactive fuel is the way to clean and cheap energy of the future. An alternative scheme using compact toroids – field-reversed configuration or spheromak – may be applied for the reactor based on any magnetic confinement system. Even more, any fusion concept, including hybrid magneto-inertial fusion might use advantages of D–3He fuel. Advanced fuel, including helium-3 – based fusion plasma and alternative systems are reviewed. Different schemes of reactors, near-term technology and non-electric applications are discussed.

Sergei V. Ryzhkov

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Nuclear Fusion Award  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Nuclear Fusion Award ceremony for 2009 and 2010 award winners was held during the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon. This time, both 2009 and 2010 award winners were celebrated by the IAEA and the participants of the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. The Nuclear Fusion Award is a paper prize to acknowledge the best distinguished paper among the published papers in a particular volume of the Nuclear Fusion journal. Among the top-cited and highly-recommended papers chosen by the Editorial Board, excluding overview and review papers, and by analyzing self-citation and non-self-citation with an emphasis on non-self-citation, the Editorial Board confidentially selects ten distinguished papers as nominees for the Nuclear Fusion Award. Certificates are given to the leading authors of the Nuclear Fusion Award nominees. The final winner is selected among the ten nominees by the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Board voting confidentially. 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award nominees For the 2009 award, the papers published in the 2006 volume were assessed and the following papers were nominated, most of which are magnetic confinement experiments, theory and modeling, while one addresses inertial confinement. Sabbagh S.A. et al 2006 Resistive wall stabilized operation in rotating high beta NSTX plasmas Nucl. Fusion 46 635–44 La Haye R.J. et al 2006 Cross-machine benchmarking for ITER of neoclassical tearing mode stabilization by electron cyclotron current drive Nucl. Fusion 46 451–61 Honrubia J.J. et al 2006 Three-dimensional fast electron transport for ignition-scale inertial fusion capsules Nucl. Fusion 46 L25–8 Ido T. et al 2006 Observation of the interaction between the geodesic acoustic mode and ambient fluctuation in the JFT-2M tokamak Nucl. Fusion 46 512–20 Plyusnin V.V. et al 2006 Study of runaway electron generation during major disruptions in JET Nucl. Fusion 46 277–84 Pitts R.A. et al 2006 Far SOL ELM ion energies in JET Nucl. Fusion 46 82–98 Berk H.L. et al 2006 Explanation of the JET n = 0 chirping mode Nucl. Fusion 46 S888–97 Urano H. et al 2006 Confinement degradation with beta for ELMy HH-mode plasmas in JT-60U tokamak Nucl. Fusion 46 781–7 Izzo V.A. et al 2006 A numerical investigation of the effects of impurity penetration depth on disruption mitigation by massive high-pressure gas jet Nucl. Fusion 46 541–7 Inagaki S. et al 2006 Comparison of transient electron heat transport in LHD helical and JT-60U tokamak plasmas Nucl. Fusion 46 133–41 Watanabe T.-H. et al 2006 Velocity–space structures of distribution function in toroidal ion temperature gradient turbulence Nucl. Fusion 46 24–32 2010 Nuclear Fusion Award nominees For the 2010 award, the papers published in the 2007 volume were assessed and the following papers were nominated, all of which are magnetic confinement experiments and theory. Rice J.E. et al 2007 Inter-machine comparison of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks Nucl. Fusion 47 1618–24 Lipschultz B. et al 2007 Plasma–surface interaction, scrape-off layer and divertor physics: implications for ITER Nucl. Fusion 47 1189–205 Loarer T. et al 2007 Gas balance and fuel retention in fusion devices Nucl. Fusion 47 1112–20 Garcia O.E et al 2007 Fluctuations and transport in the TCV scrape-off layer Nucl. Fusion 47 667–76 Zonca F. et al 2007 Electron fishbones: theory and experimental evidence Nucl. Fusion 47 1588–97 Maggi C.F. et al 2007 Characteristics of the H-mode pedestal in improved confinement scenarios in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, JET and JT-60U Nucl. Fusion 47 535–51 Yoshida M. et al 2007 Momentum transport and plasma rotation profile in toroidal direction in JT-60U L-mode plasmas Nucl. Fusion 47 856–63 Zohm H. et al 2007 Control of MHD instabilities by ECCD: ASDEX Upgrade results and implications for ITER Nucl. Fusion 47 228–32 Snyder P.B. et al 2007 Stability and dynamics of the edge pedestal in the low collisionality regime: physics mechanisms for steady-state ELM-free operation Nucl. Fusion 47 961–8 Urano H. et al 2007 H-mode pedestal structure in the v

M. Kikuchi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Method and system to directly produce electrical power within the lithium blanket region of a magnetically confined, deuterium-tritium (DT) fueled, thermonuclear fusion reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

Woolley, Robert D. (Belle Mead, NJ)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

LDRD final report on confinement of cluster fusion plasmas with magnetic fields.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two versions of a current driver for single-turn, single-use 1-cm diameter magnetic field coils have been built and tested at the Sandia National Laboratories for use with cluster fusion experiments at the University of Texas in Austin. These coils are used to provide axial magnetic fields to slow radial loss of electrons from laser-produced deuterium plasmas. Typical peak field strength achievable for the two-capacitor system is 50 T, and 200 T for the ten-capacitor system. Current rise time for both systems is about 1.7 {mu}s, with peak current of 500 kA and 2 MA, respectively. Because the coil must be brought to the laser, the driver needs to be portable and drive currents in vacuum. The drivers are complete but laser-plasma experiments are still in progress. Therefore, in this report, we focus on system design, initial tests, and performance characteristics of the two-capacitor and ten-capacitors systems. The questions of whether a 200 T magnetic field can retard the breakup of a cluster-fusion plasma, and whether this field can enhance neutron production have not yet been answered. However, tools have been developed that will enable producing the magnetic fields needed to answer these questions. These are a two-capacitor, 400-kA system that was delivered to the University of Texas in 2010, and a 2-MA ten-capacitor system delivered this year. The first system allowed initial testing, and the second system will be able to produce the 200 T magnetic fields needed for cluster fusion experiments with a petawatt laser. The prototype 400-kA magnetic field driver system was designed and built to test the design concept for the system, and to verify that a portable driver system could be built that delivers current to a magnetic field coil in vacuum. This system was built copying a design from a fixed-facility, high-field machine at LANL, but made to be portable and to use a Z-machine-like vacuum insulator and vacuum transmission line. This system was sent to the University of Texas in Austin where magnetic fields up to 50 T have been produced in vacuum. Peak charge voltage and current for this system have been 100 kV and 490 kA. It was used this last year to verify injection of deuterium and surrogate clusters into these small, single-turn coils without shorting the coil. Initial test confirmed the need to insulate the inner surface of the coil, which requires that the clusters must be injected through small holes in an insulator. Tests with a low power laser confirmed that it is possible to inject clusters into the magnetic field coils through these holes without destroying the clusters. The university team also learned the necessity of maintaining good vacuum to avoid insulator, transmission line, and coil shorting. A 200-T, 2 MA system was also constructed using the experience from the first design to make the pulsed-power system more robust. This machine is a copy of the prototype design, but with ten 100-kV capacitors versus the two used in the prototype. It has additional inductance in the switch/capacitor unit to avoid breakdown seen in the prototype design. It also has slightly more inductance at the cable connection to the vacuum chamber. With this design we have been able to demonstrate 1 MA current into a 1 cm diameter coil with the vacuum chamber at air pressure. Circuit code simulations, including the additional inductance with the new design, agree well with the measured current at a charge voltage of 40 kV with a short circuit load, and at 50 kV with a coil. The code also predicts that with a charge voltage of 97 kV we will be able to get 2 MA into a 1 cm diameter coil, which will be sufficient for 200 T fields. Smaller diameter or multiple-turn coils will be able to achieve even higher fields, or be able to achieve 200-T fields with lower charge voltage. Work is now proceeding at the university under separate funding to verify operation at the 2-MA level, and to address issues of debris mitigation, measurement of the magnetic field, and operation in vacuum. We anticipate operation at full current with single

Argo, Jeffrey W.; Kellogg, Jeffrey W.; Headley, Daniel Ignacio; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Waugh, Caleb J.; Lewis, Sean M.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Wisher, Matthew; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Quevedo, Hernan J.; Bengtson, Roger

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Cost of electricity difference for direct and indirect drive targets for inertial fusion energy using a diode pumped solid state laser driver  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A detailed systems analysis code has been used to compare the projected cost of electricity (COE) for inertial fusion energy for direct drive (DD) and indirect drive (ID) target scenarios, based on a diode pumped solid state laser driver with Yb:S-FAP (Yb doped Sr5(PO4)3F) gain media. Previously published target gain curves which resulted in a target gain at the optimal DD operating point that is 30% higher than that for the ID scenario have been used. This gain advantage for DD is offset by a requirement for improved beam smoothing, which was obtained via smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) with a 1 THz bandwidth at 349 nm. Such a large SSD bandwidth has a number of effects on laser performance, including greater risk of optics damage from non-linear effects, lowered harmonic conversion efficiency, altered extraction parameters and higher front-end costs. The non-linear effects, which contribute to optical component damage by amplification of intensity non-uniformities, were parameterized through a constraint on the maximum allowable B integral (i.e. the total average phase retardation due to the non-linear indices of all materials traversed by the beam). If we constrain B to be no larger than 1.8 rad, which is the presently accepted safe value based on observations in single shot glass laser facilities, the COEs for DD and ID are predicted to be the same within the uncertainties. If technology permits the B limit to be raised, the optimized COE for DD is predicted to decrease relative to that for ID.

C.D. Orth

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C7, supplkment au no 7, Tome 40, Juillet 1979,page C7-97 Progress of laser fusion at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

futur nous rtserve d'obstacles majeurs pour obtenir les densites ntcessaires pour une reac- tion. - Inertial confinement fusion is the present and future source of energy in our universe. Derivatives, such as solar, geothermal, wind, and biomass are proposed as future substitutes for possible fuel sources. All

Boyer, Edmond

244

Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 13, Nos. 2/3, 1994 Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC): Panel 7 Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2. A Brief History of Heavy Ion Fusion The heavy ion fusion approach to inertial fusion energy (IFEJournal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 13, Nos. 2/3, 1994 Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC): Panel 7 Report on Inertial Fusion Energy 1 Ronald Davidson,2 Barrett Ripin, Mohamed Abdou, David E. Baldwin

Abdou, Mohamed

245

Recyclable transmission line (RTL) and linear transformer driver (LTD) development for Z-pinch inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) and high yield.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy (Z-IFE) complements and extends the single-shot z-pinch fusion program on Z to a repetitive, high-yield, power plant scenario that can be used for the production of electricity, transmutation of nuclear waste, and hydrogen production, all with no CO{sub 2} production and no long-lived radioactive nuclear waste. The Z-IFE concept uses a Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) accelerator, and a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the LTD driver to a high-yield fusion target inside a thick-liquid-wall power plant chamber. Results of RTL and LTD research are reported here, that include: (1) The key physics issues for RTLs involve the power flow at the high linear current densities that occur near the target (up to 5 MA/cm). These issues include surface heating, melting, ablation, plasma formation, electron flow, magnetic insulation, conductivity changes, magnetic field diffusion changes, possible ion flow, and RTL mass motion. These issues are studied theoretically, computationally (with the ALEGRA and LSP codes), and will work at 5 MA/cm or higher, with anode-cathode gaps as small as 2 mm. (2) An RTL misalignment sensitivity study has been performed using a 3D circuit model. Results show very small load current variations for significant RTL misalignments. (3) The key structural issues for RTLs involve optimizing the RTL strength (varying shape, ribs, etc.) while minimizing the RTL mass. Optimization studies show RTL mass reductions by factors of three or more. (4) Fabrication and pressure testing of Z-PoP (Proof-of-Principle) size RTLs are successfully reported here. (5) Modeling of the effect of initial RTL imperfections on the buckling pressure has been performed. Results show that the curved RTL offers a much greater buckling pressure as well as less sensitivity to imperfections than three other RTL designs. (6) Repetitive operation of a 0.5 MA, 100 kV, 100 ns, LTD cavity with gas purging between shots and automated operation is demonstrated at the SNL Z-IFE LTD laboratory with rep-rates up to 10.3 seconds between shots (this is essentially at the goal of 10 seconds for Z-IFE). (7) A single LTD switch at Tomsk was fired repetitively every 12 seconds for 36,000 shots with no failures. (8) Five 1.0 MA, 100 kV, 100 ns, LTD cavities have been combined into a voltage adder configuration with a test load to successfully study the system operation. (9) The combination of multiple LTD coaxial lines into a tri-plate transmission line is examined. The 3D Quicksilver code is used to study the electron flow losses produced near the magnetic nulls that occur where coax LTD lines are added together. (10) Circuit model codes are used to model the complete power flow circuit with an inductive isolator cavity. (11) LTD architectures are presented for drivers for Z-IFE and high yield. A 60 MA LTD driver and a 90 MA LTD driver are proposed. Present results from all of these power flow studies validate the whole LTD/RTL concept for single-shot ICF high yield, and for repetitive-shot IFE.

Sharpe, Robin Arthur; Kingsep, Alexander S. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Smith, David Lewis; Olson, Craig Lee; Ottinger, Paul F. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Schumer, Joseph Wade (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Alexander (High Currents Institute, Tomsk, Russia); Kulcinski, Gerald L. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kammer, Daniel C. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rose, David Vincent (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Nedoseev, Sergei L. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Pointon, Timothy David; Smirnov, Valentin P. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Turgeon, Matthew C.; Kalinin, Yuri G. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Bruner, Nichelle "Nicki" (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Barkey, Mark E. (University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL); Guthrie, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Genoni, Tom C. (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Langston, William L.; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerator fusion research Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plasma Physics and Fusion 48 Inertial fusion energy studies in the UK Summary: 12;The types of research - Fusion Absorption and partition of laser energy - effects of...

247

The physics of antimatter induced fusion and thermonuclear explosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possibility of using antihydrogen for igniting inertial confinement fusion pellets or triggering large scale thermonuclear explosions is investigated. The number of antiproton annihilations required to start a thermonuclear burn wave in either D or Li_2DT is found to be about 10^{21}/k^2, where k is the compression factor of the fuel to be ignited. We conclude that the financial and energy investments needed to produce such amounts of antiprotons would confine applications of antimatter triggered thermonuclear devices to the military domain.

Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

MagnetoInertial Fusion Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009). The key point here is that breakeven-class MIF driver facilities, which already exist (e.g., ATLAS or Z/Z-Beamlet), cost US$200M compared to the multi-US$B ITER and NIF. For this reason alone, MIF introduced seed magnetic fields into the center of targets at the OMEGA laser facility, and compressed those

249

Laser Inertial Fusion-based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

injection are manageable · DT ice preheat of 100 mK is deemed acceptable (and conservative): --Target% of decomposition temperature · Several options for reducing target injection risk: --Higher velocities / shorter

250

Low-density hydrocarbon foams for laser fusion targets: Progress report, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress made in the development of direct-drive hydrocarbon foam targets for laser inertial confinement fusion during 1987. The foam materials are polystyrene, resorcinol-formaldehyde, carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde, and cellulose acetate. The processes for making the foams, their properties, characterization techniques, and the relationship of their properties to target specifications are presented. Progress in the creation and testing of prototype targets is also described.

Haendler, B.L.; Buckley, S.R.; Chen, C.; Cook, A.R.; Cook, R.C.; Hair, L.M.; Kong, F.M.; Kramer, H.D.; Letts, S.A.; Overturf, G.E. III

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

TWO IMPORTANT FUSION PROCESSES CREATING THE CONDITIONS FOR FUSION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IMPORTANT FUSION PROCESSES CREATING THE CONDITIONS FOR FUSION F u s i o n Physics of a Fundamental Energy Source C o n f i n e m e n t Q u a l i t y , n τ ( m - 3 s ) 1970-75 1990s 1975-80 1980s Ion Temperature (K) 10 21 10 20 10 19 10 18 10 17 10 6 10 7 10 8 10 9 Inertial Magnetic Expected reactor regime Expected reactor regime Useful Nuclear Masses (The electron's mass is 0.000549 u.) Label Species Mass (u*) n ( 1 n) neutron 1.008665 p ( 1 H) proton 1.007276 D ( 2 H) deuteron 2.013553 T ( 3 H) triton 3.015500 3 He helium-3 3.014932 α ( 4 He) helium-4 4.001505 * 1 u = 1.66054 x 10 -27 kg = 931.466 MeV/c 2 Nuclear Mass (u) B i n d i n g E n e r g y P e r N u c l e o n ( M e V ) 1 200 150 100 50 10 0 5 62 Ni Fusion Reactions Release Energy Fission Reactions Release Energy EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS IN FUSION RESEARCH Fusion requires high tempera- ture plasmas confined long enough at high density

252

Ion beam fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that converts the fusion and blanket energy into...target gain G is the thermonuclear energy produced by the...Most concep- tual fusion power plants have a...and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor...situation, the inertial fusion com- munity in the...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Hydrogen Hydrogen FusionFusionFusionFusionFusionFusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

100.000 years LNGS Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso Borexino THE THERMONUCLEAR FUSION REACTIONHydrogen Hydrogen Fusion Deuterium FusionFusionFusionFusionFusionFusion THE SUN AS BOREXINO SEES

Heiz, Ulrich

254

Uniformity of fuel target implosion in Heavy Ion Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In inertial confinement fusion the target implosion non-uniformity is introduced by a driver beams' illumination non-uniformity, a fuel target alignment error in a fusion reactor, the target fabrication defect, et al. For a steady operation of a fusion power plant the target implosion should be robust against the implosion non-uniformities. In this paper the requirement for the implosion uniformity is first discussed. The implosion uniformity should be less than a few percent. A study on the fuel hotspot dynamics is also presented and shows that the stagnating plasma fluid provides a significant enhancement of vorticity at the final stage of the fuel stagnation. Then non-uniformity mitigation mechanisms of the heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination are also briefly discussed in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF). A density valley appears in the energy absorber, and the large-scale density valley also works as a radiation energy confinement layer, which contributes to a radiation energy smoothing. In HIF a wobbling he...

Kawata, S; Suzuki, T; Karino, T; Barada, D; Ogoyski, A I; Ma, Y Y

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Parametic Study of the current limit within a single driver-scale transport beam line of an induction Linac for Heavy Ion Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for heavy-ion inertial fusion, Fusion Engineering and DesignIon Fusion * by Lionel Robert Prost Doctor of Philosophy in Nuclear Engineering

Prost, Lionel Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Method and apparatus to produce and maintain a thick, flowing, liquid lithium first wall for toroidal magnetic confinement DT fusion reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

Woolley, Robert D. (Hillsborough, NJ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight (nTOF) detector response in current mode to inertial confinement fusion experiments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are several machines in this country that produce short bursts of neutrons for various applications. A few examples are the Zmachine, operated by Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM; the OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester in Rochester, NY; and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) operated by the Department of Energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California. They all incorporate neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors which measure neutron yield, and the shapes of the waveforms from these detectors contain germane information about the plasma conditions that produce the neutrons. However, the signals can also be %E2%80%9Cclouded%E2%80%9D by a certain fraction of neutrons that scatter off structural components and also arrive at the detectors, thereby making analysis of the plasma conditions more difficult. These detectors operate in current mode - i.e., they have no discrimination, and all the photomultiplier anode charges are integrated rather than counted individually as they are in single event counting. Up to now, there has not been a method for modeling an nTOF detector operating in current mode. MCNPPoliMiwas developed in 2002 to simulate neutron and gammaray detection in a plastic scintillator, which produces a collision data output table about each neutron and photon interaction occurring within the scintillator; however, the postprocessing code which accompanies MCNPPoliMi assumes a detector operating in singleevent counting mode and not current mode. Therefore, the idea for this work had been born: could a new postprocessing code be written to simulate an nTOF detector operating in current mode? And if so, could this process be used to address such issues as the impact of neutron scattering on the primary signal? Also, could it possibly even identify sources of scattering (i.e., structural materials) that could be removed or modified to produce %E2%80%9Ccleaner%E2%80%9D neutron signals? This process was first developed and then applied to the axial neutron time of flight detectors at the ZFacility mentioned above. First, MCNPPoliMi was used to model relevant portions of the facility between the source and the detector locations. To obtain useful statistics, variance reduction was utilized. Then, the resulting collision output table produced by MCNPPoliMi was further analyzed by a MATLAB postprocessing code. This converted the energy deposited by neutron and photon interactions in the plastic scintillator (i.e., nTOF detector) into light output, in units of MeVee%D1%84 (electron equivalent) vs time. The time response of the detector was then folded into the signal via another MATLAB code. The simulated response was then compared with experimental data and shown to be in good agreement. To address the issue of neutron scattering, an %E2%80%9CIdeal Case,%E2%80%9D (i.e., a plastic scintillator was placed at the same distance from the source for each detector location) with no structural components in the problem. This was done to produce as %E2%80%9Cpure%E2%80%9D a neutron signal as possible. The simulated waveform from this %E2%80%9CIdeal Case%E2%80%9D was then compared with the simulated data from the %E2%80%9CFull Scale%E2%80%9D geometry (i.e., the detector at the same location, but with all the structural materials now included). The %E2%80%9CIdeal Case%E2%80%9D was subtracted from the %E2%80%9CFull Scale%E2%80%9D geometry case, and this was determined to be the contribution due to scattering. The time response was deconvolved out of the empirical data, and the contribution due to scattering was then subtracted out of it. A transformation was then made from dN/dt to dN/dE to obtain neutron spectra at two different detector locations.

Nelson, Alan J. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Cooper, Gary Wayne [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Fehl, David Lee; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Smelser, Ruth Marie; Torres, Jose A.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Multiple excitation regenerative amplifier inertial confinement system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to apparatus and methods for producing high intensity laser radiation generation which is achieved through an optical amplifier-storage ring design. One or two synchronized, counterpropagating laser pulses are injected into a regenerative amplifier cavity and amplified by gain media which are pumped repetitively by electrical or optical means. The gain media excitation pulses are tailored to efficiently amplify the laser pulses during each transit. After the laser pulses have been amplified to the desired intensity level, they are either switched out of the cavity by some switch means, as for example an electro-optical device, for any well known laser end uses, or a target means may be injected into the regenerative amplifier cavity in such a way as to intercept simultaneously the counterpropagating laser pulses. One such well known end uses to which this invention is intended is for production of high density and temperature plasmas suitable for generating neutrons, ions and x-rays and for studying matter heated by high intensity laser radiation. 11 figs.

George, V.E.; Haas, R.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Schlitt, L.G.

1980-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

260

Multiple excitation regenerative amplifier inertial confinement system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to apparatus and methods for producing high intensity laser radiation generation which is achieved through an optical amplifier-storage ring design. One or two synchronized, counterpropagating laser pulses are injected into a regenerative amplifier cavity and amplified by gain media which are pumped repetitively by electrical or optical means. The gain media excitation pulses are tailored to efficiently amplify the laser pulses during each transit. After the laser pulses have been amplified to the desired intensity level, they are either switched out of the cavity by some switch means, as for example an electro-optical device, for any well known laser end uses, or a target means may be injected into the regenerative amplifier cavity in such a way as to intercept simultaneously the counterpropagating laser pulses. One such well known end uses to which this invention is intended is for production of high density and temperature plasmas suitable for generating neutrons, ions and x-rays and for studying matter heated by high intensity laser radiation.

George, Victor E. [Livermore, CA; Haas, Roger A. [Pleasanton, CA; Krupke, William F. [Pleasanton, CA; Schlitt, Leland G. [Livermore, CA

1980-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Alternative approaches: concept improvements in magnetic fusion research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...providing a driver for inertial fusion. Keywords: stellarator...tricity generation using magnetic fusion. These are (a) pressing...e.g. the International Thermonuclear Experimen- tal Reactor (ITER...generation and/or for other fusion applications like testing prototype...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

263

AFRD - Fusion Energy Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory AFRD - Fusion Energy Sciences AFRD - Home Fusion - Home HIF-VNL Website Ion Beam Technology Group website Artist's conception of a heavy ion fusion power plant Artist's conception of an IFE powerplant We further inertial fusion energy as a future power source, primarily through R&D on heavy-ion induction accelerators. Our program is part of a "Virtual National Laboratory," headquartered in AFRD, that joins us with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in close collaboration on inertial fusion driven by beams of heavy ions. The related emergent science of high-energy-density physics (HEDP) has become a major focus. For further synergy, we have combined forces with the former Ion Beam

264

Fusion reactor systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this review we consider deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactors based on four different plasma-confinement and heating approaches: the tokamak, the theta-pinch, the magnetic-mirror, and the laser-pellet system. We begin with a discussion of the dynamics of reacting plasmas and basic considerations of reactor power balance. The essential plasma physical aspects of each system are summarized, and the main characteristics of the corresponding conceptual power plants are described. In tokamak reactors the plasma densities are about 1020 m-3, and the ? values (ratio of plasma pressure to confining magnetic pressure) are approximately 5%. Plasma burning times are of the order of 100-1000 sec. Large superconducting dc magnets furnish the toroidal magnetic field, and 2-m thick blankets and shields prevent heat deposition in the superconductor. Radially diffusing plasma is diverted away from the first wall by means of null singularities in the poloidal (or transverse) component of the confining magnetic field. The toroidal theta-pinch reactor has a much smaller minor diameter and a much larger major diameter, and operates on a 10-sec cycle with 0.1-sec burning pulses. It utilizes shock heating from high-voltage sources and adabatic-compression heating powered by low-voltage, pulsed cryogenic magnetic or inertial energy stores, outside the reactor core. The plasma has a density of about 1022 m-3 and ? values of nearly unity. In the power balance of the reactor, direct-conversion energy obtained by expansion of the burning high-? plasma against the containing magnetic field is an important factor. No divertor is necessary since neutral-gas flow cools and replaces the "spent" plasma between pulses. The open-ended mirror reactor uses both thermal conversion of neutron energy and direct conversion of end-loss plasma energy to dc electrical power. A fraction of this direct-convertor power is then fed back to the ioninjection system to sustain the reaction and maintain the plasma. The average ion energy is 600 keV, plasma diameter 6 m, and the plasma beta 85%. The power levels of the three magnetic-confinement devices are in the 500-2000 MWe range, with the exception of the mirror reactor, for which the output is approximately 200 MWe. In Laser-Pellet reactors, frozen D-T pellets are ignited in a cavity which absorbs the electromagnetic, charged particle, and neutron energy from the fusion reaction. The confinement is "inertial," since the fusion reaction occurs during the disassembly of the heated pellet. A pellet-cavity unit would produce about 200 MWt in pulses with a repetition rate of the order of 10 sec-1. Such units could be clustered to give power plants with outputs in the range of 1000 MWe.

F. L. Ribe

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Fusion driver study. Final technical report, April 1, 1978-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual design of a multi-megajoule, repetitively pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser system for Inertial Confinement Fusion is presented. System configurations consisting of 50 to 100 kJ modules operating at subatmospheric pressures with multiple pass optical extraction appear feasible with present or near term technology. Overall laser system efficiencies of greater than 10% at repetition rates in excess of 10 Hz are possible with the state-of-the-art pulsed power technology. The synthesis of all the laser subsystems into a specific configuration for a Laser Fusion Driver depends upon the reactor chamber(s) layout, subsystem reliability and restrictions on overall dimensions of the fusion driver. A design is presented which stacks power amplifier modules in series in a large torus with centrally located reactor chamber. Cost estimates of the overall Laser Fusion Driver are also presented.

Friedman, H.W.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Effects of self-heating and phase change on the thermal profile of hydrogen isotopes in confined geometries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growth of high-quality single-crystal hydrogen in confined geometries relies on the in situ formation of seed crystals. Generation of deuterium-tritium seed crystals in a confined geometry is governed by three effects: self-heating due to tritium decay, external thermal environment, and latent heat of phase change at the boundary between hydrogen liquid and vapor. A detailed computation of the temperature profile for liquid hydrogen inside a hollow shell, as is found in inertial confinement fusion research, shows that seeds are likely to form at the equatorial plane of the shell. Radioactive decay of tritium to helium slowly alters the composition of the hydrogen vapor, resulting in a modified temperature profile that encourages seed formation at the top of the shell. We show that the computed temperature profile is consistent with a variety of experimental observations.

Baxamusa, S., E-mail: baxamusa1@llnl.gov; Field, J.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Kozioziemski, B.; Suratwala, T.; Sater, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

267

IFE thick liquid wall chamber dynamics: Governing mechanisms and modeling and experimental capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal-Wall Inertial Fusion Reactors " Nuclear Eng. andI — A n Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor," Ph.D. thesis,in Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactors," Ph.D. thesis,

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Thermal Performance of Deep-Burn Fusion-Fission Hybrid Waste in a Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine [1] combines a neutron-rich but energy-poor inertial fusion system with an energy-rich but neutron-poor subcritical fission blanket. Because approximately 80% of the LIFE Engine energy is produced from fission, the requirements for laser efficiency and fusion target performance are relaxed, compared to a pure-fusion system, and hence a LIFE Engine prototype can be based on target performance in the first few years of operation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Similarly, because of the copious fusion neutrons, the fission blanket can be run in a subcritical, driven, mode, without the need for control rods or other sophisticated reactivity control systems. Further, because the fission blanket is inherently subcritical, fission fuels that can be used in LIFE Engine designs include thorium, depleted uranium, natural uranium, spent light water reactor fuel, highly enriched uranium, and plutonium. Neither enrichment nor reprocessing is required for the LIFE Engine fuel cycle, and burnups to 99% fraction of initial metal atoms (FIMA) being fissioned are envisioned. This paper discusses initial calculations of the thermal behavior of spent LIFE fuel following completion of operation in the LIFE Engine [2]. The three time periods of interest for thermal calculations are during interim storage (probably at the LIFE Engine site), during the preclosure operational period of a geologic repository, and after closure of the repository.

Blink, J A; Chipman, V; Farmer, J; Shaw, H; Zhao, P

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

269

Antimatter induced fusion and thermonuclear explosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The feasibility of using antihydrogen for igniting inertial confinement fusion pellets or triggering large scale thermonuclear explosions is investigated. The number of antiproton annihilations required to start a thermonuclear burn wave in either DT or Li_2DT is found to be about 10^{21}/k^2, where k is the compression factor of the fuel to be ignited. In the second part, the technologies for producing antiprotons with high energy accelerator systems and the means for manipulating and storing microgram amounts of antihydrogen are examined. While there seems to be no theoretical obstacles to the production of 10^{18} antiprotons per day (the amount required for triggering one thermonuclear bomb), the construction of such a plant involves several techniques which are between 3 and 4 orders of magnitude away from present day technology.

Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

Lasche, G.P.

1983-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

271

Course: FUSION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Universit degli Studi di Padova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the subject of controlled thermonuclear fusion in magnetically confined plasmas. Both fusion science of Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, b) Engineering of a Magnetically Confined Fusion Reactor, c) ExperimentalCourse: FUSION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING UniversitĂ  degli Studi di Padova in agreement

Cesare, Bernardo

272

Exploring Plasma Science Advances from Fusion Findings to Astrophysica...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the DOE's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Speakers noted that producing fusion by heating a...

273

Laser Fusion Energy The High Average Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Fusion Energy and The High Average Power Program John Sethian Naval Research Laboratory Dec for Inertial Fusion Energy with lasers, direct drive targets and solid wall chambers Lasers DPPSL (LLNL) Kr posters Snead Payne #12;Laser(s) Goals 1. Develop technologies that can meet the fusion energy

274

Interplanetary space transport using inertial fusion propulsion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we indicate how the great advantages that ICF offers for interplanetary propulsion can be accomplished with the VISTA spacecraft concept. The performance of VISTA is expected to surpass that from other realistic technologies for Mars missions if the energy gain achievable for ICF targets is above several hundred. Based on the good performance expected from the U. S. National Ignition Facility (NIF), the requirements for VISTA should be well within the realm of possibility if creative target concepts such as the fast ignitor can be developed. We also indicate that a 6000-ton VISTA can visit any planet in the solar system and return to Earth in about 7 years or less without any significant physiological hazards to astronauts. In concept, VISTA provides such short-duration missions, especially to Mars, that the hazards from cosmic radiation and zero gravity can be reduced to insignificant levels. VISTA therefore represents a significant step forward for space-propulsion concepts.

Orth, C.D.

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

Suggested Path to Develop Inertial Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and tested on small scale · We believe this particular Phase I effort could be completed in about 3 years upgrades. "18 kJ" FTF Amplifier · Similar current pulse · Diode voltage 8oo kV · Aperture width 100 cm

276

Fusion Engineering and Design 81 (2006) 16391645 Thermo-mechanical analysis of a micro-engineered  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusion Engineering and Design 81 (2006) 1639­1645 Thermo-mechanical analysis of a micro laser (HAPL) program goal is to develop a laser inertial fusion reactor using a solid first wall (FW). The FW of the inertial fusion energy (IFE) chamber is exposed to high energy photon, particle

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

277

Initial experimental evidence of self-collimation of TNSA proton beam in a stack of conducting foils 2013-08-04  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ignition  and  heavy  ion  fusion   approaches,  compact  laser-­?ignition,  inertial  confinement  heavy  ion   fusion,  a  compact  laser-­?

Ni, PA.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Component framework for coupled integrated fusion plasma simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Successful simulation of the complex physics that affect magnetically confined fusion plasma remains an important target milestone towards the development of viable fusion energy. Major advances in the underlying physics formulations, mathematical modeling, ... Keywords: components, coupled simulation, framework, fusion

Wael R. Elwasif; David E. Bernholdt; Lee A. Berry; Donald B. Batchelor

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Turbulent mixing and beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conditions. It influences thermonuclear fusion in inertial and magnetic...for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes, USA; and...inertial confinement fusion-relevant conditionsPhil...conditions. It influences thermonuclear fusion in inertial and magnetic...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Paths to Magne,c Fusion Energy (nature ignores budget austerity)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Base Research Program Plasma confinement Materials science/engineering 2020 to fusion energy present DIII-D NSTX CMOD Plasma confinement research program #12

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Paths to fusion energy The next 30 years, the next 10 years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Facility ITER Demonstra9on Power Plant Base Research Program Plasma confinement Plasma confinement research program #12;Issues for a fusion roadmap · Trade

282

Velocity Shear Stabilization of Centrifugally Confined Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A magnetized, centrifugally confined plasma is subjected to a 3D MHD stability test. Ordinarily, the system is expected to be grossly unstable to “flute” interchanges of field lines. Numerical simulation shows though that the system is stable on account of velocity shear. This allows consideration of a magnetically confined plasma for thermonuclear fusion that has a particularly simple coil configuration.

Yi-Min Huang and A. B. Hassam

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

283

Compressibility effects in Rayleigh–Taylor instability-induced flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for modeling astrophysical thermonuclear flashesAstrophys. J. Suppl...target implosion in ICFNuclear fusion by inertial confinement fusion:a comprehensive treatiseBoca...1998 Inertial confinement fusion flowBerlin, GermanySpringer...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The National Ignition Facility and the Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is operational and conducting experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy, over 60 times more energy than any previous laser system. The NIF can create temperatures of more than 100 million degrees and pressures more than 100 billion times Earth's atmospheric pressure. These conditions, similar to those at the center of the sun, have never been created in the laboratory and will allow scientists to probe the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes, and other phenomena. The NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to the conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. Experiments on the NIF are focusing on demonstrating fusion ignition and burn via inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ignition program is conducted via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) - a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and General Atomics. The NIC program has also established collaborations with the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom, Commissariat a Energie Atomique in France, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and many others. Ignition experiments have begun that form the basis of the overall NIF strategy for achieving ignition. Accomplishing this goal will demonstrate the feasibility of fusion as a source of limitless, clean energy for the future. This paper discusses the current status of the NIC, the experimental steps needed toward achieving ignition and the steps required to demonstrate and enable the delivery of fusion energy as a viable carbon-free energy source.

Moses, E

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

285

A Virtualized Computing Platform For Fusion Control Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. 2,500 servers, 400 network devices and 700 terabytes of networked attached storage provide the foundation for NIF's Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and Experimental Data Archive. This talk discusses the rationale & benefits for server virtualization in the context of an operational experimental facility, the requirements discovery process used by the NIF teams to establish evaluation criteria for virtualization alternatives, the processes and procedures defined to enable virtualization of servers in a timeframe that did not delay the execution of experimental campaigns and the lessons the NIF teams learned along the way. The virtualization architecture ultimately selected for ICCS is based on the Open Source Xen computing platform and 802.1Q open networking standards. The specific server and network configurations needed to ensure performance and high availability of the control system infrastructure will be discussed.

Frazier, T; Adams, P; Fisher, J; Talbot, A

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Spheromak Path to Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Options for a spheromak fusion-energy reactor are described and provide ... configuration offers. However, the ability of the spheromak to confine plasma energy has not yet ... . These are being studied in the Su...

K. I. Thomassen; E. B. Hooper; D. D. Ryutov

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The National Ignition Facility Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control roo...

Moses, E I

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Implosion Experiments using Glass Ablators for Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion V. A. Smalyuk, R. Betti,* J. A. Delettrez, V. Yu. Glebov, D. D. Meyerhofer,* P. B. Radha, S. P. Regan, T. C. Sangster,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with overlapped laser beams. To ignite DT fuel on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [2] with a laser energy. Sangster, J. Sanz, W. Seka, C. Stoeckl, and B. Yaakobi Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University-thick glass shells were conducted on the Omega Laser Facility to test the performance of high-Z glass ablators

289

The path to fusion power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...proportional to P 2. The energy confinement time...determines the energy gain of the fusion...needed to keep the electric current in the plasma...in France, once planning permission-which...The much higher energy fusion neutrons...essentially the same distributions of energies as those...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The National Ignition Facility: enabling fusion ignition for the 21st century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, when completed in 2008, will contain a 192-beam, 1.8?MJ, 500?TW, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10?m diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is housed in a 26?000?m2 environmentally controlled building and is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system. NIF provides a scientific centre for the study of inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures and pressures approaching 108?K and 1011?bar, respectively, conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF is currently configured with four laser beams activated in late 2002. These beams are being regularly used for laser performance and physics experiments, and to date nearly 250 system shots have been conducted. NIF's laser beams have generated 106?kJ in 23?ns pulses of infrared light and over 16?kJ in 3.5?ns pulses at the third harmonic (351?nm). A number of target experimental systems are being commissioned in support of experimental campaigns. This paper provides a detailed look at the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance, and results from laser commissioning shots. We also discuss NIF's high-energy density and inertial fusion experimental capabilities, the first experiments on NIF, and plans for future capabilities of this unique facility.

George H. Miller; Edward I. Moses; Craig R. Wuest

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Review of implicit methods for the magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetically confined plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Implicit algorithms are essential for predicting the slow growth and saturation of global instabilities in today's magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. Present day algorithms for obtaining implicit solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ... Keywords: Fusion, Implicit methods, Magnetohydrodynamics, Plasma physics

S. C. Jardin

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Current state of magnetic-fusion energy research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the improved understanding of plasma physics, progress is being made on several approaches to magnetic confinement for controlled thermonuclear fusion.

Johnson, J.L.; Weimer, K.E.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Progress toward high-gain laser fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 1985-1986 Review of the US inertial confinement fusion program by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that five more years might be required to obtain enough data to determine the future course of the program. Since then, data from the Nova laser and from the Halite/Centurion program have resolved most of the outstanding problems identified by the NAS review. In particular, we now believe that we can produce a sufficiently uniform target; that we can keep the energy content in hot electrons and high-energy photons low enough (/approximately/1--10% of drive energy, depending on target design) and achieve enough pulse-shaping accuracy (/approximately/10%, with a dynamic range of 100:1) to keep the fuel on a near-Fermi-degenerate adiabat; that we can produce an /approximately/100-Mbar pressure pulse of sufficient uniformity (/approximately/1%), and can we control hydrodynamic instabilities so that the mix of the pusher into the hot spot is low enough to permit marginal ignition. These results are sufficiently encouraging that the US Department of Energy is planning to complete a 10-MJ laboratory microfusion facility to demonstrate high-gain ICF in the laboratory within a decade. 22 refs., 1 fig.

Storm, E.

1988-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

294

IOP PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 51 (2009) 014005 (9pp) doi:10.1088/0741-3335/51/1/014005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 51 (2009) 014005 to inertial fusion [1] concerns the propagation and energy deposition of a fast electron beam in strongly change produced in the target material by the shock wave. While the initially cold solid target

Strathclyde, University of

295

Fusion Technologies for Tritium-Suppressed D-D Fusion White Paper prepared for FESAC Materials Science Subcommittee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Fusion Technologies for Tritium-Suppressed D-D Fusion White Paper prepared for FESAC Materials, Columbia University 2 Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT December 19, 2011 Summary The proposal for tritium-suppressed D-D fusion and the understanding of the turbulent pinch in magnetically confined plasma

296

Neutron detector for fusion reaction-rate measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a fast, sensitive neutron detector for recording the fusion reaction-rate history of inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The detector is based on the fast rise-time of a commercial plastic scintillator (BC-422) and has a response < 25-ps FWHM. A thin piece of scintillator material acts as a neutron-to- light converter. A zoom lens images light from the scintillator surface to a high-speed (15 ps) optical streak camera for recording. The zoom lens allows the scintillator to be positioned between 1 and 50 cm from a target. The camera simulaneously records an optical fiducial pulse which allows the camera time base to be calibrated relative to the incident laser power. Bursts of x rays formed by focusing 20-ps, 2.5-TW laser pulses onto gold disk targets demonstrate the detector resolution to be < 25 ps. We have recorded burn histories for deuterium/tritium-filled targets producing as few as 3 {times} 10{sup 7} neutrons.

Lerche, R.A.; Phillion, D.W.; Tietbohl, G.L.

1993-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

297

Microsoft Word - Written Statement FY2011 NNSA OMB approved final03012...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Technology and Engineering (Science Campaign, Engineering Campaign, Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Yield Campaign, Advanced Simulation and Computing Campaign, Science,...

298

Compressible Turbulence and Interactions with Shock Waves and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in various disciplines, including supernova explosions, inertial confinement fusion, hypersonic flight and propulsion, and shock wave lithotripsy. Accomplishments: A novel...

299

LANSCE | About LANSCE | Leadership  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

investigation of magnetically and inertially confined plasmas for controlled thermonuclear fusion, intense particle accelerators, plasma accelerators, plasma-based space...

300

Page Name: Subject/Program/Project, Acronym: Los Alamos National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thrusts High energy physics Nuclear physics Hydrodynamic material instabilities at extremes Dynamic plutonium experiments Proton radiography Inertial confinement fusion Trident...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Annual Report of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Programme 2010/11 1 Executive Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

types of "magnetic bottle", in particular stellarators. In a very different approach, "inertial fusionAnnual Report of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Programme 2010/11 1 Executive Summary 1.1 OVERVIEW This report describes the work of the EURATOM/CCFE fusion Association from April 2010 to March 2011. Research

302

Fusion Engineering and Design 23 (1993)251-297 251 North-Holland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusion Engineering and Design 23 (1993)251-297 251 North-Holland Critical technical issues and evaluation and comparison studies for inertial fusion energy reactors M.A. Abdou a, A.Y. Ying a, M.S. Tillack, Redondo Beach, California, USA d Formerly of KMS Fusion Inc., Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA Submitted 30 July

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

303

Z, ZX, and X-1: A Realistic Path to High Fusion Yield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Z-pinches now constitute the most energetic and powerful sources of x-rays available by a large margin. The Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories has produced 1.8 MJ of x-ray energy, 280 TW of power, and hohlraum temperatures of 200 eV. These advances are being applied to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments on Z. The requirements for high fusion yield are exemplified in the target to be driven by the X-1 accelerator. X-1 will drive two z-pinches, each producing 7 MJ of x-ray energy and about 1000 TW of x-ray power. Together, these radiation sources will heat a hohlraum containing the 4-mm diameter ICF capsule to a temperature exceeding 225 eV for about 10 ns, with the pulse shape required to drive the capsule to high fusion yield, in the range of 200--1000 MJ. Since X-1 consists of two identical accelerators, it is possible to mitigate the technical risk of high yield by constructing one accelerator. This accelerator, ZX, will bridge the gap from Z to X-1 by driving an integrated target experiment with a very efficient energy source, ZX will also provide experimental condition that the full specifications of the X-1 accelerator for high yield are achievable, and that a realistic path to high fission yield exists.

COOK, DONALD L.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

Design, fabrication and measurement of a novel cooling arm for fusion energy source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The issues of energy and environment are the main constraint of sustainable development in worldwide. Nuclear energy source is one important optional choice for long term sustainable development. The nuclear energy consists of fusion energy and fission energy. Compared with fission, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is a kind of clean fusion energy and can generate large energy and little environmental pollution. ICF mainly consists of peripheral driver unit and target. The cooling arm is an important component of the target, which cools the hohlraum to maintain the required temperature and positions the thermal-mechanical package (TMP) assembly. This paper mainly investigates the cooling arm, including the structural design, the verticality of sidewall and the mechanical properties. The TMP assembly is uniformly clamped in its radial when using (111) crystal orientation silicon to fabricate cooling arm. The finite element method is used to design the structure of cooling arm with 16 clamping arms, and the MEMS technologies are employed to fabricate the micro-size cooling arm structure with high vertical sidewall. Finally, the mechanical test of cooling arm is taken, and the result can meet the requirement of positioning TMP assembly.

Shui-Dong Jiang; Jing-Quan Liu; Jia-Bin Mei; Bin Yang; Chun-Sheng Yang

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

305

Inertial measurement unit using rotatable MEMS sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A MEM inertial sensor (e.g. accelerometer, gyroscope) having integral rotational means for providing static and dynamic bias compensation is disclosed. A bias compensated MEM inertial sensor is described comprising a MEM inertial sense element disposed on a rotatable MEM stage. A MEM actuator drives the rotation of the stage between at least two predetermined rotational positions. Measuring and comparing the output of the MEM inertial sensor in the at least two rotational positions allows for both static and dynamic bias compensation in inertial calculations based on the sensor's output. An inertial measurement unit (IMU) comprising a plurality of independently rotatable MEM inertial sensors and methods for making bias compensated inertial measurements are disclosed.

Kohler, Stewart M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Generalized Nonlinear Balance Criteria and Inertial Stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The connections between the concept of nonlinear balance and the classical criterion of inertial stability are explored in the context of historical work on this subject. New analytic results are derived establishing that ellipticity and inertial ...

John A. Knox

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Experimental Fusion Research | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

confinement. The shiny metal keeps the particles from re-entering the plasma as a cold gas, retains impurities that can cool the plasma and halt fusion reactions, and...

308

Confinement Of Pure Ion Plasma In A Cylindrical Current Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

j Ă?B force. An equilibrium calculation using a relativistic, 1-D, cold-fluid model shows: the confine- ment of non-neutral ion plasmas that are adequately dense for controlled thermonu- clear fusion limit? Conventional magnetic fusion devices contain quasi-neutral plasmas in a toroidal or linear

309

Alternative pathways to fusion energy (focus on Department of Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alternative pathways to fusion energy (focus on Department of Energy Innovative Confinement for a restructured fusion energy science program [5] 1996 | FESAC: Opportunities in Alternative Confinement Concepts, suggests program for Innovative Concepts [1] 1995 | OTA TPX and the Alternates [2] 1995 | PCAST (given flat

310

Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final report of the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee. The report conveys the Committee's views on the matters specified by the Secretary in his charge and subsequent letters to the Committee, and also satisfies the provisions of Section 7 of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980, Public Law 96-386, which require a triennial review of the conduct of the national Magnetic Fusion Energy program. Three sub-Committee's were established to address the large number of topics associated with fusion research and development. One considered magnetic fusion energy, a second considered inertial fusion energy, and the third considered issues common to both. For many reasons, the promise of nuclear fusion as a safe, environmentally benign, and affordable source of energy is bright. At the present state of knowledge, however, it is uncertain that this promise will become reality. Only a vigorous, well planned and well executed program of research and development will yield the needed information. The Committee recommends that the US commit to a plan that will resolve this critically important issue. It also outlines the first steps in a development process that will lead to a fusion Demonstration Power Plant by 2025. The recommended program is aggressive, but we believe the goal is reasonable and attainable. International collaboration at a significant level is an important element in the plan.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation of a reactor-scale FRC, and the FIREX program was intended to test the ideas behind this approach. We will describe in this report the technological development path and advances in physics understanding that allowed FIREX to reach a regime in which ion rings were reproducibly created with up to about half the current necessary to produce field reversal. Unfortunately, the experiments were limited to this level by a fundamental, unanticipated aspect of the physics of strong ion rings in plasma. The FIREX ring is a strongly anisotropic, current-carrying population of ions moving faster than the Alfven speed in the background plasma. The rapidly changing ring current excites very large-amplitude Alfven waves in the plasma, and these waves strongly affect the ring, causing rapid energy loss in a way that is not compatible with the success of the ring trapping scenario around which FIREX was designed. The result was that FIREX rings were always very short-lived. We will discuss the implication of these results for possible future use of large-orbit ions in FRCs. In short, it appears that a certain range of the parameters characterizing the ring Alfven mach number and distribution function must be avoided to allow the existence of a long-lived energetic ion component in an FRC. This report will explain why FIREX experimental results cannot be directly scaled to quantitatively predict this range for a particular FRC configuration. This will require accurate, three-dimensional simulations. FIREX results do constitute a very good dataset for validating such a code, and simulations already carried out during this program provide a guide to the important physics involved.

Greenly, John, B.

2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion Summary Report of the Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion Inertial Fusion: Accelerator and Target Considerations,”i.e. , injector/source, accelerator and target/chamber that10:20am - 11am "The RF accelerator approach to HIF" - P.

Seidl, P.A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Splenogonadal Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Splenogonadal fusion is a very rare congenital malformation. It is characterized by fusion of the spleen and gonad. The first case of splenogonadal fusion was described by Bostroem in 1883. There are two types: c...

Ahmed H. Al-Salem

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Type Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fusion is an indispensable tool in the arsenal ... Less well-known, but equally valuable is type fusion, which states conditions for fusing an application ... algebra. We provide a novel proof of type fusion base...

Ralf Hinze

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Method of controlling fusion reaction rates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

Kulsrud, Russell M. (Princeton, NJ); Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Valeo, Ernest J. (Princeton Junction, NJ); Goldhaber, Maurice (Bayport, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Finding Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Finding Fusion ... Study of these reactions will advance understanding of the workings of stars and giant planets, fusion energy, and nuclear weapon stockpiles. ...

JYLLIAN KEMSLEY

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

317

Score Fusion and Decision Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Score fusion is a paradigm, which calculates similarity scores ... then combines the two scores according to a fusion formula, e.g., the overall score ... mean of the two modality scores. Decision fusion is a par...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

Peng, Yueng-Kay M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Simulation of Fusion Plasmas  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The upcoming ITER experiment (www.iter.org) represents the next major milestone in realizing the promise of using nuclear fusion as a commercial energy source, by moving into the ?burning plasma? regime where the dominant heat source is the internal fusion reactions. As part of its support for the ITER mission, the US fusion community is actively developing validated predictive models of the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. In this talk, I will describe how the plasma community is using the latest high performance computing facilities to develop and refine our models of the nonlinear, multiscale plasma dynamics, and how recent advances in experimental diagnostics are allowing us to directly test and validate these models at an unprecedented level.

Chris Holland

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

320

Laser fusion experiments at LLL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLL. Two other chapters, one authored by K.A. Brueckner and the other by C. Max, present the theoretical implosion physics and laser plasma interaction physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first is an introductory section which provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

Ahlstrom, H.G.

1980-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The path to fusion power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cost-effective neutron and plasma source for a component...at Culham and NSTX at Princeton, are beginning to reach...that requires no driven plasma current to confine the...achieved near fusion plasma conditions at very modest...Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton in the USA also operates...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

RAMI Analysis Program Design and Research for CFETR (Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor) Tokamak Machine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor (CFETR) is a test reactor which shall be constructed by National Integration Design Group for Magnetic Confinement Fusion Reactor of China with an ambitious scientific ...

Shijun Qin; Yuntao Song; Damao Yao; Yuanxi Wan; Songtao Wu…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kaganovich, H. Qin, E. Startsev, PPPL, Princeton, NJ, USA I.DE-AC02-05CH11231, and by PPPL under Contract DE- AC02-

Sharp, W. M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Apparatus for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new technique for producing uniform layers of solid DT on microballoon surfaces. Local heating of the target, typically by means of a focused laser, within an isothermal freezing cell containing a low pressure cryogenic exchange gas such as helium, vaporizes the DT fuel contained within the microballoon. Removal of the laser heating source causes the DT gas to rapidly condense and freeze in a layer which exhibits a good degree of uniformity.

Miller, John R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Methods and apparatus for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new technique for producing uniform layers of solid DT on microballoon surfaces. Local heating of the target, typically by means of a focused laser, within an isothermal freezing cell containing a low pressure cryogenic exchange gas such as helium, vaporizes the DT fuel. Removal of the laser heating source causes the DT gas to rapidly condense and freeze in a layer which exhibits a good degree of uniformity.

Miller, John R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Ignition Facility (NIF) is beginning to testdriver, like that used in NIF, is well- suited. However,use in power plants. The NIF neodymium-glass lasers are less

Sharp, W. M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Plasma Jet Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploratory experiments using refurbished 50 J CO2 lasers and PIC modeling are ongoing (UC, Davis and LANL PJMIF burn configuration at peak target compression with energy gain > 10 Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for NNSA magnetized DT target plasma liner Target at peak compression o nDT ~ 5

328

Ion beam requirements for fast ignition of inertial fusion targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion beam requirements for fast ignition are investigated by numerical simulation taking into account new effects such as ion beam divergence not included before. We assume that ions are generated by the TNSA scheme in a curved foil placed inside a re-entrant cone and focused on the cone apex or beyond. From the focusing point to the compressed core ions propagate with a given divergence angle. Ignition energies are obtained for two compressed fuel configurations heated by proton and carbon ion beams. The dependence of the ignition energies on the beam divergence angle and on the position of the ion beam focusing point have been analysed. Comparison between TNSA and quasi-monoenergetic ions is also shown.

Honrubia, J J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

US ITER - Why Fusion?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

US Fusion Research Sites US Fusion Research Sites DOE Office of Science: US Fusion Energy Sciences Program Fusion Power Associates General Atomics DIIII-D National Fusion Facility...

330

National Research Council AssessmentNational Research Council Assessment --Prospects for Inertial Fusion EnergyProspects for Inertial Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engineering Laser systems Beam systems Safety & environment Construction of large-scale energy systems Beam direct drive. Understand underlying high Wall materials and design. Implementation Environment and safety.Understand underlying high energy density (HED) physical processes. Environment and safety. Cost competitiveness. Public

331

Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) half-year report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification --both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; and final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target.

Not Available

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Fusion-neutron-yield, activation measurements at the Z accelerator: Design, analysis, and sensitivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a general methodology to determine the diagnostic sensitivity that is directly applicable to neutron-activation diagnostics fielded on a wide variety of neutron-producing experiments, which include inertial-confinement fusion (ICF), dense plasma focus, and ion beam-driven concepts. This approach includes a combination of several effects: (1) non-isotropic neutron emission; (2) the 1/r{sup 2} decrease in neutron fluence in the activation material; (3) the spatially distributed neutron scattering, attenuation, and energy losses due to the fielding environment and activation material itself; and (4) temporally varying neutron emission. As an example, we describe the copper-activation diagnostic used to measure secondary deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron yields on ICF experiments conducted on the pulsed-power Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. Using this methodology along with results from absolute calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations, we find that for the diagnostic configuration on Z, the diagnostic sensitivity is 0.037% ± 17% counts/neutron per cm{sup 2} and is ? 40% less sensitive than it would be in an ideal geometry due to neutron attenuation, scattering, and energy-loss effects.

Hahn, K. D., E-mail: kdhahn@sandia.gov; Ruiz, C. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Smelser, R. M.; Torres, J. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Diagnostics and Target Physics, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Diagnostics and Target Physics, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)] [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Leeper, R. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratories, Plasma Physics Group, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratories, Plasma Physics Group, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Inertial impaction air sampling device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

Dewhurst, K.H.

1987-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

334

Inertial impaction air sampling device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

Dewhurst, Katharine H. (13150 Wenonah SE. Apt. 727, Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Inertial impaction air sampling device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inertial impactor is designed which is to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air. The device may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

Dewhurst, K.H.

1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

336

Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1984 summary of activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During fiscal 1984, major programmatic activities in AFRD continued in each of five areas: accelerator operations, highlighted by the work of nuclear science users, who produced clear evidence for the formation of compressed nuclear matter during heavy-ion collisions; high-energy physics, increasingly dominated by our participation in the design of the Superconducting Super Collider; heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, which focused on the design of a four-beam experiment as a first step toward assessing the promise of heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; and research at the Center for X-Ray Optics, which completed its first year of broadly based activities aimed at the exploitation of x-ray and ultraviolet radiation. At the same time, exploratory studies were under way, aimed at investigating major new programs for the division. During the past year, for example, we took a preliminary look at how we could use the Bevatron as an injector for a pair of colliding-beam rings that might provide the first glimpse of a hitherto unobserved state of matter called the quark-gluon plasma. Together with Livermore scientists, we also conducted pioneering high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) experiments and proposed a new FEL-based scheme (called the two-beam accelerator) for accelerating electrons to very high energies. And we began work on the design of the Coherent XUV Facility (CXF), an advanced electron storage ring for the production of intense coherent radiation from either undulators or free-electron lasers.

Not Available

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Inertial Lubrication Theory N. O. Rojas,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inertial Lubrication Theory N. O. Rojas,1 M. Argentina,1 E. Cerda,2 and E. Tirapegui3 1 Universite on the boundary conditions enforced, the energy input and the specific Reynolds number of the fluid motion. Here input of energy. We derive the minimal set of equations containing inertial effects in this strongly

Argentina, Mederic

338

Engineering ELSEVIER Fusion Engineering and Design 29 (1995) 3-17  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fusion target. The laser which will drive the target to ignition will deliver 1.8 MJ of 0.35 pm light of the National Ignition Facility to the development of inertial fusion energy M. Tobin `, G. Logan a, T. Diaz De Department of Energy is proposing to construct the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to embark on a program

Abdou, Mohamed

339

Nuclear Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although not yet developed at the commercial stage, nuclear fusion technology is still being considered as a ... used in nuclear warfare. Since research in nuclear fusion for the production of energy started abou...

Ricardo Guerrero-Lemus; José Manuel Martínez-Duart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Fusion Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear fusion was discovered in 1932, which is earlier ... than 400 fission power plants are operated to provide base load of electricity worldwide now. In contrast, nuclear fusion was used for a hydrogen bomb i...

Prof. Hiroshi Yamada

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Fusion Inhibitors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(T-20, Fuzeon) was introduced as the first fusion inhibitor at the beginning of 2003. It works by blocking the cells' viral uptake. Disadvantages of fusion inhibitors are their production difficulties, high...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

High Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when beta (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) is order of unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high beta a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. The current experiment validates this theoretical conjecture for the first time and represents critical progress toward the Polywell fusion concept which combines a high beta cusp configuration with an electrostatic fusion for a compact, economical, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

Park, Jaeyoung; Sieck, Paul E; Offermann, Dustin T; Skillicorn, Michael; Sanchez, Andrew; Davis, Kevin; Alderson, Eric; Lapenta, Giovanni

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air, and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard assoicated with compressed gas cylinders and mthods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

Lee C. Cadwallader

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Genetic fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Genetic fusion is introduced as a model for evolution. In the fusion two genomes are combined to generate a longer genome. Representing each species by a binary genetic sequence, we introduce a fitness function on the bit sequence. As the evolutionary dynamics, we incoroporate mutation, genetic fusion, and reproduction in proportion to fitness. It is found that genetic fusion leads to the appearance of module-type sequences and duplicated genes. The time necessary to find a sequence with large fitness is largely reduced by the inclusion of genetic fusion, which suggests the application of our algorithm to optimization problems.

Takashi Ikegami and Kunihiko Kaneko

1990-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

345

Steady improved confinement in FTU high field plasmas sustained by deep pellet injection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

major adverse MHD events and no impurity accumulation (an outflow of Nuclear Fusion, Vol. 41, No. 11 c to the input power due to particle concentration in the well confined hot core. Deep pellet injection (e

Vlad, Gregorio

346

Controlled Fusion and Reactors of the Tokamak Type  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research on fusion reactor problems has increased dramatically as the plasma physics of magnetic confinement continues to make substantial progress. As part of this research several studies (1–6) have been comple...

Robert W. Conn

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

An important challenge in magnetic fusion research is to obtain...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ways to reduce your tokamak heating bill: Gaining control of edge transport barriers on Alcator C-Mod A crucial challenge in magnetic fusion is to obtain high energy confinement in...

348

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, publications...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reversal and Energy Confinement Saturation in Alcator C-Mod (APS 2011) Getting a Fusion Plasma to Take Out the Trash (APS 2011) Hot and Dense Plasmas with Low Power Loads on...

349

On the Existence and Location of the Free.Boundary for an Equilibrium Problem in Nuclear Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider a non linear elliptic problem arising in the mathematical modeling of the nuclear fusion by magnetic confinement of a plasma in...

J. Francisco Padial

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

HIGH-ENERGY HEAVY-ION BEAMS AS IGNITERS FOR COMMERCIAL-SCALE INTERTIAL-FUSION POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

confined controlled thermonuclear fusion has been David L.steady succession of thermonuclear microexplosions of smallwas the detonation of thermonuclear bombs. I t was proposed

Judd, D.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Kilotesla Magnetic Assisted Fast Laser Ignited Boron-11 Hydrogen Fusion with Nonlinear Force Driven Ultrahigh Accelerated Plasma Blocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear fusion with confinement by available kilotesla magnetic fields ... combination of this approach with the established ultrahigh laser acceleration of plasma blocks driven by nonlinear (ponderomotive) forc...

P. Lalousis; S. Moustaizis; H. Hora; G. H. Miley

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: Summary Of Sessions EX/C and ICC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview is given of recent experimental results in the areas of innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement experiments as presented at the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. Important new findings are presented from fusion devices worldwide, with a strong focus towards the scientific and technical issues associated with ITER and W7-X devices, presently under construction.

Richard J. Hawryluk

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

353

Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion: Summary Report of the Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 23-26, 2011. The workshop began with plenary sessions to review the state of the art in HIF (heavy ion fusion), followed by parallel working groups, and concluded with a plenary session to review the results. There were five working groups: IFE (inertial fusion energy) targets, RF approach to HIF, induction accelerator approach to HIF, chamber and driver interface, ion sources and injectors.

Seidl, P.A.; Barnard, J.J.

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

354

Core transport studies in fusion devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The turbulence in magnetically confined fusion plasmas has important and non-trivial effects on the quality of the energy confinement. These effects are hard to make a quantitative assessment of analytically. The problem investigated in this article is the transport of energy and particles, in particular impurities, in a Tokamak plasma. Impurities from the walls of the plasma vessel cause energy losses if they reach the plasma core. It is therefore important to understand the transport mechanisms to prevent impurity accumulation and minimize losses. This is an area of research where turbulence plays a major role and is intimately associated with the performance of future fusion reactors, such as ITER.

Strand, Pär; Nordman, Hans

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Inertial measurement via dynamics of trapped particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe theoretical and practical aspects of the particle trap as an inertial sensor. The insight motivating this approach is that a trapped particle acts like a mass on a spring, but the restoring forces are provided ...

Post, E. Rehmi, 1966-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Fusion Website  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fusion Basics Fusion Intro Fusion Education Research DIII-D Internal Site Opportunities Virtual DIII-D Collaborators Countries Physics Eng Physics Operations Diagnostics Computing IFT IFT Site ITER ITER Site FDF Theory Collaborators Conferences GA-Hosted Room Reservations Fusion Meetings Plasma Publications Presentations Images Brochures Posters Movies Corporate General Atomics Products Visitor GA Fusion Hotels Internal Users GA Internal Site DIII-D General Experimental Science Experimental Science Home 2013 Experimental Campaign Burning Plasma Physics Dynamics & Control Boundary and Pedestal ELM Control Operations Diagnostics Computing Support Visitors DIII-D Web Access Help IFT ITER-GA Theory Research Highlights Personnel Links Policies Safety Comp Support Trouble Ticket Eng/Design Fusion Webmail Phone Book

357

Fusion Plasma Theory project summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively-participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at US government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the US Fusion Energy Program.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control room presents facility-wide status and orchestrates experiments using operating parameters predicted by physics models. A network of several hundred front-end processors (FEPs) implements device control. The object-oriented software system is implemented in the Ada and Java languages and emphasizes CORBA distribution of reusable software objects. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008.

E. I. Moses

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

359

Regarding Confinement Resonances  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regarding Confinement Resonances Regarding Confinement Resonances Regarding Confinement Resonances Print Wednesday, 27 July 2011 00:00 When an atom is encapsulated inside a hollow spherical carbon buckyball, the complex is called an "endofullerene." Theoretically, if the atom is an unreactive noble gas like xenon, it should be centered within the cage. If one or more of the atom's electrons are boosted out of the cage by an x-ray photon, the electron waves may be transmitted through or reflected off the carbon cage, giving rise to an interference effect similar to waves in a water tank. These so-called "confinement resonances" were predicted theoretically a decade ago but have never been observed. In the first experimental test of this theory, members of an international team led by Ronald Phaneuf, University of Nevada, and working at ALS Beamline 10.0.1 produced and isolated xenon endofullerenes and observed confinement resonances.

360

Plasma physics: A promising advance in nuclear fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Formidable challenges face the decades-long quest to achieve nuclear fusion— the power source of stars — in the laboratory. For a plasma to ... power source of stars — in the laboratory. For a plasma to undergo self-heating nuclear fusion (ignition), it must be both hot and well confined. The facilities that hope ...

Mark Herrmann

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Wellbore inertial directional surveying system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single off-shore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on the electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block aboutthe gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to the gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and anular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors.

Andreas, Ronald D. (Albuquerque, NM); Heck, G. Michael (Albuquerque, NM); Kohler, Stewart M. (Albuquerque, NM); Watts, Alfred C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Wellbore inertial directional surveying system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single offshore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on an electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block about the gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to te gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and angular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors. 25 figures.

Andreas, R.D.; Heck, G.M.; Kohler, S.M.; Watts, A.C.

1982-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

363

Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions ions are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fusion Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...present cost of coal, on a per-unit-of-energy basis. Nuclear fusion is nuclear combustion, the process that heats the sun and...enough for the release of fusion energy to exceed the heat input; and third, convert the energy released to useful form...

R. F. Post

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

COLLABORATIVE: FUSION SIMULATION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, participated in the ���¢��������Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) Planning Activities���¢������� [http://www.pppl.gov/fsp], with C.S. Chang as the institutional PI. FSP���¢��������s mission was to enable scientific discovery of important new plasma phenomena with associated understanding that emerges only upon integration. This requires developing a predictive integrated simulation capability for magnetically-confined fusion plasmas that are properly validated against experiments in regimes relevant for producing practical fusion energy. Specific institutional goal of the New York University was to participate in the planning of the edge integrated simulation, with emphasis on the usage of large scale HPCs, in connection with the SciDAC CPES project which the PI was leading. New York University successfully completed its mission by participating in the various planning activities, including the edge physics integration, the edge science drivers, and the mathematical verification. The activity resulted in the combined report that can be found in http://www.pppl.gov/fsp/Overview.html. Participation and presentations as part of this project are listed in a separation file.

Chang, Choong Seock

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

366

A TUTORIAL ON IGNITION AND GAIN FOR SMALL FUSION TARGETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fusion was discovered experimentally in 1933-34 and other charged particle nuclear reactions were documented shortly thereafter. Work in earnest on the fusion ignition problem began with Edward Teller's group at Los Alamos during the war years. His group quantified all the important basic atomic and nuclear processes and summarized their interactions. A few years later, the success of the early theory developed at Los Alamos led to very successful thermonuclear weapons, but also to decades of unsuccessful attempts to harness fusion as an energy source of the future. The reasons for this history are many, but it seems appropriate to review some of the basics with the objective of identifying what is essential for success and what is not. This tutorial discusses only the conditions required for ignition in small fusion targets and how the target design impacts driver requirements. Generally speaking, the driver must meet the energy, power and power density requirements needed by the fusion target. The most relevant parameters for ignition of the fusion fuel are the minimum temperature and areal density (rhoR), but these parameters set secondary conditions that must be achieved, namely an implosion velocity, target size and pressure, which are interrelated. Despite the apparent simplicity of inertial fusion targets, there is not a single mode of fusion ignition, and the necessary combination of minimum temperature and areal density depends on the mode of ignition. However, by providing a magnetic field of sufficient strength, the conditions needed for fusion ignition can be drastically altered. Magnetized target fusion potentially opens up a vast parameter space between the extremes of magnetic and inertial fusion.

Kirkpatrick, R. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 087545 (United States)

2009-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

367

Regarding Confinement Resonances  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regarding Confinement Resonances Print Regarding Confinement Resonances Print When an atom is encapsulated inside a hollow spherical carbon buckyball, the complex is called an "endofullerene." Theoretically, if the atom is an unreactive noble gas like xenon, it should be centered within the cage. If one or more of the atom's electrons are boosted out of the cage by an x-ray photon, the electron waves may be transmitted through or reflected off the carbon cage, giving rise to an interference effect similar to waves in a water tank. These so-called "confinement resonances" were predicted theoretically a decade ago but have never been observed. In the first experimental test of this theory, members of an international team led by Ronald Phaneuf, University of Nevada, and working at ALS Beamline 10.0.1 produced and isolated xenon endofullerenes and observed confinement resonances.

368

Regarding Confinement Resonances  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regarding Confinement Resonances Print Regarding Confinement Resonances Print When an atom is encapsulated inside a hollow spherical carbon buckyball, the complex is called an "endofullerene." Theoretically, if the atom is an unreactive noble gas like xenon, it should be centered within the cage. If one or more of the atom's electrons are boosted out of the cage by an x-ray photon, the electron waves may be transmitted through or reflected off the carbon cage, giving rise to an interference effect similar to waves in a water tank. These so-called "confinement resonances" were predicted theoretically a decade ago but have never been observed. In the first experimental test of this theory, members of an international team led by Ronald Phaneuf, University of Nevada, and working at ALS Beamline 10.0.1 produced and isolated xenon endofullerenes and observed confinement resonances.

369

Regarding Confinement Resonances  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regarding Confinement Resonances Print Regarding Confinement Resonances Print When an atom is encapsulated inside a hollow spherical carbon buckyball, the complex is called an "endofullerene." Theoretically, if the atom is an unreactive noble gas like xenon, it should be centered within the cage. If one or more of the atom's electrons are boosted out of the cage by an x-ray photon, the electron waves may be transmitted through or reflected off the carbon cage, giving rise to an interference effect similar to waves in a water tank. These so-called "confinement resonances" were predicted theoretically a decade ago but have never been observed. In the first experimental test of this theory, members of an international team led by Ronald Phaneuf, University of Nevada, and working at ALS Beamline 10.0.1 produced and isolated xenon endofullerenes and observed confinement resonances.

370

Inertial separator as a sediment control device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to address the feasibility of employing an inertial separator as a sediment control device on surface mined lands. A mathematical model has been developed to predict the sediment capture efficiency of this device on a particle size basis, and under alternative design construction conditions. The predicted performance of the inertial separator has been analyzed for a 10 year-24 hour storm generated from a contour mining operation in the Appalachian coal region. The inertial separator is designed to replace a sediment basin as the primary sediment control device. It is designed to be transported on one flat bed truck and could be modularized to facilitate a rapid installation. It has the advantages of relocation and reuse from one site to another, no moving parts, no energy requirements, simple construction, etc. The inertial separator is designed to reduce the problems common to sedimentation processes. The system uses the inertia of settling particles in accelerating flow to enhance separation, reduce short circuiting, and increase particle detention time (with a resultant increase in flocculation potential). A detailed design example is presented to indicate the expected sediment trap efficiency of the inertial separator for a sediment generated from a typical mining operation. Sediment and hydrologic inputs were determined using the SEDIMOT II model. Also, preliminary construction specifications are detailed.

Sterling, H.J.; Warner, R.C.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Driven Reconnection in Magnetic Fusion Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g. Reversed Field Pinches, Stellerators, etc.). #12;toroidal field coil toroidal magnetic field lines Figure 1.e. small non-axisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field due to coil misalignments, etc.) are a fact of life in magnetic fusion experiments. What effects do error fields have on plasma confinement? How can

Fitzpatrick, Richard

372

Discovery Research in Magnetic Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

magnetic tori? ďż˝ Fundamental study ďż˝ Confinement science, heating, sustainment, heat flux to boundariesDiscovery Research in Magnetic Fusion Energy or "How we learn about magnetic containment the shape of the magnetic field ďż˝ What can we learn by changing magnetic topology? Examples... ďż˝ Stellarator

Mauel, Michael E.

373

LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the case for early commercialization of laser inertial fusion energy (LIFE). Results taken from systems modeling of the US electrical generating enterprise quantify the benefits of fusion energy in terms of carbon emission, nuclear waste and plutonium production avoidance. Sensitivity of benefits-gained to timing of market-entry is presented. These results show the importance of achieving market entry in the 2030 time frame. Economic modeling results show that fusion energy can be competitive with other low-carbon energy sources. The paper concludes with a description of the LIFE commercialization path. It proposes constructing a demonstration facility capable of continuous fusion operations within 10 to 15 years. This facility will qualify the processes and materials needed for a commercial fusion power plant.

Anklam, T; Simon, A J; Powers, S; Meier, W R

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Vision and Inertial Sensor Based Drive Trains Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inertial Sensor Based Drive Trains Control by Haifei Cheng AInertial Sensor Based Drive Trains Control c 2010 by HaifeiInertial Sensor Based Drive Trains Control by Haifei Cheng

Cheng, Haifei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Fusion Prospects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Ermesto Mazzucato Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543, USA E-mail: mazzucato@pppl.gov Several recent letters proclaim once again the superior promise that thermonuclear fu-sion offers for future large-scale...

Ernesto Mazzucato

1996-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

376

Fusion energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Larry Baylor explains how the US ITER team is working to prevent solar flare-like events at a fusion energy reactor that will be like a small sun on earth

Baylor, Larry

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

377

Fusion energy  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Larry Baylor explains how the US ITER team is working to prevent solar flare-like events at a fusion energy reactor that will be like a small sun on earth

Baylor, Larry

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Reconfigurable Assembly Station for Precision Manufacture of Nuclear Fusion Ignition Targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper explores the design and testing of a reconfigurable assembly station developed for assembling the inertial confinement nuclear fusion ignition targets that will be fielded in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser [1]. The assembly station, referred to as the Flexible Final Assembly Machine (FlexFAM) and shown in Figure 1, is a companion system to the earlier Final Assembly Machine (FAM) [2]. Both machines consist of a manipulator system integrated with an optical coordinate measuring machine (OCMM). The manipulator system has six groups of stacked axis used to manipulate the millimeter-sized target components with submicron precision, and utilizes the same force and torque feedback sensing as the FAM. Real-time dimensional metrology is provided by the OCMM's vision system and through-the-lens (TTL) laser-based height measuring probe. The manually actuated manipulator system of the FlexFAM provides a total of thirty degrees-of-freedom to the target components being assembled predominantly in a cubic centimeter work zone.

Castro, C; Montesanti, R C; Taylor, J S; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, E G

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

379

Causality detection and turbulence in fusion plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work explores the potential of an information-theoretical causality detection method for unraveling the relation between fluctuating variables in complex nonlinear systems. The method is tested on some simple though nonlinear models, and guidelines for the choice of analysis parameters are established. Then, measurements from magnetically confined fusion plasmas are analyzed. The selected data bear relevance to the all-important spontaneous confinement transitions often observed in fusion plasmas, fundamental for the design of an economically attractive fusion reactor. It is shown how the present method is capable of clarifying the interaction between fluctuating quantities such as the turbulence amplitude, turbulent flux, and Zonal Flow amplitude, and uncovers several interactions that were missed by traditional methods.

van Milligen, B Ph; Ramisch, M; Estrada, T; Hidalgo, C; Alonso, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

2011 Confined Space Program Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Confined Space Entry Program Update Confined Space Entry Program Update IMPORTANT: After reading this document, click the "Get Course Credit" link at the bottom of the page. You will then log in to the EHS training system using your LDAP to get course credit. LBNL's confined space entry program was substantially improved this year. Several new features have been included which improve overall safety for Confined Space Entrants and better align the confined space entry program with the OSHA requirements. As an Activity Lead, Confined Space Entrant or Entry Supervisor, you should be aware of the following: We improved the procedures for safely working in confined spaces. Please review the new Chapter 34 in Publication 3000. Additionally, we have a new planning tool known as the confined space inventory which is a registry of LBNL's confined spaces, their potential hazards and safe work procedures unique to a particular confined space.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fusion Power Associates Awards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fusion Power Associates Awards Fusion Power Associates is "a non-profit, tax-exempt research and educational foundation, providing information on the status of fusion development...

382

Minimal fusion systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We define minimal fusion systems in a way that every non-solvable fusion system has a section which is minimal. Minimal fusion systems can also be… (more)

Henke, Ellen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Dynamic Instruction Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SANTA CRUZ DYNAMIC INSTRUCTION FUSION A thesis submitted in4 2.2 Instruction Fusion & Complex10 3.1 Fusion Selection

Lee, Ian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Upper-Ocean Inertial Currents Forced by a Strong Storm. Part III: Interaction of Inertial Currents and Mesoscale Eddies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction of strong near-inertial frequency currents generated by a storm with preexisting subinertial frequency currents is investigated. For 10 days after the storm, the near-inertial currents remain in the mixed layer and the subinertial ...

Eric A. D'asaro

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

VEHICLE STATE ESTIMATION USING VISION AND INERTIAL MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, pitch and yaw. A kinematic Kalman filter modeling an inertial navigation system then uses the scene: A novel method for estimating vehicle roll, pitch and yaw using machine vision and inertial sensors versus those from a high-quality GPS/INS system. Keywords: Terrain Aided Localization, Inertial

Brennan, Sean

386

John Lindl and Bruce Hammel Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advances in Indirect Drive ICF Target Physics Presentation to 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference #12;NIF in Inertial Confinement Fusion Inertial Confinement Fusion uses direct or indirect drive to couple driver by cold, dense main fuel Direct Drive Hot spot (10 keV) Cold, dense main fuel (200-1000 g/cm3) Indirect

387

RSNA 2002: Image Fusion Image Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of anatomical feature #12;RSNA 2002: Image Fusion Types of Data to be Registered Anatomic CT, MRI, US DigitizedRSNA 2002: Image Fusion Image Fusion: Introduction to the Technology Charles A. Pelizzari, Ph.D. Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology The University of Chicago #12;RSNA 2002: Image Fusion "Fusion

Pelizzari, Charles A.

388

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Inertial Confinement Fusion Inertial Confinement Fusion Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion > Facilities Facilities Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion, Facilities ICF operates a set of world-class experimental facilities to create HEDP conditions and to obtain quantitative data in support of its numerous stockpile stewardship-related activities. To learn about three high energy experimental facilities and two small lasers that provide ICF capabilities, select the links below. National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OMEGA and OMEGA EP, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics Z Machine, Sandia National Laboratories

389

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative target material Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

targets involves numerous steps. These steps are shared in common with many other types of Inertial... Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets but no other single target...

390

Research and Development | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion, including the National Ignition Facility, Omega Laser Facility at the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and the Z...

391

PowerPoint Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

relevance to Astrophysics and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Afterglow of gamma ray bursts Hot electron transport for Fast Igniter -- ICF Characteristics of CFI...

392

Contribution of different mechanisms of energy transfer in the development of the thermonuclear combustion wave upon fast ignition of ICF-targets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temporal characteristics of the thermonuclear combustion wave, critical parameters of the igniter ... fast ignition of the spherically symmetric inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target of the reactor type ... co...

N. B. Gubinskaya; S. Yu. Gus’kov; D. V. Il’in…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Two-Fluid Plasma Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fusion concepts including tokamaks, spheromaks, FRCs, Z-pinches and inertial confinement concepts], and finite Larmor radius effects in Z-pinches and Spheromaks... Plasma Dynamics Group - Aerospace

Shumlak, Uri

394

Upcoming Events, Conferences and Meetings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

modern technologies with a diverse applications, including efficient nuclear energy production via Inertial Confinement Fusion , stockpile stewardship and astrophysics. CoMuEx...

395

American Physical Society Awards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

laser beams important for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion and high-power laser-matter interactions. Max Tabak and Scott Wilks 2006 John Dawson Award for Excellence...

396

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced pilot-scale cryogenic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pilot-scale cryogenic Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Conventional and advanced thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion Riccardo Betti Summary: Conventional and...

397

Riccardo Betti, 2011 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

the physics of inertial confinement fusion including seminal transformative work on thermonuclear ignition, hydrodynamic instabilities and implosion dynamics, and the development...

398

Inertial Force, Equivalence Principle and Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the basis of a manifestly covariant formalism of non-relativistic quantum mechanics in general coordinate systems, proposed by us recently, we derive general expressions for inertial forces. The results enable us further to discuss, and to explain the validity of, the equivalence principle in non-relativistic quantum mechanics.

Minoru Omote; Susumu Kamefuchi

2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

399

Fusion–fission hybrids for nuclear waste transmutation: A synergistic step between Gen-IV fission and fusion reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy demand and GDP per capita are strongly correlated, while public concern over the role of energy in climate change is growing. Nuclear power plants produce 16% of world electricity demands without greenhouse gases. Generation-IV advanced nuclear energy systems are being designed to be safe and economical. Minimizing the handling and storage of nuclear waste is important. NIF and ITER are bringing sustainable fusion energy closer, but a significant gap in fusion technology development remains. Fusion–fission hybrids could be a synergistic step to a pure fusion economy and act as a technology bridge. We discuss how a pulsed power-driven Z-pinch hybrid system producing only 20 MW of fusion yield can drive a sub-critical transuranic blanket that transmutes 1280 kg of actinide wastes per year and produces 3000 MW. These results are applicable to other inertial and magnetic fusion energy systems. A hybrid system could be introduced somewhat sooner because of the modest fusion yield requirements and can provide both a safe alternative to fast reactors for nuclear waste transmutation and a maturation path for fusion technology. The development and demonstration of advanced materials that withstand high-temperature, high-irradiation environments is a fundamental technology issue that is common to both fusion–fission hybrids and Generation-IV reactors.

T.A. Mehlhorn; B.B. Cipiti; C.L. Olson; G.E. Rochau

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fusion-fission hybrids for nuclear waste transmutation : a synergistic step between Gen-IV fission and fusion reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy demand and GDP per capita are strongly correlated, while public concern over the role of energy in climate change is growing. Nuclear power plants produce 16% of world electricity demands without greenhouse gases. Generation-IV advanced nuclear energy systems are being designed to be safe and economical. Minimizing the handling and storage of nuclear waste is important. NIF and ITER are bringing sustainable fusion energy closer, but a significant gap in fusion technology development remains. Fusion-fission hybrids could be a synergistic step to a pure fusion economy and act as a technology bridge. We discuss how a pulsed power-driven Z-pinch hybrid system producing only 20 MW of fusion yield can drive a sub-critical transuranic blanket that transmutes 1280 kg of actinide wastes per year and produces 3000 MW. These results are applicable to other inertial and magnetic fusion energy systems. A hybrid system could be introduced somewhat sooner because of the modest fusion yield requirements and can provide both a safe alternative to fast reactors for nuclear waste transmutation and a maturation path for fusion technology. The development and demonstration of advanced materials that withstand high-temperature, high-irradiation environments is a fundamental technology issue that is common to both fusion-fission hybrids and Generation-IV reactors.

Olson, Craig Lee; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on fusion devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For fusion, obtaining reliable measurements of basic plasma parameters like ion and electron densities and temperatures is a primary goal. For theory, measurements are needed as a function of time and space to understand plasma transport and confinement with the ultimate goal of achieving economic nuclear fusion power. Electron profile measurements and plasma spectroscopy for the plasma ions are introduced. With the advent of Neutral Beam auxiliary plasma heating, Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy provides accurate and time resolved measurements of the ions in large volume fusion devices. In acknowledgement of Nicol Peacock's role in the development of these techniques, still at the forefront of plasma fusion research, this paper describes the evolution of this diagnostic method.

Duval, B. P. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

402

Liquid Vortex Shielding for Fusion Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Swirling liquid vortices can be used in fusion chambers to protect their first walls and critical elements from the harmful conditions resulting from fusion reactions. The beam tube structures in heavy ion fusion (HIF) must be shielded from high energy particles, such as neutrons, x-rays and vaporized coolant, that will cause damage. Here an annular wall jet, or vortex tube, is proposed for shielding and is generated by injecting liquid tangent to the inner surface of the tube both azimuthally and axially. Its effectiveness is closely related to the vortex tube flow properties. 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) is being conducted to precisely characterize its turbulent structure. The concept of annular vortex flow can be extended to a larger scale to serve as a liquid blanket for other inertial fusion and even magnetic fusion systems. For this purpose a periodic arrangement of injection and suction holes around the chamber circumference are used, generating the layer. Because it is important to match the index of refraction of the fluid with the tube material for optical measurement like PIV, a low viscosity mineral oil was identified and used that can also be employed to do scaled experiments of molten salts at high temperature.

Bardet, Philippe M. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Supiot, Boris F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Peterson, Per F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Savas, Oemer [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Fusion Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...later) of fusion fuel above its ignition point-about 100 million degrees...closely, so that prediction based on theory is becoming much more...new-generation experiments, based on the successes of the old...substantially lower than that of steam turbine-alternator conversion...

R. F. Post

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Symmetry Constraints on the Dynamics of Magnetically Confined Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In respect of their symmetry properties, toroidal magnetically confined plasmas have much in common with the Taylor-Couette flow. A symmetry-based analysis (equivalent bifurction theory) has proved very powerful in the analysis of the latter problem. This Letter discusses the applicability of the method to nuclear fusion experiments such as tokamaks and pinches. The likely behavior of the simplest models of rotationally symmetric tokamaks is described, and found to be potentially consistent with observation.

Arter, Wayne [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Quantum memory in non-inertial frames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effect of quantum memory in non-inertial frames under the influence of amplitude damping, depolarizing, phase flip and bit-phase flip channels. It is shown that the entanglement of initial state is heavily influenced by quantum correlations. It is seen that quantum memory compensates the loss of entanglement generated caused by the Unruh effect. It is interesting to note that the sudden death of entanglement disappears for any acceleration for higher values of memory. Therefore, it is possible to avoid ESD in non-inertial frames due to the presence of quantum memory. Furthermore, the degree of entanglement is enhanced as we increase the degree of memory and it maximizes for maximum correlations.

M. Ramzan; M. K. Khan

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

A time-delay approach for the modeling and control of plasma instabilities in thermonuclear fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A time-delay approach for the modeling and control of plasma instabilities in thermonuclear for thermonuclear fusion plasmas. Indeed, advanced plasma confinement scenarios, such as the ones considered

Sipahi, Rifat

407

Rotation studies in fusion plasmas via imaging X-ray crystal spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The increase in plasma performance associated with turbulence suppression via flow shear in magnetically confined fusion plasmas has been well documented. Currently, the standard methods for both generating and measuring ...

Ince-Cushman, Alexander Charles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Plasma-Sprayed Beryllium on Macro-Roughened Substrates for Fusion Reactor High Heat Flux Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of beryllium first wall (FW) plasma facing components for future magnetic confinement fusion experiments, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is a topic of great.....

Kendall J. Hollis; Brian D. Bartram; Manfred Roedig…

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

An Inertial Reaction to Cosmological Accelerations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mach's "fixed stars" are actually not fixed at all. The distant clusters of galaxies are not only receding from each observer but they are also accelerating since the rate of cosmological expansion is not constant. If the distant cosmic masses in someway constitute the frame of inertial reference then an additional force should be generated among local bodies in reaction to the apparent cosmological accelerations of the distant galaxies.

Scott Funkhouser

2005-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

410

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 49 (2007) 4367 doi:10.1088/0741-3335/49/1/004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion profile to access regimes with an improved confinement and detecting instabilities for plasma diagnostics plasmas A Jaun1,4 , E R Tracy2 and A N Kaufman3 1 NADA, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm

Jaun, André

411

Atomic Physics and Thermonuclear Fusion Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Presently thermonuclear fusion research is faced with a number of atomic and molecular physics problems depending on the type of high-temperature plasma investigated. The present article discusses some particular atomic physics aspects in connection with magnetically confined plasmas (Tokamaks, Stellarators): (1) rate equations for density, momentum and energy with application to plasmas; (2) initial phase of Tokamak plasmas; (3) influence of impurity radiation on operating conditions of fusion plasmas in general and on Tokamak plasmas in particular; (4) influence of atomic elementary reactions on thermodynamic plasma properties; (5) level structures of highly ionized atoms; (6) spectroscopic diagnostic problems.

H W Drawin

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Confined plasma gliding arc discharges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A confined plasma gliding arc is produced in a reactor with two-electrodes contained within a very narrow channel and water spray injected into the discharge. The evolution of pH and conductivity and the formation of hydrogen peroxide in pure water with different carrier gases and the decolourisation and mineralisation of an organic dye were compared with results for a non-confined three-electrode gliding arc reactor. The energy efficiency for the decolourisation of an organic blue dye in the confined reactor is twice that of the non-confined reactor. Significant levels of total organic carbon are removed in the confined plasma reactor.

Radu Burlica; Bruce R. Locke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Quantification of reaction violence and combustion enthalpy of plastic bonded explosive 9501 under strong confinement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The confinement experienced by an explosive during thermal self-initiation can substantially affect performance in terms of deflagration–to–detonation characteristics and explosion/detonation violence. To this end we have developed an experiment to quantitatively observe enthalpy change and reaction violence in thermally initiated plastic bonded explosive (PBX) 9501. Traditionally researchers attempt to quantify violence using terminal observations of fragment size fragment velocity and through subjective observations. In the work presented here the explosive was loaded into a heated gun assembly where we subjected a 300 mg charge to a cook-off schedule and a range of static and inertial confinements. Static confinement was controlled using rupture disks calibrated at 34.5 and 138 MPa. The use of 3.15 and 6.3 g projectile masses provided a variation in inertial confinement. This was a regime of strong confinement; a significant fraction of the explosive energy was required to rupture the disk and the projectile mass was large compared to the charge mass. The state variables pressure and volume were measured in the breech. From these data we quantified both the reactionenthalpy change and energy release rate of the explosive on a microsecond time scale using a thermodynamic analyisis. We used these values to unambiguously quantify explosion violence as a function of confinement at a fixed cook-off schedule of 190 C for 1 h. P 2 ? a measure of critical shock energy required for shock ignition of an adjacent explosive was also computed. We found variations in this confinement regime to have a weak effect on enthalpy change power violence and shock energy. Violence was approximately 100 times lower than detonating trinitrotoluene but the measured shock energy approached the critical shock energy for initiating secondary high explosives.

W. Lee Perry; Peter M. Dickson; Gary R. Parker; B. W. Asay

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A LITHIUM SELF-COOLED BLANKET FOR THE HAPL CONCEPTUAL INERTIAL CONFINEMENT REACTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. There are 60 laser beam ports situated around the chamber. The tritium breeding ratio (TBR) is 1.124. A Brayton emanations coming from the target in the form of x- rays and ions, which deposit a huge amount of energy. The beam tubes terminate at the vacuum vessel wall. From there, laser beams travel through ports

Raffray, A. René

415

Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

FUSION03, Concluding Remarks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......studies of subbarrier fusion of light nuclei are needed as input into the calculation of dynamics and evolution of various...in this conference. 7. Fusion in astrophysical settings Nuclear fusion reactions play a very important role in astrophysical settings......

A. B. Balantekin

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Magnetically Confined Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The propagation of high-velocity shock waves in an axial magnetic field generated by single-turn coils connected in parallel to a condenser bank is investigated. Time-resolved photographs show that the plasma behind the shock front is driven away from the tube walls by the magnetic pressure. This compression heats the ionized gas and maintains a high shock velocity during the transit of the front through the coil. The compressed plasma appears to be stable and undergoes radial oscillations that follow the current oscillations. The interpretation and significance of these observations in controlled thermonuclear fusion research are discussed.

A. C. Kolb

1958-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Expert Topics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AC power Education Emergency planning Engineering Fusion energy Fusion reactor design Fusion roadmapping ITER Inertial confinement fusion International collaborations Laser diagnostics Lithium Magnetic reconnection Nuclear energy Nuclear safety Particle beam dynamics Plasma astrophysics Plasma diagnostics Plasma physics Power system design Power systems Quality assurance STEM Science literacy Stellarators Surface science Sustainability Tokamaks Visiting PPPL History Fusion Basics DOE and Fusion Links Contract Documents Speakers Bureau Tours News Events Research Education Organization Contact Us Overview Learn More AC power Education Emergency planning Engineering Fusion energy Fusion reactor design Fusion roadmapping ITER Inertial confinement fusion International collaborations Laser diagnostics

419

Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Inertial currents in the Caribbean Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and Morgan (l956) on t!m other. In fact, it ls somewhat surprising tlstt the importance of inertial effects in the boundary Layer region has only recently been recognized. The argument for the importance of lateral friction is largely based on the concept... that since there can be little bottom friction in the ocean, the torque applied by the wind stress can be balanced only by Lateral frictional stresses along the coasts of the oceans. However, Morgan (l956) has shown that in addition to the counteracting...

Saylor, James H

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

data fusion 15 June 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

real world data fusion Fred Daum 15 June 2012 data fusion Copyright © 2012 Raytheon Company. All fusion fusion of measurements performance fusion of tracks interesting parameter 3 #12;real world multi-sensor data fusion fusion of tracks performance fusion of measurements interesting parameter 4 #12;real world

Dobigeon, Nicolas

422

Braided Fusion Categories First Conjecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Braided Fusion Categories First Conjecture Second Conjecture Braided Weakly Integral Fusion Fusion Categories #12;Braided Fusion Categories First Conjecture Second Conjecture Outline 1 Braided Fusion Categories Preliminaries Dimensions and Braid Representations 2 First Conjecture Finiteness

Rowell, Eric C.

423

Life Pure Fusion Target Designs: Status and Prospects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis and radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for expected high-gain fusion target performance on a demonstration 1-GWe Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) power plant are presented. The required laser energy driver is 2.2 MJ at a 0.351-{mu}m wavelength, and a fusion target gain greater than 60 at a repetition rate of 16 Hz is the design goal for economic and commercial attractiveness. A scaling-law analysis is developed to benchmark the design parameter space for hohlraum-driven central hot-spot ignition. A suite of integrated hohlraum simulations is presented to test the modeling assumptions and provide a basis for near-term experimental resolution of the key physics uncertainties on the National Ignition Facility.

Amendt, P; Dunne, M; Ho, D; Lindl, J

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

424

Multiple beam induction accelerators for heavy ion fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Induction accelerators are appealing for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy (HIF) because of their high efficiency and their demonstrated capability to accelerate high beam current (?10 kA in some applications). For the HIF application, accomplishments and challenges are summarized. HIF research and development has demonstrated the production of single ion beams with the required emittance, current, and energy suitable for injection into an induction linear accelerator. Driver scale beams have been transported in quadrupole channels of the order of 10% of the number of quadrupoles of a driver. We review the design and operation of induction accelerators and the relevant aspects of their use as drivers for HIF. We describe intermediate research steps that would provide the basis for a heavy-ion research facility capable of heating matter to fusion relevant temperatures and densities, and also to test and demonstrate an accelerator architecture that scales well to a fusion power plant.

Peter A. Seidl; John J. Barnard; Andris Faltens; Alex Friedman; William L. Waldron

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Steady Improved Confinement in FTU High Field Plasmas Sustained by Deep Pellet Injection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steady Improved Confinement in FTU High Field Plasmas Sustained by Deep Pellet Injection D at the maximum nominal toroidal field (8 T), and lower, by deep multiple pellet injection. These plasmas featured thermal losses are reduced and the total fusion reaction rate is optimized with respect to the input power

Vlad, Gregorio

426

J. A. Snipes, ITPA Confinement Database Meeting, Princeton, NJ USA 11 14 March 2002 Latest H-mode Threshold Results and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. A. Snipes, ITPA Confinement Database Meeting, Princeton, NJ USA 11 ­ 14 March 2002 Latest H. Hubbard and C. S. Pitcher MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA USA #12;J. A. Snipes, ITPA Confinement Database Meeting, Princeton, NJ USA 11 ­ 14 March 2002 Introduction Inner gap scan from 3 cm

Snipes, Joseph A.

427

Lithium and nuclear fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the EEC of a decision on the siting of the Joint European Torus (JET) nuclear fusion project, worrying setbacks though these are for European fusion research, should not be allowed ... gain is the highest (about 1,800 per fusion reaction). The first generation of nuclear fusion reactors will therefore need a continuous supply of both deuterium and tritium fuel.

Nick Walton, Ed Spooner

1976-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

428

X-ray Spectroscopy of Laser Imploded Targets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in particular the interaction with imploding targets in inertial confinement fusion. A typical fusion target is composed of materials other than the thermonuclear fuel which play a variety of roles (tamping, shielding, thermal isolation...

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Implementation of the thermonuclear process in D3He-9Be plasma on the basis of a Z pinch with an ultrafast laser ignition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new concept of inertial-magnetic confinement fusion is proposed. This concept is based on a high-current Z pinch combined with a femtosecond laser. The fusion target is composed of a...3He fuel contained under ...

V. T. Voronchev; V. I. Kukulin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Characterization of the deuteron beam current in a linear accelerator for nuclear-diagnostic calibrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research, passive detection systems are often required in several applications for observing fusion-product spectra from an ICF-capsule implosion. These detection devices can be calibrated ...

Denis, Daniel (Daniel B.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Confinement and the confined-localized-orbital-plane-wave method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mixed basis for electronic structure calculations has been constructed using a basis set consisting of localized orbitals confined to muffin-tin spheres and plane waves. The confinement smoothly suppresses the tails of atomic orbitals and hence eliminates multicenter integrals. From linear-muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) self-consistent potentials the bulk electronic structures of Cu and Si have been obtained as accurate as the original LMTO-type results. The energy-independent confined-localized-orbital-plane-wave basis functions enable a full solution without using linearization schemes.

C. M. J. Wijers; H. G. Bekker; N. E. Christensen

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma with tuning of electrostatic field  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

Rostoker, Norman (Irvine, CA); Binderbauer, Michl (Irvine, CA); Qerushi, Artan (Irvine, CA); Tahsiri, Hooshang (Irvine, CA)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

433

Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division, and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences. This isFusion Energy Sciences NetworkRequirements Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Energy

Dart, Eli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Bemerkungen zur "kalten Fusion"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steven Jones et al. reported to have observed nuclear fusion at room temperature. They observed this "cold fusion" by electrolyzing heavy water. Later experiments confirmed these observations. These experiments confirmed the generation of strong electric fields within the deuterided metals. These electric fields accelerate the deuterons to keV energies and allow the observed nuclear fusion. Roman Sioda and I suggested a theoretical description of this nuclear fusion. Our "extended micro hot fusion" scenario explains how nuclear fusion can be generated over a long time within deuterided metals. Moreover we predicted the explosion of large pieces of deuterided metals. This article reviews the "cold fusion" work of Steven Jones et al. and discusses the fracto-fusion scenario. I show that the extended micro hot fusion scenario can explain the observed neutron emissions, neutron bursts, and heat bursts.

Rainer W. Kuehne

2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

435

Bemerkungen zur "kalten Fusion"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steven Jones et al. reported to have observed nuclear fusion at room temperature. They observed this "cold fusion" by electrolyzing heavy water. Later experiments confirmed these observations. These experiments confirmed the generation of strong electric fields within the deuterided metals. These electric fields accelerate the deuterons to keV energies and allow the observed nuclear fusion. Roman Sioda and I suggested a theoretical description of this nuclear fusion. Our "extended micro hot fusion" scenario explains how nuclear fusion can be generated over a long time within deuterided metals. Moreover we predicted the explosion of large pieces of deuterided metals. This article reviews the "cold fusion" work of Steven Jones et al. and discusses the fracto-fusion scenario. I show that the extended micro hot fusion scenario can explain the observed neutron emissions, neutron bursts, and heat bursts.

Kuehne, R W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Density dependence of reactor performance with thermal confinement scalings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy confinement scalings for the thermal component of the plasma published thus far have a different dependence on plasma density and input power than do scalings for the total plasma energy. With such thermal scalings, reactor performance (measured by Q, the ratio of the fusion power to the sum of the ohmic and auxiliary input powers) worsens with increasing density. This dependence is the opposite of that found using scalings based on the total plasma energy, indicating that reactor operation concepts may need to be altered if this density dependence is confirmed in future research.

Stotler, D.P.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Photo of the Week: The Mirror Fusion Test Facility | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Mirror Fusion Test Facility The Mirror Fusion Test Facility Photo of the Week: The Mirror Fusion Test Facility July 19, 2013 - 4:17pm Addthis This 1981 photo shows the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), an experimental magnetic confinement fusion device built using a magnetic mirror at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The MFTF functioned as the primary research center for mirror fusion devices. The design consisted of a 64-meter-long vacuum vessel fitted with 26 coil magnets bonding the center of the vessel and two 400-ton yin-yang magnet mirrors at either end. The first magnet produced a magnetic field force equal to the weight of 30 jumbo jets hanging from the magnet coil. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This 1981 photo shows the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), an

438

BENCHMARKING THE ACCURACY OF INERTIAL SENSORS IN CELL PHONES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Accuracy of Gyroscopes in Cell Phones . . 2.2.1represents the shape of the cell phone. . . . . .OF INERTIAL SENSORS IN CELL PHONES by Bin An Many ubiquitous

An, Bin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

An Evaluation of Alignment Procedures for Strapdown Inertial Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The alignment of strapdown inertial systems is typically achieved by a real-time estimation process which uses a reduced Kalman filter model for coarse alignment and a more complete model for fine alignment. I...

K. P. Schwarz; Ziwen Liu

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Stochastic constraints for vision-aided inertial navigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes a new method to improve inertial navigation using feature-based constraints from one or more video cameras. The proposed method lengthens the period of time during which a human or vehicle can navigate ...

Diel, David D., 1979-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fusion Power Associates, 2011 Annual Meeting 1 General Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusion Power Associates, 2011 Annual Meeting 1 General Fusion #12;Fusion Power Associates, 2011 Annual Meeting 2 General Fusion Making commercially viable fusion power a reality. · Founded in 2002, based in Vancouver, Canada · Plan to demonstrate a fusion system capable of "net gain" within 3 years

442

Fusion Power Associates, 2012 Annual Meeting 1 General Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusion Power Associates, 2012 Annual Meeting 1 General Fusion #12;Fusion Power Associates, 2012 Annual Meeting 2 General Fusion Making affordable fusion power a reality. · Founded in 2002, based to demonstrate the first fusion system capable of "net gain" 3 years after proof · Validated by leading experts

443

Fusion News: 2002  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper summarizes key news events in the development of fusion energy. Highlights include status of ITER negotiations, FESAC studies, NIF construction and fusion-related legislation. Also included are summ...

Stephen O. Dean

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

High Current Ion Sources and Injectors for Heavy Ion Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy ion beam driven inertial fusion requires short ion beam pulses with high current and high brightness. Depending on the beam current and the number of beams in the driver system, the injector can use a large diameter surface ionization source or merge an array of small beamlets from a plasma source. In this paper, we review the scaling laws that govern the injector design and the various ion source options including the contact ionizer, the aluminosilicate source, the multicusp plasma source, and the MEVVA source.

Kwan, Joe W.

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Low-cost inertial measurement unit.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories performs many expensive tests using inertial measurement units (IMUs)--systems that use accelerometers, gyroscopes, and other sensors to measure flight dynamics in three dimensions. For the purpose of this report, the metrics used to evaluate an IMU are cost, size, performance, resolution, upgradeability and testing. The cost of a precision IMU is very high and can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Thus the goals and results of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the data flow in an IMU and determine a generic IMU design. (2) Discuss a high cost IMU implementation and its theoretically achievable results. (3) Discuss design modifications that would save money for suited applications. (4) Design and implement a low cost IMU and discuss its theoretically achievable results. (5) Test the low cost IMU and compare theoretical results with empirical results. (6) Construct a more streamlined printed circuit board design reducing noise, increasing capabilities, and constructing a self-contained unit. Using these results, we can compare a high cost IMU versus a low cost IMU using the metrics from above. Further, we can examine and suggest situations where a low cost IMU could be used instead of a high cost IMU for saving cost, size, or both.

Deyle, Travis Jay

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Asymptotic dynamics of inertial particles with memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent experimental and numerical observations have shown the significance of the Basset--Boussinesq memory term on the dynamics of small spherical rigid particles (or inertial particles) suspended in an ambient fluid flow. These observations suggest an algebraic decay to an asymptotic state, as opposed to the exponential convergence in the absence of the memory term. Here, we prove that the observed algebraic decay is a universal property of the Maxey--Riley equation. Specifically, the particle velocity decays algebraically in time to a limit that is $\\mathcal O(\\epsilon)$-close to the fluid velocity, where $0<\\epsilon\\ll 1$ is proportional to the square of the ratio of the particle radius to the fluid characteristic length-scale. These results follows from a sharp analytic upper bound that we derive for the particle velocity. For completeness, we also present a first proof of existence and uniqueness of global solutions to the Maxey--Riley equation, a nonlinear system of fractional-order differential equations.

Gabriel Provencher Langlois; Mohammad Farazmand; George Haller

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

447

Asymptotic dynamics of inertial particles with memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent experimental and numerical observations have shown the significance of the Basset--Boussinesq memory term on the dynamics of small spherical rigid particles (or inertial particles) suspended in an ambient fluid flow. These observations suggest an algebraic decay to an asymptotic state, as opposed to the exponential convergence in the absence of the memory term. Here, we prove that the observed algebraic decay is a universal property of the Maxey--Riley equation. Specifically, the particle velocity decays algebraically in time to a limit that is $\\mathcal O(\\epsilon)$-close to the fluid velocity, where $0<\\epsilon\\ll 1$ is proportional to the square of the ratio of the particle radius to the fluid characteristic length-scale. These results follows from a sharp analytic upper bound that we derive for the particle velocity. For completeness, we also present a first proof of existence and uniqueness of global solutions to the Maxey--Riley equation, a nonlinear system of fractional-order differential equ...

Langlois, Gabriel Provencher; Haller, George

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Fusion Research Moves Ahead  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fusion Research Moves Ahead ... U.S. SCIENTISTS are steadily pecking away at the problems of controlled thermonuclear reactions. ...

1959-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

Chapter 7 - Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter briefly introduces the topic of fusing light nuclei such as deuterium (D) and tritium (T) together to release binding energy. Characteristics of a plasma in which thermonuclear fusion is carried out are described. Fusion reaction cross sections are graphed for the most promising reactions including D-D and D-T. The ignition temperature for fusion is shown as the cross over point between energy produced by fusion and radiation losses due to mechanisms such as bremsstrahlung.

Raymond L. Murray; Keith E. Holbert

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Dynamic Instruction Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and energy efficient register file (Transient Register File) tightly coupled to the Fusion ALU in order to provide

Lee, Ian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Fusion Energy Division progress report, 1 January 1990--31 December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fusion Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, encompasses nearly all areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an economical and environmentally attractive energy source for the future. The program involves staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the US and abroad. Achievements resulting from this collaboration are documented in this report, which is issued as the progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division; it also contains information from components for the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling; development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments; assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas; development and testing of materials for fusion devices; and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas (about 15% of the Division`s activities). Highlights from program activities during 1990 and 1991 are presented.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Fusion systems of -type  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We prove results on 2-fusion systems related to the 2-fusion systems of groups of Lie type over the field of order 2 and certain sporadic groups. The results are used in a later paper to determine the N-systems: the 2-fusion systems of N-groups.

Michael Aschbacher

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Fusion Plasmas Martin Greenwald  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Despite the cold war, which raged for another 30 years, controlled fusion research became a modelFusion Plasmas Martin Greenwald Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, John Webster - editor, published by John Wiley & Sons, New York (1999) #12;Controlled Fusion For half a century

Greenwald, Martin

454

Cluster-impact fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a model for the cluster-impact-fusion experiments of Buehler, Friedlander, and Friedman, Calculated fusion rates as a function of bombarding energy for constant cluster size agree well with experiment. The dependence of the fusion rate on cluster size at fixed bombarding energy is explained qualitatively. The role of correlated, coherent collisions in enhanced energy loss by clusters is emphasized.

P. M. Echenique; J. R. Manson; R. H. Ritchie

1990-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

Presented by Information Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented by Information Fusion: Science and Engineering of Combining Information from Multiple's Office of Science #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Rao_InfoFusion_SC10 Information Fusion at ORNL ďż˝ ORNL Instrumental in formulating and fostering this multi-disciplinary area

456

Thermomagnetic burn control for magnetic fusion reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is provided for controlling the plasma energy production rate of a magnetic-confinement fusion reactor, by controlling the magnetic field ripple. The apparatus includes a group of shield sectors (30a, 30b, etc.) formed of ferromagnetic material which has a temperature-dependent saturation magnetization, with each shield lying between the plasma (12) and a toroidal field coil (18). A mechanism (60) for controlling the temperature of the magnetic shields, as by controlling the flow of cooling water therethrough, thereby controls the saturation magnetization of the shields and therefore the amount of ripple in the magnetic field that confines the plasma, to thereby control the amount of heat loss from the plasma. This heat loss in turn determines the plasma state and thus the rate of energy production.

Rawls, John M. (Del Mar, CA); Peuron, Unto A. (Solana Beach, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Thermomagnetic burn control for magnetic fusion reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is provided for controlling the plasma energy production rate of a magnetic-confinement fusion reactor, by controlling the magnetic field ripple. The apparatus includes a group of shield sectors formed of ferromagnetic material which has a temperature-dependent saturation magnetization, with each shield lying between the plasma and a toroidal field coil. A mechanism for controlling the temperature of the magnetic shields, as by controlling the flow of cooling water therethrough, thereby controls the saturation magnetization of the shields and therefore the amount of ripple in the magnetic field that confines the plasma, to thereby control the amount of heat loss from the plasma. This heat loss in turn determines the plasma state and thus the rate of energy production.

Rawls, J.M.; Peuron, A.U.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Figures Current World Energy Production Broken Down byUnited States and world energy production could be suppliedFigure 1.1: Current World Energy Production Broken Down by

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

outlook, October 2007. 1.1 [3] Peak oil wikipedia, the freeen.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peak_oil#cite_note-mkinghubbert1956-0.

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DT Deuterium-Tritium DU Depleted Uranium FIMA Fission ofengine loaded with depleted uranium. In Proc. PHYSOR 2010,fuel layer comprised of depleted uranium contained in

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Hydroelectric 1.1.3 Nuclear Energy . . . . . . . . .Gain GNEP Global Nuclear Energy Partnership HEU HighlyIn Progress in Nuclear Energy, 17. Pergamon Press, 1986.

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W. Williams. Laser design basis for the national ignitionof lasers to create the conditions required for ignition and350-nm laser light with a central hot spot ignition (HSI)

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properly treat the Doppler effect [45]. Similarly, thermalscattering and Doppler broadening effects. The depletion

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the HTTR project. Nuclear Engineering and Design, 233:163–measurements. Nuclear Engineering Design, 33(92), [87] L.R.in Engineering - Nuclear Engineering in the Graduate

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.1.1 Energy Production . . . . . . . . . 2.1.2 Spentof Figures Current World Energy Production Broken Down byCurrent US Energy Production Broken Down by

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Status of the Argonne heavy-ion-fusion low-beta linac  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the experimental program in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) during the next few years is to demonstrate many of the requirements of a RF linac driver for inertial-fusion power plants. So far, most of the construction effort has been applied to the front end. The ANL program has developed a high-intensity xenon source, a 1.5-MV preaccelerator, and the initial cavities of the low-beta linac. The design, initial tests, and status of the low-beta linac are described.

Watson, J.M.; Bogaty, J.M.; Moretti, A.; Sacks, R.A.; Sesol, N.Q.; Wright, A.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

CORRELATIONS IN CONFINED QUANTUM PLASMAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

DUFTY J W

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

468

Quantum Confinement in Hydrogen Bond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, the quantum confinement effect is proposed as the cause of the displacement of the vibrational spectrum of molecular groups that involve hydrogen bonds. In this approach the hydrogen bond imposes a space barrier to hydrogen and constrains its oscillatory motion. We studied the vibrational transitions through the Morse potential, for the NH and OH molecular groups inside macromolecules in situation of confinement (when hydrogen bonding is formed) and non-confinement (when there is no hydrogen bonding). The energies were obtained through the variational method with the trial wave functions obtained from Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics (SQM) formalism. The results indicate that it is possible to distinguish the emission peaks related to the existence of the hydrogen bonds. These analytical results were satisfactorily compared with experimental results obtained from infrared spectroscopy.

Santos, Carlos da Silva dos; Ricotta, Regina Maria

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

Ahlstrom, H.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Cost Accounting System for fusion studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Cost Accounting System that is applicable to all magnetic fusion reactor design studies has been developed. This system provides: (1) definitions of the elements of cost and methods for the combination of these elements to form a cost estimate; (2) a Code of Accounts that uses a functional arrangement for identification of the plant components; and (3) definitions and methods to analyze actual cost data so that the data can be directly reported into this Cost Accounting System. The purpose of the Cost Accounting System is to provide the structure for the development of a fusion cost data base and for the development of validated cost estimating procedures. This system has been developed through use at the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) and has been applied to different confinement concepts (tokamaks and tandem mirrors) and to different types of projects (experimental devices and commercial power plants). The use of this Cost Accounting System by all magnetic fusion projects will promote the development of a common cost data base, allow the direct comparison of cost estimates, and ultimately establish the cost credibility of the program.

Hamilton, W.R.; Keeton, D.C.; Thomson, S.L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Glass Transition in Confined Geometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extending mode-coupling theory, we elaborate a microscopic theory for the glass transition of liquids confined between two parallel flat hard walls. The theory contains the standard MCT equations in bulk and in two dimensions as limiting cases and requires as input solely the equilibrium density profile and the structure factors of the fluid in confinement. We evaluate the phase diagram as a function of the distance of the plates for the case of a hard sphere fluid and obtain an oscillatory behavior of the glass transtion line as a result of the structural changes related to layering.

Simon Lang; Vitalie Botan; Martin Oettel; David Hajnal; Thomas Franosch; Rolf Schilling

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

472

Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

1998-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

473

Electric microfield distribution in multicomponent plasmas Laboratoire d'Electricit, Avenue Louis Sallenave, Universit de Pau, 64000 Pau, France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

les effets rencontrés dans les plasmas de fusion inertielle produits par laser (corrélation-confinement- fusion produced by laser, the Stark broadening dia- gnostics of stripped ions immersed in ionic of the electric microfield and particular attention has been paid to effects encountered in plasmas of inertial-confined-fusion

Boyer, Edmond

474

Fusion Energy Division progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report covers all elements of the ORNL Fusion Program, including those implemented outside the division. Non-fusion work within FED, much of which is based on the application of fusion technologies and techniques, is also discussed. The ORNL Fusion Program includes research and development in most areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US and international fusion efforts. The research discussed in this report includes: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices; development and testing of plasma diagnostic tools and techniques; assembly and distribution of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. The activities involving the use of fusion technologies and expertise for non-fusion applications ranged from semiconductor manufacturing to environmental management.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, T.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Wetting Controls Separation of Inertial Flows from Solid Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the flow of liquids around solid surfaces in the inertial regime, a situation commonly encountered with the so-called “teapot effect”, the annoying tendency for a liquid to trickle down the outside of a receptacle after pouring. We demonstrate that surface wettability is an unexpected key factor in controlling flow separation and trickling, the latter being completely suppressed in the limit of superhydrophobic substrates. This unforeseen coupling is rationalized in terms of an inertial-capillary adhesion framework, which couples inertial flows to surface wettability effects. This description of flow separation successfully captures the observed dependence on the various experimental parameters, wettability, flow velocity, solid surface edge curvature. As a further illustration of this coupling, a real-time control of flow separation is demonstrated using electrowetting for contact angle actuation.

Cyril Duez; Christophe Ybert; Christophe Clanet; Lydéric Bocquet

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

476

Design of an electronic charged particle spectrometer to measure S R< on inertial fusion experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

G permanent magnet, this instrument will uniquely determine particle identities and measure particle energies on the Omega Upgrade are actively underway. Using seven 512 512 charge coupled devices CCDs and a 7.5 k

477

The role of the National Ignition Facility in energy production from inertial fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency for...in IFE, the energy multiplication factor is typically...thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency ranges...is 7%, the energy multiplication factor is 1.1, and the power conversion efficiency is...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Fast ignition of inertial fusion targets by laser-driven carbon beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-dimensional simulations of ion beam driven fast ignition are presented. Ignition energies of protons with Maxwellian spectrum and carbon ions with quasi-monoenergetic and Maxwellian energy distributions are evaluated. The effect of the coronal plasma surrounding the compressed Deuterium-Tritium is studied for three different fuel density distributions. It is found that quasi- monoenergetic ions have better coupling with the compressed Deuterium-Tritium and substantially lower ignition energies. Comparison of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions and relativistic electrons as ignitor beams shows similar laser energy requirements, provided that a laser to quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion conversion efficiency around 10% can be achieved.

Honrubia, J J; Temporal, M; Hegelich, B M; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Stauts of the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Hohlraum Point Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress on the hohlraum point design for the LIFE engine is described. New features in the original design [Amendt et al., Fus. Sci. Technol. 60, 49 (2011)] are incorporated that address the imperatives of low target cost, high manufacturing throughput, efficient and prompt material recycling, an ability for near-term testing of key target design uncertainties on the National Ignition Facility, and robustness to target chamber environment and injection insults. To this end, the novel use of Pb hohlraums and aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel loading within a high-density-carbon (HDC) ablator is implemented in the hohlraum point design.

Amendt, P; Dunne, M; Ho, D; Lasinski, B; Meeker, D; Ross, J S

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

480

Summary talk to 21st IAEA FEC, Chendu, 2006 Inertial fusion advance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DT) will be demonstrated by using National Ignition Facility (NIF) in USA and Mega Joule Laser (LMJ) in France in future 4-6 years and by using SG-IV laser facility (China) in 2020. · First ignition experiment spot scheme in 2010. · Next, LMJ laser will achieve Ignition and burning. · China is performing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inertial confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Gas Transport and Control in Thick-Liquid Inertial Fusion Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2-?uid medium. Nuclear Engineering and Design, 146(1-3):337–transient condensation. Nuclear Engineering and Design, 139:in Engineering—Nuclear Engineering in the GRADUATE DIVISION

Debonnel, Christophe Sylvain

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Rayleigh-Taylor instability and resulting failure modes of ablatively imploded inertial-fusion targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article presents a theory of these instabilities and potential modes of failure caused by them. Discussions are given for the following: small amplitude growth of the outside surface instability; and modes of failure resulting from nonlinear development of the inside surface instability.

Montierth, L.; Morse, R.

1983-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

VISUALIZATION OF MAGNETICALLY CONFINED PLASMAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developments in experimental and theoretical fu- sion energy research towards more geometric details such a source of energy is the mission of the fusion energy research community. There is presently a great, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Princeton NJ 08543, USA November 30, 1999 Abstract With the rapid

484

Crystallization of carbon tetrachloride in confined geometries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Crystallization of carbon tetrachloride in confined geometries Adil Meziane1 , Jean-Pierre E 40 71 08 #12;2 Abstract The thermal behaviour of carbon tetrachloride confined in silica gels

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

485

Reviving Cold Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reviving Cold Fusion ... In March 1989, electrochemists B. Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann announced at a press conference at the University of Utah that they had tamed the power of nuclear fusion in a benchtop electrolysis experiment. ... The discovery of cold fusion, as it came to be called, held the promise of endless amounts of pollution-free energy being generated from the natural deuterium in water. ...

STEPHEN K. RITTER

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

486

Cold Fusion Fiasco  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cold Fusion Fiasco ... When two chemists, B. Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann, announced to the world's press on March 23, 1989, that they had discovered fusion in a test tube, they launched the equivalent of a scientific gold rush. ... Within a day of that infamous Utah press conference, physicist Stephen Jones at nearby Brigham Young University claimed that he, too, had been detecting neutrons from a cold fusion cell. ...

TREVOR PINCH

1992-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

487

Magnetized Target Fusion Collaboration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fusion has the potential to satisfy the prodigious power that the world will demand in the future, but it has yet to be harnessed as a practical energy source. The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. It is the contention here that a simpler path to fusion can be achieved by creating fusion conditions in a different regime at small scale (~ a few cm). One such program now under study, referred to as Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), is directed at obtaining fusion in this high energy density regime by rapidly compressing a compact toroidal plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC). To make fusion practical at this smaller scale, an efficient method for compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. In one variant of MTF a conducting metal shell is imploded electrically. This radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining shell, thus lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. The undertaking described in this report was to provide a suitable target FRC, as well as a simple and robust method for inserting and stopping the FRC within the imploding liner. The FRC must also survive during the time it takes for the metal liner to compress the FRC target. The initial work at the UW was focused on developing adequate preionization and flux trapping that were found to be essential in past experiments for obtaining the density, flux and most critically, FRC lifetime required for MTF. The timescale for testing and development of such a source can be rapidly accelerated by taking advantage of a new facility funded by the Department of Energy. At this facility, two inductive plasma accelerators (IPA) were constructed and tested. Recent experiments with these IPAs have demonstrated the ability to rapidly form, accelerate and merge two hypervelocity FRCs into a compression chamber. The resultant FRC that was formed was hot (T{sub ion} ~ 400 eV), stationary, and stable with a configuration lifetime several times that necessary for the MTF liner experiments. The accelerator length was less than 1 meter, and the time from the initiation of formation to the establishment of the final equilibrium was less than 10 microseconds. With some modification, each accelerator can be made capable of producing FRCs suitable for the production of the target plasma for the MTF liner experiment. Based on the initial FRC merging/compression results, the design and methodology for an experimental realization of the target plasma for the MTF liner experiment can now be defined. The construction and testing of the key components for the formation of the target plasma at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) will be performed on the IPA experiment, now at MSNW. A high density FRC plasmoid will be formed and accelerated out of each IPA into a merging/compression chamber similar to the imploding liner at AFRL. The properties of the resultant FRC plasma (size, temperature, density, flux, lifetime) will be obtained. The process will be optimized, and a final design for implementation at AFRL will be carried out. When implemented at AFRL it is anticipated that the colliding/merging FRCs will then be compressed by the liner. In this manner it is hoped that ultimately a plasma with ion temperatures reaching the 10 keV range and fusion gain near unity can be obtained.

John Slough

2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

488

Controlled Nuclear Fusion Reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE presentation of full and authoritative accounts of research on controlled nuclear fusion reactions was a major feature of the second Geneva Conference on the Peaceful Uses of ...

R. S. PEASE

1958-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

489

Fission, Fusion Materials Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is shown in illustration. Materials are the immediate priority of both the fission and fusion communities. Extending the lifetime of the current fleet of light water reactors...

490

AEC Pushes Fusion Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AEC Pushes Fusion Reactors ... Project Sherwood, as the study program is called, began in 1951-52 soon after the first successful thermonuclear explosion in the Pacific. ...

1955-10-10T23:59:59.000Z