Sample records for inelastic x-ray scattering

  1. Nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and synchrotron Mossbauer spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jung-Fu "Afu"

    Chapter 19 Nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and synchrotron Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy with nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and synchrotron Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy for studying magnetic to the Planck radiation function. Synchrotron Mo¨ssbauer spectra and partial phonon density of states (PDOS

  2. Staff at sector 30, inelastic x-ray scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sector 30 Staff Advanced Photon Source A U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences national synchrotron x-ray research facility Search Button...

  3. Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niedziela, Jennifer L [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80~K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

  4. Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niedziela, J. L., E-mail: niedzielajl@ornl.gov [Instrument and Source Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Stone, M. B., E-mail: stonemb@ornl.gov [Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80?K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

  5. Maximum entropy deconvolution of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Laverock; A. R. H. Preston; D. Newby Jr; K. E. Smith; S. B. Dugdale

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) has become a powerful tool in the study of the electronic structure of condensed matter. Although the linewidths of many RIXS features are narrow, the experimental broadening can often hamper the identification of spectral features. Here, we show that the Maximum Entropy technique can successfully be applied in the deconvolution of RIXS spectra, improving the interpretation of the loss features without a severe increase in the noise ratio.

  6. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr?IrO? using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Jaouen, N.; Nicolaou, A.; Yin, W. G.; Rayan Serrao, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ding, H.; et al

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr?IrO?, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edgemore »RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.« less

  7. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr?IrO? using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, X. [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Beijing National Lab. for Condensed Matter Physics (BNLCP-CAS); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Dean, M. P. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liu, J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chiuzbaian, S. G. [Sorbonne Univ., Paris (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin (France); Jaouen, N. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin (France); Nicolaou, A. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin (France); Yin, W. G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rayan Serrao, C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ramesh, R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ding, H. [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Beijing National Lab. for Condensed Matter Physics (BNLCP-CAS); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Hill, J. P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr?IrO?, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edge RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.

  8. Inelastic x-ray scattering study of supercooled liquid and solid silicon.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alatas, A.; Said, A.; Sinn, H.; Alp, E.E.; Kodituwakku, C.N.; Saboungi, M.L.; Price, D.L.; X-Ray Science Division; Western Michigan Univ.; Purdue Univ.; CRMD-CNRS; CRMHT-CNRS

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Momentum-resolved inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) technique is one of the powerful methods for the study of dynamical properties of a given system even in extreme conditions like high temperature and high pressure. At the same time, experimental studies of physical and structural properties of liquids have multiplied in recent years with the advent of containerless techniques. These methods reduce the possibility of contamination of specimens and remove external nucleation sites. Therefore, by combining the IXS method with the levitation method, the dynamical properties of stable liquids up to 3000 K and supercooled phase of liquids can be studied. Silicon is a basic material in the semiconductor industry and has been the subject of a large amount of experimental and theoretical studies over a long time. In the crystalline phase at ambient conditions, silicon is a diamond-structured semiconductor, but upon melting it undergoes a semiconductor-to-metal transition accompanied by significant changes in the structure and density. The coordination number increases from 4 in the solid to about 6.5 in the liquid, and liquid density is increased by about 10%. The principal purpose of the present study was to determine silicon's elastic modulus from the measurement of averaged sound speed determined from IXS. The experiments were carried out at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline 3-ID with a high-resolution monochromator consisting of two nested channel-cut crystals and four backscattering analyzer setups in the horizontal scattering plane 6 m from the sample. The requirements for very high energy resolution and the basic principles of such instrumentation are discussed elsewhere as referenced. The levitation apparatus was enclosed in a bell jar specially designed for backscattering geometry with a separation of 10 cm between the sample and the detector. Silicon spheres of 2 to 3 mm in diameter were suspended in an argon gas jet and heated with a 270 W CO{sub 2} laser beam. Temperatures were measured during the experiment with a pyrometer whose operating wavelength was 0.65 {micro}m. The temperature gradient on the sample was estimated to be about +/- 20 K. The energy scans were taken for supercooled-liquid and hot-solid silicon at temperature T=1620 K. Sound velocities were determined from the initial slope of the excitation frequencies. Then, the longitudinal moduli for hotsolid and supercooled-liquid silicon were calculated from L = v{sub L}{sup 2}{rho} using measured velocities. In these calculations, density values were taken from Ohsaka et al. as referenced. Results are presented in Table 1. together with room-temperature, hot-solid single-crystal measurements, and stable-liquid values. Room-temperature longitudinal moduli were calculated from the values of the single-crystal elastic constants. They were measured between 300 K and 870 K. Since there was no phase transition up to temperature 1620 K for hot-solid silicon, it is reasonable to extrapolate these data to 1620 K in order to compare to our results for the hot solid. A significant difference (about 20%) is observed between our measurement and the extrapolated single-crystal value of the longitudinal modulus for solid silicon at temperature 1620K. This reduction of the longitudinal modulus may be an indication of the pre-melting. The factor of more than two change in the elastic modulus between supercooled liquid and hot solid at the same temperature can be attributed to the semiconductor-to-metal transition in silicon associated with melting. Also, the longitudinal modulus of the stable liquid is reported in Table 1. About a 10% difference is observed between the modulus of the supercooled and the stable liquid silicon. This can be interpreted as silicon still maintaining metallic properties with a significant increase in the degree of the directional bonding upon supercooling, as found in the x-ray diffraction and ab initio MD studies. All these results are discussed in reference.

  9. Ultra-high Resolution Optics for EUV and Soft X-ray Inelastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voronov, Dmitry L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    16. Yu. Shvyd’ko, X-Ray Optics, Berlin: Springer-Verlag,Ultra-high Resolution Optics for EUV and Soft X-rayspectral resolution soft x-ray optics. Conventionally in the

  10. An alternative scheme of angular-dispersion analyzers for high-resolution medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xian-Rong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) optics with meV and sub-meV resolution has attracted considerable efforts in recent years. Meanwhile, there are also concerns or debates about the fundamental and feasibility of the involved schemes. Here the central optical component, the back-reflection angular-dispersion monochromator or analyzer, is analyzed. The results show that the multiple-beam diffraction effect together with transmission-induced absorption can noticeably reduce the diffraction efficiency, although it may not be a fatal threat. In order to improve the efficiency, a simple four-bounce analyzer is proposed that completely avoids these two adverse effects. The new scheme is illustrated to be a feasible alternative approach for developing meV- to sub-meV-resolution IXS spectroscopy.

  11. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering study of charge excitations in superconducting and nonsuperconducting PrFeAsO??y

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jarrige, I.; Nomura, T.; Ishii, K.; Gretarsson, H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, J.; Upton, M.; Casa, D.; Gog, T.; Ishikado, M.; Fukuda, T.; Yoshida, M.; Hill, J. P.; Liu, X.; Hiraoka, N.; Tsuei, K. D.; Shamoto, S.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first observation by momentum-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering of charge excitations in an iron-based superconductor and its parent compound, PrFeAsO?.? and PrFeAsO, respectively, with two main results. First, using calculations based on a 16-band dp model, we show that the energy of the lowest-lying excitations, identified as dd interband transitions of dominant xz,yz orbital character, exhibits a dramatic dependence on electron correlation. This enables us to estimate the Coulomb repulsion U and Hund's coupling J, and to highlight the role played by J in these peculiar orbital-dependent electron correlation effects. Second, we show that short-range antiferromagnetic correlations, which are a prerequisite to the occurrence of these excitations at the ? point, are still present in the superconducting state.

  12. The phonon density of states of (alpha) and (delta)-Plutonium by inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manley, M E; Said, A; Fluss, M J; Wall, M; Lashley, J C; Alatas, A; Moore, K T

    2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of the phonon density of states (DOS) were performed on polycrystalline samples of pure {alpha}-Pu and {delta}-Pu{sub 0.98}Ga{sub 0.02} at room temperature. The heat capacity of {alpha}-Pu is well reproduced by contributions calculated from the measured phonon DOS plus conventional thermal expansion and electronic contributions, showing that {alpha}-Pu is a 'well-behaved' metal in this regard. A comparison of the phonon DOS of the two phases at room temperature surprised us in that the vibrational entropy difference between them is only a quarter of the total entropy difference expected from known thermodynamic measurements. The missing entropy is too large to be accounted for by conventional electronic entropy and evidence from the literature rules out a contribution from spin fluctuations. Possible alternative sources for the missing entropy are discussed.

  13. Nonlinear X-ray Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuchs, Matthias; Chen, Jian; Ghimire, Shambhu; Shwartz, Sharon; Kozina, Michael; Jiang, Mason; Henighan, Thomas; Bray, Crystal; Ndabashimiye, Georges; Bucksbaum, P H; Feng, Yiping; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Kenney, Christopher; Guillet, Serge; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin; Moeller, Stefan; Hastings, Jerome B; Reis, David A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray scattering is a weak linear probe of matter. It is primarily sensitive to the position of electrons and their momentum distribution. Elastic X-ray scattering forms the basis of atomic structural determination while inelastic Compton scattering is often used as a spectroscopic probe of both single-particle excitations and collective modes. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are unique tools for studying matter on its natural time and length scales due to their bright and coherent ultrashort pulses. However, in the focus of an XFEL the assumption of a weak linear probe breaks down, and nonlinear light-matter interactions can become ubiquitous. The field can be sufficiently high that even non-resonant multiphoton interactions at hard X-rays wavelengths become relevant. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions, the simultaneous Compton scattering of two identical photons producing a single photon at nearly twice the photon energy. We measure scattered...

  14. High-energy magnetic excitations in overdoped La 2 - x Sr x CuO 4 studied by neutron and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wakimoto, S.; Ishii, K.; Kimura, H.; Fujita, M.; Dellea, G.; Kummer, K.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Debeer-Schmitt, L. M.; Granroth, G. E.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed neutron inelastic scattering and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu-L? edge to study high-energy magnetic excitations at energy transfers of more than 100 meV for overdoped La2-xSrxCuO? with x=0.25 (Tc=15 K) and x=0.30 (nonsuperconducting) using identical single-crystal samples for the two techniques. From constant-energy slices of neutron-scattering cross sections, we have identified magnetic excitations up to ~250 meV for x=0.25. Although the width in the momentum direction is large, the peak positions along the (?,?) direction agree with the dispersion relation of the spin wave in the nondoped La?CuO? (LCO), which is consistent with the previous RIXS results of cuprate superconductors. Using RIXS at the Cu-L? edge, we have measured the dispersion relations of the so-called paramagnon mode along both (?,?) and (?,0) directions. Although in both directions the neutron and RIXS data connect with each other and the paramagnon along (?,0) agrees well with the LCO spin-wave dispersion, the paramagnon in the (?,?) direction probed by RIXS appears to be less dispersive and the excitation energy is lower than the spin wave of LCO near (?/2,?/2). Thus, our results indicate consistency between neutron inelastic scattering and RIXS, and elucidate the entire magnetic excitation in the (?,?) direction by the complementary use of two probes. The polarization dependence of the RIXS profiles indicates that appreciable charge excitations exist in the same energy range of magnetic excitations, reflecting the itinerant character of the overdoped sample. A possible anisotropy in the charge excitation intensity might explain the apparent differences in the paramagnon dispersion in the (?,?) direction as detected by the x-ray scattering.

  15. High-energy magnetic excitations in overdoped La 2 - x Sr x CuO 4 studied by neutron and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wakimoto, S.; Ishii, K.; Kimura, H.; Fujita, M.; Dellea, G.; Kummer, K.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Debeer-Schmitt, L. M.; Granroth, G. E.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed neutron inelastic scattering and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu-L? edge to study high-energy magnetic excitations at energy transfers of more than 100 meV for overdoped La2-xSrxCuO? with x=0.25 (Tc=15 K) and x=0.30 (nonsuperconducting) using identical single-crystal samples for the two techniques. From constant-energy slices of neutron-scattering cross sections, we have identified magnetic excitations up to ~250 meV for x=0.25. Although the width in the momentum direction is large, the peak positions along the (?,?) direction agree with the dispersion relation of the spin wave in the nondoped La?CuO? (LCO), which is consistent with themore »previous RIXS results of cuprate superconductors. Using RIXS at the Cu-L? edge, we have measured the dispersion relations of the so-called paramagnon mode along both (?,?) and (?,0) directions. Although in both directions the neutron and RIXS data connect with each other and the paramagnon along (?,0) agrees well with the LCO spin-wave dispersion, the paramagnon in the (?,?) direction probed by RIXS appears to be less dispersive and the excitation energy is lower than the spin wave of LCO near (?/2,?/2). Thus, our results indicate consistency between neutron inelastic scattering and RIXS, and elucidate the entire magnetic excitation in the (?,?) direction by the complementary use of two probes. The polarization dependence of the RIXS profiles indicates that appreciable charge excitations exist in the same energy range of magnetic excitations, reflecting the itinerant character of the overdoped sample. A possible anisotropy in the charge excitation intensity might explain the apparent differences in the paramagnon dispersion in the (?,?) direction as detected by the x-ray scattering.« less

  16. Scattering of x rays from low-Z materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, J.L.; Kissel, L.D.; Catron, H.C.; Hansen, R.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X rays incident on thin beryllium, boron, carbon, and other low-Z materials undergo both elastic and inelastic scattering as well as diffraction from the crystalline or crystalline-like structure of the material. Unpolarized monoenergetic x rays in the 1.5 to 8.0-keV energy range were used to determine the absolute scattering efficiency of thin beryllium, carbon, and boron foils. These measurements are compared to calculated scattering efficiencies predicted by single-atom theories. In addition, the relative scattering efficiency versus x-ray energy was measured for other low-Z foils using unpolarized bremsstrahlung x rays. In all the low-Z foils examined, we observed Bragg-like x-ray diffraction due to the ordered structure of the materials.

  17. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  18. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

  19. High Resolution X-Ray Scattering at Sector 3, Advanced Photon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about 1 meV resolution; momentum resolved inelastic x-ray scattering with about 1 meV resolution (HERIX); Synchrotron Mossbauer spectroscopy with about 10 neV resolution (SMS)....

  20. A sample cell to study hydrate formation with x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, Heiko; Lehmkuehler, Felix; Sternemann, Christian; Feroughi, Omid; Tolan, Metin [Fakultaet Physik/DELTA, Technische Universitaet Dortmund, Maria-Goeppert-Mayer-Str. 2, Dortmund D-44221 (Germany); Simonelli, Laura; Huotari, Simo [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Boite Postale 220, Grenoble Cedex 9 F-38043 (France)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new sample cell for measuring nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectra of a tetrahydrofuran (THF)-water liquid mixture and THF hydrate. The hydrate is formed inside the cell after nucleation seeds have been offered by a special magnetic stirring mechanism. Hydrate formation was verified by wide angle x-ray scattering and nonresonant x-ray Raman scattering spectra at the oxygen K-edge. A broad range of scattering angles can be studied with this cell which is necessary for momentum transfer dependent inelastic x-ray scattering. This cell is ideal to examine other liquid hydrate formers or other liquid samples, which have to be mixed in situ during the measurements.

  1. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Laboratory Learning Experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    .A. & Svergun D.I. (1987). Structure Analysis by Small-Angle X-Ray and Neutron Scattering. NY: Plenum PressSmall Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Laboratory Learning Experiences o - Use of small angle X-ray scattering instrumentation o - Programs that you will use SAXS (BRUKER AXS) PRIMUS (Konarev, Volkov, Koch

  2. Small Angle X-ray Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan ManagingW.tepidumAngle X-ray Scattering

  3. Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boothroyd, Andrew

    Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites Graeme Eoin Johnstone A Thesis submitted are performed using a variety of neutron scattering and x-ray scattering techniques. The electronic ground for analysing the results of the polarised neutron scattering experiment. There are a large number of people who

  4. Fourteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Fourteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 12 - 25, 2012 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang

  5. Tenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Tenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering September 24 - October 11, 2008 at Argonne of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  6. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    15th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10 - 24, 2013 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang

  7. Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 11 ­ June 25, 2011 at Argonne of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  8. Sixteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Sixteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 14-28, 2014 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Suzanne G.E. te Velthuis, Esen Ercan Alp

  9. Twelfth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Twelfth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 12 ­ June 26, 2010 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  10. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering May 30 ­ June 13, 2009 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  11. Inelastic Scatterings of Entangled Mossbauer Gammas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao Cheng; Zhongming Wang

    2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of the temperature-dependent inelastic scattering of three entangled Mossbauer gammas in the time-resolved Mossbauer spectroscopy. Recently, the long-lived E3 Mossbauer transition of rhodium generated by bremsstrahlung irradiation has been reported. Two kinds of X-rays with the fast decay are attributed to the tri-photon effect. They are tri-photon pile-up of rhodium K X-rays and the high-Z impurity K X-rays. Energy of the particular K emission is higher than the sum energy of two Mossbauer gammas. This letter reports new discoveries by cooling down the sample using liquid nitrogen, namely the collective anomalous emission of entangled Mossbauer gammas. The enhancement of inelastic scatterings at low temperature such as rhodium K satellites is attributed to this entanglement.

  12. Inelastic Scatterings of Entangled Mossbauer Gammas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Y; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Zhongming

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of the temperature-dependent inelastic scattering of three entangled Mossbauer gammas in the time-resolved Mossbauer spectroscopy. Recently, the long-lived E3 Mossbauer transition of rhodium generated by bremsstrahlung irradiation has been reported. Two kinds of x rays with the fast decay are attributed to the tri-photon effect. They are tri-photon pile-up of rhodium K x rays and the high-Z impurity K x rays. Energy of the particular K emission is greater than the sum energy of two Mossbauer gammas. This letter reports new discoveries by cooling down the sample using liquid nitrogen, namely the collective anomalous emission of entangled Mossbauer gammas. The enhancement of inelastic scatterings at low temperature such as rhodium K satellites is attributed to this entanglement.

  13. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Oak Ridge National Laboratory June 12-26, 2010 Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Oak Ridge National Laboratory June 12-26, 2010 Oak:30 Lecture Inelastic Neutron Scattering B. D. Gaulin McMaster University Lecture Magnetic Scattering B. D Break Break Break Break 9:45 - 10:45 Lecture Continued Inelastic Neutron Scattering B. D. Gaulin Mc

  14. Imaging Quantum States with X-ray Compton Scattering | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging Quantum States with X-ray Compton Scattering Wednesday, April 8, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Yoshiharu Sakurai (Japan Synchrotron...

  15. Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering Monday, September 10, 2012 - 10:00am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Keoki Seu Seminar: With the advent of free electron...

  16. X-ray server : an outline resource for simulations of x-ray diffraction and scattering.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanov, S.; Biosciences Division

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Server is a public project operational at the APS since 1997 with the goals to explore novel network technologies for providing wide scientific community with access to personal research results, establishing scientific collaborations, and refining scientific software. The Server provides Web-based access to a number of programs developed by the author in the field of X-ray diffraction and scattering. The software code operates directly on the Server available for use without downloading. Currently seven programs are accessible that have been used more than 85,000 times. This report discusses the Server philosophy, provides an overview of the physical models and algorithms beneath the codes and demonstrates some applications of the programs. It is shown with examples and statistics how the Server goals are achieved. The plans for further X-ray Server development are outlined.

  17. High performance x-ray anti-scatter grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.

    1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are an x-ray anti-scatter grid for x-ray imaging, particularly for screening mammography, and method for fabricating same, x-rays incident along a direct path pass through a grid composed of a plurality of parallel or crossed openings, microchannels, grooves, or slots etched in a substrate, such as silicon, having the walls of the microchannels or slots coated with a high opacity material, such as gold, while x-rays incident at angels with respect to the slots of the grid, arising from scatter, are blocked. The thickness of the substrate is dependent on the specific application of the grid, whereby a substrate of the grid for mammography would be thinner than one for chest radiology. Instead of coating the walls of the slots, such could be filed with an appropriate liquid, such as mercury. 4 Figs.

  18. High performance x-ray anti-scatter grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray anti-scatter grid for x-ray imaging, particularly for screening mammography, and method for fabricating same, x-rays incident along a direct path pass through a grid composed of a plurality of parallel or crossed openings, microchannels, grooves, or slots etched in a substrate, such as silicon, having the walls of the microchannels or slots coated with a high opacity material, such as gold, while x-rays incident at angels with respect to the slots of the grid, arising from scatter, are blocked. The thickness of the substrate is dependent on the specific application of the grid, whereby a substrate of the grid for mammography would be thinner than one for chest radiology. Instead of coating the walls of the slots, such could be filed with an appropriate liquid, such as mercury.

  19. Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamboa, E.J. [University of Michigan; Huntington, C.M. [University of Michigan; Trantham, M.R. [University of Michigan; Keiter, P.A [University of Michigan; Drake, R.P. [University of Michigan; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  20. Phonon dispersion of graphite by inelastic x-ray scattering * J. Maultzsch,1, E. Dobardzi,2 S. Reich,3 I. Milosevi,2 M. Damnjanovi,2 A. Bosak,4 M. Krisch,4 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    , University of Belgrade, POB 368, 11011 Belgrade, Serbia 3Department of Materials Science and Engineering quality. It has been partly measured by inelastic neutron scattering INS , electron- energy loss, e.g., the crossing between the acoustic and optical bands near the M point or the energy

  1. 2011 U.S. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, Jonathan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); te Vethuis, Suzanne [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL; Budai, John D [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 13th annual U.S. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering was held June 11 to 25, 2011, at both Oak Ridge and Argonne National Laboratories. This school brought together 65 early career graduate students from 56 different universities in the US and provided them with a broad introduction to the techniques available at the major large-scale neutron and synchrotron x-ray facilities. This school is focused primarily on techniques relevant to the physical sciences, but also touches on cross-disciplinary bio-related scattering measurements. During the school, students received lectures by over 30 researchers from academia, industry, and national laboratories and participated in a number of short demonstration experiments at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS) and Oak Ridge's Spallation neutron Source (SNS) and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) facilities to get hands-on experience in using neutron and synchrotron sources. The first week of this year's school was held at Oak Ridge National Lab, where Lab director Thom Mason welcomed the students and provided a shitorical perspective of the neutron and x-ray facilities both at Oak Ridge and Argonne. The first few days of the school were dedicated to lectures laying out the basics of scattering theory and the differences and complementarity between the neutron and x-ray probes given by Sunil Sinha. Jack Carpenter provided an introduction into how neutrons are generated and detected. After this basic introduction, the students received lectures each morning on specific techniques and conducted demonstration experiments each afternoon on one of 15 different instruments at either the SNS or HFIR. Some of the topics covered during this week of the school included inelastic neutron scattering by Bruce Gaulin, x-ray and neutron reflectivity by Chuck Majkrazak, small-angle scattering by Volker Urban, powder diffraction by Ashfia Huq and diffuse scattering by Gene Ice.

  2. Crystal defect studies using x-ray diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, B.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscopic lattice defects such as point (single atom) defects, dislocation loops, and solute precipitates are characterized by local electronic density changes at the defect sites and by distortions of the lattice structure surrounding the defects. The effect of these interruptions of the crystal lattice on the scattering of x-rays is considered in this paper, and examples are presented of the use of the diffuse scattering to study the defects. X-ray studies of self-interstitials in electron irradiated aluminum and copper are discussed in terms of the identification of the interstitial configuration. Methods for detecting the onset of point defect aggregation into dislocation loops are considered and new techniques for the determination of separate size distributions for vacancy loops and interstitial loops are presented. Direct comparisons of dislocation loop measurements by x-rays with existing electron microscopy studies of dislocation loops indicate agreement for larger size loops, but x-ray measurements report higher concentrations in the smaller loop range. Methods for distinguishing between loops and three-dimensional precipitates are discussed and possibilities for detailed studies considered. A comparison of dislocation loop size distributions obtained from integral diffuse scattering measurements with those from TEM show a discrepancy in the smaller sizes similar to that described above.

  3. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells Print Wednesday, 25 February 2015 00:00 Plastic solar cells...

  4. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10-24, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10-24, 2013 Argonne National Laboratory National Laboratory 3:15 ­ 3:30 Break #12;National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10 Dinner Week 1 wrap-up Picnic #12;National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10-24, 2012 Oak

  5. K-alpha X-ray Thomson Scattering From Dense Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kritcher, Andrea L. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Neumayer, Paul; Castor, John; Doeppner, Tilo; Landen, Otto L.; Ng, Andrew; Pollaine, Steve; Price, Dwight; Glenzer, Siegfried H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Falcone, Roger W.; Ja Lee, Hae [Physics Department, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States); Lee, Richard W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Physics Department, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States); Morse, Edward C. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States)

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrally resolved Thomson scattering using ultra-fast K-alpha x rays has measured the compression and heating of shocked compressed matter. The evolution and coalescence of two shock waves traveling through a solid density LiH target were characterized by the elastic scattering component. The density and temperature at shock coalescence, 2.2 eV and 1.7x10{sup 23} cm{sup -3}, were determined from the plasmon frequency shift and the relative intensity of the elastic and inelastic scattering features in the collective scattering regime. The observation of plasmon scattering at coalescence indicates a transition to the dense metallic state in LiH. The density and temperature regimes accessed in these experiments are relevant for inertial confinement fusion experiments and for the study of planetary formation.

  6. Week 2 AGENDA: National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering page 1 of 5 Oak Ridge National Laboratory [9/30/08

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Week 2 AGENDA: National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering page 1 of 5 Oak Ridge National Ridge National Laboratory Dean Myles, Director ORNL Neutron Scattering Science Division 1 GROUPS [A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I] Iran Thomas Auditorium Lecture Inelastic Neutron Scattering R. Osborn, ANL ALL

  7. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 14-28, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 14-28, 2014 Argonne National Laboratory:00 Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Week 1 wrap-up Picnic #12;National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Restaurant 9:45 - 10:45 Lecture Interaction of X-rays and Neutrons with Matter Roger Pynn University

  8. IN SITU SURFACE X-RAY SCATTERING STUDIES OF ELECTROSORPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WANG,J.X.; ADZIC,R.R.; OCKO,B.M.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A short review of the application of surface x-ray scattering techniques to the electrode/electrolyte interfaces is presented. Recent results on metal, halide, and metal-halide adlayers with three specific systems: Bi on Au(100) and Au(110); Br on Au(100) and Ag(100); and the coadsorption of Tl with Br or I on Au(111), are given as an illustration. Factors affecting ordering of pure metal and halide adlayers and the metal-halide surface compounds are discussed in some detail.

  9. Resonant scattering of an X-ray photon by a heavy atom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopersky, A. N., E-mail: hopersky_vm_1@rgups.ru; Nadolinsky, A. M. [Rostov State University of Transport Communication (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of many-body and relativistic effects on the absolute values and shape of the double differential cross section for the resonant scattering of a linearly polarized X-ray photon by a free xenon atom near the K-shell ionization threshold has been theoretically analyzed. The evolution of the spatially extended structure of the scattering cross section to the K{sub {alpha}}{sub ,{beta}} structure of the X-ray spectrum of the xenon atom emission has been demonstrated. The calculations have been performed in the dipole approximation for the anomalous dispersion component of the total inelastic scattering amplitude and in the impulse approximation for the contact component of this amplitude. The contribution of the Rayleigh (elastic) scattering component is taken into account using the methods developed in Hopersky et al., J. Phys. B 30, 5131 (1997). The effects of the radial relaxation of the electron shells, spin-orbit splitting, double excitation/ionization of the atomic ground state, as well as the Auger and radiative decays of the produced main vacancies, are considered. Using the results obtained by Tulkki, Phys. Rev. A 32, 3153 (1985) and Biggs et al., At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 16, 201 (1975), the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock wavefunctions are changed to the relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock wavefunctions of the single-particle scattering states when constructing the process probability amplitude. The calculations are predicting and are in good agreement with the synchrotron experiment on the measurement of the absolute values and shape of the double differential cross section for the resonant scattering of an X-ray photon by a free xenon atom reported by Czerwinski et al., Z. Phys. A 322, 183 (1985)

  10. Neutron and X-ray Scattering Studies of Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boothroyd, Andrew

    Neutron and X-ray Scattering Studies of Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Russell A. Ewings 2008 #12;Abstract Neutron and X-ray Scattering Studies of Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Russell-ray scattering and neutron scattering experiments on several strongly correlated transition metal oxides

  11. Imaging Nonequilibrium Atomic Vibrations with X-ray Diffuse Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trigo, M.; Chen, J.; Vishwanath, V.H.; /SLAC; Sheu, Y.M.; /Michigan U.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.; /U. Chicago; Reis, D; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; ,

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We use picosecond x-ray diffuse scattering to image the nonequilibrium vibrations of the lattice following ultrafast laser excitation. We present images of nonequilibrium phonons in InP and InSb throughout the Brillouin-zone which remain out of equilibrium up to nanoseconds. The results are analyzed using a Born model that helps identify the phonon branches contributing to the observed features in the time-resolved diffuse scattering. In InP this analysis shows a delayed increase in the transverse acoustic (TA) phonon population along high-symmetry directions accompanied by a decrease in the longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons. In InSb the increase in TA phonon population is less directional.

  12. Air-core grid for scattered x-ray rejection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a grid used in x-ray imaging applications to block scattered radiation while allowing the desired imaging radiation to pass through, and to process for making the grid. The grid is composed of glass containing lead oxide, and eliminates the spacer material used in prior known grids, and is therefore, an air-core grid. The glass is arranged in a pattern so that a large fraction of the area is open allowing the imaging radiation to pass through. A small pore size is used and the grid has a thickness chosen to provide high scatter rejection. For example, the grid may be produced with a 200 .mu.m pore size, 80% open area, and 4 mm thickness.

  13. Air-core grid for scattered x-ray rejection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.; Lane, S.M.

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a grid used in x-ray imaging applications to block scattered radiation while allowing the desired imaging radiation to pass through, and to process for making the grid. The grid is composed of glass containing lead oxide, and eliminates the spacer material used in prior known grids, and is therefore, an air-core grid. The glass is arranged in a pattern so that a large fraction of the area is open allowing the imaging radiation to pass through. A small pore size is used and the grid has a thickness chosen to provide high scatter rejection. For example, the grid may be produced with a 200 {micro}m pore size, 80% open area, and 4 mm thickness. 2 figs.

  14. Large-scale Nanostructure Simulations from X-ray Scattering Data On Graphics Processor Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarje, Abhinav

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Scattering Data On Graphics Processor Clusters Abhinavaccelerators. General purpose graphics processors o?er ?nethe form factors on graphics processors. Form Factor Kernel

  15. OBSERBATION OF HIGH INTENSITY X-RAYS IN INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OBSERBATION OF HIGH INTENSITY X-RAYS IN INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING EXPERIMENT S. Kashiwagi, M the first results of high intensity x-ray generation using Inverse Laser Compton scattering. This experiment Synchrotron Source (LSS). It is based on inverse Compton scattering via interaction between pulsed high power

  16. Lipid Bilayer Structure Determined by the Simultaneous Analysis of Neutron and X-Ray Scattering Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    Lipid Bilayer Structure Determined by the Simultaneous Analysis of Neutron and X-Ray Scattering) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers by simultaneously analyzing x-ray and neutron scattering data. The neutron data electron and neutron scattering density profiles. A key result of the analysis is the molecular surface

  17. Micellar structure from comparison of X-ray and neutron small-angle scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    249 Micellar structure from comparison of X-ray and neutron small-angle scattering T. Zemb and P according to the method developed by Hayter and Penfold. Both X-ray and neutron scattering signals, or by a combination of both. It has been shown recent- ly [1, 2] that it is possible in neutron scattering studies

  18. X-ray and Neutron Scattering Studies of Magnetic Domain Dynamics and Spin Structures /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, San-Wen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stanley. X-ray and neutron scattering from rough surfaces.1988. [3] R. Pynn. Neutron scattering by rough surfaces at39] V. F. Sears. Neutron scattering lengths and cross

  19. X-ray crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yennawar, Hemant [Pennsylvania State University, 8 Althouse Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Møller, Magda [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Gillilan, Richard [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Yennawar, Neela, E-mail: nhy1@psu.edu [Pennsylvania State University, 8 Althouse Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-ray crystal structure and a small-angle X-ray scattering solution structure of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase have been determined. The details of the interactions that enable the tetramer scaffold to be the functional biological unit have been analyzed. The X-ray crystal structure of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase (slSDH) has been determined using the crystal structure of human sorbitol dehydrogenase (hSDH) as a molecular-replacement model. slSDH crystallized in space group I222 with one monomer in the asymmetric unit. A conserved tetramer that superposes well with that seen in hSDH (despite belonging to a different space group) and obeying the 222 crystal symmetry is seen in slSDH. An acetate molecule is bound in the active site, coordinating to the active-site zinc through a water molecule. Glycerol, a substrate of slSDH, also occupies the substrate-binding pocket together with the acetate designed by nature to fit large polyol substrates. The substrate-binding pocket is seen to be in close proximity to the tetramer interface, which explains the need for the structural integrity of the tetramer for enzyme activity. Small-angle X-ray scattering was also used to identify the quaternary structure of the tetramer of slSDH in solution.

  20. accurate x-ray scattering: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is ove... Corrales, Lia 2012-01-01 20 Dust scattering X-ray expanding rings around gamma-ray bursts Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Scattering by dust grains in our Galaxy can...

  1. The Dust Scattering Model Can Not Explain The Shallow X-ray Decay in GRB Afterglows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong-Feng Shen; Richard Willingale; Pawan Kumar; Paul T. O'Brien; Phil A. Evans

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A dust scattering model was recently proposed to explain the shallow X-ray decay (plateau) observed prevalently in Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) early afterglows. In this model the plateau is the scattered prompt X-ray emission by the dust located close (about 10 to a few hundred pc) to the GRB site. In this paper we carefully investigate the model and find that the scattered emission undergoes strong spectral softening with time, due to the model's essential ingredient that harder X-ray photons have smaller scattering angle thus arrive earlier, while softer photons suffer larger angle scattering and arrive later. The model predicts a significant change, i.e., $\\Delta \\b \\sim 2 - 3$, in the X-ray spectral index from the beginning of the plateau toward the end of the plateau, while the observed data shows close to zero softening during the plateau and the plateau-to-normal transition phase. The scattering model predicts a big difference between the harder X-ray light curve and the softer X-ray light curve, i.e., the plateau in harder X-rays ends much earlier than in softer X-rays. This feature is not seen in the data. The large scattering optical depths of the dust required by the model imply strong extinction in optical, $A_V \\gtrsim $ 10, which contradicts current findings of $A_V= 0.1 - 0.7$ from optical and X-ray afterglow observations. We conclude that the dust scattering model can not explain the X-ray plateaus.

  2. Acquisition of an In-House X-ray Scattering Facility for Nanostructure Characterization and Student Training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuller, Ivan K [UC San Diego

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This equipment grant was specifically dedicated to the development of a "state of the art" x-ray scattering facility...

  3. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering - Combining Structural with Spectroscop...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as well as important L-edges of the 3d transition metals important in magnetic and oxide systems. Measurements of soft x-ray absorption spectra are inherently surface sensitive,...

  4. 16th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan; Achilles, Cherie; Cybulskis, Viktor; Gilbert, Ian

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Students talk about their experience at the 16th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering, or NXS 2014. Jointly conducted by Oak Ridge and Argonne national laboratories, NXS immerses graduate students in national user facilities to learn in a hands-on environment how to use neutrons and X-rays in their research.

  5. 16th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan; Achilles, Cherie; Cybulskis, Viktor; Gilbert, Ian

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Students talk about their experience at the 16th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering, or NXS 2014. Jointly conducted by Oak Ridge and Argonne national laboratories, NXS immerses graduate students in national user facilities to learn in a hands-on environment how to use neutrons and X-rays in their research.

  6. Safety & Security Guidelines Annual U.S. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safety & Security Guidelines 15th Annual U.S. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering-574-4600. Neutron Sciences User Programs and Outreach Office Oak Ridge National Laboratory #12;

  7. X-ray small-angle scattering from sputtered CeO{sub 2}/C bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haviar, S.; Dubau, M.; Khalakhan, I.; Vorokhta, M.; Matolinova, I.; Matolin, V. [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00, Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Vales, V.; Endres, J.; Holy, V. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Buljan, M. [Institute Ruder Boskovic, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Bernstorff, S. [Sincrotrone ELETTRA, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface and interface morphology of cerium oxide/carbon bilayers used as thin-film catalysts is studied by grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic-force microscopy, and the dependence of the structural parameters on the thicknesses of the constituting layers is investigated. The applicability of x-ray scattering and its advantages over standard analytical methods are discussed.

  8. 136 3. Scattering The Compton scattering of an x-ray is incoherent because there are de-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    136 3. Scattering The Compton scattering of an x-ray is incoherent because there are de- grees of freedom in each scattering event associated with the atomic electron. Compton scattering provides of an atom are the ones that can participate in Compton scattering because they can be- come unbound from

  9. Observation of pulsed x-ray trains produced by laser-electron Compton scatterings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Washio, Masakazu [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Araki, Sakae; Fukuda, Masafumi; Higashi, Yasuo; Honda, Yosuke; Omori, Tsunehiko; Taniguchi, Takashi; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji [KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Sasao, Noboru [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray generation based on laser-electron Compton scattering is one attractive method to achieve a compact laboratory-sized high-brightness x-ray source. We have designed, built, and tested such a source; it combines a 50 MeV multibunch electron linac with a mode-locked 1064 nm laser stored and amplified in a Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We directly observed trains of pulsed x rays using a microchannel plate detector; the resultant yield was found to be 1.2x10{sup 5} Hz in good agreement with prediction. We believe that the result has demonstrated good feasibility of linac-based compact x-ray sources via laser-electron Compton scatterings.

  10. Probing warm dense lithium by inelastic X-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    of warm dense matter states has practical applications for controlled thermonuclear fusion, where, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX, UK 4 Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics

  11. Entangled valence electron-hole dynamics revealed by stimulated attosecond x-ray Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healion, Daniel; Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that broadband x-ray pulses can create wavepackets of valence electrons and holes localized in the vicinity of a selected atom (nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur in cysteine) by resonant stimulated Raman scattering. The subsequent dynamics reveals highly correlated motions of entangled electrons and hole quasiparticles. This information goes beyond the time-dependent total charge density derived from x-ray diffraction.

  12. Demonstration of Successful X-ray Thomson Scattering Using Picosecond K-(alpha) X-ray Sources for the Characterization of Dense Heated Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Doeppner, T; Falcone, R; Glenzer, S; Morse, E C

    2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the first successful K-{alpha} x-ray Thomson scattering experiment from solid density plasmas for use as a diagnostic in determining the temperature, density, and ionization state of warm dense matter with picosecond resolution. The development of this source as a diagnostic and stringent requirements for successful K-{alpha} x-ray Thomson scattering are addressed. Data for the experimental techniques described in this paper [1] suggest the capability of single shot characterization of warm dense matter and the ability to use this scattering source at future Free Electron Lasers (FEL) where comparable scattering signal levels are predicted.

  13. Ab initio studies of ultrafast x-ray scattering of the photodissociation of iodine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debnarova, Andrea; Techert, Simone [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37077 Goettingen, Am Fassberg 11 (Germany); Schmatz, Stefan [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Goettingen, 37077 Goettingen, Tammannstr. 6 (Germany)

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We computationally examine various aspects of the reaction dynamics of the photodissociation and recombination of molecular iodine. We use our recently proposed formalism to calculate time-dependent x-ray scattering signal changes from first principles. Different aspects of the dynamics of this prototypical reaction are studied, such as coherent and noncoherent processes, features of structural relaxation that are periodic in time versus nonperiodic dissociative processes, as well as small electron density changes caused by electronic excitation, all with respect to x-ray scattering. We can demonstrate that wide-angle x-ray scattering offers a possibility to study the changes in electron densities in nonperiodic systems, which render it a suitable technique for the investigation of chemical reactions from a structural dynamics point of view.

  14. HIV-1 Tat membrane interactions probed using X-ray and neutron scattering, CD spectroscopy and MD simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    HIV-1 Tat membrane interactions probed using X-ray and neutron scattering, CD spectroscopy and MD translocation, were provided by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and neutron scattering. CD spectroscopy for Neutron Research, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 6102, Gaithersburg, MD 20899, United States d CHESS, Cornell

  15. Small angle X-ray scattering study of coal soot formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winans, R. E.; Parker, J. T.; Seifert, S.; Fletcher, T. H.

    2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to examine, by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), the formation of soot from individual coal particle combustion in a methane flat flame burner. The SAXS instrument at the Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotron Radiation Center (BESSRC) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) can be used to observe both the formation of spherules and clusters since it can access length scales of 6--6000 {angstrom}. The high X-ray flux enables rapid acquisition of scattering data of various regions of the flame. SAXS data reveal particle size, shape, surface areas, and surface roughness.

  16. Exact limiting relation between the structure factors in neutron and x-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. B. Bobrov; S. A. Trigger; S. N. Skovorod'ko

    2010-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratio of the static matter structure factor measured in experiments on coherent X-ray scattering to the static structure factor measured in experiments on neutron scattering is considered. It is shown theoretically that this ratio in the long-wavelength limit is equal to the nucleus charge at arbitrary thermodynamic parameters of a pure substance (the system of nuclei and electrons, where interaction between particles is pure Coulomb) in a disordered equilibrium state. This result is the exact relation of the quantum statistical mechanics. The experimental verification of this relation can be done in the long wavelength X-ray and neutron experiments.

  17. Characterization of irradiation-induced precipitates by small angle x-ray and neutron scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosse, M.; Eichhorn, F.; Boehmert, J.; Brauer, G. [Research Center Rossendorf Inc., Dresden (Germany)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the irradiation-induced precipitates in the VVER-440-type steel 15Kh2MFA has been investigated by the combination of small angle neutron scattering and anomalous small angle X-ray scattering. Information about the chemical composition of the irradiation-induced precipitates was obtained by the method of contrast variation. ASAXS experiments with variation of the X-ray energy near the energy of the vanadium K-absorption edge prove the content of vanadium within the irradiation-induced precipitates. The scattering density of the precipitates is lower than the scattering density of the iron matrix. The chemical shift of the vanadium-K{sub {alpha}}-absorption-edge and the results of the variation of the contribution of the magnetic scattering in the SANS experiment show, that vanadium does not precipitate in an elementary state. These results can be explained by assuming the precipitates are vanadium carbide.

  18. INELASTIC LIGHT SCATTERING STUDIES OF BOROCARBIDE SUPERCONDUCTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, In-Sang

    INELASTIC LIGHT SCATTERING STUDIES OF BOROCARBIDE SUPERCONDUCTORS IN­SANG YANG Department In recent years of studies in ``unconventional'' superconductivity, researchers have concentrated on exotic behavior of the heavy fermion and cuprate su­ perconductors. However, even superconductors that are thought

  19. Kevin Yager on the Nanoscience of Studying Scattered X-Rays

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Yager; Kevin

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Kevin Yager, a scientist at Brookhaven Lab's Center for Functional Nanomaterials, discusses his research on materials spanning just billionths of a meter. Yager specializes in making new materials through meticulously guided self-assembly and probing nanoscale structures with a technique called x-ray scattering.

  20. Alamethicin in lipid bilayers: Combined use of X-ray scattering and MD simulations Jianjun Pan a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    Alamethicin in lipid bilayers: Combined use of X-ray scattering and MD simulations Jianjun Pan of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA d Canadian Neutron Beam Centre:1PC with varying amounts of alamethicin (Alm). We combine the use of X-ray diffuse scattering

  1. X-ray Raman scattering with Bragg diffraction in a La-based superlattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    at the BESSY synchrotron facility. The spectral bandwidth of the quasi- monochromatic radiation delivered of attention, in connection with the development of third generation synchrotrons [9-11]. Inelastic scattering

  2. Pixel array detector for time-resolved x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodricks, B.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Barna, S.L.; Gruner, S.M.; Shepherd, J.A.; Tate, M.W.; Wixted, R.L. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of a large-area hybrid pixel detector designed for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray scattering experiments where limited frames, with a high framing rate, is required. The final design parameters call for a 1024{times}1O24 pixel array device with 150-micron pixels that is 100% quantum efficient for x-rays with energy up to 20 keV, with a framing rate in the microsecond range. The device will consist of a fully depleted diode array bump bonded to a CMOS electronic storage capacitor array with eight frames per pixel. The two devices may be separated by a x-ray blocking layer that protects the radiation-sensitive electronics layer from damage. The signal is integrated in the electronics layer and stored in one of eight CMOS capacitors. After eight frames are taken, the data are then read out, using clocking electronics external to the detector, and stored in a RAM disk. Results will be presented on the development of a prototype 4{times}4 pixel electronics layer that is capable of storing at least 10,000 12-keV x-ray photons for a capacity of over 50 million electrons with a noise corresponding to 2 x-ray photons per pixel. The diode detective layer, electronics storage layer along with the radiation damage and blocking layers will be discussed.

  3. The diagnostic capability of x-ray scattering parameters for the characterization of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elshemey, Wael M.; Desouky, Omar S.; Fekry, Mostafa M.; Talaat, Sahar M.; Elsayed, Anwar A. [Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt); Department of Radiation Physics, National Centre for Radiation Research and Technology, Madinet Nasr 13759 (Egypt); Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt); Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo 11559 (Egypt); Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The evaluation of the diagnostic capability of easy to measure x-ray scattering profile characterization parameters for the detection of breast cancer in excised samples. The selected parameters are the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and area under the x-ray scattering profile of breast tissue in addition to the ratio of scattering intensities (I{sub 2}/I{sub 1}%) at 1.6 nm{sup -1} to that at 1.1 nm{sup -1} (corresponding to scattering from soft and adipose tissues, respectively). Methods: A histopathologist is asked to classify 36 excised breast tissue samples into healthy or malignant. A conventional x-ray diffractometer is used to acquire the scattering profiles of the investigated samples. The values of three profile characterization parameters are calculated and the diagnostic capability of each is evaluated by determining the optimal cutoffs of scatter diagrams, calculating the diagnostic indices, and plotting the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results: At the calculated optimal cutoff for each of the examined parameters, the sensitivity ranged from 78% (for area under curve) up to 94% (for FWHM), the specificity ranged from 94%[for I{sub 2}/I{sub 1}% and area under curve] up to 100% (for FWHM), and the diagnostic accuracy ranged from 86% (for area under curve) up to 97% (for FWHM). The area under the ROC curves is greater than 0.95 for all of the investigated parameters, reflecting a highly accurate diagnostic performance. Conclusions: The discussed tests offered a means to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the suggested breast tissue x-ray scattering characterization parameters. The performance results are promising, indicating that the evaluated parameters would be considered a tool for fast, on spot probing of breast cancer in excised tissue samples.

  4. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Jon

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA IRVINE Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of the Intermediate Valence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Inelastic Neutron Scattering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.a Neutron Scattering Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.b

  5. BIOISIS: Biological Macromolecules by Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tainer, John (Scripps Research Institute); Hura, Greg (LBNL); Rambo, Robert P. (LBNL)

    BIOISIS is an open access database dedicated to the study of biological macromolecules by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). BIOISIS aims to become the complete source for the deposition, distribution and maintenance of small angle X-ray scattering data and technologies. The database is designed around the concept of an ôexperimentö and relates a specific experiment to a set of genes, organisms, computational models and experimental data. As of May 2012, BIOSIS contains 7,118 genes covering four different organisms. Forty-two modeled structures are available. Clicking on a structures reveals scattering curves, experimental conditions, and experimental values. The data are collected at Beamline 12.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS).[Copied with editing from http://www.bioisis.net/about

  6. SU-E-I-01: A Fast, Analytical Pencil Beam Based Method for First Order X-Ray Scatter Estimation of Kilovoltage Cone Beam X-Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J; Bourland, J [Wake Forest University, Winston-salem, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analytically estimate first-order x-ray scatter for kV cone beam x-ray imaging with high computational efficiency. Methods: In calculating first-order scatter using the Klein-Nishina formula, we found that by integrating the point-to-point scatter along an interaction line, a “pencil-beam” scatter kernel (BSK) can be approximated to a quartic expression when the imaging field is small. This BSK model for monoenergetic, 100keV x-rays has been verified on homogeneous cube and cylinder water phantoms by comparing with the exact implementation of KN formula. For heterogeneous medium, the water-equivalent length of a BSK was acquired with an improved Siddon's ray-tracing algorithm, which was also used in calculating pre- and post- scattering attenuation. To include the electron binding effect for scattering of low-kV photons, the mean corresponding scattering angle is determined from the effective point of scattered photons of a BSK. The behavior of polyenergetic x-rays was also investigated for 120kV x-rays incident to a sandwiched infinite heterogeneous slab phantom, with the electron binding effect incorporated. Exact computation and Monte Carlo simulations were performed for comparisons, using the EGSnrc code package. Results: By reducing the 3D volumetric target (o(n{sup 3})) to 2D pencil-beams (o(n{sup 2})), the computation expense can be generally lowered by n times, which our experience verifies. The scatter distribution on a flat detector shows high agreement between the analytic BSK model and exact calculations. The pixel-to-pixel differences are within (-2%, 2%) for the homogeneous cube and cylinder phantoms and within (0, 6%) for the heterogeneous slab phantom. However, the Monte Carlo simulation shows increased deviation of the BSK model toward detector periphery. Conclusion: The proposed BSK model, accommodating polyenergetic x-rays and electron binding effect at low kV, shows great potential in efficiently estimating the first-order scatter from small imaging fields. We are investigating more thoroughly to improve performance and explore applications.

  7. Nuclear effects in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O. Benhar; V.R. Pandharipande; I. Sick

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors extend the approach used to treat quasi-elastic inclusive electron-nucleus scattering to the deep inelastic region. They provide a general approach to describe lepton scattering from an off-shell nucleon, and calculate the ratio of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross sections to the deuteron for nuclear matter and helium (EMC-effect). They find that the consistent inclusion of the binding effects, in particular the ones arising from the short-range nucleon-nucleon interaction, allows to describe the data in the region of x > 0.15 where binding fully accounts for the deviation of the cross section ratios from one.

  8. Wide angle x-ray scattering of proteins : effect of beam exposure on protein integrity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischetti, R. F.; Rodi, D. J.; Mirza, A.; Makowski, L.; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wide-angle X-ray scattering patterns from proteins in solution contain information relevant to the determination of protein fold. At relevant scattering angles, however, these data are weak, and the degree to which they might be used to categorize the fold of a protein is unknown. Preliminary work has been performed at the BioCAT insertion-device beamline at the Advanced Photon Source which demonstrates that one can collect X-ray scattering data from proteins in solution to spacings of at least 2.2 {angstrom} (q = 2.8 {angstrom}-1). These data are sensitive to protein conformational states, and are in good agreement with the scattering predicted by the program CRYSOL using the known three-dimensional atomic coordinates of the protein. An important issue in the exploitation of this technique as a tool for structural genomics is the extent to which the high intensity of X-rays available at third-generation synchrotron sources chemically or structurally damage proteins. Various data-collection protocols have been investigated demonstrating conditions under which structural degradation of even sensitive proteins can be minimized, making this technique a viable tool for protein fold categorization, the study of protein folding, unfolding, protein-ligand interactions and domain movement.

  9. Reflectivity and scattering measurements of an Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility test coating sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, J.V.; Mauche, C.W.; Hailey, C.J.; Madison, L. [Laboratory for Experimental Astrophysics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reflectivity and scattering profile measurements were made on a gold-coated witness sample produced to evaluate mirror coatings for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility program. Reflectivity measurements were made at Al K, Ti K, and Cu K energies as a function of incident graze angle. The results are fit to a model that includes the effects of roughness, particulate and organic contamination layers, and gold-coating density. Reflectivities are close to theoretical, with the difference being well accounted for by 4.1 A of roughness at spatial frequencies above 4 {mu}m{sup {minus}1}, a gold-coating density equal to 0.98 bulk, and a surface contaminant layer 27 A thick. Scattering measurements extending to {plus_minus}35 arcmin of the line center were obtained by the use of Al K x rays and incidence angles from 0.75{degree} to 3{degree}. The scattering profiles imply a power spectral density of surface-scattering frequencies that follows a power law with an index of {minus}1.0 and a total surface roughness for the spatial frequency band between 0.05 {mu}m{sup {minus}1} and 4 {mu}m{sup {minus}1} of 3.3 A. Combining the roughnesses derived from both the reflectivity and scattering measurements yields a total roughness of 5.3 A for scattering frequencies between 0.05 {mu}m{sup {minus}1} and 15,000 {mu}m{sup {minus}1}.

  10. Scattering Theory When an x-ray beam (or neutron or light) passes through a material with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    Scattering Theory When an x-ray beam (or neutron or light) passes through a material radiation is scattered in directions that differ from that of the incident beam. Scattering arises since x of scattered radiation resulting from this process bears a direct relationship to the structure (the pattern

  11. Compact x-ray source based on burst-mode inverse Compton scattering at 100 kHz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bessuille, J.

    A design for a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) with flux and brilliance orders of magnitude beyond existing laboratory scale sources is presented. The source is based on inverse Compton scattering of a high brightness ...

  12. USING THE X-RAY DUST SCATTERING HALO OF CYGNUS X-1 TO DETERMINE DISTANCE AND DUST DISTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang, Jingen

    We present a detailed study of the X-ray dust scattering halo of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 based on two Chandra High Energy Transmission Gratings Spectrometer observations. Using 18 different dust models, including ...

  13. X-ray Dust Scattering at Small Angles: The Complete Halo around GX13+1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall K. Smith

    2008-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The exquisite angular resolution available with Chandra should allow precision measurements of faint diffuse emission surrounding bright sources, such as the X-ray scattering halos created by interstellar dust. However, the ACIS CCDs suffer from pileup when observing bright sources, and this creates difficulties when trying to extract the scattered halo near the source. The initial study of the X-ray halo around GX13+1 using only the ACIS-I detector done by Smith, Edgar & Shafer (2002) suffered from a lack of sensitivity within 50'' of the source, limiting what conclusions could be drawn. To address this problem, observations of GX13+1 were obtained with the Chandra HRC-I and simultaneously with the RXTE PCA. Combined with the existing ACIS-I data, this allowed measurements of the X-ray halo between 2-1000''. After considering a range of dust models, each assumed to be smoothly distributed with or without a dense cloud along the line of sight, the results show that there is no evidence in this data for a dense cloud near the source, as suggested by Xiang et al. (2005). Finally, although no model leads to formally acceptable results, the Weingartner & Draine (2001) and nearly all of the composite grain models from Zubko, Dwek & Arendt (2004) give poor fits.

  14. Attosecond Thomson-scattering x-ray source driven by laser-based electron acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, W. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China) [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhuo, H. B.; Yu, T. P. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)] [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Ma, Y. Y. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China) [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Song, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. C. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China)] [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China) [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of producing attosecond x-rays through Thomson scattering of laser light off laser-driven relativistic electron beams is investigated. For a ?200-as, tens-MeV electron bunch produced with laser ponderomotive-force acceleration in a plasma wire, exceeding 10{sup 6} photons/s in the form of ?160 as pulses in the range of 3–300 keV are predicted, with a peak brightness of ?5 × 10{sup 20} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1% bandwidth). Our study suggests that the physical scheme discussed in this work can be used for an ultrafast (attosecond) x-ray source, which is the most beneficial for time-resolved atomic physics, dubbed “attosecond physics.”.

  15. Eur. J. Biochem. 85, 529-534 (1978) X-Ray and Neutron Small-Angle Scattering Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eur. J. Biochem. 85, 529-534 (1978) X-Ray and Neutron Small-Angle Scattering Studies of the Complex-ray and neutron scattering techniques. In this work, we concentrated mainly on radius of gyration analyses and a neutron scattering experiment is performed in 21-Iz0 solvent. This decrease simply reflects the fact

  16. Z .Reviews in Molecular Biotechnology 74 2000 207 231 X-ray and neutron surface scattering for studying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhl, Tonya L.

    Z .Reviews in Molecular Biotechnology 74 2000 207 231 X-ray and neutron surface scattering,U , Tonya L. Kuhlb , Joyce Y. Wongc , Gregory S. Smitha,1 a Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center is defined as the Zratio of the number of particles neutrons or .photons elastically and specularly scattered

  17. The accurate assessment of small-angle X-ray scattering data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, Thomas D. [Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); Luft, Joseph R. [Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); SUNY Buffalo, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); Carter, Lester G.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M.; Martel, Anne [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS69, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Snell, Edward H., E-mail: esnell@hwi.buffalo.edu [Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); SUNY Buffalo, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of quantitative techniques is suggested for assessing SAXS data quality. These are applied in the form of a script, SAXStats, to a test set of 27 proteins, showing that these techniques are more sensitive than manual assessment of data quality. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has grown in popularity in recent times with the advent of bright synchrotron X-ray sources, powerful computational resources and algorithms enabling the calculation of increasingly complex models. However, the lack of standardized data-quality metrics presents difficulties for the growing user community in accurately assessing the quality of experimental SAXS data. Here, a series of metrics to quantitatively describe SAXS data in an objective manner using statistical evaluations are defined. These metrics are applied to identify the effects of radiation damage, concentration dependence and interparticle interactions on SAXS data from a set of 27 previously described targets for which high-resolution structures have been determined via X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The studies show that these metrics are sufficient to characterize SAXS data quality on a small sample set with statistical rigor and sensitivity similar to or better than manual analysis. The development of data-quality analysis strategies such as these initial efforts is needed to enable the accurate and unbiased assessment of SAXS data quality.

  18. Protein folding and protein metallocluster studies using synchrotron small angler X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliezer, D.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proteins, biological macromolecules composed of amino-acid building blocks, possess unique three dimensional shapes or conformations which are intimately related to their biological function. All of the information necessary to determine this conformation is stored in a protein`s amino acid sequence. The problem of understanding the process by which nature maps protein amino-acid sequences to three-dimensional conformations is known as the protein folding problem, and is one of the central unsolved problems in biophysics today. The possible applications of a solution are broad, ranging from the elucidation of thousands of protein structures to the rational modification and design of protein-based drugs. The scattering of X-rays by matter has long been useful as a tool for the characterization of physical properties of materials, including biological samples. The high photon flux available at synchrotron X-ray sources allows for the measurement of scattering cross-sections of dilute and/or disordered samples. Such measurements do not yield the detailed geometrical information available from crystalline samples, but do allow for lower resolution studies of dynamical processes not observable in the crystalline state. The main focus of the work described here has been the study of the protein folding process using time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering measurements. The original intention was to observe the decrease in overall size which must accompany the folding of a protein from an extended conformation to its compact native state. Although this process proved too fast for the current time-resolution of the technique, upper bounds were set on the probable compaction times of several small proteins. In addition, an interesting and unexpected process was detected, in which the folding protein passes through an intermediate state which shows a tendency to associate. This state is proposed to be a kinetic molten globule folding intermediate.

  19. Time Resolved Collapse of a Folding Protein Observed with Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollack, L.; Tate, M. W.; Finnefrock, A. C.; Kalidas, C.; Trotter, S.; Darnton, N. C.; Lurio, L.; Austin, R. H.; Batt, C. A.; Gruner, S. M. (and others)

    2001-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High-intensity, ''pink'' beam from an undulator was used in conjunction with microfabricated rapid-fluid mixing devices to monitor the early events in protein folding with time resolved small angle x-ray scattering. This Letter describes recent work on the protein bovine {beta} -lactoglobulin where collapse from an expanded to a compact set of states was directly observed on the millisecond time scale. The role of chain collapse, one of the initial stages of protein folding, is not currently understood. The characterization of transient, compact states is vital in assessing the validity of theories and models of the folding process.

  20. Dynamics of bulk fluctuations in a lamellar phase studied by coherent x-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doru Constantin; Guillaume Brotons; Tim Salditt; Eric Freyssingeas; Anders Madsen

    2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, we studied the layer fluctuations in the lamellar phase of an ionic lyotropic system. We measured the relaxation rate of in-plane (undulation) fluctuations as a function of the wave vector. Static and dynamic results obtained during the same experiment were combined to yield the values of both elastic constants of the lamellar phase (compression and bending moduli) as well as that of the sliding viscosity. The results are in very good agreement with dynamic light-scattering data, validating the use of the technique in ordered phases.

  1. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers Print

  2. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

  3. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block

  4. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-BlockResonant Soft

  5. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-BlockResonant

  6. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-BlockResonantResonant

  7. Ultrafast K{alpha} x-ray Thomson scattering from shock compressed lithium hydride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kritcher, A. L. [L-399, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94709 (United States); Neumayer, P.; Castor, J.; Doeppner, T.; Landen, O. L.; Ng, A.; Pollaine, S.; Price, D.; Glenzer, S. H. [L-399, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Falcone, R. W.; Lee, H. J. [Physics Department, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94709 (United States); Lee, R. W. [L-399, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Physics Department, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94709 (United States); Holst, B.; Redmer, R. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Morse, E. C. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94709 (United States)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrally and temporally resolved x-ray Thomson scattering using ultrafast Ti K{alpha} x rays has provided experimental validation for modeling of the compression and heating of shocked matter. The coalescence of two shocks launched into a solid density LiH target by a shaped 6 ns heater beam was observed from rapid heating to temperatures of 2.2 eV, enabling tests of shock timing models. Here, the temperature evolution of the target at various times during shock progression was characterized from the intensity of the elastic scattering component. The observation of scattering from plasmons, electron plasma oscillations, at shock coalescence indicates a transition to a dense metallic plasma state in LiH. From the frequency shift of the measured plasmon feature the electron density was directly determined with high accuracy, providing a material compression of a factor of 3 times solid density. The quality of data achieved in these experiments demonstrates the capability for single shot dynamic characterization of dense shock compressed matter. The conditions probed in this experiment are relevant for the study of the physics of planetary formation and to characterize inertial confinement fusion targets for experiments such as on the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  8. Ultrafast K-(alpha) X-ray Thomson Scattering from Shock Compressed Lithium Hydride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Castor, J; Doeppner, T; Falcone, R W; Landen, O L; Lee, H J; Lee, R W; Holst, B; Redmer, R; Morse, E C; Ng, A; Pollaine, S; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrally and temporally resolved x ray Thomson scattering using ultrafast Ti K-{alpha} x-rays has provided experimental validation for modeling of the compression and heating of shocked matter. The coalescence of two shocks launched into a solid density LiH target by a shaped 6 nanosecond heater beam was observed from rapid heating to temperatures of 2.2 eV, enabling tests of shock timing models. Here, the temperature evolution of the target at various times during shock progression was characterized from the intensity of the elastic scattering component. The observation of scattering from plasmons, electron plasma oscillations, at shock coalescence indicates a transition to a dense metallic plasma state in LiH. From the frequency shift of the measured plasmon feature the electron density was directly determined with high accuracy, providing a material compression of a factor of three times solid density. The quality of data achieved in these experiments demonstrates the capability for single-shot dynamic characterization of dense shock compressed matter. The conditions probed in this experiment are relevant for the study of the physics of planetary formation and to characterize inertial confinement fusion targets for experiments such as on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), LLNL.

  9. Characterization of porous materials using combined small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Naiping; Borkar, Neha; Kohls, Doug; Schaefer, Dale W. (UCIN)

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of ultra small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) is used to characterize porous materials. The analysis methods yield quantitative information, including the mean skeletal chord length, mean pore chord length, skeletal density, and composition. A mixed cellulose ester (MCE) membrane with a manufacturer-labeled pore size of 0.1 {mu}m was used as a model to elucidate the specifics of the method. Four approaches describing four specific scenarios (different known parameters and form of the scattering data) are compared. Pore chords determined using all four approaches are in good agreement with the scanning electron microscopy estimates but are larger than the manufacturer's nominal pore size. Our approach also gives the average chord of the skeletal solid (struts) of the membrane, which is also consistent for all four approaches. Combined data from USAXS and USANS gives the skeletal density and the strut composition.

  10. Spectral softening in the X-RAY afterglow of GRB 130925A as predicted by the dust scattering model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Shao, Lang, E-mail: lshao@hebtu.edu.cn [Department of Space Science and Astronomy, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) usually occur in a dense star-forming region with a massive circumburst medium. The small-angle scattering of intense prompt X-ray emission off the surrounding dust grains will have observable consequences and sometimes can dominate the X-ray afterglow. In most of the previous studies, only the Rayleigh-Gans (RG) approximation is employed for describing the scattering process, which works accurately for the typical size of grains (with radius of a ? 0.1 ?m) in the diffuse interstellar medium. When the size of the grains may significantly increase, as in a more dense region where GRBs would occur, the RG approximation may not be valid enough for modeling detailed observational data. In order to study the temporal and spectral properties of the scattered X-ray emission more accurately with potentially larger dust grains, we provide a practical approach using the series expansions of anomalous diffraction (AD) approximation based on the complicated Mie theory. We apply our calculations to understand the puzzling X-ray afterglow of recently observed GRB 130925A that showed a significant spectral softening. We find that the X-ray scattering scenarios with either AD or RG approximation adopted could well reproduce both the temporal and spectral profile simultaneously. Given the plateau present in the early X-ray light curve, a typical distribution of smaller grains as in the interstellar medium would be suggested for GRB 130925A.

  11. Simultaneous measurements of several state variables in shocked carbon by imaging x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamboa, E. J., E-mail: eliseo@umich.edu; Drake, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Trantham, M. R. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Falk, K.; Montgomery, D. S.; Benage, J. F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the novel experimental technique of imaging x-ray Thomson scattering to measure the spatial profiles of the temperature, ionization state, relative material density, and the shock speed in a high-energy density system. A blast wave driven in a low-density foam is probed with 90? scattering of 7.8?keV helium-like nickel x-rays, which are spectrally dispersed and resolved in one spatial dimension by a doubly curved crystal. The inferred properties of the shock are shown to be self-consistent with 1D analytical estimates. These high-resolution measurements enable a direct comparison of the observed temperature with the results from hydrodynamic simulations. We find good agreement with the simulations for the temperature at the shock front but discrepancies in the modeling of the spatial temperature profile and shock speed. These results indicate the challenges in modeling the shock dynamics of structured materials like foams, commonly used in many high-energy density and laboratory astrophysics experiments.

  12. Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering Studies of Multiferroic YMn2O5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partzsch, S.; Wilkins, S.B.; Schierle, E.; Soltwisch, V.; Hill, J.P.; Weschke, E.; Souptel, D.; Buchner, B.; Geck, J.

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed soft x-ray resonant scattering at the MnL{sub 2,3}- and OK edges of YMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}. While the resonant intensity at the MnL{sub 2,3} edges represent the magnetic order parameter, the resonant scattering at the OK edge is found to be directly related to the macroscopic ferroelectric polarization. The latter observation reveals the important role of the spin-dependent Mn-O hybridization for the multiferroicity of YMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}. We present details about how to obtain correct energy dependent lineshapes and discuss the origin of the resonant intensity at the OK edge.

  13. Supplementary data for HIV-1 Tat membrane interaction probed using X-ray and neutron scattering, CD, and MD simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    1 Supplementary data for HIV-1 Tat membrane interaction probed using X-ray and neutron scattering- spacing are linearly related. Figure S3. Neutron scattering from stacks of DOPC:DOPE (3:1)/Tat, x=0 of Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180, 3 NIST Center for Neutron

  14. A New Polyethylene Scattering Law Determined Using Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavelle, Christopher M [ORNL; Liu, C [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo neutron transport codes such as MCNP rely on accurate data for nuclear physics cross-sections to produce accurate results. At low energy, this takes the form of scattering laws based on the dynamic structure factor, S (Q, E). High density polyethylene (HDPE) is frequently employed as a neutron moderator at both high and low temperatures, however the only cross-sections available are for T =300 K, and the evaluation has not been updated in quite some time. In this paper we describe inelastic neutron scattering measurements on HDPE at 5 and 300 K which are used to improve the scattering law for HDPE. We describe the experimental methods, review some of the past HDPE scattering laws, and compare computations using these models to the measured S (Q, E). The total cross-section is compared to available data, and the treatment of the carbon secondary scatterer as a free gas is assessed. We also discuss the use of the measurement itself as a scattering law via the 1 phonon approximation. We show that a scattering law computed using a more detailed model for the Generalized Density of States (GDOS) compares more favorably to this experiment, suggesting that inelastic neutron scattering can play an important role in both the development and validation of new scattering laws for Monte Carlo work.

  15. Measuring the mean and scatter of the X-ray luminosity -- optical richness relation for maxBCG galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Rykoff; T. A. McKay; M. R. Becker; A. Evrard; D. E. Johnston; B. P. Koester; E. Rozo; E. S. Sheldon; R. H. Wechsler

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining the scaling relations between galaxy cluster observables requires large samples of uniformly observed clusters. We measure the mean X-ray luminosity--optical richness (L_X--N_200) relation for an approximately volume-limited sample of more than 17,000 optically-selected clusters from the maxBCG catalog spanning the redshift range 0.1X-ray emission from many clusters using ROSAT All-Sky Survey data, we are able to measure mean X-ray luminosities to ~10% (including systematic errors) for clusters in nine independent optical richness bins. In addition, we are able to crudely measure individual X-ray emission from ~800 of the richest clusters. Assuming a log-normal form for the scatter in the L_X--N_200 relation, we measure \\sigma_\\ln{L}=0.86+/-0.03 at fixed N_200. This scatter is large enough to significantly bias the mean stacked relation. The corrected median relation can be parameterized by L_X = (e^\\alpha)(N_200/40)^\\beta 10^42 h^-2 ergs/s, where \\alpha = 3.57+/-0.08 and \\beta = 1.82+/-0.05. We find that X-ray selected clusters are significantly brighter than optically-selected clusters at a given optical richness. This selection bias explains the apparently X-ray underluminous nature of optically-selected cluster catalogs.

  16. Flat panel X-ray detector with reduced internal scattering for improved attenuation accuracy and dynamic range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Peter D. (Santa Fe, NM); Claytor, Thomas N. (White Rock, NM); Berry, Phillip C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Charles R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray detector is disclosed that has had all unnecessary material removed from the x-ray beam path, and all of the remaining material in the beam path made as light and as low in atomic number as possible. The resulting detector is essentially transparent to x-rays and, thus, has greatly reduced internal scatter. The result of this is that x-ray attenuation data measured for the object under examination are much more accurate and have an increased dynamic range. The benefits of this improvement are that beam hardening corrections can be made accurately, that computed tomography reconstructions can be used for quantitative determination of material properties including density and atomic number, and that lower exposures may be possible as a result of the increased dynamic range.

  17. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Building 223 Auditorium, Room B002 September 24 -October 11, 2008 Argonne National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Building 223 Auditorium, Room B002 September 24 (HFIR) Neutron Scattering Science Division Oak Ridge Laboratory 10:15 - 10:30 Break 9:30 - 9:45 Break 10 School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Building 8600, Main Lobby September 24 - October 11, 2008 Oak

  18. Inelastic neutron scattering, Raman and DFT investigations of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inelastic neutron scattering, Raman and DFT investigations of the adsorption of phenanthrenequinone on onion-like carbon Daniela M. Anjos a , Alexander I. Kolesnikov a , Zili Wu a...

  19. Changes in the Atomic Structure through Glass Transition Observed by X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egami, Takeshi [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The glass transition involves a minor change in the internal energy, and yet the physical and mechanical properties of a glass change dramatically. In order to determine the evolution of the atomic structure through the glass transition, we employed in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering measurements as a function of temperature on a model material: Zr-Cu-Al metallic glass. We found that the thermal expansion at the atomic level is smaller than the macroscopic thermal expansion, and significantly increases above the glass transition temperature. The observed changes in the pair-distribution function (PDF) are explained in terms of the fluctuations in the local atomic volume and their change through the glass transition.

  20. Robust, high-throughput solution structural analyses by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hura, Greg L.; Menon, Angeli L.; Hammel, Michal; Rambo, Robert P.; Poole II, Farris L.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Jenney Jr, Francis E.; Classen, Scott; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Yang, Sungjae; Scott, Joseph W.; Dillard, Bret D.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Tainer, John A.

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an efficient pipeline enabling high-throughput analysis of protein structure in solution with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our SAXS pipeline combines automated sample handling of microliter volumes, temperature and anaerobic control, rapid data collection and data analysis, and couples structural analysis with automated archiving. We subjected 50 representative proteins, mostly from Pyrococcus furiosus, to this pipeline and found that 30 were multimeric structures in solution. SAXS analysis allowed us to distinguish aggregated and unfolded proteins, define global structural parameters and oligomeric states for most samples, identify shapes and similar structures for 25 unknown structures, and determine envelopes for 41 proteins. We believe that high-throughput SAXS is an enabling technology that may change the way that structural genomics research is done.

  1. Small angle neutron and X-ray scattering studies of carbons prepared using inorganic templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandi, G.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Winans, R.E.; Carrado, K.A.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small angle neutron (SANS) and X-ray (SAXS) scattering analyses of carbons derived from organic-loaded inorganic template materials, used as anodes in lithium ion cells, have been performed. Two clays were used as templates to load the organic precursors, pillared montmorrillonite (PILC), a layered silicate clay whose sheets have been permanently propped open by sets of thermally stable molecular props, and sepiolite, a natural channeled clay. Five different organic precursors were used to load the PILC: pyrene, styrene, pyrene/trioxane copolymer, ethylene and propylene, whereas only propylene and ethylene were used to load sepiolite. Pyrolysis took place at 700{degrees}C under nitrogen. Values such as hole radius, fractal dimension, cutoff length and density of the final carbons will be compared as a function of the clay and carbon precursors.

  2. Deep-inelastic photon-neutrino scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huq, M.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The moments of the structure functions scrF/sub T//sup( N/), scrF/sub 3//sup( N/), and scrF/sub L//sup( N/) in deep-inelastic photon-neutrino scattering have been calculated. Exactly calculable leading-order QCD corrections to the box-diagram contributions are large for scrF/sub T//sup( N/) and scrF/sub 3//sup( N/) increasing with N. For scrF/sub L//sup( N/) the corrections are very small except for small N. Dependence of the results on the number of flavors of quarks is very small.

  3. Ultra-fast x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of coalescing shock-heated matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Castor, J; Doppner, T; Falcone, R W; Landen, O L; Lee, H J; Lee, R W; Morse, E C; Ng, A; Pollaine, S; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The experiment in this work was preformed at the Titan laser facility (S1) where a short pulse beam at a wavelength of 1053nm delivered up to 350J in 0.5 to 20 ps and a long pulse beam at 527nm, 2{omega} frequency provided energies up to 450J in 1 to 6 ns. Long pulse shaping in this experiment, similar to future capabilities at NIF, was primarily a 4ns long foot with an intensity of 1 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, followed by a 2ns long peak with an intensity of 3 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. A {approx} 600 um phase plate was used on the long pulse beam to moderate non-uniformities in the intensity profile. An illustration of the Thomson scattering setup for this experiment is provided in Fig. 1 of the main text. A nearly mono-energetic scattering source of {Delta}E/E {approx} 0.3% in the 4.5 keV Ti K-alpha line was produced via intense short-pulse laser irradiation of 1.9 x 3 x 0.01 mm Ti foils, creating energetic keV electrons in the process (S2, S3). The nearly isotropic source emission (S4) is produced in the cold solid density bulk of the foil from electron K shell ionization of neutral or weakly ionized atoms, with an emission size on the order of the laser focal spot. By optimizing the laser intensity and pulse width to 4.4 x 10{sup 16} W cm{sup -2}, a total of 2.3 x 10{sup 13} x-ray photons have been produced into 4{pi}. This value corresponds to a conversion efficiency of laser energy into Ti K-alpha x-ray energy of 5 x 10{sup -5}, see Fig. S1. These sources provide {approx}10 ps x-ray pulses as measured experimentally (S5).

  4. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barke, Ingo; Hartmann, Hannes; Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Sauppe, Mario; Adolph, Marcus; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Treusch, Rolf; Peltz, Christian; et al

    2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The diversity of nanoparticle shapes generated by condensation from gaseous matter reflects the fundamental competition between thermodynamic equilibration and the persistence of metastable configurations during growth. In the kinetically limited regime, intermediate geometries that are favoured only in early formation stages can be imprinted in the finally observed ensemble of differently structured specimens. Here we demonstrate that single-shot wide-angle scattering of femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser pulses allows three-dimensional characterization of the resulting metastable nanoparticle structures. For individual free ?silver particles, which can be considered frozen in space for the duration of photon exposure, both shape and orientation are uncoveredmore »from measured scattering images. We identify regular shapes, including species with fivefold symmetry and surprisingly large aspect ratio up to particle radii of the order of 100 nm. Our approach includes scattering effects beyond Born’s approximation and is remarkably efficient—opening up new routes in ultrafast nanophysics and free-electron laser science« less

  5. X-ray resonant magnetic scattering and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism branching ratios, L[subscript 3] / L[subscript 2], for heavy rare earths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Yongbin; Kim, Jong-Woo; Goldman, Alan I.; Harmon, Bruce N. (Iowa State)

    2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we have used first principles electronic structure methods to investigate the detailed contributions to the L{sub 3}/L{sub 2} branching ratio in the heavy rare earth elements. The calculations use the full potential, relativistic, linear augmented plane wave method with the LSDA+U approach for consideration of the local 4f electronic orbitals. With no spin orbit coupling (SOC) in the conducting bands, and with the same radial function for the 2p{sub 3/2} and 2p{sub 1/2} core states, the branching ratio (BR) is exactly 1:-1 for the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectra of the ferromagnetic heavy rare earth metals. However, with full SOC the BR ranges from 1.5 to 6.0 in going from Gd to Er. The energy and spin dependence of the 5d radial functions are important. The results point to problems with modified atomic models which have been proposed to explain the BR. Recent x-ray resonant magentic scattering experiments on (Gd,Tb,Dy,Ho,Er,Tm)Ni{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} are discussed.

  6. Studies of protein structure in solution and protein folding using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Lingling

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) has been applied to the structural study of several biological systems, including the nitrogenase complex, the heat shock cognate protein (hsc70), and lysozyme folding. The structural information revealed from the SAXS experiments is complementary to information obtained by other physical and biochemical methods, and adds to our knowledge and understanding of these systems.

  7. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory May 30-June 14, 2009 Air Travel Arrangements The Argonne Division of Educational Programs has made to Argonne - June 8 through and including June 13, 2009 Daily bus transportation will be provided for School

  8. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Argonne National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Argonne National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory June 12-26, 2010 Schedule for Saturday, June 12, 2010 School participants arrive at Argonne and check in at the Argonne Guest House, Building 460. 3:00 PM until 8:00 PM - Registration and informal get

  9. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory June 11-25, 2011 Air Travel Arrangements The Argonne Division of Educational Programs has made at the Argonne Guest House at approximately 6:00 p.m. (CDT). Dinner will be provided upon arrival to the hotel

  10. Molecular structures of fluid phase phosphatidylglycerol bilayers as determined by small angle neutron and X-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    neutron and X-ray scattering Jianjun Pan a, , Frederick A. Heberle a , Stephanie Tristram-Nagle b Matter Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 378316100 Institute for Neutron Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 378316453, USA e Canadian

  11. Neutron and X-ray Scattering Techniques have proved so successful in condensed matter studies that a wide variety of sample environments have been developed in consquence. Many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Foreword Neutron and X-ray Scattering Techniques have proved so successful in condensed matter whose function is to develop and optimise the techniques appropriate to neutron scattering. Since other neutron and X-ray research centres have similar technical support groups, it was felt timely to unité

  12. Relaxation transition in glass-forming polybutadiene as revealed by nuclear resonance X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanaya, Toshiji; Inoue, Rintaro [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto-fu 611-0011 (Japan)] [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto-fu 611-0011 (Japan); Saito, Makina [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, S. S. 14 Km 163.5, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)] [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, S. S. 14 Km 163.5, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Seto, Makoto [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka-fu 590-0494 (Japan)] [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka-fu 590-0494 (Japan); Yoda, Yoshitaka [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo-ken 679-5198 (Japan)] [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo-ken 679-5198 (Japan)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the arrest mechanism of molecular motions in a glass forming polybutadiene near the glass transition using a new nuclear resonance synchrotron X-ray scattering technique to cover a wide time range (10{sup ?9} to 10{sup ?5} s) and a scattering vector Q range (9.6–40 nm{sup ?1}), which have never been accessed by other methods. Owing to the wide time and Q ranges it was found for the first time that a transition of the ?-process to the slow ?-process (or the Johari-Goldstein process) was observed in a Q range higher than the first peak in the structure factor S(Q) at the critical temperature T{sub c} in the mode coupling theory. The results suggest the important roles of hopping motions below T{sub c}, which was predicted by the recent extended mode coupling theory and the cooperative motions due to the strong correlation at the first peak in S(Q) in the arrest mechanism.

  13. Concept to diagnose mix with imaging x-ray Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Paul A.; Gamboa, Eliseo J.; Huntington, Channing M.; Kuranz, Carolyn C. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulent mixing of two fluid species is a ubiquitous problem, prevalent in systems such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions, supernova remnants, and other astrophysical systems. In complex, high Reynolds number compressible high energy density (HED) flows such as these, hydrodynamic instabilities initiate the turbulent mixing process, which can then feedback and alter the mean hydrodynamic motion through nonlinear processes. In order to predict how these systems evolve under turbulent conditions, models are used. However, these models require detailed quantitative data to validate and constrain their detailed physics models as well as improve them. Providing this much needed data is currently at the forefront of HED research but is proving elusive due to a lack of available diagnostics capable of directly measuring detailed flow variables. Thomson scattering is a promising technique in this regard as it provides fundamental conditions of the flow ({rho}, T, Zbar) due to its direct interaction with the small scales of the fluid or plasma and was recently considered as a possible mix diagnostic. With the development of imaging x-ray Thomson scattering (IXRTS) obtaining spatial profiles of these variables is within reach. We propose a novel use of the IXRTS technique that will provide more detailed quantitative data required for model validation in mix experiments.

  14. Multi-Scaled Microstructures in Natural Rubber Characterized by Synchrotron X-ray Scattering and Optical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toki , S.; Hsiao, B; Amnuaypornsri , S; Sakdapipanich, J; Tanaka, Y

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-scaled microstructures induced by natural impurities (i.e., proteins, phospholipids, carbohydrates) in natural rubber (NR) were investigated by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), and optical microscopy using several kinds of untreated and chemically treated un-vulcanized samples. These microstructures include large aggregates (size less than 50 m), well-defined crystals (size less than a few 10 m), and micelles (size much less than 10 m). In un-vulcanized NR samples, even though the concentrations of natural impurities are relatively low, the dispersion of these microstructures significantly affects the mechanical properties

  15. Nucleation and Ordering of an Electrodeposited Two-Dimensional Crystal: Real-Time X-Ray Scattering and Electronic Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finnefrock, A.C.; Ringland, K.L.; Brock, J.D. [School of Applied Engineering Physics and Materials Science Center, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)] [School of Applied Engineering Physics and Materials Science Center, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Buller, L.J.; Abruna, H.D. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Center, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Center, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied {ital in situ} the ordering of a two-dimensional Cu-Cl crystal electrodeposited on a Pt(111) surface. We simultaneously measured x-ray scattering and chronoamperometric transients during Cu desorption and subsequent ordering of the Cu-Cl crystal. In all cases, the current transient occurs on a shorter time scale than the development of crystalline order. The ordering time diverges with applied potential, consistent with the nucleation and growth of two-dimensional islands. We see a time-dependent narrowing of the x-ray peak, corresponding to the growing islands. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Inelastic neutron scattering in valence fluctuation compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon M Lawrence

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The valence fluctuation compounds are rare earth intermetallics where hybridization of the nearly-localized 4f electrons with the conduction electrons leads to incorporation of the 4f's into the itinerant states. This hybridization slows down the conduction electrons and hence gives them a heavy effective mass, justifying application of the term 'heavy Fermion' (HF) to these materials. During the project period, we grew large single crystals of several such compounds and measured their properties using both standard thermodynamic probes and state-of-the-art inelastic neutron scattering. We obtained three main results. For the intermediate valence compounds CePd{sub 3} and YbAl{sub 3}, we showed that the scattering of neutrons by the fluctuations of the 4f magnetic moment does not have the momentum dependence expected for the itinerant heavy mass state; rather, the scattering is more typical of a localized spin fluctuation. We believe that incoherent scattering localizes the excitation. For the heavy Fermion compound Ce(Ni{sub 0.935}Pd{sub 0.065}){sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, which sits at a T = 0 critical point for transformation into an antiferromagnetic (AF) phase, we showed that the scattering from the AF fluctuations does not exhibit any of the divergences that are expected at a phase transition. We speculate that alloy disorder profoundly suppresses the growth of the fluctuating AF regions, leading to short range clusters rather than regions of infinite size. Finally, we explored the applicability of key concepts used to describe the behavior of rare earth heavy Fermions to uranium based HF compounds where the 5f electrons are itinerant as opposed to localized. We found that scaling laws relating the spin fluctuation energy measured in neutron scattering to the low temperature specific heat and susceptibility are valid for the uranium compounds, once corrections are made for AF fluctuations; however, the degeneracy of the high temperature moment is smaller than expected for rare-earth-like Hund's rule behavior, essentially because the orbital moment is suppressed for itinerant 5f electrons. We also found that the standard local-moment-based theory of the temperature dependence of the specific heat, susceptibility and neutron scattering fails badly for URu{sub 2}Zn{sub 20} and UCo{sub 2}Zn{sub 20}, even though the theory is phenomenally successful for the closely related rare earth compound YbFe{sub 2}Zn{sub 20}. Both these results highlight the distinction between the itineracy of the 5f's and the localization of the 4f's. It is our hope that these results are sufficiently significant as to stimulate deeper investigation of these compounds.

  17. Qualification of a high-efficiency, gated spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Döppner, T.; Kritcher, A. L.; Bachmann, B.; Burns, S.; Hawreliak, J.; House, A.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Swift, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Neumayer, P. [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenphysik, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kraus, D. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Falcone, R. W. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94309 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed, built, and successfully fielded a highly efficient and gated Bragg crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering measurements on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It utilizes a cylindrically curved Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite crystal. Its spectral range of 7.4–10?keV is optimized for scattering experiments using a Zn He-? x-ray probe at 9.0 keV or Mo K-shell line emission around 18 keV in second diffraction order. The spectrometer has been designed as a diagnostic instrument manipulator-based instrument for the NIF target chamber at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA. Here, we report on details of the spectrometer snout, its novel debris shield configuration and an in situ spectral calibration experiment with a Brass foil target, which demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/?E = 220 at 9.8 keV.

  18. anomalous x-ray scattering: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

  19. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the importance of RSoXS as a unique, powerful tool for examining complex, multi-component systems that could not be characterized with conventional methods. An X-Ray Probe for Soft...

  20. Neutron and x-ray scattering studies of the metallurgical condition and residual stresses in Weldalite welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spooner, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pardue, E.B.S. [Technology for Energy Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Weldalite is a lithium-containing aluminum alloy which is being considered for aerospace applications because its favorable strength-to-weight ratio. Successful welding of this alloy depends on the control of the metallurgical condition and residual stresses in the heat affected zone. Neutron and x-ray scattering methods of residual stress measurement were applied to plasma arc welds made in aluminum-lithium alloy test panels as part of an evaluation of materials for use in welded structures. In the course of these studies discrepancies between x-ray and neutron results from the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the weld were found. Texture changes and recovery from the cold work, indicated in peak widths, were found in the HAZ as well. The consideration of x-ray and neutron results leads to the conclusion that there is a change in solute composition which modifies the d-spacings in the HAZ which affects the neutron diffraction determination of residual stresses. The composition changes give the appearance of significant compressive strains in the HAZ. This effect and sharp gradients in the texture give severe anomalies in the neutron measurement of residual stress. The use of combined x-ray and neutron techniques and the solution to the minimizing of the neutron diffraction anomalies are discussed.

  1. Analysis of Order Formation in Block Copolymer Thin Films UsingResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virgili, Justin M.; Tao, Yuefei; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Balsara,Nitash P.; Segalman, Rachel A.

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The lateral order of poly(styrene-block-isoprene) copolymer(PS-b-PI) thin films is characterized by the emerging technique ofresonant soft X-ray scattering (RSOXS) at the carbon K edge and comparedto ordering in bulk samples of the same materials measured usingconventional small-angle X-ray scattering. We show resonance using theoryand experiment that the loss of scattering intensity expected with adecrease in sample volume in the case of thin films can be overcome bytuning X-rays to the pi* resonance of PS or PI. Using RSOXS, we study themicrophase ordering of cylinder- and phere-forming PS-b-PI thin films andcompare these results to position space data obtained by atomic forcemicroscopy. Our ability to examine large sample areas (~;9000 mu m2) byRSOXS enables unambiguous identification of the lateral lattice structurein the thin films. In the case of the sphere-forming copolymer thin film,where the spheres are hexagonally arranged, the average sphere-to-spherespacing is between the bulk (body-centered cubic) nearest neighbor andbulk unit cell spacings. In the case of the cylinder-forming copolymerthin film, the cylinder-to-cylinder spacing is within experimental errorof that obtained in the bulk.

  2. Effects of grazing incidence conditions on the x-ray diffuse scattering from self-assembled nanoscale islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidbauer, M.; Grigoriev, D.; Hanke, M.; Schaefer, P.; Wiebach, T.; Koehler, R. [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstrasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction from SiGe nanoscale islands grown on Si(001) substrate were investigated. Experiments and corresponding theoretical simulations based on the distorted-wave Born approximation were carried out. The strain field inside and in the vicinity of the SiGe islands was calculated in the framework of linear elasticity theory using the numerical finite element method. The diffuse intensity pattern in reciprocal space reveals a well-resolved fine structure with prominent maxima and a complicated fringe pattern. The distribution of diffuse intensity in reciprocal space strongly depends on the angle of incidence with respect to the sample surface. The results obtained substantiate the important role of basically five (grazing incidence small-angle x-ray) and nine (grazing incidence diffraction) scattering channels that have to be considered for a complete understanding of the scattering scenario. A refined island model concerning shape, size, and Ge composition was elaborated.

  3. Ion distributions at charged aqueous surfaces: Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bu, Wei

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface sensitive synchrotron X-ray scattering studies were performed to obtain the distribution of monovalent ions next to a highly charged interface at room temperature. To control surface charge density, lipids, dihexadecyl hydrogen-phosphate (DHDP) and dimysteroyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA), were spread as monolayer materials at the air/water interface, containing CsI at various concentrations. Five decades in bulk concentrations (CsI) are investigated, demonstrating that the interfacial distribution is strongly dependent on bulk concentration. We show that this is due to the strong binding constant of hydronium H3O+ to the phosphate group, leading to proton-transfer back to the phosphate group and to a reduced surface charge. Using anomalous reflectivity off and at the L3 Cs+ resonance, we provide spatial counterion (Cs+) distributions next to the negatively charged interfaces. The experimental ion distributions are in excellent agreement with a renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions without fitting parameters or additional assumptions. Energy Scans at four fixed momentum transfers under specular reflectivity conditions near the Cs+ L3 resonance were conducted on 10-3 M CsI with DHDP monolayer materials on the surface. The energy scans exhibit a periodic dependence on photon momentum transfer. The ion distributions obtained from the analysis are in excellent agreement with those obtained from anomalous reflectivity measurements, providing further confirmation to the validity of the renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions. Moreover, the dispersion corrections f0 and f00 for Cs+ around L3 resonance, revealing the local environment of a Cs+ ion in the solution at the interface, were extracted simultaneously with output of ion distributions.

  4. Your access to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is approved beginning Sunday, June 20, 2010, for the second week of the Neutron X-ray Scattering School.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , for the second week of the Neutron X-ray Scattering School. Please be certain to bring photo identification access to the Target Facility.) · General User Access Training for Neutron Scattering Users, Neutron Scattering Science User Office Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL Neutron Scattering School June

  5. Evidence for the Importance of Resonance Scattering in X-Ray Emission Line Profiles of the O Star Zeta Puppis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leutenegger, M.A.; /Columbia U.; Owocki, S.P.; /Bartol Research Inst.; Kahn, S.M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Paerels, F.B.S.; /Columbia U.

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We fit the Doppler profiles of the He-like triplet complexes of O VII and N VI in the X-ray spectrum of the O star {zeta} Pup, using XMM-Newton RGS data collected over {approx} 400 ks of exposure. We find that they cannot be well fit if the resonance and intercombination lines are constrained to have the same profile shape. However, a significantly better fit is achieved with a model incorporating the effects of resonance scattering, which causes the resonance line to become more symmetric than the intercombination line for a given characteristic continuum optical depth {tau}{sub *}. We discuss the plausibility of this hypothesis, as well as its significance for our understanding of Doppler profiles of X-ray emission lines in O stars.

  6. Phase-based x-ray scattering—A possible method to detect cancer cells in a very early stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feye-Treimer, U., E-mail: feye-treimer@helmholtz-berlin.de; Treimer, W. [Department of Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry, University of Applied Sciences, D-13353 Berlin, Germany and Joint Department G-GTOMO, Helmholtz Zentrum fuer Materialien und Energie Berlin, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)] [Department of Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry, University of Applied Sciences, D-13353 Berlin, Germany and Joint Department G-GTOMO, Helmholtz Zentrum fuer Materialien und Energie Berlin, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This theoretical work contains a detailed investigation of the potential and sensitivity of phase-based x-ray scattering for cancer detection in biopsies if cancer is in a very early stage of development. Methods: Cancer cells in their early stage of development differ from healthy ones mainly due to their faster growing cell nuclei and the enlargement of their densities. This growth is accompanied by an altered nucleus–plasma relation for the benefit of the cell nuclei, that changes the physical properties especially the index of refraction of the cell and the one of the cell nuclei. Interaction of radiation with matter is known to be highly sensitive to small changes of the index of refraction of matter; therefore a detection of such changes of volume and density of cell nuclei by means of high angular resolved phase-based scattering of x rays might provide a technique to distinguish malignant cells from healthy ones ifthe cell–cell nucleus system is considered as a coherent phase shifting object. Then one can observe from a thin biopsy which represents a monolayer of cells (no multiple scattering) that phase-based x-ray scattering curves from healthy cells differ from those of cancer cells in their early stage of development. Results: Detailed calculations of x-ray scattering patterns from healthy and cancer cell nuclei yield graphs and numbers with which one can distinguish healthy cells from cancer ones, taking into account that both kinds of cells occur in a tissue within a range of size and density. One important result is the role and the influence of the (lateral) coherence width of the radiation on the scattering curves and the sensitivity of phase-based scattering for cancer detection. A major result is that a larger coherence width yields a larger sensitivity for cancer detection. Further import results are calculated limits for critical sizes and densities of cell nuclei in order to attribute the investigated tissue to be healthy or diseased. Conclusions: With this proposed method it should be in principle possible to detect cancer cells in apparently healthy tissues in biopsies and/or in samples of the far border region of abscised or excised tissues. Thus this method could support established methods in diagnostics of cancer-suspicious samples.

  7. Anomalous small angle x-ray scattering studies of amorphous metal-germanium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation addresses the issue of composition modulation in sputtered amorphous metal-germanium thin films with the aim of understanding the intermediate range structure of these films as a function of composition. The investigative tool used in this work is anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS). The primary focus of this investigation is the amorphous iron-germanium (a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}) system with particular emphasis on the semiconductor-rich regime. Brief excursions are made into the amorphous tungsten-germanium (a-W{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}) and the amorphous molybdenum-germanium (a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}) systems. All three systems exhibit an amorphous structure over a broad composition range extending from pure amorphous germanium to approximately 70 atomic percent metal when prepared as sputtered films. Across this composition range the structures change from the open, covalently bonded, tetrahedral network of pure a-Ge to densely packed metals. The structural changes are accompanied by a semiconductor-metal transition in all three systems as well as a ferromagnetic transition in the a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} system and a superconducting transition in the a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} system. A long standing question, particularly in the a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} and the a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} systems, has been whether the structural changes (and therefore the accompanying electrical and magnetic transitions) are accomplished by homogeneous alloy formation or phase separation. The application of ASAXS to this problem proves unambiguously that fine scale composition modulations, as distinct from the simple density fluctuations that arise from cracks and voids, are present in the a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}, a-W{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}, and a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} systems in the semiconductor-metal transition region. Furthermore, ASAXS shows that germanium is distributed uniformly throughout each sample in the x<25 regime of all three systems.

  8. Tunable X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyce, James R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  9. INHOMOGENEITIES IN TYPE Ib/c SUPERNOVAE: AN INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING ORIGIN OF THE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjoernsson, C.-I., E-mail: bjornsson@astro.su.se [Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Inhomogeneities in a synchrotron source can severely affect the conclusions drawn from observations regarding the source properties. However, their presence is not always easy to establish, since several other effects can give rise to similar observed characteristics. It is argued that the recently observed broadening of the radio spectra and/or light curves in some Type Ib/c supernovae is a direct indication of inhomogeneities. As compared to a homogeneous source, this increases the deduced velocity of the forward shock and the observed correlation between total energy and shock velocity could in part be due to a varying covering factor. The X-ray emission from at least some Type Ib/c supernovae is unlikely to be synchrotron radiation from an electron distribution accelerated in a nonlinear shock. Instead it is shown that the observed correlation during the first few hundred days between the radio, X-ray, and bolometric luminosities indicates that the X-ray emission is inverse Compton scattering of the photospheric photons. Inhomogeneities are consistent with equipartition between electrons and magnetic fields in the optically thin synchrotron emitting regions.

  10. Focus characterization at an X-ray free-electron laser by coherent scattering and speckle analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Schropp, Andreas; Seiboth, Frank; Feng, Yiping; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Chollet, Matthieu; Lemke, Henrik T.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray focus optimization and characterization based on coherent scattering and quantitative speckle size measurements was demonstrated at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Its performance as a single-pulse free-electron laser beam diagnostic was tested for two typical focusing configurations. The results derived from the speckle size/shape analysis show the effectiveness of this technique in finding the focus' location, size and shape. In addition, its single-pulse compatibility enables users to capture pulse-to-pulse fluctuations in focus properties compared with other techniques that require scanning and averaging.

  11. Bent crystal spectrometer for both frequency and wavenumber resolved x-ray scattering at a seeded free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zastrau, Ulf; Foerster, Eckhart; Galtier, Eric Ch; Gamboa, Eliseo; Glenzer, Siegfried H; Heimann, Philipp; Marschner, Heike; Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Wehrhan, Ortrud; Lee, Hae Ja

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a cylindrically curved GaAs x-ray spectrometer with energy resolution $\\Delta E/E = 1.1\\cdot 10^{-4}$ and wave-number resolution of $\\Delta k/k = 3\\cdot 10^{-3}$, allowing plasmon scattering at the resolution limits of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free-electron laser. It spans scattering wavenumbers of 3.6 to $5.2/$\\AA\\ in 100 separate bins, with only 0.34\\% wavenumber blurring. The dispersion of 0.418~eV/$13.5\\,\\mu$m agrees with predictions within 1.3\\%. The reflection homogeneity over the entire wavenumber range was measured and used to normalize the amplitude of scattering spectra. The proposed spectrometer is superior to a mosaic HAPG spectrometer when the energy resolution needs to be comparable to the LCLS seeded bandwidth of 1~eV and a significant range of wavenumbers must be covered in one exposure.

  12. Bent crystal spectrometer for both frequency and wavenumber resolved x-ray scattering at a seeded free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zastrau, Ulf, E-mail: ulf.zastrau@uni-jena.de [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Fletcher, Luke B.; Galtier, Eric Ch.; Gamboa, Eliseo; Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Heimann, Philipp; Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Lee, Hae Ja [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Förster, Eckhart [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Marschner, Heike; Wehrhan, Ortrud [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a cylindrically curved GaAs x-ray spectrometer with energy resolution ?E/E = 1.1 ×?10{sup ?4} and wave-number resolution of ?k/k = 3 ×?10{sup ?3}, allowing plasmon scattering at the resolution limits of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free-electron laser. It spans scattering wavenumbers of 3.6 to 5.2/Å in 100 separate bins, with only 0.34% wavenumber blurring. The dispersion of 0.418 eV/13.5??m agrees with predictions within 1.3%. The reflection homogeneity over the entire wavenumber range was measured and used to normalize the amplitude of scattering spectra. The proposed spectrometer is superior to a mosaic highly annealed pyrolytic graphite spectrometer when the energy resolution needs to be comparable to the LCLS seeded bandwidth of 1 eV and a significant range of wavenumbers must be covered in one exposure.

  13. Ultra-fast x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of insulator-metal transition in shock-compressed matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Castor, J; Doppner, T; Falcone, R W; Landen, O L; Lee, H J; Lee, R W; Morse, E C; Ng, A; Pollaine, S; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrally resolved scattering of ultra-short pulse laser-generated K-{alpha} x rays has been applied to measure the heating and compression of shocked solid-density lithium hydride. Two shocks launched by a nanosecond laser pulse coalesce yielding pressures of 400 gigapascals. The evolution of the intensity of the elastic (Rayleigh) scattering component indicates rapid heating to temperatures of 25,000 K on a 100 ps time scale. At shock coalescence, the scattering spectra show the collective plasmon oscillations indicating the transition to the dense metallic plasma state. The plasmon frequency determines the material compression, which is found to be a factor of three thereby reaching conditions in the laboratory important for studying astrophysics phenomena.

  14. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  15. SU-E-I-76: Matching Primary and Scattered X-Ray Spectra for Use in Calculating the Diagnostic Radiation Index of Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasciak, A [University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States); Jones, A [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wagner, L [UT Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Lightweight lead-free or lead-composite protective garments exploit k-edge interactions to attenuate scattered X-rays. Manufacturers specify the protective value of garments in terms of lead equivalence at a single kVp. This is inadequate, as the protection provided by such garments varies with radiation quality in different use conditions. We present a method for matching scattered X-ray spectra to primary X-ray spectra. The resulting primary spectra can be used to measure penetration through protective garments, and such measurements can be weighted and summed to determine a Diagnostic Radiation Index for Protection (DRIP). Methods: Scattered X-ray spectra from fluoroscopic procedures were modeled using Monte Carlo techniques in MCNP-X 2.7. Data on imaging geometry, operator position, patient size, and primary beam spectra were gathered from clinical fluoroscopy procedures. These data were used to generate scattered X-ray spectra resulting from procedural conditions. Technical factors, including kV and added filtration, that yielded primary X-ray spectra that optimally matched the generated scattered X-ray spectra were identified through numerical optimization using a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithm. Results: The primary spectra generated with shape functions matched the relative flux in each bin of the scattered spectra within 5%, and half and quarter-value layers matched within 0.1%. The DRIP for protective garments can be determined by measuring the penetration through protective garments using the matched primary spectra, then calculating a weighted average according to the expected clinical use of the garment. The matched primary spectra are specified in terms of first and second half-value layers in aluminum and acrylic. Conclusion: Lead equivalence is inadequate for completely specifying the protective value of garments. Measuring penetration through a garment using full scatter conditions is very difficult. The primary spectra determined in this work allow for practical primary penetration measurements to be made with equipment readily available to clinical medical physicists.

  16. Bulk effects in the coherent inelastic scattering of ultracold neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. L. Barabanov; S. T. Belyaev

    2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    With the use of theory developed earlier, bulk effects in ultracold neutron coherent inelastic scattering are considered both for solid and liquid target samples related to energy and momentum exchange with phonon and diffusion-like modes. For the neutron in a material trap, differential and integral probabilities for the energy transfer per bounce are presented in a simple analytic form which exhibits the parameter dependence. As an example, the theoretical values for the ultracold neutron loss rate from a storage bottle with Fomblin coated walls and stainless steel walls are evaluated. Possible contribution from incoherent inelastic scattering on hydrogen contamination is discussed.

  17. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Hung T. [BioMaPS Institute for Quantitative Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Case, David A., E-mail: case@biomaps.rutgers.edu [BioMaPS Institute for Quantitative Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+}) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein–Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko–Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  18. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » Important TrinityEnergyIn Situ X-Ray

  19. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » Important TrinityEnergyIn Situ X-RayIn

  20. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » Important TrinityEnergyIn Situ X-RayInIn

  1. Liquid Argon Cryogenic Detector Calibration by Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Polosatkin; Evgeny Grishnyaev; Alexander Dolgov

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for calibration of cryogenic liquid argon detector response to recoils with certain energy -8.2 keV - is proposed. The method utilizes a process of inelastic scattering of monoenergetic neutrons produced by fusion DD neutron generator. Features of kinematics of inelastic scattering cause sufficient (forty times) increase in count rate of useful events relative to traditional scheme exploited elastic scattering with the same recoil energy and compatible energy resolution. The benefits of the proposed scheme of calibration most well implemented with the use of tagged neutron generator as a neutron source that allows to eliminate background originated from casual coincidence of signals on cryogenic detector and additional detector of scattered neutrons.

  2. Leading proton production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leading proton production in deep inelastic 1 scattering at HERA 2 ZEUS Collaboration 3 Draft, with a #28;nal-state proton carrying a large fraction of the incoming proton energy, x L > 0 photon virtualities Q 2 > 3 GeV 2 and mass of the photon-proton sys- tem 45

  3. INELASTIC NEUTRON SCATTERING SELECTION RULES OF 03B1 HgI2 M. SIESKIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    899 INELASTIC NEUTRON SCATTERING SELECTION RULES OF 03B1 HgI2 M. SIESKIND Laboratoire de The inelastic neutron scattering selection rules of 03B1 HgI2 in the directions 0394, 03A3 and 039B are derived Abstracts 63.20D Introduction. - Inelastic neutron scattering is a powerful technique for the determination

  4. A general framework and review of scatter correction methods in x-ray cone-beam computerized tomography. Part 1: Scatter compensation approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruehrnschopf, Ernst-Peter; Klingenbeck, Klaus [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Imaging and Therapy Division, Forchheim (Germany)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since scattered radiation in cone-beam volume CT implies severe degradation of CT images by quantification errors, artifacts, and noise increase, scatter suppression is one of the main issues related to image quality in CBCT imaging. The aim of this review is to structurize the variety of scatter suppression methods, to analyze the common structure, and to develop a general framework for scatter correction procedures. In general, scatter suppression combines hardware techniques of scatter rejection and software methods of scatter correction. The authors emphasize that scatter correction procedures consist of the main components scatter estimation (by measurement or mathematical modeling) and scatter compensation (deterministic or statistical methods). The framework comprises most scatter correction approaches and its validity also goes beyond transmission CT. Before the advent of cone-beam CT, a lot of papers on scatter correction approaches in x-ray radiography, mammography, emission tomography, and in Megavolt CT had been published. The opportunity to avail from research in those other fields of medical imaging has not yet been sufficiently exploited. Therefore additional references are included when ever it seems pertinent. Scatter estimation and scatter compensation are typically intertwined in iterative procedures. It makes sense to recognize iterative approaches in the light of the concept of self-consistency. The importance of incorporating scatter compensation approaches into a statistical framework for noise minimization has to be underscored. Signal and noise propagation analysis is presented. A main result is the preservation of differential-signal-to-noise-ratio (dSNR) in CT projection data by ideal scatter correction. The objective of scatter compensation methods is the restoration of quantitative accuracy and a balance between low-contrast restoration and noise reduction. In a synopsis section, the different deterministic and statistical methods are discussed with respect to their properties and applications. The current paper is focused on scatter compensation algorithms. The multitude of scatter estimation models will be dealt with in a separate paper.

  5. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  6. X-ray scattering studies of structure and dynamics of surfaces and interfaces of polymeric liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Zhang

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and S. K. Sinha, “Structure and dynamics of thin polymer ?Scattering Studies of Structure and Dynamics of Surfaces andScattering Studies of Structure and Dynamics of Surfaces and

  7. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Measurements of Ionization in Warm, Dense Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Paul

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    attention to hydrogens high-pressure properties has sinceal. , Thermophysical properties of warm dense hydrogen using

  8. Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering of Rare-Earth and Copper Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kvashnina, Kristina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of lanthanum, and yttrium hydride ?lms with changingof lanthanum, and yttrium hydride ?lms with changing

  9. Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering of Rare-Earth and Copper Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kvashnina, Kristina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bombardment for twelve rare-earths metals [1] . Accord- ingal. [3] have showed that rare-earth metals such as La has aof most of the rare- earths metals, oxides, and chlorides.

  10. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Measurements of Ionization in Warm, Dense Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Paul

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of ultrashort, ultra-intense laser light by solids andpulses, ultra-high intensity lasers have revolutionizedpresent in ultra-high-intensity laser-matter interaction

  11. Linear Dichroism in Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering to Molecular

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us countLighting SignLiisaLin WangSpin-Orbit

  12. Coherence effects in deep inelastic scattering from nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ver Steeg, G. L. (Greg L.); Raufeisen, J. (Jorg)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete theoretical picture of multiple scattering processes in QCD remains elusive. In deep inelastic scattering experiments (DIS), we hope to find out information about the internal structure of nuclei from inelastically scattering high-energy electrons off them. The electrons interact via virtual photon exchange with the target. In the target rest frame the virtual photon splits into a quark-antiquark pair which is then scattered off the target color field. At high energies, coherent multiple scattering within the nucleus takes place. We develop a model that uses a parameterization of scattering cross section of the quark-antiquark pair off the proton to predict the cross section suppression known as shadowing in larger nuclei. This model takes the possibility of multiple scattering into account using Glauber high-energy collision theory. In large nuclei we must also move beyond the eikonal approximation by correcting for the finite lifetime of the quark-antiquark pair inside the nucleus. Results and implications of this model in relation to available data will be discussed. Finally, application of this type of model to predicting gluon densities will be considered. Understanding this process can give us insights into the more oomplicated scattering taking place in heavy ion colliders such as RHIC and LHC.

  13. Small-angle x-ray scattering measurements of the microstructure of liquid helium mixtures adsorbed in aerogel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lurio, L. B.; Mulders, N.; Paetkau, M.; Chan, M. H. W.; Mochrie, S. G. J. [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Okanagan College, British Columbia V1Y4X8 (Canada); Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to measure the microstructure of isotopic mixtures of {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He adsorbed into silica aerogels as a function of temperature and {sup 3}He concentration. The SAXS measurements could be well described by the formation of a nearly pure film of {sup 4}He which separates from the bulk mixture onto the aerogel strands and which thickens with decreasing temperature. Previous observations of a superfluid {sup 3}He-rich phase are consistent with superfluidity existing within this film phase. Observed differences between different density aerogels are explained in terms of the depletion of {sup 4}He from the bulk mixture due to film formation.

  14. Structure of Flame-Made Silica Nanoparticles by Ultra-Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    by thermophoretic sampling and microscopy that provided consistent results with light scattering with respect thermophoretically collected samples and image analysis of t

  15. Narrowband inverse Compton scattering x-ray sources at high laser intensities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seipt, D; Surzhykov, A; Fritzsche, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Narrowband x- and gamma-ray sources based on the inverse Compton scattering of laser pulses suffer from a limitation of the allowed laser intensity due to the onset of nonlinear effects that increase their bandwidth. It has been suggested that laser pulses with a suitable frequency modulation could compensate this ponderomotive broadening and reduce the bandwidth of the spectral lines, which would allow to operate narrowband Compton sources in the high-intensity regime. In this paper we, therefore, present the theory of nonlinear Compton scattering in a frequency modulated intense laser pulse. We systematically derive the optimal frequency modulation of the laser pulse from the scattering matrix element of nonlinear Compton scattering, taking into account the electron spin and recoil. We show that, for some particular scattering angle, an optimized frequency modulation completely cancels the ponderomotive broadening for all harmonics of the backscattered light. We also explore how sensitive this compensation ...

  16. DEEPLY INELASTIC SCATTERING OFF NUCLEI AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VENUGOPALAN, R.

    2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, we discussed the physics case for an eA collider. We emphasized the novel physics that might be studied at small x. The interesting physics at intermediate x's has been discussed elsewhere [3]. Plans for an electron-ion collider include, as a major part of the program, the possibility of doing polarized electron-polarized proton/light ion scattering. A discussion of the combined case for high energy electron nucleus and polarized electron-polarized proton scattering will be published separately [66].

  17. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program uses ab-initio and multiple scattering to study surface dynamical processes; high-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy is used in particular. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50--300 eV). The analyses have been extended to surfaces of ordered alloys. Phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross section calculations. Work on low-energy electron and positron holography is mentioned.

  18. Monitoring simultaneously the growth of nanoparticles and aggregates by in situ ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kammler, Hendrik K.; Beaucage, Gregory; Kohls, Douglas J.; Agashe, Nikhil; Ilavsky, Jan [Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, ML F23, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Cincinnati, 540 Engineering Research Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0012 (United States); UNICAT, Advanced Photon Source, Building 438D, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering can provide information about primary particles and aggregates from a single scattering experiment. This technique is applied in situ to flame aerosol reactors for monitoring simultaneously the primary particle and aggregate growth dynamics of oxide nanoparticles in a flame. This was enabled through the use of a third generation synchrotron source (Advanced Photon Source, Argonne IL, USA) using specialized scattering instrumentation at the UNICAT facility which is capable of simultaneously measuring nanoscales to microscales (1 nm to 1 {mu}m). More specifically, the evolution of primary-particle diameter, mass-fractal dimension, geometric standard deviation, silica volume fraction, number concentration, radius of gyration of the aggregate, and number of primary particles per aggregate are measured along the flame axis for two different premixed flames. All these particle characteristics were derived from a single and nonintrusive measurement technique. Flame temperature profiles were measured in the presence of particles by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermophoretic sampling was used to visualize particle growth with height above the burner as well as in the radial direction.

  19. Inelastic scattering of fast neutrons from $^{56}$Fe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyer, R; Hannaske, R; Junghans, A R; Massarczyk, R; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Ferrari, A; Kögler, T; Röder, M; Schmidt, K; Wagner, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inelastic scattering of fast neutrons from $^{56}$Fe was studied at the photoneutron source nELBE. The neutron energies were determined on the basis of a timeof- flight measurement. Gamma-ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium detector. The total scattering cross sections deduced from the present experiment in an energy range from 0.8 to 9.6 MeV agree within 15% with earlier data and with predictions of the statistical-reaction code Talys.

  20. A short working distance multiple crystal x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, B.; Seidler, G. T.; Webb, Z. W.; Bradley, J. A.; Nagle, K. P. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Heald, S. M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratories, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Gordon, R. A. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Chou, I. M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 20192 (United States)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For x-ray spot sizes of a few tens of microns or smaller, a millimeter-sized flat analyzer crystal placed {approx}1 cm from the sample will exhibit high energy resolution while subtending a collection solid angle comparable to that of a typical spherically bent crystal analyzer (SBCA) at much larger working distances. Based on this observation and a nonfocusing geometry for the analyzer optic, we have constructed and tested a short working distance (SWD) multicrystal x-ray spectrometer. This prototype instrument has a maximum effective collection solid angle of 0.14 sr, comparable to that of 17 SBCA at 1 m working distance. We find good agreement with prior work for measurements of the Mn K{beta} x-ray emission and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for MnO, and also for measurements of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure for Dy metal using L{alpha}{sub 2} partial-fluorescence yield detection. We discuss future applications at third- and fourth-generation light sources. For concentrated samples, the extremely large collection angle of SWD spectrometers will permit collection of high-resolution x-ray emission spectra with a single pulse of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The range of applications of SWD spectrometers and traditional multi-SBCA instruments has some overlap, but also is significantly complementary.

  1. A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Montanez, Paul; Delor, James; Bergmann, Uwe [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kern, Jan [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States); Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis [SSRL, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Tran, Rosalie; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive hard x-ray spectrometer with high-energy resolution and large solid angle collection is described. The instrument is specifically designed for time-resolved applications of x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. It also simplifies resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of the whole 2d RIXS plane. The spectrometer is based on the Von Hamos geometry. This dispersive setup enables an XES or XRS spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode, overcoming the scanning needs of the Rowland circle spectrometers. In conjunction with the XFEL temporal profile and high-flux, it is a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of time-dependent systems. Photo-induced processes and fast catalytic reaction kinetics, ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds, will be resolvable in a wide array of systems circumventing radiation damage.

  2. Using synchrotron X-ray scattering to study the diffusion of water in a weakly-hydrated clay sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Meheust; B. Sandnes; G. Lovoll; K. J. Maloy; J. O. Fossum; G. J. da Silva; M. S. P. Mundim; R. Droppa; D. d. Miranda Fonseca

    2005-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the diffusion of water in weakly-hydrated samples of the smectite clay Na-fluorohectorite. The quasi one-dimensional samples are dry compounds of nano-layered particles consisting of ~ 80 silicate platelets. Water diffuses into a sample through the mesoporosity in between the particles, and can subsequently intercalate into the adjacent particles. The samples are placed under controlled temperature. They are initially under low humidity conditions, with all particles in a 1WL intercalation state. We then impose a high humidity at one sample end, triggering water penetration along the sample length. We monitor the progression of the humidity front by monitoring the intercalation state of the particles in space and time. This is done by determining the characteristic spacing of the nano-layered particles in situ, from synchrotron wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements. The spatial width of the intercalation front is observed to be smaller than 2mm, while its velocity decreases with time, as expected from a diffusion process.

  3. Protein Folding Dynamics Detected By Time-Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Small-Angle Scattering Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujisawa, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Satoshi [RIKEN Harima Institute, SPring-8 Center, Laboratory for Biometal Science, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University Suita Osaka 565-0871/CREST, JST (Japan)

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The polypeptide collapse is an essential dynamics in protein folding. To understand the mechanism of the collapse, in situ observation of folding by various probes is necessary. The changes in secondary and tertiary structures in the folding process of globular proteins, whose chain lengths are less than 300 polypeptides, were observed by circular dichrosim and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopies, respectively. On the other hand, those in protein compactness could be only detected by using time-resolved synchrotron x-ray small-angle scattering technique. The observed dynamics for several proteins with different topologies suggested a common folding mechanism termed 'collapse and search' dynamics, in which the polypeptide collapse precedes the formation of the native contact formation. In 'collapse and search' dynamics, the most outstanding feature lied in the compactness of the initial intermediates. The collapsed intermediates demonstrated the scaling relationship between radius of gyration (Rg) and chain length with a scaling exponent of 0.35 {+-} 0.11, which is close to the value (1/3) predicted by mechano-statistical theory for the collapsed globules of polymers in poor solvent. Thus, it was suggested that the initial collapse is caused by the coil-globule transition of polymers. Since the collapse is essential to the folding of larger proteins, further investigations on the collapse likely lead to an important insight into the protein folding phenomena.

  4. Proton inelastic scattering on {sup 56}Ni in inverse kinematics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraus, G.; Egelhof, P.; Fischer, C.; Geissel, H.; Himmler, A.; Nickel, F.; Muenzenberg, G.; Schwab, W.; Weiss, A. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Chulkov, L.; Golovkov, M.; Ogloblin, A. [I.V. Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Friese, J.; Gillitzer, A.; Koerner, H.J.; Peter, M. [TU, Munich (Germany); Henning, W.; Schiffer, J.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Kratz, J.V. [Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inelastic proton scattering to the first excited 2{sup +} state at 2.701 MeV in doubly magic {sup 56}Ni was studied at 101 MeV/u in inverse kinematics. The radioactive {sup 56}Ni ion beam was obtained from the SIS heavy ion synchrotron at GSI Darmstadt via fragmentation of a {sup 58}Ni beam, and separation by the fragment separator (FRS). A value B(E2, 0{sup +} {yields} 2{sup +}) = 600 {+-} 120 e{sup 2} fm{sup 4} was obtained which corresponds to a deformation parameter {beta} ({sup 56}Ni) = 0.173 {+-} 0.017.

  5. Investigating Silicon-Based Photoresists with Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering and X-ray Micro-spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caster, Allison G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIGHT (X- RAYS , EUV, ULTRAFAST PULSES ), OR HEAT . T HEthe “on” time of an ultrafast pulse is referred to as thepeak-power of the ultrafast pulses, purely electronic four-

  6. Electronic Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials with Photon-in/Photon-out Soft-X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jinghua

    2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The applications of resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy on a variety of carbon systems have yielded characteristic fingerprints. With high-resolution monochromatized synchrotron radiation excitation, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering has emerged as a new source of information about electronic structure and excitation dynamics. Photon-in/photon-out soft-X-ray spectroscopy is used to study the electronic properties of fundamental materials, nanostructure, and complex hydrides and will offer potential in-depth understanding of chemisorption and/or physisorption mechanisms of hydrogen adsorption/desorption capacity and kinetics.

  7. Core and Valence Excitations in Resonant X-ray Spectroscopy using Restricted Excitation Window Time-dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Healion, Daniel; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report simulations of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and 1D stimulated X-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) signals of cysteine at the oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur K and L2,3 edges. The simulated XANES signals from the restricted window time-dependent density functional theory (REW-TDDFT) and the static exchange (STEX) method are compared with experiments, showing that REW-TDDFT is more accurate and computationally less expensive than STEX. Simulated RIXS and 1D SXRS signals from REW-TDDFT give some insights on the correlation of different excitations in the molecule.

  8. Hydrostatic low-range pressure applications of the Paris-Edinburgh cell utilising polymer gaskets for diffuse x-ray scattering measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, K. W.; Chupas, P. J.; Kurtz, C.; Locke, D.; Parise, J. B.; Hriljac, J. A.; Stony Brook Univ.; Univ. of Birmingham

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a polymeric Torlon (polyamide-imide) gasket material in a Paris-Edinburgh pressure cell for in situ high-pressure X-ray scattering measurements is demonstrated. The relatively low bulk modulus of the gasket allows for fine control of the sample pressure over the range 0.01-0.42 GPa. The quality of the data obtained in this way is suitable for Bragg and pair distribution function analysis.

  9. Mass fractal characteristics of wet sonogels as determined by small-angle x-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vollet, D. R.; Donatti, D. A.; Ibanez Ruiz, A.; Gatto, F. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Unesp-Univerisdade Estadual Paulista, IGCE, P.O. Box 178 CEP 13500-970 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low density silica sonogels were prepared from acid sonohydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. Wet gels were studied by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC tests were carried out under a heating rate of 2 deg. C/min from -120 deg. C up to 30 deg. C. Aerogels were obtained by CO{sub 2} supercritical extraction and characterized by nitrogen adsorption and SAXS. The DSC thermogram displays two distinct endothermic peaks. The first, a broad peak extending from about -80 deg. C up to practically 0 deg. C, was associated to the melting of ice nanocrystals with a crystal size distribution with 'pore' diameter ranging from 1 or 2 nm up to about 60 nm, as estimated from Thomson's equation. The second, a sharp peak with onset temperature close to 0 deg. C, was attributed to the melting of macroscopic crystals. The DSC incremental 'nanopore' volume distribution is in reasonable agreement with the incremental pore volume distribution of the aerogel as determined from nitrogen adsorption. No macroporosity was detected by nitrogen adsorption, probably because the adsorption method applies stress on the sample during measurement, leading to a underestimation of pore volume, or because often positive curvature of the solid surface is in aerogels, making the nitrogen condensation more difficult. According to the SAXS results, the solid network of the wet gels behaves as a mass fractal structure with mass fractal dimension D=2.20{+-}0.01 in a characteristic length scale below {xi}=7.9{+-}0.1 nm. The mass fractal characteristics of the wet gels have also been probed from DSC data by means of an earlier applied modeling for generation of a mass fractal from the incremental ''pore'' volume distribution curves. The results are shown to be in interesting agreement with the results from SAXS.

  10. Mass fractal characteristics of silica sonogels as determined by small-angle x-ray scattering and nitrogen adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donatti, D.A.; Vollet, D.R.; Ibanez Ruiz, A.; Mesquita, A.; Silva, T.F.P. [Unesp-Universidade Estadual Paulista, IGCE, Departamento de Fisica, P.O. Box 178 CEP, 13500-970 Rio Claro, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample series of silica sonogels was prepared using different water-tetraethoxysilane molar ratio (r{sub w}) in the gelation step of the process in order to obtain aerogels with different bulk densities after the supercritical drying. The samples were analyzed by means of small-angle x-ray-scattering (SAXS) and nitrogen-adsorption techniques. Wet sonogels exhibit mass fractal structure with fractal dimension D increasing from {approx}2.1 to {approx}2.4 and mass-fractal correlation length {xi} diminishing from {approx}13 nm to {approx}2 nm, as r{sub w} is changed in the nominal range from 66 to 6. The process of obtaining aerogels from sonogels and heat treatment at 500 deg. C, in general, increases the mass-fractal dimension D, diminishes the characteristic length {xi} of the fractal structure, and shortens the fractal range at the micropore side for the formation of a secondary structured particle, apparently evolved from the original wet structure at a high resolution level. The overall mass-fractal dimension D of aerogels was evaluated as {approx}2.4 and {approx}2.5, as determined from SAXS and from pore-size distribution by nitrogen adsorption, respectively. The fine structure of the 'secondary particle' developed in the obtaining of aerogels could be described as a surface-mass fractal, with the correlated surface and mass-fractal dimensions decreasing from {approx}2.4 to {approx}2.0 and from {approx}2.7 to {approx}2.5, respectively, as the aerogel bulk density increases from 0.25 (r{sub w}=66) up to 0.91 g/cm{sup 3} (r{sub w}=6)

  11. Parallel Computational Modelling of Inelastic Neutron Scattering in Multi-node and Multi-core Architectures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garba, M.T.; Gonzales-Velez, H.; Roach, D.L.

    2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the initial parallel implementation of SCATTER, a computationally intensive inelastic neutron scattering routine with polycrystalline averaging capability, for the General Utility Lattice Program (GULP). Of particular importance...

  12. X-ray-induced electronic structure change in CuIr{sub 2}S{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gretarsson, H.; Kim, Young-June [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 (Canada); Kim, Jungho; Casa, D.; Gog, T. [CMC-XOR, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Choi, K. R. [l-PEM, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, S. W. [l-PEM, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); R-CEM and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structure of CuIr{sub 2}S{sub 4} is investigated using various bulk-sensitive x-ray spectroscopic methods near the Ir L{sub 3} edge: resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), x-ray absorption spectroscopy in the partial fluorescence yield mode, and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy. A strong RIXS signal (0.75 eV) resulting from a charge-density-wave gap opening is observed below the metal-insulator transition temperature of 230 K. The resultant modification of electronic structure is consistent with the density functional theory prediction. In the spin- and charge-dimer disordered phase induced by x-ray irradiation below 50 K, we find that a broad peak around 0.4 eV appears in the RIXS spectrum.

  13. Structural and magnetic properties of transition metal substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} compounds studied by x-ray and neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Min Gyu [Ames Laboratory

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of my dissertation is to understand the structural and magnetic properties of the newly discovered FeAs-based superconductors and the interconnection between superconductivity, antiferromagnetism, and structure. X-ray and neutron scattering techniques are powerful tools to directly observe the structure and magnetism in this system. I used both xray and neutron scattering techniques on di#11;erent transition substituted BaFe2As2 compounds in order to investigate the substitution dependence of structural and magnetic transitions and try to understand the connections between them.

  14. Mode-Locked Multichromatic X-Rays in a Seeded Free-Electron Laser for Single-Shot X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang, Dao; Ding, Yuantao; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the promise of generating gigawatt mode-locked multichromatic x rays in a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). We show that, by using a laser to imprint periodic modulation in electron beam phase space, a single-frequency coherent seed can be amplified and further translated to a mode-locked multichromatic output in an FEL. With this configuration the FEL output consists of a train of mode-locked ultrashort pulses which span a wide frequency gap with a series of equally spaced sharp lines. These gigawatt multichromatic x rays may potentially allow one to explore the structure and dynamics of a large number of atomic states simultaneously. The feasibility of generating mode-locked x rays ranging from carbon K edge ({approx}284 eV) to copper L{sub 3} edge ({approx}931 eV) is confirmed with numerical simulation using the realistic parameters of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) and LCLS-II. We anticipate that the mode-locked multichromatic x rays in FELs may open up new opportunities in x-ray spectroscopy (i.e. resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, time-resolved scattering and spectroscopy, etc.).

  15. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, Joshua J.; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Hwang, Harold Y.; Zarem, Alex; Schlotter, William F.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Staub, Urs; Johnson, Steven; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm?¹ electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed.

  16. Low-frequency Vibrational Anomalies in -Lactoglobulin: Contribution of Different Hydrogen Classes Revealed by Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuscia, Università Degli Studi Della

    Revealed by Inelastic Neutron Scattering A. Orecchini, A. Paciaroni, A. R. Bizzarri, and S. Cannistraro -lactoglobulin has been investigated by inelastic neutron scattering, on both dry and D2O-hydrated samples. Both typically accessible energy and momentum transfers, inelastic thermal neutron scattering is probably

  17. Nuclear spin response studies in inelastic polarized proton scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, K.W.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spin-flip probabilities S/sub nn/ have been measured for inelastic proton scattering at incident proton energies around 300 MeV from a number of nuclei. At low excitation energies S/sub nn/ is below the free value. For excitation energies above about 30 MeV for momentum transfers between about 0.35 fm/sup /minus/1/ and 0.65 fm/sup / minus/1/ S/sub nn/ exceeds free values significantly. These results suggest that the relative ..delta..S = 1(..delta..S = 0 + ..delta..S = 1) nuclear spin response approaches about 90% in the region of the enhancement. Comparison of the data with slab response calculations are presented. Decomposition of the measured cross sections into sigma(..delta..S = 0) and sigma(..delta..S = 1) permit extraction of nonspin-flip and spin-flip dipole and quadrupole strengths. 29 refs., 11 figs.

  18. A Survey of Students from the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering: Communication Habits and Preferences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world. And the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulse neutron beams. Management of these resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD started conducting the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering (NXS) in conjunction with the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory in 2007. This survey was conducted to determine the most effective ways to reach students with information about what SNS and HFIR offer the scientific community, including content and communication vehicles. The emphasis is on gaining insights into compelling messages and the most effective channels, e.g., Web sites and social media, for communicating with students about neutron science The survey was conducted in two phases using a classic qualitative investigation to confirm language and content followed by a survey designed to quantify issues, assumptions, and working hypotheses. Phase I consisted of a focus group in late June 2010 with students attending NXS. The primary intent of the group was to inform development of an online survey. Phase two consisted of an online survey that was developed and pre-tested in July 2010 and launched on August 9, 2010 and remained in the field until September 9, 2010. The survey achieved an overall response rate of 48% for a total of 157 completions. The objective of this study is to determine the most effective ways to reach students with information about what SNS and HFIR offer the scientific community, including content and communication vehicles. The emphasis is on gaining insights into compelling messages and the most effective channels, e.g., Web sites, social media, for communicating with students about neutron science.

  19. Sub-100-ps structural dynamics of horse heart myoglobin probed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    Sub-100-ps structural dynamics of horse heart myoglobin probed by time-resolved X-ray solution-slicing Structural dynamics Myoglobin a b s t r a c t Here we report sub-100-ps structural dynamics of horse heart rearrangement [27]. In this work, we extend the time-slicing scheme to a protein, horse heart myoglobin (Mb

  20. Propagation of a strong x-ray pulse: Pulse compression, stimulated Raman scattering, amplified spontaneous emission, lasing without inversion, and four-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, 250014 Jinan (China); Department of Theoretical Chemistry, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Liu Jicai; Gel'mukhanov, Faris [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the compression of strong x-ray pulses from x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) propagating through the resonant medium of atomic argon. The simulations are based on the three-level model with the frequency of the incident x-ray pulse tuned in the 2p{sub 3/2}-4s resonance. The pulse propagation is accompanied by the self-seeded stimulated resonant Raman scattering (SRRS). The SRRS starts from two channels of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), 4s-2p{sub 3/2} and 3s-2p{sub 3/2}, which form the extensive ringing pattern and widen the power spectrum. The produced seed field triggers the Stokes ASE channel 3s-2p{sub 3/2}. The population inversion is quenched for longer propagation distances where the ASE is followed by the lasing without inversion (LWI), which amplifies the Stokes component. Both ASE and LWI reshape the input pulse: The compressed front part of the pulse (up to 100 as) is followed by the long tail of the ringing and beating between the pump and Stokes frequencies. The pump pulse also generates weaker Stokes and anti-Stokes fields caused by four-wave mixing. These four spectral bands have fine structures caused by the dynamical Stark effect. A slowdown of the XFEL pulse up to 78% of the speed of light in vacuum is found because of a large nonlinear refractive index.

  1. Excitation of Giant Monopole Resonance in $^{208}$Pb and $^{116}$Sn Using Inelastic Deuteron Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Patel; U. Garg; M. Itoh; H. Akimune; G. P. A. Berg; M. Fujiwara; M. N. Harakeh; C. Iwamoto; T. Kawabata; K. Kawase; J. T. Matta; T. Murakami; A. Okamoto; T. Sako; K. W. Schlax; K. Takahashi; M. White; M. Yosoi

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The excitation of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) in $^{116}$Sn and $^{208}$Pb has been investigated using small-angle (including $0^\\circ$) inelastic scattering of 100 MeV/u deuteron and multipole-decomposition analysis (MDA). The extracted strength distributions agree well with those from inelastic scattering of 100 MeV/u $\\alpha$ particles. These measurements establish deuteron inelastic scattering at E$_d \\sim$ 100 MeV/u as a suitable probe for extraction of the ISGMR strength with MDA, making feasible the investigation of this resonance in radioactive isotopes in inverse kinematics.

  2. Morphology of gold nanoparticles determined by full-curve fitting of the light absorption spectrum. Comparison with X-ray scattering and electron microscopy data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostyantyn Slyusarenko; Benjamin Abécassis; Patrick Davidson; Doru Constantin

    2015-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize the size and shape of gold nanoparticles. We present a full-spectrum model that yields reliable results for the commonly encountered case of mixtures of spheres and rods in varying proportions. We determine the volume fractions of the two populations, the aspect ratio distribution of the nanorods (average value and variance) and the interface damping parameter. We validate the model by checking the fit results against small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy data and show that correctly accounting for the polydispersity in aspect ratio is essential for a quantitative description of the longitudinal plasmon peak.

  3. Separable-spherical-wave approximation: Application to x-ray-absorption fine-structure multiple scattering in ReO sub 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houser, B. (Department of Physics, MS 68, Eastern Washington University, Cheney, Washington 99004 (United States)); Ingalls, R.; Rehr, J.J. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rehr and Albers have shown that the exact x-ray-absorption fine-structure (XAFS) propagator may be expanded in a separable matrix form, and that the lowest-order term in the expansion yields XAFS formulas that contain spherical-wave corrections, yet retain the simplicity of the plane-wave approximation. This separable-spherical-wave approximation was used to model the multiple-scattering contributions to the XAFS spectrum of rhenium trioxide. We report a modest improvement over the plane-wave approximation.

  4. BioSAXS Sample Changer: a robotic sample changer for rapid and reliable high-throughput X-ray solution scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Round, Adam, E-mail: around@embl.fr; Felisaz, Franck [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes–EMBL–CNRS, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Fodinger, Lukas; Gobbo, Alexandre [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Huet, Julien [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes–EMBL–CNRS, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Villard, Cyril [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Blanchet, Clement E., E-mail: around@embl.fr [EMBL c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Pernot, Petra; McSweeney, Sean [ESRF, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France); Roessle, Manfred; Svergun, Dmitri I. [EMBL c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Cipriani, Florent, E-mail: around@embl.fr [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes–EMBL–CNRS, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic sample changer for solution X-ray scattering experiments optimized for speed and to use the minimum amount of material has been developed. This system is now in routine use at three high-brilliance European synchrotron sites, each capable of several hundred measurements per day. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of macromolecules in solution is in increasing demand by an ever more diverse research community, both academic and industrial. To better serve user needs, and to allow automated and high-throughput operation, a sample changer (BioSAXS Sample Changer) that is able to perform unattended measurements of up to several hundred samples per day has been developed. The Sample Changer is able to handle and expose sample volumes of down to 5 µl with a measurement/cleaning cycle of under 1 min. The samples are stored in standard 96-well plates and the data are collected in a vacuum-mounted capillary with automated positioning of the solution in the X-ray beam. Fast and efficient capillary cleaning avoids cross-contamination and ensures reproducibility of the measurements. Independent temperature control for the well storage and for the measurement capillary allows the samples to be kept cool while still collecting data at physiological temperatures. The Sample Changer has been installed at three major third-generation synchrotrons: on the BM29 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), the P12 beamline at the PETRA-III synchrotron (EMBL@PETRA-III) and the I22/B21 beamlines at Diamond Light Source, with the latter being the first commercial unit supplied by Bruker ASC.

  5. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, D.

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep-inelastic scattering ...

  6. Inclusive Aand Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at Cebaf at Higher Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Frois; P. J. Mulders

    1994-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the discussion on the possibilities of doing inclusive and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering experiments at CEBAF with beam energy of the order of 10 GeV.

  7. Hadronization in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering on nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadronization in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering on nuclei A. Airapetian p , N. Akopov aa , Z. Akopov aa , E.C. Aschenauer g , W. Augustyniak z , R. Avakian aa , A. Avetissian aa , E

  8. Nucleon binding corrections to lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering: Use of a realistic spectral function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dieperink, A.E.L.; Miller, G.A. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (USA))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear spectral functions computed with realistic nuclear forces are used to compute mean separation energies and to estimate the binding corrections to lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering. The separation energies are large and significant binding effects are obtained.

  9. Hadron attenuation in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falter, T.; Cassing, W.; Gallmeister, K.; Mosel, U. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed theoretical investigation of hadron attenuation in deep inelastic scattering off complex nuclei in the kinematic regime of the HERMES experiment. The analysis is carried out in the framework of a probabilistic coupled-channel transport model based on the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation, which allows for a treatment of the final-state interactions beyond simple absorption mechanisms. Furthermore, our event-by-event simulations account for the kinematic cuts of the experiments as well as the geometrical acceptance of the detectors. We calculate the multiplicity ratios of charged hadrons for various nuclear targets relative to deuterium as a function of the photon energy {nu}, the hadron energy fraction z{sub h}=E{sub h}/{nu}, and the transverse momentum p{sub T}. We also confront our model results on double-hadron attenuation with recent experimental data. Separately, we compare the attenuation of identified hadrons ({pi}{sup {+-}}, {pi}{sup 0}, K{sup {+-}}, p, and p) on {sup 20}Ne and {sup 84}Kr targets with the data from the HERMES Collaboration and make predictions for a {sup 131}Xe target. At the end we turn towards hadron attenuation on {sup 63}Cu nuclei at EMC energies. Our studies demonstrate that (pre-)hadronic final-state interactions play a dominant role in the kinematic regime of the HERMES experiment while our present approach overestimates the attenuation at EMC energies.

  10. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 205440 (2012) Inelastic neutron scattering investigations of the quantum molecular dynamics of a H2 molecule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 205440 (2012) Inelastic neutron scattering investigations of the quantum transfer arising from the neutron scattering event has also been investigated. The -dependence spectra investigations using infrared (IR),3,13­15 inelastic neutron scattering (INS),3,16,17 and nuclear magnetic

  11. Test of the consistency of various linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions in application to inelastic neutron scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William H.

    functions in application to inelastic neutron scattering from liquid para-hydrogen Jian Liua and William H for inelastic neutron scattering from liquid para-hydrogen at 14 K. Various time correlations functions were neutron scattering experimental data all suggest that the LSC-IVR is indeed a good short

  12. Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of Alpha-Particles and Protons from Sm-144

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barker, J. H.; Hiebert, John C.

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PH YSICA L REVIEW C VOLUME 4, NUMB ER 6 DECEMBER 1971 Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of o. Particles and Protons from Sm~ J. H. Barker* and J. C. Hiebert Texas ARM University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 14 June 1971) Differential... cross sections for the elastic scattering and inelastic scattering to the low-ly- ing states in Sm have been measured using 50-MeV e-particle and 30-MeV proton beams from the Texas ASM variable-energy cyclotron. Spin and parity assignments are checked...

  13. Test of the consistency of various linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions in application to inelastic neutron scattering from liquid para-hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jian

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory of Thermal Neutron Scattering. (Dover Publications,S. W. Lovesey, Theory of Neutron Scattering from Condensedwith the inelastic neutron scattering experiment results.

  14. Flavor Decomposition of the Sea Quark Helicity Distributions in the Nucleon from Semi-inclusive Deep-inelastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -inclusive Deep-inelastic Scattering A. Airapetian,30 N. Akopov,30 Z. Akopov,30 M. Amarian,6, 30 V.V. Ammosov,22 A

  15. Vacancy-induced nanoscale phase separation in KxFe2–ySe? single crystals evidenced by Raman scattering and powder x-ray diffraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lazarevi?, N.; Abeykoon, M.; Stephens, P. W.; Lei, Hechang; Bozin, E. S.; Petrovic, C.; Popovi?, Z. V.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarized Raman scattering spectra of KxFe2–ySe? were analyzed in terms of peculiarities of both I4/m and I4/mmm space group symmetries. The presence of the Raman active modes from both space group symmetries (16 Raman-active modes of the I4/m phase and two Raman-active modes of the I4/mmm phase) confirmed the existence of two crystallographic domains with different space group symmetry in a KxFe2–ySe? sample. High-resolution synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction structural refinement of the same sample confirmed the two-phase description, and determined the atomic positions and occupancies for both domains.

  16. Evolution of crystalline structures of poly([epsilon]-caprolactone)/polycarbonate blends; 1: Isothermal crystallization kinetics as probed by synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Y.W.; Stein, R.S. (Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering); Chu, B.; Wu, G. (State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Long Island, NY (United States))

    1994-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Evolution of the poly([epsilon]-caprolactone) (PCL) lamellae in blends of PCL/PC (polycarbonate) was monitored by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The effects of crystallization temperature, PC concentration, and PC crystallinity on the PCL lamellar growth in the PCL-rich blends were investigated. The half-crystallization time derived from the temporal change of the peak intensity increased with crystallization temperature and generally increased with the addition of PC. For a given blend composition, the lamellar growth rate increased with increasing PC crystallinity. The interlamellar spacing initially varied with time and then approached a plateau value at the later stage of crystallization. An insertion mechanism is proposed in which the PCL is crystallized in the amorphous intralamellar phase. This model is also consistent with the quantitative SAXS results, which suggested that random mixing of PCL and PC lamellae occurred in the semicrystalline (PCL)/semicrystalline (PC) state.

  17. Study of the Crystalline Morphology Evolution of PET and PET/PC Blends by Time-resolved Synchrotron Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) and DSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbosa, Irineu; Larocca, Nelson M.; Hage, Elias [Dep. de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Plivelic, Tomas S.; Torriani, Iris L. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Mantovani, Gerson L. [Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Sociais Aplicadas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09090-400 Santo Andre, SP (Brazil)

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Isothermal melt crystallization of poly(ethylene terephthalate)(PET) and PET/PC (polycarbonate) blend, with and without a transesterification catalyst, was studied by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in order to achieve the variation of the morphological parameters throughout the whole crystallization time. For neat PET, the catalyst promotes a decrease of the crystal lamellar thickness but for the blend no variations were observed. The effect of incorporation of catalyst in crystallization kinetics was very distinct in PET pure and the blend: in the former the catalyst leads to an increase of this kinetics while for the latter it was observed a decreasing.

  18. Combined x-ray scattering, radiography, and velocity interferometry/streaked optical pyrometry measurements of warm dense carbon using a novel technique of shock-and-release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falk, K.; Collins, L. A.; Kagan, G.; Kress, J. D.; Montgomery, D. S.; Srinivasan, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Gamboa, E. J. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States) [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS 72, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Tzeferacos, P. [Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] [Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Benage, J. F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States) [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work focused on a new application of the shock-and-release technique for equation of state (EOS) measurements. Warm dense matter states at near normal solid density and at temperatures close to 10?eV in diamond and graphite samples were created using a deep release from a laser-driven shock at the OMEGA laser facility. Independent temperature, density, and pressure measurements that do not depend on any theoretical models or simulations were obtained using imaging x-ray Thomson scattering, radiography, velocity interferometry, and streaked optical pyrometry. The experimental results were reproduced by the 2-D FLASH radiation hydrodynamics simulations finding a good agreement. The final EOS measurement was then compared with widely used SESAME EOS models as well as quantum molecular dynamics simulation results for carbon, which were very consistent with the experimental data.

  19. Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salah, Wa'el [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan); Department of Physics, The Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Bp 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Hoorani, H. [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and wide angle x-ray scattering beamline, currently under construction at SESAME is described. This beamline is based on a cylindrically bent germanium (111) single crystal with an asymmetric cut of 10.5 deg., followed by a 1.2 m long rhodium coated plane mirror bent into a cylindrical form. The focusing properties of bent asymmetrically cut crystals have not yet been studied in depth. The present paper is devoted to study of a particular application of a bent asymmetrically cut crystal using ray tracing simulations with the SHADOW code. These simulations show that photon fluxes of order of 1.09x10{sup 11} photons/s will be available at the experimental focus at 8.79 keV. The focused beam dimensions will be 2.2 mm horizontal full width at half maximum (FWHM) by 0.12 mm vertical (FWHM).

  20. J. Mol. Biol. (1975) 99, 15-25 On the Interpretation of Small-angle X-ray Solution Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scattering points of unit weight with angular co-ordinates 8t, ~b~,we have g, = Y..:,* (el,i,,) (2) t=1 since

  1. Crystal Structures and Small-angle X-ray Scattering Analysis of UDP-galactopyranose Mutase from the Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Karr, Dale B.; Nix, Jay C.; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J. (Missouri); (LBNL); (VPI-SU)

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the conversion of UDP-galactopyranose to UDP-galactofuranose, which is a central reaction in galactofuranose biosynthesis. Galactofuranose has never been found in humans but is an essential building block of the cell wall and extracellular matrix of many bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. The importance of UGM for the viability of many pathogens and its absence in humans make UGM a potential drug target. Here we report the first crystal structures and small-angle x-ray scattering data for UGM from the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, the causative agent of aspergillosis. The structures reveal that Aspergillus UGM has several extra secondary and tertiary structural elements that are not found in bacterial UGMs yet are important for substrate recognition and oligomerization. Small-angle x-ray scattering data show that Aspergillus UGM forms a tetramer in solution, which is unprecedented for UGMs. The binding of UDP or the substrate induces profound conformational changes in the enzyme. Two loops on opposite sides of the active site move toward each other by over 10 {angstrom} to cover the substrate and create a closed active site. The degree of substrate-induced conformational change exceeds that of bacterial UGMs and is a direct consequence of the unique quaternary structure of Aspergillus UGM. Galactopyranose binds at the re face of the FAD isoalloxazine with the anomeric carbon atom poised for nucleophilic attack by the FAD N5 atom. The structural data provide new insight into substrate recognition and the catalytic mechanism and thus will aid inhibitor design.

  2. Probing the MgATP-Bound Conformation of the Nitrogenase Fe Protein By Solution Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarma, R.; Mulder, D.W.; Brecht, E.; Szilagyi, R.K.; Seefeldt, L.C.; Tsuruta, H.; Peters, J.W.; /Montana State U. /SLAC, SSRL /Utah State U.

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The MgATP-bound conformation of the Fe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii has been examined in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and compared to existing crystallographically characterized Fe protein conformations. The results of the analysis of the crystal structure of an Fe protein variant with a Switch II single-amino acid deletion recently suggested that the MgATP-bound state of the Fe protein may exist in a conformation that involves a large-scale reorientation of the dimer subunits, resulting in an overall elongated structure relative to the more compact structure of the MgADP-bound state. It was hypothesized that the Fe protein variant may be a conformational mimic of the MgATP-bound state of the native Fe protein largely on the basis of the observation that the spectroscopic properties of the [4Fe-4S] cluster of the variant mimicked in part the spectroscopic signatures of the native nitrogenase Fe protein in the MgATP-bound state. In this work, SAXS studies reveal that the large-scale conformational differences between the native Fe protein and the variant observed by X-ray crystallography are also observed in solution. In addition, comparison of the SAXS curves of the Fe protein nucleotide-bound states to the nucleotide-free states indicates that the conformation of the MgATP-bound state in solution does not resemble the structure of the variant as initially proposed, but rather, at the resolution of this experiment, it resembles the structure of the nucleotide-free state. These results provide insights into the Fe protein conformations that define the role of MgATP in nitrogenase catalysis.

  3. Photoluminescence due to inelastic exciton-exciton scattering in ZnMgO-alloy thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chia, C. H.; Chen, J. N.; Hu, Y. M. [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 81148, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the photoluminescence of ZnMgO thin film, grown by the radiofrequency sputtering method, as a function of excitation intensity and temperature. As the excitation intensity increases, a nonlinear emission band caused by the radiative recombination of the inelastic exciton-exciton scattering was detected at low temperature. We found that the inelastic exciton-exciton scattering process can only persist up to T {approx} 260 K. The nonlinear emission band observed at room temperature is due to the radiative recombination of the electron-hole plasma.

  4. Conversion method of powder inelastic scattering data for one-dimensional systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomiyasu, Dr. Keisuke [Tohoku University, Japan; Fujita, Prof. Masaki [Tohoku University, Japan; Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL; Bewley, Robert I. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Bull, Dr. Martyn J. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Bennington, Dr. Stephen M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extracting dispersive magnetic excitations from inelastic neutron scattering data usually requires large single crystals. We present a simple yet powerful method for extracting such information from polycrystalline or powder data for one-dimensional systems. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this data treatment by extracting dispersion curves from powder inelastic neutron scattering data on the one-dimensional spin-half systems: CuGeO3 and Rb2Cu2Mo3O12. For many such materials it is not possible to grow sufficiently large crystals and this method offers a quick and efficient way to study their magnetic excitations.

  5. X-Ray Data from the X-Ray Data Booklet Online

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thompson, Albert C.; Attwood, David T.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Underwood, James H.; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kirz, Janos; Lindau, Ingolf; Pianetta, Piero; Winick, Herman; Williams, Gwyn P.; Scofield, James H.

    The original X-Ray Data Booklet, published in 1985, became a classic reference source. The online version has been significantly revised and updated to reflect today's science. Hundreds of pages of authoritative data provide the x-ray properties of elements, information on synchrotron radiation, scattering processes, optics and detectors, and other related calculations, formulas, and data tables.

  6. Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R. [and others

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

  7. Time-, frequency-, and wavevector-resolved x-ray diffraction from single molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, Kochise, E-mail: kcbennet@uci.edu; Biggs, Jason D.; Zhang, Yu; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul, E-mail: smukamel@uci.edu [University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 (United States)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a quantum electrodynamic framework, we calculate the off-resonant scattering of a broadband X-ray pulse from a sample initially prepared in an arbitrary superposition of electronic states. The signal consists of single-particle (incoherent) and two-particle (coherent) contributions that carry different particle form factors that involve different material transitions. Single-molecule experiments involving incoherent scattering are more influenced by inelastic processes compared to bulk measurements. The conditions under which the technique directly measures charge densities (and can be considered as diffraction) as opposed to correlation functions of the charge-density are specified. The results are illustrated with time- and wavevector-resolved signals from a single amino acid molecule (cysteine) following an impulsive excitation by a stimulated X-ray Raman process resonant with the sulfur K-edge. Our theory and simulations can guide future experimental studies on the structures of nano-particles and proteins.

  8. Mechanism of elastic and inelastic proton scattering on a {sup 15}C nucleus in diffraction theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibraeva, E. T., E-mail: ibr@inp.kz [National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Kazakhstan); Zhusupov, M. A. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University (Kazakhstan); Imambekov, O. [National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Kazakhstan)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The amplitudes for elastic and inelastic proton scattering on the neutron-rich nucleus {sup 15}C (to its J{sup {pi}} = 5/2{sup +} level in the latter case) in inverse kinematics were calculated within Glauber diffraction theory. First- and second-order terms were taken into account in the multiple-scattering operator. The {sup 15}C wave function in the multiparticle shell model was used. This made it possible to calculate not only respective differential cross sections but also the contribution of proton scattering on nucleons occurring in different shells. The differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering were calculated at the energies of 0.2, 0.6, and 1 GeV per nucleon.

  9. 2011 X-Ray Science Gordon Research Conference (August 7-12, 2011, Colby, College. Waterville, ME)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Stephenson

    2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 Gordon Research Conference on X-ray Science will feature forefront x-ray-based science enabled by the rapid improvements in synchrotron and x-ray laser sources. Across the world, x-ray sources are playing an increasingly important role in physics, materials, chemistry, and biology, expanding into ever broadening areas of science and engineering. With the first hard x-ray free electron laser source beginning operation and with other advanced x-ray sources operational and planned, it is a very exciting and pivotal time for exchange ideas about the future of x-ray science and applications. The Conference will provide the forum for this interaction. An international cast of speakers will illuminate sessions on ultrafast science, coherence, imaging, in situ studies, extreme conditions, new developments in optics, sources, and detectors, inelastic scattering, nanoscience, life science, and energy sciences. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of these areas, and will provide a venue for young scientists entering a career in x-ray research to present their research in poster format, hold discussions in a friendly setting, and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. Some poster presenters will be selected for short talks. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with ample time for discussion as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, will provide an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to exchange ideas about forefront x-ray techniques and will promote cross-fertilization between the various research areas represented.

  10. Chest x-Rays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica.

  11. Comparison of longitudinal polarization of $?$ and $\\bar?$ in deep-inelastic scattering at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. G. Sapozhnikov

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The longitudinal polarization of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperons produced in deep-inelastic scattering of 160 GeV/c polarized muons is studied in the COMPASS experiment. Preliminary results on x- and y- dependence of the longitudinal polarization of Lambda and anti-Lambda from data collected during the 2003 run are presented.

  12. Inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of H2@C60 and its temperature dependence decoded using rigorous quantum calculations and a new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    Inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of H2@C60 and its temperature dependence decoded using://jcp.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 139, 064309 (2013) Inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of H2@C60 quantum cal- culations of the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra of this prototypical endohedral

  13. X-Ray Interactions with Matter from the Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Henke, B.L.; Gullikson, E.M.; Davis, J.C.

    The primary interactions of low-energy x-rays within condensed matter, viz. photoabsorption and coherent scattering, are described for photon energies outside the absorption threshold regions by using atomic scattering factors. The atomic scattering factors may be accurately determined from the atomic photoabsorption cross sections using modified Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations. From a synthesis of the currently available experimental data and recent theoretical calculations for photoabsorption, the angle-independent, forward-scattering components of the atomic scattering factors have been thus semiempirically determined and tabulated here for 92 elements and for the region 50-30,000 eV. Atomic scattering factors for all angles of coherent scattering and at the higher photon energies are obtained from these tabulated forward-scattering values by adding a simple angle-dependent form-factor correction. The incoherent scattering contributions that become significant for the light elements at the higher photon energies are similarly determined. The basic x-ray interaction relations that are used in applied x-ray physics are presented here in terms of the atomic scattering factors. The bulk optical constants are also related to the atomic scattering factors. These atomic and optical relations are applied to the detailed calculation of the reflectivity characteristics of a series of practical x-ray mirror, multilayer, and crystal monochromators. Comparisons of the results of this semiempirical,"atom-like", description of x-ray interactions for the low-energy region with those of experiment and ab initio theory are presented.

  14. Nuclear medium effects in $?(\\bar?)$-nucleus deep inelastic scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Haider; I. Ruiz Simo; M. Sajjad Athar; M. J. Vicente Vacas

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the nuclear medium effects in the weak structure functions $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $F_3(x,Q^2)$ in the deep inelastic neutrino/antineutrino reactions in nuclei. We use a theoretical model for the nuclear spectral functions which incorporates the conventional nuclear effects, such as Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions calculated from a microscopic model for meson-nucleus self-energies. The calculations have been performed using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations. Our results are compared with the experimental data of NuTeV and CDHSW.

  15. The Nature of the Surface Species Formed on Au/TiO2 during the Reaction of H2 and O2: An Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Neutron Scattering Study Chinta Sivadinarayana, Tushar V. Choudhary, Luke L. Daemen, Juergen Eckert of obvious interest for understanding this process. Vibrational spectroscopy by inelastic neutron scattering

  16. Inelastic neutron and low-frequency Raman scattering in a niobium-phosphate glass for Raman gain applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schirmacher, Walter

    Inelastic neutron and low-frequency Raman scattering in a niobium-phosphate glass for Raman gain: Raman scattering; Neutron scattering; Raman gain; Boson peak We present measurements of the vibrational, extracted from specific-heat or neutron scattering measurements [7,8]. Only very recently two of the present

  17. A promising concept for using near-surface measuring angles in angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy considering elastic scattering effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oswald, S.; Oswald, F. [IFW Dresden, Postfach 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing number of applications of very thin films requires both reliable thin-layer and interface characterization. A powerful method for characterization in the nanometer thickness range is the angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). This is a nondestructive depth-profiling method, which can provide elemental content as well as chemical information. Two of the drawbacks of ARXPS are, that it requires dedicated mathematical modeling and that, at least up until now, its use has been restricted away from near-surface angles. In this paper we present a method for the mathematical description of a few, hitherto unaccounted, measurement effects in order to improve the simulations of ARXPS data for complex surface structures. As an immediate application, we propose a simple algorithm to consider the effects of elastic scattering in the standard ARXPS data interpretation, which in principle would allow the use of the whole angular range for the analysis; thus leading to a significant increase in the usable information content from the measurements. The potential of this approach is demonstrated with model calculations for a few thin film examples.

  18. Surface Area and Microporosity of Carbon Aerogels from Gas Adsorption and Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Fairén-jiménez; Francisco Carrasco-marín; David Djurado; Françoise Bley; Françoise Ehrburger-dolle; Carlos Moreno-castilla

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon aerogel was obtained by carbonization of an organic aerogel prepared by sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde in water. The carbon aerogel was then CO2 activated at 800 °C to increase its surface area and widen its microporosity. Evolution of these parameters was followed by gas adsorption and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS, respectively) with contrast variation by using dry and wet (immersion in benzene and m-xylene) samples. For the original carbon aerogel, the surface area, SSAXS, obtained by SAXS, is larger than that obtained by gas adsorption (Sads). The values become nearly the same as the degree of activation of the carbon aerogel increases. This feature is due to the widening of the narrow microporosity in the carbon aerogel as the degree of activation is increased. In addition, WAXS results show that the short-range spatial correlations into the assemblies of hydrocarbon molecules confined inside the micropores are different from those existing in the liquid phase. 1.

  19. Investigations of the R5(SixGe1-x)4 Intermetallic Compounds by X-Ray Resonant Magnetic Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lizhi Tan

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The XRMS experiment on the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} system has shown that, below the Neel temperature, T{sub N} = 127 K, the magnetic unit cells is the same as the chemical unit cell. From azimuth scans and the Q dependence of the magnetic scattering, all three Gd sites in the structure were determined to be in the same magnetic space group Pnma. The magnetic moments are aligned along the c-axis and the c-components of the magnetic moments at the three different sites are equal. The ferromagnetic slabs are stacked antiferromagnetically along the b-direction. They found an unusual order parameter curve in Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}. A spin-reorientation transition is a possibility in Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}, which is similar to the Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} case. Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} possesses the same Sm{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}-type crystallographic structure and the same magnetic space group as Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} does. The difference in magnetic structure is that Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} has a canted one but Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} has nearly a collinear one in the low temperature antiferromagnetic phase. The competition between the magneto-crystalline anisotropy and the nearest-neighbor magnetic exchange interactions may allow a 3-dimensional canted antiferromagnetic structure in Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}. The spin-reorientation transition in both Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} and Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} may arise from the competition between the magnetic anisotropy from the spin-orbit coupling of the conduction electrons and the dipolar interactions anisotropy.

  20. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  1. Nuclear Effects in Deep Inelastic Scattering of Charged-Current Neutrino off Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan ChunGui; Li GuangLie; Shen PengNian

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear effect in the neutrino-nucleus charged-Current inelastic scattering process is studied by analyzing the CCFR and NuTeV data. Structure functions $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $xF_3(x,Q^2)$ as well as differential cross sections are calculated by using CTEQ parton distribution functions and EKRS and HKN nuclear parton distribution functions, and compared with the CCFR and NuTeV data. It is found that the corrections of nuclear effect to the differential cross section for the charged-current anti-neutrino scattering on nucleus are negligible, the EMC effect exists in the neutrino structure function $F_2(x,Q^2)$ in the large $x$ region, the shadowing and anti-shadowing effect occurs in the distribution functions of valence quarks in the small and medium $x$ region,respectively. It is also found that shadowing effects on $F_2(x,Q^2)$ in the small $x$ region in the neutrino-nucleus and the charged-lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering processes are different. It is clear that the neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering data should further be employed in restricting nuclear parton distributions.

  2. Intrinsic vs. extrinsic inelastic scattering contributions in kappa-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br - transport measurements under hydrostatic pressure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strack, C.; Akinci, C.; Paschenko, V.; Wolf, B.; Uhrig, E.; Assmus, W.; Schreuer, J.; Wiehl, L.; Schlueter, J.; Wosnitza, J.; Schweitzer, D.; Lang , M.; Materials Science Division; J.W. Goethe-Universitat Frankfurt; Inst.fur Festkorperphysik; Univ. Stuttgart

    2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Interlayer-resistivity measurements have been performed on a variety of single crystals of the quasi-two-dimensional organic superconductor {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br. These crystals, which have been synthesized along two somewhat different routes, reveal strongly sample-dependent resistivity profiles: while the majority of samples shows a more or less pronounced {rho}(T) maximum around 90 K with a semiconducting behavior above, some crystals remain metallic at all temperatures T {le} 300 K. In the absence of significant differences in the crystals' structural parameters and chemical compositions, as proved by high-resolution X-ray and electron-probe-microanalysis, these results indicate that real structure phenomena, i.e. disorder and/or defects, may strongly affect the inelastic scattering. Comparative resistivity measurements under He-gas pressure on two crystals with strongly differing {rho}(T) profiles indicate that these additional, sample-dependent scattering contributions are characterized by an extraordinarily strong pressure response which is highly non-monotonous as a function of temperature. No correlations have been found between the strength of these scattering contributions and other characteristic properties such as the glass transition at T{sub g} = 77 K, the temperature T* {approx} 40 K, where the temperature dependence of the resistivity changes rather abruptly, or the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c}.

  3. Nuclear level density as a tool for probing the inelastic scattering of 6He

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bora Canbula; Halil Babacan

    2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross sections are calculated for the both elastic and inelastic scattering of 6He from 12C and 4He. A phenomenological optical potential is used to describe the elastic scattering. 4He is taken as spherical and inelastic couplings to the first excited states of 6He and 12C are described with collective rotational model and coupled-channels method. Deformation lengths for 6He and 12C are determined from semi-classical nuclear level density model by using Laplace-like formula for the nuclear level density parameter. The comparison of the predicted and the measured cross sections are presented to test the applicability of nuclear level density model to the light exotic nuclei reactions. Good agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured cross sections.

  4. Measurement of Leading Neutron Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H1 Collaboration

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of leading neutrons, where the neutron carries a large fraction x_L of the incoming proton's longitudinal momentum, is studied in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at HERA. The data were taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 122 pb^{-1}. The semi-inclusive cross section is measured in the phase space defined by the photon virtuality 6 neutron transverse momentum p_T neutron structure function, F_2^{LN(3)}(Q^2,x,x_L), and the fraction of deep-inelastic scattering events containing a leading neutron are studied as a function of Q^2, x and x_L. Assuming that the pion exchange mechanism dominates leading neutron production, the data provide constraints on the shape of the pion structure function.

  5. Producing a compound Nucleus via Inelastic Scattering: The 90Zr(alpha,alpha')90Zr* Case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Escher, J E; Dietrich, F S

    2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In a Surrogate reaction a compound nucleus is produced via a direct reaction (pickup, stripping, or inelastic scattering). For a proper application of the Surrogate approach it is necessary to predict the resulting angular momentum and parity distribution in the compound nucleus. A model for determining these distributions is developed for the case of inelastic alpha scattering off a spherical nucleus. The focus is on obtaining a first, simple description of the direct-reaction process that produces the compound nucleus and on providing the basis for a more complete treatment of the problem. The approximations employed in the present description are discussed and the extensions required for a more rigorous treatment of the problem are outlined. To illustrate the formalism, an application to {sup 90}Zr({alpha},{alpha}{prime}){sup 90}Zr* is presented.

  6. Deep Inelastic Electron Scattering Off the Helium and Tritium Mirror Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, Roy J. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Petratos, Gerassimos G. [Department of Physics, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242 (United States)

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a possible measurement of the ratio of nucleon structure functions, F{sub 2}{sup n}/F{sub 2}{sup p}, and the ratio of up to down quark distributions, u/d, at large Bjorken x, by performing deep inelastic electron scattering from the {sup 3}H and {sup 3}He mirror nuclei with the 11 GeV upgraded beam of Jefferson Lab. The measurement is expected to be almost free of nuclear effects, which introduce a significant uncertainty in the extraction of these two ratios from deep inelastic scattering off the proton and deuteron. The results are expected to test perturbative and non-perturbative mechanisms of spin-flavor symmetry breaking in the nucleon, and constrain the structure function parametrizations needed for the interpretation of high energy collider and neutrino oscillations data. The precision of the expected data can also test models of the nuclear EMC effect and provide valuable input for its full explanation.

  7. Double spin asymmetry AL?T? in charged pion production from deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized ³He target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I discuss the first measurement of the beam-target double-spin asymmetry ALT for charged pion electroproduction in deep inelastic electron scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target. These data were ...

  8. Hadron Formation in Deep-Inelastic Positron Scattering in a Nuclear Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akushevich, I V; Amarian, M; Arrington, J; Aschenauer, E C; Avakian, H; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Bains, B; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brauksiepe, S; Braun, B; Brückner, W; Brüll, A; Budz, P; Bulten, H J; Capitani, G P; Carter, P; Chumney, P; Cisbani, E; Court, G R; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Devitsin, E G; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; Di Nezza, P; Dzhordzhadze, V; Düren, M; Dvoredsky, A P; Elbakian, G M; Ely, J; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Felawka, L; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Fiedler, K; Filippone, B W; Fischer, H; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Gärber, Y; Garibaldi, F; Garutti, E; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Golendukhin, A; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Green, P W; Greeniaus, L G; Gute, A; Haeberli, W; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Heinsius, F H; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hofman, G J; Holler, Y; Holt, R J; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Iodice, M; Izotov, A A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Jung, P; Kaiser, R; Kanesaka, J; Kinney, E R; Kiselev, A; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, H; Koch, N; Königsmann, K C; Kolster, H; Korotkov, V A; Kotik, E; Kozlov, V; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kyle, G S; Lagamba, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Lindemann, T; Lorenzon, W; Makins, N C R; Martin, J W; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; McAndrew, M; McIlhany, K; McKeown, R D; Meissner, F; Menden, F; Metz, A; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Milner, R; Muccifora, V; Mussa, R; Nagaitsev, A P; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaeva, K; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganesyan, K A; O'Neill, T G; Openshaw, R; Ouyang, J; Owen, B R; Pate, S F; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Rakness, G; Rappoport, V; Redwine, R P; Reggiani, D; Reolon, A R; Ristinen, R; Rith, K; Robinson, D; Rostomyan, A; Ruh, M; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Sato, T; Savin, I A; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schmidt, F; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Schwind, A; Seibert, J; Seitz, B; Shibata, T A; Shin, T; Shutov, V B; Simani, M C; Simon, A; Sinram, K; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Suetsugu, K; Sutter, M F; Taroian, S P; Terkulov, A R; Tessarin, S; Thomas, E; Tipton, B; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van den Brand, J F J; van der Steenhoven, G; Van de Vyver, R; Van Hunen, J J; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Volk, E; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Wise, T; Yen, S; Yoneyama, S; Zohrabyan, H G

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the nuclear medium on the production of charged hadrons in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering has been studied by the HERMES experiment at DESY using a 27.5 GeV positron beam. The differential multiplicity of charged hadrons and identified charged pions from nitrogen relative to that from deuterium has been measured as a function of the virtual photon energy \

  9. Measurements of transverse momentum in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering at CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.A. Griffioen

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With mounting experimental evidence that only a small fraction of the proton's spin comes from the spins of its quarks and gluons, the quest for orbital angular momentum has begun. The parton distributions relevant to this depend on transverse quark momenta. Recent CLAS semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering measurements probe these new transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions using longitudinally polarized beams and targets and detecting {pi}{sup +},{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup 0} in the final state.

  10. Tagging emc effects and hadronization mechanisms by semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Ciofi Degli Atti; Leonid P. Kaptari; Chiara Benedetta Mezzetti

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a nucleus A with detection of a slow nucleus (A-1) in the ground or low excitation states, i.e. the process A(e,e'(A-1))X, can provide useful information on the origin of the EMC effect and the mechanisms of hadronization. The theoretical description of the process is reviewed and the results of several calculations on few-body systems and complex nuclei are presented.

  11. Coulomb and Nuclear-Excitation of Giant-Dipole Resonances in (Alpha,alpha') Inelastic-Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlomo, S.; Lui, YW; Youngblood, David H.; Udagawa, T.; Tamura, T.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 36, NUMBER 4 OCTOBER 1987 Coulomb and nuclear excitation of giant dipole resonances in (a, a') inelastic scattering S. Sh-lomo Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, and Cyclotron Institute, Texas A... January 1987) Cross sections of inelastic a-particle scattering to isovector giant dipole resonances are calculat- ed including both nuclear and Coulomb excitation. It is shown that the calculated cross sections are rather small and can be safely...

  12. Systematics of the Giant Monopole Resonance from Inelastic Alpha Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youngblood, David H.; Bogucki, P.; Bronson, J. D.; Garg, U.; Lui, YW; Rozsa, C. M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and the isovector GDR in '44Sm are shown in Fig. 2. The curves correspond to the full energy weighted sum rule (EWSR) for each. The techniques used in the calculation are de- scribed in Ref. 5. It is clear that the DWBA cal- culation has preserved the features... in Figs. 4 and 5. For heavier targets, such as Sm and Pb, second- ary scattering from the solid-angle defining slits produced a continuum background discernible in the spectra for 8~ ~ 5', and measurements below 3' were practical only at 0 where...

  13. X-ray beam finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  14. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  15. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  16. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  17. X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-Ray Diagnostics X-Ray

  18. In situ synchrotron based x-ray techniques as monitoring tools for atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devloo-Casier, Kilian, E-mail: Kilian.DevlooCasier@Ugent.be; Detavernier, Christophe; Dendooven, Jolien [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281/S1, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Ludwig, Karl F. [Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film deposition technique that has been studied with a variety of in situ techniques. By exploiting the high photon flux and energy tunability of synchrotron based x-rays, a variety of new in situ techniques become available. X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering, x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are reviewed as possible in situ techniques during ALD. All these techniques are especially sensitive to changes on the (sub-)nanometer scale, allowing a unique insight into different aspects of the ALD growth mechanisms.

  19. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces]. [Annual] progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program is aimed at the quantitative study of surface dynamical processes (vibrational, magnetic excitations) in crystalline slabs, ultrathin-layered materials, and chemisorbed systems on substrates, and of the geometric structure connected to these dynamical excitations. High-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful probe. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50-300 eV). The analyses has been used to study surfaces of ordered alloys (NiAl). Ab-initio surface lattice dynamical results were combined with phonon-loss cross sections to achieve a more accurate microscopic description. First-principles phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross-section calculations. The combined microscopic approach was used to analyze EELS data of Cu(0001) and Ag(001) at two points. Positron diffraction is discussed as a structural and imaging tool. The relation between geometric structure of a film and its local magnetic properties will be studied in the future, along with other things.

  20. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, D.; et. al.,; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bellini, V.; et al

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were publishedmore »earlier, but are presented here in more detail.« less

  1. Polarized Deep Inelastic Scattering Off the "Neutron" From Gauge/String Duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Hua Gao; Zong-Gang Mou

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate deep inelastic scattering off the polarized "neutron" using gauge/string duality. The "neutron" corresponds to a supergravity mode of the neutral dilatino. Through introducing the Pauli interaction term into the action in $\\textrm{AdS}_{5}$ space, we calculate the polarized deep inelastic structure functions of the "neutron" in supergravity approximation at large t' Hooft coupling $\\lambda$ and finite $x$ with $\\lambda^{-1/2}\\ll xneutron" are power suppressed at the same order as the ones of the "proton." Especially, we find the Burkhardt-Cottingham-like sum rule, which is satisfied in the work by Gao and Xiao, is broken due to the Pauli interaction term. We also illustrate how such a Pauli interaction term can arise naturally from higher dimensional fermion-graviton coupling through the usual Kaluza-Klein reduction.

  2. Measurement of Charm and Beauty Jets in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H1 Collaboration

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of cross sections for events with charm and beauty jets in deep inelastic scattering at HERA are presented. Events with jets of transverse energy E_T^jet > 6 GeV and pseudorapidity -1.0 6 GeV^2 and inelasticity variable 0.07 6 GeV. The data were collected with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 189 pb^-1. The numbers of charm and beauty jets are determined using variables reconstructed using the H1 vertex detector with which the impact parameters of the tracks to the primary vertex and the position of secondary vertices are measured. The measurements are compared with QCD predictions and with previous measurements where heavy flavours are identified using muons.

  3. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, D. [UVA; et. al.,; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bellini, V.; Beminiwattha, R.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Dalton, M. M.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deconinck, W.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; Fassi, L. El; Erler, J.; Flay, D.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Giusa, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Golge, S.; Grimm, K.; Hafidi, K.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmes, R.; Holmstrom, T.; Holt, R. J.; Huang, J.; Hyde, C. E.; Jen, C. M.; Jones, D.; Kang, Hoyoung; King, P. M.; Kowalski, S.; Kumar, K. S.; Lee, J. H.; LeRose, J. J.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; McNulty, D.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Meddi, F.; Meekins, D. G.; Mercado, L.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Mihovilovic, M.; Muangma, N.; Mesick, K. E.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Nuruzzaman,; Oh, Y.; Parno, D.; Paschke, K. D.; Phillips, S. K.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Quinn, B.; Rakhman, A.; Reimer, P. E.; Rider, K.; Riordan, S.; Roche, J.; Rubin, J.; Russo, G.; Saenboonruang, K.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Silwal, R.; Sirca, S.; Souder, P. A.; Suleiman, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Sutera, C. M.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Waidyawansa, B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, L.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were published earlier, but are presented here in more detail.

  4. Measurement of Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Electron-Deuteron Inelastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Wang; K. Pan; R. Subedi; Z. Ahmed; K. Allada; K. A. Aniol; D. S. Armstrong; J. Arrington; V. Bellini; R. Beminiwattha; J. Benesch; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; J. -P. Chen; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; M. M. Dalton; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; W. Deconinck; X. Deng; A. Deur; C. Dutta; L. El Fassi; J. Erler; D. Flay; G. B. Franklin; M. Friend; S. Frullani; F. Garibaldi; S. Gilad; A. Giusa; A. Glamazdin; S. Golge; K. Grimm; K. Hafidi; J. -O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; R. Holmes; T. Holmstrom; R. J. Holt; J. Huang; C. E. Hyde; C. M. Jen; D. Jones; Hoyoung Kang; P. M. King; S. Kowalski; K. S. Kumar; J. H. Lee; J. J. LeRose; N. Liyanage; E. Long; D. McNulty; D. J. Margaziotis; F. Meddi; D. G. Meekins; L. Mercado; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; M. Mihovilovic; N. Muangma; K. E. Mesick; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; A. Nuruzzaman; Y. Oh; D. Parno; K. D. Paschke; S. K. Phillips; X. Qian; Y. Qiang; B. Quinn; A. Rakhman; P. E. Reimer; K. Rider; S. Riordan; J. Roche; J. Rubin; G. Russo; K. Saenboonruang; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; A. Shahinyan; R. Silwal; S. Širca; P. A. Souder; R. Suleiman; V. Sulkosky; C. M. Sutera; W. A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; B. Waidyawansa; B. Wojtsekhowski; L. Ye; B. Zhao; X. Zheng

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were published earlier, but are presented here in more detail.

  5. Inelastic neutron scattering study of hydrogen in d8-THF/D2O ice clathrate Kimberly T. Tait,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    Inelastic neutron scattering study of hydrogen in d8-THF/D2O ice clathrate Kimberly T. Tait,a Frans Trouw,b and Yusheng Zhao Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los October 2007 In situ neutron inelastic scattering experiments on hydrogen adsorbed into a fully deutrated

  6. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering W. Wang, D. A. Sokolov, A. D. Huxley, and K. V. Kamenev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Christopher

    Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering W. Wang, D. A. Sokolov, A. D for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of quantum fluids and solids Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 015101 (2013) TOF-SEMSANS--Time-of-flight spin-echo modulated small-angle neutron scattering J. Appl. Phys. 112

  7. Residual stress measurement using X-ray diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderoglu, Osman

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    -rays..............................................................................................16 2.4. Bragg's Law ..........................................................................................................18 2.5. Diffractometer Geometry... Figure 2.2 Schematic showing the basic components of a modern x-ray tube. Beryllium window is highly transparent to x-rays...............................15 Figure 2.3 Coherent scattering from an electron to a point P...

  8. Small-angle scattering investigations of poly([epsilon]-caprolactone)/polycarbonate blends -- 2: Small-angle X-ray and light scattering study of semicrystalline/semicrystalline and semicrystalline/amorphous blend morphologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Y.W.; Stein, R.S. (Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering); Lin, J.S.; Wignall, G.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

    1994-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline morphologies of poly([epsilon]-caprolactone) (PCL) and polycarbonate (PC) blends were probed with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle light scattering (SALS). Quantitative SAXS analysis suggested that random mixing of PCL and PC lamellae occurred in the semicrystalline/semicrystalline state. Two distinct regions of incorporation were identified in the semicrystalline/amorphous state. It was found that PCL was rejected from the PC interlamellar region in the PCL-rich blends. In contrast, PCL was incorporated into the amorphous phase between the crystalline lamellae in the PC-rich blends. This transition from interlamellar exclusion to interlamellar inclusion may be related to the glass transition temperatures or the mobility of the blends. It is proposed that the mode of incorporation or exclusion is governed by the competition between entropy and diffusion. Additionally, SALS coupled with optical microscopy indicated that PC is an effective nucleating agent for PCL crystallization as manifested by the reduction of PCL spherulitic size with the addition of PC.

  9. Comparison of inclusive inelastic scattering of. pi. sup + and. pi. sup minus from nuclei at 100 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenzweig, D.P.; Amann, J.F.; Boudrie, R.L.; Doss, K.G.R.; Drake, D.M.; Halpern, I.; Khandaker, M.A.; Nelson, J.; Storm, D.W.; Tieger, D.R.; Wood, S.A. (Department of Physics, University of Washington, FM-15 Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States) Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States) Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 0W0 (Canada) Bates Linear Accelerator Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Middleton, Massachusetts 01949 (United States))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusive inelastic scattering spectra from C, Ca, Sn, and Pb were measured for 100-MeV pions at a number of angles. The observed ratios of the {pi}{sup {minus}} and {pi}{sup +} total inelastic cross sections for the different targets are explained in terms of a simple model which is based on the assumption that the scattered pion has interacted with only one nucleon. This model also accounts for the ratio between normal and charge-exchange scattering cross sections at 100 MeV.

  10. Theoretical standards in x-ray spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to extend our state-of-the-art, ab initio XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) codes, FEFF. Our current work has been highly successful in achieving accurate, user-friendly XAFS standards, exceeding the performance of both tabulated standards and other codes by a considerable margin. We now propose to add the capability to treat more complex materials. This includes multiple-scattering, polarization dependence, an approximate treatment of XANES (x-ray absorption near edge structure), and other improvements. We also plan to adapt FEFF to other spectroscopies, e.g. photoelectron diffraction (PD) and diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS).

  11. Multiplicity of Charged and Neutral Pions in Deep-Inelastic Scattering of 27.5 GeV Positrons on Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Amarian, M; Arrington, J; Aschenauer, E C; Avakian, H; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Bains, B; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brauksiepe, S; Braun, B; Brückner, W; Brüll, A; Budz, P; Bulten, H J; Capitani, G P; Carter, P; Chumney, P; Cisbani, E; Court, G R; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Devitsin, E G; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; Di Nezza, P; Dzhordzhadze, V; Düren, M; Dvoredsky, A P; Elbakian, G M; Ely, J; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Fiedler, K; Filippone, B W; Fischer, H; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Gärber, Y; Garibaldi, F; Garutti, E; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Golendukhin, A; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Green, P W; Greeniaus, L G; Gute, A; Haeberli, W; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Heinsius, F H; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hoffmann-Rothe, P; Hofman, G J; Holler, Y; Holt, R J; Hommez, B; Hoprich, W; Iarygin, G; Ihssen, H; Iodice, M; Izotov, A A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kanesaka, J; Kinney, E R; Kiselev, A; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, H; Koch, N; Königsmann, K C; Kolster, H; Korotkov, V A; Kotik, E; Kozlov, V; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kyle, G S; Lagamba, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Lindemann, T; Lorenzon, W; Makins, N C R; Martin, J W; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; McAndrew, M; McIlhany, K; McKeown, R D; Meissner, F; Menden, F; Metz, A; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Milner, R; Muccifora, V; Mussa, R; Nagaitsev, A P; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; O'Neill, T G; Openshaw, R; Ouyang, J; Owen, B R; Pate, S F; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Rakness, G; Redwine, R P; Reggiani, D; Reolon, A R; Ristinen, R; Rith, K; Robinson, D; Rostomyan, A; Ruh, M; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Sato, F; Savin, I A; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schmidt, F; Schmitt, M; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Schwind, A; Seibert, J; Shibata, T A; Shin, T; Shutov, V B; Simani, M C; Simon, A; Sinram, K; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Suetsugu, K; Sutter, M F; Tallini, H A; Taroian, S P; Terkulov, A R; Tessarin, S; Thomas, E; Tipton, B; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van den Brand, J F J; van der Steenhoven, G; Van de Vyver, R; Van Hunen, J J; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Volk, E; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Wise, T; Woller, K; Yoneyama, S; Zohrabyan, H G

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiplicity of Charged and Neutral Pions in Deep-Inelastic Scattering of 27.5 GeV Positrons on Hydrogen

  12. Measurement of Parton Distributions of Strange Quarks in the Nucleon from Charged-Kaon Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering on the Deuteron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Deep-Inelastic Scattering on the Deuteron A. Airapetian,16 N. Akopov,27 Z. Akopov,27 A. Andrus,15 E

  13. Shadowing in inelastic scattering of muons on carbon, calcium and lead at low x$_{Bj}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, M R; Anthony, P L; Averill, D A; Baker, M D; Baller, B R; Banerjee, A; Bhatti, A A; Bratzler, U; Braun, H M; Breidung, H; Busza, W; Carroll, T J; Clark, H L; Conrad, J M; Davisson, R; Derado, I; Dhawan, S K; Dietrich, F S; Dougherty, W; Dreyer, T; Eckardt, V; Ecker, U; Erdmann, M; Fang, G Y; Figiel, J; Finlay, R W; Gebauer, H J; Geesaman, D F; Griffioen, K A; Guo, R S; Haas, J; Halliwell, C; Hantke, D; Hicks, K H; Hughes, V W; Jackson, H E; Jaffe, D E; Jancso, G; Jansen, D M; Jin, Z; Kaufman, S; Kennedy, R D; Kinney, E R; Kirk, T; Kobrak, H G E; Kotwal, A V; Kunori, S; Lord, J J; Lubatti, H J; McLeod, D; Madden, P; Magill, S; Manz, A; Melanson, H; Michael, D G; Montgomery, H E; Morfín, J G; Nickerson, R B; Novák, J; O'Day, S; Olkiewicz, K; Osborne, L; Otten, R; Papavassiliou, V; Pawlik, B; Pipkin, F M; Potterveld, D H; Ramberg, E J; Röser, A; Ryan, J J; Salgado, C W; Salvarani, A; Schellman, H; Schmitt, M; Schmitz, N; Schüler, K P; Siegert, G; Skuja, A; Snow, G A; Soldner, S; Rembold, U; Spentzouris, P; Stier, H E; Stopa, P; Swanson, R A; Venkataramania, H; Wilhelm, M; Wilson, R; Wittek, W; Wolbers, S A; Zghiche, A; Zhao, T

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear shadowing is observed in the per-nucleon cross-sections of positive muons on carbon, calcium and lead as compared to deuterium. The data were taken by Fermilab experiment E665 using inelastically scattered muons of mean incident momentum 470 GeV/c. Cross-section ratios are presented in the kinematic region 0.0001 < XBj <0.56 and 0.1 < Q**2 < 80 GeVc. The data are consistent with no significant nu or Q**2 dependence at fixed XBj. As XBj decreases, the size of the shadowing effect, as well as its A dependence, are found to approach the corresponding measurements in photoproduction.

  14. Shadowing in Inelastic Scattering of Muons on Carbon, Calcium and Lead at Low XBj

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab E665 Collaboration

    1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear shadowing is observed in the per-nucleon cross-sections of positive muons on carbon, calcium and lead as compared to deuterium. The data were taken by Fermilab experiment E665 using inelastically scattered muons of mean incident momentum 470 GeV/c. Cross-section ratios are presented in the kinematic region 0.0001 < XBj <0.56 and 0.1 < Q**2 < 80 GeVc. The data are consistent with no significant nu or Q**2 dependence at fixed XBj. As XBj decreases, the size of the shadowing effect, as well as its A dependence, are found to approach the corresponding measurements in photoproduction.

  15. EMC effect in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baogui Lu; Bo-Qiang Ma

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By considering the $x$-dependence of $\\pi^+$, $\\pi^-$, $K^+$, $K^-$, $\\Lambda$, $\\bar{\\Lambda}$, $p$, $\\bar{p}$ hadron productions in charged lepton semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off nuclear target (using Fe as an example) and deuteron D target, % at $Q^2=5$ GeV$^2$, we find that $(\\bar{\\Lambda}^A/\\Lambda^A)/(\\bar{\\Lambda}^D/\\Lambda^D)$ and $({\\bar{p}}^A/{p}^A)/({\\bar{p}}^A/p^A)$ are ideal to figure out the nuclear sea content, which is predicted to be different by different models accounting for the nuclear EMC effect.

  16. EMC effect in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Baogui; Ma Boqiang [Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); CCAST (World Laboratory), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China) and Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By considering the x-dependence of {pi}{sup +},{pi}{sup -},K{sup +},K{sup -},{lambda},{lambda},p,p hadron productions in charged lepton semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering off nuclear target (using Fe as an example) and deuteron D target, we find that ({lambda}{sup A}/{lambda}{sup A})/({lambda}{sup D}/{lambda}{sup D}) and (p{sup A}/p{sup A})/(p{sup A}/p{sup A}) are ideal to figure out the nuclear sea content, which is predicted to be different by different models accounting for the nuclear EMC effect.

  17. Characterization of a Fe/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} metal/oxide interface using neutron and x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, E. B.; Majewski, J., E-mail: demkowicz@mit.edu, E-mail: jarek@lanl.gov [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kashinath, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Computational Modeling Technology, Aramco Research Center—Boston, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Wang, P. [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon, 97006 (United States); Baldwin, J. K. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Demkowicz, M. J., E-mail: demkowicz@mit.edu, E-mail: jarek@lanl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of metal/oxide interfaces is important to the radiation resistance of oxide dispersion-strengthened steels. We find evidence of gradual variations in stoichiometry and magnetization across a Fe/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} metal/oxide heterophase interface using neutron and x-ray reflectometry. These findings suggest that the Fe/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface is a transitional zone approximately ?64?Å-thick containing mixtures or compounds of Fe, Y, and O. Our results illustrate the complex chemical and magnetic nature of Fe/oxide interfaces and demonstrate the utility of combined neutron and x-ray techniques as tools for characterizing them.

  18. Excitation of states of medium-mass nuclei in the region of giant resonances in inelastic deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grantsev, V. I.; Davydovskyy, V. V., E-mail: odavi@kinr.kiev.ua; Kisurin, K. K.; Omelchuk, S. E.; Palkin, G. P.; Roznyuk, Yu. S.; Rudenko, B. A.; Saltykov, L. S.; Semenov, V. S.; Slusarenko, L. I., E-mail: slus@kinr.kiev.ua; Struzhko, B. G.; Tartakovsky, V. K.; Shytiuk, V. A. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute for Nuclear Research (Ukraine)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented that were obtained by measuring a continuum in the inelastic scattering of 37-MeV deuterons on {sup 12}C, {sup 48}Ti, and {sup 58,64}Ni nuclei in the angular range 16{sup o} {<=} {theta} {<=} 61{sup o}. Broad excitation maxima are found for deuteron scattering angles in the range {theta} {<=} 21{sup o}. The region of a broad maximum includes giant resonances of target nuclei, whose levels are excited quite readily at E{sub d} = 37 MeV. Summation of the inelastic-scattering cross sections over all final states of the excited vertical bar nucleus and the use of completeness of the wave functions for these states make it possible to express the total cross section for inelastic (incoherent) deuteron scattering only in terms of the wave functions for the ground state of the target nucleus. The corresponding quasielastic-scattering amplitude is taken in the diffraction approximation. Nucleon correlations in the target nucleus are disregarded. Upon disregarding a small contribution of multiple quasielastic scattering at small scattering angles, the cross section for incoherent deuteron scattering is represented approximately as the product of known factors-the square of the absolute value of the amplitude for diffractive quasielastic scattering and the effective number of target nucleons scattering deuterons. The results of these calculations agree qualitatively with experimental data.

  19. Bomb Detection Using Backscattered X-Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, J.; Lockwood, G.; Selph, M; Shope, S.; Wehlburg, J.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bomb Detection Using Backscattered X-rays* Currently the most common method to determine the contents of a package suspected of containing an explosive device is to use transmission radiography. This technique requires that an x-ray source and film be placed on opposite sides of the package. This poses a problem if the pachge is placed so that only one side is accessible, such as against a wall. There is also a threat to persomel and property since exTlosive devices may be "booby trapped." We have developed a method to x-ray a paclage using backscattered x-rays. This procedure eliminates the use of film behind the target. All of the detection is done from the same side as the source. When an object is subjected to x-rays, some of them iare scattered back towards the source. The backscattenng of x-rays is propordoml to the atomic number (Z) of the material raised to the 4.1 power. This 24"' dependence allows us to easily distinguish between explosives, wires, timer, batteries, and other bomb components. Using transmission radiography-to image the contents of an unknown package poses some undesirable risks. The object must have an x-ray film placed on the side opposite the x-ray source; this cannot be done without moving the package if it has been placed firmly against a wall or pillar. Therefore it would be extremely usefid to be able to image the contents of a package from only one side, without ever having to disturb the package itself. where E is the energy of the incoming x-ray. The volume of x-rays absorbed is important because it is, of course, directly correlated to the intensity of x-mys that will be scattered. Most of the x-rays that scatter will do so in a genemlly forward direction; however, a small percentage do scatter in a backward direction. Figure 1 shows a diagram of the various fates of x-rays directed into an object. The package that was examined in this ex~enment was an attache case made of pressed fiberboardwith a vinyl covering. It was approxirmtely 36 cm wide by 51 cm long by 13 cm deep. The case was placed on an aluminum sheet under the x-ray source. Because of the laborato~ setup, the attache case was rastered in the y-coordinate direction, while the x-ray source mstered in the x-coordinate direction. However, for field use, the x-ray source would of course raster in both the x- and y-coordinate directions, while the object under interrogation would remain stationary and undisturbed. A mobile system for use by law enforcement agencies or bomb disposal squads needs to be portable and somewhat durable. A 300 kV x-ray source should be sufficient for the task requirements and can be mounted on a mobile system. A robotic carriage could be used to transport the x-ray source and the CCD camera to the proximity of the suspect package. The controlling and data analyzing elements of the system' could then be maintained at a &tie distance from the possible explosive. F@re 8 shows a diagram of a conceptual design of a possible system for this type of use. The use of backscattered x-rays for interrogation of packages that may contain explosive devices has been shown to be feasible inthelaboratory. Usinga 150kVx-ray source anddetectors consisting of plastic scintillating material, all bomb components including the wiring were detectable. However, at this time the process requires more time than is desirable for the situations in which it will most likely be needed. Further development of the technology using CCD cameras, rather than the plastic stint illator detectors, shows promise of leading to a much faster system, as well as one with better resolution. Mounting the x- ray source and the CCD camera on a robotic vehicle while keeping the controlling and analyzing components and the opemting personnel a safe distance away from the suspect package will allow such a package to be examined at low risk to human life.

  20. Final-state interactions in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cosyn, Wim; Melnitchouk, Wally; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the role of final-state interactions (FSI) in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Relating the inclusive cross section to the deuteron forward virtual Compton scattering amplitude, a general formula for the FSI contribution is derived in the generalized eikonal approximation, utilizing the diffractive nature of the effective hadron-nucleon interaction. The calculation uses a factorized model with a basis of three resonances with mass W~ 0.6 andmore »Q2 2 increasing in magnitude for lower Q2, but vanishing in the high-Q2 limit due to phase space constraints. The off-shell rescattering contributes at x ~> 0.8 and is taken as an uncertainty on the on-shell result.« less

  1. Final-state interactions in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cosyn, Wim [FL Intl U.; Melnitchouk, Wally [JLAB; Sargsian, Misak M. [JLAB

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the role of final-state interactions (FSI) in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Relating the inclusive cross section to the deuteron forward virtual Compton scattering amplitude, a general formula for the FSI contribution is derived in the generalized eikonal approximation, utilizing the diffractive nature of the effective hadron-nucleon interaction. The calculation uses a factorized model with a basis of three resonances with mass W~ 0.6 and Q2 2 increasing in magnitude for lower Q2, but vanishing in the high-Q2 limit due to phase space constraints. The off-shell rescattering contributes at x ~> 0.8 and is taken as an uncertainty on the on-shell result.

  2. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  3. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  4. Multiplicities of charged pions and kaons from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering by the proton and the deuteron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Belostotski, S; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Brodski, I; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Kobayashi, N; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikás, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Ruiz, A López; Lorenzon, W; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfré, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Petrosyan, A; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Shutov, V; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Taroian, S; Terkulov, A; Truty, R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vilardi, I; Vogel, C; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zagrebelnyy, V; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiplicities in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering are presented for each charge state of \\pi^\\pm and K^\\pm mesons. The data were collected by the HERMES experiment at the HERA storage ring using 27.6 GeV electron and positron beams incident on a hydrogen or deuterium gas target. The results are presented as a function of the kinematic quantities x_B, Q^2, z, and P_h\\perp. They represent a unique data set for identified hadrons that will significantly enhance our understanding of the fragmentation of quarks into final-state hadrons in deep-inelastic scattering.

  5. Multiplicities of charged pions and kaons from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering by the proton and the deuteron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; S. Belostotski; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; J. Bowles; I. Brodski; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; L. De Nardo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Düren; M. Ehrenfried; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; R. Fabbri; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; D. Gabbert; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; F. Garibaldi; G. Gavrilov; V. Gharibyan; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Golembiovskaya; C. Hadjidakis; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; A. Hillenbrand; M. Hoek; Y. Holler; I. Hristova; Y. Imazu; A. Ivanilov; A. Izotov; H. E. Jackson; H. S. Jo; S. Joosten; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; N. Kobayashi; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; P. Kravchenko; V. G. Krivokhijine; L. Lagamba; L. Lapikás; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; A. López Ruiz; W. Lorenzon; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; B. Maiheu; N. C. R. Makins; S. I. Manaenkov; L. Manfré; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; C. A. Miller; Y. Miyachi; A. Movsisyan; M. Murray; A. Mussgiller; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; M. Negodaev; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; A. Petrosyan; M. Raithel; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; F. Sanftl; A. Schäfer; G. Schnell; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; V. Shutov; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; J. J. M. Steijger; J. Stewart; F. Stinzing; S. Taroian; A. Terkulov; R. Truty; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; I. Vilardi; C. Vogel; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; Z. Ye; S. Yen; W. Yu; V. Zagrebelnyy; D. Zeiler; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiplicities in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering are presented for each charge state of \\pi^\\pm and K^\\pm mesons. The data were collected by the HERMES experiment at the HERA storage ring using 27.6 GeV electron and positron beams incident on a hydrogen or deuterium gas target. The results are presented as a function of the kinematic quantities x_B, Q^2, z, and P_h\\perp. They represent a unique data set for identified hadrons that will significantly enhance our understanding of the fragmentation of quarks into final-state hadrons in deep-inelastic scattering.

  6. High-resolution, high-transmission soft x-ray spectrometer for the study of biological samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuchs, Oliver; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Weigand, M.; Umbach, E.; Bar, M.; Heske, Clemens; Denlinger, Jonathan; Chuang, Y.-D.; McKinney, Wayne; Hussain, Zahid; Gullikson, Eric; Jones, M.; Batson, Phil; Nelles, B.; Follath, R.

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a variable line-space grating spectrometer for soft x-rays that covers the photon energy range between 130 and 650 eV. The optical design is based on the Hettrick-Underwood principle and tailored to synchrotron-based studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples. The spectrometer is able to record the entire spectral range in one shot, i.e., without any mechanical motion, at a resolving power of 1200 or better. Despite its slitless design, such a resolving power can be achieved for a source spot as large as 30x3000 mu m2, which is important for keeping beam damage effects in radiation-sensitive samples low. The high spectrometer efficiency allows recording of comprehensive two-dimensional resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) maps with good statistics within several minutes. This is exemplarily demonstrated for a RIXS map of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, which was taken within 10 min.

  7. Hard x-ray emission spectroscopy: a powerful tool for the characterization of magnetic semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rovezzi, Mauro

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review aims to introduce the x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) techniques to the materials scientist working with magnetic semiconductors (e.g. semiconductors doped with 3d transition metals) for applications in the field of spin-electronics. We focus our attention on the hard part of the x-ray spectrum (above 3 keV) in order to demonstrate a powerful element- and orbital-selective characterization tool in the study of bulk electronic structure. XES and RIXS are photon-in/photon-out second order optical processes described by the Kramers-Heisenberg formula. Nowadays, the availability of third generation synchrotron radiation sources permits to apply such techniques also to dilute materials, opening the way for a detailed atomic characterization of impurity-driven materials. We present the K{\\ss} XES as a tool to study the occupied valence states (directly, via valence-to-core transitions) and to probe the local spin angular momentum (indirectly, via intra-at...

  8. X-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowicz, A.A.; Van Grieken, R.E.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the period under review, i.e, through 1984 and 1985, some 600 articles on XRS (X-ray spectrometry) were published; most of these have been scanned and the most fundamental ones are discussed. All references will refer to English-language articles, unless states otherwise. Also general books have appeared on quantitative EPXMA (electron-probe X-ray microanalysis) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) as well as an extensive review on the application of XRS to trace analysis of environmental samples. In the period under review no radically new developments have been seen in XRS. However, significant improvements have been made. Gain in intensities has been achieved by more efficient excitation, higher reflectivity of dispersing media, and better geometry. Better understanding of the physical process of photon- and electron-specimen interactions led to complex but more accurate equations for correction of various interelement effects. Extensive use of micro- and minicomputers now enables fully automatic operation, including qualitative analysis. However, sample preparation and presentation still put a limit to further progress. Although some authors find XRS in the phase of stabilization or even stagnation, further gradual developments are expected, particularly toward more dedicated equipment, advanced automation, and image analysis systems. Ways are outlined in which XRS has been improved in the 2 last years by excitation, detection, instrumental, methodological, and theoretical advances. 340 references.

  9. Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for fission reactor applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicks, S. F.; Combs, B.; Downes, L.; Girgis, J.; Kersting, L. J.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; Schniederjan, J.; Sidwell, L.; Sigillito, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Dallas, Irving TX 75019 (United States); Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; Kumar, A.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estevz, F. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Vanhoy, J. R.; Watts, D. [Department of Physics, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis MD 21402 (United States); Yates, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States) and Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear data important for the design and development of the next generation of light-water reactors and future fast reactors include neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections on important structural materials, such as Fe, and on coolant materials, such as Na. These reaction probabilities are needed since neutron reactions impact fuel performance during irradiations and the overall efficiency of reactors. While neutron scattering cross sections from these materials are available for certain incident neutron energies, the fast neutron region, particularly above 2 MeV, has large gaps for which no measurements exist, or the existing uncertainties are large. Measurements have been made at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory to measure neutron scattering cross sections on both Fe and Na in the region where these gaps occur and to reduce the uncertainties on scattering from the ground state and first excited state of these nuclei. Results from measurements on Fe at incident neutron energies between 2 and 4 MeV will be presented and comparisons will be made to model calculations available from data evaluators.

  10. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  11. Folding model analysis of pion elastic and inelastic scattering from {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebrahim, A. A., E-mail: aebrahim@aun.edu.eg [Assiut University, Physics Department (Egypt)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    {pi}{sup {+-}}-Nucleus scattering cross sections are calculated applying the Watanabe superposition model with a phenomenological Woods-Saxon potential. The phenomenological potential parameters are searched for {pi}{sup {+-}} scattering from {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C to reproduce not only differential elastic cross sections but also inelastic and total and reaction cross sections at pion kinetic energies from 50 to 672 MeV. The optical potentials of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C are calculated in terms of the alpha particle and deuteron optical potentials. Inelastic scattering has been analyzed using the distorted waves from elastic-scattering data. The values of deformation lengths thus obtained compare very well with the ones reported earlier.

  12. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.; Lima, E.; Huang, X.; Krupin, O.; Seu, K.; Parks, D.; Kevan, S.; Kisslinger, K.; McNulty, I.; Gambino, R.; Mangin, S.; Roy, S. and Fischer, P.

    2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first proof-of-principle experiment of iterative phase retrieval from magnetic x-ray diffraction. By using the resonant x-ray excitation process and coherent x-ray scattering, we show that linearly polarized soft x rays can be used to image both the amplitude and the phase of magnetic domain structures. We recovered the magnetic structure of an amorphous terbium-cobalt thin film with a spatial resolution of about 75 nm at the Co L{sub 3} edge at 778 eV. In comparison with soft x-ray microscopy images recorded with Fresnel zone plate optics at better than 25 nm spatial resolution, we find qualitative agreement in the observed magnetic structure.

  13. X-ray and neutron scattering studies of the Rb?MnF? and Cu?â??õxMgx̳GeO? in an external magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christianson, Rebecca J. (Rebecca Jean), 1973-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents results of two scattering studies of low dimensional magnetic materials. The first is a neutron scattering study of Rb2MnF4, a nearly ideal two-dimensional square lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet ...

  14. Azimuthal single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarised hydrogen target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Diefenthaler

    2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Azimuthal single-spin asymmetries (SSA) in semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions and kaons in deep-inelastic scattering of positrons on a transversely polarised hydrogen target were observed. SSA amplitudes for both the Collins and the Sivers mechanism are presented.

  15. High-Energy-Resolution Inelastic Electron and Proton Scattering and the Multiphonon Nature of Mixed-Symmetry 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponomarev, Vladimir

    , University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700, South Africa 3 School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050, South Africa 4 iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129, South Africa 5 Institut fuHigh-Energy-Resolution Inelastic Electron and Proton Scattering and the Multiphonon Nature of Mixed

  16. Unpolarised TMD Distribution and Fragmentation Functions from recent HERMES and COMPASS Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering Multiplicities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokudin, Alexey; Anselmino, Mauro; Boglione, Mariaelena; Melis, Stefano; Gonzalez, J. O.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unpolarised transverse momentum dependent distribution and fragmentation functions (TMDs) are extracted from HERMES and COMPASS experimental measurements of semi- inclusive deep inelastic scattering multiplicities for charged hadron production. A simple factorised functional form of the TMDs is adopted, with a Gaussian dependence on the intrinsic transverse momentum, which turns out to be quite adequate in shape.

  17. Measurement of “pretzelosity” asymmetry of charged pion production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a polarized ³He target

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y.; Qian, X.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized ³He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of 0.16 ± on He3 and on neutron pretzelosity asymmetries are consistent with zero within experimental uncertainties.

  18. Inelastic neutron scattering of a quantum translator-rotator encapsulated in a closed fullerene cage: Isotope effects and translation-rotation coupling in H2@C60 and HD@C60

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    Inelastic neutron scattering of a quantum translator-rotator encapsulated in a closed fullerene, New York 10027, USA Received 1 July 2010; published 20 August 2010 We report an inelastic neutron-scattering inelastic neutron scattering INS ,6 and specific heat7 inves- tigations have recently been reported

  19. Refined model of the {Fe9} magnetic molecule from low-temperature inelastic neutron scattering studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelhardt, Larry [Francis Marion University; Demmel, Franz [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Luban, Marshall [Ames Laboratory; Timco, Grigore A [The University of Manchester; Tuna, Floriana [The University of Manchester; Winpenny, Richard E [The University of Manchester

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a refined model of the {Fe9} tridiminished icosahedron magnetic molecule system. This molecule was originally modeled as being composed of two ({Fe3} and {Fe6}) clusters, with the Fe3+ ions within each cluster being coupled via exchange interactions, but with no coupling between the clusters. The present inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements were used to probe the low-lying energy spectrum of {Fe9}, and these results demonstrate that the previously published model of two uncoupled clusters is incomplete. To achieve agreement between the experiment and theory, we have augmented the model with relatively small exchange coupling between the clusters. A combination of Lanczos matrix diagonalization and quantum Monte Carlo simulations have been used to achieve good agreement between the experimental data and the improved model of the full {Fe9} system despite the complexity of this model (with Hilbert space dimension >107).

  20. A cryogenic high pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of quantum fluids and solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL; Omar Diallo, Souleymane [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present our new development of a high pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of helium at ultra-low temperatures. The cell has a large sample volume of ~140 cm3, and a working pressure of ~70 bar, with a relatively thin wall-thickness (1.1 mm) - thanks to the high yield strength aluminum used in the design. Two variants of this cell have been developed; one with permanently joined components using electron-beam welding and explosion welding, methods that have little or no impact on the global heat treatment of the cell, and another with modular and interchangeable components, which include a capacitance pressure gauge, that can be sealed using traditional indium wire technique. The performance of the cell has been tested in recent measurements on superfluid liquid helium near the solidification line.

  1. Sivers asymmetries for inclusive pion and kaon production in deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, John [Theory Division, Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Hwang, Dae Sung [Department of Physics, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kotzinian, Aram [CEA DAPNIA/SPhN Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Yerevan Physics Institute, 375036 Yerevan (Armenia)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the Sivers distribution functions induced by the final-state interaction due to one-gluon exchange in diquark models of a nucleon structure, treating the cases of scalar and axial-vector diquarks with both dipole and Gaussian form factors. We use these distribution functions to calculate the Sivers single-spin asymmetries for inclusive pion and kaon production in deep-inelastic scattering. We compare our calculations with the results of HERMES and COMPASS, finding good agreement for {pi}{sup +} production at HERMES, and qualitative agreement for {pi}{sup 0} and K{sup +} production. Our predictions for pion and kaon production at COMPASS could be probed with increased statistics. The successful comparison of our calculations with the HERMES data constitutes prima facie evidence that the quarks in the nucleon have some orbital angular momentum in the infinite-momentum frame.

  2. Measurement of Leading Proton and Neutron Production in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Adloff

    1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep--inelastic scattering events with a leading baryon have been detected by the H1 experiment at HERA using a forward proton spectrometer and a forward neutron calorimeter. Semi--inclusive cross sections have been measured in the kinematic region 2 neutron with energy E' >= 160 GeV. The measurements are used to test production models and factorization hypotheses. A Regge model of leading baryon production which consists of pion, pomeron and secondary reggeon exchanges gives an acceptable description of both semi-inclusive cross sections in the region 0.7 neutron data are used to estimate for the first time the structure function of the pion at small Bjorken--x.

  3. Effects of transversity in deep-inelastic scattering by polarized protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Bacchetta, A; Belostotski, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Brodski, I; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dueren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gharibyan, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hill, G; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Kobayashi, N; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Lagamba, L; Lamb, R; Lapikas, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Ruiz, A Lopez; Lorenzon, W; Lu, X -G; Lu, X -R; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfre, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Pickert, N; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schaefer, A; Schnell, G; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Shutov, V; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Taroian, S; Terkulov, A; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; van der Nat, P B; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Vogel, C; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, H; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-spin asymmetries for pions and charged kaons are measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of positrons and electrons off a transversely nuclear-polarized hydrogen target. The dependence of the cross section on the azimuthal angles of the target polarization (phi_S)and the produced hadron (phi) is found to have a substantial sin(phi+phi_S) modulation for the production of pi+, pi- and K+. This Fourier component can be interpreted in terms of non-zero transversity distribution functions and non-zero favored and disfavored Collins fragmentation functions with opposite sign. For pi0 and K- production the amplitude of this Fourier component is consistent with zero.

  4. Effects of transversity in deep-inelastic scattering by polarized protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HERMES collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; A. Bacchetta; S. Belostotski; N. Bianchi; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; J. Bowles; I. Brodski; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; L. De Nardo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Dueren; M. Ehrenfried; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; U. Elschenbroich; R. Fabbri; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; D. Gabbert; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; F. Garibaldi; V. Gharibyan; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Golembiovskaya; C. Hadjidakis; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; G. Hill; A. Hillenbrand; M. Hoek; Y. Holler; I. Hristova; Y. Imazu; A. Ivanilov; A. Izotov; H. E. Jackson; H. S. Jo; S. Joosten; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; N. Kobayashi; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; P. Kravchenko; L. Lagamba; R. Lamb; L. Lapikas; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; L. A. Linden-Levy; A. Lopez Ruiz; W. Lorenzon; X. -G. Lu; X. -R. Lu; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; N. C. R. Makins; S. I. Manaenkov; L. Manfre; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; C. A. Miller; Y. Miyachi; A. Movsisyan; M. Murray; A. Mussgiller; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; M. Negodaev; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; N. Pickert; M. Raithel; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; F. Sanftl; A. Schaefer; G. Schnell; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; V. Shutov; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; J. J. M. Steijger; H. Stenzel; J. Stewart; F. Stinzing; S. Taroian; A. Terkulov; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; P. B. van der Nat; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; V. Vikhrov; I. Vilardi; C. Vogel; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; H. Ye; Z. Ye; S. Yen; W. Yu; D. Zeiler; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-spin asymmetries for pions and charged kaons are measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of positrons and electrons off a transversely nuclear-polarized hydrogen target. The dependence of the cross section on the azimuthal angles of the target polarization (phi_S)and the produced hadron (phi) is found to have a substantial sin(phi+phi_S) modulation for the production of pi+, pi- and K+. This Fourier component can be interpreted in terms of non-zero transversity distribution functions and non-zero favored and disfavored Collins fragmentation functions with opposite sign. For pi0 and K- production the amplitude of this Fourier component is consistent with zero.

  5. Longitudinal Spin Transfer to the $\\Lambda$ Hyperon in Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Balin, D; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Borysenko, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Chen, T; Chen, X; Chiang, H C; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Funel, A; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Gavrilov, G; Karibian, V; Grebenyuk, O; Gregor, I M; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Hristova, I; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Kobayashi, T; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lorenzon, W; Lü, H; Lü, J; Lu, S; Lü, X; Ma, B Q; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Michler, T; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Negodaev, M; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Osborne, A; Pickert, N; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V; Sinram, K; Sommer, W; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Van Haarlem, Y; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Vogel, C; Volmer, J; Wang, S; Wendland, J; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of polarization from a high-energy positron to a \\lam hyperon produced in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering has been measured. The data have been obtained by the HERMES experiment at DESY using the 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized positron beam of the HERA collider and unpolarized gas targets internal to the positron (electron) storage ring. The longitudinal spin transfer coefficient is found to be $\\dll = 0.11 \\pm 0.10 \\mathrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.03 \\mathrm{(syst)}$ at an average fractional energy carried by the \\lam hyperon $= 0.45$. The dependence of \\dll on both the fractional energy $z$ and the fractional longitudinal momentum $x_F$ is presented.

  6. Measurement of inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering using VFPS at H1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomas Hreus

    2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Performances of the Very Forward Proton Spectrometer (VFPS) of the H1 detector at HERA using data collected during the 2006/2007 running period are discussed, including the description of acceptance, reconstruction of proton energy loss and estimation of the amount of the beam-gas background. The first physics result obtained with the VFPS detector - a preliminary measurement of the semi-inclusive reduced cross section is presented for the diffractive deep inelastic scattering process with the leading final state proton measured by the VFPS. Results of this measurement are found to be in agreement with other measurements by the H1 Collaboration and with a theoretical prediction based on a NLO DGLAP QCD fit. They provide a higher precision and therefore allow a deeper inside to the nature of diffraction.

  7. Final-state interactions in deep-inelastic scattering from a tensor polarized deuteron target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wim Cosyn; Misak Sargsian

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) from a tensor polarized deuteron is sensitive to possible non-nucleonic components of the deuteron wave function. To accurately estimate the size of the nucleonic contribution, final-state interactions (FSIs) need to be accounted for in calculations. We outline a model that, based on the diffractive nature of the effective hadron-nucleon interaction, uses the generalized eikonal approximation to model the FSIs in the resonance region, taking into account the proton-neutron component of the deuteron. The calculation uses a factorized model with a basis of three resonances with mass $Wkinematics accessible in experiments at Jefferson Lab and Hermes. For inclusive DIS, sizeable effects are found when including FSIs for Bjorken $x>0.2$, but the overall size of $A_{zz}$ remains small. For tagged spectator DIS, FSIs effects are largest at spectator momenta around 300 MeV and for forward spectator angles.

  8. Leading neutron energy and pT distributions in deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ZEUS Collaboration; S. Chekanov

    2007-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of energetic neutrons in $ep$ collisions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The neutron energy and $p_T^2$ distributions were measured with a forward neutron calorimeter and tracker in a $40 \\pb^{-1}$ sample of inclusive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) data and a $6 \\pb^{-1}$ sample of photoproduction data. The neutron yield in photoproduction is suppressed relative to DIS for the lower neutron energies and the neutrons have a steeper $p_T^2$ distribution, consistent with the expectation from absorption models. The distributions are compared to HERA measurements of leading protons. The neutron energy and transverse-momentum distributions in DIS are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and to the predictions of particle exchange models. Models of pion exchange incorporating absorption and additional secondary meson exchanges give a good description of the data.

  9. Study of ?(1385) and ?(1321) hyperon and antihyperon production in deep inelastic muon scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Adolph; M. Alekseev; V. Yu. Alexakhin; Yu. Alexandrov; G. D. Alexeev; A. Amoroso; A. Austregesilo; B. Badelek; F. Balestra; J. Barth; G. Baum; Y. Bedfer; A. Berlin; J. Bernhard; R. Bertini; K. Bicker; J. Bieling; R. Birsa; J. Bisplinghoff; P. Bordalo; F. Bradamante; C. Braun; A. Bravar; A. Bressan; M. Buechele; E. Burtin; L. Capozza; M. Chiosso; S. U. Chung; A. Cicuttin; M. L. Crespo; S. Dalla Torre; S. S. Dasgupta; S. Dasgupta; O. Yu. Denisov; S. V. Donskov; N. Doshita; V. Duic; W. Duennweber; M. Dziewiecki; A. Efremov; C. Elia; P. D. Eversheim; W. Eyrich; M. Faessler; A. Ferrero; A. Filin; M. Finger; M. Finger jr.; H. Fischer; C. Franco; N. du Fresne von Hohenesche; J. M. Friedrich; V. Frolov; R. Garfagnini; F. Gautheron; O. P. Gavrichtchouk; S. Gerassimov; R. Geyer; M. Giorgi; I. Gnesi; B. Gobbo; S. Goertz; S. Grabmueller; A. Grasso; B. Grube; R. Gushterski; A. Guskov; T. Guthoerl; F. Haas; D. von Harrach; F. H. Heinsius; F. Herrmann; C. Hess; F. Hinterberger; Ch. Hoeppner; N. Horikawa; N. d'Hose; S. Huber; S. Ishimoto; Yu. Ivanshin; T. Iwata; R. Jahn; V. Jary; P. Jasinski; R. Joosten; E. Kabuss; D. Kang; B. Ketzer; G. V. Khaustov; Yu. A. Khokhlov; Yu. Kisselev; F. Klein; K. Klimaszewski; J. H. Koivuniemi; V. N. Kolosov; K. Kondo; K. Koenigsmann; I. Konorov; V. F. Konstantinov; A. M. Kotzinian; O. Kouznetsov; M. Kraemer; Z. V. Kroumchtein; N. Kuchinski; F. Kunne; K. Kurek; R. P. Kurjata; A. A. Lednev; A. Lehmann; S. Levorato; J. Lichtenstadt; A. Maggiora; A. Magnon; N. Makke; G. K. Mallot; A. Mann; C. Marchand; A. Martin; J. Marzec; H. Matsuda; T. Matsuda; G. Meshcheryakov; W. Meyer; T. Michigami; Yu. V. Mikhailov; Y. Miyachi; A. Morreale; A. Nagaytsev; T. Nagel; F. Nerling; S. Neubert; D. Neyret; V. I. Nikolaenko; J. Novy; W. -D. Nowak; A. S. Nunes; A. G. Olshevsky; M. Ostrick; R. Panknin; D. Panzieri; B. Parsamyan; S. Paul; G. Piragino; S. Platchkov; J. Pochodzalla; J. Polak; V. A. Polyakov; J. Pretz; M. Quaresma; C. Quintans; S. Ramos; G. Reicherz; E. Rocco; V. Rodionov; E. Rondio; N. S. Rossiyskaya; D. I. Ryabchikov; V. D. Samoylenko; A. Sandacz; M. G. Sapozhnikov; S. Sarkar; I. A. Savin; G. Sbrizzai; P. Schiavon; C. Schill; T. Schlueter; A. Schmidt; K. Schmidt; L. Schmitt; H. Schmieden; K. Schoenning; S. Schopferer; M. Schott; O. Yu. Shevchenko; L. Silva; L. Sinha; S. Sirtl; S. Sosio; F. Sozzi; A. Srnka; L. Steiger; M. Stolarski; M. Sulc; R. Sulej; H. Suzuki; P. Sznajder; S. Takekawa; J. Ter Wolbeek; S. Tessaro; F. Tessarotto; F. Thibaud; S. Uhl; I. Uman; M. Vandenbroucke; M. Virius; L. Wang; T. Weisrock; M. Wilfert; R. Windmolders; W. Wislicki; H. Wollny; K. Zaremba; M. Zavertyaev; E. Zemlyanichkina; N. Zhuravlev; M. Ziembicki

    2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Large samples of \\Lambda, \\Sigma(1385) and \\Xi(1321) hyperons produced in deep-inelastic muon scattering off a ^6LiD target were collected with the COMPASS experimental setup at CERN. The relative yields of \\Sigma(1385)^+, \\Sigma(1385)^-, \\bar{\\Sigma}(1385)^-, \\bar{\\Sigma}(1385)^+, \\Xi(1321)^-, and \\bar{\\Xi}(1321)^+ hyperons decaying into \\Lambda(\\bar{\\Lambda})\\pi were measured. The heavy hyperon to \\Lambda and heavy antihyperon to \\bar{\\Lambda} yield ratios were found to be in the range 3.8% to 5.6% with a relative uncertainty of about 10%. They were used to tune the parameters relevant for strange particle production of the LEPTO Monte Carlo generator.

  10. Deep Inelastic Scattering from A=3 Nuclei and the Neutron Structure Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Afnan; F. Bissey; J. Gomez; A. Katramatou; S. Liuti; W. Melnitchouk; G. Petratos; A.W. Thomas

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comprehensive analysis of deep inelastic scattering from {sup 3}He and {sup 3}H, focusing in particular on the extraction of the free neutron structure function, F{sup n}{sub 2}. Nuclear corrections are shown to cancel to within 1-2% for the isospin-weighted ratio of {sup 3}He to {sup 3}H structure functions, which leads to more than an order of magnitude improvement in the current uncertainty on the neutron to proton ratio F{sup 2n}{sub 2}/F{sup p}{sub 2} at large x. Theoretical uncertainties originating tom the nuclear wave function, including possible non-nucleonic components, are evaluated. Measurement of the {sup 3}He and {sup 3}H structure functions will, in addition, determine the magnitude of the EMC effect in all A [lte] 3 nuclei.

  11. Measurement of Isolated Photon Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H1 Collaboration

    2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of isolated photons in deep-inelastic scattering $ep\\to e \\gamma X$ is measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The measurement is performed in the kinematic range of negative four-momentum transfer squared $450$ GeV. The analysis is based on a total integrated luminosity of 227~pb$^{-1}$. The production cross section of isolatedphotons with a transverse energy in the range $3 measured as a function of $E_T^\\gamma$, $\\eta^\\gamma$ and $Q^2$. Isolated photon cross sections are also measured for events with no jets or at least one hadronic jet. The measurements are compared with predictions from Monte Carlo generators modelling the photon radiation from the quark and the electron lines, as well as with calculations at leading and next to leading order in the strong coupling. The predictions significantly underestimate the measured cross sections.

  12. Neutron and X-ray experiments at high temperature P. Aldebert (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    neutron scattering have appeared as power- ful tools to get information, mainly structural temperature scattering devices compared to X-rays. At the present time thermal neutron high flux reactors be investigated by neutron scattering.

  13. Polarization transfer in inelastic scattering and pionic models of the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, T.A.; Jones, K.W.; McClelland, J.B.; Moss, J.M.; Rees, L.B.; Tanaka, N.; Bacher, A.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the experiment reported was to make a precise test of the enhanced pion field model in a medium-energy scattering experiment. The quantity probed is the spin-longitudinal response function, a measure of the nuclear pion density which is used explicitly in the pion-excess models of the EMC effect. The point of reference used is deuterium. The spin-dependent response functions for heavy targets and /sup 2/H are compared using identical experimental techniques. The technique of complete polarization transfer is used to separate the spin-longitudinal and spin-transverse response in the continuum. The experiment consisted of precise determinations of the polarization transfer coefficients for 500 MeV protons inelastically scattered from Pb, Ca, and /sup 2/H. The experiment utilized longitudinal, sideways, and normal polarized beams in conjunction with final polarization analysis from the focal-plane polarimeter of the high-resolution spectrometer. Quantities constructed from these data are the longitudinal and transverse spin-flip probabilities. Calculations were performed of the ratio of longitudinal to transverse response functions and of the EMC effect with the same model. No evidence was found for collectivity in the isovector spin-longitudinal response function. 10 refs. (LEW)

  14. Structural characterization of Green River oil-shale at high-pressure using pair distribution function analysis and small angle x-ray scattering.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Locke, D. R.; Chupas, P. J.; Chapman, K. W.; Pugmire, R. J.; Winans, R. E.; Univ. of Utah

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compression behavior of a silicate-rich oil shale from the Green River formation in the pressure range 0.0-2.4 GPa was studied using in situ high pressure X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) measurements for the sample contained within a Paris-Edinburgh cell. The real-space local structural information in the PDF, G(r), was used to evaluate the compressibility of the oil shale. Specifically, the pressure-induced reduction in the medium- to long-range atom distances (6-20 {angstrom}) yielded an average sample compressibility corresponding to a bulk modulus of ca. 61-67 GPa. A structural model consisting of a three phase mixture of the principal crystalline oil shale components (quartz, albite and Illite) provided a good fit to the ambient pressure PDF data (R 30.7%). Indeed the features in the PDF beyond 6 {angstrom}, were similarly well fit by a single phase model of the highest symmetry, highly crystalline quartz component.

  15. Pressure-induced valence change in YbAl3: A combined high-pressure inelastic x-ray scattering and theoretical investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svane, Axel Torstein

    4Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA 5 HPCAT, Carnegie-1 K-2 .13 YbAl3 finds application as a thermoelectric material with a large Seebeck coefficient

  16. Elastic and inelastic X-ray scattering studies of the low dimensional spin-1/2 quantum magnet TiOCl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Eric T

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ground state for a one dimensional spin 1/2 Heisenberg chain coupled to phonons is a dimerized singlet state known as a "spin-Peierls" state. Currently, the spin-Peierls state is realized in only a handful of known ...

  17. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  18. Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized [superscript 3]He target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Y. X.

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized [superscript 3]He target. Both the Collins ...

  19. Measurement of “pretzelosity” asymmetry of charged pion production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a polarized [superscript 3]He target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.

    An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries of semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized [superscript 3]He target was performed at Jefferson Laboratory in the ...

  20. Simultaneous extraction of transversity and Collins functions from new semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and e + e ? data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; D’Alesio, U.; Melis, S.; Murgia, F.; Prokudin, A.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a global reanalysis of the most recent experimental data on azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, from the HERMES and COMPASS Collaborations, and in e?e??h?h?X processes, from the Belle Collaboration. The transversity and the Collins functions are extracted simultaneously, in the framework of a revised analysis in which a new parametrization of the Collins functions is also tested.

  1. Coulomb-Excitation of the Giant-Dipole Resonance in Light-Ion Inelastic-Scattering from Pb-208

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izumoto, T.; Lui, YW; Youngblood, David H.; Udagawa, T.; Tamura, T.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIE%' C VOLUME 24, NUMBER 5 NOVEMBER 1981 Coulomb excitation of the giant dipole resonance in light-ion inelastic scattering from Pb T. Izumoto, Y. -%. Lui, and D. H. Youngblood Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College... Station, Texas 77843 T. Udagawa and T. Tamura Department of Physics, Uniuersity of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (Received 26 May 1981) A coupled-channel calculation including Coulomb excitation has been done for excita- tion of the isovector...

  2. Structure of low-density nanoporous dielectrics revealed by low-vacuum electron microscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kucheyev, S O; Toth, M; Baumann, T F; Hamza, A V; Ilavsky, J; Knowles, W R; Thiel, B L; Tileli, V; van Buuren, T; Wang, Y M; Willey, T M

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We use low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy to image directly the ligament and pore size and shape distributions of representative aerogels over a wide range of length scales ({approx} 10{sup 0}-10{sup 5} nm). The images are used for unambiguous, real-space interpretation of small-angle scattering data for these complex nanoporous systems.

  3. Discrimination of gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering in AGATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ataç; A. Kas¸kas A; S. Akkoyun A; M. S¸enyi?git A; T. Hüyük A; S. O. Kara A; J. Nyberg B

    Possibilities of discriminating neutrons and ? rays in the AGATA ?-ray tracking spectrometer have been investigated with the aim of reducing the background due to inelastic scattering of neutrons in the high-purity germanium crystals. This background may become a serious problem especially in experiments with neutron-rich radioactive ion beams. Simulations using the Geant4 toolkit and a tracking program based on the forward tracking algorithm were carried out by emitting neutrons and ? rays from the center of AGATA. Three different methods were developed and tested in order to find “fingerprints ” of the neutron interaction points in the detectors. In a simulation with simultaneous emission of six neutrons with energies in the range 1-5 MeV and ten ? rays with energies between 150 and 1450 keV, the peak-to-background ratio at a ?-ray energy of 1.0 MeV was improved by a factor of 2.4 after neutron rejection with a reduction of the photopeak efficiency at 1.0 MeV of only a factor of 1.25.

  4. Parity Violating Deep Inelastic Electron Scattering from the Deuteron at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Kai [MIT

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment that measured the parity violating (PV) asymmetry A{sub d} in e-{sup 2}H deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at Q{sup 2} ~#25; 1.10 and 1.90 (GeV/c){sup 2} and x{sub B} ~#25; 0.3 was completed in experimental Hall A at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The asymmetry can be used to extract the neutral weak coupling combination (2C{sub 2u}-C{sub 2d}), providing a factor of five to six improvement over the current world data. To achieve this precision, asymmetries of the 10{sup -4} level needed to be measured at event rates up to 500 kHz with high electron detection efficiency and high pion background rejection capability. A specialized scaler-based counting data acquisition system (DAQ) with hardware-based particle identification was successfully implemented. The statistical quality of the asymmetry measurement agreed with the Gaussian distribution to over five orders of magnitudes and the experimental goal of 3-4% statistical uncertainty was achieved. The design and performance of the new DAQ system is presented with the preliminary asymmetry results given in the end.

  5. Inclusive Measurements of Inelastic Electron and Positron Scattering from Unpolarized Hydrogen and Deuterium Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; S. Belostotski; N. Bianchi; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; J. Bowles; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; L. De Nardo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Dueren; M. Ehrenfried; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; R. Fabbri; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; D. Gabbert; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; F. Garibaldi; G. Gavrilov; V. Gharibyan; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Golembiovskaya; C. Hadjidakis; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; G. Hill; A. Hillenbrand; M. Hoek; Y. Holler; I. Hristova; Y. Imazu; A. Ivanilov; H. E. Jackson; H. S. Jo; S. Joosten; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; P. Kravchenko; V. G. Krivokhijine; L. Lagamba; R. Lamb; L. Lapikas; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; L. A. Linden-Levy; A. Lopez Ruiz; W. Lorenzon; X. -G. Lu; X. -R. Lu; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; N. C. R. Makins; S. I. Manaenkov; L. Manfre; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; C. A. Miller; Y. Miyachi; A. Movsisyan; V. Muccifora; M. Murray; A. Mussgiller; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; M. Negodaev; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; N. Pickert; M. Raithel; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; F. Sanftl; A. Schaefer; G. Schnell; K. P. Schueler; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; V. Shutov; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; J. J. M. Steijger; H. Stenzel; J. Stewart; F. Stinzing; S. Taroian; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; A. Vandenbroucke; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; V. Vikhrov; I. Vilardi; C. Vogel; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; H. Ye; Z. Ye; S. Yen; W. Yu; D. Zeiler; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

    2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of inclusive measurements of inelastic electron and positron scattering from unpolarized protons and deuterons at the HERMES experiment are presented. The structure functions $F_2^p$ and $F_2^d$ are determined using a parameterization of existing data for the longitudinal-to-transverse virtual-photon absorption cross-section ratio. The HERMES results provide data in the ranges $0.006\\leq x\\leq 0.9$ and 0.1 GeV$^2\\leq Q^2\\leq$ 20 GeV$^2$, covering the transition region between the perturbative and the non-perturbative regimes of QCD in a so-far largely unexplored kinematic region. They are in agreement with existing world data in the region of overlap. The measured cross sections are used, in combination with data from other experiments, to perform fits to the photon-nucleon cross section using the functional form of the ALLM model. The deuteron-to-proton cross-section ratio is also determined.

  6. Inclusive Measurements of Inelastic Electron and Positron Scattering from Unpolarized Hydrogen and Deuterium Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Belostotski, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dueren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hill, G; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lamb, R; Lapikas, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Ruiz, A Lopez; Lorenzon, W; Lu, X -G; Lu, X -R; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfre, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Pickert, N; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schaefer, A; Schnell, G; Schueler, K P; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Shutov, V; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Taroian, S; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Vogel, C; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, H; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of inclusive measurements of inelastic electron and positron scattering from unpolarized protons and deuterons at the HERMES experiment are presented. The structure functions $F_2^p$ and $F_2^d$ are determined using a parameterization of existing data for the longitudinal-to-transverse virtual-photon absorption cross-section ratio. The HERMES results provide data in the ranges $0.006\\leq x\\leq 0.9$ and 0.1 GeV$^2\\leq Q^2\\leq$ 20 GeV$^2$, covering the transition region between the perturbative and the non-perturbative regimes of QCD in a so-far largely unexplored kinematic region. They are in agreement with existing world data in the region of overlap. The measured cross sections are used, in combination with data from other experiments, to perform fits to the photon-nucleon cross section using the functional form of the ALLM model. The deuteron-to-proton cross-section ratio is also determined.

  7. Longitudinal-Transverse Separation of Deep-Inelastic Scattering at Low Q² on Nucleons and Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vladas Tvaskis

    2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the early experiments at SLAC, which discovered the nucleon substructure and led to the development of the quark parton model, deep inelastic scattering (DIS) has been the most powerful tool to investigate the partonic substructure of the nucleon. After about 30 years of experiments with electron and muon beams the nucleon structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) is known with high precision over about four orders of magnitude in x and Q{sup 2}. In the region of Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2} the results of the DIS measurements are interpreted in terms of partons (quarks and gluons). The theoretical framework is provided in this case by perturbative Quantum Chromo Dynamics (pQCD), which includes scaling violations, as described by the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) equations. The description starts to fail when Q{sup 2} becomes of the order of 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}, where non-perturbative effects (higher-twist effects), which are still not fully understood, become important (non-pQCD). The sensitivity for order-n twist effects increases with decreasing Q{sup 2}, since they include a factor 1/(Q{sup 2}{sup n}) (n {ge} 1).

  8. Discrimination of gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering in AGATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ataç; A. Ka?ka?; S. Akkoyun; M. ?enyi?it; T. Hüyük; S. O. Kara; J. Nyberg

    2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Possibilities of discriminating neutrons and gamma rays in the AGATA gamma-ray tracking spectrometer have been investigated with the aim of reducing the background due to inelastic scattering of neutrons in the high-purity germanium crystals. This background may become a serious problem especially in experiments with neutron-rich radioactive ion beams. Simulations using the Geant4 toolkit and a tracking program based on the forward tracking algorithm were carried out by emitting neutrons and gamma rays from the center of AGATA. Three different methods were developed and tested in order to find 'fingerprints' of the neutron interaction points in the detectors. In a simulation with simultaneous emission of six neutrons with energies in the range 1-5 MeV and ten gamma rays with energies between 150 and 1450 keV, the peak-to-background ratio at a gamma-ray energy of 1.0 MeV was improved by a factor of 2.4 after neutron rejection with a reduction of the photopeak efficiency at 1.0 MeV of only a factor of 1.25.

  9. X-Ray Emission from Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth: A Short Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anil Bhardwaj

    2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth - the three planets having dense atmosphere and a well developed magnetosphere - are known to emit X-rays. Recently, Chandra X-ray Observatory has observed X-rays from these planets, and XMM-Newton has observed them from Jupiter and Saturn. These observations have provided improved morphological, temporal, and spectral characteristics of X-rays from these planets. Both auroral and non-auroral (low-latitude) 'disk' X-ray emissions have been observed on Earth and Jupiter. X-rays have been detected from Saturn's disk, but no convincing evidence for X-ray aurora on Saturn has been observed. The non-auroral disk X-ray emissions from Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth, are mostly produced due to scattering of solar X-rays. X-ray aurora on Earth is mainly generated via bremsstrahlung from precipitating electrons and on Jupiter via charge exchange of highlyionized energetic heavy ions precipitating into the polar atmosphere. Recent unpublished work suggests that at higher (>2 keV) energies electron bremsstrahlung also plays a role in Jupiter's X-ray aurora. This paper summarizes the recent results of X-ray observations on Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth mainly in the soft energy (~0.1-2.0 keV) band and provides a comparative overview.

  10. Beyond mean-field study of elastic and inelastic electron scattering off nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Yao; M. Bender; P. -H. Heenen

    2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron scattering provides a powerful tool to determine charge distributions and transition densities of nuclei. This tool will soon be available for short-lived neutron-rich nuclei. [Purpose] Beyond mean-field methods have been successfully applied to the study of excitation spectra of nuclei in the whole nuclear chart. These methods permit to determine energies and transition probabilities starting from an effective in-medium nucleon-nucleon interaction but without other phenomenological ingredients. Such a method has recently been extended to calculate the charge density of nuclei deformed at the mean-field level of approximation [J. M. Yao et al., Phys. Rev. C86, 014310 (2012)]. The aim of this work is to further extend the method to the determination of transition densities between low-lying excited states. [Method] The starting point of our method is a set of Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov wave functions generated with a constraint on the axial quadrupole moment and using a Skyrme energy density functional. Correlations beyond the mean field are introduced by projecting mean-field wave functions on angular-momentum and particle number and by mixing the symmetry restored wave functions.[Results] We give in this paper detailed formulae derived for the calculation of densities and form factors. These formulae are rather easy to obtain when both initial and final states are $0^+$ states but are far from being trivial when one of the states has a finite $J$-value. Illustrative applications to $^{24}$Mg and to the even-mass $^{58-68}$Ni have permitted to analyse the main features of our method, in particular the effect of deformation on densities and form factors. An illustration calculation of both elastic and inelastic scattering form factors is presented....

  11. Vector meson dominance and deep inelastic scattering at low and medium Q squared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar Bugaev; Boris Mangazeev

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We argued that deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at small values of Q squared is an essentially nonperturbative process and can be described, partially at least, by the vector meson dominance (VMD) model. We showed by the straightforward calculation that VMD model alone can successfully explain data on structure functions of DIS in a broad interval of x (5e-2 - 1e-4) for the region Q squared < 1 GeV squared. For a description of data at larger Q squared we used the two-component (VMD + perturbative QCD) approach. We showed that these two components can be separated if VMD is used in the aligned jet version. We took into account, in calculations of VMD component of structure functions, the excited states of the rho-meson and nondiagonal transitions between different members of the rho-meson family. Amplitudes of these transitions were obtained using a formalism of the light-front Bethe-Salpeter equation and the method of diffraction-scattering eigenstates. The perturbative QCD component was calculated using a framework of the colour dipole model with the dipole cross section having a Regge-type energy dependence. We presented results of the detailed comparison of our predictions with experimental data for structure functions of the nucleon. We obtained also approximate predictions for the structure functions in the region of very small x, up to 1e-9, and showed that nonperturbative component at such values of x is still relatively large and must be taken into account if Q squared is about few GeV squared or less.

  12. In-situ high-energy x-ray diffuse-scattering study of the phase transition in a Ni{sub 2}MnGa ferromagnetic shape-memory crystal.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, G.; Yan-Dong, W.; Yang, R.; Yan-Dong, L.; Peter, L. K.; X-Ray Science Division; Northeastern Univ.; Univ. of Tennessee

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The full information on the changes in many crystallographic aspects, including the structural and microstructural characterizations, during the phase transformation is essential for understanding the phase transition and 'memory' behavior in the ferromagnetic shape-memory alloys. In the present article, the defects-related microstructural features connected to the premartensitic and martensitic transition of a Ni{sub 2}MnGa single crystal under a uniaxial pressure of 50 MPa applied along the [110] crystallographic direction were studied by the in-situ high-energy X-ray diffuse-scattering experiments. The analysis of the characteristics of diffuse-scattering patterns around different sharp Bragg spots suggests that the influences of some defect clusters on the pressure-induced phase-transition sequences of Ni2MnGa are significant. Our experiments show that an intermediate phase is produced during the premartensitic transition in the Ni{sub 2}MnGa single crystal, which is favorable for the nucleation of a martensitic phase. The compression stress along the [110] direction of the Heusler phase can promote the premartensitic and martensitic transition of the Ni{sub 2}MnGa single crystal.

  13. alpha-particle inelastic scattering: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is studied in a coupled channel method by using a double folding model with microscopic wave functions of 12C. Experimental angular distributions in elastic and inelastic...

  14. Chemical and displacement atomic pair correlations in crystalline solid solutions recovered by anomalous x-ray scattering in Fe-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shaffer, L.B. [Anderson Univ., Anderson, IN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Short-range pair correlations of atoms in crystalline solid solutions consist of both chemical and displacement correlations. Measurement of these pair correlations is fundamental to understanding the properties of solid solutions. We discuss anomalous scattering techniques which have provided an important advance in our ability to recover these pair correlations and to model the local atomic arrangements in crystalline solid solutions of Fe-Ni alloys.

  15. Linear accelerator x-ray sources with high duty cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig; Gozani, Tsahi; Langeveld, Willem G. J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., 520 Almanor Ave. Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Hernandez, Michael [XScell corp., 2134 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray cargo inspection systems typically use a several-MV pulsed linear accelerator (linac) to produce a bremsstrahlung spectrum of x rays by bombarding a target with electrons. The x rays traverse the cargo and are detected by a detector array. Spectroscopy of the detected x rays is very desirable: if one can determine the spectrum of the transmitted x rays, one can determine the Z of the material they traversed. Even in relatively low-dose modes of operation, thousands of x rays arrive at each detector element during each pulse, unless the x rays are heavily absorbed or scattered by the cargo. For portal or fixed-site systems, dose rates, and therefore x-ray count rates, are even higher. Because of the high x-ray count rate, spectroscopy is impractical in conventional cargo inspection systems, except in certain special cases. For a mobile system, typical pulse durations are a few microseconds, and the number of pulses is on the order of 100 per second, leading to a duty factor of about 0.04%. Clearly, a linear accelerator x-ray source with much higher duty factor would be useful, since then the same number of x rays could be spread out over time, reducing the x-ray count rate. In this paper, we explore the possibility of designing a linear accelerator system, using more or less Conventional Off the Shelf (COTS) components, capable of duty cycles of 1% or greater. A survey was conducted of available linac RF source options and, given the possibilities, calculations were performed for suitable beam centerline designs. Keeping in mind that the size and cost of the accelerator system should be practical for use in a mobile cargo inspection system, only a few options are shown to be reasonably feasible, both requiring the use of klystrons instead of the magnetrons used in conventional systems. An S-Band design appears clearly possible, and there is also a promising X-Band design.

  16. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  17. Structural dynamics and ssDNA binding activity of the three N-terminal domains of the large subunit of Replication Protein A from small angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pretto, Dalyir I.; Tsutakawa, Susan; Brosey, Chris A.; Castillo, Amalchi; Chagot, Marie-Eve; Smith, Jarrod A.; Tainer, John A.; Chazin, Walter J.

    2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Replication Protein A (RPA) is the primary eukaryotic ssDNA binding protein utilized in diverse DNA transactions in the cell. RPA is a heterotrimeric protein with seven globular domains connected by flexible linkers, which enable substantial inter-domain motion that is essential to its function. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments on two multi-domain constructs from the N-terminus of the large subunit (RPA70) were used to examine the structural dynamics of these domains and their response to the binding of ssDNA. The SAXS data combined with molecular dynamics simulations reveal substantial interdomain flexibility for both RPA70AB (the tandem high affinity ssDNA binding domains A and B connected by a 10-residue linker) and RPA70NAB (RPA70AB extended by a 70-residue linker to the RPA70N protein interaction domain). Binding of ssDNA to RPA70NAB reduces the interdomain flexibility between the A and B domains, but has no effect on RPA70N. These studies provide the first direct measurements of changes in orientation of these three RPA domains upon binding ssDNA. The results support a model in which RPA70N remains structurally independent of RPA70AB in the DNA bound state and therefore freely available to serve as a protein recruitment module.

  18. Focused X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  19. Status report on the analysis of inelastic neutron scattering from carbon, iron, yttrium and lead at 96 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Gustavsson; C. Hellesen; S. Pomp; A. Öhrn; J. Blomgren; U. Tippawan

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is part of an effort to provide more experimental data for the (n,n'x) reaction. The experiments were carried out at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden, at the quasi-mono-energetic neutron beam of 96 MeV, before the facility was upgraded in 2004. Using an extended data analysis of data primarily intended for measuring elastic neutron scattering only, it was found to be possible to extract information on the inelastic scattering from several nuclei. In the preliminary data analysis, an iterative forward-folding technique was applied, in which a physically reasonable trial spectrum was folded with the response function of the detector system and the output was compared to the experimental data. As a result, double-differential cross sections and angular distributions of inelastic neutron scattering from 12-C, 56-Fe, 89-Y and 208-Pb could be obtained. In this paper, a status update on the efforts to improve the description of the detector response function is given.

  20. X-ray characterization of solid small molecule organic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billinge, Simon; Shankland, Kenneth; Shankland, Norman; Florence, Alastair

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides, inter alia, methods of characterizing a small molecule organic material, e.g., a drug or a drug product. This method includes subjecting the solid small molecule organic material to x-ray total scattering analysis at a short wavelength, collecting data generated thereby, and mathematically transforming the data to provide a refined set of data.

  1. Azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons, pions, and kaons produced in deep-inelastic scattering off unpolarized protons and deuterons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; S. Belostotski; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; J. Bowles; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; L. De Nardo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Düren; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; F. Garibaldi; G. Gavrilov; V. Gharibyan; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Golembiovskaya; C. Hadjidakis; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; A. Hillenbrand; M. Hoek; Y. Holler; I. Hristova; Y. Imazu; A. Ivanilov; H. E. Jackson; H. S. Jo; S. Joosten; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; P. Kravchenko; V. G. Krivokhijine; L. Lagamba; L. Lapikás; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; A. López Ruiz; W. Lorenzon; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; N. C. R. Makins; S. I. Manaenkov; L. Manfré; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; C. A. Miller; Y. Miyachi; A. Movsisyan; M. Murray; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; M. Negodaev; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; A. Petrosyan; M. Raithel; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; F. Sanftl; A. Schäfer; G. Schnell; K. P. Schüler; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; M. Stancari; M. Statera; J. J. M. Steijger; J. Stewart; F. Stinzing; A. Terkulov; R. Truty; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; A. Vandenbroucke; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; V. Vikhrov; I. Vilardi; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; Z. Ye; S. Yen; W. Yu; V. Zagrebelnyy; D. Zeiler; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

    2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The azimuthal cos{\\phi} and cos2{\\phi} modulations of the distribution of hadrons produced in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons and positrons off hydrogen and deuterium targets have been measured in the HERMES experiment. For the first time these modulations were determined in a four-dimensional kinematic space for positively and negatively charged pions and kaons separately, as well as for unidentified hadrons. These azimuthal dependences are sensitive to the transverse motion and polarization of the quarks within the nucleon via, e.g., the Cahn, Boer-Mulders and Collins effects.

  2. Azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons, pions, and kaons produced in deep-inelastic scattering off unpolarized protons and deuterons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Belostotski, S; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikás, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Ruiz, A López; Lorenzon, W; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfré, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Petrosyan, A; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Terkulov, A; Truty, R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zagrebelnyy, V; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The azimuthal cos{\\phi} and cos2{\\phi} modulations of the distribution of hadrons produced in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons and positrons off hydrogen and deuterium targets have been measured in the HERMES experiment. For the first time these modulations were determined in a four-dimensional kinematic space for positively and negatively charged pions and kaons separately, as well as for unidentified hadrons. These azimuthal dependences are sensitive to the transverse motion and polarization of the quarks within the nucleon via, e.g., the Cahn, Boer-Mulders and Collins effects.

  3. Accuracy evaluation of a Compton X-ray spectrometer with bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by a 6 MeV electron bunch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojima, Sadaoki, E-mail: kojima-s@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Zhang, Zhe; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Morace, Alessio; Nagai, Takahiro; Abe, Yuki; Sakata, Shouhei; Inoue, Hiroaki; Utsugi, Masaru; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Togawa, Hiromi [Toyota Technical Development Corporation, 1-21 Imae, Hanamoto-cho, Toyota, Aichi 470-0334 (Japan); Ozaki, Tetsuo [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshicho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kato, Ryukou [The Institute of Science and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Compton-scattering-based X-ray spectrometer is developed to obtain the energy distribution of fast electrons produced by intense laser and matter interactions. Bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by fast electrons in a material are used to measure fast electrons’ energy distribution in matter. In the Compton X-ray spectrometer, X-rays are converted into recoil electrons by Compton scattering in a converter made from fused silica glass, and a magnet-based electron energy analyzer is used to measure the energy distribution of the electrons that recoil in the direction of the incident X-rays. The spectrum of the incident X-rays is reconstructed from the energy distribution of the recoil electrons. The accuracy of this spectrometer is evaluated using a quasi-monoenergetic 6 MeV electron bunch that emanates from a linear accelerator. An electron bunch is injected into a 1.5 mm thick tungsten plate to produce bremsstrahlung X-rays. The spectrum of these bremsstrahlung X-rays is obtained in the range from 1 to 9 MeV. The energy of the electrons in the bunch is estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of particle-matter interactions. The result shows that the spectrometer's energy accuracy is ±0.5 MeV for 6.0 MeV electrons.

  4. Producing X-rays at the APS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  5. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs...

  6. APS X-rays Reveal Picasso's Secret

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed APS X-rays Reveal Picasso's Secret OCTOBER 15, 2012 Bookmark and Share X-rays reveal that Picasso's "Old Guitarist," at...

  7. Spectral analysis of X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridriksson, Joel Karl

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present work from three separate research projects associated with observations of X-ray binaries. Two of those revolve around spectral characteristics of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), ...

  8. Single-spin Azimuthal Asymmetries in Electroproduction of Neutral Pions in Semi-inclusive Deep-inelastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Amarian, M; Aschenauer, E C; Avakian, H; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Bains, B; Baturin, V; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Bouhali, O; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brauksiepe, S; Brückner, W; Brüll, A; Brunn, I; Bulten, H J; Capitani, G P; Chumney, P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Court, G R; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Devitsin, E G; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; Di Nezza, P; Dzhordzhadze, V; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G M; Ellinghaus, F; Ely, J; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Felawka, L; Filippone, B W; Fischer, H; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Gärber, Y; Garibaldi, F; Garutti, E; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Golendukhin, A; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Green, P W; Greeniaus, L G; Gute, A; Haeberli, W; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Heinsius, F H; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hofman, G J; Holler, Y; Holt, R J; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Izotov, A A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Jung, P; Kaiser, R; Kanesaka, J; Kinney, E R; Kiselev, A; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, H; Koch, N; Königsmann, K C; Kolster, H; Korotkov, V A; Kotik, E; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kyle, G S; Lagamba, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Lindemann, T; Lorenzon, W; Maas, A; Makins, N C R; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; McAndrew, M; McIlhany, K; Meissner, F; Menden, F; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Milner, R; Muccifora, V; Mussa, R; Nagaitsev, A P; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaeva, K; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganesyan, K A; O'Neill, T G; Owen, B R; Pate, S F; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Rakness, G; Rappoport, V; Redwine, R P; Reggiani, D; Reolon, A R; Rith, K; Robinson, D; Rostomyan, A; Ruh, M; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Sanjiev, I; Sato, F; Savin, I A; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schmidt, F; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Schwind, A; Seibert, J; Seitz, B; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V B; Simani, M C; Simon, A; Sinram, K; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Suetsugu, K; Taroian, S P; Terkulov, A R; Teryaev, O V; Tessarin, S; Thomas, E; Tipton, B; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van den Brand, J F J; van der Steenhoven, G; Van de Vyver, R; Van Hunen, J J; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Wise, T; Yen, S; Yoneyama, S; Zohrabyan, H G

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-spin asymmetry in the azimuthal distribution of neutral pions relative to the lepton scattering plane has been measured for the first time in deep-inelastic scattering of positrons off longitudinally polarized protons. The analysing power in the sin(phi) moment of the cross section is 0.019 +/- 0.007(stat.) +/- 0.003(syst.). This result is compared to single-spin asymmetries for charged pion production measured in the same kinematic range. The pi^0 asymmetry is of the same size as the pi^+ asymmetry and shows a similar dependence on the relevant kinematic variables. The asymmetry is described by a phenomenological calculation based on a fragmentation function that represents sensitivity to the transverse polarization of the struck quark.

  9. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  10. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Ables, Elden (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  11. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  12. A scaler-based data acquisition system for measuring parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subedi, Ramesh R. [Virginia U.; Wang, Diancheng [Virginia U.; Pan, Kai [MIT; Deng, Xiaoyan [Virginu U.; Michaels, Robert W. [JLAB; Shahinyan, Albert [Yerevan Institute; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B. [JLAB; Zheng, Xiaochao [JLAB

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment that measured the parity violating asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering was completed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in experimental Hall A. From these asymmetries, a combination of the quark weak axial charge could be extracted with a factor of five improvement in precision over world data. To achieve this, asymmetries at the 10^-4 level needed to be measured at event rates up to 500 kHz and the high pion background typical to deep inelastic scattering experiments needed to be rejected efficiently. A specialized data acquisition (DAQ) system with intrinsic particle identification (PID) was successfully developed and used: The pion contamination in the electron samples was controlled at the order of 2 × 10^-4 or below with an electron efficiency of higher than 91% throughout the production period of the experiment, the systematic uncertainty in the measured asymmetry due to DAQ deadtime was below 0.2%, and the statistical quality of the asymmetry measurement agreed with the Gaussian distribution to over five orders of magnitudes. The DAQ system is presented here with an emphasis on its design scheme, the achieved PID performance, deadtime effect and the capability of measuring small asymmetries.

  13. Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Deep Inelastic Scattering at JLab 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Diancheng [UVA

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS) offers us a useful tool to study the weak neutral couplings and the hadronic structure of the nucleon, and provides high precision tests on the Standard Model. During the 6 GeV PVDIS experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, the parity-violating asymmetries A{sub PV} of a polarized electron beam scattering off an unpolarized deuteron target in the deep inelastic scattering region were precisely measured at two Q{sup 2} values of 1.1 and 1.9 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The asymmetry at Q{sup 2}=1.9 (GeV/c){sup 2} can be used to extract the weak coupling combination 2C{sub 2u} - C{sub 2d}, assuming the higher twist effect is small. The extracted result from this measurement is in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction, and improves the precision by a factor of five over previous data. In addition, combining the asymmetries at both Q{sup 2} values provides us extra knowledge on the higher twist effects. The parity violation asymmetries in the resonance region were also measured during this experiment. These results are the first A{sub PV} data in the resonance region beyond the {Delta}#1;(1232). They provide evidence that the quark hadron duality works for A{sub PV} at the (10-15)% level, and set constraints on nucleon resonance models that are commonly used for background calculations to other parity-violating electron scattering measurements.

  14. SMB, Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome to the

  15. Spatial resolution of synchrotron x-ray microtomography in high energy range: Effect of x-ray energy and sample-to-detector distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, D.; Tomizato, F.; Toda, H.; Kobayashi, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Uesugi, K.; Takeuchi, A.; Suzuki, Y. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial resolution of three-dimensional images obtained by synchrotron X-ray microtomography technique is evaluated using cyclic bar patterns machined on a steel wire. Influences of X-ray energy and the sample-to-detector distance on spatial resolution were investigated. High X-ray energies of 33-78 keV are applied due to the high X-ray absorption of transition metals. Best spatial resolution of about 1.2 {mu}m pitch was observed at the sample-to-detector distance range of 20-110 mm and at the energy range of 68-78 keV. Several factors such as X-ray scattering and diffraction phenomena affecting the degradation of spatial resolution are also discussed.

  16. X-ray spectroscopy of low-mass X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juett, Adrienne Marie, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present high-resolution X-ray grating spectroscopy of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) using instruments onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton). The first ...

  17. Extending The Methodology Of X-ray Crystallography To Allow X-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Jianwei "John"

    , the radiation damage. While the radiation damage problem can be mitigated somewhat by using cryogenic techniques resolution without serious radiation damage to the specimens. Although X-ray crystallography becomesExtending The Methodology Of X-ray Crystallography To Allow X-ray Microscopy Without X-ray Optics

  18. Synchronization of x-ray pulses to the pump laser in an ultrafast x-ray facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corlett, J.N.; Barry, W.; Byrd, J.M.; Schoenlein, R.; Zholents, A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate timing of ultrafast x-ray probe pulses emitted fromOF X-RAY PULSES TO THE PUMP LASER IN AN ULTRAFAST X-RAY

  19. X-ray holography of biological specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solem, J.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author reviews the reasons for x-ray imaging of biological specimens and the techniques presently being used for x-ray microscopy. The author points out the advantages of x-ray holography and the difficulties of obtaining the requisite coherence with conventional sources. The author discusses the problems of radiation damage and the remarkable fact that short pulse x-ray sources circumvent these problems and obtain high-resolution images of specimens in the living state. Finally, the author reviews some of the efforts underway to develop high-intensity coherent x-ray sources for the laboratory. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Distorted spin dependent spectral function of {sup 3}He and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaptari, Leonya P. [University of Perugia (Italy); INFN-Perugia (Italy); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russia); Del Dotto, Alessio [University of Rome, Rome (Italy); INFN-Roma (Italy); Pace, Emanuele [University of Rome (Italy); INFN-Tor Vergata (Italy); Salme, Giovanni [INFN-Roma (Italy); Scopetta, Sergio [University of Perugia (Italy); INFN-Perugia (Italy)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spin dependent spectral function, relevant to describe polarized electron scattering off polarized {sup 3}He, is studied, within the Plane Wave Impulse Approximation and taking into account final state interaction effects (FSI). In particular, the case of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SiDIS) is considered, evaluating the FSI of the hadronizing quark with the nuclear remnants. It is shown that particular kinematical regions can be selected to minimize the latter effects, so that parton distributions in the neutron can be accessed. On the other side, in the regions where FSI dominates, the considered reactions can elucidate the mechanism of hadronization of quarks during the propagation in the nuclear medium. It is shown that the obtained spin dependent spectral function can be directly applied to investigate the SiDIS reaction e-vector + {sup 3}He-vector to h+X, where the hadron h originates from the current fragmentation. Experiments of this type are being performed at JLab to extract neutron transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. As a case study, a different SiDIS process, with detection of slow (A-1) systems in the final state, is considered in more details, in order to establish when nuclear structure effects and FSI can be distinguished from elementary reactions on quasi-free nucleons. It is argued that, by a proper choice of kinematics, the origin of nuclear effects in polarized DIS phenomena and the details of the interaction between the hadronizing quark and the nuclear medium can be investigated at a level which is not reachable in inclusive deep inelastic scattering.

  1. Soft X-ray techniques to study mesoscale magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.

  2. Inelastic scattering in a monolayer graphene sheet: A weak-localization study Dong-Keun Ki, Dongchan Jeong, Jae-Hyun Choi, and Hu-Jong Lee*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hu-Jong

    ,7 II. SAMPLE PREPARATION AND MEASUREMENTS A monolayer graphene sheet used in this study was meInelastic scattering in a monolayer graphene sheet: A weak-localization study Dong-Keun Ki in a graphene sheet, a single layer of graphite, exhibit distinct characteristics from those in other two

  3. Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Y X; Wang, Y; Allada, K; Aniol, K; Annand, J R; Averett, T; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bradshaw, P C; Bosted, P; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Cates, G D; Chen, C; Chen, J -P; Chen, W; Chirapatpimol, K; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Cornejo, J C; Cusanno, F; Dalton, M M; Deconinck, W; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deng, X; Deur, A; Ding, H; Dolph, P A; Dutta, C; Dutta, D; El Fassi, L; Frullani, S; Gao, H; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Golge, S; Guo, L; Hamilton, D; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Huang, J; Huang, M; Ibrahim, H F; Iodice, M; Jiang, X; Jin, G; Jones, M K; Katich, J; Kelleher, A; Kim, W; Kolarkar, A; Korsch, W; LeRose, J J; Li, X; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Long, E; Lu, H -J; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; McNulty, D; Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Munoz Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Narayan, A; Nelyubin, V; Norum, B; Oh, Y; Osipenko, M; Parno, D; Peng, J -C; Phillips, S K; Posik, M; Puckett, A J; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Rakhman, A; Ransome, R; Riordan, S; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shahinyan, A; Shabestari, M H; Sirca, S; Stepanyan, S; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Tang, L -G; Tobias, A; Urciuoli, G M; Vilardi, I; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yuan, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L; Zhu, X; Zong, X

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1

  4. Measurement of pretzelosity asymmetry of charged pion production in Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering on a polarized 3He target

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y; Qian, X; Allada, K; Dutta, C; Huang, J; Katich, J; Wang, Y; Aniol, K; Annand, J R.; Averett, T; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bradshaw, P C.; Bosted, P; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Cates, G D.; Chen, C; Chen, J -P; Chen, W; Chirapatpimol, K; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Cornejo, J C.; Cusanno, F; Dalton, M M.; Deconinck, W; de Jager, C W.; De Leo, R; Deng, X; Deur, A; Ding, H; Dolph, P A.; Dutta, D; El Fassi, L; Frullani, S; Gao, H; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Golge, S; Guo, L; Hamilton, D; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W.; Holmstrom, T; Huang, M; Ibrahim, H F.; Iodice, M; Jiang, X; Jin, G; Jones, M K.; Kelleher, A; Kim, W; Kolarkar, A; Korsch, W; LeRose, J J.; Li, X; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Long, E; Lu, H -J.; Margaziotis, D J.; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; McNulty, D; Meziani, Z -E.; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Mu??oz Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Narayan, A; Nelyubin, V; Norum, B; Oh, Y; Osipenko, M; Parno, D; Peng, J C.; Phillips, S K.; Posik, M; Puckett, A J.; Qiang, Y; Rakhman, A; Ransome, R D.; Riordan, S; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shahinyan, A; Shabestari, M H.; ??irca, S; Stepanyan, S; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Tang, L -G.; Tobias, W A.; Urciuoli, G M.; Vilardi, I; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yuan, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y -W.; Zhao, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L; Zhu, X; Zong, X

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of 0.16

  5. Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y X; Wang, Y; Allada, K; Aniol, K; Annand, J R; Averett, T; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bradshaw, P C; Bosted, P; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Cates, G D; Chen, C; Chen, J -P; Chen, W; Chirapatpimol, K; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Cornejo, J C; Cusanno, F; Dalton, M M; Deconinck, W; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deng, X; Deur, A; Ding, H; Dolph, P A; Dutta, C; Dutta, D; El Fassi, L; Frullani, S; Gao, H; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Golge, S; Guo, L; Hamilton, D; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Huang, J; Huang, M; Ibrahim, H F; Iodice, M; Jiang, X; Jin, G; Jones, M K; Katich, J; Kelleher, A; Kim, W; Kolarkar, A; Korsch, W; LeRose, J J; Li, X; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Long, E; Lu, H -J; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; McNulty, D; Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Munoz Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Narayan, A; Nelyubin, V; Norum, B; Oh, Y; Osipenko, M; Parno, D; Peng, J -C; Phillips, S K; Posik, M; Puckett, A J; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Rakhman, A; Ransome, R; Riordan, S; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shahinyan, A; Shabestari, M H; Sirca, S; Stepanyan, S; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Tang, L -G; Tobias, A; Urciuoli, G M; Vilardi, I; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yuan, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L; Zhu, X; Zong, X

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1

  6. Apparatus for generating x-ray holograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, C.K.; Boyer, K.; Solem, J.C.; Haddad, W.S.

    1990-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for x-ray microholography of living biological materials. A Fourier transform holographic configuration is described as being most suitable for the 3-dimensional recording of the physical characteristics of biological specimens. The use of a spherical scatterer as a reference and a charge-coupled device two-dimensional detector array placed in the forward direction relative to the incident x-radiation for viewing electromagnetic radiation simultaneously scattered from both the specimen and the reference scatterer permits the ready reconstruction of the details of the specimen from the fringe pattern detected by the charge-coupled device. For example, by using a nickel reference scatter at 4.5 nm, sufficient reference illumination is provided over a wide enough angle to allow similar resolution in both transverse and longitudinal directions. Both laser and synchrotron radiation sources are feasible for generating microholographs. Operation in the water window (2.4 to 4.5 nm) should provide maximum contrast for features of the specimen and spatial resolution on the order of the wavelength of x-radiation should be possible in all three dimensions, which is sufficient for the visualization of many biological features. It is anticipated that the present apparatus will find utility in other areas as well where microscopic physical details of a specimen are important. A computational procedure which enables the holographic data collected by the detector to be used to correct for misalignments introduced by inexact knowledge of the relative positions of the spherical reference scatterer and the sample under investigation has been developed. If the correction is performed prior to reconstruction, full compensation can be achieved and a faithfully reconstructed image produced. 7 figs.

  7. Apparatus for generating x-ray holograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Charles K. (Chicago, IL); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM); Solem, Johndale C. (Los Alamos, NM); Haddad, Waleed S. (Chicago, IL)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for x-ray microholography of living biological materials. A Fourier transform holographic configuration is described as being most suitable for the 3-dimensional recording of the physical characteristics of biological specimens. The use of a spherical scatterer as a reference and a charge-coupled device two-dimensional detector array placed in the forward direction relative to the incident x-radiation for viewing electromagnetic radiation simultaneously scattered from both the specimen and the reference scatterer permits the ready reconstruction of the details of the specimen from the fringe pattern detected by the charge-coupled device. For example, by using a nickel reference scatter at 4.5 nm, sufficient reference illumination is provided over a wide enough angle to allow similar resolution in both transverse and longitudinal directions. Both laser and synchrotron radiation sources are feasible for generating microholographs. Operation in the water window (2.4 to 4.5 nm) should provide maximum contrast for features of the specimen and spatial resolution on the order of the wavelength of x-radiation should be possible in all three dimensions, which is sufficient for the visualization of many biological features. It is anticipated that the present apparatus will find utility in other areas as well where microscopic physical details of a specimen are important. A computational procedure which enables the holographic data collected by the detector to be used to correct for misalignments introduced by inexact knowledge of the relative positions of the spherical reference scatterer and the sample under investigation has been developed. If the correction is performed prior to reconstruction, full compensation can be achieved and a faithfully reconstructed image produced.

  8. Techniques for synchronization of X-Ray pulses to the pump laser in an ultrafast X-Ray facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corlett, J.N.; Doolittle, L.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wilcox, R.; Zholents, A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    synchronization of ultrafast x-ray pulses produced in theAccurate timing of ultrafast x-ray probe pulses emitted fromOF X-RAY PULSES TO THE PUMP LASER IN AN ULTRAFAST X-RAY

  9. Controlling X-rays With Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

  10. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  11. Q-dependence of the inelastic neutron scattering cross section for molecular spin clusters with high molecular symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Waldmann

    2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    For powder samples of polynuclear metal complexes the dependence of the inelastic neutron scattering intensity on the momentum transfer Q is known to be described by a combination of so called interference terms. They reflect the interplay between the geometrical structure of the compound and the spatial properties of the wave functions involved in the transition. In this work, it is shown that the Q-dependence is strongly interrelated with the molecular symmetry of molecular nanomagnets, and, if the molecular symmetry is high enough, is actually completely determined by it. A general formalism connecting spatial symmetry and interference terms is developed. The arguments are detailed for cyclic spin clusters, as experimentally realized by e.g. the octanuclear molecular wheel Cr8, and the star like tetranuclear cluster Fe4.

  12. Peripheral elastic and inelastic scattering of 17,18O on light targets at 12 MeV/nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Al-Abdullah; F. Carstoiu; C. A. Gagliardi; G. Tabacaru; L. Trache; R. E. Tribble

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of interaction of neutron rich oxygen isotopes $^{17,18}$O with light targets has been undertaken in order to determine the optical potentials needed for the transfer reaction $^{13}$C($^{17}$O,$^{18}$O)$^{12}$C. Optical potentials in both incoming and outgoing channels have been determined in a single experiment. This transfer reaction was used to infer the direct capture rate to the $^{17}$F(p,$\\gamma$)$^{18}$Ne which is essential to estimate the production of $^{18}$F at stellar energies in ONe novae. The success of the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) as indirect method for astrophysics is guaranteed if the reaction mechanism is peripheral and the DWBA cross section calculations are warranted and stable against OMP used. We demonstrate the stability of the ANC method and OMP results using good quality elastic and inelastic scattering data with stable beams before extending the procedures to rare ion beams. The peripherality of our reaction is inferred from a semiclassical decomposition of the total scattering amplitude into barrier and internal barrier components. Comparison between elastic scattering of $^{17}$O, $^{18}$O and $^{16}$O projectiles is made.

  13. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spielman, Rick B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  14. High speed x-ray beam chopper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPherson, Armon (Oswego, IL); Mills, Dennis M. (Naperville, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast, economical, and compact x-ray beam chopper with a small mass and a small moment of inertia whose rotation can be synchronized and phase locked to an electronic signal from an x-ray source and be monitored by a light beam is disclosed. X-ray bursts shorter than 2.5 microseconds have been produced with a jitter time of less than 3 ns.

  15. Probing bismuth ferrite nanoparticles by hard x-ray photoemission: Anomalous occurrence of metallic bismuth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Smita; Rajendra, Ranguwar; Ballav, Nirmalya; Kulkarni, Sulabha, E-mail: s.kulkarni@iiserpune.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pune 411008 (India); Sarkar, Indranil [DESY Photon Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Shirolkar, Mandar M. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Jeng, U-Ser; Yeh, Yi-Qi [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101, Hsin-Ann Road, Science Park, Hsinchu 3007-6, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (?75?nm and ?155?nm) synthesized by a chemical method, using soft X-ray (1253.6?eV) and hard X-ray (3500, 5500, and 7500?eV) photoelectron spectroscopy. This provided an evidence for the variation of chemical state of bismuth in crystalline, phase pure nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis using Mg K? (1253.6?eV) source showed that iron and bismuth were present in both Fe{sup 3+} and Bi{sup 3+} valence states as expected for bismuth ferrite. However, hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the bismuth ferrite nanoparticles using variable photon energies unexpectedly showed the presence of Bi{sup 0} valence state below the surface region, indicating that bismuth ferrite nanoparticles are chemically inhomogeneous in the radial direction. Consistently, small-angle X-ray scattering reveals a core-shell structure for these radial inhomogeneous nanoparticles.

  16. X-ray populations in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fabbiano

    2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's sensistive, high resolution Chandra X-ray observations allow the study of many populations of X-ray sources. The traditional astronomical tools of photometric diagrams and luminosity functions are now applied to these populations, and provide the means for classifying the X-ray sources and probing their evolution. While overall stellar mass drives the amount of X-ray binaries in old stellar population, the amount of sources in star-forming galaxies is related to the star formation rate. Shart-lived, luminous, high mass binaries (HNXBs) dominate these young populations.

  17. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suckewer, Szymon (Princeton, NJ); DiCicco, Darrell S. (Plainsboro, NJ); Hirschberg, Joseph G. (Coral Gables, FL); Meixler, Lewis D. (East Windsor, NJ); Sathre, Robert (Princeton, NJ); Skinner, Charles H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  18. X-ray spectroscopy of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krauss, Miriam Ilana

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present work spanning a variety of topics relating to neutron star lowmass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and utilize spectral information from X-ray observations to further our understanding of these sources. ...

  19. A combined analysis of SLAC experiments on deep inelastic e-p and e-d scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitlow, L.W. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States)); Bodek, A.; deBarbaro, P.; Dasu, S.; Harada, H.; Krasny, M.W.; Lang, K.; Riordan, E.M. (Rochester Univ., NY (United States)); Rock, S.; Arnold, R.; Benton, D.; Bosted, P.; Button-Shafer, J.; deChambrier, G.; Clogher, L.; Lung, A.; Szalata, Z.M. (American Univ., Washington, DC (United States)); Alster, J. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)); Debebe, B.; Hicks, R. (Massach

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report recent work on the extraction of R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T} and the structure function F{sub 2} over a large kinematic range, which is based on a reanalysis of deep inelastic {var epsilon} {minus} p and {var epsilon} {minus} d scattering cross sections measured at SLAC between 1970 and 1985. All these data were corrected for radiative effects using improved versions of external and internal radiative correction procedures. The data from seven individual experiments were normalized to those from the recent high-precision SLAC experiment E140. We find that R{sub p} = R{sub d}, as expected in QCD. The value of R is higher than predicted by QCD even when target-mass effects are included. This difference indicates that additional dynamical higher-twist effects may be present. The structure functions F{sub 2}p and F{sub 2}d were also extracted from the full data sets of normalized cross sections using an empirical fit to R. These structure functions were then compared with data from the CERN muon scattering experiments BCDMS and EMC. We find that our data are consistent with the EMC data, if the latter are multiplied by a normalization factor of 1.07. No single, uniform normalization factor can be applied to the BCDMS data that will bring them into agreement with the SLAC data in the region of overlap.

  20. A combined analysis of SLAC experiments on deep inelastic e-p and e-d scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitlow, L.W. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Bodek, A.; deBarbaro, P.; Dasu, S.; Harada, H.; Krasny, M.W.; Lang, K.; Riordan, E.M. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States); Rock, S.; Arnold, R.; Benton, D.; Bosted, P.; Button-Shafer, J.; deChambrier, G.; Clogher, L.; Lung, A.; Szalata, Z.M. [American Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Alster, J. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel); Debebe, B.; Hicks, R. [Massachusetts Univ., Amherst, MA (United States); Dietrich, F.; Van Bibber, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Filippone, B.; Jourdan, J.; Milner, R.; McKeown, R.; Potterveld, D.; Walker, R.C. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Gearhart, R. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Para, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report recent work on the extraction of R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T} and the structure function F{sub 2} over a large kinematic range, which is based on a reanalysis of deep inelastic {var_epsilon} {minus} p and {var_epsilon} {minus} d scattering cross sections measured at SLAC between 1970 and 1985. All these data were corrected for radiative effects using improved versions of external and internal radiative correction procedures. The data from seven individual experiments were normalized to those from the recent high-precision SLAC experiment E140. We find that R{sub p} = R{sub d}, as expected in QCD. The value of R is higher than predicted by QCD even when target-mass effects are included. This difference indicates that additional dynamical higher-twist effects may be present. The structure functions F{sub 2}p and F{sub 2}d were also extracted from the full data sets of normalized cross sections using an empirical fit to R. These structure functions were then compared with data from the CERN muon scattering experiments BCDMS and EMC. We find that our data are consistent with the EMC data, if the latter are multiplied by a normalization factor of 1.07. No single, uniform normalization factor can be applied to the BCDMS data that will bring them into agreement with the SLAC data in the region of overlap.

  1. Anharmonic lattice dynamics of Ag2O studied by inelastic neutron scattering and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan, Tian [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Li, Chen [ORNL] [ORNL; Niedziela, Jennifer L [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, Hillary [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL] [ORNL; Rossman, George [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Fultz, B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on silver oxide (Ag2O) with the cuprite structure were performed at temperatures from 40 to 400 K, and Fourier transform far-infrared spectra were measured from 100 to 300 K. The measured phonon densities of states and the infrared spectra showed unusually large energy shifts with temperature, and large linewidth broadenings. First principles molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were performed at various temperatures, successfully accounting for the negative thermal expansion (NTE) and local dynamics. Using the Fourier-transformed velocity autocorrelation method, the MD calculations reproduced the large anharmonic effects of Ag2O, and were in excellent agreement with the neutron scattering data. The quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) was less successful in accounting for much of the phonon behavior. The QHA could account for some of the NTE below 250 K, although not at higher temperatures. Strong anharmonic effects were found for both phonons and for the NTE. The lifetime broadenings of Ag2O were explained by anharmonic perturbation theory, which showed rich interactions between the Ag-dominated modes and the O-dominated modes in both up- and down-conversion processes.

  2. The Argonne National Laboratory 6-7 GeV Synchrotron X-ray Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of investigations to be accommodated by these 10 beams are visualized as follows: 1. Topography and radiographytomography 2. Inelastic scattering with ultra-high energy...

  3. STUDY MAGNETIC EXCITATIONS IN DOPED TRANSITION METAL OXIDES USING INELASTIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Pengcheng

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity continues to be a “hot” topic in modern condensed matter physics. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in iron-based materials in 2008 provided an unique opportunity to compare and contrast these materials with traditional high-Tc copper oxide superconductors. Neutron scattering plays an important role in determining the dynamical spin properties in these materials. This proposal is a continuation of previous DOE supported proposal. This report summarizes the final progress we have made over from May 2005 till Aug. 2013. Overall, we continue to carry out extensive neutron scattering experiments on Fe-based materials, focusing on understanding their magnetic properties. In addition, we have established a materials laboratory at UT that has allowed us to grow these superconductors. Because neutron scattering typically demands a large amount of samples, by growing these materials in our own laboratory, we can now pursuit neutron scattering experiments over the entire electronic phase diagram, focusing on regions of interests. The material synthesis laboratory at UT was established entirely with the support of DOE funding. This not only allowed us to carry out neutron scattering experiments, but also permit us to provide samples to other US/International collaborators for studying these materials.

  4. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Erin Miller

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  5. X-ray source populations in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fabbiano

    2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's sensitive, high-resolution X-ray observations allow the study of populations of X-ray sources, in the luminosity range of Galactic X-ray binaries, in galaxies as distant as 20-30 Mpc. The traditional astronomical tools of photometric diagrams and luminosity functions are now applied to these populations, providing a direct probe of the evolved binary component of different stellar populations. The study of the X-ray populations of E and S0 galaxies has revamped the debate on the formation and evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and on the role of globular clusters in these processes. While overall stellar mass drives the amount of X-ray binaries in old stellar populations, the amount of sources in star forming galaxies is related to the star formation rate. Short-lived, luminous, high-mass binaries (HMXBs) dominate these young populations. The most luminous sources in these systems are the debated ULXs, which have been suggested to be ~100-1000 Msol black holes, but could alternatively include a number of binaries with stellar mass black holes. Very soft sources have also been discovered in many galaxies and their nature is currently being debated. Observations of the deep X-ray sky, and comparison with deep optical surveys, are providing the first evidence of the X-ray evolution of galaxies.

  6. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; Turner, Joshua; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens.

  7. Nuclear surface studies with antiprotonic atom X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wycech, S; Jastrzebski, J J; Klos, B; Trzcinska, A; Von Egidy, T

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent and older level shifts and widths in pbar atoms are analyzed. The results are fitted by an antiproton-nucleus optical potential with two basic complex strength parameters. These parameters are related to average S and P wave scattering parameters in the subthreshold energy region. A fair consistency of the X-ray data for all Z values, stopping pbar data and the Nbar-N scattering data has been achieved. The determination of neutron density profiles at the nuclear surface is undertaken, and the determination of the neutron R_{rms} radii is attempted. Uncertainties due to the input data and the procedure are discussed.

  8. Neutron Scattering Tutorials | Neutron Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron Scattering Tutorials SHARE Neutron Scattering Tutorials The following lectures were presented at the 2011 and 2010 National School on Neutron & X-Ray Scattering. This...

  9. Inelastic scattering and current saturation in graphene Vasili Perebeinos* and Phaedon Avouris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perebeinos, Vasili

    . The discrepancy is due to the self-heating effect which lowers substantially the value of the saturated velocity about the role of self-heating and elastic scattering on the current satu- ration. High bias find that the self-heating of graphene on SiO2 limits significantly the value of the saturated current

  10. Proceedings of the 1984 workshop on high-energy excitations in condensed matter. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silver, R.N. (comp.)

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume covers neutron scattering inelastic instrumentation, x-ray scattering inelastic instrumentation, and magnetic excitations. (GHT)

  11. Fiber fed x-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hailey, C.J.; Ziock, K.P.

    1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus is disclosed for detecting the position, energy, and intensity of x-ray/gamma ray radiation comprising scintillation means disposed in the path of such radiation and capable of generating photons in response to such radiation; first photodetection means optically bonded to the scintillation means and capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the intensity, and energy of the radiation detected by the scintillation means; second photodetection means capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the position of the radiation in the radiation pattern; and means for optically coupling the scintillation means to the second photodetection means. The photodetection means are electrically connected to control and storage means which may also be used to screen out noise by rejecting a signal from one photodetection means not synchronized to a signal from the other photodetection means; and also to screen out signals from scattered radiation. 6 figs.

  12. Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry in Deep-Inelastic Scattering from the Reaction $^{3}\\mathrm{He}^{\\uparrow}(e,e')X$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Katich; X. Qian; Y. X. Zhao; K. Allada; K. Aniol; J. R. M. Annand; T. Averett; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; P. C. Bradshaw; P. Bosted; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; C. Chen; J. -P. Chen; W. Chen; K. Chirapatpimol; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; J. C. Cornejo; F. Cusanno; M. M. Dalton; W. Deconinck; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; X. Deng; A. Deur; H. Ding; P. A. M. Dolph; C. Dutta; D. Dutta; L. El Fassi; S. Frullani; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; O. Glamazdin; S. Golge; L. Guo; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; J. Huang; M. Huang; H. F. Ibrahim; M. Iodice; X. Jiang; G. Jin; M. K. Jones; A. Kelleher; W. Kim; A. Kolarkar; W. Korsch; J. J. LeRose; X. Li; Y. Li; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; E. Long; H. -J. Lu; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; D. McNulty; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; C. Mu?oz Camacho; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; B. Norum; Y. Oh; M. Osipenko; D. Parno; J. C. Peng; S. K. Phillips; M. Posik; A. J. R. Puckett; Y. Qiang; A. Rakhman; R. D. Ransome; S. Riordan; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; E. Schulte; A. Shahinyan; M. H. Shabestari; S. Širca; S. Stepanyan; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; L. -G. Tang; A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; I. Vilardi; K. Wang; Y. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; Y. Ye; Z. Ye; L. Yuan; X. Zhan; Y. Zhang; Y. -W. Zhang; B. Zhao; X. Zheng; L. Zhu; X. Zhu; X. Zong

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first measurement of the target-normal single-spin asymmetry in deep-inelastic scattering from the inclusive reaction $^3$He$^{\\uparrow}\\left(e,e' \\right)X$ on a polarized $^3$He gas target. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero in the Born approximation but can be non-zero if two-photon-exchange contributions are included. The experiment, conducted at Jefferson Lab using a 5.89 GeV electron beam, covers a range of $1.7 2$ GeV, which is non-zero at the $2.89\\sigma$ level. Our measured asymmetry agrees both in sign and magnitude with a two-photon-exchange model prediction that uses input from the Sivers transverse momentum distribution obtained from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  13. Beam-Target Double-Spin Asymmetry ALT in Charged Pion Production from Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized 3He Target at 1.4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jin

    We report the first measurement of the double-spin asymmetry A[subscript LT] for charged pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic electron scattering on a transversely polarized [superscript 3]He target. The ...

  14. Determination of Differential Elastic and Inelastic and Double-differential Neutron Scattering Cross Sections of Elemental Titanium at Energies between 7.93 MeV and 14.72 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Dankwart; Xichao, R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of Differential Elastic and Inelastic and Double-differential Neutron Scattering Cross Sections of Elemental Titanium at Energies between 7.93 MeV and 14.72 MeV

  15. Subleading-twist effects in single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering on a longitudinally polarized hydrogen target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; :

    2005-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-spin asymmetries in the semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering from transversely and longitudinally polarized proton targets are combined to evaluate the subleading-twist contribution to the longitudinal case. This contribution is significantly positive for (\\pi^+) mesons and dominates the asymmetries on a longitudinally polarized target previously measured by \\hermes. The subleading-twist contribution for (\\pi^-) mesons is found to be small.

  16. Deep Inelastic Scattering of Polarized Electrons by Polarized $^3$He and the Study of the Neutron Spin Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The E142 Collaboration; P. L. Anthony et al

    1996-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron longitudinal and transverse asymmetries $A^n_1$ and $A^n_2$ have been extracted from deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons by a polarized $^3$He target at incident energies of 19.42, 22.66 and 25.51 GeV. The measurement allows for the determination of the neutron spin structure functions $g^n_1 (x,Q^2)$ and $g^n_2(x,Q^2)$ over the range $0.03 neutron spin structure function $g^n_1 (x,Q^2)$ is small and negative within the range of our measurement, yielding an integral ${\\int_{0.03}^{0.6} g_1^n(x) dx}= -0.028 \\pm 0.006 (stat) \\pm 0.006 (syst) $. Assuming Regge behavior at low $x$, we extract $\\Gamma_1^n=\\int^1_0 g^n_1(x)dx = -0.031 \\pm 0.006 (stat)\\pm 0.009 (syst) $. Combined with previous proton integral results from SLAC experiment E143, we find $\\Gamma_1^p - \\Gamma_1^n = 0.160 \\pm 0.015$ in agreement with the Bjorken sum rule prediction $\\Gamma^p_1 - \\Gamma ^n_1 = 0.176 \\pm 0.008$ at a $Q^2$ value of 3 (GeV$/c)^2$ evaluated using $\\alpha_s = 0.32\\pm 0.05$.

  17. Neutron inelastic scattering and reactions in natural Pb as a background in neutrinoless double-beta-decay experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. E. Guiseppe; M. Devlin; S. R. Elliott; N. Fotiades; A. Hime; D. -M. Mei; R. O. Nelson; D. V. Perepelitsa

    2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Inelastic neutron scattering and reactions on Pb isotopes can result in gamma rays near the signature endpoint energy in a number of double-beta decay isotopes. In particular, there are gamma-ray transitions in Pb-206,207,208 that might produce energy deposits at the 76-Ge Q value in Ge detectors used for double-beta decay searches. The levels that produce these gamma rays can be excited by (n,n'gamma) or (n,xngamma) reactions, but the cross sections are small and previously unmeasured. This work uses the pulsed neutron beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center to directly measure reactions of interest to double-beta decay experiments. The cross section on natural Pb to produce the 2041-keV gamma ray from Pb-206 is measured to be 3.6 +/- 0.7 (stat.) +/- 0.3 (syst.) mb at ~9.6 MeV. The cross section on natural Pb to produce the 3062-keV gamma ray from Pb-207 and Pb-208 is measured to be 3.9 +/- 0.8 (stat.) +/- 0.4 (syst.) mb at the same energy. We report cross sections or place upper limits on the cross sections for exciting some other levels in Pb that have transition energies corresponding to Q value in other double-beta decay isotopes.

  18. X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-Ray ImagingX-Ray

  19. Neutron inelastic scattering in natural Pb as a background in neutrinoless

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3,Neutron Scattering3

  20. Measurement of Parton Distributions of Strange Quarks in the Nucleon from Charged-Kaon Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering on the Deuteron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Belostotskii, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Bttcher, H; Bonomo, C; Borisov, A; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Funel, A; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Karibian, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Gregor, I M; Guler, H; Hadjidakis, C; Hasch, D; Hasegawa, T; Hesselink, W H A; Hill, G; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Hristova, I; Iarygin, G; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Kobayashi, T; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lamb, R; Lapikas, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lopez Ruiz, A; Lorenzon, W; Lu, S; Lu, X R; Ma, B Q; Mahon, D; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Manfr, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Mexner, V; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W D; Osborne, A; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Pickert, N; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rock, S E; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seitz, B; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Streit, J; Tait, P; Taroian, S; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Van Haarlem, Y; van Hulse, C; Varanda, M; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Vogel, C; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The momentum and helicity density distributions of the strange quark sea in the nucleon are obtained in leading order from charged-kaon production in deep-inelastic scattering on the deuteron. The distributions are extracted from spin-averaged K+/- multiplicities, and from K+/- and inclusive double-spin asymmetries for scattering of polarized positrons by a polarized deuterium target. The shape of the momentum distribution is softer than that of the average of the ubar and dbar quarks. In the region of measurement, the helicity distribution is zero within experimental uncertainties.

  1. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Materials. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell...

  2. Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization for a Berea Sandstone: Resolution Effect. Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization for...

  3. Manipulating X-rays with Tiny Mirrors | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for controlling X-rays. MEMS, or microelectromechanical systems, allow shrinking the optics to the microscale creating ultrafast devices for reflecting X-rays at precise times...

  4. Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    temperature ambient (plastic windows) 5 Radiography - Monochromatic x-rays - Absorption of x-rays by the fuel - Ensemble averaged (flux limited) - Room temperature ambient...

  5. Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by ECN using several different techniques - Silicone molds (Valencia) - X-ray absorption tomography (CAT) - X-Ray phase contrast imaging (Argonne) - Microscopy (Sandia) ...

  6. X-ray induced optical reflectivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Durbin, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The change in optical reflectivity induced by intense x-ray pulses can now be used to study ultrafast many body responses in solids in the femtosecond time domain. X-ray absorption creates photoelectrons and core level holes subsequently filled by Auger or fluorescence processes, and these excitations ultimately add conduction and valence band carriers that perturb optical reflectivity.Optical absorption associated with band filling and band gap narrowing is shown to explain the basic features found in recent measurements on an insulator (silicon nitride, Si3N4), a semiconductor(gallium arsenide,GaAs), and a metal (gold,Au), obtained with ?100 fs x-ray pulses at 500-2000 eV and probed with 800 nm laser pulses. In particular GaAs exhibits an abrupt drop in reflectivity, persisting only for a time comparable to the x-ray excitation pulse duration, consistent with prompt band gap narrowing.

  7. Columbia University X-Ray Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University X-Ray Measurements of the Levitated Dipole Experiment J. L. Ellsworth, J. Kesner MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center D.T. Garnier, A.K. Hansen, M.E. Mauel Columbia University

  8. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field...

  9. X-ray source for mammography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  10. X-ray grid-detector apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boone, John M. (Folsom, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

  11. X-ray source for mammography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

  12. Principles of X-ray Navigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, John Eric; /SLAC

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray navigation is a new concept in satellite navigation in which orientation, position and time are measured by observing stellar emissions in x-ray wavelengths. X-ray navigation offers the opportunity for a single instrument to be used to measure these parameters autonomously. Furthermore, this concept is not limited to missions in close proximity to the earth. X-ray navigation can be used on a variety of missions from satellites in low earth orbit to spacecraft on interplanetary missions. In 1997 the Unconventional Stellar Aspect Experiment (USA) will be launched as part of the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS). USA will provide the first platform for real-time experimentation in the field of x-ray navigation and also serves as an excellent case study for the design and manufacturing of space qualified systems in small, autonomous groups. Current techniques for determining the orientation of a satellite rely on observations of the earth, sun and stars in infrared, visible or ultraviolet wavelengths. It is possible to use x-ray imaging devices to provide arcsecond level measurement of attitude based on star patterns in the x-ray sky. This technique is explored with a simple simulation. Collimated x-ray detectors can be used on spinning satellites to provide a cheap and reliable measure of orientation. This is demonstrated using observations of the Crab Pulsar taken by the high Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-1) in 1977. A single instrument concept is shown to be effective, but dependent on an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity and thus susceptible to errors in that estimate. A star scanner based on a differential measurement from two x-ray detectors eliminates the need for an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity. A first order model and a second order model of the two star scanner concepts are considered. Many of the stars that emit in the x-ray regime are also x-ray pulsars with frequency stability approaching a part in 10{sup 9}. By observing these pulsations, a satellite can keep accurate time autonomously. They have demonstrated the acquisition and tracking of the Crab nebula pulsar by simulating the operation of a phase-locked loop.

  13. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C.; et al

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore »resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  14. High-resolution ab initio Three-dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Rosen, R; He, H; Spence, J H; Weierstall, U; Beetz, T; Jacobsen, C; Shapiro, D

    2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging non-periodic isolated objects at resolutions only limited, in principle, by the largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate X-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the 3D diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a non-periodic object. We also construct 2D images of thick objects with infinite depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution using X-ray undulator radiation, and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  15. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C.; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

  16. Characteristic x-ray emission from undermines plasmas irradiated by ultra-intense lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, Christoph

    2012-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Between FY09 and FY11 we have conducted more than a dozen three-week experimental campaigns at high-power laser facilities around the world to investigate laser-channeling through x-ray and optical imaging and the conversion from laser-energy to xrays. We have performed simultaneous two-wavelength x-ray imaging (K-alpha and He-alpha) to distinguish the hot-plasma region (hot-spot) from the laser-produced electrons (K-alpha). In addition, we have initiated a new collaboration with SNL and have performed first shots on the 100 TW beamlet chamber to commission a fast x-ray streak camera to be used to investigate the temporal evolution of our K-alpha sources. We also collaborated on campaigns at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) and the LANL Trident laser to employ laser produced x-ray sources for Thomson scattering off dense matter.

  17. Ultrafast probing of the x-ray-induced lattice and electron dynamics in graphite at atomic-resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hau-Riege, S

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We used LCLS pulses to excite thin-film and bulk graphite with various different microstructures, and probed the ultrafast ion and electron dynamics through Bragg and x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS). We pioneered XRTS at LCLS, making this technique viable for other users. We demonstrated for the first time that the LCLS can be used to characterize warm-dense-matter through Bragg and x-ray Thomson scattering. The warm-dense-matter conditions were created using the LCLS beam. Representative examples of the results are shown in the Figure above. In our experiment, we utilized simultaneously both Bragg and two Thomson spectrometers. The Bragg measurements as a function of x-ray fluence and pulse length allows us to characterize the onset of atomic motion at 2 keV with the highest resolution to date. The Bragg detector was positioned in back-reflection, providing us access to scattering data with large scattering vectors (nearly 4{pi}/{lambda}). We found a clear difference between the atomic dynamics for 70 and 300 fs pulses, and we are currently in the process of comparing these results to our models. The outcome of this comparison will have important consequences for ultrafast diffractive imaging, for which it is still not clear if atomic resolution can truly be achieved. The backward x-ray Thomson scattering data suggests that the average graphite temperature and ionization was 10 eV and 1.0, respectively, which agrees with our models. In the forward scattering data, we observed an inelastic feature in the Thomson spectrum that our models currently do not reproduce, so there is food for thought. We are in the process of writing these results up. Depending on if we can combine the Bragg and Thomson data or not, we plan to publish them in a single paper (e.g. Nature or Science) or as two separate papers (e.g. two Phys. Rev. Lett.). We will present the first analysis of the results at the APS Plasma Meeting in November 2010. We had a fantastic experience performing our experiment at the LCLS, and we are grateful to the beamline scientists and all the support personnel for enabling this experiment. A major hurdle was the very short transition time of two days, which despite all our preparations did not give us sufficient time to test the full system before the start of the beam time. We further were not able to make optimal use of the beam time since we had to exchange samples in the middle of the 36-hours shift. An additional 12-hours break could have avoided this. Finally, our experiment would have benefitted from the best possible focus, but 5 shifts do not allow performing the experiment while fine-tuning the focusing optics.

  18. Ab initio curved-wave x-ray-absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mustre de Leon, J.; Rehr, J.J.; Zabinsky, S.I. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (USA)); Albers, R.C. (Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (USA))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most important elements of {ital ab} {ital initio} calculations of x-ray-absorption fine structure (XAFS) are studied. To obtain accurate results without {ital ad} {ital hoc} adjustable parameters, we find it essential to include (i) curved-wave effects, (ii) a complex, energy-dependent self-energy, (iii) an approximate molecular potential, and (iv) a fixed energy reference for the photoelectron wave number. Based on these findings, an automated code has been developed for {ital ab} {ital initio} calculations of single-scattering XAFS, in which curved-wave effects are treated exactly in terms of effective backscattering amplitudes, inelastic losses and self-energy shifts are incorporated with use of a Hedin-Lundqvist self-energy, an automated relativistic overlapping-atom muffin-tin potential is used, and the energy threshold is estimated from electron-gas theory. The efficiency of the code is made possible by analytic expressions for the Hedin-Lundqvist self-energy. This code replaces existing tables of XAFS phases and scattering amplitudes and yields reliable theoretical XAFS standards for arbitrary pairs of atoms throughout the Periodic Table ({ital Z}{le}94). These results are comparable to those from self-consistent calculations and are valid to within about 20 eV of the absorption edge. Comparisons with experiment are presented for Cu, Ge, Pt, Br{sub 2}, and GeCl{sub 4}. The calculated XAFS amplitudes are found to be accurate to within 15%; XAFS phases are accurate to within 0.2 rad; and nearest-neighbor distances are typically accurate to within 0.02 A.

  19. A theoretical analysis of reflection of X-rays from water at energies relevant for diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arsenovic, Dusan [Institute of Physics, Pregrevica 118, P.O. Box 57, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Davidovic, Dragomir M.; Vukanic, Jovan [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O Box 522, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2003-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The reflection of X-rays from a semi-infinite water target, for energies used in X-ray diagnostics, is treated by the analog Monte Carlo simulation. In the developed procedure it was possible to calculate separately contributions of photons scattered, before reflection, fixed number of times with target electrons. It turned out that multiple collision type of reflection dominates at all energies investigated, whenever the absorption is small. The same process was also treated analytically as the classical albedo problem for isotropic scattering without energy loss. Very good agreement of results of the two approaches is obtained.

  20. Polarized inelastic neutron scattering of the partially ordered Tb2Sn2O7 K. C. Rule,1 G. Ehlers,2 J. R. Stewart,3 A. L. Cornelius,4 P. P. Deen,3 Y. Qiu,5,6 C. R. Wiebe,7,8 J. A. Janik,7 H. D. Zhou,7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Polarized inelastic neutron scattering of the partially ordered Tb2Sn2O7 K. C. Rule,1 G. Ehlers,2 J 17 August 2007; published 21 December 2007 We present inelastic neutron scattering results neutron scattering, susceptibility, and specific heat techniques have shown that below 0.87 K Tb2Sn2O7

  1. Earth X-ray albedo for cosmic X-ray background radiation in the 1--1000 keV band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Churazov; S. Sazonov; R. Sunyaev; M. Revnivtsev

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present calculations of the reflection of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) by the Earth's atmosphere in the 1--1000 keV energy range. The calculations include Compton scattering and X-ray fluorescent emission and are based on a realistic chemical composition of the atmosphere. Such calculations are relevant for CXB studies using the Earth as an obscuring screen (as was recently done by INTEGRAL). The Earth's reflectivity is further compared with that of the Sun and the Moon -- the two other objects in the Solar system subtending a large solid angle on the sky, as needed for CXB studies.

  2. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  3. Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Rosser, R.

    1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

  4. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, Malcolm S. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobsen, Chris (Sound Beach, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

  5. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  6. Radiographic X-Ray Pulse Jitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitton, C. V., Good, D. E., Henderson, D. J., Hogge, K. W.

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources. Major components of the machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse-forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25-MV, 60-kA, 60-ns. Each source has the following x-ray parameters: 1-mm-diameter spot size, 4-rad at 1 m, 50-ns full width half max. The x-ray pulse is measured with PIN diode detectors. The sources were developed to produce high resolution images on single-shot, high-value experiments. For this application it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. X-ray pulse jitter is a key metric for analysis of reproducibility. We will give measurements of x-ray jitter for each machine. It is expected that x-ray pulse jitter is predominantly due to PFL switch jitter, and therefore a correlation of the two will be discussed.

  7. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tod E. Strohmayer

    2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290 Hz) has been claimed.

  8. X-RAY SPECTROMETRY X-Ray Spectrom. 2007; 36: 336342

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    , Chicago, IL 60637, USA 3 Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source and School of Applied and EngineeringX-RAY SPECTROMETRY X-Ray Spectrom. 2007; 36: 336­342 Published online in Wiley InterScience (www to establish a breakthrough in high-resolution, simultaneous area mapping of multiple trace elements

  9. In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries Johanna Information ABSTRACT: Rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great potential for high of these batteries for commercial use. The two primary obstacles are the solubility of long chain lithium

  10. Frontiers in X-Ray Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linda Young

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The year 2010 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the optical laser and the first anniversary of the world's first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. This exciting, new accelerator-based source of x-rays provides peak brilliances roughly a billion times greater than currently available from synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, and thus explores a qualitatively different parameter space. This talk will describe the first experiments at the LCLS aimed at understanding the nature of high intensity x-ray interactions, related applications in ultrafast imaging on the atomic scale and sketch nascent plans for the extension of both linac and storage-ring based photon sources.

  11. The X-ray/submillimetre link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Almaini

    2000-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely believed that most of the cosmic X-ray background (XRB) is produced by a vast, hitherto undetected population of obscured AGN. Deep X-ray surveys with Chandra and XMM will soon test this hypothesis. Similarly, recent sub-mm surveys with SCUBA have revealed an analogous population of exceptionally luminous, dust-enshrouded {\\em star-forming} galaxies at high redshift. There is now growing evidence for an intimate link between these obscured populations. There are currently large uncertainties in the models, but several independent arguments lead to the conclusion that a significant fraction of the SCUBA sources ($10-30% $) will contain quasars. Recent observational studies of SCUBA survey sources appear to confirm these predictions, although the relative roles of AGN and star-forming activity in heating the dust are unclear. Forthcoming surveys combining X-ray and sub-mm observations will provide a very powerful tool for disentangling these processes.

  12. X-ray atlas of rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas comprises instructive X-rays of the various inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases in all stages at the extremities and the spinal column. In addition, the complex pattern of the wide range of arthroses, also known as degenerative rheumatic disease is included. Besides the instructive pointers to X-ray diagnosis, the book is also a guide to differential diagnosis. Hence, this book is actually an X-ray atlas of joint diseases in general. Selected Contents: Introduction: What Does ''Rheumatism'' Actually Mean./Radiographic Methodology in Rheumatic Diseases of the Locomotor System/The Mosaic of Arthritis/Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis/Seronegative Spondylarthritis/Classic Collagen Diseases/Enthesiopathies/Gout-Pseudogout

  13. Combined microstructure x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilayers are man-made microstructures which vary in depth and are now of sufficient quality to be used as x-ray, soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet optics. Gratings are man-made in plane microstructures which have been used as optic elements for most of this century. Joining of these two optical microstructures to form combined microstructure optical microstructures to form combined microstructure optical elements has the potential for greatly enhancing both the throughput and the resolution attainable in these spectral ranges. The characteristics of these new optic elements will be presented and compared to experiment with emphasis on the unique properties of these combined microstructures. These results reported are general in nature and not limited to the soft x-ray or extreme ultraviolet spectral domains and also apply to neutrons. 19 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. X-ray reflectivity and surface roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocko, B.M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the advent of high brightness synchrotron radiation sources there has been a phenomenal growth in the use of x-rays as a probe of surface structure. The technique of x-ray reflectivity is particularly relevant to electrochemists since it is capable of probing the structure normal to an electrode surface in situ. In this paper the theoretical framework for x-ray reflectivity is reviewed and the results from previous non-electrochemistry measurements are summarized. These measurements are from the liquid/air interface (CCl/sub 4/), the metal crystal vacuum interface (Au(100)), and from the liquid/solid interface(liquid crystal/silicon). 34 refs., 5 figs.

  15. A Lack of Radio Emission from Neutron Star Low Mass X-ray Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael P. Muno; Tomaso Belloni; Vivek Dhawan; Edward H. Morgan; Ronald A. Remillard; Michael P. Rupen

    2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report strict upper limits to the radio luminosities of three neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries obtained with the Very Large Array while they were in hard X-ray states as observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer: 1E 1724-307, 4U 1812-12, and SLX 1735-269. We compare these upper limits to the radio luminosities of several black hole binaries in very similar hard states, and find that the neutron star systems are as faint as or fainter than all of the black hole candidates. The differences in luminosities can partly be attributed to the lower masses of the neutron star systems, which on theoretical and observational grounds are expected to decrease the radio luminosities as M^0.8. However, there still remains a factor of 30 scatter in the radio luminosities of black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries, particularly at X-ray luminosities of a few percent Eddington. We find no obvious differences in the X-ray timing and spectral properties that can be correlated with the radio luminosity. We discuss the implications of these results on current models for the relationship between accretion and jets.

  16. Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Yong [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Wilder, Julie [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Hutt, Julie A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Padilla, Mabel T. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Gott, Katherine M. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

  17. Energy resolved X-ray grating interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thuering, T.; Stampanoni, M. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland) [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Barber, W. C.; Iwanczyk, J. S. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)] [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States); Seo, Y.; Alhassen, F. [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)] [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

    2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Although compatible with polychromatic radiation, the sensitivity in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a grating interferometer is strongly dependent on the X-ray spectrum. We used an energy resolving detector to quantitatively investigate the dependency of the noise from the spectral bandwidth and to consequently optimize the system-by selecting the best energy band matching the experimental conditions-with respect to sensitivity maximization and, eventually, dose. Further, since theoretical calculations of the spectrum are usually limited due to non-ideal conditions, an energy resolving detector accurately quantifies the spectral changes induced by the interferometer including flux reduction and beam hardening.

  18. X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-Ray

  19. Elastic and inelastic scattering of 240-MeV (6)Li ions from (40)Ca and (48)Ca and tests of a systematic optical potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Krishichayan X.; Lui, Y. -W; Button, J.; Youngblood, David H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 044612 (2010) Elastic and inelastic scattering of 240-MeV 6Li ions from 40Ca and 48Ca and tests of a systematic optical potential Krishichayan, X. Chen,* Y.-W. Lui, J. Button, and D. H. Youngblood Cyclotron Institute, Texas... that 0556-2813/2010/81(4)/044612(10) 044612-1 ?2010 The American Physical Society KRISHICHAYAN, CHEN, LUI, BUTTON, AND YOUNGBLOOD PHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 044612 (2010) the real and imaginary optical potentials have the same radial shape [22]. However...

  20. Beam-Target Double Spin Asymmetry ALT in Charged Pion Production from Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized 3He Target at 1.422

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R; Munoz Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Narayan, A; Nelyubin, V; Norum, B; Oh, Y; Osipenko, M; Parno, D; Peng, J C; Phillips, S K; Posik, M; Puckett, A.J. R; Qiang, Y; Rakhman, A; Ransome, R D; Riordan, S; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shahinyan, A; Shabestari, M H; Sirca, S; Stepanyan, S; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Tang, L -G; Tobias, A; Urciuoli, G M; Vilardi, I; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yuan, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L; Zhu, X

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first measurement of the double-spin asymmetry ALT for charged pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target. The kinematics focused on the valence quark region, 0.16 2 2. The corresponding neutron ALT asymmetries were extracted from the measured 3He asymmetries and proton/3He cross section ratios using the effective polarization approximation. These new data probe the transverse momentum dependent parton distribution function gq and therefore provide access to quark spin-orbit correlations. Our results indicate a positive azimuthal asymmetry for ?- production on 3He and the neutron, while our ?+ asymmetries are consistent with zero.

  1. Bandpass x-ray diode and x-ray multiplier detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, C.L.

    1982-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An absorption-edge of an x-ray absorption filter and a quantum jump of a photocathode determine the bandpass characteristics of an x-ray diode detector. An anode, which collects the photoelectrons emitted by the photocathode, has enhanced amplification provided by photoelectron-multiplying means which include dynodes or a microchannel-plate electron-multiplier. Suppression of undesired high frequency response for a bandpass x-ray diode is provided by subtracting a signal representative of energies above the passband from a signal representative of the overall response of the bandpass diode.

  2. SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

  3. Femtosecond X-ray protein nanocrystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Kirian, Richard A.; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Schulz, Joachim; DePonte, Daniel P.; Weierstall, Uwe; Doak, R. Bruce; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Martin, Andrew V.; Schlichting, Ilme; Lomb, Lukas; Coppola, Nicola; Shoeman, Robert L.; Epp, Sascha W.; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Foucar, Lutz; Kimmel, Nils; Weidenspointner, Georg; Holl, Peter; Liang, Mengning; Barthelmess, Miriam; Caleman, Carl; Boutet, Sebastien; Bogan, Michael J.; Krzywinski, Jacek; Bostedt, Christoph; Bajt, Sasa; Gumprecht, Lars; Rudek, Benedikt; Erk, Benjamin; Schmidt, Carlo; Homke, Andre; Reich, Christian; Pietschner, Daniel; Struder, Lothar; Hauser, Gunter; Gorke, Hubert; Ullrich, Joachim; Herrmann, Sven; Schaller, Gerhard; Schopper, Florian; Soltau, Heike; Kuhnel, Kai-Uwe; Messerschmidt, Marc; Bozek, John D.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Frank, Matthias; Hampton, Christina Y.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Starodub, Dmitri; Williams, Garth J.; Hajdu, Janos; Timneanu, Nicusor; Seibert, M. Marvin; Andreasson, Jakob; Rocker, Andrea; Jonsson, Olof; Svenda, Martin; Stern, Stephan; Nass, Karol; Andritschke, Robert; Schroter, Claus-Dieter; Krasniqi, Faton; Bott, Mario; Schmidt, Kevin E.; Wang, Xiaoyu; Grotjohann, Ingo; Holton, James M.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Neutze, Richard; Marchesini, Stefano; Fromme, Raimund; Schorb, Sebastian; Rupp, Daniela; Adolph, Marcus; Gorkhover, Tais; Andersson, Inger; Hirsemann, Helmut; Potdevin, Guillaume; Graafsma, Heinz; Nilsson, Bjorn; Spence, John C. H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray crystallography provides the vast majority of macromolecular structures, but the success of the method relies on growing crystals of sufficient size. In conventional measurements, the necessary increase in X-ray dose to record data from crystals that are too small leads to extensive damage before a diffraction signal can be recorded. It is particularly challenging to obtain large, well-diffracting crystals of membrane proteins, for which fewer than 300 unique structures have been determined despite their importance in all living cells. Here we present a method for structure determination where single-crystal X-ray diffraction ‘snapshots’ are collected from a fully hydrated stream of nanocrystals using femtosecond pulses from a hard-X-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source. We prove this concept with nanocrystals of photosystem I, one of the largest membrane protein complexes. More than 3,000,000 diffraction patterns were collected in this study, and a three-dimensional data set was assembled from individual photosystem I nanocrystals (~200?nm to 2??m in size). We mitigate the problem of radiation damage in crystallography by using pulses briefer than the timescale of most damage processes. This offers a new approach to structure determination of macromolecules that do not yield crystals of sufficient size for studies using conventional radiation sources or are particularly sensitive to radiation damage.

  4. Catalog of supersoft X-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Greiner

    2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This catalog comprises an up-to-date (December 1999) list of luminous (>10^36 erg/s), binary supersoft X-ray sources. This electronic version (including the accompannying Web-pages) supersedes the printed version of Greiner (1996).

  5. Transformation of x-ray server from a set of WWW-accessed programs into WWW-based library for remote calls from x-ray data analysis software.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanov, S.; Biosciences Division

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Server [x-server.gmca.aps.anl.gov] is a public project providing a collection of online software tools for modeling data in the fields of surface X-ray scattering and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction from thin solid films and multilayers with account for the effects of crystal lattice strains, magnetization and interface roughness. This paper reports on recent developments that are addressing numerous requests to expand the Server access beyond plain web browser sessions and facilitate batch processing, remote fitting and integration of Server programs into users' data analysis software.

  6. Measurement of Feynman-x Spectra of Photons and Neutrons in the Very Forward Direction in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H1 Collaboration

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of normalised cross sections for the production of photons and neutrons at very small angles with respect to the proton beam direction in deep-inelastic $ep$ scattering at HERA are presented as a function of the Feynman variable $x_F$ and of the centre-of-mass energy of the virtual photon-proton system $W$. The data are taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of $131 \\mathrm{pb}^{-1}$. The measurement is restricted to photons and neutrons in the pseudorapidity range $\\eta>7.9$ and covers the range of negative four momentum transfer squared at the positron vertex $6scattering models and of models for hadronic interactions of high energy cosmic rays are compared to the measured cross sections.

  7. Soft X-Ray Spectroscopic Study of Dense Strontium-Doped Lanthanum Manganite Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piper, L.F.J.; Preston, Andrew R.H.; Cho, Sang Wan; DeMasi, Alexander; Chen, Bin; Laverock, J.; Smith, K. E.; Miara, Lincoln J.; Davis, Jacob N.; Basu, Soumendra; Pal, Uday B.; Gopalan, Srikanth; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Matsuura, A. Y.; Glans, P.A.; Guo, Jianzhong

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The modification of the Mn charge-state, chemical composition and electronic structure of La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 (LSMO) cathodes for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications remains an area of interest, due to the poorly understood enhanced catalytic activity (often referred to as the "burn-in" phenomenon) observed after many hours of operation. Using a combination of core-level X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray emission/absorption spectroscopy (XES/XAS), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and resonant photoemission spectroscopy (RPES), we have monitored the evolution of these properties in LSMO at various stages of fabrication and operation. By rapidly quenching and sealing in vacuum, we were able to directly compare the pristine (as-fabricated) LSMO with both "heat-treated" (800°C in air, and no bias) and "burnt-in" (800°C in air, -1 V bias) LSMO cathodes i.e. before and after the activation observed in our electrochemical impendence spectroscopy measurements. Comparison between the O K-edge XAS/XES and Mn L3,2-edge XAS of pristine and “burnt-in” LSMO cathodes revealed a severe change in the oxygen environment along with a reduced Mn2+ presence near the surface following activation. The change in the oxygen environment is attributed to SrxMnyOz formation, along with possible passive SrO and Mn3O4 species. We present evidence from our “heat-treated” samples that SrxMnyOz regions form at elevated temperatures in air before the application of a cathodic bias. Our core-level XPS, Mn L3,2-edge RIXS and Mn L3 RPES studies of “heat-treated” and pristine LSMO determined that SOFC environments result in La-deficiency (severest near the surface) and stronger Mn4+ contribution, leading to the increased insulating character of the cathode prior to activation. The passive Mn2+ species near the surface and increased hole-doping (>0.6) of the LSMO upon exposure to the operating environment are considered responsible for the initially poor performance of the SOFC. Meanwhile, the improved oxygen reduction following the application of a cathodic bias is considered to be due to enhanced bulk oxygen-ion diffusion resulting from the migration of Mn2+ ions towards the LSMO/electrolyte interface and the SrxMnyOz regions facilitating enhanced bulk oxygen reduction reaction kinetics.

  8. Rise time measurement for ultrafast X-ray pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Weber, Franz A. (Oakland, CA); Moon, Stephen J. (Tracy, CA)

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  9. Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  10. X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflections optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.H.

    1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices is discussed. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics.

  11. X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflection optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.H.

    1981-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes are described along with their role as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics.

  12. Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Lepton Scattering: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gehrmann, T; Roberts, R. G.; Whalley, M. R.; Durham HEP Database Group

    Gehrmann, Roberts, and Whalley in their 1999 paper, A Compilation of Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Scattering, published in volume 25 of Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics) note that these data will continue to be relevant to the next generation of hadron colliders. They present data on the unpolarized structure functions F2 and xF3, R D ._L=_T /, the virtual photon asymmetries A1 and A2 and the polarized structure functions g1 and g2, from deep inelastic lepton scattering off protons, deuterium and nuclei. Data are presented in both tabular and graphical format and include predictions based on the MRST98 and CTEQ4 parton distribution functionsö as well. The data gathered from the relevant collaborations at DOE's Fermilab, SLAC, and JLAB are available, and so are data from related collaborations based at CERN and DESY. The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also include in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  13. Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering off Few-Nucleon Systems: Tagging the EMC Effect and Hadronization Mechanisms with Detection of Slow Recoiling Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Ciofi degli Atti; L. P. Kaptari

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off the deuteron ($^2H \\equiv D$) and $^3He$ with detection of slow protons and deuterons, respectively, i.e. the processes $D(e,e'p)X$ and $^3He(e,e'D)X$, are calculated within the spectator mechanism, taking into account the final state interaction of the hadronizing quark with the detected protons and deuterons, respectively. It is shown that by a proper choice of the kinematics the origin of the EMC effect and the details of the interaction between the hadronizing quark and the nuclear medium can be investigated at a level which cannot be reached by inclusive deep inelastic scattering. A comparison of our calculations with recently available experimental data on the process $D(e,e'p)X$ shows a good agreement in the backward hemisphere of the emitted nucleons. Theoretical predictions at the energies thyat will be available at the upgraded Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facilty are presented, and the possibility to investigate the proposed semi-inclusive processes at electron-ion colliders is briefly discussed.

  14. Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry in Deep-Inelastic Scattering from the Reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katich, Joseph; Qian, Xin; Zhao, Yuxiang; Allada, Kalyan; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Bradshaw, Elliott; Bosted, Peter; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chen, Wei; Chirapatpimol, Khem; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Cornejo, Juan; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De Jager, Cornelis; De Leo, Raffaele; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Ding, Huaibo; Dolph, Peter; Dutta, Chiranjib; Dutta, Dipangkar; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Frullani, Salvatore; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gilad, Gilad; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Guo, Lei; Hamilton, David; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jijun; Huang, Min; Ibrahim Abdalla, Hassan; Iodice, Mauro; Jin, Ge; Jones, Mark; Kelleher, Aidan; Kim, Wooyoung; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; LeRose, John; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Y.; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lu, Hai-jiang; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Oh, Yoomin; Osipenko, Mikhail; Parno, Diana; Peng, Jen-chieh; Phillips, Sarah; Posik, Matthew; Puckett, Andrew; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Ransome, Ronald; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Schulte, Elaine; Shahinyan, Albert; Hashemi Shabestari, Mitra; Sirca, Simon; Stepanyan, Stepan; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tang, Liguang; Tobias, William; Urciuoli, Guido; Vilardi, Ignazio; Wang, Kebin; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Z.; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Y.-W.; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zong, Xing

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry in deep-inelastic scattering from the inclusive reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X on a 3He gas target polarized normal to the lepton plane. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero in the Born approximation. The experiment, conducted at Jefferson Lab using a 5.89 GeV electron beam, covers a range of 1.72 GeV, which is non-zero at the 2.75sigma level. Theoretical calculations, which assume two-photon exchange with quasi-free quarks, predict a neutron asymmetry of O(10?4) when both photons couple to one quark, and O(10?2) for the photons coupling to different quarks. Our measured asymmetry agrees both in sign and magnitude with the prediction that uses input based on the Sivers transverse momentum distribution obtained from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  15. Semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering off few-nucleon systems: Tagging the EMC effect and hadronization mechanisms with detection of slow recoiling nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciofi degli Atti, C.; Kaptari, L. P. [Department of Physics, University of Perugia, Piazza dell' Universita 1, I-06123 Perugia (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons off {sup 2}H and {sup 3}He with detection of slow protons and deuterons, respectively, i.e., the processes {sup 2}H(e,e{sup '}p)X and {sup 3}He(e,e{sup '}d)X, are calculated within the spectator mechanism, taking into account the final state interaction of the nucleon debris with the detected protons and deuterons. It is shown that by a proper choice of the kinematics the origin of the EMC effect and the details of the interaction between the hadronizing quark and the nuclear medium can be investigated at a level which cannot be reached by inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. A comparison of the results of our calculations, containing no adjustable parameters, with recently available experimental data on the process {sup 2}H(e,e{sup '}p)X shows a good agreement in the backward hemisphere of the emitted nucleons. Theoretical predictions at energies that will be available at the upgraded Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility are presented, and the possibility to investigate the proposed semi-inclusive processes at electron-ion colliders is briefly discussed.

  16. Measurement of the F2n/F2p and d/u Ratios in Deep Inelastic Electron Scattering off 3H and 3He

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Petratos; I. R. Afnan; F. Bissey; J. Gomez; A. T. Katramatou; W. Melnitchouk; A. W. Thomas

    2000-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a possible measurement of the ratio of the nucleon structure functions, F2n/F2p, and the ratio of the up to down quark distributions, u/d, at large x, by performing deep inelastic electron scattering from the 3H and 3He mirror nuclei with the 11 GeV upgraded beam of Jefferson Lab. The measurement is expected to be almost free of nuclear effects, which introduce a significant uncertainty in the extraction of these two ratios from deep inelastic scattering off the proton and deuteron. The results are expected to test perturbative and non-perturbative mechanisms of spin-flavor symmetry breaking in the nucleon, and constrain the structure function parameterizations needed for the interpretation of high energy e-p, p-p and p-pbar collider data. The precision of the expected data can also allow for testing competing parameterizations of the nuclear EMC effect and provide valuable constraints on models of its dynamical origin.

  17. Measurement of the structure function of the nearly free neutron using spectator tagging in inelastic $^2$H(e, e'p)X scattering with CLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Tkachenko; N. Baillie; S. E. Kuhn; J. Zhang; J. Arrington; P. Bosted; S. Bültmann; M. E. Christy; D. Dutta; R. Ent; H. Fenker; K. A. Griffioen; M. Ispiryan; N. Kalantarians; C. E. Keppel; W. Melnitchouk; V. Tvaskis; K. P. Adhikari; M. Aghasyan; M. J. Amaryan; S. Anefalos Pereira; H. Avakian; J. Ball; N. A. Baltzell; M. Battaglieri; I. Bedlinskiy; A. S. Biselli; W. J. Briscoe; W. K. Brooks; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; G. Charles; P. L. Cole; M. Contalbrigo; O. Cortes; V. Crede; A. D'Angelo; N. Dashyan; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; A. Deur; C. Djalali; G. E. Dodge; D. Doughty; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; J. A. Fleming; B. Garillon; N. Gevorgyan; Y. Ghandilyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; E. Golovatch; R. W. Gothe; M. Guidal; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; C. Hanretty; N. Harrison; M. Hattawy; K. Hicks; D. Ho; M. Holtrop; C . E. Hyde; Y. Ilieva; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; H. S. Jo; D. Keller; M. Khandaker; A. Kim; W. Kim; P. M. King; A. Klein; F. J. Klein; S. Koirala; V. Kubarovsky; S. V. Kuleshov; P. Lenisa; S. Lewis; K. Livingston; H. Lu; M. MacCormick; I. J. D. MacGregor; N. Markov; M. Mayer; B. McKinnon; T. Mineeva; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; R. A. Montgomery; H. Moutarde; C. Munoz Camacho; P. Nadel-Turonski; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Paremuzyan; K. Park; E. Pasyuk; J. J. Phillips; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; J. W. Price; S. Procureur; D. Protopopescu; A. J . R. Puckett; D. Rimal; M. Ripani; A. Rizzo; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; P. Roy; F. Sabatié; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; I. Senderovich; Y. G. Sharabian; A. Simonyan; G. D. Smith; D. I. Sober; D. Sokhan; S. Stepanyan; S. S. Stepanyan; S. Strauch; W. Tang; M. Ungaro; A. V. Vlassov; H. Voskanyan; E. Voutier; N. K. Walford; D. Watts; X. Wei; L. B. Weinstein; M. H. Wood; L. Zana; I. Zonta

    2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Much less is known about neutron structure than that of the proton due to the absence of free neutron targets. Neutron information is usually extracted from data on nuclear targets such as deuterium, requiring corrections for nuclear binding and nucleon off-shell effects. These corrections are model dependent and have significant uncertainties, especially for large values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. The Barely Off-shell Nucleon Structure (BONuS) experiment at Jefferson Lab measured the inelastic electron deuteron scattering cross section, tagging spectator protons in coincidence with the scattered electrons. This method reduces nuclear binding uncertainties significantly and has allowed for the first time a (nearly) model independent extraction of the neutron structure function. A novel compact radial time projection chamber was built to detect protons with momentum between 70 and 150 MeV/c. For the extraction of the free neutron structure function $F_{2n}$, spectator protons at backward angle and with momenta below 100 MeV/c were selected, ensuring that the scattering took place on a nearly free neutron. The scattered electrons were detected with Jefferson Lab's CLAS spectrometer. The extracted neutron structure function $F_{2n}$ and its ratio to the deuteron structure function $F_{2d}$ are presented in both the resonance and deep inelastic regions. The dependence of the cross section on the spectator proton momentum and angle is investigated, and tests of the spectator mechanism for different kinematics are performed. Our data set can be used to study neutron resonance excitations, test quark hadron duality in the neutron, develop more precise parametrizations of structure functions, as well as investigate binding effects (including possible mechanisms for the nuclear EMC effect) and provide a first glimpse of the asymptotic behavior of d/u as x goes to 1.

  18. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitter, Manfred L. (Princeton, NJ); Fraenkel, Ben (Jerusalem, IL); Gorman, James L. (Bordentown, NJ); Hill, Kenneth W. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Roquemore, A. Lane (Cranbury, NJ); Stodiek, Wolfgang (Princeton, NJ); von Goeler, Schweickhard E. (Princeton, NJ)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  19. X-RAY POINT-SOURCE POPULATIONS CONSTITUTING THE GALACTIC RIDGE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morihana, Kumiko [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)] [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Yoshida, Tessei, E-mail: morihana@crab.riken.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of X-ray astronomy; this is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra bulge field, we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard-band continuum and Fe K line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-thermal sources with different fractions in different flux ranges. From their X-ray properties, we speculate that the group A non-thermal sources are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf (WD) binaries such as magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), pre-CVs, and symbiotic stars, whereas the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flares and quiescence, respectively. In the log N-log S curve of the 2-8 keV band, the group A non-thermal sources are dominant above Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is gradually taken over by Galactic sources in the fainter flux ranges. The Fe K{alpha} emission is mostly from the group A thermal (WD binaries) and the group B (X-ray active stars) sources.

  20. Study of the superconducting gap in RNi2B2C,,RY, Lu... single crystals by inelastic light scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, In-Sang

    Study of the superconducting gap in RNi2B2C,,RÃ?Y, Lu... single crystals by inelastic light Initiative Center for Superconductivity, Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 790-390 Pohang, Korea Received 28 February 2000 Superconductivity-induced changes in the electronic

  1. Fundamental Parameters of Low Mass X-ray Binaries II: X-Ray Persistent Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge Casares; Phil Charles

    2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of fundamental parameters in X-ray luminous (persistent) X-ray binaries has been classically hampered by the large optical luminosity of the accretion disc. New methods, based on irradiation of the donor star and burst oscillations, provide the opportunity to derive dynamical information and mass constraints in many persistent systems for the first time. These techniques are here reviewed and the latest results presented.

  2. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonas Gunst; Christoph H. Keitel; Adriana Pálffy

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The implementation of logical operations on polarization-encoded x-rays via resonant light-nucleus interactions is theoretically investigated. We show that by means of resonant scattering off nuclei and fast rotations of the nuclear hyperfine magnetic field to control the polarization of the output photon, single-qubit logical gates can be simulated. A second control qubit may be employed to trigger the magnetic field rotation, thus allowing several implementation choices for a controlled NOT gate for x-ray photons.

  3. The spectra of accretion discs in low-mass X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. R. Ross; A. C. Fabian

    1995-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present self-consistent models for the radiative transfer in Shakura-Sunyaev accretion discs in bright low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB). Our calculations include the full effects of incoherent Compton scattering and the vertical temperature structure within the disc, as well as the effects of Doppler blurring and gravitational redshift. We find that the observed X-ray spectra are well fit by exponentially cutoff power-law models. The difference between the observed total spectrum and our calculated disc spectrum should reveal the spectrum of the disc/neutron star boundary layer and other emitting regions considered to be present in LMXB.

  4. Theoretical standards in x-ray spectroscopies. Annual progress report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to extend our state-of-the-art, ab initio XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) codes, FEFF. Our current work has been highly successful in achieving accurate, user-friendly XAFS standards, exceeding the performance of both tabulated standards and other codes by a considerable margin. We now propose to add the capability to treat more complex materials. This includes multiple-scattering, polarization dependence, an approximate treatment of XANES (x-ray absorption near edge structure), and other improvements. We also plan to adapt FEFF to other spectroscopies, e.g. photoelectron diffraction (PD) and diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS).

  5. Maskelynite formation via solid-state transformation: Evidence of infrared and x-ray anisotropy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaret, Steven J.; Ehm, Lars; Woerner, William R.; Phillips, Brian L.; Nekvasil, Hanna; Wright, Shawn P.; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present optical microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, high-energy X-ray total scattering experiments, and micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy on shocked labradorite from the Lonar Crater, India. We show that maskelynite of shock class 2 is structurally more similar to fused glass than to crystalline plagioclase. However, there are slight but significant differences – preservation of original pre-impact igneous zoning, anisotropy at Infrared wavelengths, X-ray anisotropy, and preservation of some intermediate range order – which are all consistent with a solid-state transformation formation of maskelynite.

  6. An x-ray setup to investigate the atomic order of confined liquids in slit geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippmann, M.; Ehnes, A.; Seeck, O. H. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A setup has been designed to investigate thin films of confined liquids with the use of X-ray scattering methods. The confinement is realized between the flat culets of a pair of diamonds by positioning and orienting the lower diamond with nanometer and micro radian accuracy. We routinely achieve gaps between 5 and 50 nm at culet diameters of 200 ?m. With this setup and a micro focused X-ray beam we have investigated the in-plane and the out-off-plane atomic order of benzene with atomic resolution.

  7. Mapping Local Strain in Thin Film/Substrate Systems using X-ray

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan,H.; Murray, C.; Noyan, I.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report experimental data and modeling results for reflection microbeam x-ray topographs from a Si substrate strained by an overlying pseudomorphic SiGe film edge. The diffracted x-ray intensity from the Si substrate is strongly asymmetric as a function of distance from the film edge. A model of the diffracted intensity based on the classical Ewald-von Laue dynamical diffraction theory for an antisymmetric strain distribution indicates that the asymmetry in the diffracted beam profile is only due to the scattering process; individual intensity maxima in the intensity profile cannot be uniquely ascribed to individual features in the local strain distribution.

  8. ASCA Discovery of Diffuse 6.4 keV Emission Near the Sgr C Complex: A New X-ray Reflection Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Murakami; K. Koyama; M. Tsujimoto; Y. Maeda; M. Sakano

    2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an ASCA discovery of diffuse hard X-ray emission from the Sgr C complex with its peak in the vicinity of the molecular cloud core. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a strong 6.4-keV line and large absorption. These properties suggest that Sgr C is a new X-ray reflection nebula which emits fluorescent and scattered X-rays via irradiation from an external X-ray source. We found no adequately bright source in the immediate Sgr C vicinity to fully account for the fluorescence. The irradiating source may be the Galactic nucleus Sgr A*, which was brighter in the past than it is now as is suggested from observations of the first X-ray reflection nebula Sgr B2.

  9. Soft x-ray capabilities for investigating the strongly correlated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray, aiming to understand their sciences for applying a new material. In particular, soft x-ray capabilities have been used to obtain microscopic-level understanding of the...

  10. Dawn of x-ray nonlinear optics | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dawn of x-ray nonlinear optics Wednesday, July 8, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: David Reis, PULSE Program Description X-ray free electron lasers...

  11. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    times science has used high-brilliance x-rays to look so closely at these reactions. Lead author Dr. David Mueller at the ALS using x-rays to characterize working fuel cells....

  12. A World's Top-10 X-ray Crystal Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A World's Top-10 X-ray Crystal Structure October 7, 2014 Bookmark and Share Philip Coppens An x-ray crystal structure solved by Philip Coppens has been chosen as one of the world's...

  13. Nanofabrication of Diffractive X-ray Optics for Synchrotrons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the soft x-ray range and down to 15 nm in the multi keV range. For use at x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources, diffractive optics must be capable of withstanding extreme...

  14. High resolution x-ray lensless imaging by differential holographic encoding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, D.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Wu, B.; Scherz, A.; Acremann, Y.; Tylisczcak, T.; Fischer, P.; Friedenberger, N.; Ollefs, K.; Farle, M.; Fienup, J. R.; Stohr, J.

    2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FEL{sub s}) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by splitand-delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with stateof- the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  15. Anomalous X-ray Diffraction Studies for Photovoltaic Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous X-ray Diffraction (AXRD) has become a useful technique in characterizing bulk and nanomaterials as it provides specific information about the crystal structure of materials. In this project we present the results of AXRD applied to materials for photovoltaic applications: ZnO loaded with Ga and ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel. The X-ray diffraction data collected for various energies were plotted in Origin software. The peaks were fitted using different functions including Pseudo Voigt, Gaussian, and Lorentzian. This fitting provided the integrated intensity data (peaks area values), which when plotted as a function of X-ray energies determined the material structure. For the first analyzed sample, Ga was not incorporated into the ZnO crystal structure. For the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel Co was found in one or both tetrahedral and octahedral sites. The use of anomalous X-ray diffraction (AXRD) provides element and site specific information for the crystal structure of a material. This technique lets us correlate the structure to the electronic properties of the materials as it allows us to probe precise locations of cations in the spinel structure. What makes it possible is that in AXRD the diffraction pattern is measured at a number of energies near an X-ray absorption edge of an element of interest. The atomic scattering strength of an element varies near its absorption edge and hence the total intensity of the diffraction peak changes by changing the X-ray energy. Thus AXRD provides element specific structural information. This method can be applied to both crystalline and liquid materials. One of the advantages of AXRD in crystallography experiments is its sensitivity to neighboring elements in the periodic tables. This method is also sensitive to specific crystallographic phases and to a specific site in a phase. The main use of AXRD in this study is for transparent conductors (TCs) analysis. TCs are considered to be important materials because of their efficiency and low risk of environmental pollution. These materials are important to solar cells as a result of their remarkable combination of optical and electrical properties, including high electrical conductivity and high optical transparency in the spectrum of visible light. TCs provide a transparent window, which allows sunlight to pass through while also allowing electricity to conduct out of the cell. Spinel materials have the chemical form AB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and are made of a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice of oxygen anions and cations in specific interstitial sites. A normal spinel has all A cations on tetrahedral sites and B cations on octahedral sites. In contrast; an inverse spinel has the A and half of the B cations on octahedral sites and the other half of the B cations on tetrahedral sites; a mixed spinel lies between. In the spinel structure, 8 of 64 possible tetrahedral sites and 16 of 32 possible octahedral sites are filled. Normal spinels have particularly high conduction as the linear octahedral chains of B cations likely serve as conduction paths. In this paper we present how the data obtained with AXRD is used to analyze TCs properties as they apply to photovoltaic applications. One of the materials used for this analysis is zinc oxide. It has been loaded with 5% and 10% of Ga, which has an absorption edge of 10367 eV. The peak (100) was measured for the zinc oxide loaded with 10% Ga. In the case of 5% Ga, we measured peaks (100) and (101). With the information provided by the AXRD we can identify if Ga is being incorporated in the ZnO crystal structure. The analysis of 311 plane in the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel shows if Co is in tetrahedral or octahedral site.

  16. Beyond Chandra - the X-ray Surveyor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisskopf, Martin C; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 16 years, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided an unparalleled means for exploring the universe with its half-arcsecond angular resolution. Chandra studies have deepened our understanding of galaxy clusters, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, supernova remnants, planets, and solar system objects addressing almost all areas of current interest in astronomy and astrophysics. As we look beyond Chandra, it is clear that comparable or even better angular resolution with greatly increased photon throughput is essential to address even more demanding science questions, such as the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift; the emergence of the first galaxy groups; and details of feedback over a large range of scales from galaxies to galaxy clusters. Recently, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, has initiated a concept study for such a mission named the X-ray Surveyor. This study starts with a baseline payloa...

  17. X-ray radiography for container inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Jonathan I. (Clayton, MO); Morris, Christopher L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Arrangements of X-ray inspection systems are described for inspecting high-z materials in voluminous objects such as containers. Inspection methods may involve generating a radiographic image based on detected attenuation corresponding to a pulsed beams of radiation transmitted through a voluminous object. The pulsed beams of radiation are generated by a high-energy source and transmitted substantially downward along an incident angle, of approximately 1.degree. to 30.degree., to a vertical axis extending through the voluminous object. The generated radiographic image may be analyzed to detect on localized high attenuation representative of high-z materials and to discriminate high-z materials from lower and intermediate-z materials on the basis of the high density and greater attenuation of high-z material for higher energy (3-10 MeV) X-rays, and the compact nature of threatening masses of fissionable materials.

  18. X-ray mammography with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burattini, E. (CNR and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy)); Gambaccini, M.; Marziani, M.; Rimondi, O. (Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy)); Indovina, P.L. (Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Napoli, Naples (Italy)); Pocek, M.; Simonetti, G. (Istituto di Radiologia, Ospedale Sant'Eugenio, Universita di Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy)); Benassi, M.; Tirelli, C. (Istituto Nazionale del Cancro, Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Passariello, R. (Cattedra di Radiologia, Universita dell'Aquila, L'Aquila (Italy))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time in the literature, radiographs of breast phantoms were obtained using several monochromatic synchrotron radiation x-ray beams of selected energy in the range from 14 to 26 keV. In addition, after optimization of the photon energy as a function of the phantom thickness, several mammographs were obtained on surgically removed human breast specimens containing cancer nodules. Comparison between radiographs using a conventional x-ray unit and those obtained of the same specimens utilizing synchrotron monochromatic beams clearly shows that higher contrast and better resolution can be achieved with synchrotron radiation. These results demonstrate the possibility of obtaining radiographs of excised human breast tissue containing a greater amount of radiological information using synchrotron radiation.

  19. X-rays from Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2002-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary of X-ray observations of supernova remnants is presented including the explosion fragment A of the Vela SNR, Tycho, N132D, RX J0852-4622, the Crab Nebula and the 'bulls eye', and SN 1987A, high-lighting the progress made with Chandra and XMM-Newton and touching upon the questions which arise from these observations and which might inspire future research.

  20. Accretion Disk Boundary Layers Around Neutron Stars: X-ray Production in Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Popham; Rashid Sunyaev

    2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present solutions for the structure of the boundary layer where the accretion disk meets the neutron star, which is expected to be the dominant source of high-energy radiation in low-mass X-ray binaries which contain weakly magnetized accreting neutron stars. We find that the main portion of the boundary layer gas is hot (> ~10^8 K), low in density, radially and vertically extended, and optically thick to scattering but optically thin to absorption. It will produce large X-ray luminosity by Comptonization. Energy is transported inward by viscosity, concentrating the energy dissipation in the dense, optically thick zone close to the stellar surface. We explore the dependence of the boundary layer structure on the mass accretion rate, the rotation rate of the star, the alpha viscosity parameter and the viscosity prescription. Radiation pressure is the dominant source of pressure in the boundary layer; the flux is close to the Eddington limiting flux even for luminosities well below (~0.01 times) L(Edd). At luminosities near L(Edd), the boundary layer expands radially, and has a radial extent larger than one stellar radius. Based on the temperatures and optical depths which characterize the boundary layer, we expect that Comptonization will produce a power-law spectrum at low source luminosities. At high luminosities, a Planckian spectrum will be produced in the dense region where most of the energy is released, and modified by Comptonization as the radiation propagates outward.

  1. The PG X-ray QSO sample: Links between the UV-X-ray Continuum and Emission Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beverley J. Wills; M. S. Brotherton; A. Laor; D. Wills; B. J. Wilkes; G. J. Ferland; Zhaohui Shang

    1999-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The UV to soft X-rays of luminous AGNs dominate their bolometric luminosity, driven by an accretion-powered dynamo at the center. These photons ionize the surrounding gas, thereby providing clues to fueling and exhaust. Two sets of important relationships - neither of them understood - link the continuum and gas properties. (i) Boroson & Green's `eigenvector 1' relationships: Steeper soft X-ray spectra are clearly related to narrower Hbeta emission and stronger optical Fe II emission from the BLR, and weaker [O III] 5007 from the NLR. We show that these relationships extend to UV spectra: narrower C III] 1909, stronger low ionization lines, larger Si III] 1892/C III] 1909 (a density indicator), weaker C IV 1549 but stronger higher-ionization N V 1240. We speculate that high accretion rates are linked to high columns of dense (1e10 - 1e11 cm-3), nitrogen-enhanced, low-ionization gas from nuclear starbursts. Linewidth, inverse Fe II-[O III] and inverse Fe II-C IV relationships hint at the geometrical arrangement of this gas. (ii) The Baldwin effect (inverse equivalent width - luminosity relationships): Our correlation analyses suggest that these are independent of the above eigenvector 1 relationships. The eigenvector 1 relationships can therefore be used in future work, to reduce scatter in the Baldwin relationships, perhaps fulfilling the dream of using the Baldwin effect for cosmological studies.

  2. Bright X-ray galaxies in SDSS filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tugay, A V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighteen bright X-ray emitting galaxies were found in nearby filaments within SDSS region. Basic X-ray spectral parameters were estimated for these galaxies using power law model with photoelectric absorption. A close pair of X-ray galaxies was found.

  3. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  4. ASCA Observations of the Sgr B2 Cloud: An X-Ray Reflection Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Murakami; K. Koyama; M. Sakano; M. Tsujimoto; Y. Maeda

    1999-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the ASCA results of imaging spectroscopy of the giant molecular cloud Sgr B2. The X-ray spectrum is found to be very peculiar; it exhibits a strong emission line at 6.4 keV, a low energy cutoff below about 4 keV and a pronounced edge-structure at 7.1 keV. The X-ray image is extended and its peak position is shifted from the core of the molecular cloud toward the Galactic center by about 1--2 arcminute. The X-ray spectrum and the morphology are well reproduced by a scenario that X-rays from an external source located in the Galactic center direction are scattered by the molecular cloud Sgr B2, and come into our line of sight. Thus Sgr B2 may be called an X-ray reflection nebula. Possible implications of the Galactic center activity related to this unique source are presented.

  5. Local structure of Rb{sub 2}Li{sub 4}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O by the modeling of X-ray diffuse scattering - from average-structure to microdomain model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komornicka, Dorota [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Okolna 2, 50-420 Wroclaw (Poland); Wolcyrz, Marek, E-mail: m.wolcyrz@int.pan.wroc.pl [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Okolna 2, 50-420 Wroclaw (Poland); Pietraszko, Adam [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Okolna 2, 50-420 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Local structure of dirubidium tetralithium tris(selenate(VI)) dihydrate - Rb{sub 2}Li{sub 4}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 3}{center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O has been determined basing on the modeling of X-ray diffuse scattering. The origin of observed structured diffuse streaks is SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra switching between two alternative positions in two quasi-planar layers existing in each unit cell and formation of domains with specific SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra configuration locally fulfilling condition for C-centering in the 2a Multiplication-Sign 2b Multiplication-Sign c superstructure cell. The local structure solution is characterized by a uniform distribution of rather large domains (ca. thousand of unit cells) in two layers, but also monodomains can be taken into account. Inside a single domain SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra are ordered along ab-diagonal forming two-string ribbons. Inside the ribbons SeO{sub 4} and LiO{sub 4} tetrahedra share the oxygen corners, whereas ribbons are bound to each other by a net of hydrogen bonds and fastened by corner sharing SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra of the neighboring layers. - Graphical abstract: Experimental sections of the reciprocal space showing diffraction effects observed for RLSO. Bragg spots are visible on sections with integer indices (1 kl section - on the left), streaks - on sections with fractional ones (1.5 kl section - on the right). At the center: resulting local structure of the A package modeled as a microdomain: two-string ribbons of ordered oxygen-corners-sharing SeO{sub 4} and LiO{sub 4} terahedra extended along ab-diagonal are seen; ribbons are bound by hydrogen bonds (shown in pink); the multiplied 2a Multiplication-Sign 2b unit cell is shown. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray diffuse scattering in RLSO was registered and modeled. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The origin of diffuse streaks is SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra switching in two structure layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The local structure is characterized by a uniform distribution of microdomains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inside a single domain SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra are ordered along ab-diagonal forming ribbons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ribbons are bound to each other by a net of hydrogen bonds.

  6. Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ZEUS Collaboration; H. Abramowicz; I. Abt; L. Adamczyk; M. Adamus; R. Aggarwal; S. Antonelli; P. Antonioli; A. Antonov; M. Arneodo; O. Arslan; V. Aushev; Y. Aushev; O. Bachynska; A. Bamberger; A. N. Barakbaev; G. Barbagli; G. Bari; F. Barreiro; N. Bartosik; D. Bartsch; M. Basile; O. Behnke; J. Behr; U. Behrens; L. Bellagamba; A. Bertolin; S. Bhadra; M. Bindi; C. Blohm; V. Bokhonov; T. Bold; K. Bondarenko; E. G. Boos; K. Borras; D. Boscherini; D. Bot; I. Brock; E. Brownson; R. Brugnera; N. Brummer; A. Bruni; G. Bruni; B. Brzozowska; P. J. Bussey; B. Bylsma; A. Caldwell; M. Capua; R. Carlin; C. D. Catterall; S. Chekanov; J. Chwastowski; J. Ciborowski; R. Ciesielski; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; A. Contin; A. M. Cooper-Sarkar; N. Coppola; M. Corradi; F. Corriveau; M. Costa; G. D'Agostini; F. Dal Corso; J. del Peso; R. K. Dementiev; S. De Pasquale; M. Derrick; R. C. E. Devenish; D. Dobur; B. A. Dolgoshein; G. Dolinska; A. T. Doyle; V. Drugakov; L. S. Durkin; S. Dusini; Y. Eisenberg; P. F. Ermolov; A. Eskreys; S. Fang; S. Fazio; J. Ferrando; M. I. Ferrero; J. Figiel; B. Foster; G. Gach; A. Galas; E. Gallo; A. Garfagnini; A. Geiser; I. Gialas; A. Gizhko; L. K. Gladilin; D. Gladkov; C. Glasman; O. Gogota; Yu. A. Golubkov; P. Gottlicher; I. Grabowska-Bold; J. Grebenyuk; I. Gregor; G. Grigorescu; G. Grzelak; O. Gueta; M. Guzik; C. Gwenlan; T. Haas; W. Hain; R. Hamatsu; J. C. Hart; H. Hartmann; G. Hartner; E. Hilger; D. Hochman; R. Hori; A. Huttmann; Z. A. Ibrahim; Y. Iga; R. Ingbir; M. Ishitsuka; H. -P. Jakob; F. Januschek; T. W. Jones; M. Jungst; I. Kadenko; B. Kahle; S. Kananov; T. Kanno; U. Karshon; F. Karstens; I. I. Katkov; M. Kaur; P. Kaur; A. Keramidas; L. A. Khein; J. Y. Kim; D. Kisielewska; S. Kitamura; R. Klanner; U. Klein; E. Koffeman; N. Kondrashova; O. Kononenko; P. Kooijman; Ie. Korol; I. A. Korzhavina; A. Kotanski; U. Kotz; H. Kowalski; O. Kuprash; M. Kuze; A. Lee; B. B. Levchenko; A. Levy; V. Libov; S. Limentani; T. Y. Ling; M. Lisovyi; E. Lobodzinska; W. Lohmann; B. Lohr; E. Lohrmann; K. R. Long; A. Longhin; D. Lontkovskyi; O. Yu. Lukina; J. Maeda; S. Magill; I. Makarenko; J. Malka; R. Mankel; A. Margotti; G. Marini; J. F. Martin; A. Mastroberardino; M. C. K. Mattingly; I. -A. Melzer-Pellmann; S. Mergelmeyer; S. Miglioranzi; F. Mohamad Idris; V. Monaco; A. Montanari; J. D. Morris; K. Mujkic; B. Musgrave; K. Nagano; T. Namsoo; R. Nania; A. Nigro; Y. Ning; T. Nobe; D. Notz; R. J. Nowak; A. E. Nuncio-Quiroz; B. Y. Oh; N. Okazaki; K. Olkiewicz; Yu. Onishchuk; K. Papageorgiu; A. Parenti; E. Paul; J. M. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; P. G. Pelfer; A. Pellegrino; W. Perlanski; H. Perrey; K. Piotrzkowski; P. Plucinski; N. S. Pokrovskiy; A. Polini; A. S. Proskuryakov; M. Przybycien; A. Raval; D. D. Reeder; B. Reisert; Z. Ren; J. Repond; Y. D. Ri; A. Robertson; P. Roloff; I. Rubinsky; M. Ruspa; R. Sacchi; U. Samson; G. Sartorelli; A. A. Savin; D. H. Saxon; M. Schioppa; S. Schlenstedt; P. Schleper; W. B. Schmidke; U. Schneekloth; V. Schonberg; T. Schorner-Sadenius; J. Schwartz; F. Sciulli; L. M. Shcheglova; R. Shehzadi; S. Shimizu; I. Singh; I. O. Skillicorn; W. Slominski; W. H. Smith; V. Sola; A. Solano; D. Son; V. Sosnovtsev; A. Spiridonov; H. Stadie; L. Stanco; N. Stefaniuk; A. Stern; T. P. Stewart; A. Stifutkin; P. Stopa; S. Suchkov; G. Susinno; L. Suszycki; J. Sztuk-Dambietz; D. Szuba; J. Szuba; A. D. Tapper; E. Tassi; J. Terron; T. Theedt; H. Tiecke; K. Tokushuku; J. Tomaszewska; V. Trusov; T. Tsurugai; M. Turcato; O. Turkot; T. Tymieniecka; M. Vazquez; A. Verbytskyi; O. Viazlo; N. N. Vlasov; R. Walczak; W. A. T. Wan Abdullah; J. J. Whitmore; K. Wichmann; L. Wiggers; M. Wing; M. Wlasenko; G. Wolf; H. Wolfe; K. Wrona; A. G. Yagues-Molina; S. Yamada; Y. Yamazaki; R. Yoshida; C. Youngman; O. Zabiegalov; A. F. . Zarnecki; L. Zawiejski; O. Zenaiev; W. Zeuner; B. O. Zhautykov; N. Zhmak; A. Zichichi; Z. Zolkapli; D. S. Zotkin

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d(sigma)/dQ2, d(sigma)/dx and d(sigma)/dy and the reduced cross-section were measured in the kinematic region Q2 > 185 GeV2 and y < 0.9, where Q2 is the four-momentum transfer squared, x the Bjorken scaling variable, and y the inelasticity of the interaction. The measurements were performed separately for positively and negatively polarised positron beams. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 135.5 pb-1 collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007 at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions F3 and F3(gamma)Z were determined by combining the e+p results presented in this paper with previously published e-p neutral current results. The asymmetry parameter A+ is used to demonstrate the parity violation predicted in electroweak interactions. The measurements are well described by the predictions of the Standard Model.

  7. Inclusive inelastic scattering of 96. 5-MeV. pi. sup + and. pi. sup minus by the hydrogen and helium isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khandaker, M.A.; Doss, M.; Halpern, I.; Murakami, T.; Storm, D.W.; Tieger, D.R. (University of Washington, Department of Physics, FM-15, Seattle, Washington 98195 (USA)); Burger, W.J. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Bates Linear Accelerator Center, Middleton, Massachusetts 01949 (USA))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectra, angular distributions, and integrated cross sections for inclusive inelastic scattering of 96.5-MeV {pi}{sup +} and {pi}{sup {minus}} from {sup 2}H, {sup 3}He, and {sup 4}He are presented. The measurements were made using a high-pressure gas cell, which permits an accurate determination of relative cross sections for all targets. The data are compared with distorted-wave impulse-approximation calculations and with a modified plane-wave impulse-approximation calculation. In addition, by combining the total inelastic cross sections from this work with estimates of single-charge-exchange cross sections and with published values and reasonable estimates of the other {pi}{sup +} cross sections at the same energy, values for total reaction and pion absorption cross sections are obtained for all the targets. The dependence of these cross sections on {ital Z}, {ital N}, nuclear density, and nuclear binding energy is discussed in terms of a simple model.

  8. The X-ray Halo of G21.5-0.9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Bandiera; F. Bocchino

    2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission of the plerion G21.5-0.9 appears more extended in X rays than in radio. This is an unexpected result because it would imply that short-lived X-ray electrons may reach distances even larger than radio electrons. Applying an empirical relationship between dust scattering optical depth and photoelectric column density, the measured column density leads to a large optical depth at 1 keV, of about 1. Therefore we investigate the hypothesis that the detected halo be an effect of dust scattering, re-analyzing an Cal/PV XMM-Newton observation of G21.5-0.9 and critically examining it in terms of a dust scattering model. We also present a spectral analysis of a prominent extended feature in the northern sector of the halo.

  9. Proceedings of the workshop on X-ray computed microtomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of vugraphs from the nine presentations at the conference. Titles of the presentations are: CMT: Applications and Techniques; Computer Microtomography Using X-rays from Third Generation Synchrotron X-ray; Approaches to Soft-X-ray Nanotomography; Diffraction Enhanced Tomography; X-ray Computed Microtomography Applications at the NSLS; XCMT Applications in Forestry and Forest Products; 3DMA: Investigating Three Dimensional Pore Geometry from High Resolution Images; X-ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Volcanic Rock; and 3-D Visualization of Tomographic Volumes.

  10. Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugh, M. J.

    2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

  11. Mixed quantum/classical theory for inelastic scattering of asymmetric-top-rotor + atom in the body-fixed reference frame and application to the H{sub 2}O + He system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semenov, Alexander [Chemistry Department, Wehr Chemistry Building, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201-1881 (United States); PSL Research University, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, ENS, UCP, CNRS, UMR8112, LERMA, 5 Place Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France); Dubernet, Marie-Lise [PSL Research University, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, ENS, UCP, CNRS, UMR8112, LERMA, 5 Place Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France); Babikov, Dmitri, E-mail: dmitri.babikov@mu.edu [Chemistry Department, Wehr Chemistry Building, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201-1881 (United States)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The mixed quantum/classical theory (MQCT) for inelastic molecule-atom scattering developed recently [A. Semenov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174108 (2013)] is extended to treat a general case of an asymmetric-top-rotor molecule in the body-fixed reference frame. This complements a similar theory formulated in the space-fixed reference-frame [M. Ivanov, M.-L. Dubernet, and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 134301 (2014)]. Here, the goal was to develop an approximate computationally affordable treatment of the rotationally inelastic scattering and apply it to H{sub 2}O + He. We found that MQCT is somewhat less accurate at lower scattering energies. For example, below E = 1000 cm{sup ?1} the typical errors in the values of inelastic scattering cross sections are on the order of 10%. However, at higher scattering energies MQCT method appears to be rather accurate. Thus, at scattering energies above 2000 cm{sup ?1} the errors are consistently in the range of 1%–2%, which is basically our convergence criterion with respect to the number of trajectories. At these conditions our MQCT method remains computationally affordable. We found that computational cost of the fully-coupled MQCT calculations scales as n{sup 2}, where n is the number of channels. This is more favorable than the full-quantum inelastic scattering calculations that scale as n{sup 3}. Our conclusion is that for complex systems (heavy collision partners with many internal states) and at higher scattering energies MQCT may offer significant computational advantages.

  12. Precision measurement of R = sigma/sub L//sigma/sub T/ and F/sub 2/ in deep-inelastic electron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dasu, S.; de Barbaro, P.; Bodek, A.; Harada, H.; Krasny, M.W.; Lang, K.; Riordan, E.M.; Arnold, R.; Benton, D.; Bosted, P.; and others

    1988-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new results on a precision measurement of the ratio R = sigma/sub L//sigma/sub T/ and the structure function F/sub 2/ for deep-inelastic electron-nucleon scattering in the kinematic range 0.2less than or equal toxless than or equal to0.5 and 1less than or equal toQ/sup 2/less than or equal to10 (GeV/c)/sup 2/. Our results show, for the first time, a clear falloff of R with increasing Q/sup 2/. Our R and F/sub 2/ results are in good agreement with QCD predictions only when corrections for target-mass effects are included.

  13. Beam-Target Double Spin Asymmetry ALT in Charged Pion Production from Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized 3He Target at 1.422

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R; Munoz Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Narayan, A; Nelyubin, V; Norum, B; Oh, Y; Osipenko, M; Parno, D; et al

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first measurement of the double-spin asymmetry ALT for charged pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target. The kinematics focused on the valence quark region, 0.16 2 2. The corresponding neutron ALT asymmetries were extracted from the measured 3He asymmetries and proton/3He cross section ratios using the effective polarization approximation. These new data probe the transverse momentum dependent parton distribution function gq and therefore provide access to quark spin-orbit correlations. Our results indicate a positive azimuthal asymmetry for ?- production onmore »3He and the neutron, while our ?+ asymmetries are consistent with zero.« less

  14. Measurement of the Inclusive ep Deep Inelastic Scattering Cross Section at Low Q2 with the H1 Detector at HERA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raicevic, N. [Faculty of Science, University of Montenegro, Cetinjski put BB, 81000 Podgorica (Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this report are the recent measurements of the cross section and proton structure function F2 in ep deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at low virtuality of the exchanged boson, Q2, with the H1 detector at the HERA accelerator in Hamburg. The region of low Q2 and low Bjorken x allows precision tests of perturbative QCD at high gluon densities to be performed and also the transition from the perturbative to non-perturbative QCD domains to be explored. The recent H1 measurements of charm and beauty cross sections and structure functions, F{sub 2}{sup cc-bar} ans F{sub 2}{sup bb-bar}, for photon virtuality 12 < Q2 < 60 GeV2 will also be discussed.

  15. Measurement of pretzelosity asymmetry of charged pion production in Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering on a polarized $^3$He target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Zhang; X. Qian; K. Allada; C. Dutta; J. Huang; J. Katich; Y. Wang; K. Aniol; J. R. M. Annand; T. Averett; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; P. C. Bradshaw; P. Bosted; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; C. Chen; J. -P. Chen; W. Chen; K. Chirapatpimol; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; J. C. Cornejo; F. Cusanno; M. M. Dalton; W. Deconinck; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; X. Deng; A. Deur; H. Ding; P. A. M. Dolph; D. Dutta; L. El Fassi; S. Frullani; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; O. Glamazdin; S. Golge; L. Guo; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; M. Huang; H. F. Ibrahim; M. Iodice; X. Jiang; G. Jin; M. K. Jones; A. Kelleher; W. Kim; A. Kolarkar; W. Korsch; J. J. LeRose; X. Li; Y. Li; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; E. Long; H. -J. Lu; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; D. McNulty; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; C. Muñoz Camacho; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; B. Norum; Y. Oh; M. Osipenko; D. Parno; J. C. Peng; S. K. Phillips; M. Posik; A. J. R. Puckett; Y. Qiang; A. Rakhman; R. D. Ransome; S. Riordan; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; E. Schulte; A. Shahinyan; M. H. Shabestari; S. Sirca; S. Stepanyan; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; L. -G. Tang; W. A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; I. Vilardi; K. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; Y. Ye; Z. Ye; L. Yuan; X. Zhan; Y. -W. Zhang; B. Zhao; X. Zheng; L. Zhu; X. Zhu; X. Zong

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized $^3$He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of $0.16

  16. Single Spin Asymmetries in Charged Kaon Production from Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized $^3{\\rm{He}}$ Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. X. Zhao; Y. Wang; K. Allada; K. Aniol; J. R. M. Annand; T. Averett; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; P. C. Bradshaw; P. Bosted; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; C. Chen; J. -P. Chen; W. Chen; K. Chirapatpimol; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; J. C. Cornejo; F. Cusanno; M. M. Dalton; W. Deconinck; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; X. Deng; A. Deur; H. Ding; P. A. M. Dolph; C. Dutta; D. Dutta; L. El Fassi; S. Frullani; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; O. Glamazdin; S. Golge; L. Guo; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; J. Huang; M. Huang; H. F Ibrahim; M. Iodice; X. Jiang; G. Jin; M. K. Jones; J. Katich; A. Kelleher; W. Kim; A. Kolarkar; W. Korsch; J. J. LeRose; X. Li; Y. Li; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; E. Long; H. -J. Lu; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; D. McNulty; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; C. Muñoz Camacho; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; B. Norum; Y. Oh; M. Osipenko; D. Parno; J. -C. Peng; S. K. Phillips; M. Posik; A. J. R. Puckett; X. Qian; Y. Qiang; A. Rakhman; R. Ransome; S. Riordan; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; E. Schulte; A. Shahinyan; M. H. Shabestari; S. Širca; S. Stepanyan; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; L. -G. Tang; A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; I. Vilardi; K. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; Y. Ye; Z. Ye; L. Yuan; X. Zhan; Y. Zhang; Y. -W. Zhang; B. Zhao; X. Zheng; L. Zhu; X. Zhu; X. Zong

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized $^3{\\rm{He}}$ target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1$<$$x_{bj}$$<$0.4 for $K^{+}$ and $K^{-}$ production. While the Collins and Sivers moments for $K^{+}$ are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties, both moments for $K^{-}$ favor negative values. The Sivers moments are compared to the theoretical prediction from a phenomenological fit to the world data. While the $K^{+}$ Sivers moments are consistent with the prediction, the $K^{-}$ results differ from the prediction at the 2-sigma level.

  17. Level crossings and zero-field splitting in the {Cr8}-cubane spin-cluster studied using inelastic neutron scattering and magnetization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaknin, D. [Ames Laboratory; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL; Demmel, F. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Nojiri, H [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan; Martin, Catalin [Florida State University; Chiorescu, Irinel [Florida State University; Qiu, Y. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Luban, M. [Ames Laboratory; Kogerler, P. [Ames Laboratory; Fielden, J. [Ames Laboratory; Engelhardt, L [Francis Marion University, Florence, South Sarolina; Rainey, C [Francis Marion University, Florence, South Sarolina

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in variable magnetic field and high-field magnetization measurements in the millikelvin temperature range were performed to gain insight into the low-energy magnetic excitation spectrum and the field-induced level crossings in the molecular spin cluster {Cr8}-cubane. These complementary techniques provide consistent estimates of the lowest level-crossing field. The overall features of the experimental data are explained using an isotropic Heisenberg model, based on three distinct exchange interactions linking the eight CrIII paramagnetic centers (spins s = 3/2), that is supplemented with a relatively large molecular magnetic anisotropy term for the lowest S = 1 multiplet. It is noted that the existence of the anisotropy is clearly evident from the magnetic field dependence of the excitations in the INS measurements, while the magnetization measurements are not sensitive to its effects.

  18. Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for monitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency. 2 figures.

  19. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  20. HgMn Stars as apparent X-ray emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubrig, S; Mathys, G

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the ROSAT all-sky survey 11 HgMn stars were detected as soft X-ray emitters (Berghoefer, Schmitt & Cassinelli 1996). Prior to ROSAT, X-ray observations with the Einstein Observatory had suggested that stars in the spectral range B5-A7 are devoid of X-ray emission. Since there is no X-ray emitting mechanism available for these stars (also not for HgMn stars), the usual argument in the case of an X-ray detected star of this spectral type is the existence of an unseen low-mass companion which is responsible for the X-ray emission. The purpose of the present work is to use all available data for our sample of X-ray detected HgMn stars and conclude on the nature of possible companions.