Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The Poles of Mars: A Key to Understanding Earth's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deposits. We believe these layers can give us clues to the way in which the residual caps formed snow cover on Earth, lies a permanent, residual polar cap #12;Ice Age made mainly of water ice. The residual cap at the south pole is smaller tban that of the north pole, and its carbon dioxide seasonal

Faraon, Andrei

2

Magnet pole tips  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved magnet more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

1981-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

3

Pole pulling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for removal of embedded utility-type poles which removes the poles quickly and efficiently from their embedded position without damage to the pole or surrounding structures. The apparatus includes at least 2 piston/cylinder members equally spaced about the pole, and a head member affixed to the top of each piston. Elongation of the piston induces rotation of the head into the pole to increase the gripping action and reduce slippage. Repeated actuation and retraction of the piston and head member will "jack" the pole from its embedded position.

McIntire, Gary L. (12 Honeybee La., Idaho Falls, ID 83402)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Single phase two pole/six pole motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single phase alternating current two pole/six pole motor is provided with a main stator winding having six coils disposed unequally around the periphery of the machine. These coils are divided into two groups. When these groups are connected such that their magnetomotive forces are additive, two pole motor operation results. When the polarity of one of the groups is then reversed, six pole motor operation results. An auxiliary stator winding which is similar to the main stator winding is displaced from the main stator winding by 90 electrical degrees on a two pole basis.

Kirschbaum, Herbert S. (Asheville, NC)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Single phase two pole/six pole motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single phase alternating current two pole/six pole motor is provided with a main stator winding having six coils disposed unequally around the periphery of the machine. These coils are divided into two groups. When these groups are connected such that their magnetomotive forces are additive, two pole motor operation results. When the polarity of one of the groups is then reversed, six pole motor operation results. An auxiliary stator winding which is similar to the main stator winding is displaced from the main stator winding by 90 electrical degrees on a two pole basis. 12 figs.

Kirschbaum, H.S.

1984-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

6

Lightweight extendable and retractable pole  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole.

Warren, John L. (Santa Barbara, CA); Brandt, James E. (Santa Barbara, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Lightweight extendable and retractable pole  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole. 18 figs.

Warren, J.L.; Brandt, J.E.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Six pole/eight pole single-phase motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single phase alternating current electric motor is provided with a main stator winding having two coil groups which are connected to form eight poles for eight-pole operation and to form six poles for six-pole operation. Each group contains four series connected coil elements with each element spanning approximately one-seventh of the periphery of the machine. The coil groups are spaced 180 mechanical degrees apart such that each end coil of one group overlaps one of the end coils of the other group. An auxiliary stator winding having two coil groups with the same relative angular displacement as the main stator winding coil groups is included. 10 figs.

Kirschbaum, H.S.

1984-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Single phase four pole/six pole motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single phase alternating current electric motor is provided with a main stator winding having two coil groups each including the series connection of three coils. These coil groups can be connected in series for six pole operation and in parallel for four pole operation. The coils are approximately equally spaced around the periphery of the machine but are not of equal numbers of turns. The two coil groups are identically wound and spaced 180 mechanical degrees apart. One coil of each group has more turns and a greater span than the other two coils. 10 figs.

Kirschbaum, H.S.

1984-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

10

Are Simple Real Pole Solutions Physical?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider exact solutions generated by the inverse scattering technique, also known as the soliton transformation. In particular, we study the class of simple real pole solutions. For quite some time, those solutions have been considered interesting as models of cosmological shock waves. A coordinate singularity on the wave fronts was removed by a transformation which induces a null fluid with negative energy density on the wave front. This null fluid is usually seen as another coordinate artifact, since there seems to be a general belief that that this kind of solution can be seen as the real pole limit of the smooth solution generated with a pair of complex conjugate poles in the transformation. We perform this limit explicitly, and find that the belief is unfounded: two coalescing complex conjugate poles cannot yield a solution with one real pole. Instead, the two complex conjugate poles go to a different limit, what we call a ``pole on a pole''. The limiting procedure is not unique; it is sensitive to how quickly some parameters approach zero. We also show that there exists no improved coordinate transformation which would remove the negative energy density. We conclude that negative energy is an intrinsic part of this class of solutions.

M Berg; M Bradley

2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Pole structure from energy-dependent and single-energy fits to $?N$ elastic scattering data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The pole structure of the current GW/SAID partial-wave analysis of elastic $\\pi N$ scattering and $\\eta N$ production data is studied. Pole positions and residues are extracted from both the energy-dependent and single-energy fits, using two different methods. For the energy-dependent fits, both contour integration and a Laurent+Pietarinen approach are used. In the case of single-energy fits, the Laurent+Pietarinen approach is used. Errors are estimated and the two sets of results are compared to other recent and older fits to data.

Alfred Švarc; Mirza Hadžimehmedovi?; Hedim Osmanovi?; Jugoslav Stahov; Ron L. Workman

2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

12

HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) Data from CDIAC's HIPPO Data Archive  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) study of the carbon cycle and greenhouse gases measured meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and aerosol constituents along transects from approximately pole-to-pole over the Pacific Ocean. HIPPO flew hundreds of vertical profiles from the ocean/ice surface to as high as the tropopause, at five times during different seasons over a three year period from 2009-2011. HIPPO provides the first high-resolution vertically-resolved global survey of a comprehensive suite of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols pertinent to understanding the carbon cycle and challenging global climate models.

13

Inelastic Tunneling Spectroscopy in Unconventional Superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic Tunneling Spectroscopy in Unconventional Superconductors Molecular Vibration and Single Superconductors ­ p.1/13 #12;Old Results R.C. Jaklevic and J. Lambe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 17, 1139-1140 (1966 in Unconventional Superconductors ­ p.2/13 #12;STM observation of local inelastic mode B.C. Stipe, M.A Rezaei, and W

14

Surface energy budget over the South Pole and turbulent heat fluxes as a function of an empirical bulk Richardson number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface energy budget over the South Pole and turbulent heat fluxes as a function of an empirical in the monthly mean surface energy budget and to investigate the behavior of turbulent heat fluxes under stable and one as the residual of the surface energy budget (i.e., subsurface heat fluxes minus net radiation

Walden, Von P.

15

Stability of autonomous systems The pole placement problem Stabilization by state feedback State observers Pole placement and Stability, Pole Placement, Observers and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stability of autonomous systems The pole placement problem Stabilization by state feedback State University of Groningen Stability, Pole Placement, Observers and Stabilization #12;Stability of autonomous and Outline 1 Stability of autonomous systems 2 The pole placement problem 3 Stabilization by state feedback 4

Trentelman, Harry L.

16

Steve Kropper WindPole Ventures, LLC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Wind Is More Valuable Than Wind Power "The Bloomberg of Wind" #12;PROBLEM 300 MW wind needs backup. No construction. No tech risk. Big economic advantage $15k vs $65k. Invenergy, #5 in wind asset. 6 states prepaidSteve Kropper WindPole Ventures, LLC Lexington, MA 617-306-9312 kropper@windpole.com Information

17

Fusion Residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss when and how the Verlinde dimensions of a rational conformal field theory can be expressed as correlation functions in a topological LG theory. It is seen that a necessary condition is that the RCFT fusion rules must exhibit an extra symmetry. We consider two particular perturbations of the Grassmannian superpotentials. The topological LG residues in one perturbation, introduced by Gepner, are shown to be a twisted version of the $SU(N)_k$ Verlinde dimensions. The residues in the other perturbation are the twisted Verlinde dimensions of another RCFT; these topological LG correlation functions are conjectured to be the correlation functions of the corresponding Grassmannian topological sigma model with a coupling in the action to instanton number.

Kenneth Intriligator

1991-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

18

Pole structure from energy-dependent and single-energy fits to $\\pi N$ elastic scattering data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The pole structure of the current GW/SAID partial-wave analysis of elastic $\\pi N$ scattering and $\\eta N$ production data is studied. Pole positions and residues are extracted from both the energy-dependent and single-energy fits, using two different methods. For the energy-dependent fits, both contour integration and a Laurent+Pietarinen approach are used. In the case of single-energy fits, the Laurent+Pietarinen approach is used. Errors are estimated and the two sets of results are compared to other recent and older fits to data.

Švarc, Alfred; Osmanovi?, Hedim; Stahov, Jugoslav; Workman, Ron L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

EECBG Success Story: North Pole's Holiday Wish for an Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pole's Holiday Wish for an Energy Efficient 2012 EECBG Success Story: North Pole's Holiday Wish for an Energy Efficient 2012 December 23, 2011 - 4:20pm Addthis The city of North...

20

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA IRVINE Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of the Intermediate Valence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Inelastic Neutron Scattering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.a Neutron Scattering Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.b

Lawrence, Jon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nuclear effects in deep inelastic scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors extend the approach used to treat quasi-elastic inclusive electron-nucleus scattering to the deep inelastic region. They provide a general approach to describe lepton scattering from an off-shell nucleon, and calculate the ratio of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross sections to the deuteron for nuclear matter and helium (EMC-effect). They find that the consistent inclusion of the binding effects, in particular the ones arising from the short-range nucleon-nucleon interaction, allows to describe the data in the region of x > 0.15 where binding fully accounts for the deviation of the cross section ratios from one.

O. Benhar; V.R. Pandharipande; I. Sick

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Heavy-quark correlations in deep inelastic scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss results for heavy quark correlations in next-to-leading order QCD in deep inelastic electroproduction.

J. Smith; B. W. Harris

1996-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

INELASTIC LIGHT SCATTERING STUDIES OF BOROCARBIDE SUPERCONDUCTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INELASTIC LIGHT SCATTERING STUDIES OF BOROCARBIDE SUPERCONDUCTORS IN­SANG YANG Department In recent years of studies in ``unconventional'' superconductivity, researchers have concentrated on exotic behavior of the heavy fermion and cuprate su­ perconductors. However, even superconductors that are thought

Yang, In-Sang

24

Microsoft Word - CX-Murray-CusterWoodPoles_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Covington SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Steve Scott Line Foreman III - TFNF-Snohomish Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement at selected locations along the...

25

POLE ASSIGNMENT FOR A VIBRATING SYSTEM WITH AERODYNAMIC EFFECT #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLE ASSIGNMENT FOR A VIBRATING SYSTEM WITH AERODYNAMIC EFFECT # J. N. WANG + , S. H. CHOU # , Y. C­input state feedback control arising from a one­dimensional vibrating system with aerodynamic e real axis. Key words. vibrating system, aerodynamic e#ect, state feedback control, pole assignment AMS

Chou, So-Hsiang

26

POLE ASSIGNMENT FOR A VIBRATING SYSTEM WITH AERODYNAMIC EFFECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLE ASSIGNMENT FOR A VIBRATING SYSTEM WITH AERODYNAMIC EFFECT J. N. WANG, S. H. CHOU, Y. C. CHEN feedback control arising from a one-dimensional vibrating system with aerodynamic effect. On the practical real axis. Key words. vibrating system, aerodynamic effect, state feedback control, pole assignment AMS

Lin, Wen-Wei

27

Coulomb Distortion in the Inelastic Regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coulomb distortion effects have been for a long time neglected in deep inelastic scattering for the good reason that the incident energies were very high. But for energies in the range of earlier data from SLAC or at JLab, the Coulomb distortion could have the potential consequence of affecting the A-dependence of the EMC effect and of the longitudinal to transverse virtual photon absorption cross section ratio $R(x,Q^2)$.

Patricia Solvignon, Dave Gaskell, John Arrington

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Coulomb distortion in the inelastic regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coulomb distortion effects have been for a long time neglected in deep inelastic scattering for the good reason that the incident energies were very high. But for energies in the range of earlier data from SLAC or at JLab, the Coulomb distortion could have the potential consequence of affecting the A-dependence of the EMC effect and of the longitudinal to transverse virtual photon absorption cross section ratio R(x,Q{sup 2}).

Solvignon, P.; Arrington, J. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gaskell, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

29

Coulomb distortion in the inelastic regime.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coulomb distortion effects have been for a long time neglected in deep inelastic scattering for the good reason that the incident energies were very high. But for energies in the range of earlier data from SLAC or at JLab, the Coulomb distortion could have the potential consequence of affecting the A-dependence of the EMC effect and of the longitudinal to transverse virtual photon absorption cross section ratio R(x,Q{sup 2}).

Solvignon, P.; Gaskell, D.; Arrington, J.; Physics; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Inelastic neutron scattering, Raman and DFT investigations of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inelastic neutron scattering, Raman and DFT investigations of the adsorption of phenanthrenequinone on onion-like carbon Daniela M. Anjos a , Alexander I. Kolesnikov a , Zili Wu a...

31

Shaping the spectrum of downconverted photons through optimized custom poling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a scheme for engineering the joint spectrum of photons created via spontaneous parametric down conversion. Our method relies on customizing the poling configuration of a quasi-phase-matched crystal. We use simulated annealing to find an optimized poling configuration which allows almost arbitrary shaping of the crystal's phase-matching function. This has direct application in the creation of pure single photons---currently one of the most important goals of single-photon quantum optics. We describe the general algorithm and provide code, written in C++, that outputs an optimized poling configuration given specific experimental parameters.

Annamaria Dosseva; Lukasz Cincio; Agata M. Branczyk

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

32

Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

Negret, Alexandru [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

Refined gluino and squark pole masses beyond leading order  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The physical pole and running masses of squarks and gluinos have recently been related at two-loop order in a mass-independent renormalization scheme. I propose a general method for improvement of such formulas, and argue that better accuracy results. The improved version gives an imaginary part of the pole mass that agrees exactly with the direct calculation of the physical width at next-to-leading order. I also find the leading three-loop contributions to the gluino pole mass in the case that squarks are heavier, using effective field theory and renormalization group methods. The efficacy of these improvements for the gluino and squarks is illustrated with numerical examples. Some necessary three-loop results for gauge coupling and fermion mass beta functions and pole masses in theories with more than one type of fermion representation, which are not directly accessible from the published literature, are presented in an Appendix.

Stephen P. Martin

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

34

Crater ice deposits near the south pole of Mars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Layered deposits atop both Martian poles are thought to preserve a record of past climatic conditions in up to three km of water ice and dust. Just beyond the extent of these south polar layered deposits (SPLD), dozens of ...

Westbrook, Owen William

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Damage-induced nonassociated inelastic flow in rock salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model recently developed by CHAN, et al. (1992), for describing time-dependent, pressure-sensitive inelastic flow and damage evolution in crystalline solids was evaluated against triaxial creep experiments on rock salt. Guided by experimental observations, the kinetic equation and the flow law for damage-induced inelastic flow in the model were modified to account for the development of damage and inelastic dilatation in the transient creep regime. The revised model was then utilized to obtain the creep response and damage evolution in rock salt as a function of confining pressure and stress difference. Comparison between model calculation and experiment revealed that damage-induced inelastic flow is nonassociated, dilatational, and contributes significantly to the macroscopic strain rate observed in rock salt deformed at low confining pressures. The inelastic strain rate and volumetric strain due to damage decrease with increasing confining pressures, and all are suppressed at sufficiently high confining pressures.

Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Brodsky, N.S.; Fossum, A.F. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Avoidance of a Landau pole by flat contributions in QED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider massless Quantum Electrodynamics in the momentum scheme and carry forward an approach based on Dyson–Schwinger equations to approximate both the ?-function and the renormalized photon self-energy (Yeats, 2011). Starting from the Callan–Symanzik equation, we derive a renormalization group (RG) recursion identity which implies a non-linear ODE for the anomalous dimension and extract a sufficient but not necessary criterion for the existence of a Landau pole. This criterion implies a necessary condition for QED to have no such pole. Solving the differential equation exactly for a toy model case, we integrate the corresponding RG equation for the running coupling and find that even though the ?-function entails a Landau pole it exhibits a flat contribution capable of decreasing its growth, in other cases possibly to the extent that such a pole is avoided altogether. Finally, by applying the recursion identity, we compute the photon propagator and investigate the effect of flat contributions on both spacelike and timelike photons. -- Highlights: •We present an approach to approximate both the ?-function and the photon self-energy. •We find a sufficient criterion for the self-energy to entail the existence of a Landau pole. •We study non-perturbative ‘flat’ contributions that emerge within the context of our approach. •We discuss a toy model and how it is affected by flat contributions.

Klaczynski, Lutz, E-mail: lutz.klaczynski@gmx.de [Department of Physics, Humboldt University Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kreimer, Dirk, E-mail: kreimer@mathematik.hu-berlin.de [Alexander von Humboldt Chair in Mathematical Physics, Humboldt University, Berlin 12489 (Germany)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Pole placement design for linear multivariable control systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assignment. 4. Accuracy of the solution of FX=G. 5. Examples. IV MINIMUM NORM STATE FEEDBACK PROBLEM 1. Introduction. 2. Minimum norm algorithm. A lower bourd 4. Examples. ROBUST EIGENSTRUCTURE POLE PLACEMENT COMPENSATOR DESIGN. g 7 39 61 61 61.... 82758 4. 68965 2. 65517 L 2. 06896 -1. 72413 -3. 13793 Condition No. oi' X = 9. $0778 Closed Loop System Poles I -3 -0 99999-j. -0 99999+ii 16 B the new al orithm(A com anion form) A 0 1 0 0 0 1 -6 -8 -5 -3 ~ 2 -2 ~ 3 -0. 8 X = -7 -6. 5 ? 2 5...

Keel, Leehyun

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Hydrodynamic Burnett equations for inelastic Maxwell models of granular gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hydrodynamic Burnett equations and the associated transport coefficients are exactly evaluated for generalized inelastic Maxwell models. In those models, the one-particle distribution function obeys the inelastic Boltzmann equation, with a velocity-independent collision rate proportional to the $\\gamma$ power of the temperature. The pressure tensor and the heat flux are obtained to second order in the spatial gradients of the hydrodynamic fields with explicit expressions for all the Burnett transport coefficients as functions of $\\gamma$, the coefficient of normal restitution, and the dimensionality of the system. Some transport coefficients that are related in a simple way in the elastic limit become decoupled in the inelastic case. As a byproduct, existing results in the literature for three-dimensional elastic systems are recovered, and a generalization to any dimension of the system is given. The structure of the present results is used to estimate the Burnett coefficients for inelastic hard spheres.

Nagi Khalil; Vicente Garzó; Andrés Santos

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

39

Dynamics of inelastic and reactive gas-surface collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of inelastic and reactive collisions in atomic beam-surface scattering are presented. The inelastic scattering of hyperthermal rare gaseous atoms from three alkali halide surfaces (LiF, NaCl, GI)was studied to understand mechanical energy transfer in unreactive systems. The dynamics of the chemical reaction in the scattering of H(D) atoms from the surfaces of LIF(001) and the basal plane of graphite were also studied.

Smoliar, L.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

BUCKLING BEHAVIOUR OF WOODEN POLES J. Savic" S.H. Rizkalla2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lines and transmission towers. In recent years, a considerable number of such poles have failed duc and transmission towers. In recent years, a considerable number of such poles have failed due to heavy ice build

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

HADES - Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) is located in the upper part of the optical neutrino observatory IceCube, currently under construction. SPATS consists of four strings at depths between 80 m and 500 m below the surface of the ice with seven stages per string. Each stage is equipped with an acoustic sensor and a transmitter. Three strings (string A-C) were deployed in the austral summer 2006/07. SPATS was extended by a fourth string (string D) with second generation sensors and transmitters in 2007/08. One second generation sensor type HADES (Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole) consists of a ring-shaped piezo-electric element coated with polyurethane. The development of the sensor, optimization of acoustic transmission by acoustic impedance matching and first in-situ results will be discussed.

Semburg, Benjamin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

HADES - Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) is located in the upper part of the optical neutrino observatory IceCube, currently under construction. SPATS consists of four strings at depths between 80 m and 500 m below the surface of the ice with seven stages per string. Each stage is equipped with an acoustic sensor and a transmitter. Three strings (string A-C) were deployed in the austral summer 2006/07. SPATS was extended by a fourth string (string D) with second generation sensors and transmitters in 2007/08. One second generation sensor type HADES (Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole) consists of a ring-shaped piezo-electric element coated with polyurethane. The development of the sensor, optimization of acoustic transmission by acoustic impedance matching and first in-situ results will be discussed.

Benjamin Semburg; for the IceCube Collaboration

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

43

North Pole, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company) JumpNorth Haven, Maine:Ohio:Pole, Alaska: Energy Resources Jump

44

Pole-phase modulated toroidal winding for an induction machine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stator (10) for an induction machine for a vehicle has a cylindrical core (12) with inner and outer slots (26, 28) extending longitudinally along the inner and outer peripheries between the end faces (22, 24). Each outer slot is associated with several adjacent inner slots. A plurality of toroidal coils (14) are wound about the core and laid in the inner and outer slots. Each coil occupies a single inner slot and is laid in the associated outer slot thereby minimizing the distance the coil extends from the end faces and minimizing the length of the induction machine. The toroidal coils are configured for an arbitrary pole phase modulation wherein the coils are configured with variable numbers of phases and poles for providing maximum torque for cranking and switchable to a another phase and pole configuration for alternator operation. An adaptor ring (36) circumferentially positioned about the stator improves mechanical strength, and provides a coolant channel manifold (34) for removing heat produced in stator windings during operation.

Miller, John Michael (Saline, MI); Ostovic, Vlado (Weinheim, DE)

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

45

Factorization and resummation for collinear poles in QCD amplitudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the origin of subleading soft and collinear poles of form factors and amplitudes in dimensionally-regulated massless gauge theories. In the case of form factors of fundamental fields, these poles originate from a single function of the coupling, denoted G({alpha}{sub s}), depending on both the spin and gauge quantum numbers of the field. We relate G({alpha}{sub s}) to gauge-theory matrix elements involving the gluon field strength. We then show that G({alpha}{sub s}) is the sum of three terms: a universal eikonal anomalous dimension, a universal non-eikonal contribution, given by the coefficient B{sub {delta}}({alpha}{sub s}) of {delta}(1-z) in the collinear evolution kernel, and a process-dependent short-distance coefficient function, which does not contribute to infrared poles. Using general results on the factorization of soft and collinear singularities in fixed-angle massless gauge theory amplitudes, we conclude that all such singularities are captured by the eikonal approximation, supplemented only by the knowledge of B{sub {delta}}({alpha}{sub s}). We explore the consequences of our results for conformal gauge theories, where in particular we find a simple exact relation between the form factor and the cusp anomalous dimension.

Dixon, Lance J.; Magnea, Lorenzo; Sterman, George

2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

46

Inelastic Production of J/psi Mesons in Photoproduction and Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A measurement is presented of inelastic photo- and electroproduction of J/psi mesons in ep scattering at HERA. The data were recorded with the H1 detector in the period from 2004 to 2007. Single and double differential cross sections are determined and the helicity distributions of the J/psi mesons are analysed. The results are compared to theoretical predictions in the colour singlet model and in the framework of non-relativistic QCD. Calculations in the colour singlet model using a k_T factorisation ansatz are able to give a good description of the data, while colour singlet model calculations to next-to-leading order in collinear factorisation underestimate the data.

Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; Delcourt, B; Delvax, J; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Falkiewicz, A; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Grebenyuk, A; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C.W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, X; Jonsson, L; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P.J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nikitin, D; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Pahl, P; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Radescu, V; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P.C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Volchinski, V; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fusion, deep-inelastic collisions, and neck formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use the liquid drop model to calculate the cross section for neck formation in a heavy-ion collision and show that for the recently measured /sup 58/Ni+/sup 124/Sn case this cross section is strongly related to the sum of the fusion and deep-inelastic cross sections. We note that the observation of deep-inelastic collisions at sub-Coulomb barrier energies may be classically understood by the effective barrier lowering obtained when the neck degree of freedom is considered.

Aguiar, C.E.; Barbosa, V.C.; Canto, L.F.; Donangelo, R.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

INELASTIC NEUTRON SCATTERING SELECTION RULES OF 03B1 HgI2 M. SIESKIND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

899 INELASTIC NEUTRON SCATTERING SELECTION RULES OF 03B1 HgI2 M. SIESKIND Laboratoire de The inelastic neutron scattering selection rules of 03B1 HgI2 in the directions 0394, 03A3 and 039B are derived Abstracts 63.20D Introduction. - Inelastic neutron scattering is a powerful technique for the determination

Boyer, Edmond

49

Study of gamma rays from neutron inelastic scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy and intensity of the inelastic gamma rays of twenty low atomic number elements: Li, C, N, 0, Mg, Al, Na, Si, S, Cl, K, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Pb, are measured with a 30 cc Ge(Li) detector using an ...

Hui, Bertram Ho Wai

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Heavy Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss two topics in the production of heavy quarks in deep-inelastic scattering: the next-to-leading order Monte-Carlo HVQDIS and the next-to-leading logarithmic resummation of soft gluon effects, including estimates of next-to-next-to-leading order corrections therefrom.

B. W. Harris; E. Laenen; S. Moch; J. Smith

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

51

Kinematic dynamo wave in the vicinity of the solar poles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a dynamo wave in the solar convective shell for the kinematic $\\alpha\\omega$-dynamo model. The spectrum and eigenfunctions of the corresponding equations are derived analytically with the aid of the WKB method. Our main aim here is to investigate the dynamo wave behavior in the vicinity of the solar poles. Explicit expressions for the incident and reflected waves are obtained. The reflected wave is shown to be relatively weak in comparison to the incident wave. The phase shifts and the ratio of amplitudes of the two waves are found.

Victor Galitski; D. D. Sokoloff

2001-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

52

SRC Residual fuel oils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

Tewari, Krishna C. (Whitehall, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos in South Pole ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When high-energy particles interact in dense media to produce a particle shower, most of the shower energy is deposited in the medium as heat. This causes the medium to expand locally and emit a shock wave with a medium-dependent peak frequency on the order of 10 kHz. In South Pole ice in particular, the elastic properties of the medium have been theorized to provide good coupling of particle energy to acoustic energy. The acoustic attenuation length has been theorized to be several km, which could enable a sparsely instrumented large-volume detector to search for rare signals from high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. We simulated a hybrid optical/radio/acoustic extension to the IceCube array, specifically intended to detect cosmogenic (GZK) neutrinos with multiple methods simultaneously in order to achieve high confidence in a discovered signal and to measure angular, temporal, and spectral distributions of GZK neutrinos. This work motivated the design, deployment, and operation of the South Pole Acoustic Te...

Vandenbroucke, Justin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Microsoft Word - CX-RossDistrictWoodPolesFY13_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Alvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Stacie Hensley Realty Specialist - TEP-TPP-4 Proposed Action: 2013 Ross District Wood Pole...

55

Microsoft Word - CX-Chehalis-CentraliaNo2WoodPolesFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPROlympia SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Ryan Brady Line Foreman III - TFOK-Chehalis Proposed Action: Wood pole structure replacements on...

56

Microsoft Word - CX-AlveyMaintenanceHQ_PoleStorageUpgrade_WEB...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Brett Sherer Project Manager - KEP-4 Proposed Action: Environmental protection system upgrades at pole...

57

Microsoft Word - CX-KalispellTLMDistrictFY11WoodPoleReplacement...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Cleareance Memorandum Michael Stolfus Lineman Foreman III - TFKF-Kalispell Kurt Marsh Lineman Foreman I - TFKF-Kalispell Proposed Action: Wood pole...

58

Microsoft Word - CX-PascoDistrictPoleReplacement_FY13_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPRPasco SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Greg Wilfong Lineman Foreman III - TFPF-PASCO Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement and minor access...

59

Microsoft Word - CX-BigEddy-RedmondWoodPoles_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Celilo SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Darrell Aaby Line Foreman III - TFDF-Redmond Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements at select locations...

60

Microsoft Word - CX-FY11PascoDistrictWoodPoleReplacement_WEB...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-PASCO SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Toby Cossairt Lineman Foreman III - TFPF-PASCO Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement and minor...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Microsoft Word - CX-CowlitzTaptoChehalis-CovingtonWoodPoles_WEB...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Covington SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Clay Grande Line Foreman III - TFCF-Covington Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement at...

62

Microsoft Word - CX-WenatcheeDistrictPoleReplacementFY13_WEB...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPRPasco SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Joseph Lauer Lineman Foreman III - TFWF-SCHULTZ Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement and minor...

63

Microsoft Word - CX-FY11WenatcheeDistrictWoodPoleReplacement...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-PASCO SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Terry Kugler Lineman Foreman III - TFWF-SCHULTZ Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement and minor...

64

Microsoft Word - CX-PacificCoWAWoodPolesFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPROlympia SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Ryan Brady Line Foreman III - TFOK-Chehalis Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements as needed on...

65

Microsoft Word - CX-PilotButte-LaPine-WoodPoles-FY13_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements on Bonneville Power...

66

Microsoft Word - CX-RedmondWoodPoles_multiSub_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Celilo SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Darrell Aaby Line Foreman III - TFDF-Redmond Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement at selected...

67

Microsoft Word - CX-AlveyDistrictWoodPoles-FY14_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8, 2014 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Alvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Stacey Hensley Project Manager - TEP-TPP-4 Proposed Action: 2014 Alvey District Wood Pole...

68

Liquid Argon Cryogenic Detector Calibration by Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method for calibration of cryogenic liquid argon detector response to recoils with certain energy -8.2 keV - is proposed. The method utilizes a process of inelastic scattering of monoenergetic neutrons produced by fusion DD neutron generator. Features of kinematics of inelastic scattering cause sufficient (forty times) increase in count rate of useful events relative to traditional scheme exploited elastic scattering with the same recoil energy and compatible energy resolution. The benefits of the proposed scheme of calibration most well implemented with the use of tagged neutron generator as a neutron source that allows to eliminate background originated from casual coincidence of signals on cryogenic detector and additional detector of scattered neutrons.

Sergey Polosatkin; Evgeny Grishnyaev; Alexander Dolgov

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

69

Spin Measurements in lp -> hX Deep Inelastic Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of hadrons in polarized lepton-nucleon deep inelastic scattering is discussed. The helicity density matrix of the hadron is computed within the QCD hard scattering formalism and its elements are shown to yield information on the spin structure of the nucleon and the spin dependence of the quark fragmentation process. The case of $\\rho$ vector mesons is considered in more detail and estimates are given.

Anselmino, M; Hansson, J; Murgia, F

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Radio-frequency probes of Antarctic ice at South Pole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System Sciences O p e n A cce ss Discussions Radio-frequency probes of Antarctic ice at South Pole D. Besson1 and I. Kravchenko2 1University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582, USA 2University of Nebraska – Lincoln... to successive waveforms. Each 0.5 meter division horizontally corresponds to approximately 5 ns. -20 -10 0 10 20 Rx v ol ta ge ( V, a ft er s ca li ng ; of fs e Time (ns, relative) 6 us echo (Vx1) 9.6 us echo (Vx1.3) 13.9 us echo (Vx3.5) 17.2 us echo (Vx10...

Besson, David Zeke; Kravchenko, I.

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

71

Transient Simulation of On-Chip Transmission Lines via Exact Pole Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transient Simulation of On-Chip Transmission Lines via Exact Pole Extraction Guoqing Chen and Eby G response at the far end of a transmission line is proposed in this paper. Unlike approximating the poles, on-chip interconnects exhibit significant transmission line behavior. An efficient solution

Friedman, Eby G.

72

ULYSSES BEGINS EXPLORATION OF THE SUN'S NORTHERN POLE The Ulysses spacecraft has begun to explore the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ULYSSES BEGINS EXPLORATION OF THE SUN'S NORTHERN POLE The Ulysses spacecraft has begun to explore the northern pole of the Sun, initiating the second phase of its primary mission to study regions above and below the Sun never before explored by spacecraft. Ulysses, a joint NASA-European Space Agency mission

Christian, Eric

73

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Maine Department of Environmental Protection's Residuals, Sludge, and Composting program regulates the land application and post-processing of organic wastes, including sewage sludge, septage,...

74

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha-particle inelastic scattering Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with matter in several ways. A large, massive, charged alpha particle... and inelastic scattering of the neutron means that the atomic nucleus remains unexcited (in ground...

75

Heavy-quark correlations in deep-inelastic electroproduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have completed the next-to-leading order perturbative QCD corrections to the virtual-photon exclusive differential cross sections for heavy quark production in deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering, i.e. $e + P \\rightarrow Q + \\overline{Q} + X$. Using these results, we have computed distributions which are sensitive to correlations among the heavy quark, the heavy antiquark, and the associated jet. Some predictions for charm and bottom heavy quark production at the electron-proton collider HERA are presented.

B. W. Harris; J. Smith

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Inelastic scattering of fast neutrons from $^{56}$Fe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic scattering of fast neutrons from $^{56}$Fe was studied at the photoneutron source nELBE. The neutron energies were determined on the basis of a timeof- flight measurement. Gamma-ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium detector. The total scattering cross sections deduced from the present experiment in an energy range from 0.8 to 9.6 MeV agree within 15% with earlier data and with predictions of the statistical-reaction code Talys.

Beyer, R; Hannaske, R; Junghans, A R; Massarczyk, R; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Ferrari, A; Kögler, T; Röder, M; Schmidt, K; Wagner, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Proton inelastic scattering on {sup 56}Ni in inverse kinematics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inelastic proton scattering to the first excited 2{sup +} state at 2.701 MeV in doubly magic {sup 56}Ni was studied at 101 MeV/u in inverse kinematics. The radioactive {sup 56}Ni ion beam was obtained from the SIS heavy ion synchrotron at GSI Darmstadt via fragmentation of a {sup 58}Ni beam, and separation by the fragment separator (FRS). A value B(E2, 0{sup +} {yields} 2{sup +}) = 600 {+-} 120 e{sup 2} fm{sup 4} was obtained which corresponds to a deformation parameter {beta} ({sup 56}Ni) = 0.173 {+-} 0.017.

Kraus, G.; Egelhof, P.; Fischer, C.; Geissel, H.; Himmler, A.; Nickel, F.; Muenzenberg, G.; Schwab, W.; Weiss, A. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Chulkov, L.; Golovkov, M.; Ogloblin, A. [I.V. Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Friese, J.; Gillitzer, A.; Koerner, H.J.; Peter, M. [TU, Munich (Germany); Henning, W.; Schiffer, J.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Kratz, J.V. [Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Nuclear medium effects in $?(\\bar?)$-nucleus deep inelastic scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the nuclear medium effects in the weak structure functions $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $F_3(x,Q^2)$ in the deep inelastic neutrino/antineutrino reactions in nuclei. We use a theoretical model for the nuclear spectral functions which incorporates the conventional nuclear effects, such as Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions calculated from a microscopic model for meson-nucleus self-energies. The calculations have been performed using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations. Our results are compared with the experimental data of NuTeV and CDHSW.

H. Haider; I. Ruiz Simo; M. Sajjad Athar; M. J. Vicente Vacas

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

79

Graphene nanoribbon molecular sensor based on inelastic transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of phonon-assisted inelastic quantum transport calculations are presented for graphene nanoribbons. We consider a single molecule attached to a carbon atom and describe the electronic structure by a tight-binding model, taking into account a local phonon mode associated with the attached molecule characteristic vibration. The calculated transmission spectra reveal a striking sensitivity for molecules attached to the edges of asymmetric zigzag graphene nanoribbons. Our results show that the differential conductance may be used to identify the presence as well as the characteristic vibration frequency of a target molecule at finite temperatures.

Ritter, C. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Muniz, R. B.; Latgé, A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense SN, 24210-360 Niterói-RJ (Brazil)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

Poles as the only true resonant-state signals extracted from a worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes using only one, well controlled pole-extraction method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each and every energy-dependent partial-wave analysis is parametrizing the pole positions in a procedure defined by the way the continuous energy dependence is implemented. These pole positions are, henceforth, inherently model dependent. To reduce this model dependence, we use only one, coupled-channel, unitary, fully analytic method based on the isobar approximation to extract the pole positions from each available member of the worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes, which are understood as nothing more but a good energy-dependent representation of genuine experimental numbers assembled in a form of partial-wave data. In that way, the model dependence related to the different assumptions on the analytic form of the partial-wave amplitudes is avoided, and the true confidence limit for the existence of a particular resonant state, at least in one model, is established. The way the method works and first results are demonstrated for the S{sub 11} partial wave.

Hadzimehmedovic, M.; Osmanovic, H.; Stahov, J. [Univerzity of Tuzla, Faculty of Science, Univerzitetska 4, 75000 Tuzla (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Ceci, S.; Svarc, A. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Simplest piston problem. II. Inelastic collisions Pablo I. Hurtado1,2,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simplest piston problem. II. Inelastic collisions Pablo I. Hurtado1,2, * and S. Redner3, 1 particles are separated by a heavy "piston," with elastic collisions between particles but inelastic collisions between the light particles and the interval ends. A symmetry breaking occurs in which the piston

Redner, Sidney

82

Simplest piston problem. II. Inelastic collisions Pablo I. Hurtado 1,2, * and S. Redner 3,+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simplest piston problem. II. Inelastic collisions Pablo I. Hurtado 1,2, * and S. Redner 3,+ 1 particles are separated by a heavy ``piston,'' with elastic collisions between particles but inelastic collisions between the light particles and the interval ends. A symmetry breaking occurs in which the piston

Redner, Sidney

83

Capture and Indirect Detection of Inelastic Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the capture rate for Dark Matter in the Sun for models where the dominant interaction with nuclei is inelastic -- the Dark Matter up-scatters to a nearby dark "partner" state with a small splitting of order a 100 keV. Such models have previously been shown to be compatible with DAMA/LIBRA data, as well as data from all other direct detection experiments. The kinematics of inelastic Dark Matter ensures that the dominant contribution to capture occurs from scattering off of iron. We give a prediction for neutrino rates for current and future neutrino telescopes based on the results from current direct detection experiments. Current bounds from Super--Kamiokande and IceCube-22 significantly constrain these models, assuming annihilations are into two-body Standard Model final states, such as W+W-, t-tbar, b-bbar or tau+tau-. Annihilations into first and second generation quarks and leptons are generally allowed, as are annihilations into new force carriers which decay dominantly into e+e-, mu+mu- and pi+pi-.

Arjun Menon; Rob Morris; Aaron Pierce; Neal Weiner

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

84

Froissart Bound on Inelastic Cross Section Without Unknown Constants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assuming that axiomatic local field theory results hold for hadron scattering, Andr\\'e Martin and S. M. Roy recently obtained absolute bounds on the D-wave below threshold for pion-pion scattering and thereby determined the scale of the logarithm in the Froissart bound on total cross sections in terms of pion mass only. Previously, Martin proved a rigorous upper bound on the inelastic cross-section $\\sigma_{inel}$ which is one-fourth of the corresponding upper bound on $\\sigma_{tot}$, and Wu, Martin,Roy and Singh improved the bound by adding the constraint of a given $\\sigma_{tot}$. Here we use unitarity and analyticity to determine, without any high energy approximation, upper bounds on energy averaged inelastic cross sections in terms of low energy data in the crossed channel. These are Froissart-type bounds without any unknown coefficient or unknown scale factors and can be tested experimentally. Alternatively, their asymptotic forms,together with the Martin-Roy absolute bounds on pion-pion D-waves below t...

Martin, André

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Coherence effects in deep inelastic scattering from nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complete theoretical picture of multiple scattering processes in QCD remains elusive. In deep inelastic scattering experiments (DIS), we hope to find out information about the internal structure of nuclei from inelastically scattering high-energy electrons off them. The electrons interact via virtual photon exchange with the target. In the target rest frame the virtual photon splits into a quark-antiquark pair which is then scattered off the target color field. At high energies, coherent multiple scattering within the nucleus takes place. We develop a model that uses a parameterization of scattering cross section of the quark-antiquark pair off the proton to predict the cross section suppression known as shadowing in larger nuclei. This model takes the possibility of multiple scattering into account using Glauber high-energy collision theory. In large nuclei we must also move beyond the eikonal approximation by correcting for the finite lifetime of the quark-antiquark pair inside the nucleus. Results and implications of this model in relation to available data will be discussed. Finally, application of this type of model to predicting gluon densities will be considered. Understanding this process can give us insights into the more oomplicated scattering taking place in heavy ion colliders such as RHIC and LHC.

Ver Steeg, G. L. (Greg L.); Raufeisen, J. (Jorg)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A New Polyethylene Scattering Law Determined Using Inelastic Neutron Scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monte Carlo neutron transport codes such as MCNP rely on accurate data for nuclear physics cross-sections to produce accurate results. At low energy, this takes the form of scattering laws based on the dynamic structure factor, S (Q, E). High density polyethylene (HDPE) is frequently employed as a neutron moderator at both high and low temperatures, however the only cross-sections available are for T =300 K, and the evaluation has not been updated in quite some time. In this paper we describe inelastic neutron scattering measurements on HDPE at 5 and 300 K which are used to improve the scattering law for HDPE. We describe the experimental methods, review some of the past HDPE scattering laws, and compare computations using these models to the measured S (Q, E). The total cross-section is compared to available data, and the treatment of the carbon secondary scatterer as a free gas is assessed. We also discuss the use of the measurement itself as a scattering law via the 1 phonon approximation. We show that a scattering law computed using a more detailed model for the Generalized Density of States (GDOS) compares more favorably to this experiment, suggesting that inelastic neutron scattering can play an important role in both the development and validation of new scattering laws for Monte Carlo work.

Lavelle, Christopher M [ORNL; Liu, C [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Pentachlorophenol (PCP)-treated wood poles and crossarms: Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative database on leachable concentrations of pentachlorophenol (PCP) from a population of treated utility wood poles and crossarms as obtained by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). An ancillary objective was to carefully document a subsampling method in preparing wood samples for tests by the TCLP. Data obtained in this study indicate that PCP-treated utility wood poles and crossarms are non-hazardous. Measured concentrations of PCP and other organic compounds subject to TCLP analysis were an order of magnitude or more below TC limits in 47 samples of wood derived from three different sections of 13 utility wood poles and from 9 crossarms. Wedge shaped subsamples, removed from full cross sectional slices of poles and crossarms, were prepared according to EPA procedures, subjected to the TCLP, and resultant leachates analyzed for the presence of PCP. 4 refs., 3 figs., 10 tab.

Horn, M.E. (Environmental Management Services, Waupaca, WI (USA)); Holcombe, L.; Owens, J.B. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

June 15, 1996 / Vol. 21, No. 12 / OPTICS LETTERS 857 Photorefractive effects in periodically poled ferroelectrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- conversion interactions.2 ­ 5 There have been several reports that periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN s is a parameter that depends on the properties of the host crystal, donors, and traps and nd is the dark

Fejer, Martin M.

89

Microsoft Word - CX-NBendFY11WoodPolesWEND-TAHK_TAHK-RDSPT_WEB...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Line Foreman III - TFEP-North Bend Line Foreman I - TFEP-North Bend Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement and minor access road maintenance along the Wendson-Tahkenitch 1 and...

90

Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Price, Attenuation of acoustic waves in glacial ice and saltacoustics, South Pole, sound speed, pressure waves,shear waves PACS: 47.35.De, 47.35.Rs, 62.65. +k, 92.40.Vq,

Klein, Spencer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Nested Saturation with Guaranteed Real Poles1 Eric N. Johnson2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nested Saturation with Guaranteed Real Poles1 Eric N. Johnson2 and Suresh K. Kannan 3 School Assistant Professor of Avionics Integration eric.johnson@ae.gatech.edu 3Graduate Research Assistant suresh

Johnson, Eric N.

92

Microsoft Word - CX-ChemawaWoodPolesCT-KFG12-KOCFGT-FY12_WEB...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemawa District Wood Pole Replacement Projects PP&A Project No.: 2325 (Carlton-Tillamook 1, Keeler-Forest Grove 2, Keeler-Oregon City 2, Keeler-Forest Grove 1, Forest...

93

Microsoft Word - CX-Brasada-Harney-WoodPoles_FY13_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Brasada-Harney No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement...

94

Microsoft Word - CX-Driscoll-NaselleWood PolesFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPAlvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Ryan Brady Line Foreman III - TFOK-Chehalis Proposed Action: In-kind wood pole replacements as needed on...

95

Microsoft Word - CX-OregonCity-ChemawaWoodPolesFY12_WEB .docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Alvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum James Semrau Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Oregon City-Chemawa 2 Wood Pole...

96

Microsoft Word - CX-SpokaneDistrictWoodPoleReplacementsFY13_WEB...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Amanda Williams Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: 2013 Spokane District Wood Pole...

97

Microsoft Word - CX-Redmond-PilotButte-WoodPoleFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Redmond-Pilot Butte No. 1 Wood Pole...

98

Microsoft Word - CX-NorthBendWoodPoles_FY13_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

North Bend District Wood Pole Replacement Projects PP&A Project No.: 2658 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location:...

99

Microsoft Word - CX-Big Eddy-Redmond-WoodPolesFY13_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Big Eddy-Redmond No. 1 Wood Pole...

100

Microsoft Word - CX-AlveyDistWoodPoles_FY13_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alvey District Wood Pole Replacement Projects PP&A Project No.: 2663 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Various...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microsoft Word - CX-LaPine-ChiloquinWoodPoleFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: La Pine-Chiloquin No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement...

102

Microsoft Word - CX-PilotButte-LaPineWoodPoleFY12_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 Wood Pole...

103

Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0908.3251. [29] B. Semburg, HADES–Hydrophone for Acousticand two sensor modules of the “HADES” design with one sensorDetection at South Pole”, HADES [29]). The sensors are

Klein, Spencer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Low-frequency Vibrational Anomalies in -Lactoglobulin: Contribution of Different Hydrogen Classes Revealed by Inelastic Neutron Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revealed by Inelastic Neutron Scattering A. Orecchini, A. Paciaroni, A. R. Bizzarri, and S. Cannistraro -lactoglobulin has been investigated by inelastic neutron scattering, on both dry and D2O-hydrated samples. Both typically accessible energy and momentum transfers, inelastic thermal neutron scattering is probably

Tuscia, Università Degli Studi Della

105

Resolution of the multichannel anomaly in the extraction of S-matrix resonance-pole parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the framework of a mathematically well-defined coupled-channel T-matrix model we have improved the existing multichannel pole-extraction procedure based on the numerical analytic continuation of the channel propagator, and for the first time we present the full set of pole parameters for already published amplitudes. Standard single-channel pole-extraction method (speed plot) was then applied to those amplitudes and resulting sets of T-matrix poles were inspected. The anomaly has been established that in some partial waves the pole values extracted using the standard single-channel methods differ not only from the values obtained using the analytic continuation method, but also change from one reaction to another. Inspired by this peculiarity, we have developed a new single-channel pole-extraction method based solely on the assumption of the partial wave analyticity. Since the speed plot turns out to be the lowest order term of the proposed method, the anomaly is understood and resolved.

Ceci, Sasa [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Stahov, Jugoslav [Abilene Christian University, ACU Station Box 27963, Abilene, TX 79699 (United States); University of Tuzla, Faculty of Science, Univerzitetska 4, 35000 Tuzla (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Svarc, Alfred; Zauner, Branimir [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Watson, Shon [Abilene Christian University, ACU Station Box 27963, Abilene, TX 79699 (United States)

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Chemical Characterization of Individual Particles and Residuals...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Individual Particles and Residuals of Cloud Droplets and Ice Crystals Collected On Board Research Chemical Characterization of Individual Particles and Residuals of Cloud Droplets...

107

DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

Kyser, E

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

108

Noise Rectification and Fluctuations of an Asymmetric Inelastic Piston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a massive inelastic piston, whose opposite faces have different coefficients of restitution, moving under the action of an infinitely dilute gas of hard disks maintained at a fixed temperature. The dynamics of the piston is Markovian and obeys a continuous Master Equation: however, the asymmetry of restitution coefficients induces a violation of detailed balance and a net drift of the piston, as in a Brownian ratchet. Numerical investigations of such non-equilibrium stationary state show that the velocity fluctuations of the piston are symmetric around the mean value only in the limit of large piston mass, while they are strongly asymmetric in the opposite limit. Only taking into account such an asymmetry, i.e. including a third parameter in addition to the mean and the variance of the velocity distribution, it is possible to obtain a satisfactory analytical prediction for the ratchet drift velocity.

G. Costantini; U. Marini Bettolo Marconi; A. Puglisi

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

109

Nuclear spin response studies in inelastic polarized proton scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spin-flip probabilities S/sub nn/ have been measured for inelastic proton scattering at incident proton energies around 300 MeV from a number of nuclei. At low excitation energies S/sub nn/ is below the free value. For excitation energies above about 30 MeV for momentum transfers between about 0.35 fm/sup /minus/1/ and 0.65 fm/sup / minus/1/ S/sub nn/ exceeds free values significantly. These results suggest that the relative ..delta..S = 1(..delta..S = 0 + ..delta..S = 1) nuclear spin response approaches about 90% in the region of the enhancement. Comparison of the data with slab response calculations are presented. Decomposition of the measured cross sections into sigma(..delta..S = 0) and sigma(..delta..S = 1) permit extraction of nonspin-flip and spin-flip dipole and quadrupole strengths. 29 refs., 11 figs.

Jones, K.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - accumulated inelastic strain Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-4. It is known that the total equivalent inelastic strain range per step of thermal load can be used to evaluate... the life 5-8. To clarify the relation between design...

111

Hadronization in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering on nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hadronization in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering on nuclei A. Airapetian p , N. Akopov aa , Z. Akopov aa , E.C. Aschenauer g , W. Augustyniak z , R. Avakian aa , A. Avetissian aa , E

112

Inclusive Aand Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at Cebaf at Higher Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We summarize the discussion on the possibilities of doing inclusive and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering experiments at CEBAF with beam energy of the order of 10 GeV.

B. Frois; P. J. Mulders

1994-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

113

Parallel Computational Modelling of Inelastic Neutron Scattering in Multi-node and Multi-core Architectures   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper examines the initial parallel implementation of SCATTER, a computationally intensive inelastic neutron scattering routine with polycrystalline averaging capability, for the General Utility Lattice Program (GULP). Of particular importance...

Garba, M.T.; Gonzales-Velez, H.; Roach, D.L.

2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

Evolution and stability of shock waves in dissipative gases characterized by activated inelastic collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous experiments have revealed that shock waves driven through dissipative gases may become unstable, for example, in granular gases, and in molecular gases undergoing strong relaxation effects. The mechanisms controlling these instabilities are not well understood. We successfully isolated and investigated this instability in the canonical problem of piston driven shock waves propagating into a medium characterized by inelastic collision processes. We treat the standard model of granular gases, where particle collisions are taken as inelastic with constant coefficient of restitution. The inelasticity is activated for sufficiently strong collisions. Molecular dynamic simulations were performed for 30,000 particles. We find that all shock waves investigated become unstable, with density non-uniformities forming in the relaxation region. The wavelength of these fingers is found comparable to the characteristic relaxation thickness. Shock Hugoniot curves for both elastic and inelastic collisions were obtaine...

Sirmas, Nick

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Revised Born-Oppenheimer approach and a reprojection method for inelastic collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantum reprojection method within the standard adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approach is derived for multielectron collision systems. The method takes nonvanishing asymptotic nonadiabatic couplings into account and distinguishes asymptotic currents in molecular-state channels and in atomic-state channels. The method is demonstrated for the example of low-energy inelastic Li + Na collisions for which the conventional application of the standard adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approach fails and leads to paradoxes such as infinite inelastic cross sections.

Belyaev, Andrey K. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Herzen University, St. Petersburg 191186 (Russian Federation) and Department of Chemistry, University of Rome 'La Sapienza', I-00185 Rome (Italy)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Positron interactions with water–total elastic, total inelastic, and elastic differential cross section measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilising a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam, we have measured both elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons from water vapour. The measurements comprise differential elastic, total elastic, and total inelastic (not including positronium formation) absolute cross sections. The energy range investigated is from 1 eV to 60 eV. Comparison with theory is made with both R-Matrix and distorted wave calculations, and with our own application of the Independent Atom Model for positron interactions.

Tattersall, Wade [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia) [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, 4810 Queensland (Australia); Chiari, Luca [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia (Australia)] [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia (Australia); Machacek, J. R.; Anderson, Emma; Sullivan, James P. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); White, Ron D. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, 4810 Queensland (Australia)] [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, 4810 Queensland (Australia); Brunger, M. J. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia (Australia) [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Buckman, Stephen J. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia) [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Garcia, Gustavo [Instituto de F?sica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigationes Cient?ficas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de F?sica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigationes Cient?ficas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, Francisco [Departamento de F?sica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Departamento de F?sica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

117

Characterization of coplanar poled electro optic polymer films for Si-photonic devices with multiphoton microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We imaged coplanar poled electro optic (EO) polymer films on transparent substrates with a multiple-photon microscope in reflection and correlated the second-harmonic light intensity with the results of Pockels coefficient (r{sub 33}) measurements. This allowed us to make quantitative measurements of poled polymer films on non-transparent substrates like silicon, which are not accessible with traditional Pockels coefficient measurement techniques. Phase modulators consisting of silicon waveguide devices with EO polymer claddings with a known Pockels coefficient (from V{sub ?} measurements) were used to validate the correlation between the second-harmonic signal and r{sub 33}. This also allowed us to locally map the r{sub 33} coefficient in the poled area.

Himmelhuber, R., E-mail: rolandh@optics.arizona.edu; Mehravar, S. S.; Herrera, O. D.; Demir, V.; Kieu, K.; Norwood, R. A.; Peyghambarian, N. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Luo, J. [Soluxra LLC, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Jen, A. K.-Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

118

Instrument for analysis of electric motors based on slip-poles component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new instrument is described for monitoring the condition and speed of an operating electric motor from a remote location. The slip-poles component is derived from a motor current signal. The magnitude of the slip-poles component provides the basis for a motor condition monitor, while the frequency of the slip-poles component provides the basis for a motor speed monitor. The result is a simple-to-understand motor health monitor in an easy-to-use package. Straightforward indications of motor speed, motor running current, motor condition (e.g., rotor bar condition) and synthesized motor sound (audible indication of motor condition) are provided. With the device, a relatively untrained worker can diagnose electric motors in the field without requiring the presence of a trained engineer or technician. 4 figs.

Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.; Casada, D.A.

1996-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

119

Instrument for analysis of electric motors based on slip-poles component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new instrument for monitoring the condition and speed of an operating electric motor from a remote location. The slip-poles component is derived from a motor current signal. The magnitude of the slip-poles component provides the basis for a motor condition monitor, while the frequency of the slip-poles component provides the basis for a motor speed monitor. The result is a simple-to-understand motor health monitor in an easy-to-use package. Straightforward indications of motor speed, motor running current, motor condition (e.g., rotor bar condition) and synthesized motor sound (audible indication of motor condition) are provided. With the device, a relatively untrained worker can diagnose electric motors in the field without requiring the presence of a trained engineer or technician.

Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Clinton, TN); Casada, Donald A. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Hadron attenuation in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a detailed theoretical investigation of hadron attenuation in deep inelastic scattering off complex nuclei in the kinematic regime of the HERMES experiment. The analysis is carried out in the framework of a probabilistic coupled-channel transport model based on the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation, which allows for a treatment of the final-state interactions beyond simple absorption mechanisms. Furthermore, our event-by-event simulations account for the kinematic cuts of the experiments as well as the geometrical acceptance of the detectors. We calculate the multiplicity ratios of charged hadrons for various nuclear targets relative to deuterium as a function of the photon energy {nu}, the hadron energy fraction z{sub h}=E{sub h}/{nu}, and the transverse momentum p{sub T}. We also confront our model results on double-hadron attenuation with recent experimental data. Separately, we compare the attenuation of identified hadrons ({pi}{sup {+-}}, {pi}{sup 0}, K{sup {+-}}, p, and p) on {sup 20}Ne and {sup 84}Kr targets with the data from the HERMES Collaboration and make predictions for a {sup 131}Xe target. At the end we turn towards hadron attenuation on {sup 63}Cu nuclei at EMC energies. Our studies demonstrate that (pre-)hadronic final-state interactions play a dominant role in the kinematic regime of the HERMES experiment while our present approach overestimates the attenuation at EMC energies.

Falter, T.; Cassing, W.; Gallmeister, K.; Mosel, U. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Yeast Mps1p Phosphorylates the Spindle Pole Component Spc110p in the N-terminal Domain*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yeast Mps1p Phosphorylates the Spindle Pole Component Spc110p in the N-terminal Domain* Received pole body (SPB) component Spc110p (Nuf1p) undergoes specific serine/threonine phospho- rylation of Spc110p in vivo and that Mps1p phosphorylates Spc110p in vitro. Phosphopeptides generated

Davis, Trisha N.

122

Monte Carlo Posterior Integration in GARCH Peter M uller and Andy Pole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monte Carlo Posterior Integration in GARCH Models Peter M¨ uller and Andy Pole Peter M along both lines to apply to the analysis of GARCH (generalized autoregressive conditional­ tion to GARCH models in Bollerslev (1986). There are now over 300 papers in the mainstream statistics

West, Mike

123

Creosote-treated wood poles and crossarms: Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative database on leachable concentrations of cresols (i.e., m-, o- and p-cresol isomers) from a population of creosote-treated utility wood poles and crossarms by application of the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The TCLP was promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in March 1990 (55FR 11798). Data generated in this study indicate that creosote-treated utility poles and crossarms are non-hazardous. Measured concentrations of total cresols and other semi-volatile organic compounds, from wood subjected to TCLP analysis, were an order of magnitude or more below their current Toxicity Characteristic (TC) regulatory levels. The wood analyzed in this study consisted of 54 samples of wood poles and 6 crossarms. Subsamples, removed from full cross sectional slices of poles and crossarms, were prepared according to EPA procedures, subjected to the TCLP, and the resultant leachates analyzed for the presence of cresols and other semi-volatile compounds.

Horn, M.E. (Environmental Management Services, Waupaca, WI (United States)); Holcombe, L.; Owens, J.B. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Looking Deep from the South Pole: Star Formation in the Thermal Infrared  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Looking Deep from the South Pole: Star Formation in the Thermal Infrared Michael G.Burton, John W extra-galactic star formation through a deep survey of the Hubble Deep Field{South in this band. We-eminent conditions on the Earth for wide- eld imaging at thermal infrared wavelengths. We describe a project to equip

Ashley, Michael C. B.

125

The Efficiency of Mollies, Poecilia mexicana, as Live Bait for Pole-and-Line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that limited bait supplies prevent further expansion of skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, pole-line skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, fishing. Fishing trials were con- ducted in American Samoa, Tuvalu to Katsuwonus pelamis and yel- lowfin tuna refers to Thunnus alba- cares, as given by Klawe (1977). Patrick G

126

CONTRIBUTION A LA MISE EN PLACE DU POLE GEOMATIQUE DE LA MIMEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTRIBUTION A LA MISE EN PLACE DU POLE GEOMATIQUE DE LA MIMEL ELABORATION ET STRUCTURATION DE COUCHES "SIG" SUR LA REGLEMENTATION DES PECHES MARITIMES, SUR LES CULTURES MARINES ET SUR LA SENSIBILITE'étude............................................................................................................. 4 2 Réglementation des pêches maritimes et cultures marines

Boyer, Edmond

127

Role of Calmodulin and Spc110p Interactionin the Proper Assembly of Spindle Pole Body Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of Calmodulin and Spc110p Interactionin the Proper Assembly of Spindle Pole Body Components PCR mutagenesis with a plasmid shuffle strategy. The temperature-sensitive allele spc110-220 differs the temperature sensitivityof spc110-220. Furthermore, calmodulin levels at the SPB decrease in the mutant cells

Davis, Trisha N.

128

PID Controller Synthesis with Shifted Axis Pole Assignment for a Class of MIMO Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PID Controller Synthesis with Shifted Axis Pole Assignment for a Class of MIMO Systems A. N. G-output plants, a systematic synthesis is developed for stabilization using Proportional+Integral+Derivative (PID-zero of the plant. Plant classes that admit PID controllers with this property include stable and unstable multi

Gundes, A. N.

129

Single-Molecule Microscopy Studies of Electric-Field Poling in Chromophore-Polymer Composite Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-Molecule Microscopy Studies of Electric-Field Poling in Chromophore-Polymer Composite electrooptic devices based on chromophore-polymer composite materials is to improve chromophore ordering of susceptibility.16 Chromophore-polymer composite materials lack inherent non- centrosymmetry, which is required

Reid, Philip J.

130

Temperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: Implications for life nearby subglacial lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: Implications for life nearby subglacial lake deep of South of #9°C, which is 7°C below pressure­induced melting temperature freshwater produce contamination Lake Vostok. semiempirical expression strain vs. stress, estimate shear depth show Ice

Woschnagg, Kurt

131

A Serenitatis origin for the Imbrian grooves and South Pole-Aitken thorium anomaly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Serenitatis origin for the Imbrian grooves and South Pole-Aitken thorium anomaly Mark A) basin contains a high abundance of thorium and a unique Imbrian aged geomorphologic unit that consists are almost antipodal to the Imbrium basin, where high-thorium ejecta and seismic energy are expected to have

Zuber, Maria

132

Control of Delayed Recycling Systems with an Unstable Pole at Forward Path  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control of Delayed Recycling Systems with an Unstable Pole at Forward Path J. F. Marquez Rubio, B. del Muro Cu´ellar and Olivier Sename Abstract-- Unstable time delay system and recycling system pose a challenge problem in their own. When unstable time delay system have recycle the control problem becomes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

133

Damage Characterization of the Z24 Bridge by Transfer Function Pole Migration R. Andrew Swartz1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Damage Characterization of the Z24 Bridge by Transfer Function Pole Migration R. Andrew Swartz1 , Jerome P. Lynch2 1 PhD Candidate, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 2 Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Lynch, Jerome P.

134

Transforms for prediction residuals in video coding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Typically the same transform, the 2-D Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT), is used to compress both image intensities in image coding and prediction residuals in video coding. Major prediction residuals include the motion ...

Kam??l?, Fatih

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

BRIGHTNESS AND FLUCTUATION OF THE MID-INFRARED SKY FROM AKARI OBSERVATIONS TOWARD THE NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the smoothness of the mid-infrared sky from observations by the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. AKARI monitored the north ecliptic pole (NEP) during its cold phase with nine wave bands covering from 2.4 to 24 {mu}m, out of which six mid-infrared bands were used in this study. We applied power-spectrum analysis to the images in order to search for the fluctuation of the sky brightness. Observed fluctuation is explained by fluctuation of photon noise, shot noise of faint sources, and Galactic cirrus. The fluctuations at a few arcminutes scales at short mid-infrared wavelengths (7, 9, and 11 {mu}m) are largely caused by the diffuse Galactic light of the interstellar dust cirrus. At long mid-infrared wavelengths (15, 18, and 24 {mu}m), photon noise is the dominant source of fluctuation over the scale from arcseconds to a few arcminutes. The residual fluctuation amplitude at 200'' after removing these contributions is at most 1.04 {+-} 0.23 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} or 0.05% of the brightness at 24 {mu}m and at least 0.47 {+-} 0.14 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} or 0.02% at 18 {mu}m. We conclude that the upper limit of the fluctuation in the zodiacal light toward the NEP is 0.03% of the sky brightness, taking 2{sigma} error into account.

Pyo, Jeonghyun; Jeong, Woong-Seob [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Matsumoto, Toshio [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Matsuura, Shuji, E-mail: jhpyo@kasi.re.kr [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Connections among residual strong interaction, the EMC effect and short range correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A linear correlation is shown quantitatively between the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and the nuclear residual strong interaction energy (RSIE) obtained from the nuclear binding energy subtracting the Coulomb energy part. The observed correlation supports the recent speculation that the nuclear dependence of quark distributions depend on the local nuclear density. This phenomenological relationship can be used to extract the size of in-medium correction (IMC) effect on deuteron. Most importantly, the EMC slopes $dR_{EMC}/dx$ of nuclei can be predicted with the nuclear binding energy data. The relationship between nucleon-nucleon (N-N) short range correlation (SRC) and RSIE is also presented.

Rong Wang; Xurong Chen

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Double-pole nature of $?(1405)$ studied with coupled-channel complex scaling method using complex-range Gaussian basis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The excited hyperon $\\Lambda(1405)$ is the important building block for kaonic nuclei which are nuclear many-body system with anti-kaons. We have been investigating the $\\Lambda(1405)$ resonance with the coupled-channel Complex Scaling Method (ccCSM) in which the $\\Lambda(1405)$ is treated as a hadron-molecular state of a $\\bar{K}N$-$\\pi\\Sigma$ coupled system. We use a $\\bar{K}N$(-$\\pi Y$) potential based on the chiral SU(3) theory. In this article, we report the double-pole nature of the $\\Lambda(1405)$, which is a characteristic property predicted by many studies with chiral SU(3)-based models. With the help of the complex-range Gaussian basis in ccCSM, we have found successfully another pole besides a pole near the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold (called higher pole) which was found in our previous work with the real-range Gaussian basis. The new pole (called lower pole) is found far below $\\bar{K}N$ threshold: $(M, -\\Gamma/2)=(1395, -138)$ MeV when $f_\\pi=110$ MeV. In spite of so broad width of the lower-pole state, the state is clearly identified with good separation from continuum states, since the oscillatory behavior of the continuum states is improved owing to the complex-range Gaussian basis. Analyzing the ccCSM wave function of the lower pole, we have revealed explicitly that the lower-pole state is dominated by the $\\pi\\Sigma$ component rather than the $\\bar{K}N$ component. We have confirmed that the ccCSM wave function is correctly connected to the asymptotic form of the resonance wave function. We have estimated the meson-baryon mean distance for the lower-pole state as well as for the higher-pole state. In addition, we have investigated the origin of the appearance of the lower pole. The lower pole is confirmed to be generated by the energy dependence attributed to the chiral dynamics, by comparing the result of an energy-independent potential.

Akinobu Dote; Takayuki Myo

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

138

Process to recycle shredder residue  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Test of the consistency of various linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions in application to inelastic neutron scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

functions in application to inelastic neutron scattering from liquid para-hydrogen Jian Liua and William H for inelastic neutron scattering from liquid para-hydrogen at 14 K. Various time correlations functions were neutron scattering experimental data all suggest that the LSC-IVR is indeed a good short

Miller, William H.

140

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 205440 (2012) Inelastic neutron scattering investigations of the quantum molecular dynamics of a H2 molecule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 205440 (2012) Inelastic neutron scattering investigations of the quantum transfer arising from the neutron scattering event has also been investigated. The -dependence spectra investigations using infrared (IR),3,13­15 inelastic neutron scattering (INS),3,16,17 and nuclear magnetic

Turro, Nicholas J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Conversion method of powder inelastic scattering data for one-dimensional systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extracting dispersive magnetic excitations from inelastic neutron scattering data usually requires large single crystals. We present a simple yet powerful method for extracting such information from polycrystalline or powder data for one-dimensional systems. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this data treatment by extracting dispersion curves from powder inelastic neutron scattering data on the one-dimensional spin-half systems: CuGeO3 and Rb2Cu2Mo3O12. For many such materials it is not possible to grow sufficiently large crystals and this method offers a quick and efficient way to study their magnetic excitations.

Tomiyasu, Dr. Keisuke [Tohoku University, Japan; Fujita, Prof. Masaki [Tohoku University, Japan; Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL; Bewley, Robert I. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Bull, Dr. Martyn J. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Bennington, Dr. Stephen M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Deep inelastic cross-section measurements at large y with the ZEUS detector at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reduced cross sections for $e^{+}p$ deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different centre-of-mass energies, $318$, $251$ and $225$ GeV. The cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken $x$ and the virtuality, $Q^2$, were obtained in the region $0.13\\ \\leq\\ y\\ \\leq\\ 0.75$, where $y$ denotes the inelasticity and $5\\ \\leq\\ Q^2\\ \\leq\\ 110$ GeV$^2$. The proton structure functions $F_2$ and $F_L$ were extracted from the measured cross sections.

ZEUS Collaboration; H. Abramowicz; I. Abt; L. Adamczyk; M. Adamus; R. Aggarwal; S. Antonelli; O. Arslan; V. Aushev; Y. Aushev; O. Bachynska; A. N. Barakbaev; N. Bartosik; O. Behnke; J. Behr; U. Behrens; A. Bertolin; S. Bhadra; I. Bloch; V. Bokhonov; E. G. Boos; K. Borras; I. Brock; R. Brugnera; A. Bruni; B. Brzozowska; P. J. Bussey; A. Caldwell; M. Capua; C. D. Catterall; J. Chwastowski; J. Ciborowski; R. Ciesielski; A. M. Cooper-Sarkar; M. Corradi; F. Corriveau; G. D'Agostini; R. K. Dementiev; R. C. E. Devenish; G. Dolinska; V. Drugakov; S. Dusini; J. Ferrando; J. Figiel; B. Foster; G. Gach; A. Garfagnini; A. Geiser; A. Gizhko; L. K. Gladilin; O. Gogota; Yu. A. Golubkov; J. Grebenyuk; I. Gregor; G. Grzelak; O. Gueta; M. Guzik; W. Hain; G. Hartner; D. Hochman; R. Hori; Z. A. Ibrahim; Y. Iga; M. Ishitsuka; A. Iudin; F. Januschek; I. Kadenko; S. Kananov; T. Kanno; U. Karshon; M. Kaur; P. Kaur; L. A. Khein; D. Kisielewska; R. Klanner; U. Klein; N. Kondrashova; O. Kononenko; Ie. Korol; I. A. Korzhavina; A. Kotanski; U. Kotz; N. Kovalchuk; H. Kowalski; O. Kuprash; M. Kuze; B. B. Levchenko; A. Levy; V. Libov; S. Limentani; M. Lisovyi; E. Lobodzinska; W. Lohmann; B. Lohr; E. Lohrmann; A. Longhin; D. Lontkovskyi; O. Yu. Lukina; J. Maeda; I. Makarenko; J. Malka; J. F. Martin; S. Mergelmeyer; F. Mohamad Idris; K. Mujkic; V. Myronenko; K. Nagano; A. Nigro; T. Nobe; D. Notz; R. J. Nowak; K. Olkiewicz; Yu. Onishchuk; E. Paul; W. Perlanski; H. Perrey; N. S. Pokrovskiy; A. S. Proskuryakov; M. Przybycien; A. Raval; P. Roloff; I. Rubinsky; M. Ruspa; V. Samojlov; D. H. Saxon; M. Schioppa; W. B. Schmidke; U. Schneekloth; T. Schorner-Sadenius; J. Schwartz; L. M. Shcheglova; R. Shevchenko; O. Shkola; I. Singh; I. O. Skillicorn; W. Slominski; V. Sola; A. Solano; A. Spiridonov; L. Stanco; N. Stefaniuk; A. Stern; T. P. Stewart; P. Stopa; J. Sztuk-Dambietz; D. Szuba; J. Szuba; E. Tassi; T. Temiraliev; K. Tokushuku; J. Tomaszewska; A. Trofymov; V. Trusov; T. Tsurugai; M. Turcato; O. Turkot; T. Tymieniecka; A. Verbytskyi; O. Viazlo; R. Walczak; W. A. T. Wan Abdullah; K. Wichmann; M. Wing; G. Wolf; S. Yamada; Y. Yamazaki; N. Zakharchuk; A. F. Zarnecki; L. Zawiejski; O. Zenaiev; B. O. Zhautykov; N. Zhmak; D. S. Zotkin

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

143

Deep inelastic cross-section measurements at large y with the ZEUS detector at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reduced cross sections for $e^{+}p$ deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different centre-of-mass energies, $318$, $251$ and $225$ GeV. The cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken $x$ and the virtuality, $Q^2$, were obtained in the region $0.13\\ \\leq\\ y\\ \\leq\\ 0.75$, where $y$ denotes the inelasticity and $5\\ \\leq\\ Q^2\\ \\leq\\ 110$ GeV$^2$. The proton structure functions $F_2$ and $F_L$ were extracted from the measured cross sections.

Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Aggarwal, R; Antonelli, S; Arslan, O; Aushev, V; Aushev, Y; Bachynska, O; Barakbaev, A N; Bartosik, N; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Behrens, U; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bokhonov, V; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Brock, I; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Brzozowska, B; Bussey, P J; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Catterall, C D; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; D'Agostini, G; Dementiev, R K; Devenish, R C E; Dolinska, G; Drugakov, V; Dusini, S; Ferrando, J; Figiel, J; Foster, B; Gach, G; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Gizhko, A; Gladilin, L K; Gogota, O; Golubkov, Yu A; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Grzelak, G; Gueta, O; Guzik, M; Hain, W; Hartner, G; Hochman, D; Hori, R; Ibrahim, Z A; Iga, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Iudin, A; Januschek, F; Kadenko, I; Kananov, S; Kanno, T; Karshon, U; Kaur, M; Kaur, P; Khein, L A; Kisielewska, D; Klanner, R; Klein, U; Kondrashova, N; Kononenko, O; Korol, Ie; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, A; Kotz, U; Kovalchuk, N; Kowalski, H; Kuprash, O; Kuze, M; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Libov, V; Limentani, S; Lisovyi, M; Lobodzinska, E; Lohmann, W; Lohr, B; Lohrmann, E; Longhin, A; Lontkovskyi, D; Lukina, O Yu; Maeda, J; Makarenko, I; Malka, J; Martin, J F; Mergelmeyer, S; Idris, F Mohamad; Mujkic, K; Myronenko, V; Nagano, K; Nigro, A; Nobe, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Olkiewicz, K; Onishchuk, Yu; Paul, E; Perlanski, W; Perrey, H; Pokrovskiy, N S; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M; Raval, A; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Ruspa, M; Samojlov, V; Saxon, D H; Schioppa, M; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schwartz, J; Shcheglova, L M; Shevchenko, R; Shkola, O; Singh, I; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Sola, V; Solano, A; Spiridonov, A; Stanco, L; Stefaniuk, N; Stern, A; Stewart, T P; Stopa, P; Sztuk-Dambietz, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tassi, E; Temiraliev, T; Tokushuku, K; Tomaszewska, J; Trofymov, A; Trusov, V; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Turkot, O; Tymieniecka, T; Verbytskyi, A; Viazlo, O; Walczak, R; Abdullah, W A T Wan; Wichmann, K; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Zakharchuk, N; Zarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zenaiev, O; Zhautykov, B O; Zhmak, N; Zotkin, D S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of Alpha-Particles and Protons from Sm-144  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PH YSICA L REVIEW C VOLUME 4, NUMB ER 6 DECEMBER 1971 Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of o. Particles and Protons from Sm~ J. H. Barker* and J. C. Hiebert Texas ARM University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 14 June 1971) Differential... cross sections for the elastic scattering and inelastic scattering to the low-ly- ing states in Sm have been measured using 50-MeV e-particle and 30-MeV proton beams from the Texas ASM variable-energy cyclotron. Spin and parity assignments are checked...

Barker, J. H.; Hiebert, John C.

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

A Search for the Dark Matter Annual Modulation in South Pole Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astrophysical observations and cosmological data have led to the conclusion that nearly one quarter of the Universe consists of dark matter. Under certain assumptions, an observable signature of dark matter is the annual modulation of the rate of dark matter-nucleon interactions taking place in an Earth-bound experiment. To search for this effect, we introduce the concept for a new dark matter experiment using NaI scintillation detectors deployed deep in the South Pole ice. This experiment complements dark matter search efforts in the Northern Hemisphere and will investigate the observed annual modulation in the DAMA/LIBRA and DAMA/NaI experiments. The unique location will permit the study of background effects correlated with seasonal variations and the surrounding environment. This paper describes the experimental concept and explores the sensitivity of a 250 kg NaI experiment at the South Pole.

Cherwinka, J; Cowen, D F; Grant, D; Halzen, F; Heeger, K M; Hsu, L; Karle, A; Kudryavtsev, V A; Maruyama, R; Pettus, W; Robinson, M; Spooner, N J C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of H2@C60 and its temperature dependence decoded using rigorous quantum calculations and a new  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of H2@C60 and its temperature dependence decoded using://jcp.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 139, 064309 (2013) Inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of H2@C60 quantum cal- culations of the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra of this prototypical endohedral

Turro, Nicholas J.

147

Residual stress patterns in steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron strain scanning of residual stress is a valuable nondestructive tool for evaluation of residual stress in welds. The penetrating characteristic of neutrons permits mapping of strain patterns with a spatial resolution approaching 1mm at depths of 20mm in steels. While the overall patterns of the residual stress tensor in a weld are understood, the detailed patterns depend on welding process parameters and the effects of solid state transformation. The residual strain profiles in two multi-pass austenitic welds and a ferritic steel weld are presented. The stress-free lattice parameters within the fusion zone and the adjacent heat affected zone in the two austenitic welds show that the interpretation of residual stress from strains are affected by welding parameters. An interpretation of the residual strain pattern in the ferritic steel plate can be made using the strain measurements of a Gleeble test bar which has undergone the solid state austenite decomposition.

Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, X.L.; David, S.A.; Holden, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Root, J.H.; Swainson, I. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of simulated wind and rain on the residues. Tempera- ture and humidity conditions incident to the holding period were sufficient to destroy most of the residual toxicity of this material. Effect of Simulated Wind Among the chlorinated... hydrocarbon insecticides, there was little difference between the effects of simu- lated wind and rain on residual toxicities. However, it is likely that under field conditions the effects of rain would be more noticeable. Simulated wind was less damaging...

Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Methods of separating particulate residue streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Christopher T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

150

Particulate residue separators for harvesting devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include a plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams which are formed by the harvesting device and which travel, at least in part, along the plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly which is located in partially occluding relation relative to the plenum, and which substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, John R.

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

151

Exponential velocity tails in a driven inelastic Maxwell model T. Antal,1,2,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of shaken granular material is revisited. Numerical solution of the master equation and analytical arguments is transferred by a ther- mostat into the system, in order to balance the energy loss during inelastic collisions using corresponding Boltzmann equations. These off-lattice two- or three-dimensional systems are

Antal, Tibor

152

Open charm production in deep inelastic scattering at next-to-leading order at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An introduction and overview of charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA is given. The existing next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations are then reviewed, and key results are summarized. Finally, comparisons are made with the most recent HERA data, and unresolved issues are highlighted.

B. W. Harris

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

153

Charm quark and D^* cross sections in deeply inelastic scattering at DESY HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A next-to-leading order Monte Carlo program for the calculation of heavy quark cross sections in deeply inelastic scattering is described. Concentrating on charm quark and D^*(2010) production at HERA, several distributions are presented and their variation with respect to charm quark mass, parton distribution set, and renormalization-factorization scale is studied.

B. W. Harris; J. Smith

1997-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

154

Invariant mass distributions for heavy quark-antiquark pairs in deep inelastic electroproduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have completed the ${\\cal O}(\\alpha_s)$ QCD corrections to exclusive heavy quark-antiquark distributions in deep inelastic electroproduction and present here the differential distributions in the masses of charm-anticharm and bottom-antibottom pairs at the electron-proton collider HERA.

B. W. Harris; J. Smith

1995-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Inelastic light scattering and light emission from single and double wall carbon , Stephen Cronin2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surfactant suspensions. Keywords: carbon nanotubes, optical transition energies, chirality, photoluminescence of excitation energy from a distribution of single wall carbon nanotubes, in a surfactant suspensionInelastic light scattering and light emission from single and double wall carbon nanotubes Yan Yin1

156

N/z equilibration in deep inelastic collisions and the fragmentation of the resulting quasiprojectiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When target and projectile nuclei have a difference in neutron to proton ratio (N/Z), the quasiprojectiles formed in a deep inelastic collision (DIC) should have a mean N/Z between the N/Z of the target and the N/Z of the projectile, depending...

Keksis, August Lawrence

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

157

Randomly accelerated particle in a box: Mean absorption time for partially absorbing and inelastic boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Randomly accelerated particle in a box: Mean absorption time for partially absorbing and inelastic which is randomly accelerated by Gaussian white noise on the line segment 0 x 1 and is absorbed as soon accelerated particle which moves on the half line x 0 with an absorbing boundary at x=0. The motion

158

A scaler-based data acquisition system for measuring parity violation asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experiment that measured the parity violating (PV) asymmetry Ad in e- 2H deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at Q2 ~ 1.10 and 1.90 (GeV/c) 2 and XB ~ 0.3 was completed in experimental Hall A at the Thomas Jefferson National ...

Pan, Kai, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

862 / JOURNAL OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING / AUGUST 1999 INELASTIC BEHAVIOR OF MULTISTORY PARTIALLY RESTRAINED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limitations in concentrated plastic-hinge analysis methods and have proposed modifications (King et al. 1990862 / JOURNAL OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING / AUGUST 1999 INELASTIC BEHAVIOR OF MULTISTORY PARTIALLY Fellow, ASCE ABSTRACT: The plastic-zone method of analysis described in a companion paper is used

Foley, Christopher M.

160

Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

Murray, A.M.

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Inhomogeneous quasi-stationary state of dense fluid of inelastic hard spheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study closed dense collections of hard spheres that collide inelastically with constant coefficient of normal restitution. We find inhomogeneous states (IS) where the density profile is spatially non-uniform but constant in time. The states are exact solutions of non-linear partial differential equations that describe the coupled distributions of density and temperature when inelastic losses of energy per collision are small. The derivation is performed without modelling the equations' coefficients that are unknown in the dense limit (such as the equation of state), using only their scaling form specific for hard spheres. The IS is exact non-linear state of this many-body system. It captures a fundamental property of inelastic collections of particles: the possibility of preserving non-uniform temperature via the interplay of inelastic cooling and heat conduction, generalizing previous results in the dilute case. We perform numerical simulations to demonstrate that arbitrary initial state evolves to the IS in the limit of long times where the container has the geometry of the channel. The evolution is like gas-liquid transition. The liquid condenses in a vanishing part of the total volume but takes most of the mass of the system. However, the gaseous phase, which mass grows only logarithmically with the system size, is relevant because its fast particles carry most of the energy of the system. Remarkably, the system self-organizes to dissipate no energy: the inelastic decay of energy is a power-law $[1+t/t_c]^{-2}$ where $t_c$ diverges in the thermodynamic limit. This behavior is caused by unusual spatial distribution of particles: on approach to one of the container's walls the density grows inversely with the distance. We discuss the relation of our results to the recently proposed finite-time singularity in other container's geometries.

Itzhak Fouxon

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

162

Asymptotics for GARCH Squared Residual Correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymptotics for GARCH Squared Residual Correlations Istv'an Berkes \\Lambda A. R'enyi Institute a GARCH(p; q) model. Denoting by â?? r n (k); k â?? 1; these autocorrelations computed from a realization words and phrases: GARCH(p; q) sequence, quasi--maximum likelihood esti­ mator, squared residuals

Kokoszka, Piotr

163

University of Pittsburgh Residual Funds on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Pittsburgh Residual Funds on FINANCIAL GUIDELINE Subject: Sponsored Projects I by the sponsor. Funds cannot be unilaterally retained by the University. Failure to return residual funds related funds on sponsored grants and contracts on the financial accounting records of the University

Sibille, Etienne

164

Data Conversion in Residue Number System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for direct conversion when interaction with the real analog world is required. We first develop two efficient schemes for direct analog-to-residue conversion. Another efficient scheme for direct residue analogique réel est nécessaire. Nous dévelopons deux systèmes efficaces pour la conversion directe du domaine

Zilic, Zeljko

165

Mach-Zehnder Modulator Performance on the NIF South Pole Bang Time Diagnostic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present performance data for Mach-Zehnder optical modulators fielded on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a potential signal path upgrade for the South Pole Bang Time diagnostic. A single channel demonstration system has been deployed utilizing two modulators operating in a 90-degree In phase and Quadrature (I/Q) configuration. X-ray target emission signals are split and fed into two recording systems: a reference CRT based oscilloscope, Greenfield FTD10000, and the dual Mach-Zehnder system. Results of X-ray implosion time (bang time) determination from these two recording systems are compared and presented.

Beeman, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Chow, R.; Carpenter, A.; Bond, E.; Zayas-Rivera, Z.; Bell, P.; Celeste, J.; Clancy, T.; Miller, E. K.; Edgell, D.; Donaldson, W. R.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Hydrothermal alteration at the Panorama Formation, North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An airborne hyperspectral remote sensing dataset was obtained of the North Pole Dome region of the Pilbara Craton in October 2002. It has been analyzed for indications of hydrothermal minerals. Here we report on the identification and mapping of hydrothermal minerals in the 3.459 Ga Panorama Formation and surrounding strata. The spatial distribution of a pattern of subvertical pyrophyllite rich veins connected to a pyrophyllite rich palaeohorizontal layer is interpreted to represent the base of an acid-sulfate epithermal system that is unconformably overlain by the stromatolitic 3.42 Ga Strelley Pool Chert.

Brown, Adrian J; Walter, Malcolm R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Double spin asymmetry AL?T? in charged pion production from deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized ³He target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis I discuss the first measurement of the beam-target double-spin asymmetry ALT for charged pion electroproduction in deep inelastic electron scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target. These data were ...

Huang, Jin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Extension of the Application of the generalized pole representation to the treatment of resonance cross sections.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One reliable and convenient way of processing the cross sections in the resolved energy region is by use of the generalized pole representation, whereby the Doppler-broadening calculation can be carried out rigorously using the analytical approach. So far, its applications have been limited to cases with resonance parameters specified by the Reich-Moore formalism. Although such an approach, in principle, can be extended to all three remaining representations of resolved resonance parameters specified by the ENDF data format, there is no computational tool for handling such a task at present. Given that Breit-Wigner formalisms are probably the most widely used by any evaluated nuclear data library to represent cross sections, a special effort has to be made to convert the single level and multilevel Breit-Wigner resonance parameters to pole parameters. A FORTRAN computer code BW2PR has been developed for this purpose. Extensive calculations have been performed to demonstrate that the proposed method ensures the conservation of the information contained originally in Breit-Wigner resonance parameters. This will make it possible to apply the exact Doppler-broadening method to a larger collection of nuclides.

Hwang, R. N.; Jammes, C.

1999-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

169

Gravitational Wave Spectrums from Pole-like Inflations based on Generalized Gravity Theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a general and unified formulation which can handle the classical evolution and quantum generation processes of the cosmological gravitational wave in a broad class of generalized gravity theories. Applications are made in several inflation models based on the scalar-tensor theory, the induced gravity, and the low energy effective action of string theory. The gravitational wave power spectrums based on the vacuum expectation value of the quantized fluctuating metric during the pole-like inflation stages are derived in analytic forms. Assuming that the gravity theory transits to Einstein one while the relevant scales remain in the superhorizon scale, we derive the consequent power spectrums and the directional fluctuations of the relic radiation produced by the gravitational wave. The spectrums seeded by the vacuum fluctuations in the pole-like inflation models based on the generalized gravity show a distinguished common feature which differs from the scale invariant spectrum generated in an exponential inflation in Einstein gravity which is supported by observations.

J. Hwang

1997-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

170

Coulomb and Nuclear-Excitation of Giant-Dipole Resonances in (Alpha,alpha') Inelastic-Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 36, NUMBER 4 OCTOBER 1987 Coulomb and nuclear excitation of giant dipole resonances in (a, a') inelastic scattering S. Sh-lomo Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, and Cyclotron Institute, Texas A... January 1987) Cross sections of inelastic a-particle scattering to isovector giant dipole resonances are calculat- ed including both nuclear and Coulomb excitation. It is shown that the calculated cross sections are rather small and can be safely...

Shlomo, S.; Lui, YW; Youngblood, David H.; Udagawa, T.; Tamura, T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Measurement of Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Electron-Deuteron Inelastic Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were published earlier, but are presented here in more detail.

D. Wang; K. Pan; R. Subedi; Z. Ahmed; K. Allada; K. A. Aniol; D. S. Armstrong; J. Arrington; V. Bellini; R. Beminiwattha; J. Benesch; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; J. -P. Chen; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; M. M. Dalton; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; W. Deconinck; X. Deng; A. Deur; C. Dutta; L. El Fassi; J. Erler; D. Flay; G. B. Franklin; M. Friend; S. Frullani; F. Garibaldi; S. Gilad; A. Giusa; A. Glamazdin; S. Golge; K. Grimm; K. Hafidi; J. -O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; R. Holmes; T. Holmstrom; R. J. Holt; J. Huang; C. E. Hyde; C. M. Jen; D. Jones; Hoyoung Kang; P. M. King; S. Kowalski; K. S. Kumar; J. H. Lee; J. J. LeRose; N. Liyanage; E. Long; D. McNulty; D. J. Margaziotis; F. Meddi; D. G. Meekins; L. Mercado; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; M. Mihovilovic; N. Muangma; K. E. Mesick; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; A. Nuruzzaman; Y. Oh; D. Parno; K. D. Paschke; S. K. Phillips; X. Qian; Y. Qiang; B. Quinn; A. Rakhman; P. E. Reimer; K. Rider; S. Riordan; J. Roche; J. Rubin; G. Russo; K. Saenboonruang; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; A. Shahinyan; R. Silwal; S. Širca; P. A. Souder; R. Suleiman; V. Sulkosky; C. M. Sutera; W. A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; B. Waidyawansa; B. Wojtsekhowski; L. Ye; B. Zhao; X. Zheng

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

172

Cold inelastic collisions between lithium and cesium in a two-species magneto-optical trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate collisional properties of lithium and cesium which are simultaneously confined in a combined magneto-optical trap. Trap-loss collisions between the two species are comprehensively studied. Different inelastic collision channels are identified, and inter-species rate coefficients as well as cross sections are determined. It is found that loss rates are independent of the optical excitation of Li, as a consequence of the repulsive Li$^*$-Cs interaction. Li and Cs loss by inelastic inter-species collisions can completely be attributed to processes involving optically excited cesium (fine-structure changing collisions and radiative escape). By lowering the trap depth for Li, an additional loss channel of Li is observed which results from ground-state Li-Cs collisions changing the hyperfine state of cesium.

Schlöder, U; Schünemann, U; Grimm, R; Weidemüller, M

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Mechanism of elastic and inelastic proton scattering on a {sup 15}C nucleus in diffraction theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amplitudes for elastic and inelastic proton scattering on the neutron-rich nucleus {sup 15}C (to its J{sup {pi}} = 5/2{sup +} level in the latter case) in inverse kinematics were calculated within Glauber diffraction theory. First- and second-order terms were taken into account in the multiple-scattering operator. The {sup 15}C wave function in the multiparticle shell model was used. This made it possible to calculate not only respective differential cross sections but also the contribution of proton scattering on nucleons occurring in different shells. The differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering were calculated at the energies of 0.2, 0.6, and 1 GeV per nucleon.

Ibraeva, E. T., E-mail: ibr@inp.kz [National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Kazakhstan); Zhusupov, M. A. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University (Kazakhstan); Imambekov, O. [National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Kazakhstan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Measurement of Leading Neutron Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of leading neutrons, where the neutron carries a large fraction x_L of the incoming proton's longitudinal momentum, is studied in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at HERA. The data were taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 122 pb^{-1}. The semi-inclusive cross section is measured in the phase space defined by the photon virtuality 6 neutron transverse momentum p_T neutron structure function, F_2^{LN(3)}(Q^2,x,x_L), and the fraction of deep-inelastic scattering events containing a leading neutron are studied as a function of Q^2, x and x_L. Assuming that the pion exchange mechanism dominates leading neutron production, the data provide constraints on the shape of the pion structure function.

H1 Collaboration

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

175

Nuclear level density as a tool for probing the inelastic scattering of 6He  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cross sections are calculated for the both elastic and inelastic scattering of 6He from 12C and 4He. A phenomenological optical potential is used to describe the elastic scattering. 4He is taken as spherical and inelastic couplings to the first excited states of 6He and 12C are described with collective rotational model and coupled-channels method. Deformation lengths for 6He and 12C are determined from semi-classical nuclear level density model by using Laplace-like formula for the nuclear level density parameter. The comparison of the predicted and the measured cross sections are presented to test the applicability of nuclear level density model to the light exotic nuclei reactions. Good agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured cross sections.

Bora Canbula; Halil Babacan

2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

176

Deep Inelastic Electron Scattering Off the Helium and Tritium Mirror Nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss a possible measurement of the ratio of nucleon structure functions, F{sub 2}{sup n}/F{sub 2}{sup p}, and the ratio of up to down quark distributions, u/d, at large Bjorken x, by performing deep inelastic electron scattering from the {sup 3}H and {sup 3}He mirror nuclei with the 11 GeV upgraded beam of Jefferson Lab. The measurement is expected to be almost free of nuclear effects, which introduce a significant uncertainty in the extraction of these two ratios from deep inelastic scattering off the proton and deuteron. The results are expected to test perturbative and non-perturbative mechanisms of spin-flavor symmetry breaking in the nucleon, and constrain the structure function parametrizations needed for the interpretation of high energy collider and neutrino oscillations data. The precision of the expected data can also test models of the nuclear EMC effect and provide valuable input for its full explanation.

Holt, Roy J. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Petratos, Gerassimos G. [Department of Physics, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242 (United States)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

177

Polarized Deep Inelastic Scattering Off the "Neutron" From Gauge/String Duality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate deep inelastic scattering off the polarized "neutron" using gauge/string duality. The "neutron" corresponds to a supergravity mode of the neutral dilatino. Through introducing the Pauli interaction term into the action in $\\textrm{AdS}_{5}$ space, we calculate the polarized deep inelastic structure functions of the "neutron" in supergravity approximation at large t' Hooft coupling $\\lambda$ and finite $x$ with $\\lambda^{-1/2}\\ll xneutron" are power suppressed at the same order as the ones of the "proton." Especially, we find the Burkhardt-Cottingham-like sum rule, which is satisfied in the work by Gao and Xiao, is broken due to the Pauli interaction term. We also illustrate how such a Pauli interaction term can arise naturally from higher dimensional fermion-graviton coupling through the usual Kaluza-Klein reduction.

Jian-Hua Gao; Zong-Gang Mou

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

178

Sensitivity improvement of a laser interferometer limited by inelastic back-scattering, employing dual readout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic back-scattering of stray light is a long-standing problem in high-sensitivity interferometric measurements and a potential limitation for advanced gravitational-wave detectors, in particular at sub-audio-band frequencies. The emerging parasitic interferences cannot be distinguished from a scientific signal via conventional single readout. In this work, we propose and demonstrate the subtraction of inelastic back-scatter signals by employing dual homodyne detection on the output light -- here -- of a table-top Michelson interferometer. The additional readout contains solely parasitic signals and is used to model the scatter source. Subtraction of the scatter signal reduces the noise spectral density and thus improves the measurement sensitivity. Our scheme is qualitatively different from the previously demonstrated vetoing of scatter signals and opens a new path for improving the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors.

Meinders, Melanie

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

IBIS: An inverse geometry Brillouin inelastic neutron spectrometer for the SNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high power target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) currently has about 20 completed neutron scattering instruments. With a broad coverage of the momentum transfer (Q)-energy (E) space, these instruments serve an extensive user community. In an effort to further expand the scientific capabilities of the SNS instrument suites, we propose a low background, inverse geometry Brillouin inelastic spectrometer for the SNS which will expand the Q-E coverage of the current instrument suite and facilitate the study of inelastic and quasi-elastic scatterings at low Q values. The possible location for the proposed instrument is either beamline 8 which views the decoupled water moderator, or beamline 14A, which views a cold, coupled super critical hydrogen moderator. The instrument parameters, optimizations, and performances at these two beamline locations are discussed.

Zhao, J. K.; Robertson, Lee; Herwig, Kenneth W. [Instrument and Source Development Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Wildgruber, Christoph U. [Chemical and Engineering Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Strangeness Production at low $Q^2$ in Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of neutral strange hadrons is investigated using deep-inelastic scattering events measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The measurements are made in the phase space defined by the negative four-momentum transfer squared of the photon 2 < Q^2 < 100 GeV^2 and the inelasticity 0.1 < y < 0.6. The K_s and Lambda production cross sections and their ratios are determined. K_s production is compared to the production of charged particles in the same region of phase space. The Lambda - anti-Lambda asymmetry is also measured and found to be consistent with zero. Predictions of leading order Monte Carlo programs are compared to the data.

Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Bacchetta, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H.-U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, Paul R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Peng, H; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wegener, D; Wessels, M; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Yeganov, V; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Measurement of Charm and Beauty Jets in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of cross sections for events with charm and beauty jets in deep inelastic scattering at HERA are presented. Events with jets of transverse energy E_T^jet > 6 GeV and pseudorapidity -1.0 6 GeV^2 and inelasticity variable 0.07 6 GeV. The data were collected with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 189 pb^-1. The numbers of charm and beauty jets are determined using variables reconstructed using the H1 vertex detector with which the impact parameters of the tracks to the primary vertex and the position of secondary vertices are measured. The measurements are compared with QCD predictions and with previous measurements where heavy flavours are identified using muons.

Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, D; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Ceccopieri, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; Delcourt, B; Delvax, J; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dobre, M; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Grebenyuk, A; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C.W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Huber, F; Jacquet, M; Janssen, X; Jonsson, L; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P.J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lipka, K; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nikitin, D; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Pahl, P; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pirumov, H; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Tabasco, J E.Ruiz; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P.C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Trevino, A Vargas; Vazdik, Y; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Resource Letter on Stimulated Inelastic X-ray Scattering at an XFEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At sufficient X-ray intensity, stimulated effects in inelastic scattering will become important. These coherent, non-linear optical phenomena may be used to impulsively produce a high degree of collective excitation in, for example, correlated electron materials, suitable for performing ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy. This Resource Letter collects information on fundamental aspects of stimulated X-ray scattering and evaluates the prospect for successful experiments at a present or future X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facility.

Patterson, Bruce

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

183

Tagging emc effects and hadronization mechanisms by semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a nucleus A with detection of a slow nucleus (A-1) in the ground or low excitation states, i.e. the process A(e,e'(A-1))X, can provide useful information on the origin of the EMC effect and the mechanisms of hadronization. The theoretical description of the process is reviewed and the results of several calculations on few-body systems and complex nuclei are presented.

Claudio Ciofi Degli Atti; Leonid P. Kaptari; Chiara Benedetta Mezzetti

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

184

Hadron Formation in Deep-Inelastic Positron Scattering in a Nuclear Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of the nuclear medium on the production of charged hadrons in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering has been studied by the HERMES experiment at DESY using a 27.5 GeV positron beam. The differential multiplicity of charged hadrons and identified charged pions from nitrogen relative to that from deuterium has been measured as a function of the virtual photon energy \

Airapetian, A; Akushevich, I V; Amarian, M; Arrington, J; Aschenauer, E C; Avakian, H; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Bains, B; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brauksiepe, S; Braun, B; Brückner, W; Brüll, A; Budz, P; Bulten, H J; Capitani, G P; Carter, P; Chumney, P; Cisbani, E; Court, G R; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Devitsin, E G; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; Di Nezza, P; Dzhordzhadze, V; Düren, M; Dvoredsky, A P; Elbakian, G M; Ely, J; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Felawka, L; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Fiedler, K; Filippone, B W; Fischer, H; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Gärber, Y; Garibaldi, F; Garutti, E; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Golendukhin, A; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Green, P W; Greeniaus, L G; Gute, A; Haeberli, W; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Heinsius, F H; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hofman, G J; Holler, Y; Holt, R J; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Iodice, M; Izotov, A A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Jung, P; Kaiser, R; Kanesaka, J; Kinney, E R; Kiselev, A; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, H; Koch, N; Königsmann, K C; Kolster, H; Korotkov, V A; Kotik, E; Kozlov, V; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kyle, G S; Lagamba, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Lindemann, T; Lorenzon, W; Makins, N C R; Martin, J W; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; McAndrew, M; McIlhany, K; McKeown, R D; Meissner, F; Menden, F; Metz, A; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Milner, R; Muccifora, V; Mussa, R; Nagaitsev, A P; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaeva, K; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganesyan, K A; O'Neill, T G; Openshaw, R; Ouyang, J; Owen, B R; Pate, S F; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Rakness, G; Rappoport, V; Redwine, R P; Reggiani, D; Reolon, A R; Ristinen, R; Rith, K; Robinson, D; Rostomyan, A; Ruh, M; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Sato, T; Savin, I A; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schmidt, F; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Schwind, A; Seibert, J; Seitz, B; Shibata, T A; Shin, T; Shutov, V B; Simani, M C; Simon, A; Sinram, K; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Suetsugu, K; Sutter, M F; Taroian, S P; Terkulov, A R; Tessarin, S; Thomas, E; Tipton, B; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van den Brand, J F J; van der Steenhoven, G; Van de Vyver, R; Van Hunen, J J; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Volk, E; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Wise, T; Yen, S; Yoneyama, S; Zohrabyan, H G

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80?K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

Niedziela, J. L., E-mail: niedzielajl@ornl.gov [Instrument and Source Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Stone, M. B., E-mail: stonemb@ornl.gov [Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

186

Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80~K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

Niedziela, Jennifer L [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Evolution and stability of shock waves in dissipative gases characterized by activated inelastic collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous experiments have revealed that shock waves driven through dissipative gases may become unstable, for example, in granular gases, and in molecular gases undergoing strong relaxation effects. The mechanisms controlling these instabilities are not well understood. We successfully isolated and investigated this instability in the canonical problem of piston driven shock waves propagating into a medium characterized by inelastic collision processes. We treat the standard model of granular gases, where particle collisions are taken as inelastic with constant coefficient of restitution. The inelasticity is activated for sufficiently strong collisions. Molecular dynamic simulations were performed for 30,000 particles. We find that all shock waves investigated become unstable, with density non-uniformities forming in the relaxation region. The wavelength of these fingers is found comparable to the characteristic relaxation thickness. Shock Hugoniot curves for both elastic and inelastic collisions were obtained analytically and numerically. Analysis of these curves indicate that the instability is not of the Bethe-Zeldovich-Thompson or Dyakov-Kontorovich types. Analysis of the shock relaxation rates and rates for clustering in a convected fluid element with the same thermodynamic history outruled the clustering instability of a homogeneous granular gas. Instead, wave reconstruction of the early transient evolution indicates that the onset of instability occurs during the re-pressurization of the gas following the initial relaxation of the medium behind the lead shock. This re-pressurization gives rise to internal pressure waves in the presence of strong density gradients. This indicates that the mechanism of instability is more likely of the vorticity-generating Richtmyer-Meshkov type, relying on the action of the inner pressure waves development during the transient relaxation.

Nick Sirmas; Matei I. Radulescu

2015-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

188

Maximum entropy deconvolution of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) has become a powerful tool in the study of the electronic structure of condensed matter. Although the linewidths of many RIXS features are narrow, the experimental broadening can often hamper the identification of spectral features. Here, we show that the Maximum Entropy technique can successfully be applied in the deconvolution of RIXS spectra, improving the interpretation of the loss features without a severe increase in the noise ratio.

J. Laverock; A. R. H. Preston; D. Newby Jr; K. E. Smith; S. B. Dugdale

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

189

Residual stress in nanocrystalline nickel tungsten electrodeposits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We employ a three-dimensional ...

Ziebell, Tiffany D. (Tiffany Dawn)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

SAR impulse response with residual chirps.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Nuclear Effects in Deep Inelastic Scattering of Charged-Current Neutrino off Nuclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear effect in the neutrino-nucleus charged-Current inelastic scattering process is studied by analyzing the CCFR and NuTeV data. Structure functions $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $xF_3(x,Q^2)$ as well as differential cross sections are calculated by using CTEQ parton distribution functions and EKRS and HKN nuclear parton distribution functions, and compared with the CCFR and NuTeV data. It is found that the corrections of nuclear effect to the differential cross section for the charged-current anti-neutrino scattering on nucleus are negligible, the EMC effect exists in the neutrino structure function $F_2(x,Q^2)$ in the large $x$ region, the shadowing and anti-shadowing effect occurs in the distribution functions of valence quarks in the small and medium $x$ region,respectively. It is also found that shadowing effects on $F_2(x,Q^2)$ in the small $x$ region in the neutrino-nucleus and the charged-lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering processes are different. It is clear that the neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering data should further be employed in restricting nuclear parton distributions.

Duan ChunGui; Li GuangLie; Shen PengNian

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

192

Interplay of threshold resummation and hadron mass corrections in deep inelastic processes  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We discuss hadron mass corrections and threshold resummation for deep-inelastic scattering lN-->l'X and semi-inclusive annihilation e+e- -->hX processes, and provide a prescription how to consistently combine these two corrections respecting all kinematic thresholds. We find an interesting interplay between threshold resummation and target mass corrections for deep-inelastic scattering at large values of Bjorken xB. In semi-inclusive annihilation, on the contrary, the two considered corrections are relevant in different kinematic regions and do not affect each other. A detailed analysis is nonetheless of interest in the light of recent high precision data from BaBar and Belle on pion and kaon production, with which we compare our calculations. For both deep inelastic scattering and single inclusive annihilation, the size of the combined corrections compared to the precision of world data is shown to be large. Therefore, we conclude that these theoretical corrections are relevant for global QCD fits in order to extract precise parton distributions at large Bjorken xB, and fragmentation functions over the whole kinematic range.

Accardi, Alberto; Anderle, Daniele P.; Ringer, Felix

2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a Densified Large Square Bale Format ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a...

194

Sustainable System for Residual Hazards Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous, radioactive and other toxic substances have routinely been generated and subsequently disposed of in the shallow subsurface throughout the world. Many of today’s waste management techniques do not eliminate the problem, but rather only concentrate or contain the hazardous contaminants. Residual hazards result from the presence of hazardous and/or contaminated material that remains on-site following active operations or the completion of remedial actions. Residual hazards pose continued risk to humans and the environment and represent a significant and chronic problem that require continuous longterm management (i.e. >1000 years). To protect human health and safeguard the natural environment, a sustainable system is required for the proper management of residual hazards. A sustainable system for the management of residual hazards will require the integration of engineered, institutional and land-use controls to isolate residual contaminants and thus minimize the associated hazards. Engineered controls are physical modifications to the natural setting and ecosystem, including the site, facility, and/or the residual materials themselves, in order to reduce or eliminate the potential for exposure to contaminants of concern (COCs). Institutional controls are processes, instruments, and mechanisms designed to influence human behavior and activity. System failure can involve hazardous material escaping from the confinement because of system degradation (i.e., chronic or acute degradation) or by externalintrusion of the biosphere into the contaminated material because of the loss of institutional control. An ongoing analysis of contemporary and historic sites suggests that the significance of the loss of institutional controls is a critical pathway because decisions made during the operations/remedial action phase, as well as decisions made throughout the residual hazards management period, are key to the longterm success of the prescribed system. In fact, given that society has become more reliant on and confident of engineered controls, there may be a growing tendency to be even less concerned with institutional controls.

Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Final environmental assessment for vegetation control at VHF stations, microwave stations, electrical substations, and pole yards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Southwestern Power Adm. operates very high frequency (VHF) and microwave radio stations, electrical substations, and pole yards for electric power transmission throughout AR, MO, and OK. Vegetation growth at the stations must be suppressed for safety of operation and personnel. Southwestern has been using a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control for this purpose; Federally- mandated reductions in staff and budgetary resources require Southwestern to evaluate all potentially efficient methods for vegetation control. Three alternatives were examined: no action, mechanical/manual control, and (proposed) a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control. Environmental impacts on air and water quality, wetlands, wildlife, endangered species, archaeological and other resources, farmland, human health, transportation, etc. were evaluated.

NONE

1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

Large-Scale Structure in the ROSAT North Ecliptic Pole Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used the ROSAT All-Sky Survey around the North Ecliptic Pole to construct a complete sample of galaxy clusters. The deep and contiguous nature of the survey affords us the opportunity to examine large-scale structure in the Universe on scales of hundreds of megaparsecs. We have identified over 99% of the 446 X-ray sources in the survey area. The cluster sample consists of 65 objects with redshifts approaching unity. Surprisingly, some 20% of the clusters exists in a wall-like structure at z=0.088 spanning the entire 9 deg x 9 deg survey region. This is a very significant extension of both the membership and the spatial extent to a known supercluster in this location.

Christopher R. Mullis

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

197

Test of the consistency of various linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions in application to inelastic neutron scattering from liquid para-hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory of Thermal Neutron Scattering. (Dover Publications,S. W. Lovesey, Theory of Neutron Scattering from Condensedwith the inelastic neutron scattering experiment results.

Liu, Jian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198
199

Inelastic neutron scattering studies of magnetic fluctuations in the tetragonal and collapsed tetragonal phases of CaFe2As2.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The relationship between magnetism and superconductivity has become a central topic of research in studies of superconductivity in the iron pnictides. This thesis presents inelastic… (more)

Soh, Jing Han

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Nature of the Surface Species Formed on Au/TiO2 during the Reaction of H2 and O2: An Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron Scattering Study Chinta Sivadinarayana, Tushar V. Choudhary, Luke L. Daemen, Juergen Eckert of obvious interest for understanding this process. Vibrational spectroscopy by inelastic neutron scattering

Goodman, Wayne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Multiplicity of Charged and Neutral Pions in Deep-Inelastic Scattering of 27.5 GeV Positrons on Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiplicity of Charged and Neutral Pions in Deep-Inelastic Scattering of 27.5 GeV Positrons on Hydrogen

Airapetian, A; Amarian, M; Arrington, J; Aschenauer, E C; Avakian, H; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Bains, B; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brauksiepe, S; Braun, B; Brückner, W; Brüll, A; Budz, P; Bulten, H J; Capitani, G P; Carter, P; Chumney, P; Cisbani, E; Court, G R; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Devitsin, E G; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; Di Nezza, P; Dzhordzhadze, V; Düren, M; Dvoredsky, A P; Elbakian, G M; Ely, J; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Fiedler, K; Filippone, B W; Fischer, H; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Gärber, Y; Garibaldi, F; Garutti, E; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Golendukhin, A; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Green, P W; Greeniaus, L G; Gute, A; Haeberli, W; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Heinsius, F H; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hoffmann-Rothe, P; Hofman, G J; Holler, Y; Holt, R J; Hommez, B; Hoprich, W; Iarygin, G; Ihssen, H; Iodice, M; Izotov, A A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kanesaka, J; Kinney, E R; Kiselev, A; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, H; Koch, N; Königsmann, K C; Kolster, H; Korotkov, V A; Kotik, E; Kozlov, V; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kyle, G S; Lagamba, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Lindemann, T; Lorenzon, W; Makins, N C R; Martin, J W; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; McAndrew, M; McIlhany, K; McKeown, R D; Meissner, F; Menden, F; Metz, A; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Milner, R; Muccifora, V; Mussa, R; Nagaitsev, A P; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; O'Neill, T G; Openshaw, R; Ouyang, J; Owen, B R; Pate, S F; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Rakness, G; Redwine, R P; Reggiani, D; Reolon, A R; Ristinen, R; Rith, K; Robinson, D; Rostomyan, A; Ruh, M; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Sato, F; Savin, I A; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schmidt, F; Schmitt, M; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Schwind, A; Seibert, J; Shibata, T A; Shin, T; Shutov, V B; Simani, M C; Simon, A; Sinram, K; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Suetsugu, K; Sutter, M F; Tallini, H A; Taroian, S P; Terkulov, A R; Tessarin, S; Thomas, E; Tipton, B; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van den Brand, J F J; van der Steenhoven, G; Van de Vyver, R; Van Hunen, J J; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Volk, E; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Wise, T; Woller, K; Yoneyama, S; Zohrabyan, H G

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

BY HOW MUCH CAN RESIDUAL MINIMIZATION ACCELERATE THE CONVERGENCE OF ORTHOGONAL RESIDUAL METHODS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Examples of such pairs are the conjugate gradient (CG) and the conjugate residual (CR) methods, the full-minimal residual (QMR) methods. Also the pairs consisting of the (bi)conjugate gradient squared (CGS, iterative method, Krylov space method, conjugate gradient method, biconjugate gradient method, CG, CGNE

Gutknecht, Martin H.

203

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 45, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2009 5399 Modeling of the Starting Performance of Large Solid-Pole Synchronous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refineries, steel mills, and power plants [1]­[6]. Large solid pole motors are a special category of large virtual windings. Therefore, the two-axis theory can be used for the solid pole synchronous motor. We, starting performance, transformation coefficient, two-axis theory, virtual windings. I. INTRODUCTION LARGE

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

204

A FAMILY OF TWENTY-AMPERES POWER SUPPLIES FOR MULTI-POLE CORRECTORS FOR ACCELERATORS AND STORAGE RINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A FAMILY OF TWENTY-AMPERES POWER SUPPLIES FOR MULTI- POLE CORRECTORS FOR ACCELERATORS AND STORAGE of accelerator facilities and storage ring complexes in broad range of output power. Some tasks, e.g. powering-150, correspondingly. The power supplies developed meet the requirements of the up-to-date accelerator facilities

Kozak, Victor R.

205

Ultraviolet poling of pure fused silica by high-intensity femtosecond Costantino Corbari and Peter G. Kazansky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field of 200 kV/cm and irradiating it with high-intensity 40 GW/cm2 femtosecond 220 fs laser pulses a second-order nonlinearity in glass by poling has some very intriguing possibilities for fiber optics, first realized by Fujiwara et al.,1 consists of the irradiation of highly Ge-doped 15.7 mol % fused

Nikogosyan, David N.

206

Please leave this heading unchanged! Sound radiation of a non-rigid piston and pole cap compared with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Please leave this heading unchanged! Sound radiation of a non-rigid piston and pole cap compared are often modelled as a rigid piston in an infinite baffle. This model is for real loudspeakers somewhat of the baffled-piston radiation the spatial impulse response is presented. 1. Nijboer-Zernike approach

207

Sound radiation from a loudspeaker, from a spherical pole cap, and from a piston in an infinite baffle1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sound radiation from a loudspeaker, from a spherical pole cap, and from a piston in an infinite are often modelled as a rigid piston in an infinite baffle. As a model for real loudspeakers, this approach of the baffled-piston radiation the spatial impulse response is presented. 1. Nijboer-Zernike approach

208

Feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection in ice: Design and performance of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been built to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of the South Pole ice in the 10 to 100 kHz frequency range so that the feasibility and specific design of an acoustic neutrino detection array at South Pole can be evaluated. SPATS consists of three vertical strings that were deployed in the upper 400 meters of the South Pole ice cap in January 2007, using the upper part of IceCube holes. The strings form a triangular array with the longest baseline 421 meters. Each of them has 7 stages with one transmitter and one sensor module. Both are equipped with piezoelectric ceramic elements in order to produce or detect sound. Analog signals are brought to the surface on electric cables where they are digitized by a PC-based data acquisition system. The data from all three strings are collected on a master-PC in a central facility, from which they are sent to the northern hemisphere via a satellite link or locally stored on tape. A technical overview of the SPATS detect...

Boeser, S; Descamps, F; Fischer, J; Hallgren, A; Heller, R; Hundertmark, S; Krieger, K; Nahnhauer, R; Pohl, M; Price, P B; Sulanke, K -H; Tosi, D; Vandenbroucke, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection in ice: Design and performance of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been built to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of the South Pole ice in the 10 to 100 kHz frequency range so that the feasibility and specific design of an acoustic neutrino detection array at South Pole can be evaluated. SPATS consists of three vertical strings that were deployed in the upper 400 meters of the South Pole ice cap in January 2007, using the upper part of IceCube holes. The strings form a triangular array with the longest baseline 421 meters. Each of them has 7 stages with one transmitter and one sensor module. Both are equipped with piezoelectric ceramic elements in order to produce or detect sound. Analog signals are brought to the surface on electric cables where they are digitized by a PC-based data acquisition system. The data from all three strings are collected on a master-PC in a central facility, from which they are sent to the northern hemisphere via a satellite link or locally stored on tape. A technical overview of the SPATS detector and its performance is presented.

S. Boeser; C. Bohm; F. Descamps; J. Fischer; A. Hallgren; R. Heller; S. Hundertmark; K. Krieger; R. Nahnhauer; M. Pohl; P. B. Price; K. -H. Sulanke; D. Tosi; J. Vandenbroucke

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

210

An indigenous origin for the South Pole Aitken basin thorium anomaly Ian Garrick-Bethell and Maria T. Zuber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An indigenous origin for the South Pole Aitken basin thorium anomaly Ian Garrick-Bethell and Maria high abundance of thorium as determined by Apollo and Lunar Prospector gamma-ray spectroscopy that the anomaly is the result of convergence of thorium-enriched ejecta from the Imbrium impact. Examination

Zuber, Maria

211

Temperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: Implications for life in a nearby subglacial lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-induced melting temperature of freshwater ice. To produce the strong radar signal, the frozen lake must consistTemperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: Implications for life in a nearby subglacial by P. Buford Price, April 22, 2002 Airborne radar has detected 100 lakes under the Antarctic ice cap

Price, P. Buford

212

Sensorless Direct Torque Control For Salient Pole PMSM Based on Extended Kalman Filter Fed By AC/DC/AC Converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensorless Direct Torque Control For Salient ­ Pole PMSM Based on Extended Kalman Filter Fed By AC is proposed. The Direct Torque Control (DTC) technique for PMSM is receiving increasing attention due on the stochastic intromission, in others words, noise. The PMSM is fed by an indirect power electronic converter

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

213

Residual oil conversion in Ashland FCC Units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ashland Petroleum Company is a production-poor refining and marketing company. A company must have refining flexibility to compete in today's crude and marketing situation. Ashland has adopted a dual approach to achieving the required refining flexibility: development and construction of the RCC process, and development of techniques to practice residual oil conversion in Ashland FCC units. This paper discusses the operating techniques Ashland has used to allow residual oil conversion to be practiced in their present day FCC's and shows some of the yields which have been achieved.

Barger, D.F.; Miller, C.B.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Residual dust charges in discharge afterglow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An on-ground measurement of dust-particle residual charges in the afterglow of a dusty plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance the gravitational force. It was found that positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral dust particles coexisted for more than 1 min after the discharge was switched off. The mean residual charge for 200-nm-radius particles was measured. The dust particle mean charge is about -5e at a pressure of 1.2 mbar and about -3e at a pressure of 0.4 mbar.

Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.; Samarian, A. A. [GREMI - Groupe de Recherches sur l'Energetique des Milieux Ionises, CNRS/Universite d'Orleans, 14 rue d'Issoudun, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Measurement of the inelastic proton-proton cross section with the ATLAS detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A measurement of the inelastic proton-proton cross-section at centre-of-mass energy of Central diffraction in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented. Events are selected by requiring hits in scintillator counters mounted in the forward region of the ATLAS detector and the dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20{mu}b{sup -1}. In addition, the total cross-section is studied as a function of the rapidity gap size measured with the inner detector and calorimetry.

Zenis, Tibor [Comenius University Bratislava (Slovakia); Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Inelastic Interactions of Proton with Emulsion Nuclei without Shower Particle Creation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents exhaustively the general characteristics of the inelastic interactions of P, 4He and 7Li with emulsion nuclei distinguished without relativistic hadrons (ns = 0) in Lab. system. The dependence of these interactions on the projectile and target sizes is presented. It is found that, the probability of the events having (ns = 0) is dependent on projectile size and incident energy. The average no. of grey particles and black particles as well as the ratio / are displayed for different target size. The multiplicity distribution of different target fragments for the events having (ns = 0), ns {>=} 0 and those of complete destruction (Nh {>=} 28) are presented.

Abdelsalam, A. [Physics Department, Faculty of science, Cairo University, Giza, (Egypt); El-Nagdy, M. S. [Physics Department, Faculty of science, Helwan University, Helwan (Egypt); Rashed, N. [Physics Department, Faculty of science, Fayoum University, Fayoum (Egypt); Badawy, B. M. [Reactor Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt)

2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

The excitation of high spin states with quasi-elastic and deep inelastic reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of populating high spin states using reactions induced by a 220 MeV {sup 22}Ne beam on a {sup 170}Er target was studied. The experiment was carried out using a multidetector array for high resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy, a 14 element sum multiplicity spectrometer and six {Delta}E-E particle telescopes. Detailed information was obtained concerning the reaction mechanisms associated with various reaction channels. Deep inelastic collisions are shown to be a promising tool for high spin spectroscopy in regions of the chart of nuclides which are not accessible by other reactions.

Knott, C.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Population of high spin states by quasi-elastic and deep inelastic collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of populating high spin states using reactions induced by a 10 MeV/nucleon /sup 22/Ne beam on /sup 170/Er was studied. The experiment was carried out using a multidetector array for high resolution ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy, a 14 element sum-multiplicity spectrometer and six ..delta..E-E telescopes. Detailed information was obtained concerning the reaction mechanisms associated with various reaction channels. Deep inelastic collisions are shown to be a promising tool for high spin spectroscopy in regions of the chart of nuclides which are not accessible by other reactions.

Takai, H.; Knott, C.N.; Winchell, D.F.; Saladin, J.X.; Kaplan, M.S.; de Faro, L.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Blue, R.A.; Ronningen, R.M.; Morrissey, D.J.; and others

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments on B[subscript 4]C under high static pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron K-edge inelastic X-ray scattering experiments were performed on clean B{sub 4}C and shock impact recovered boron carbide up to 30 GPa and at ambient temperature to understand the pressure induced bonding changes. The spectral features corresponding to the boron site in the interlinking chain remained unchanged up to 30 GPa. The results of our experiments indicate that pressure induces less distortion to the boron sites and the local amorphization observed in the previous reports are due to the rearrangement of carbon atoms under extreme conditions without affecting the boron environment.

Kumar, Ravhi S.; Dandekar, Dattatraya; Leithe-Jasper, Andres; Tanaka, Takaho; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Nicol, Malcolm F.; Cornelius, Andrew L. (UNLV); (MXPL-M); (CIW); (USARL)

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

220

EMC effect in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By considering the $x$-dependence of $\\pi^+$, $\\pi^-$, $K^+$, $K^-$, $\\Lambda$, $\\bar{\\Lambda}$, $p$, $\\bar{p}$ hadron productions in charged lepton semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off nuclear target (using Fe as an example) and deuteron D target, % at $Q^2=5$ GeV$^2$, we find that $(\\bar{\\Lambda}^A/\\Lambda^A)/(\\bar{\\Lambda}^D/\\Lambda^D)$ and $({\\bar{p}}^A/{p}^A)/({\\bar{p}}^A/p^A)$ are ideal to figure out the nuclear sea content, which is predicted to be different by different models accounting for the nuclear EMC effect.

Baogui Lu; Bo-Qiang Ma

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

EMC effect in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By considering the x-dependence of {pi}{sup +},{pi}{sup -},K{sup +},K{sup -},{lambda},{lambda},p,p hadron productions in charged lepton semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering off nuclear target (using Fe as an example) and deuteron D target, we find that ({lambda}{sup A}/{lambda}{sup A})/({lambda}{sup D}/{lambda}{sup D}) and (p{sup A}/p{sup A})/(p{sup A}/p{sup A}) are ideal to figure out the nuclear sea content, which is predicted to be different by different models accounting for the nuclear EMC effect.

Lu Baogui; Ma Boqiang [Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); CCAST (World Laboratory), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China) and Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Automatic Methods for Predicting Functionally Important Residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pazos and Alfonso Valencia* Protein Design Group National Center for Biotechnology, Cantoblanco Madrid of protein families into subfamilies in the search for those positions that could have some functional families, testing the statistical meaning of the Tree-determinant residues predicted by three different

Pazos, Florencio

223

Residual Energy Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 years of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of sigma_r = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r_A = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cros...

Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; Maruca, B A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in-situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of the three most significant mobile contaminants of concern from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. For uranium, all three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective MCLs for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste. This innovative approach has the potential to revolutionize Hanford’s tank retrieval process, by allowing larger volumes of residual waste to be left in tanks while providing an acceptably low level of risk with respect to contaminant release that is protective of the environment and human health. Such an approach could enable DOE to realize significant cost savings through streamlined retrieval and closure operations.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Measurement of high-Q2 deep inelastic scattering cross sections with longitudinally polarised positron beams at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first measurements of the cross sections for neutral and charged current deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions with longitudinally polarised positron beams are presented. The total cross section for e+p charged current deep inelastic scattering is presented at positive and negative values of positron beam longitudinal polarisation for an integrated luminosity of 37.0 pb^-1 H1 data and 30.5 pb^-1 ZEUS data collected in 2003 and 2004 at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. In addition, the ZEUS collaboration measured the single differential cross sections for charged and neutral current deep inelastic scattering in the kinematic region Q^2>200 GeV^2. The measured cross sections are compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. The H1 collaboration extrapolate the cross section to a fully left handed positron beam and find it to be consistent with the Standard Model expectation.

Julian Rautenberg

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Inelastic neutron scattering study of hydrogen in d8-THF/D2O ice clathrate Kimberly T. Tait,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic neutron scattering study of hydrogen in d8-THF/D2O ice clathrate Kimberly T. Tait,a Frans Trouw,b and Yusheng Zhao Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los October 2007 In situ neutron inelastic scattering experiments on hydrogen adsorbed into a fully deutrated

Downs, Robert T.

227

Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering W. Wang, D. A. Sokolov, A. D. Huxley, and K. V. Kamenev  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering W. Wang, D. A. Sokolov, A. D for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of quantum fluids and solids Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 015101 (2013) TOF-SEMSANS--Time-of-flight spin-echo modulated small-angle neutron scattering J. Appl. Phys. 112

Hall, Christopher

228

Multiplicities of charged pions and kaons from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering by the proton and the deuteron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiplicities in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering are presented for each charge state of \\pi^\\pm and K^\\pm mesons. The data were collected by the HERMES experiment at the HERA storage ring using 27.6 GeV electron and positron beams incident on a hydrogen or deuterium gas target. The results are presented as a function of the kinematic quantities x_B, Q^2, z, and P_h\\perp. They represent a unique data set for identified hadrons that will significantly enhance our understanding of the fragmentation of quarks into final-state hadrons in deep-inelastic scattering.

Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Belostotski, S; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Brodski, I; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Kobayashi, N; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikás, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Ruiz, A López; Lorenzon, W; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfré, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Petrosyan, A; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Shutov, V; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Taroian, S; Terkulov, A; Truty, R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vilardi, I; Vogel, C; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zagrebelnyy, V; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Multiplicities of charged pions and kaons from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering by the proton and the deuteron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiplicities in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering are presented for each charge state of \\pi^\\pm and K^\\pm mesons. The data were collected by the HERMES experiment at the HERA storage ring using 27.6 GeV electron and positron beams incident on a hydrogen or deuterium gas target. The results are presented as a function of the kinematic quantities x_B, Q^2, z, and P_h\\perp. They represent a unique data set for identified hadrons that will significantly enhance our understanding of the fragmentation of quarks into final-state hadrons in deep-inelastic scattering.

HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; S. Belostotski; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; J. Bowles; I. Brodski; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; L. De Nardo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Düren; M. Ehrenfried; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; R. Fabbri; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; D. Gabbert; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; F. Garibaldi; G. Gavrilov; V. Gharibyan; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Golembiovskaya; C. Hadjidakis; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; A. Hillenbrand; M. Hoek; Y. Holler; I. Hristova; Y. Imazu; A. Ivanilov; A. Izotov; H. E. Jackson; H. S. Jo; S. Joosten; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; N. Kobayashi; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; P. Kravchenko; V. G. Krivokhijine; L. Lagamba; L. Lapikás; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; A. López Ruiz; W. Lorenzon; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; B. Maiheu; N. C. R. Makins; S. I. Manaenkov; L. Manfré; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; C. A. Miller; Y. Miyachi; A. Movsisyan; M. Murray; A. Mussgiller; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; M. Negodaev; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; A. Petrosyan; M. Raithel; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; F. Sanftl; A. Schäfer; G. Schnell; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; V. Shutov; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; J. J. M. Steijger; J. Stewart; F. Stinzing; S. Taroian; A. Terkulov; R. Truty; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; I. Vilardi; C. Vogel; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; Z. Ye; S. Yen; W. Yu; V. Zagrebelnyy; D. Zeiler; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

230

Energy production rates in fluid mixtures of inelastic rough hard spheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this work is to explore the combined effect of polydispersity and roughness on the partial energy production rates and on the total cooling rate of a granular fluid mixture. We consider a mixture of inelastic rough hard spheres of different number densities, masses, diameters, moments of inertia, and mutual coefficients of normal and tangential restitution. Starting from the first equation of the BBGKY hierarchy, the collisional energy production rates associated with the translational and rotational temperatures ($T_i^\\text{tr}$ and $T_i^\\text{rot}$) are expressed in terms of two-body average values. Next, those average values are estimated by assuming a velocity distribution function based on maximum-entropy arguments, allowing us to express the energy production rates and the total cooling rate in terms of the partial temperatures and the parameters of the mixture. Finally, the results are applied to the homogeneous cooling state of a binary mixture and the influence of inelasticity and roughness on the temperature ratios $T_1^\\text{tr}/T_1^\\text{rot}$, $T_2^\\text{tr}/T_1^\\text{tr}$, and $T_2^\\text{rot}/T_1^\\text{rot}$ is analyzed.

Andrés Santos; Gilberto M. Kremer; Vicente Garzó

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

231

Measurement of Leading Neutron Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of leading neutrons, where the neutron carries a large fraction x_L of the incoming proton's longitudinal momentum, is studied in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at HERA. The data were taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 122 pb^{-1}. The semi-inclusive cross section is measured in the phase space defined by the photon virtuality 6 < Q^2 < 100 GeV^2, Bjorken scaling variable 1.5x10^{-4} < x < 3x10^{-2}, longitudinal momentum fraction 0.32 < x_L < 0.95 and neutron transverse momentum p_T < 0.2 GeV. The leading neutron structure function, F_2^{LN(3)}(Q^2,x,x_L), and the fraction of deep-inelastic scattering events containing a leading neutron are studied as a function of Q^2, x and x_L. Assuming that the pion exchange mechanism dominates leading neutron production, the data provide constraints on the shape of the pion structure function.

Aaron, F D; Alimujiang, K; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; Delcourt, B; Delvax, J; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Falkiewicz, A; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D.-J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, X; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; INSPIRE-00183962; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nikitin, D; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Pahl, P; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Generation of polarization entangled photons using type-II doubly periodically poled lithium niobate waveguides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we address the issue of the generation of non-degenerate cross-polarization-entangled photon pairs using type-II periodically poled lithium niobate. We show that, by an appropriate engineering of the quasi-phase-matching grating, it is possible to simultaneously satisfy the conditions for two spontaneous parametric down-conversion processes, namely ordinary pump photon down-conversion to either extraordinary signal and ordinary idler paired photons, or to ordinary signal and extraordinary idler paired photons. In contrast to single type-II phase-matching, these two processes, when enabled together, can lead to the direct production of cross-polarization-entangled state for non degenerate signal and idler wavelengths. Such a scheme should be of great interest in applications requiring polarization-entangled non degenerate paired photons with, for instance, one of the entangled photons at an appropriate wavelength being used for local operation or for quantum storage in an atomic ensemble, and the other one at the typical wavelength of 1550 nm for propagation through an optical fiber.

K. Thyagarajan; K. Sinha; J. Lugani; S. Ghosh; A. Martin; D. B. Ostrowsky; O. Alibart; S. Tanzilli

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

Axial gap permanent-magnet machine with reluctance poles and PM element covers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electric machine (10) has a disk-shaped rotor (24) disposed in an operating space between two opposing stator assemblies (11, 12) to provide two axial air gaps (15, 16). The rotor (24) has a hub (28) and an outer ring (26) of non-magnetic material and is further provided with a plurality of permanent magnetic elements (25) for coupling flux that is induced by the magnetic field of the stator assemblies (11, 12). The permanent magnetic elements (25) are spaced apart and reluctance poles (27) are positioned in spaces between the magnetic elements (25) to couple additional flux induced by the magnetic field of the stator assemblies (11, 12). Various constructions and shapes (40-45) for the PM magnetic elements (25) are disclosed, and including PM covers (60) of ferromagnetic material for enhancing q-axis flux in the air gaps (15, 16) and for reducing harmonics where toothed stators are used. Methods of providing increased torque using the the various rotor constructions are also disclosed.

Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W [Oak Ridge, TN

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

234

Inelastic neutron scattering of a quantum translator-rotator encapsulated in a closed fullerene cage: Isotope effects and translation-rotation coupling in H2@C60 and HD@C60  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic neutron scattering of a quantum translator-rotator encapsulated in a closed fullerene, New York 10027, USA Received 1 July 2010; published 20 August 2010 We report an inelastic neutron-scattering inelastic neutron scattering INS ,6 and specific heat7 inves- tigations have recently been reported

Turro, Nicholas J.

235

Thin layer chromatography residue applicator sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin layer chromatograph residue applicator sampler. The residue applicator sampler provides for rapid analysis of samples containing high explosives, chemical warfare, and other analyses of interest under field conditions. This satisfied the need for a field-deployable, small, hand-held, all-in-one device for efficient sampling, sample dissolution, and sample application to an analytical technique. The residue applicator sampler includes a sampling sponge that is resistant to most chemicals and is fastened via a plastic handle in a hermetically sealed tube containing a known amount of solvent. Upon use, the wetted sponge is removed from the sealed tube and used as a swiping device across an environmental sample. The sponge is then replaced in the hermetically sealed tube where the sample remains contained and dissolved in the solvent. A small pipette tip is removably contained in the hermetically sealed tube. The sponge is removed and placed into the pipette tip where a squeezing-out of the dissolved sample from the sponge into the pipette tip results in a droplet captured in a vial for later instrumental analysis, or applied directly to a thin layer chromatography plate for immediate analysis.

Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Kelly, Fredrick R. (Modesto, CA); Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA)

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in Water-Wet Porous Media. A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in Water-Wet Porous Media....

237

In-situ method for treating residual sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Henslee, S. Paul (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

Testing regression models with residuals as data by Xia Hua.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract In polynomial regression ... . In this thesis, I developed a residual based test, the turning point test for residuals, which tests the hypothesis that the kth order polynomial regression holds with ... while the ...

Hua, Xia, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

NEURAL NETWORK RESIDUAL STOCHASTIC COSIMULATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on radioactive soil contamination from the Chernobyl fallout. Introduction The problem of analysing environmentalNEURAL NETWORK RESIDUAL STOCHASTIC COSIMULATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS V. Demyanov, M original method of stochastic simulation of environmental data -- Neural Network Residual Sequential

240

In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

1-D Transforms for the Motion Compensation Residual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforms used in image coding are also commonly used to compress prediction residuals in video coding. Prediction residuals have different spatial characteristics from images, and it is useful to develop transforms that ...

Kamisli, Fatih

242

INELASTIC PROCESSES IN 0.11000 keV/u COLLISIONS OF Ne q+ (q=710) IONS WITH ATOMIC HYDROGEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 INELASTIC PROCESSES IN 0.1­1000 keV/u COLLISIONS OF Ne q+ (q=7­10) IONS WITH ATOMIC HYDROGEN D to recycle hydrogen, and how to remove heat from the plasma. Cooling is required both to extract heat to run transfer, hydrogen and impurity radiation, ionization, and elastic collisions between the recycling gas

243

Unpolarised TMD Distribution and Fragmentation Functions from recent HERMES and COMPASS Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering Multiplicities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unpolarised transverse momentum dependent distribution and fragmentation functions (TMDs) are extracted from HERMES and COMPASS experimental measurements of semi- inclusive deep inelastic scattering multiplicities for charged hadron production. A simple factorised functional form of the TMDs is adopted, with a Gaussian dependence on the intrinsic transverse momentum, which turns out to be quite adequate in shape.

Prokudin, Alexey; Anselmino, Mauro; Boglione, Mariaelena; Melis, Stefano; Gonzalez, J. O.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Inelastic neutron and low-frequency Raman scattering in a niobium-phosphate glass for Raman gain applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic neutron and low-frequency Raman scattering in a niobium-phosphate glass for Raman gain: Raman scattering; Neutron scattering; Raman gain; Boson peak We present measurements of the vibrational, extracted from specific-heat or neutron scattering measurements [7,8]. Only very recently two of the present

Schirmacher, Walter

245

Study of the superconducting gap in RNi2B2C,,RY, Lu... single crystals by inelastic light scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of the superconducting gap in RNi2B2C,,RÃ?Y, Lu... single crystals by inelastic light Initiative Center for Superconductivity, Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 790-390 Pohang, Korea Received 28 February 2000 Superconductivity-induced changes in the electronic

Yang, In-Sang

246

Azimuthal single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarised hydrogen target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Azimuthal single-spin asymmetries (SSA) in semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions and kaons in deep-inelastic scattering of positrons on a transversely polarised hydrogen target were observed. SSA amplitudes for both the Collins and the Sivers mechanism are presented.

Markus Diefenthaler

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

247

Bioassays of weathered residues of several organic phosphorus insecticides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residues on fruit, forage crops, and animals. The effects of temperature, relative humid? ity, light, wind, and simulated rain on the residual toxicities of many of the chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides used for the control of cotton insects were... humidity. Sunlight was found to be an important factor in reducing the residual effectiveness of dieldrin. Wind and simulated rain reduced the period of residual effectiveness of many of the compounds tested. These investigators have shown...

Hightower, Billie Gene

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

248

RESIDUAL STRESS AND YOUNG'S MODULUS MEASUREMENT OF CAPACITIVE MICROMACHINED ULTRASONIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deposition technique yields residual stress of around 100 MPa and Young's modulus of around 300 GPa. Keywords's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and residual stress of the deposited thin films. In this paper, we propose a newRESIDUAL STRESS AND YOUNG'S MODULUS MEASUREMENT OF CAPACITIVE MICROMACHINED ULTRASONIC TRANSDUCER

Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

249

SUPERLAYER RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECT ON THE INDENTATION ADHESION MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a function of film thickness and residual stress. These films were sputter deposited onto thermally oxidized deposition parameters were controlled to produce either a compressive residual stress of 1 GPa or a tensile in a study of compressive and tensile residual stresses created during sputter deposition of tungsten

Volinsky, Alex A.

250

Welding residual stresses in ferritic power plant steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Welding residual stresses in ferritic power plant steels J. A. Francis*1 , H. K. D. H require therefore, an accounting of residual stresses, which often are introduced during welding. To do in the estimation of welding residual stresses in austenitic stainless steels. The progress has been less convincing

Cambridge, University of

251

COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH-SELECTED CLUSTERS WITH X-RAY OBSERVATIONS IN THE FIRST 178 deg[superscript 2] OF THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE SURVEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use measurements from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) cluster survey in combination with X-ray measurements to constrain cosmological parameters. We present a statistical method that fits for the ...

Andersson, Karl

252

Precision Measurements of $A_1^n$ in the Deep Inelastic Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have performed precision measurements of the double-spin virtual-photon asymmetry $A_1$ on the neutron in the deep inelastic scattering regime, using an open-geometry, large-acceptance spectrometer. Our data cover a wide kinematic range $0.277 \\leq x \\leq 0.548$ at an average $Q^2$ value of 3.078~(GeV/c)$^2$, doubling the available high-precision neutron data in this $x$ range. We have combined our results with world data on proton targets to extract the ratio of polarized-to-unpolarized parton distribution functions for up quarks and for down quarks in the same kinematic range. Our data are consistent with a previous observation of an $A_1^n$ zero crossing near $x=0.5$. We find no evidence of a transition to a positive slope in $(\\Delta d + \\Delta \\bar{d})/(d + \\bar{d})$ up to $x=0.548$.

D. S. Parno; D. Flay; M. Posik; K. Allada; W. Armstrong; T. Averett; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; C. Chen; J. -P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; M. M. Dalton; W. Deconinck; C. W. de Jager; X. Deng; A. Deur; C. Dutta; L. El Fassi; G. B. Franklin; M. Friend; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; O. Glamazdin; S. Golge; J. Gomez; L. Guo; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; J. Huang; C. Hyde; H. F. Ibrahim; X. Jiang; G. Jin; J. Katich; A. Kelleher; A. Kolarkar; W. Korsch; G. Kumbartzki; J. J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; E. Long; A. Lukhanin; V. Mamyan; D. McNulty; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; M. Mihovilovi?; B. Moffit; N. Muangma; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; B. Norum; Nuruzzaman; Y. Oh; J. C. Peng; X. Qian; Y. Qiang; A. Rakhman; S. Riordan; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; M. H. Shabestari; A. Shahinyan; S. Širca; P. Solvignon; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; W. A. Tobias; W. Troth; D. Wang; Y. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; Y. Ye; Z. Ye; L. Yuan; X. Zhan; Y. Zhang; Y. -W. Zhang; B. Zhao; X. Zheng

2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

253

Effects of transversity in deep-inelastic scattering by polarized protons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-spin asymmetries for pions and charged kaons are measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of positrons and electrons off a transversely nuclear-polarized hydrogen target. The dependence of the cross section on the azimuthal angles of the target polarization (phi_S)and the produced hadron (phi) is found to have a substantial sin(phi+phi_S) modulation for the production of pi+, pi- and K+. This Fourier component can be interpreted in terms of non-zero transversity distribution functions and non-zero favored and disfavored Collins fragmentation functions with opposite sign. For pi0 and K- production the amplitude of this Fourier component is consistent with zero.

Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Bacchetta, A; Belostotski, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Brodski, I; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dueren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gharibyan, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hill, G; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Kobayashi, N; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Lagamba, L; Lamb, R; Lapikas, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Ruiz, A Lopez; Lorenzon, W; Lu, X -G; Lu, X -R; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfre, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Pickert, N; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schaefer, A; Schnell, G; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Shutov, V; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Taroian, S; Terkulov, A; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; van der Nat, P B; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Vogel, C; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, H; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Effects of transversity in deep-inelastic scattering by polarized protons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-spin asymmetries for pions and charged kaons are measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of positrons and electrons off a transversely nuclear-polarized hydrogen target. The dependence of the cross section on the azimuthal angles of the target polarization (phi_S)and the produced hadron (phi) is found to have a substantial sin(phi+phi_S) modulation for the production of pi+, pi- and K+. This Fourier component can be interpreted in terms of non-zero transversity distribution functions and non-zero favored and disfavored Collins fragmentation functions with opposite sign. For pi0 and K- production the amplitude of this Fourier component is consistent with zero.

HERMES collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; A. Bacchetta; S. Belostotski; N. Bianchi; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; J. Bowles; I. Brodski; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; L. De Nardo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Dueren; M. Ehrenfried; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; U. Elschenbroich; R. Fabbri; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; D. Gabbert; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; F. Garibaldi; V. Gharibyan; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Golembiovskaya; C. Hadjidakis; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; G. Hill; A. Hillenbrand; M. Hoek; Y. Holler; I. Hristova; Y. Imazu; A. Ivanilov; A. Izotov; H. E. Jackson; H. S. Jo; S. Joosten; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; N. Kobayashi; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; P. Kravchenko; L. Lagamba; R. Lamb; L. Lapikas; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; L. A. Linden-Levy; A. Lopez Ruiz; W. Lorenzon; X. -G. Lu; X. -R. Lu; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; N. C. R. Makins; S. I. Manaenkov; L. Manfre; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; C. A. Miller; Y. Miyachi; A. Movsisyan; M. Murray; A. Mussgiller; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; M. Negodaev; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; N. Pickert; M. Raithel; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; F. Sanftl; A. Schaefer; G. Schnell; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; V. Shutov; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; J. J. M. Steijger; H. Stenzel; J. Stewart; F. Stinzing; S. Taroian; A. Terkulov; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; P. B. van der Nat; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; V. Vikhrov; I. Vilardi; C. Vogel; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; H. Ye; Z. Ye; S. Yen; W. Yu; D. Zeiler; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

255

Longitudinal Spin Transfer to the $\\Lambda$ Hyperon in Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transfer of polarization from a high-energy positron to a \\lam hyperon produced in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering has been measured. The data have been obtained by the HERMES experiment at DESY using the 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized positron beam of the HERA collider and unpolarized gas targets internal to the positron (electron) storage ring. The longitudinal spin transfer coefficient is found to be $\\dll = 0.11 \\pm 0.10 \\mathrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.03 \\mathrm{(syst)}$ at an average fractional energy carried by the \\lam hyperon $= 0.45$. The dependence of \\dll on both the fractional energy $z$ and the fractional longitudinal momentum $x_F$ is presented.

Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Balin, D; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Borysenko, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Chen, T; Chen, X; Chiang, H C; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Funel, A; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Gavrilov, G; Karibian, V; Grebenyuk, O; Gregor, I M; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Hristova, I; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Kobayashi, T; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lorenzon, W; Lü, H; Lü, J; Lu, S; Lü, X; Ma, B Q; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Michler, T; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Negodaev, M; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Osborne, A; Pickert, N; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V; Sinram, K; Sommer, W; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Van Haarlem, Y; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Vogel, C; Volmer, J; Wang, S; Wendland, J; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

On the lepton-nucleon neutral and charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the requirement in the simulation of lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering (DIS), we construct a fortran program LDCS 1.0 calculating the differential and total cross sections for the unpolarized charged lepton-unpolarized nucleon and neutrino-unpolarized nucleon neutral current (charged current) DIS at leading order. Any set of the experimentally fitted parton distribution functions could be employed directly. The mass of incident and scattered leptons is taken into account and the boundary conditions calculating the single differential and total cross section are studied. The calculated results well agree with the corresponding experimental data which indicating the LDCS 1.0 program is good. It is also turned out that the effect of tauon mass is not negligible in the GeV energy level.

Xing-Long Li; Yu-Liang Yan; Xiao-Mei Li; Dai-Mei Zhou; Xu Cai; Ben-Hao Sa

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

257

Final-state interactions in deep-inelastic scattering from a tensor polarized deuteron target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) from a tensor polarized deuteron is sensitive to possible non-nucleonic components of the deuteron wave function. To accurately estimate the size of the nucleonic contribution, final-state interactions (FSIs) need to be accounted for in calculations. We outline a model that, based on the diffractive nature of the effective hadron-nucleon interaction, uses the generalized eikonal approximation to model the FSIs in the resonance region, taking into account the proton-neutron component of the deuteron. The calculation uses a factorized model with a basis of three resonances with mass $Wkinematics accessible in experiments at Jefferson Lab and Hermes. For inclusive DIS, sizeable effects are found when including FSIs for Bjorken $x>0.2$, but the overall size of $A_{zz}$ remains small. For tagged spectator DIS, FSIs effects are largest at spectator momenta around 300 MeV and for forward spectator angles.

Wim Cosyn; Misak Sargsian

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

258

A cryogenic high pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of quantum fluids and solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present our new development of a high pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of helium at ultra-low temperatures. The cell has a large sample volume of ~140 cm3, and a working pressure of ~70 bar, with a relatively thin wall-thickness (1.1 mm) - thanks to the high yield strength aluminum used in the design. Two variants of this cell have been developed; one with permanently joined components using electron-beam welding and explosion welding, methods that have little or no impact on the global heat treatment of the cell, and another with modular and interchangeable components, which include a capacitance pressure gauge, that can be sealed using traditional indium wire technique. The performance of the cell has been tested in recent measurements on superfluid liquid helium near the solidification line.

Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL; Omar Diallo, Souleymane [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Study of ?(1385) and ?(1321) hyperon and antihyperon production in deep inelastic muon scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large samples of \\Lambda, \\Sigma(1385) and \\Xi(1321) hyperons produced in deep-inelastic muon scattering off a ^6LiD target were collected with the COMPASS experimental setup at CERN. The relative yields of \\Sigma(1385)^+, \\Sigma(1385)^-, \\bar{\\Sigma}(1385)^-, \\bar{\\Sigma}(1385)^+, \\Xi(1321)^-, and \\bar{\\Xi}(1321)^+ hyperons decaying into \\Lambda(\\bar{\\Lambda})\\pi were measured. The heavy hyperon to \\Lambda and heavy antihyperon to \\bar{\\Lambda} yield ratios were found to be in the range 3.8% to 5.6% with a relative uncertainty of about 10%. They were used to tune the parameters relevant for strange particle production of the LEPTO Monte Carlo generator.

C. Adolph; M. Alekseev; V. Yu. Alexakhin; Yu. Alexandrov; G. D. Alexeev; A. Amoroso; A. Austregesilo; B. Badelek; F. Balestra; J. Barth; G. Baum; Y. Bedfer; A. Berlin; J. Bernhard; R. Bertini; K. Bicker; J. Bieling; R. Birsa; J. Bisplinghoff; P. Bordalo; F. Bradamante; C. Braun; A. Bravar; A. Bressan; M. Buechele; E. Burtin; L. Capozza; M. Chiosso; S. U. Chung; A. Cicuttin; M. L. Crespo; S. Dalla Torre; S. S. Dasgupta; S. Dasgupta; O. Yu. Denisov; S. V. Donskov; N. Doshita; V. Duic; W. Duennweber; M. Dziewiecki; A. Efremov; C. Elia; P. D. Eversheim; W. Eyrich; M. Faessler; A. Ferrero; A. Filin; M. Finger; M. Finger jr.; H. Fischer; C. Franco; N. du Fresne von Hohenesche; J. M. Friedrich; V. Frolov; R. Garfagnini; F. Gautheron; O. P. Gavrichtchouk; S. Gerassimov; R. Geyer; M. Giorgi; I. Gnesi; B. Gobbo; S. Goertz; S. Grabmueller; A. Grasso; B. Grube; R. Gushterski; A. Guskov; T. Guthoerl; F. Haas; D. von Harrach; F. H. Heinsius; F. Herrmann; C. Hess; F. Hinterberger; Ch. Hoeppner; N. Horikawa; N. d'Hose; S. Huber; S. Ishimoto; Yu. Ivanshin; T. Iwata; R. Jahn; V. Jary; P. Jasinski; R. Joosten; E. Kabuss; D. Kang; B. Ketzer; G. V. Khaustov; Yu. A. Khokhlov; Yu. Kisselev; F. Klein; K. Klimaszewski; J. H. Koivuniemi; V. N. Kolosov; K. Kondo; K. Koenigsmann; I. Konorov; V. F. Konstantinov; A. M. Kotzinian; O. Kouznetsov; M. Kraemer; Z. V. Kroumchtein; N. Kuchinski; F. Kunne; K. Kurek; R. P. Kurjata; A. A. Lednev; A. Lehmann; S. Levorato; J. Lichtenstadt; A. Maggiora; A. Magnon; N. Makke; G. K. Mallot; A. Mann; C. Marchand; A. Martin; J. Marzec; H. Matsuda; T. Matsuda; G. Meshcheryakov; W. Meyer; T. Michigami; Yu. V. Mikhailov; Y. Miyachi; A. Morreale; A. Nagaytsev; T. Nagel; F. Nerling; S. Neubert; D. Neyret; V. I. Nikolaenko; J. Novy; W. -D. Nowak; A. S. Nunes; A. G. Olshevsky; M. Ostrick; R. Panknin; D. Panzieri; B. Parsamyan; S. Paul; G. Piragino; S. Platchkov; J. Pochodzalla; J. Polak; V. A. Polyakov; J. Pretz; M. Quaresma; C. Quintans; S. Ramos; G. Reicherz; E. Rocco; V. Rodionov; E. Rondio; N. S. Rossiyskaya; D. I. Ryabchikov; V. D. Samoylenko; A. Sandacz; M. G. Sapozhnikov; S. Sarkar; I. A. Savin; G. Sbrizzai; P. Schiavon; C. Schill; T. Schlueter; A. Schmidt; K. Schmidt; L. Schmitt; H. Schmieden; K. Schoenning; S. Schopferer; M. Schott; O. Yu. Shevchenko; L. Silva; L. Sinha; S. Sirtl; S. Sosio; F. Sozzi; A. Srnka; L. Steiger; M. Stolarski; M. Sulc; R. Sulej; H. Suzuki; P. Sznajder; S. Takekawa; J. Ter Wolbeek; S. Tessaro; F. Tessarotto; F. Thibaud; S. Uhl; I. Uman; M. Vandenbroucke; M. Virius; L. Wang; T. Weisrock; M. Wilfert; R. Windmolders; W. Wislicki; H. Wollny; K. Zaremba; M. Zavertyaev; E. Zemlyanichkina; N. Zhuravlev; M. Ziembicki

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

260

Dirac Phenomenological Analyses of Unpolarized Proton Inelastic Scattering from $^{22}$Ne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unpolarized 800 MeV proton inelastic scatterings from an s-d shell nucleus $^{22}$Ne are analyzed using phenomenological optical potentials in the Dirac coupled channel formalism. The first-order rotational collective model is used to obtain the transition optical potentials for the low lying excited collective states that belong to the ground state rotational band of the nucleus. The optical potential parameters of Woods-Saxon shape and the deformation parameters of the excited states are varied phenomenologically using the sequential iteration method to reproduce the experimental differential cross section data. The effective central and spin-orbit optical potentials are obtained by reducing the Dirac equations to the Schr\\"odinger-like second-order differential equations and the surface-peaked phenomena are observed at the real effective central potentials when the scattering from $^{22}$Ne is considered. The obtained deformation parameters of the excited states are compared with those of the nonrelativist...

Kim, Moon-Won

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Deep Inelastic Scattering from A=3 Nuclei and the Neutron Structure Function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a comprehensive analysis of deep inelastic scattering from {sup 3}He and {sup 3}H, focusing in particular on the extraction of the free neutron structure function, F{sup n}{sub 2}. Nuclear corrections are shown to cancel to within 1-2% for the isospin-weighted ratio of {sup 3}He to {sup 3}H structure functions, which leads to more than an order of magnitude improvement in the current uncertainty on the neutron to proton ratio F{sup 2n}{sub 2}/F{sup p}{sub 2} at large x. Theoretical uncertainties originating tom the nuclear wave function, including possible non-nucleonic components, are evaluated. Measurement of the {sup 3}He and {sup 3}H structure functions will, in addition, determine the magnitude of the EMC effect in all A [lte] 3 nuclei.

I. Afnan; F. Bissey; J. Gomez; A. Katramatou; S. Liuti; W. Melnitchouk; G. Petratos; A.W. Thomas

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Refined model of the {Fe9} magnetic molecule from low-temperature inelastic neutron scattering studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a refined model of the {Fe9} tridiminished icosahedron magnetic molecule system. This molecule was originally modeled as being composed of two ({Fe3} and {Fe6}) clusters, with the Fe3+ ions within each cluster being coupled via exchange interactions, but with no coupling between the clusters. The present inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements were used to probe the low-lying energy spectrum of {Fe9}, and these results demonstrate that the previously published model of two uncoupled clusters is incomplete. To achieve agreement between the experiment and theory, we have augmented the model with relatively small exchange coupling between the clusters. A combination of Lanczos matrix diagonalization and quantum Monte Carlo simulations have been used to achieve good agreement between the experimental data and the improved model of the full {Fe9} system despite the complexity of this model (with Hilbert space dimension >107).

Engelhardt, Larry [Francis Marion University; Demmel, Franz [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Luban, Marshall [Ames Laboratory; Timco, Grigore A [The University of Manchester; Tuna, Floriana [The University of Manchester; Winpenny, Richard E [The University of Manchester

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Leading neutron energy and pT distributions in deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of energetic neutrons in $ep$ collisions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The neutron energy and $p_T^2$ distributions were measured with a forward neutron calorimeter and tracker in a $40 \\pb^{-1}$ sample of inclusive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) data and a $6 \\pb^{-1}$ sample of photoproduction data. The neutron yield in photoproduction is suppressed relative to DIS for the lower neutron energies and the neutrons have a steeper $p_T^2$ distribution, consistent with the expectation from absorption models. The distributions are compared to HERA measurements of leading protons. The neutron energy and transverse-momentum distributions in DIS are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and to the predictions of particle exchange models. Models of pion exchange incorporating absorption and additional secondary meson exchanges give a good description of the data.

ZEUS Collaboration; S. Chekanov

2007-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

Final-state interactions in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We explore the role of final-state interactions (FSI) in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Relating the inclusive cross section to the deuteron forward virtual Compton scattering amplitude, a general formula for the FSI contribution is derived in the generalized eikonal approximation, utilizing the diffractive nature of the effective hadron-nucleon interaction. The calculation uses a factorized model with a basis of three resonances with mass W~ 0.6 and Q2 2 increasing in magnitude for lower Q2, but vanishing in the high-Q2 limit due to phase space constraints. The off-shell rescattering contributes at x ~> 0.8 and is taken as an uncertainty on the on-shell result.

Cosyn, Wim [FL Intl U.; Melnitchouk, Wally [JLAB; Sargsian, Misak M. [JLAB

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Study of Charm Fragmentation into $D^{*\\pm}$ Mesons in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The process of charm quark fragmentation is studied using $D^{*\\pm}$ meson production in deep-inelastic scattering as measured by the H1 detector at HERA. Two different regions of phase space are investigated defined by the presence or absence of a jet containing the $D^{*\\pm}$ meson in the event. The parameters of fragmentation functions are extracted for QCD models based on leading order matrix elements and DGLAP or CCFM evolution of partons together with string fragmentation and particle decays. Additionally, they are determined for a next-to-leading order QCD calculation in the fixed flavour number scheme using the independent fragmentation of charm quarks to $D^{*\\pm}$ mesons.

Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Bacchetta, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, Paul R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G.D; Pejchal, O; Peng, H; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P.D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wegener, D; Wessels, M; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Yeganov, V; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; 10.1140/epjc/s10052-008-0792-2

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Dirac Phenomenological Analyses of Unpolarized Proton Inelastic Scattering from $^{22}$Ne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unpolarized 800 MeV proton inelastic scatterings from an s-d shell nucleus $^{22}$Ne are analyzed using phenomenological optical potentials in the Dirac coupled channel formalism. The first-order rotational collective model is used to obtain the transition optical potentials for the low lying excited collective states that belong to the ground state rotational band of the nucleus. The optical potential parameters of Woods-Saxon shape and the deformation parameters of the excited states are varied phenomenologically using the sequential iteration method to reproduce the experimental differential cross section data. The effective central and spin-orbit optical potentials are obtained by reducing the Dirac equations to the Schr\\"odinger-like second-order differential equations and the surface-peaked phenomena are observed at the real effective central potentials when the scattering from $^{22}$Ne is considered. The obtained deformation parameters of the excited states are compared with those of the nonrelativistic calculations and another s-d shell nucleus $^{20}$Ne. The deformation parameters for the $2^+$ and the $4^+$ states of the ground state rotational band at the nucleus $^{22}$Ne are found to be smaller than those of $^{20}$Ne, indicating that the couplings of those states to the ground state are weaker at the nucleus $^{22}$Ne compared to those at the nucleus $^{20}$Ne. The multistep channel coupling effect is confirmed to be important for the $4^+$ state excitation of the ground state rotational band at the proton inelastic scattering from the s-d shell nucleus $^{22}$Ne.

Moon-Won Kim; Sugie Shim

2015-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

267

Increasing the solid angle of the Enge Split-Pole Magnetic Spectrograph and continuing the development of the hybrid detector system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INCREASING THE SOLID ANGLE OF THK ENGR SPLIT-POLE MAGNETIC SPECTROGRAPH AND CONTINUING THK DEVELOPMENT OF THE HYBRID DETECTOR SYSTEM A Thesis by PHILIP WILLIAM BOWMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Physics INCREASING THE SOLID ANGLE OF THE ENGR SPLIT-POLE NAGNETIC SPECTROGRAPH AND CONTINUING THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE HYBRID DETECTOR SYSTEN A Thesis...

Bowman, Philip William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . -slide #1 The SQ-universality and residual properties of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #1 The SQ-universality Main Results Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #2 SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #2 SQ-universality A group G is called SQ-universal if any countable group

Minasyan, Ashot

269

Heavy residue production in the interaction of 29 MeV/nucleon 208 Pb with 197  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Technology, Go¨teborg, Sweden 3 Studsvik Neutron Research Laboratory, S-611 82 Nyko mechanisms such as complete/ incomplete fusion, deep inelastic scattering, etc. or high en- ergy mechanisms be understood in terms of nucleon exchange models 19 used to describe low energy deep inelastic scattering 2

Menge, Duncan

270

Combination process for upgrading residual oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for upgrading high boiling residual portions of crude oils comprising metal contaminants, porphyrins, asphaltenes and high molecular weight multi-ring hydrocarbon material. It comprises: charging a high boiling residual portion of crude oil admixed with diluent in contact with suspended upflowing substantially inert fluidizable solids particulate material at an elevated thermal visbreaking temperature in a riser contact zone for a time sufficient to recover therefrom a vaporous hydrocarbon product higher boiling than gasoline partially decarbonized and demetallized to a lower contaminating metals level, quenching the vaporous product of thermal visbreaking below its dew point after separation from solids, charging quenched thermally modified high boiling hydrocarbon product with a crystalline zeolite cracking catalyst under cracking conditions for a hydrocarbon residence time in a riser cracking zone; recovering a hydrocarbon conversion product; separating a combined C{sub 4} minus wet gas product stream of the visbreaking and zeolite catalyst cracking operating to recover a C{sub 3}-C{sub 4} rich fraction separately from a C{sub 2} minus dry gas product fraction, and regenerating the crystalline zeolite contcontaining catalyst.

Busch, L.E.; Walters, P.W.; Zandona, O.

1990-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. The use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - is reviewed as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. The environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass are covered. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

Dale, L; Opilla, R; Surles, T

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of carbohydrate sources can be used as raw material for the production of ethanol. Section 1 is a review of technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. Section 2 is a review of the use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. Section 3 deals with the environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

Opilla, R.; Dale, L.; Surles, T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Combustion turbine deposition observations from residual and simulated residual oil studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burning residual oil in utility combustion turbines and the consequent deposition on blades and vanes may adversely affect reliability and operation. Corrosion and deposition data for combustion turbine materials have been obtained through dynamic testing in pressurized passages. The deposition produced by the 1900/sup 0/F (1038/sup 0/C) combustion gases from a simulated and a real residual oil on cooled Udimet 500 surfaces is described. Higher deposition rates for the doped fuel than for the real residual oil raised questions of whether true simulation with this approach can be achieved. Particles 4-8..mu.. m in diameter predominated in the gas stream, with some fraction in the 0.1-12 ..mu.. m range. Deposition rates seemed to be influenced by thermophoretic delivery of small molten particles, tentatively identified as magnesium pyro and metavanadates and free vanadium pentoxide, which may act to bond the larger solid particles arriving by inertial impaction to turbine surfaces. Estimated maintenance intervals for current utility turbines operating with washed and treated residual oil agreed well with field experience.

Whitlow, G.A.; Cohn, A.; Lee, S.Y.; Mulik, P.R.; Sherlock, T.P.; Wenglarz, R.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Ultraviolet laser-induced poling inhibition produces bulk domains in MgO-doped lithium niobate crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the realization of high-resolution bulk domains achieved using a shallow, structured, domain inverted surface template obtained by UV laser-induced poling inhibition in MgO-doped lithium niobate. The quality of the obtained bulk domains is compared to those of the template and their application for second harmonic generation is demonstrated. The present method enables domain structures with a period length as small as 3??m to be achieved. Furthermore, we propose a potential physical mechanism that leads to the transformation of the surface template into bulk domains.

Boes, Andreas, E-mail: s3363819@student.rmit.edu.au; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Sivan, Vijay; Mitchell, Arnan [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); ARC Center for Ultra-high Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); Yudistira, Didit [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); Wade, Scott [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Mailis, Sakellaris [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Soergel, Elisabeth [Institute of Physics, University of Bonn, Wegelerstr. 8, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Hyperspectral imaging spectroscopy of a Mars analogue environment at the North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A visible and near infrared (VNIR) to shortwave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral dataset of the Early Archaean North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia, has been analysed for indications of hydrothermal alteration. Occurrence maps of hydrothermal alteration minerals were produced. It was found that using a spatial resolution on the ground of approximately 5 m and spectral coverage from 0.4 to 2.5 mm was sufficient to delineate several hydrothermal alteration zones and associated veins, including phyllic, serpentinitic and chloritic alteration. These results suggest this level of spectral and spatial resolution would be ideal for localising shallow epithermal activity, should such activity have existed, on the surface of Mars.

Brown, Adrian J; Cudahy, Thomas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized [superscript 3]He target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized [superscript 3]He target. Both the Collins ...

Zhao, Y. X.

277

Measurement of “pretzelosity” asymmetry of charged pion production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a polarized [superscript 3]He target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries of semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized [superscript 3]He target was performed at Jefferson Laboratory in the ...

Zhang, Y.

278

Transverse dynamics of water across the melting point: A parallel neutron and x-ray inelastic scattering study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Joint inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering measurements have been performed on heavy water across the melting point. The spectra bear clear evidence of low- and high-frequency inelastic shoulders related to transverse and longitudinal modes, respectively. Upon increasing the momentum transfer, the spectral shape evolves from a viscoelastic regime, where the low-frequency mode is clearly over-damped, toward an elastic one where its propagation becomes instead allowed. The crossover between the two regimes occurs whenever both the characteristic frequency and the linewidth of the low-frequency mode match the inverse of the structural relaxation time. Furthermore, we observe that the frequency of the transverse mode undergoes a discontinuity across the melting, whose extent reduces upon increasing the exchanged momentum.

Cunsolo A.; Kodituwakku C.; Bencivenga, F.; Frontzek, M.; Leu, b.M.; Said, A.H.

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

279

Folding model analysis of pion elastic and inelastic scattering from {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

{pi}{sup {+-}}-Nucleus scattering cross sections are calculated applying the Watanabe superposition model with a phenomenological Woods-Saxon potential. The phenomenological potential parameters are searched for {pi}{sup {+-}} scattering from {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C to reproduce not only differential elastic cross sections but also inelastic and total and reaction cross sections at pion kinetic energies from 50 to 672 MeV. The optical potentials of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C are calculated in terms of the alpha particle and deuteron optical potentials. Inelastic scattering has been analyzed using the distorted waves from elastic-scattering data. The values of deformation lengths thus obtained compare very well with the ones reported earlier.

Ebrahim, A. A., E-mail: aebrahim@aun.edu.eg [Assiut University, Physics Department (Egypt)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Recovery of gallium from aluminum industry residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A procedure is proposed to recover gallium from flue dust aluminum residues produced in plants by using solid-phase extraction with a commercial polyether-type polyurethane foam (PUF). Gallium can be separated from high concentrations of aluminum, iron, nickel, titanium, vanadium, copper, zinc, sulfate, fluoride, and chloride by extraction with PUF from 3 M sulfuric acid and 3 M sodium chloride concentration medium with at least a 92% efficiency. Gallium backextraction was fast and quantitative with ethanol solution. In all recovery steps commercial-grade reagents could be used, including tap water. The recovered gallium was precipitated with sodium hydroxide solution, purified by dissolution and precipitation, calcinated, and the final oxide was 98.6% pure.

Carvalho, M.S.; Neto, K.C.M.; Nobrega, A.W.; Medeiros, J.A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Method For Characterizing Residual Stress In Metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for measuring the residual stress in metals. The method includes the steps of drilling one or more holes in a metal workpiece to a preselected depth and mounting one or more acoustic sensors on the metal workpiece and connecting the sensors to an electronic detecting and recording device. A liquid metal capable of penetrating into the metal workpiece placed at the bottom of the hole or holes. A recording is made over a period of time (typically within about two hours) of the magnitude and number of noise events which occur as the liquid metal penetrates into the metal workpiece. The magnitude and number of noise events are then correlated to the internal stress in the region of the workpiece at the bottom of the hole.

Jacobson, Loren A. (Santa Fe, NM); Michel, David J. (Alexandria, VA); Wyatt, Jeffrey R. (Burke, VA)

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

282

Process converts incineration slag into stabilized residue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1973 and 1974, EMC-Services designed and built a physico-chemical treatment plant in Hombourg, in France's Alsatian region. The plant is still in operation. Since then, EMC-Services has developed substantial experience in environmental projects, becoming one of the top companies internationally with experience and practice in designing, building and operating hazardous waste treatment plants. EMC-Services operates in France in Salaise, Strasbourg, Mitry-Mory, and Saint-Vulbas, where eight incinerators treat solid, liquid, highly halogenated and nonhazardous industrial waste. The incinerators, built or updated by EMC-Services, have a total capacity of about 200,000 tons per year. In the new process, incineration of special industrial wastes produces non-volatilized solid residue or slag, which is sent for disposal, in compliance with regulations, to special disposal plants. Future European regulations will incorporate landfilling criteria requiring such slag to be stabilized.

Thauront, J.; Deneux-Mustin, S. (EMC-Services, Paris (France)); Durecu, S. (EMC-Services, Vandoeuvre-Les Nancy (France)); Fraysse, G. (EMC-Services, Saint-Vulbas (France)); Berthelin, J. (Centre de Pedologie Biologique, Vandoeuvre-Les Nancy (France))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

EXPLORING THE TIME DISPERSION OF THE IBEX-HI ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM SPECTRA AT THE ECLIPTIC POLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has observed energetic neutral atom (ENA) hydrogen emissions from the edge of the solar system for more than three years. The observations span energies from 0.01 to 6 keV FWHM. At energies greater than 0.5-6 keV, and for a travel distance of {approx}100 AU, the travel time difference between the slowest and the fastest ENA is more than a year. Therefore, we construct spectra including the effect that slower ENAs left the source at an earlier time than faster ones. If the source produces a steady rate of ENAs and the extinction does not vary, then we expect that the spectral shape would be time independent. However, while the extinction of ENAs has been fairly constant during the first two and a half years, the source appears to have changed, and thus the spectra at a single time may not represent the conditions at the source. IBEX's viewing allows continuous sampling of the ecliptic poles where fluxes can be continuously monitored. For a given source distance we construct spectra assuming that the measured ENAs left the source at roughly the same time. To accomplish this construction, we apply time lag corrections to the signal at different ENA energies that take into account the travel time difference. We show that the spectral shape at the poles exhibits a statistically significant change with time.

Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, P.O. Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Bzowski, M.; Kubiak, M. A. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bartycka 18A, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); DeMajistre, R. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Funsten, H. O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, Bikini Atoll Road, SM 30, NM 87545 (United States); Janzen, P. H.; Reisenfeld, D. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Montana, 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT (United States); Schwadron, N. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Morse Hall Room 407, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Vanderspek, R., E-mail: fallegrini@swri.edu [Massachussetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

active site residue: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in human transferrin and Tyr Oksana Lockridge 2008-01-01 140 RESEARCH ARTICLE Benefits of organic residues and chemical fertilizer Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: RESEARCH...

285

active site residues: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in human transferrin and Tyr Oksana Lockridge 2008-01-01 140 RESEARCH ARTICLE Benefits of organic residues and chemical fertilizer Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: RESEARCH...

286

Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996...

287

Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997...

288

Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction in Vehicle Components: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Residual...

289

Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

290

Disappearance of fusionlike residues and the nuclear equation of state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross sections for massive residues from {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca and {sup 40}Ar+{sup 27}Al collisions were calculated with an improved Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation. The calculated residue cross sections decrease with incident energy, an effect which does not appear related to the residue excitation energy. Larger residue cross sections result from calculations with larger in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections or with equations of state which are less attractive at subnuclear density. This dual sensitivity may be eliminated by measurements of observables associated with the coincident light particles.

Xu, H.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Danielewicz, P.; Bertsch, G.F. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA) Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA))

1990-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

291

acetamido trideoxyhexose residue: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The theory describes this...

292

autophosphorylated residues required: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

though no flow is present. The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The...

293

abradable coating residual: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The theory describes this...

294

Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

Gao, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Huaiqiu, E-mail: hqzhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yao, Xin-Qiu [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); She, Zhen-Su, E-mail: she@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

295

Discrimination of gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering in AGATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Possibilities of discriminating neutrons and gamma rays in the AGATA gamma-ray tracking spectrometer have been investigated with the aim of reducing the background due to inelastic scattering of neutrons in the high-purity germanium crystals. This background may become a serious problem especially in experiments with neutron-rich radioactive ion beams. Simulations using the Geant4 toolkit and a tracking program based on the forward tracking algorithm were carried out by emitting neutrons and gamma rays from the center of AGATA. Three different methods were developed and tested in order to find 'fingerprints' of the neutron interaction points in the detectors. In a simulation with simultaneous emission of six neutrons with energies in the range 1-5 MeV and ten gamma rays with energies between 150 and 1450 keV, the peak-to-background ratio at a gamma-ray energy of 1.0 MeV was improved by a factor of 2.4 after neutron rejection with a reduction of the photopeak efficiency at 1.0 MeV of only a factor of 1.25.

A. Ataç; A. Ka?ka?; S. Akkoyun; M. ?enyi?it; T. Hüyük; S. O. Kara; J. Nyberg

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

296

Inclusive Measurements of Inelastic Electron and Positron Scattering from Unpolarized Hydrogen and Deuterium Targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of inclusive measurements of inelastic electron and positron scattering from unpolarized protons and deuterons at the HERMES experiment are presented. The structure functions $F_2^p$ and $F_2^d$ are determined using a parameterization of existing data for the longitudinal-to-transverse virtual-photon absorption cross-section ratio. The HERMES results provide data in the ranges $0.006\\leq x\\leq 0.9$ and 0.1 GeV$^2\\leq Q^2\\leq$ 20 GeV$^2$, covering the transition region between the perturbative and the non-perturbative regimes of QCD in a so-far largely unexplored kinematic region. They are in agreement with existing world data in the region of overlap. The measured cross sections are used, in combination with data from other experiments, to perform fits to the photon-nucleon cross section using the functional form of the ALLM model. The deuteron-to-proton cross-section ratio is also determined.

The HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; S. Belostotski; N. Bianchi; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; J. Bowles; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; L. De Nardo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Dueren; M. Ehrenfried; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; R. Fabbri; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; D. Gabbert; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; F. Garibaldi; G. Gavrilov; V. Gharibyan; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Golembiovskaya; C. Hadjidakis; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; G. Hill; A. Hillenbrand; M. Hoek; Y. Holler; I. Hristova; Y. Imazu; A. Ivanilov; H. E. Jackson; H. S. Jo; S. Joosten; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; P. Kravchenko; V. G. Krivokhijine; L. Lagamba; R. Lamb; L. Lapikas; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; L. A. Linden-Levy; A. Lopez Ruiz; W. Lorenzon; X. -G. Lu; X. -R. Lu; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; N. C. R. Makins; S. I. Manaenkov; L. Manfre; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; C. A. Miller; Y. Miyachi; A. Movsisyan; V. Muccifora; M. Murray; A. Mussgiller; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; M. Negodaev; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; N. Pickert; M. Raithel; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; F. Sanftl; A. Schaefer; G. Schnell; K. P. Schueler; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; V. Shutov; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; J. J. M. Steijger; H. Stenzel; J. Stewart; F. Stinzing; S. Taroian; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; A. Vandenbroucke; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; V. Vikhrov; I. Vilardi; C. Vogel; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; H. Ye; Z. Ye; S. Yen; W. Yu; D. Zeiler; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

297

Inclusive Measurements of Inelastic Electron and Positron Scattering from Unpolarized Hydrogen and Deuterium Targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of inclusive measurements of inelastic electron and positron scattering from unpolarized protons and deuterons at the HERMES experiment are presented. The structure functions $F_2^p$ and $F_2^d$ are determined using a parameterization of existing data for the longitudinal-to-transverse virtual-photon absorption cross-section ratio. The HERMES results provide data in the ranges $0.006\\leq x\\leq 0.9$ and 0.1 GeV$^2\\leq Q^2\\leq$ 20 GeV$^2$, covering the transition region between the perturbative and the non-perturbative regimes of QCD in a so-far largely unexplored kinematic region. They are in agreement with existing world data in the region of overlap. The measured cross sections are used, in combination with data from other experiments, to perform fits to the photon-nucleon cross section using the functional form of the ALLM model. The deuteron-to-proton cross-section ratio is also determined.

Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Belostotski, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dueren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hill, G; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lamb, R; Lapikas, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Ruiz, A Lopez; Lorenzon, W; Lu, X -G; Lu, X -R; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfre, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Pickert, N; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schaefer, A; Schnell, G; Schueler, K P; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Shutov, V; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Taroian, S; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Vogel, C; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, H; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Parity Violating Deep Inelastic Electron Scattering from the Deuteron at 6 GeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experiment that measured the parity violating (PV) asymmetry A{sub d} in e-{sup 2}H deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at Q{sup 2} ~#25; 1.10 and 1.90 (GeV/c){sup 2} and x{sub B} ~#25; 0.3 was completed in experimental Hall A at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The asymmetry can be used to extract the neutral weak coupling combination (2C{sub 2u}-C{sub 2d}), providing a factor of five to six improvement over the current world data. To achieve this precision, asymmetries of the 10{sup -4} level needed to be measured at event rates up to 500 kHz with high electron detection efficiency and high pion background rejection capability. A specialized scaler-based counting data acquisition system (DAQ) with hardware-based particle identification was successfully implemented. The statistical quality of the asymmetry measurement agreed with the Gaussian distribution to over five orders of magnitudes and the experimental goal of 3-4% statistical uncertainty was achieved. The design and performance of the new DAQ system is presented with the preliminary asymmetry results given in the end.

Pan, Kai [MIT

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Longitudinal-Transverse Separation of Deep-Inelastic Scattering at Low Q² on Nucleons and Nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the early experiments at SLAC, which discovered the nucleon substructure and led to the development of the quark parton model, deep inelastic scattering (DIS) has been the most powerful tool to investigate the partonic substructure of the nucleon. After about 30 years of experiments with electron and muon beams the nucleon structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) is known with high precision over about four orders of magnitude in x and Q{sup 2}. In the region of Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2} the results of the DIS measurements are interpreted in terms of partons (quarks and gluons). The theoretical framework is provided in this case by perturbative Quantum Chromo Dynamics (pQCD), which includes scaling violations, as described by the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) equations. The description starts to fail when Q{sup 2} becomes of the order of 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}, where non-perturbative effects (higher-twist effects), which are still not fully understood, become important (non-pQCD). The sensitivity for order-n twist effects increases with decreasing Q{sup 2}, since they include a factor 1/(Q{sup 2}{sup n}) (n {ge} 1).

Vladas Tvaskis

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

300

Polarization transfer in inelastic scattering and pionic models of the EMC effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the experiment reported was to make a precise test of the enhanced pion field model in a medium-energy scattering experiment. The quantity probed is the spin-longitudinal response function, a measure of the nuclear pion density which is used explicitly in the pion-excess models of the EMC effect. The point of reference used is deuterium. The spin-dependent response functions for heavy targets and /sup 2/H are compared using identical experimental techniques. The technique of complete polarization transfer is used to separate the spin-longitudinal and spin-transverse response in the continuum. The experiment consisted of precise determinations of the polarization transfer coefficients for 500 MeV protons inelastically scattered from Pb, Ca, and /sup 2/H. The experiment utilized longitudinal, sideways, and normal polarized beams in conjunction with final polarization analysis from the focal-plane polarimeter of the high-resolution spectrometer. Quantities constructed from these data are the longitudinal and transverse spin-flip probabilities. Calculations were performed of the ratio of longitudinal to transverse response functions and of the EMC effect with the same model. No evidence was found for collectivity in the isovector spin-longitudinal response function. 10 refs. (LEW)

Carey, T.A.; Jones, K.W.; McClelland, J.B.; Moss, J.M.; Rees, L.B.; Tanaka, N.; Bacher, A.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Discrimination of gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering in AGATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Possibilities of discriminating neutrons and ? rays in the AGATA ?-ray tracking spectrometer have been investigated with the aim of reducing the background due to inelastic scattering of neutrons in the high-purity germanium crystals. This background may become a serious problem especially in experiments with neutron-rich radioactive ion beams. Simulations using the Geant4 toolkit and a tracking program based on the forward tracking algorithm were carried out by emitting neutrons and ? rays from the center of AGATA. Three different methods were developed and tested in order to find “fingerprints ” of the neutron interaction points in the detectors. In a simulation with simultaneous emission of six neutrons with energies in the range 1-5 MeV and ten ? rays with energies between 150 and 1450 keV, the peak-to-background ratio at a ?-ray energy of 1.0 MeV was improved by a factor of 2.4 after neutron rejection with a reduction of the photopeak efficiency at 1.0 MeV of only a factor of 1.25.

A. Ataç; A. Kas¸kas A; S. Akkoyun A; M. S¸enyi?git A; T. Hüyük A; S. O. Kara A; J. Nyberg B

302

Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for fission reactor applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear data important for the design and development of the next generation of light-water reactors and future fast reactors include neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections on important structural materials, such as Fe, and on coolant materials, such as Na. These reaction probabilities are needed since neutron reactions impact fuel performance during irradiations and the overall efficiency of reactors. While neutron scattering cross sections from these materials are available for certain incident neutron energies, the fast neutron region, particularly above 2 MeV, has large gaps for which no measurements exist, or the existing uncertainties are large. Measurements have been made at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory to measure neutron scattering cross sections on both Fe and Na in the region where these gaps occur and to reduce the uncertainties on scattering from the ground state and first excited state of these nuclei. Results from measurements on Fe at incident neutron energies between 2 and 4 MeV will be presented and comparisons will be made to model calculations available from data evaluators.

Hicks, S. F.; Combs, B.; Downes, L.; Girgis, J.; Kersting, L. J.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; Schniederjan, J.; Sidwell, L.; Sigillito, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Dallas, Irving TX 75019 (United States); Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; Kumar, A.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estevz, F. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Vanhoy, J. R.; Watts, D. [Department of Physics, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis MD 21402 (United States); Yates, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States) and Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

303

Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of high level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington and Savannah River, South Carolina. These tanks will eventually be emptied and decommissioned. This will leave a residue of sludge adhering to the interior tank surfaces that may contaminate nearby groundwaters with radionuclides and RCRA metals. Performance assessment (PA) calculations must be carried out prior to closing the tanks. This requires developing radionuclide release models from the sludges so that the PA calculations can be based on credible source terms. These efforts continued to be hindered by uncertainties regarding the actual nature of the tank contents and the distribution of radionuclides among the various phases. In particular, it is of vital importance to know what radionuclides are associated with solid sludge components. Experimentation on actual tank sludges can be difficult, dangerous and prohibitively expensive. The research funded under this grant for the past three years was intended to provide a cost-effective method for developing the needed radionuclide release models using non-radioactive artificial sludges. Insights gained from this work will also have more immediate applications in understanding the processes responsible for heel development in the tanks and in developing effective technologies for removing wastes from the tanks.

J.L. Krumhansl

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

304

Rapid Protein Structure Detection and Assignment using Residual Dipolar Couplings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapid Protein Structure Detection and Assignment using Residual Dipolar Couplings Michael A substructures by exploiting the orientational constraint of residual dipolar coupling (RDC). PEPMORPH reverses: We have tested PEPMORPH on a variety of real proteins deposited in the Protein Data Base (PDB), using

305

Computing Symmetrized Weight Enumerators for Lifted Quadratic Residue Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computing Symmetrized Weight Enumerators for Lifted Quadratic Residue Codes I. M. Duursma Dept for the computation of structural parameters for ring-linear codes. This article therefore presents a method to eÃ?ciently compute weight enumerators of linear codes over primary integer residue rings. For the lifted QR-codes

Duursma, Iwan M.

306

Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures P. Michaleris at Champaign Urbana, Urbana, IL Abstract Welding distortion in large structures is usually caused by buckling due to the residual stress. In cases where the design is fixed and minimum weld size requirements

Michaleris, Panagiotis

307

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

308

Residual Energy-Aware Cooperative Transmission (REACT) in Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residual Energy-Aware Cooperative Transmission (REACT) in Wireless Networks Erwu Liu, Qinqing Zhang the lifetime of the network and we call the selection method a residual energy-aware cooperative transmission- works, where energy efficiency is a critical design consideration. We assume that multiple relay nodes

Leung, Kin K.

309

RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECTS IN FRACTURE OF COMPOSITES AND ADHESIVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECTS IN FRACTURE OF COMPOSITES AND ADHESIVES JOHN A. NAIRN ABSTRACT Because composites and adhesive joints are made from different phases with different thermal expansion coefficients, they inevitably develop residual thermal stresses. When designing composites or adhesive joints, it is important

Nairn, John A.

310

Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

Brinson, Jonathan Ashley (Vale of Glamorgan, GB); Crum, Bruce Robert (Madison, IN); Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank (Midland, MI)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Beyond mean-field study of elastic and inelastic electron scattering off nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron scattering provides a powerful tool to determine charge distributions and transition densities of nuclei. This tool will soon be available for short-lived neutron-rich nuclei. [Purpose] Beyond mean-field methods have been successfully applied to the study of excitation spectra of nuclei in the whole nuclear chart. These methods permit to determine energies and transition probabilities starting from an effective in-medium nucleon-nucleon interaction but without other phenomenological ingredients. Such a method has recently been extended to calculate the charge density of nuclei deformed at the mean-field level of approximation [J. M. Yao et al., Phys. Rev. C86, 014310 (2012)]. The aim of this work is to further extend the method to the determination of transition densities between low-lying excited states. [Method] The starting point of our method is a set of Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov wave functions generated with a constraint on the axial quadrupole moment and using a Skyrme energy density functional. Correlations beyond the mean field are introduced by projecting mean-field wave functions on angular-momentum and particle number and by mixing the symmetry restored wave functions.[Results] We give in this paper detailed formulae derived for the calculation of densities and form factors. These formulae are rather easy to obtain when both initial and final states are $0^+$ states but are far from being trivial when one of the states has a finite $J$-value. Illustrative applications to $^{24}$Mg and to the even-mass $^{58-68}$Ni have permitted to analyse the main features of our method, in particular the effect of deformation on densities and form factors. An illustration calculation of both elastic and inelastic scattering form factors is presented....

J. M. Yao; M. Bender; P. -H. Heenen

2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

A Conformal Mapping Based Fractional Order Approach for Sub-optimal Tuning of PID Controllers with Guaranteed Dominant Pole Placement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel conformal mapping based Fractional Order (FO) methodology is developed in this paper for tuning existing classical (Integer Order) Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) controllers especially for sluggish and oscillatory second order systems. The conventional pole placement tuning via Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) method is extended for open loop oscillatory systems as well. The locations of the open loop zeros of a fractional order PID (FOPID or PI{\\lambda}D{\\mu}) controller have been approximated in this paper vis-\\`a-vis a LQR tuned conventional integer order PID controller, to achieve equivalent integer order PID control system. This approach eases the implementation of analog/digital realization of a FOPID controller with its integer order counterpart along with the advantages of fractional order controller preserved. It is shown here in the paper that decrease in the integro-differential operators of the FOPID/PI{\\lambda}D{\\mu} controller pushes the open loop zeros of the equivalent PID cont...

Saha, Suman; Das, Shantanu; Gupta, Amitava

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

DDT RESIDUES IN SEAWATER AND PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE CALIFORNIA CURRENT SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DDT RESIDUES IN SEAWATER AND PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE CALIFORNIA CURRENT SYSTEM JAMES L. COX in the California current system were analyzed for DDT residues. DDT residue concentrations in whole seawater are discussed in relation to mechanisms of land-sea DDT residue transfer. DDT residue concentrations

314

Azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons, pions, and kaons produced in deep-inelastic scattering off unpolarized protons and deuterons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The azimuthal cos{\\phi} and cos2{\\phi} modulations of the distribution of hadrons produced in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons and positrons off hydrogen and deuterium targets have been measured in the HERMES experiment. For the first time these modulations were determined in a four-dimensional kinematic space for positively and negatively charged pions and kaons separately, as well as for unidentified hadrons. These azimuthal dependences are sensitive to the transverse motion and polarization of the quarks within the nucleon via, e.g., the Cahn, Boer-Mulders and Collins effects.

HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; S. Belostotski; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; J. Bowles; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; L. De Nardo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Düren; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; F. Garibaldi; G. Gavrilov; V. Gharibyan; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Golembiovskaya; C. Hadjidakis; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; A. Hillenbrand; M. Hoek; Y. Holler; I. Hristova; Y. Imazu; A. Ivanilov; H. E. Jackson; H. S. Jo; S. Joosten; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; P. Kravchenko; V. G. Krivokhijine; L. Lagamba; L. Lapikás; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; A. López Ruiz; W. Lorenzon; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; N. C. R. Makins; S. I. Manaenkov; L. Manfré; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; C. A. Miller; Y. Miyachi; A. Movsisyan; M. Murray; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; M. Negodaev; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; A. Petrosyan; M. Raithel; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; F. Sanftl; A. Schäfer; G. Schnell; K. P. Schüler; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; M. Stancari; M. Statera; J. J. M. Steijger; J. Stewart; F. Stinzing; A. Terkulov; R. Truty; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; A. Vandenbroucke; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; V. Vikhrov; I. Vilardi; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; Z. Ye; S. Yen; W. Yu; V. Zagrebelnyy; D. Zeiler; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

315

Azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons, pions, and kaons produced in deep-inelastic scattering off unpolarized protons and deuterons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The azimuthal cos{\\phi} and cos2{\\phi} modulations of the distribution of hadrons produced in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons and positrons off hydrogen and deuterium targets have been measured in the HERMES experiment. For the first time these modulations were determined in a four-dimensional kinematic space for positively and negatively charged pions and kaons separately, as well as for unidentified hadrons. These azimuthal dependences are sensitive to the transverse motion and polarization of the quarks within the nucleon via, e.g., the Cahn, Boer-Mulders and Collins effects.

Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Belostotski, S; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikás, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Ruiz, A López; Lorenzon, W; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfré, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Petrosyan, A; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Terkulov, A; Truty, R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zagrebelnyy, V; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Coulomb-Excitation of the Giant-Dipole Resonance in Light-Ion Inelastic-Scattering from Pb-208  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIE%' C VOLUME 24, NUMBER 5 NOVEMBER 1981 Coulomb excitation of the giant dipole resonance in light-ion inelastic scattering from Pb T. Izumoto, Y. -%. Lui, and D. H. Youngblood Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College...- sess the contribution from Coulomb excitation of 24 2179 , 1981 The American Physical Society 2180 IZUMOTO, LUI, YOUNGSLOOD, UDAGAW'A, AND TAMUWk 24 the GDR in the region of the GMR in Pb in (a,a') scattering with incident energies between 96...

Izumoto, T.; Lui, YW; Youngblood, David H.; Udagawa, T.; Tamura, T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

AN ORIGIN FOR THE SOUTH POLE-AITKEN BASIN THORIUM. V.I. Chikmachev, S.G.Pugacheva, Sternberg State Astronomical institute. Moscow University.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN ORIGIN FOR THE SOUTH POLE-AITKEN BASIN THORIUM. V.I. Chikmachev, S.G.Pugacheva, Sternberg State, that within the limits of the possible Al-Khwarizmi/King basin [3]. The SPA basin thorium map: The using data Lunar Prospector [4] the thorium distribution map demonstrated a hemisphere of the Moon which contains

Chikmachov, Vadim I.

318

SECOND HARMONIC GENERATION OF Bi4Ti3O12 FILMS IN-SITU PROBING OF DOMAIN POLING IN Bi4Ti3O12 THIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECOND HARMONIC GENERATION OF Bi4Ti3O12 FILMS IN-SITU PROBING OF DOMAIN POLING IN Bi4Ti3O12 THIN FILMS BY OPTICAL SECOND HARMONIC GENERATION YANIV BARAD, VENKATRAMAN GOPALAN Materials Research, of a ferroelectric Bi4Ti3O12 thin film using optical second harmonic generation as a probe. The ferroelectric

Gopalan, Venkatraman

319

SPT-CL J0205–5829: A z = 1.32 EVOLVED MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTER IN THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE SUNYAEV-ZEL’DOVICH EFFECT SURVEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The galaxy cluster SPT-CL J0205–5829 currently has the highest spectroscopically confirmed redshift, z = 1.322, in the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey. XMM-Newton observations measure a core-excluded ...

Andersoon, K.

320

A manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material at sites identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. 36 refs., 16 figs, 22 tabs.

Gilbert, T.L.; Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Zielen, A.J.; Jusko, M.J.; Wallo, A. III

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Asphalt landscape after all : residual suburban surface as public infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thesis proposes a hybridized commercial retail strip inserted into a residual suburban condition as a manner of investigating the latent potential of suburban logic, both its constituent elements and its formal rules ...

O'Connor, Joseph Michael, M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Residual stress in electrodeposited nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We use a three-dimensional ...

Ziebell, Tiffany D.

323

FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999 After completion of all deliverables required under a fixed-price award, after costs in fulfilling the requirements of the award have been

Weston, Ken

324

Minimizing High Spatial Frequency Residual in Active Space Telescope Mirrors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Miller June 2008 SSL # 4-08 #12;#12;Minimizing High Spatial Frequency Residual in Active Space Telescope Mirrors Thomas Gray, David W. Miller June 2008 SSL # 4-08 This work is based on the unaltered text

325

An urban infill : a residual site in Boston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is concerned with the treatment of residual sites in the context of the urban environment and in particular with the wounds inflicted by the passage of the Massachusetts Turnpike through the city of Boston. The ...

Savvides, Andreas L. (Andreas Loucas)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

RetroFILL : residual spaces as urban infill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In any city there are small slivers and chunks of awkward spaces - in between buildings, occupying edge conditions, not large enough to warrant many forms of traditional use - which can be termed residual. These areas of ...

Kobel, Marika

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Residual dust charges in an afterglow plasma , M. Mikikian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance]. For the study concerning residual charges, the top electrode was cooled. An upward thermophoretic force

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

328

RELATIVE RESIDUAL BOUNDS FOR INDEFINITE SINGULAR HERMITIAN MATRICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residual bounds, indefinite Hermitian matrix, eigen- values, perturbation theory, relative perturbations. These theorems are proper generalization of results on a semi-definite Hermitian matrix SIAM Journal on Matrix

Truhar, Ninoslav

329

GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

330

THE PROTON-AIR INELASTIC CROSS SECTION AT E -0.3 EeV G.L. Cassiday, R. Cooper, S.C. Corbato, B.R. Dawson,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HE 1.3-1 THE PROTON-AIR INELASTIC CROSS SECTION AT E - 0.3 EeV G.L. Cassiday, R. Cooper, S their observation of the showers produced by protons interacting with air molecules, are able to shed light on the proton-air inelastic cross section ( ó( p-air )), a quantity that can be related, through calculations

331

THE INFLUENCE OF INELASTIC NEUTRINO REACTIONS WITH LIGHT NUCLEI ON THE STANDING ACCRETION SHOCK INSTABILITY IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We perform numerical experiments to investigate the influence of inelastic neutrino reactions with light nuclei on the standing accretion shock instability (SASI). The time evolution of shock waves is calculated with a simple light-bulb approximation for the neutrino transport and a multi-nuclei equation of state. The neutrino absorptions and inelastic interactions with deuterons, tritons, helions, and alpha particles are taken into account in the hydrodynamical simulations. In addition, the effects of ordinary charged-current interactions with nucleons is addressed in the simulations. Axial symmetry is assumed but no equatorial symmetry is imposed. We show that the heating rates of deuterons reach as high as {approx}10% of those of nucleons around the bottom of the gain region. On the other hand, alpha particles are heated near the shock wave, which is important when the shock wave expands and the density and temperature of matter become low. It is also found that the models with heating by light nuclei evolve differently in the non-linear phase of SASI than do models that lack heating by light nuclei. This result is because matter in the gain region has a varying density and temperature and therefore sub-regions appear that are locally rich in deuterons and alpha particles. Although the light nuclei are never dominant heating sources and they work favorably for shock revival in some cases and unfavorably in other cases, they are non-negligible and warrant further investigation.

Furusawa, Shun; Nagakura, Hiroki; Yamada, Shoichi [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke, E-mail: furusawa@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Status report on the analysis of inelastic neutron scattering from carbon, iron, yttrium and lead at 96 MeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work is part of an effort to provide more experimental data for the (n,n'x) reaction. The experiments were carried out at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden, at the quasi-mono-energetic neutron beam of 96 MeV, before the facility was upgraded in 2004. Using an extended data analysis of data primarily intended for measuring elastic neutron scattering only, it was found to be possible to extract information on the inelastic scattering from several nuclei. In the preliminary data analysis, an iterative forward-folding technique was applied, in which a physically reasonable trial spectrum was folded with the response function of the detector system and the output was compared to the experimental data. As a result, double-differential cross sections and angular distributions of inelastic neutron scattering from 12-C, 56-Fe, 89-Y and 208-Pb could be obtained. In this paper, a status update on the efforts to improve the description of the detector response function is given.

C. Gustavsson; C. Hellesen; S. Pomp; A. Öhrn; J. Blomgren; U. Tippawan

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

333

A scaler-based data acquisition system for measuring parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experiment that measured the parity violating asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering was completed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in experimental Hall A. From these asymmetries, a combination of the quark weak axial charge could be extracted with a factor of five improvement in precision over world data. To achieve this, asymmetries at the 10^-4 level needed to be measured at event rates up to 500 kHz and the high pion background typical to deep inelastic scattering experiments needed to be rejected efficiently. A specialized data acquisition (DAQ) system with intrinsic particle identification (PID) was successfully developed and used: The pion contamination in the electron samples was controlled at the order of 2 × 10^-4 or below with an electron efficiency of higher than 91% throughout the production period of the experiment, the systematic uncertainty in the measured asymmetry due to DAQ deadtime was below 0.2%, and the statistical quality of the asymmetry measurement agreed with the Gaussian distribution to over five orders of magnitudes. The DAQ system is presented here with an emphasis on its design scheme, the achieved PID performance, deadtime effect and the capability of measuring small asymmetries.

Subedi, Ramesh R. [Virginia U.; Wang, Diancheng [Virginia U.; Pan, Kai [MIT; Deng, Xiaoyan [Virginu U.; Michaels, Robert W. [JLAB; Shahinyan, Albert [Yerevan Institute; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B. [JLAB; Zheng, Xiaochao [JLAB

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Characterization of flue gas residues from municipal solid waste combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid residues recovered from treatment of flue gas resulting from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) are of particular concern because of ever-increasing worldwide production rates and their concentrations of potentially hazardous transition elements and heavy metals. Three main residue types have been studied in this study: electrostatic precipitator ashes, wet filter cakes, and semidry scrubber residues. Using a large number of residues from two French MSW combustion (MSWC) facilities, the aim of this work is to determine their chemistry and mineralogy in order to shed light on their potential toxicity. The authors find that pollutant concentrations are dependent not only on the composition of MSW but also on the size of particles and flue gas treatment process. Using a procedure based on leaching, grain-size, density, and magnetic separations, the authors present a detailed description of the mineralogy of MSWC solid residues. These residues consist of a very heterogeneous assemblage of glasses, metals, and other crystals in which polluting elements are distributed. The results of this characterization will therefore help to contribute to the development of adequate waste management strategies.

Forestier, L.L. [CRPG-CNRS, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)] [CRPG-CNRS, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); [ENSG, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Libourel, G. [CRPG-CNRS, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)] [CRPG-CNRS, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); [Univ. H. Poincare, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique.

Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Opportunities and Challenges for Nondestructive Residual Stress Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a long time, nondestructive residual stress assessment has been one of the greatest opportunities as well as one of the greatest challenges for the NDE community, and probably it will remain so in the foreseeable future. The most critical issue associated with nondestructive residual stress assessment seems to be that of selectivity. Numerous NDE methods have been found to be sufficiently sensitive to the presence of residual stress, but unfortunately also rather sensitive to other spurious variations that usually accompany residual stresses, such as anisotropic texture, microstructural inhomogeneity, plastic deformation, etc., which could interfere with, or even overshadow, the elastic strain caused by the sought residual stress. The only sufficiently selective NDE method that is more or less immune from these spurious effects is X-ray diffraction measurement, which however does not have the required penetration depth in most applications unless high-energy neutron radiation is used. It is timely for the community to sit back and ask where we are in this important area. This paper presents an overview of the various indirect techniques that have been used to measure residual stress in the past. It is shown that traditional techniques have a number of limitations, which have spurred several recent research programs. Some of the new techniques that are presently being examined in the NDE community are reviewed and the current status of these research efforts is assessed.

Nagy, P. B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0070 (United States)

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

337

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess residue contributions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste Incinerators in England and Summary: . To assess the risks to health from ash and air pollution control residues, the Agency assessed the risks... Solid Residues from...

338

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptable residual magnetic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

residual limb. A small Neodymium-Iron-Boron magnet... of a small permanent magnet into the distal residual ... Source: Peshkin, Michael A.- Department of Mechanical...

339

Hanford tank residual waste – contaminant source terms and release models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual waste is expected to be left in 177 underground storage tanks after closure at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State (USA). In the long term, the residual wastes represent a potential source of contamination to the subsurface environment. Residual materials that cannot be completely removed during the tank closure process are being studied to identify and characterize the solid phases and estimate the release of contaminants from these solids to water that might enter the closed tanks in the future. As of the end of 2009, residual waste from five tanks has been evaluated. Residual wastes from adjacent tanks C-202 and C-203 have high U concentrations of 24 and 59 wt%, respectively, while residual wastes from nearby tanks C-103 and C-106 have low U concentrations of 0.4 and 0.03 wt%, respectively. Aluminum concentrations are high (8.2 to 29.1 wt%) in some tanks (C-103, C-106, and S-112) and relatively low (<1.5 wt%) in other tanks (C-202 and C-203). Gibbsite is a common mineral in tanks with high Al concentrations, while non-crystalline U-Na-C-O-P±H phases are common in the U-rich residual wastes from tanks C-202 and C-203. Iron oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual waste samples studied to date. Contaminant release from the residual wastes was studied by conducting batch leach tests using distilled deionized water, a Ca(OH)2-saturated solution, or a CaCO3-saturated water. Uranium release concentrations are highly dependent on waste and leachant compositions with dissolved U concentrations one or two orders of magnitude higher in the tests with high U residual wastes, and also higher when leached with the CaCO3-saturated solution than with the Ca(OH)2-saturated solution. Technetium leachability is not as strongly dependent on the concentration of Tc in the waste, and it appears to be slightly more leachable by the Ca(OH)2-saturated solution than by the CaCO3-saturated solution. In general, Tc is much less leachable (<10 wt% of the available mass in the waste) than previously predicted. This may be due to the coprecipitation of trace concentrations of Tc in relatively insoluble phases such as Fe oxide/hydroxide solids.

Deutsch, William J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

340

A new HST/Herschel deep field at the North Ecliptic Pole: preparing the way for JWST, SPICA and Euclid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a co-ordinated multi-observatory survey at the North Ecliptic Pole. This field is the natural extragalactic deep field location for most space observatories (e.g. containing the deepest Planck, WISE and eROSITA data), is in the continuous viewing zones for e.g. Herschel, HST, JWST, and is a natural high-visibility field for the L2 halo orbit of SPICA with deep and wide-field legacy surveys already planned. The field is also a likely deep survey location for the forthcoming Euclid mission. It is already a multi-wavelength legacy field in its own right (e.g. AKARI, LOFAR, SCUBA-2): the outstanding and unparalleled continuous mid-IR photometric coverage in this field and nowhere else enables a wide range of galaxy evolution diagnostics unachievable in any other survey field, by spanning the wavelengths of redshifted PAH and silicate features and the peak energy output of AGN hot dust. We argue from the science needs of Euclid and JWST, and from the comparative multiwavelength depths, that the logical ...

Serjeant, Stephen; Burgarella, Denis; Clements, Dave; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Goto, Tomo; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hopwood, Rosalind; Hwang, Narae; Inami, Hanae; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Kim, Seong Jin; Krumpe, Mirko; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Malkan, Matt; Matsuhara, Hideo; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Oyabu, Shinki; Pearson, Chris; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Vaccari, Mattia; Valtchanov, Ivan; van der Werf, Paul; Wada, Takehiko; White, Glenn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A Medium-Deep Survey of a Mini-Slice at the North Galactic Pole. II. The Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report 328 redshifts, b$_J$ magnitudes and b$_J$--r$_F$ colors of galaxies measured in a redshift survey of a 4$^\\circ$ $\\times$ 0.67$^\\circ$ slice close to the north Galactic pole. The faintest galaxies in this survey have a magnitude of b$_J$ $\\sim$ 20.5. The redshifts present external errors of the order of 70 \\kms, and we estimate that the mean photometry errors are $\\sim$ 0.2 for magnitudes and $\\sim$ 0.3 for colors. The redshift completeness level of the sample is of the order of $\\sim$ 35\\% at b$_J$=20, and part of this rather low completeness is the result of the combination of limitations imposed by the multifiber system with the clustering of galaxies, and an insufficient number of configurations. At the nominal magnitude limit of the survey, we were able to measure redshifts for $\\sim$ 70 \\% of the galaxies we observed. From the correlation between observed properties of the galaxies in this sample, we demonstrate that the mean surface brightness is a major limiting factor in our ability to measure redshifts of faint objects.

C. N. A. Willmer; D. C. Koo; N. ELlman; M. J. Kurtz; A. S. Szalay

1996-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

342

Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1

Zhao, Y X; Wang, Y; Allada, K; Aniol, K; Annand, J R; Averett, T; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bradshaw, P C; Bosted, P; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Cates, G D; Chen, C; Chen, J -P; Chen, W; Chirapatpimol, K; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Cornejo, J C; Cusanno, F; Dalton, M M; Deconinck, W; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deng, X; Deur, A; Ding, H; Dolph, P A; Dutta, C; Dutta, D; El Fassi, L; Frullani, S; Gao, H; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Golge, S; Guo, L; Hamilton, D; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Huang, J; Huang, M; Ibrahim, H F; Iodice, M; Jiang, X; Jin, G; Jones, M K; Katich, J; Kelleher, A; Kim, W; Kolarkar, A; Korsch, W; LeRose, J J; Li, X; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Long, E; Lu, H -J; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; McNulty, D; Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Munoz Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Narayan, A; Nelyubin, V; Norum, B; Oh, Y; Osipenko, M; Parno, D; Peng, J -C; Phillips, S K; Posik, M; Puckett, A J; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Rakhman, A; Ransome, R; Riordan, S; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shahinyan, A; Shabestari, M H; Sirca, S; Stepanyan, S; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Tang, L -G; Tobias, A; Urciuoli, G M; Vilardi, I; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yuan, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L; Zhu, X; Zong, X

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Measurement of pretzelosity asymmetry of charged pion production in Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering on a polarized 3He target  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of 0.16

Zhang, Y; Qian, X; Allada, K; Dutta, C; Huang, J; Katich, J; Wang, Y; Aniol, K; Annand, J R.; Averett, T; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bradshaw, P C.; Bosted, P; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Cates, G D.; Chen, C; Chen, J -P; Chen, W; Chirapatpimol, K; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Cornejo, J C.; Cusanno, F; Dalton, M M.; Deconinck, W; de Jager, C W.; De Leo, R; Deng, X; Deur, A; Ding, H; Dolph, P A.; Dutta, D; El Fassi, L; Frullani, S; Gao, H; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Golge, S; Guo, L; Hamilton, D; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W.; Holmstrom, T; Huang, M; Ibrahim, H F.; Iodice, M; Jiang, X; Jin, G; Jones, M K.; Kelleher, A; Kim, W; Kolarkar, A; Korsch, W; LeRose, J J.; Li, X; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Long, E; Lu, H -J.; Margaziotis, D J.; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; McNulty, D; Meziani, Z -E.; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Mu??oz Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Narayan, A; Nelyubin, V; Norum, B; Oh, Y; Osipenko, M; Parno, D; Peng, J C.; Phillips, S K.; Posik, M; Puckett, A J.; Qiang, Y; Rakhman, A; Ransome, R D.; Riordan, S; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shahinyan, A; Shabestari, M H.; ??irca, S; Stepanyan, S; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Tang, L -G.; Tobias, W A.; Urciuoli, G M.; Vilardi, I; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yuan, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y -W.; Zhao, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L; Zhu, X; Zong, X

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Inelastic hosts as electrodes for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries Kejie Zhao, Matt Pharr, Joost J. Vlassak, and Zhigang Suoa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic hosts as electrodes for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries Kejie Zhao, Matt Pharr, Joost for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries. Upon absorbing lithium, silicon swells several times its volume strength. © 2011 American Institute of Physics. doi:10.1063/1.3525990 Lithium-ion batteries

345

Pressure-induced valence change in YbAl3: A combined high-pressure inelastic x-ray scattering and theoretical investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA 5 HPCAT, Carnegie-ray emission RXES measurements were performed on the intermediate-valence com- pound YbAl3 under pressure of up-liquid coherence and the crossover to the local-moment regime have been studied by transport,15 inelastic nuclear

Svane, Axel Torstein

346

Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1

Zhao, Y X; Wang, Y; Allada, K; Aniol, K; Annand, J R; Averett, T; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bradshaw, P C; Bosted, P; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Cates, G D; Chen, C; Chen, J -P; Chen, W; Chirapatpimol, K; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Cornejo, J C; Cusanno, F; Dalton, M M; Deconinck, W; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deng, X; Deur, A; Ding, H; Dolph, P A; Dutta, C; Dutta, D; El Fassi, L; Frullani, S; Gao, H; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Golge, S; Guo, L; Hamilton, D; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Huang, J; Huang, M; Ibrahim, H F; Iodice, M; Jiang, X; Jin, G; Jones, M K; Katich, J; Kelleher, A; Kim, W; Kolarkar, A; Korsch, W; LeRose, J J; Li, X; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Long, E; Lu, H -J; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; McNulty, D; Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Munoz Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Narayan, A; Nelyubin, V; Norum, B; Oh, Y; Osipenko, M; Parno, D; Peng, J -C; Phillips, S K; Posik, M; Puckett, A J; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Rakhman, A; Ransome, R; Riordan, S; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shahinyan, A; Shabestari, M H; Sirca, S; Stepanyan, S; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Tang, L -G; Tobias, A; Urciuoli, G M; Vilardi, I; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yuan, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L; Zhu, X; Zong, X

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

DDT residues in human milk samples from Delhi, India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The widespread use of DDT in India has resulted in increased levels of the insecticide in the ecosystem and, therefore, the potential possible health hazards has been voiced. DDT-residues excreted in milk have been reported from different parts of the world; however, very few reports did appear from India. In fact, there is no report on DDT-content in human milk from Delhi area where higher levels of DDT and BHC in human adipose tissues and blood have already been reported. Higher bioaccumulation of DDT might reflect the higher excretion of residues in milk. The authors have, therefore, attempted a systematic study to monitor DDT-residues in human milk samples collected from various hospitals of Delhi (India).

Zaidi, S.S.A.; Bhatnagar, V.K.; Banerjee, B.D.; Balakrishnan, G.; Shah, M.P.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Acoustic plasmons and doping evolution of Mott physics in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering from cuprate superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By incorporating a long-range Coulomb interaction into the framework of the one-band Hubbard model, they delineate how the low-energy plasmon around 1 eV, which is a universal feature of the charge dynamics of the cuprates, manifests itself in the resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra. The long-range Coulomb interaction in the doped system control sthe form of the intraband RIXS dispersion near the Brillouin zone center around the {Gamma} point. The out-of-plane momentum transfer component q{sub z} is found to play a key role in determining whether or not the RIXS spectrum shows a plasmon-related gap at {Gamma}.

Markiewicz, R.S.; Hasan, M.Z.; Bansil, A.; (NEU); (Princeton)

2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

350

Quasi-zero dimensional CuB2O4: a resonant inelastic X-ray scattering case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the general phenomenology of resonant inelastic scattering (RIXS) using CuB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, a network of CuO{sub 4} plaquettes electronically isolated by B{sup +3} ions. Spectra show a small number of well-separated features, and we exploit the simple electronic structure to explore RIXS phenomenology by developing a calculation which allows for intermediate-state effects ignored in standard approaches. These effects are found to be non-negligible and good correspondence between our model and experiment leads to a simple picture of such phenomenology as the genesis of d {yields} d excitations at the K edge and intermediate-state interference effects.

Hancock, J.N.

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

351

Q-dependence of the inelastic neutron scattering cross section for molecular spin clusters with high molecular symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For powder samples of polynuclear metal complexes the dependence of the inelastic neutron scattering intensity on the momentum transfer Q is known to be described by a combination of so called interference terms. They reflect the interplay between the geometrical structure of the compound and the spatial properties of the wave functions involved in the transition. In this work, it is shown that the Q-dependence is strongly interrelated with the molecular symmetry of molecular nanomagnets, and, if the molecular symmetry is high enough, is actually completely determined by it. A general formalism connecting spatial symmetry and interference terms is developed. The arguments are detailed for cyclic spin clusters, as experimentally realized by e.g. the octanuclear molecular wheel Cr8, and the star like tetranuclear cluster Fe4.

O. Waldmann

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

352

Single-spin Azimuthal Asymmetries in Electroproduction of Neutral Pions in Semi-inclusive Deep-inelastic Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A single-spin asymmetry in the azimuthal distribution of neutral pions relative to the lepton scattering plane has been measured for the first time in deep-inelastic scattering of positrons off longitudinally polarized protons. The analysing power in the sin(phi) moment of the cross section is 0.019 +/- 0.007(stat.) +/- 0.003(syst.). This result is compared to single-spin asymmetries for charged pion production measured in the same kinematic range. The pi^0 asymmetry is of the same size as the pi^+ asymmetry and shows a similar dependence on the relevant kinematic variables. The asymmetry is described by a phenomenological calculation based on a fragmentation function that represents sensitivity to the transverse polarization of the struck quark.

Airapetian, A; Amarian, M; Aschenauer, E C; Avakian, H; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Bains, B; Baturin, V; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Bouhali, O; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brauksiepe, S; Brückner, W; Brüll, A; Brunn, I; Bulten, H J; Capitani, G P; Chumney, P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Court, G R; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Devitsin, E G; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; Di Nezza, P; Dzhordzhadze, V; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G M; Ellinghaus, F; Ely, J; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Felawka, L; Filippone, B W; Fischer, H; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Gärber, Y; Garibaldi, F; Garutti, E; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Golendukhin, A; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Green, P W; Greeniaus, L G; Gute, A; Haeberli, W; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Heinsius, F H; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hofman, G J; Holler, Y; Holt, R J; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Izotov, A A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Jung, P; Kaiser, R; Kanesaka, J; Kinney, E R; Kiselev, A; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, H; Koch, N; Königsmann, K C; Kolster, H; Korotkov, V A; Kotik, E; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kyle, G S; Lagamba, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Lindemann, T; Lorenzon, W; Maas, A; Makins, N C R; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; McAndrew, M; McIlhany, K; Meissner, F; Menden, F; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Milner, R; Muccifora, V; Mussa, R; Nagaitsev, A P; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaeva, K; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganesyan, K A; O'Neill, T G; Owen, B R; Pate, S F; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Rakness, G; Rappoport, V; Redwine, R P; Reggiani, D; Reolon, A R; Rith, K; Robinson, D; Rostomyan, A; Ruh, M; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Sanjiev, I; Sato, F; Savin, I A; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schmidt, F; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Schwind, A; Seibert, J; Seitz, B; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V B; Simani, M C; Simon, A; Sinram, K; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Suetsugu, K; Taroian, S P; Terkulov, A R; Teryaev, O V; Tessarin, S; Thomas, E; Tipton, B; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van den Brand, J F J; van der Steenhoven, G; Van de Vyver, R; Van Hunen, J J; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Wise, T; Yen, S; Yoneyama, S; Zohrabyan, H G

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering study of charge excitations in superconducting and nonsuperconducting PrFeAsO??y  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We report the first observation by momentum-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering of charge excitations in an iron-based superconductor and its parent compound, PrFeAsO?.? and PrFeAsO, respectively, with two main results. First, using calculations based on a 16-band dp model, we show that the energy of the lowest-lying excitations, identified as dd interband transitions of dominant xz,yz orbital character, exhibits a dramatic dependence on electron correlation. This enables us to estimate the Coulomb repulsion U and Hund's coupling J, and to highlight the role played by J in these peculiar orbital-dependent electron correlation effects. Second, we show that short-range antiferromagnetic correlations, which are a prerequisite to the occurrence of these excitations at the ? point, are still present in the superconducting state.

Jarrige, I.; Nomura, T.; Ishii, K.; Gretarsson, H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, J.; Upton, M.; Casa, D.; Gog, T.; Ishikado, M.; Fukuda, T.; Yoshida, M.; Hill, J. P.; Liu, X.; Hiraoka, N.; Tsuei, K. D.; Shamoto, S.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A unified view of coherent and incoherent dihydrogen exchange in transition metal hydrides by nuclear resonance and inelastic neutron scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper a unified view of coherent and incoherent dihydrogen exchange in transition metal hydrides by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is presented. It is shown that both exchange processes coexist i.e. do not transform into each other although they may dominate the spectra in different temperature ranges. This superposition is the consequence of the incorporation of the tunnel frequency J of the coherent process into the nuclear two-spin hamiltonian of hydrogen pairs which allows to treat the problem using the well known density matrix theory of NMR line-shapes developed by Alexander and Binsch. It is shown that this theory can also be used to predict the line-shapes of the rotational tunneling transitions observed in the INS spectra of transition metal dihydrogen complexes and that both NMR and INS spectra depend on similar parameters.

Limbach, H.H.; Ulrich, S.; Buntkowsky, G. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Organische Chemie; Sabo-Etienne, S.; Chaudret, B. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Lab. de Chimie de Coordination du C.N.R.S.; Kubas, G.J.; Eckert, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

355

The phonon density of states of (alpha) and (delta)-Plutonium by inelastic x-ray scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of the phonon density of states (DOS) were performed on polycrystalline samples of pure {alpha}-Pu and {delta}-Pu{sub 0.98}Ga{sub 0.02} at room temperature. The heat capacity of {alpha}-Pu is well reproduced by contributions calculated from the measured phonon DOS plus conventional thermal expansion and electronic contributions, showing that {alpha}-Pu is a 'well-behaved' metal in this regard. A comparison of the phonon DOS of the two phases at room temperature surprised us in that the vibrational entropy difference between them is only a quarter of the total entropy difference expected from known thermodynamic measurements. The missing entropy is too large to be accounted for by conventional electronic entropy and evidence from the literature rules out a contribution from spin fluctuations. Possible alternative sources for the missing entropy are discussed.

Manley, M E; Said, A; Fluss, M J; Wall, M; Lashley, J C; Alatas, A; Moore, K T

2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

356

Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Deep Inelastic Scattering at JLab 6 GeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS) offers us a useful tool to study the weak neutral couplings and the hadronic structure of the nucleon, and provides high precision tests on the Standard Model. During the 6 GeV PVDIS experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, the parity-violating asymmetries A{sub PV} of a polarized electron beam scattering off an unpolarized deuteron target in the deep inelastic scattering region were precisely measured at two Q{sup 2} values of 1.1 and 1.9 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The asymmetry at Q{sup 2}=1.9 (GeV/c){sup 2} can be used to extract the weak coupling combination 2C{sub 2u} - C{sub 2d}, assuming the higher twist effect is small. The extracted result from this measurement is in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction, and improves the precision by a factor of five over previous data. In addition, combining the asymmetries at both Q{sup 2} values provides us extra knowledge on the higher twist effects. The parity violation asymmetries in the resonance region were also measured during this experiment. These results are the first A{sub PV} data in the resonance region beyond the {Delta}#1;(1232). They provide evidence that the quark hadron duality works for A{sub PV} at the (10-15)% level, and set constraints on nucleon resonance models that are commonly used for background calculations to other parity-violating electron scattering measurements.

Wang, Diancheng [UVA

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Distorted spin dependent spectral function of {sup 3}He and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spin dependent spectral function, relevant to describe polarized electron scattering off polarized {sup 3}He, is studied, within the Plane Wave Impulse Approximation and taking into account final state interaction effects (FSI). In particular, the case of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SiDIS) is considered, evaluating the FSI of the hadronizing quark with the nuclear remnants. It is shown that particular kinematical regions can be selected to minimize the latter effects, so that parton distributions in the neutron can be accessed. On the other side, in the regions where FSI dominates, the considered reactions can elucidate the mechanism of hadronization of quarks during the propagation in the nuclear medium. It is shown that the obtained spin dependent spectral function can be directly applied to investigate the SiDIS reaction e-vector + {sup 3}He-vector to h+X, where the hadron h originates from the current fragmentation. Experiments of this type are being performed at JLab to extract neutron transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. As a case study, a different SiDIS process, with detection of slow (A-1) systems in the final state, is considered in more details, in order to establish when nuclear structure effects and FSI can be distinguished from elementary reactions on quasi-free nucleons. It is argued that, by a proper choice of kinematics, the origin of nuclear effects in polarized DIS phenomena and the details of the interaction between the hadronizing quark and the nuclear medium can be investigated at a level which is not reachable in inclusive deep inelastic scattering.

Kaptari, Leonya P. [University of Perugia (Italy); INFN-Perugia (Italy); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russia); Del Dotto, Alessio [University of Rome, Rome (Italy); INFN-Roma (Italy); Pace, Emanuele [University of Rome (Italy); INFN-Tor Vergata (Italy); Salme, Giovanni [INFN-Roma (Italy); Scopetta, Sergio [University of Perugia (Italy); INFN-Perugia (Italy)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Wave induced residual pore-water pressures in sandbeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subject: Ocean Engineering WAVE INDUCED RESIDUAL PORE-WATER PRESSURES IN SANDBEDS A Thesis by Jack W. Deyries Approved as to style and content by: J. B. Her bich (Chairman of Committee) Y. K. Lou (Member) W. A. Dunlap (Member) R. O. Reid (Member...-Water Pressure . . . . . 43 Development of Residual Pore-Mater Pressure 46 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Wave Height Recording Pore-Water Pressure Recording Permeability of Sand Permeability of Glass Beads Wave Form (least steep) Wave Form (middle steepness...

DeVries, Jack Walter

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Inelastic x-ray scattering study of supercooled liquid and solid silicon.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Momentum-resolved inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) technique is one of the powerful methods for the study of dynamical properties of a given system even in extreme conditions like high temperature and high pressure. At the same time, experimental studies of physical and structural properties of liquids have multiplied in recent years with the advent of containerless techniques. These methods reduce the possibility of contamination of specimens and remove external nucleation sites. Therefore, by combining the IXS method with the levitation method, the dynamical properties of stable liquids up to 3000 K and supercooled phase of liquids can be studied. Silicon is a basic material in the semiconductor industry and has been the subject of a large amount of experimental and theoretical studies over a long time. In the crystalline phase at ambient conditions, silicon is a diamond-structured semiconductor, but upon melting it undergoes a semiconductor-to-metal transition accompanied by significant changes in the structure and density. The coordination number increases from 4 in the solid to about 6.5 in the liquid, and liquid density is increased by about 10%. The principal purpose of the present study was to determine silicon's elastic modulus from the measurement of averaged sound speed determined from IXS. The experiments were carried out at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline 3-ID with a high-resolution monochromator consisting of two nested channel-cut crystals and four backscattering analyzer setups in the horizontal scattering plane 6 m from the sample. The requirements for very high energy resolution and the basic principles of such instrumentation are discussed elsewhere as referenced. The levitation apparatus was enclosed in a bell jar specially designed for backscattering geometry with a separation of 10 cm between the sample and the detector. Silicon spheres of 2 to 3 mm in diameter were suspended in an argon gas jet and heated with a 270 W CO{sub 2} laser beam. Temperatures were measured during the experiment with a pyrometer whose operating wavelength was 0.65 {micro}m. The temperature gradient on the sample was estimated to be about +/- 20 K. The energy scans were taken for supercooled-liquid and hot-solid silicon at temperature T=1620 K. Sound velocities were determined from the initial slope of the excitation frequencies. Then, the longitudinal moduli for hotsolid and supercooled-liquid silicon were calculated from L = v{sub L}{sup 2}{rho} using measured velocities. In these calculations, density values were taken from Ohsaka et al. as referenced. Results are presented in Table 1. together with room-temperature, hot-solid single-crystal measurements, and stable-liquid values. Room-temperature longitudinal moduli were calculated from the values of the single-crystal elastic constants. They were measured between 300 K and 870 K. Since there was no phase transition up to temperature 1620 K for hot-solid silicon, it is reasonable to extrapolate these data to 1620 K in order to compare to our results for the hot solid. A significant difference (about 20%) is observed between our measurement and the extrapolated single-crystal value of the longitudinal modulus for solid silicon at temperature 1620K. This reduction of the longitudinal modulus may be an indication of the pre-melting. The factor of more than two change in the elastic modulus between supercooled liquid and hot solid at the same temperature can be attributed to the semiconductor-to-metal transition in silicon associated with melting. Also, the longitudinal modulus of the stable liquid is reported in Table 1. About a 10% difference is observed between the modulus of the supercooled and the stable liquid silicon. This can be interpreted as silicon still maintaining metallic properties with a significant increase in the degree of the directional bonding upon supercooling, as found in the x-ray diffraction and ab initio MD studies. All these results are discussed in reference.

Alatas, A.; Said, A.; Sinn, H.; Alp, E.E.; Kodituwakku, C.N.; Saboungi, M.L.; Price, D.L.; X-Ray Science Division; Western Michigan Univ.; Purdue Univ.; CRMD-CNRS; CRMHT-CNRS

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Computer aided analysis for residual stress measurement using ultrasonic techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to detect travel-times with a precision of 0. l nanoseconds and an accuracy of less than 2.5 nanoseconds. A residual stress reference standard developed for previous research was used as the sample to measure travel-times. The sample was designed...

Kypa, Jagan Mohan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Removal of residual particulate matter from filter media  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing residual filter cakes that remain adhered to a filter after typical particulate removal methodologies have been employed, such as pulse-jet filter element cleaning, for all cleanable filters used for air pollution control, dust control, or powder control.

Almlie, Jay C; Miller, Stanley J

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

363

Modeling, Optimization and Economic Evaluation of Residual Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. .............................................................................. 7 Table 2. Components Used in Simulation. ...................................................................... 20 Table 3. Composition of Biomass Feedstock to Biorefinery. ......................................... 43 Table 4. Operating... for optimizing gasification plant design from an economic perspective. Specifically, the problem addressed in this work is stated as follows: Given are: ? A set of biomass feedstocks {i|i = 1,2,?,I } which includes fresh as well as residue biomass ? A set...

Georgeson, Adam

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

PROPERTIES OF RESIDUALS FOR SPATIAL POINT PROCESSES A. BADDELEY,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPERTIES OF RESIDUALS FOR SPATIAL POINT PROCESSES A. BADDELEY, University of Western Australia J. MØLLER, University of Aalborg A.G. PAKES, University of Western Australia Abstract For any point process & Statistics M019, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Nedlands WA 6009, Australia Postal

Baddeley, Adrian

365

COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus Evolutionarily Conserved? Yan Yuan Tseng is the hallmark of life. It is important to understand how protein folding and evolution influence each other in protein folding nucleus as measured by experi- mental f-value and selection pressure as measured by v

Dai, Yang

366

Trigeneration in a northern Chinese village using crop residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification of crop residues can provide modern energy carriers to rural areas at potentially at- tractive in rural areas of developing countries by the introduction of mod- ern, clean energy carriers (e.g., fluid the prospects for providing such energy carriers to a rural village in Jilin province, China: clean gas

367

AIAA-2001-0025 SPECTRUM FATIGUE LIFETIME AND RESIDUAL STRENGTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a typical fiberglass laminate configuration turbine blade fiberglass material has been undertaken under at various fractions of the lifetime turbine blade materials.. are consistent with the residual strength of fiberglass spectrum have been studied. Data have been obtained for materials produce results that may

368

Ammonia volatilization from soils with surface rice straw residue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rice residue and related factors on NH3 volatilization from an acid Beaumont clay (pH 5.4) and an alkaline Lake Charles clay (pH 7.4). The treatments in the greenhouse and lab consisted of all possible combinations of the following variables: surface...

Barghassa, Peyam

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Sorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aluminum smelter residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature carbon oxidation in primary aluminum smelters results in the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the environment. The main source of PAH are the anodes, which are composed of petroleum coke (black carbon, BC) and coal tar pitch. To elucidate the dominant carbonaceous phase controlling the environmental fate of PAH in aluminum smelter residues (coke BC and/or coal tar), the sorptive behavior of PAHs has been determined, using passive samplers and infinite-sink desorption methods. Samples directly from the wet scrubber were studied as well as ones from an adjacent 20-year old storage lagoon and roof dust from the smelter. Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. Sorption isotherms of laboratory-spiked deuterated phenanthrene showed strong (about 100 times stronger than AOC) but nonetheless linear sorption in both fresh and aged aluminum smelter residues. The absence of nonlinear behavior typical for adsorption to BC indicates that PAH sorption in aluminum smelter residues is dominated by absorption into the semi-solid coal tar pitch matrix. Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35-50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11-16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. Weathering of the coal tar residue and/or redistribution of PAH between coal tar and BC phases could explain the reduced availability in aged samples. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Gijs D. Breedveld; Emilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen [Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo (Norway)

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Beam-Target Double-Spin Asymmetry ALT in Charged Pion Production from Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized 3He Target at 1.4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first measurement of the double-spin asymmetry A[subscript LT] for charged pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic electron scattering on a transversely polarized [superscript 3]He target. The ...

Huang, Jin

371

Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry in Deep-Inelastic Scattering from the Reaction $^{3}\\mathrm{He}^{\\uparrow}(e,e')X$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first measurement of the target-normal single-spin asymmetry in deep-inelastic scattering from the inclusive reaction $^3$He$^{\\uparrow}\\left(e,e' \\right)X$ on a polarized $^3$He gas target. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero in the Born approximation but can be non-zero if two-photon-exchange contributions are included. The experiment, conducted at Jefferson Lab using a 5.89 GeV electron beam, covers a range of $1.7 2$ GeV, which is non-zero at the $2.89\\sigma$ level. Our measured asymmetry agrees both in sign and magnitude with a two-photon-exchange model prediction that uses input from the Sivers transverse momentum distribution obtained from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

J. Katich; X. Qian; Y. X. Zhao; K. Allada; K. Aniol; J. R. M. Annand; T. Averett; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; P. C. Bradshaw; P. Bosted; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; C. Chen; J. -P. Chen; W. Chen; K. Chirapatpimol; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; J. C. Cornejo; F. Cusanno; M. M. Dalton; W. Deconinck; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; X. Deng; A. Deur; H. Ding; P. A. M. Dolph; C. Dutta; D. Dutta; L. El Fassi; S. Frullani; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; O. Glamazdin; S. Golge; L. Guo; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; J. Huang; M. Huang; H. F. Ibrahim; M. Iodice; X. Jiang; G. Jin; M. K. Jones; A. Kelleher; W. Kim; A. Kolarkar; W. Korsch; J. J. LeRose; X. Li; Y. Li; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; E. Long; H. -J. Lu; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; D. McNulty; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; C. Mu?oz Camacho; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; B. Norum; Y. Oh; M. Osipenko; D. Parno; J. C. Peng; S. K. Phillips; M. Posik; A. J. R. Puckett; Y. Qiang; A. Rakhman; R. D. Ransome; S. Riordan; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; E. Schulte; A. Shahinyan; M. H. Shabestari; S. Širca; S. Stepanyan; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; L. -G. Tang; A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; I. Vilardi; K. Wang; Y. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; Y. Ye; Z. Ye; L. Yuan; X. Zhan; Y. Zhang; Y. -W. Zhang; B. Zhao; X. Zheng; L. Zhu; X. Zhu; X. Zong

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

372

Subleading-twist effects in single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering on a longitudinally polarized hydrogen target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-spin asymmetries in the semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering from transversely and longitudinally polarized proton targets are combined to evaluate the subleading-twist contribution to the longitudinal case. This contribution is significantly positive for (\\pi^+) mesons and dominates the asymmetries on a longitudinally polarized target previously measured by \\hermes. The subleading-twist contribution for (\\pi^-) mesons is found to be small.

The HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; :

2005-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

373

Structural group analysis of residues from Athabasca bitumen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the processability of bitumen from tar sand is dependent on its chemical composition, the details of this relationship are poorly understood. In this study, residue fractions from Athabasca bitumen (topped at different temperatures) and hydrocracker and coker residues were analyzed in detail. Separated class fractions were subjected to elemental analysis, NMR and IR spectroscopy, and potentiometric titration. These data were combined mathematically to obtain a structural profile of each oil. This analysis defines the structural changes in asphaltene precipitates due to distillation and processing, as well as the quantitative changes in the overall structural composition of the oil. Hydrocarbon structures such as paraffinic chains and naphthenes show definite trends with distillation and processing.

Gray, M.R.; Choi, J.H.K.; Egiebor, N.O. (Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Kirchen, R.P.; Sanford, E.C. (Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Hydroconversion of heavy oils. [Residue of tar sand bitumen distillation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for hydroconversion of feedstocks consisting essentially of at least one heavy hydrocarbon oil selected from the group consisting of residue of petroleum oil distillation and the residue of tar sand bitumen distillation to enhance the recovery of 350/sup 0/-650/sup 0/F boiling product fraction. The method comprises treating such feed stock with hydrogen at superatmospheric pressure and in the presence of finely divided active hydrogenation catalyst in consecutive reaction stages. An initial reaction stage is carried out at a temperature in the range of 780/sup 0/-825/sup 0/F, and a subsequent reaction stage is directly carried out after the initial reaction stage at a higher temperature in the range of 800/sup 0/F-860/sup 0/F, the temperature of the subsequent reaction stage being at least 20/sup 0/F higher than that of the initial reaction stage.

Garg, D.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

375

Residual stresses in dielectrics caused by metallization lines and pads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual stresses in dielectrics and semiconductors induced by metal lines, pads and vias can have detrimental effects on the performance of devices and electronic packages. Analytical and numerical calculations of these stresses have been performed for two purposes. (1) To illustrate how these stresses relate to the residual stress in the metallization and its geometry; (2) to calibrate a piezo-spectroscopic method for measuring these stresses with high spatial resolution. The results of the calculations have been presented using non-dimensional parameters that both facilitate scaling and provide connections to the stresses in the metal, with or without yielding. Preliminary experimental results obtained for Au/Ge eutectic pads illustrate the potential of the method and the role of the stress analysis.

He, M.Y.; Lipkin, J.; Clarke, D.R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Dept.] [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Dept.; Evans, A.G. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Div. of Applied Sciences] [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Div. of Applied Sciences; Tenhover, M. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States)] [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A vertical drift chamber as a high resolution focal plane detector for heavy ion spectroscopy with the Enge split-pole spectrometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the VDC chamber. In (a), the true equipotential distribution, numerically calculated using program SIMION, is shown. The applied cathode voltage was -9. 5 kV. Each line represents a potential difference of 400 V. In (b), the approximate field... designed for future heavy ion I spectroscopy applications in the split-pole spectrograph. The hybrid t detector will be capable of identifying heavy iona having masses through A - 20 and energies up to 35 MeV/amu to be available from the new K-500...

Yates, Kenneth Warren

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Dissolution of Desicooler Residues in H-Canyon Dissolvers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of dissolution and characterization studies has been performed to determine if FB-Line residues stored in desicooler containers will dissolve using a modified H-Canyon processing flowsheet. Samples of desicooler materials were used to evaluate dissolving characteristics in the low-molar nitric acid solutions used in H-Canyon dissolvers. The selection for the H-Canyon dissolution of desicooler residues was based on their high-enriched uranium content and trace levels of plutonium. Test results showed that almost all of the enriched uranium will dissolve from the desicooler materials after extended boiling in one molar nitric acid solutions. The residue that contained uranium after completion of the extended boiling cycle consisted of brown solids that had agglomerated into large pieces and were floating on top of the dissolver solution. Addition of tenth molar fluoride to a three molar nitric acid solution containing boron did not dissolve remaining uranium from the brown solids. Only after boiling in an eight molar nitric acid-tenth molar fluoride solution without boron did remaining uranium and aluminum dissolve from the brown solids. The amount of uranium associated with brown solids would be approximately 1.4 percent of the total uranium content of the desicooler materials. The brown solids that remain in the First Uranium Cycle feed will accumulate at the organic/aqueous interface during solvent extraction operations. Most of the undissolved white residue that remained after extended boiling was aluminum oxide containing additional trace quantities of impurities. However, the presence of mercury used in H-Canyon dissolvers should complete the dissolution of these aluminum compounds.

Gray, J.H.

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Combustion of textile residues in a packed bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Textile is one of the main components in the municipal waste which is to be diverted from landfill for material and energy recovery. As an initial investigation for energy recovery from textile residues, the combustion of cotton fabrics with a minor fraction of polyester was investigated in a packed bed combustor for air flow rates ranging from 117 to 1638 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.027-0.371 m/s). Tests were also carried out in order to evaluate the co-combustion of textile residues with two segregated waste materials: waste wood and cardboard. Textile residues showed different combustion characteristics when compared to typical waste materials at low air flow rates below 819 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.186 m/s). The ignition front propagated fast along the air channels randomly formed between packed textile particles while leaving a large amount of unignited material above. This resulted in irregular behaviour of the temperature profile, ignition rate and the percentage of weight loss in the ignition propagation stage. A slow smouldering burn-out stage followed the ignition propagation stage. At air flow rates of 1200-1600 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.272-0.363 m/s), the bed had a maximum burning rate of about 240 kg/m{sup 2} h consuming most of the combustibles in the ignition propagation stage. More uniform combustion with an increased burning rate was achieved when textile residues were co-burned with cardboard that had a similar bulk density. (author)

Ryu, Changkook; Phan, Anh N.; Sharifi, Vida N.; Swithenbank, Jim [Sheffield University Waste Incineration Centre (SUWIC), Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

The effect of magnetic flutter on residual flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hypothesis that stochastic magnetic fields disrupt zonal flows associated with ion temperature gradient turbulence saturation is investigated analytically with a residual flow calculation in the presence of magnetic flutter. The calculation starts from the time-asymptotic zero-beta residual flow of Rosenbluth and Hinton [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)] with the sudden application of an externally imposed, fixed magnetic field perturbation. The short-time electron response from radial charge loss due to magnetic flutter is calculated from the appropriate gyrokinetic equation. The potential evolution has quadratic behavior, with a zero crossing at finite time. The crossing time and its parametric dependencies are compared with numerical results from a gyrokinetic simulation of residual flow in the presence of magnetic flutter. The numerical and analytical results are in good agreement and support the hypothesis that the high-beta runaway of numerical simulations is a result of the disabling of zonal flows by finite-beta charge losses associated with magnetic flutter.

Terry, P. W.; Pueschel, M. J.; Carmody, D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Nevins, W. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Residual Stress Evaluation within a Crimped Splice Connector Assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In power transmission, connectors play an important role in the efficiency and reliability of the system. Due to the increase of power demand and lack of new infrastructure, existing overhead power transmission lines often need to operate at temperatures higher than the original design criteria. However, this had led to the accelerated aging and degradation of splice connectors, which has been manifested by the formation of hot-spots that have been revealed by infrared imaging during inspection of transmission lines operating at elevated temperatures. The implications of connector aging is two-fold: (1) significant increase in resistivity of the splice connector (i.e., less efficient transmission of electricity) and (2) significant reduction in the connector clamping strength, which ultimately results in separation of the power transmission line at the joint. Therefore, the splice connector has become the weakest link in the electric power transmission infrastructure. The compressive residual stresses induced by the crimping process within the splice provide the clamping forces to secure the conductor and therefore, the determination of the state of residual stresses in splice connectors is a necessary requirement to provide an accurate estimate of their service lifetime. This paper presents a protocol of utilizing finite-element analysis and neutron scattering experiments for evaluating the residual stress fields within a crimped single-stage splice connector assembly.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; King Jr, Thomas J [ORNL; Graziano, Joe [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Chan, John [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

THE METHOD OF CONJUGATE RESIDUALS FOR SOLVING THE GALERKIN EQUATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH SYMMETRIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kind integral equations, conjugate gradient type methods, Galerkin method, regularization schemesTHE METHOD OF CONJUGATE RESIDUALS FOR SOLVING THE GALERKIN EQUATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH SYMMETRIC, the method of conjugate residuals is consid- ered. An a posteriori stopping rule is introduced

Plato, Robert

382

Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford and P. Westerhoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford to global warming. Biofuel from phototrophic microbes like algae and bacteria provides a viable substitute improves biofuel sustainability by refining phosphorus recycling. Biomass Production Residual Biomass

Hall, Sharon J.

383

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspartic acid residues Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scott1 and Barry LStoddard 2* Summary: -links are each consistent with a parallel coiled coil structure, residues 1-36 of the aspartate receptor were... residues 23-180 of the...

384

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues involved Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contacts, however... acid residues with small side-chains (Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys) allow tight helix packing by mediating strong... ) amino acid residues. We propose the use of the...

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-pollution-control residues leaching...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

leaching Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air-pollution-control residues leaching Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Solid Residues from...

386

Neutron inelastic scattering and reactions in natural Pb as a background in neutrinoless double-beta-decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic neutron scattering and reactions on Pb isotopes can result in gamma rays near the signature endpoint energy in a number of double-beta decay isotopes. In particular, there are gamma-ray transitions in Pb-206,207,208 that might produce energy deposits at the 76-Ge Q value in Ge detectors used for double-beta decay searches. The levels that produce these gamma rays can be excited by (n,n'gamma) or (n,xngamma) reactions, but the cross sections are small and previously unmeasured. This work uses the pulsed neutron beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center to directly measure reactions of interest to double-beta decay experiments. The cross section on natural Pb to produce the 2041-keV gamma ray from Pb-206 is measured to be 3.6 +/- 0.7 (stat.) +/- 0.3 (syst.) mb at ~9.6 MeV. The cross section on natural Pb to produce the 3062-keV gamma ray from Pb-207 and Pb-208 is measured to be 3.9 +/- 0.8 (stat.) +/- 0.4 (syst.) mb at the same energy. We report cross sections or place upper limits on the cross sections for exciting some other levels in Pb that have transition energies corresponding to Q value in other double-beta decay isotopes.

V. E. Guiseppe; M. Devlin; S. R. Elliott; N. Fotiades; A. Hime; D. -M. Mei; R. O. Nelson; D. V. Perepelitsa

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

387

Large-angle elastic and inelastic scattering of Pi(+) and Pi(-) from (28)Si and (40)Ca. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differential cross sections were measured for Pi(+) and Pi(-) elastic scattering of Calcium 40 and Silicon 28 at incident pion energies ranging from 100 to 260 MeV at a scattering angle of 175 degs. Differential cross sections were also measured for Pi(+) and Pi(-) inelastic scattering to the 2(+), 1.78 MeV, 4(+), 4.62 MeV, and 3(-) 6.88 MeV states of 28Si at incident pion energies of 130, 180, and 226 MeV and scattering angles between 115 and 175{degrees} in 6{degrees} increments. The data are compared to previously obtained forward angle data through 120{degrees} and agree quite well. The data show a generally flat angular dependence for angles greater than 100{degrees}. Several theoretical codes are reviewed for their ability to predict large angle scattering. Coordinate-space and momentum-space models generally thought to be sufficient for predicting forward angle scattering have proved to be inappropriate for use at large angles. A new phenomenological delta-hole model, currently under modification, shows a greatly enhanced ability to predict scattering at back angles.

Snell, M.P.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Peripheral elastic and inelastic scattering of 17,18O on light targets at 12 MeV/nucleon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of interaction of neutron rich oxygen isotopes $^{17,18}$O with light targets has been undertaken in order to determine the optical potentials needed for the transfer reaction $^{13}$C($^{17}$O,$^{18}$O)$^{12}$C. Optical potentials in both incoming and outgoing channels have been determined in a single experiment. This transfer reaction was used to infer the direct capture rate to the $^{17}$F(p,$\\gamma$)$^{18}$Ne which is essential to estimate the production of $^{18}$F at stellar energies in ONe novae. The success of the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) as indirect method for astrophysics is guaranteed if the reaction mechanism is peripheral and the DWBA cross section calculations are warranted and stable against OMP used. We demonstrate the stability of the ANC method and OMP results using good quality elastic and inelastic scattering data with stable beams before extending the procedures to rare ion beams. The peripherality of our reaction is inferred from a semiclassical decomposition of the total scattering amplitude into barrier and internal barrier components. Comparison between elastic scattering of $^{17}$O, $^{18}$O and $^{16}$O projectiles is made.

T. Al-Abdullah; F. Carstoiu; C. A. Gagliardi; G. Tabacaru; L. Trache; R. E. Tribble

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Anharmonic lattice dynamics of Ag2O studied by inelastic neutron scattering and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on silver oxide (Ag2O) with the cuprite structure were performed at temperatures from 40 to 400 K, and Fourier transform far-infrared spectra were measured from 100 to 300 K. The measured phonon densities of states and the infrared spectra showed unusually large energy shifts with temperature, and large linewidth broadenings. First principles molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were performed at various temperatures, successfully accounting for the negative thermal expansion (NTE) and local dynamics. Using the Fourier-transformed velocity autocorrelation method, the MD calculations reproduced the large anharmonic effects of Ag2O, and were in excellent agreement with the neutron scattering data. The quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) was less successful in accounting for much of the phonon behavior. The QHA could account for some of the NTE below 250 K, although not at higher temperatures. Strong anharmonic effects were found for both phonons and for the NTE. The lifetime broadenings of Ag2O were explained by anharmonic perturbation theory, which showed rich interactions between the Ag-dominated modes and the O-dominated modes in both up- and down-conversion processes.

Lan, Tian [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Li, Chen [ORNL] [ORNL; Niedziela, Jennifer L [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, Hillary [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL] [ORNL; Rossman, George [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Fultz, B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Experimental evaluation of a constitutive model for inelastic flow and damage evolution in solids subjected to triaxial compression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent concern over the potential for creep induced development of a damaged rock zone adjacent to shafts and rooms at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has motivated the formulation of a coupled constitutive description of continuum salt creep and damage. This constitutive model gives time-dependent inelastic flow and pressure-sensitive damage in crystalline solids. Initially the constitutive model was successfully used to simulate multiaxial, i.e. true triaxial, experiments obtained at relatively high, 2.5 to 20 MPa, confining pressures. Predictions of the complete creep curve, including the heretofore unmodeled tertiary creep, were also demonstrated. However, comparisons of model predictions with data were hampered because the bulk of the creep data existing on WIPP salt was intentionally obtained under confining pressures typically greater than 15 MPa, in an attempt to match the underground in situ lithostatic pressure level. It was realized that the high confining pressures suppressed tertiary creep and resulted in better defined steady state creep responses. To address the tertiary creep process directly, a number of creep tests were conducted at lower confining pressures for the explicit purpose of creating dilatant behavior.

Fossum, A.F.; Brodsky, N.S. (RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States)); Chan, K.S. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)); Munson, D.E. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Experimental evaluation of a constitutive model for inelastic flow and damage evolution in solids subjected to triaxial compression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent concern over the potential for creep induced development of a damaged rock zone adjacent to shafts and rooms at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has motivated the formulation of a coupled constitutive description of continuum salt creep and damage. This constitutive model gives time-dependent inelastic flow and pressure-sensitive damage in crystalline solids. Initially the constitutive model was successfully used to simulate multiaxial, i.e. true triaxial, experiments obtained at relatively high, 2.5 to 20 MPa, confining pressures. Predictions of the complete creep curve, including the heretofore unmodeled tertiary creep, were also demonstrated. However, comparisons of model predictions with data were hampered because the bulk of the creep data existing on WIPP salt was intentionally obtained under confining pressures typically greater than 15 MPa, in an attempt to match the underground in situ lithostatic pressure level. It was realized that the high confining pressures suppressed tertiary creep and resulted in better defined steady state creep responses. To address the tertiary creep process directly, a number of creep tests were conducted at lower confining pressures for the explicit purpose of creating dilatant behavior.

Fossum, A.F.; Brodsky, N.S. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Chan, K.S. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

MATERIALS DEGRADATION ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT TO ENABLE ULTRA LOW COST, WEB-PROCESSED WHITE P-OLED FOR SSL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress over Phase II of DE-FG02-07ER86293 'Materials Degradation Analysis and Development to Enable Ultra Low Cost, Web-Processed White P-OLED for SSL' was initially rapid in terms of device performance improvements. We exceeded our device luminance lifetime goals for printed flexible white OLEDs as laid out in our project proposal. Our Phase II performance target was to demonstrate >1500 hours luminance lifetime at 100 Cd/m2 from a printed flexible device. We now have R&D devices well in excess of 8000 hrs lifetime at 100 Cd/m2, tested in air. We also were able to produce devices which met the voltage target of >1500 hours below 15V operation. After completing the initial performance milestones, we went on to focus on color-related degradation issues which were cited as important to commercialization of the technology by our manufacturing partners. We also put additional focus on cathode work as the active material development that occurred over the STTR time period required an adaptation of the cathode from the original cathode formulations which were developed based on previous generation active layer materials. We were able to improve compatibility of the cathode with some of the newer generation active layer materials and improve device yield and voltage behavior. An additional objective of the initial Phase II was to further develop the underlying manufacturing technology and real-life product specifications. This is a key requirement that must be met to ensure eventual commercialization of this DOE-funded technology. The link between commercial investment for full commercialization and R&D efforts in OLED solid State Lighting is often a large one. Add-Vision's lower cost, printed OLED manufacturing approach is an attraction, but close engagement with manufacturing partners and addressing customer specifications is a very important link. Manufacturing technology encompasses development of moisture reduction encapsulation technology, improved cost performance, and reductions in operating voltage through thinner and higher uniformity active device layers. We have now installed a pilot encapsulation system at AVI for controlled, high throughput lamination encapsulation of flexible OLEDs in a novel process. Along with this, we have developed, with our materials supply partners, adhesives, barrier films and other encapsulation materials and we are showing total air product lifetimes in the 2-4 years range from a process consistent with our throughput goals of {approx}1M device per month ({approx}30,000 sq. ft. of processed OLEDs). Within the last year of the project, we have been working to introduce the manufacturing improvements made in our LEP deposition and annealing process to our commercial partners. Based on the success of this, a pilot scale-up program was begun. During this process, Add-Vision was acquired by a strategic partner, in no small part, because of the promise of future success of the technology as evidenced by our commercial partners pilot scale-up plans. Overall, the performance, manufacturing and product work in this project has been successful. Additional analysis and device work at LBL has also shown a unique adhesion change with device bias stressing which may result from active layer polymer cross-linking during bias stressing of device. It was shown that even small bias stresses, as a fraction of a full device lifetime stress period, result in measurable chemical change in the device. Further work needs to be conducted to fully understand the chemical nature of this interaction. Elucidation of this effect would enable doped OLED formulation to be engineered to suppress this effect and further extend lifetimes and reduce voltage climb.

DR. DEVIN MACKENZIE

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

393

Residuals in steel products -- Impacts on properties and measures to minimize them  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of major residual elements on the properties of steel products is summarized. Measures to minimize these elements are discussed including the pretreatment of raw materials, innovative refining processes and environmental issues. This paper addresses (1) scrap situation, (2) upper limit of residual concentrations acceptable for processing and product quality, (3) possible means to reduce the residuals, and (4) consideration on the practicable measures to solve the residuals problem in a systematic way. 52 refs.

Emi, Toshihiko [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Advanced Materials Processing; Wijk, O. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Process Metallurgy

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Burning Forest Residues231 Corstorphine Road www.forestry.gov.uk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for disposal of coppice, to reduce specific weeds and to aid land use conversion. BURNING RESIDUES: TYPES

395

Residual Stress Relaxation and Microstructure in ZnO Thin Films Istem Ozena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be eliminated during deposition. Introduction In this study, the decay of the residual stressesResidual Stress Relaxation and Microstructure in ZnO Thin Films Istem Ozena and Mehmet Ali Gulgunb. a istem@sabanciuniv.edu b m-gulgun@sabanciuniv.edu Keywords: ZnO, thin films, residual stress

Yanikoglu, Berrin

396

NONLINEAR SAW PROPAGATION IN THIN-FILM SYSTEMS WITH RESIDUAL STRESS* R. E. Kumon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

harmonics. I. INTRODUCTION AND MOTIVATION The thin-film deposition process can create large residualNONLINEAR SAW PROPAGATION IN THIN-FILM SYSTEMS WITH RESIDUAL STRESS* R. E. Kumon National Institute is the residual stress. The effective elas- tic constants and density are given by Ceff ijkl = Cijkl(1 - eres

397

Microstructure, residual stress, and fracture of sputtered TiN films Liqiang Zhang a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microstructure, residual stress, and fracture of sputtered TiN films Liqiang Zhang a , Huisheng Keywords: TiN films Residual stress Hardness Fracture toughness Morphology, structure, residual stress, hardness, and fracture toughness of magnetron sputtered titanium nitride (TiN) thin films, deposited at 300

Volinsky, Alex A.

398

Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduces the energy content of forest residues delivered to a bio-fuel facility as mobile facilities use by bio-oil, bio-slurry and torrefied wood is 45%, 65% and 87% of the initial forest residue energyUsing mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio

Victoria, University of

399

Prediction of Protein Interaction Sites From Sequence Profile and Residue Neighbor List  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of Protein Interaction Sites From Sequence Profile and Residue Neighbor List Huan Protein­protein interaction sites are predicted from a neural network with sequence profiles correctly predicted residues account for 65% of the 11,805 residues making up the 129 interfaces. The main

Weston, Ken

400

Environmental and economic evaluation of energy recovery from agricultural and forestry residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four conversion methods and five residues are examined in this report, which describes six model systems: hydrolysis of corn residues, pyrolysis of corn residues, combustion of cotton-ginning residues, pyrolysis of wheat residues, fermentation of molasses, and combustion of pulp and papermill wastes. Estimates of material and energy flows for those systems are given per 10/sup 12/ Btu of recovered energy. Regional effects are incorporated by addressing the regionalized production of the residues. A national scope cannot be provided for every residue considered because of the biological and physical constraints of crop production. Thus, regionalization of the model systems to the primary production region for the crop from which the residue is obtained has been undertaken. The associated environmental consequences of residue utilization are then assessed for the production region. In addition, the environmental impacts of operating the model systems are examined by quantifying the residuals generated and the land, water, and material requirements per 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy generated. On the basis of estimates found in the literature, capital, operating, and maintenance cost estimates are given for the model systems. These data are also computed on the basis of 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy recovered. The cost, residual, material, land, and water data were then organized into a format acceptable for input into the SEAS data management program. The study indicates that the most serious environmental impacts arise from residue removal rather than from conversion.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Analysis of the Use of Wind Energy to Supplement the Power Needs at McMurdo Station and Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes an analysis of the inclusion of wind-driven power generation technology into the existing diesel power plants at two U.S. Antarctic research stations, McMurdo and Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Staff at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted the analysis. Raytheon Polar Services, which currently holds the private sector support contract for the two research stations, was a major contributor to this report. To conduct the analysis, available data were obtained on the wind resources, power plant conditions, load, and component cost. Whenever possible, we validated the information. We then used NREL's Hybrid2 power system modeling software to analyze the potential and cost of using wind turbine generators at the two aforementioned facilities. Unfortunately, the power systems and energy allocations at McMurdo and South Pole Station are being redeveloped, so it is not possible to validate future fuel use. This report is an initial assessment of the potential use of wind energy and should be followed by further, more detailed analysis if this option is to be considered further.

Baring-Gould, I.; Robichaud, R.; McLain, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Submillimeter residual losses in high-{Tc} superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bolometry was used obtain accurate submillimeter residual loss data for epitaxial films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO), Tl{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10}, Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (TCBCO), and Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}BiO{sub 3} (BKBO). We were able to fit the absorptivity measured for Nb films to an Eliashberg strong coupling calculation; excellent agreement resulted between parameters from best fits and measured Residual Resistivity Ratio. Microwave surface resistance measurements made on the same YBCO and TCBCO films are in excellent agreement with submillimeter measurements. Absorptivities for all YBCO films studied are qualitatively similar, increasing smoothly with frequency, with no gap-like features below the well known absorption edge at 450 cm{sup {minus}1}. Losses in YBCO films were fit to a weakly coupled grain model for the a-b plane conductivity. Strong phonon structure was observed in TCBCO films between 60 and 700 cm{sup {minus}1} (2 THz and 23 THz); these losses could not be fitted to the simple weakly coupled grain model, in contrast to the case for other high-{Tc} superconductors where phonon structure observed in ceramics are is absent in epitaxial oriented films and crystals because of electronic screening due to high conductivity of a-b planes. Absorptivity data for the BKBO films all show a strong absorption onset near the BCS tunneling gap of 3.5 k{sub B}{Tc}. Comparison with strong coupling Eliashberg predictions and of a Kramers-Kronig analysis indicate that the absorption onset is consistent with a superconducting energy gap. Effects of magnetic field on residual losses in YBCO films show a resonant absorption feature in vicinity of predicted

Miller, D.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Residual stresses in bakelite models induced by quenching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the bellows was extended to six inobes. Lifter proper focusing and using a Kodachrome type 4 film, separate piotures were made at openings f8, fll, f16, and f22 in order to provide for a suitable spread of exposure. Sodium vapor was used as the source... for determining the residual stresses or the elastic redistribution of stresses that occurs after the prototype has undergone some plastio deformation or heat treatment. The creep characteristics of bakelite, BT-61-893, become appreciable with temperatures...

Jarvi, Ray Victor

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Radon transform on a space over a residue class ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The functions on a space of dimension N over the residue class ring Z{sub n} modulo n that are invariant with respect to the group GL(N,Z{sub n}) form a commutative convolution algebra. We describe the structure of this algebra and find the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the operators of multiplication by elements of this algebra. The results thus obtained are applied to solve the inverse problem for the hyperplane Radon transform on Z{sup N}{sub n}. Bibliography: 2 titles.

Molchanov, Vladimir F [Tambov State University, Tambov (Russian Federation)

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Quarry residuals RI/FS scoping document. [Weldon Spring quarry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to serve as a planning tool for the implementation of the Quarry Residual Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process and to provide direct input to revising and updating the 1988 Work Plan for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study-Environmental Impact Statement for the Weldon Spring Site (RI/FS-EIS) (Peterson et al. 1988) for this effort. The scoping process is intended to outline the tasks necessary to develop and implement activities in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act-National Environmental Policy Act (CERCLA-NEPA) process from detailed planning through the appropriate decision document. In addition to scoping the entire process, this document will serve as the primary tool for planning and accomplishing all activities to be developed in the Quarry Residual RI/FS Work Plan. Subsequent tasks are difficult to plan at this time. 10 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Estimating Residual Solids Volume In Underground Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site liquid waste system consists of multiple facilities to safely receive and store legacy radioactive waste, treat, and permanently dispose waste. The large underground storage tanks and associated equipment, known as the 'tank farms', include a complex interconnected transfer system which includes underground transfer pipelines and ancillary equipment to direct the flow of waste. The waste in the tanks is present in three forms: supernatant, sludge, and salt. The supernatant is a multi-component aqueous mixture, while sludge is a gel-like substance which consists of insoluble solids and entrapped supernatant. The waste from these tanks is retrieved and treated as sludge or salt. The high level (radioactive) fraction of the waste is vitrified into a glass waste form, while the low-level waste is immobilized in a cementitious grout waste form called saltstone. Once the waste is retrieved and processed, the tanks are closed via removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations and severing/sealing external penetrations. The comprehensive liquid waste disposition system, currently managed by Savannah River Remediation, consists of 1) safe storage and retrieval of the waste as it is prepared for permanent disposition; (2) definition of the waste processing techniques utilized to separate the high-level waste fraction/low-level waste fraction; (3) disposition of LLW in saltstone; (4) disposition of the HLW in glass; and (5) closure state of the facilities, including tanks. This paper focuses on determining the effectiveness of waste removal campaigns through monitoring the volume of residual solids in the waste tanks. Volume estimates of the residual solids are performed by creating a map of the residual solids on the waste tank bottom using video and still digital images. The map is then used to calculate the volume of solids remaining in the waste tank. The ability to accurately determine a volume is a function of the quantity and quality of the waste tank images. Currently, mapping is performed remotely with closed circuit video cameras and still photograph cameras due to the hazardous environment. There are two methods that can be used to create a solids volume map. These methods are: liquid transfer mapping / post transfer mapping and final residual solids mapping. The task is performed during a transfer because the liquid level (which is a known value determined by a level measurement device) is used as a landmark to indicate solids accumulation heights. The post transfer method is primarily utilized after the majority of waste has been removed. This method relies on video and still digital images of the waste tank after the liquid transfer is complete to obtain the relative height of solids across a waste tank in relation to known and usable landmarks within the waste tank (cooling coils, column base plates, etc.). In order to accurately monitor solids over time across various cleaning campaigns, and provide a technical basis to support final waste tank closure, a consistent methodology for volume determination has been developed and implemented at SRS.

Clark, Jason L.; Worthy, S. Jason; Martin, Bruce A.; Tihey, John R.

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

407

Optical breakdown threshold in nanosecond high repetition second harmonic generation by periodically poled Mg-doped LiTaO{sub 3} crystal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our study shows that a local temperature increase of ?1 K in the crystal lattice caused by second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon absorption of 532 nm radiation at the rear of periodically poled stoichiometric LiTaO{sub 3} crystal by changing spontaneous polarization induces a pyroelectric field ?10 kV/cm, accelerating free electrons to an energy of ?10 eV, followed by optical breakdown and crystal damage. Theoretical analysis leads to an explicit expression for the threshold laser fluence of optical breakdown giving ?1.2 J/cm{sup 2} for 1064 nm input radiation in 6.8 kHz pulsed SHG operation, agreeing well with the experimentally found value ?1.32 J/cm{sup 2}.

Louchev, Oleg A.; Wada, Satoshi [Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hatano, Hideki; Kitamura, Kenji [Division of Environment and Energy Materials, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)] [Division of Environment and Energy Materials, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Multi-Factor Analysis of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have significant potential as a near term source of cellulosic biomass for bioenergy production, but sustainable removal of agricultural residues requires consideration of the critical roles that residues play in the agronomic system. Previous work has developed an integrated model to evaluate sustainable agricultural residue removal potential considering soil erosion, soil organic carbon, greenhouse gas emission, and long-term yield impacts of residue removal practices. The integrated model couples the environmental process models WEPS, RUSLE2, SCI, and DAYCENT. This study uses the integrated model to investigate the impact of interval removal practices in Boone County, Iowa, US. Residue removal of 4.5 Mg/ha was performed annually, bi-annually, and tri-annually and were compared to no residue removal. The study is performed at the soil type scale using a national soil survey database assuming a continuous corn rotation with reduced tillage. Results are aggregated across soil types to provide county level estimates of soil organic carbon changes and individual soil type soil organic matter content if interval residue removal were implemented. Results show interval residue removal is possible while improving soil organic matter. Implementation of interval removal practices provide greater increases in soil organic matter while still providing substantial residue for bioenergy production.

Jared Abodeely; David Muth; Paul Adler; Eleanor Campbell; Kenneth Mark Bryden

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Measurement of Parton Distributions of Strange Quarks in the Nucleon from Charged-Kaon Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering on the Deuteron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The momentum and helicity density distributions of the strange quark sea in the nucleon are obtained in leading order from charged-kaon production in deep-inelastic scattering on the deuteron. The distributions are extracted from spin-averaged K+/- multiplicities, and from K+/- and inclusive double-spin asymmetries for scattering of polarized positrons by a polarized deuterium target. The shape of the momentum distribution is softer than that of the average of the ubar and dbar quarks. In the region of measurement, the helicity distribution is zero within experimental uncertainties.

Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Belostotskii, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Bttcher, H; Bonomo, C; Borisov, A; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Funel, A; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Karibian, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Gregor, I M; Guler, H; Hadjidakis, C; Hasch, D; Hasegawa, T; Hesselink, W H A; Hill, G; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Hristova, I; Iarygin, G; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Kobayashi, T; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lamb, R; Lapikas, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lopez Ruiz, A; Lorenzon, W; Lu, S; Lu, X R; Ma, B Q; Mahon, D; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Manfr, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Mexner, V; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W D; Osborne, A; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Pickert, N; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rock, S E; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seitz, B; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Streit, J; Tait, P; Taroian, S; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Van Haarlem, Y; van Hulse, C; Varanda, M; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Vogel, C; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Beam-Target Double Spin Asymmetry ALT in Charged Pion Production from Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized 3He Target at 1.422  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We report the first measurement of the double-spin asymmetry ALT for charged pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target. The kinematics focused on the valence quark region, 0.16 2 2. The corresponding neutron ALT asymmetries were extracted from the measured 3He asymmetries and proton/3He cross section ratios using the effective polarization approximation. These new data probe the transverse momentum dependent parton distribution function gq and therefore provide access to quark spin-orbit correlations. Our results indicate a positive azimuthal asymmetry for ?- production on 3He and the neutron, while our ?+ asymmetries are consistent with zero.

Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R; Munoz Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Narayan, A; Nelyubin, V; Norum, B; Oh, Y; Osipenko, M; Parno, D; Peng, J C; Phillips, S K; Posik, M; Puckett, A.J. R; Qiang, Y; Rakhman, A; Ransome, R D; Riordan, S; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shahinyan, A; Shabestari, M H; Sirca, S; Stepanyan, S; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Tang, L -G; Tobias, A; Urciuoli, G M; Vilardi, I; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yuan, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L; Zhu, X

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

Elastic and inelastic scattering of 240-MeV (6)Li ions from (40)Ca and (48)Ca and tests of a systematic optical potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 044612 (2010) Elastic and inelastic scattering of 240-MeV 6Li ions from 40Ca and 48Ca and tests of a systematic optical potential Krishichayan, X. Chen,* Y.-W. Lui, J. Button, and D. H. Youngblood Cyclotron Institute, Texas... that 0556-2813/2010/81(4)/044612(10) 044612-1 ?2010 The American Physical Society KRISHICHAYAN, CHEN, LUI, BUTTON, AND YOUNGBLOOD PHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 044612 (2010) the real and imaginary optical potentials have the same radial shape [22]. However...

Chen, Krishichayan X.; Lui, Y. -W; Button, J.; Youngblood, David H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10{sup ?12} Pa{sup ?1}. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA’s Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented.

Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 (United States); Hayward, Maurice [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

413

Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

Younkin, T. R., E-mail: tyounkin@gatech.edu [Fusion and Materials for Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering – Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Marcus, C. [Fusion and Materials for Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Evaluation of the residue from microset on various metal surfaces.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast-curing impression materials are sometimes used to cast negative-mold replications of physical defects on material surfaces. The negative-mold impressions can then be used for further measurements to record the nature of the defect. These impression materials have been designed to cure quickly, and with very low adhesion, so that they can be easily removed from the surface leaving little residual contamination. Unfortunately, some contaminant is retained by the substrate material. This investigation seeks to identify the composition and quantity of the remaining material upon removal of Microset Synthetic Rubber Replicating Compound from several material surfaces. Coe-Flex was used as a relative comparison to Microset. On fifteen different substrate materials the Microset leaves no visible trace of contaminant, however, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows evidence of a thin silicone-based contaminant film of approximately 2 nm thickness.

Brumbach, Michael Todd

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Residual Stress Determination for A Ferritic Steel Weld Plate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this experiment is to demonstrate the capability of neutron diffraction technique to reproducibly map residual strains in a ferritic steel weld. The objective includes the identification of corrections for variations in metal composition due to the welding process which produces changes in lattice parameter that are not due to mechanical effects. The second objective is to develop and demonstrate a best practice for neutron diffraction strain mapping of steel welds. The appropriate coordinate system for the measurement of a weld, which is strongly distorted from planar geometry, has to be defined. The coordinate system is important in determining the procedures for mounting and positioning of the weld so that mapping details, especially in regions of high gradients, can be conveniently inter-compared between laboratories.

Wang, D.-Q.; Hubbard, C.R.; Spooner, S.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Residue temperatures in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an improved Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model, we have investigated the reaction dynamics leading to the thermal freeezout for [sup 40]Ar+[sup 124]Sn collisions. Several criteria are assessed for defining the proper thermal freezout time which separates preequilibrium processes from equilbrium processes. One of these criteria, the time dependence of the thermal excitation energy, provides consistent results for defining the thermal freezeout. The other two criteria, the emission rate of nucleons and the quadrupole moment of the momentum distributions, do not consistently provide accurate freezeout times due to the existence of long time scale collective vibrations. The predicted values for the excitation energies and temperatures, obtained assuming Fermi gas level densities, are quite sensitive to the equation of state and the impact parameter. Surprisingly, both the thermal excitation energies and the residue temperatures, in the limit of a large ensemble of parallel collisions, show little sensitivity to the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section.

Xu, H.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Danielewicz, P. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States) Cyclotron Institute, Texas A M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Residual energy in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations indicate that kinetic and magnetic energies are not in equipartition in the solar wind turbulence. Rather, magnetic fluctuations are more energetic and have somewhat steeper energy spectrum compared to the velocity fluctuations. This leads to the presence of the so-called residual energy E_r=E_v-E_b in the inertial interval of turbulence. This puzzling effect is addressed in the present paper in the framework of weak turbulence theory. Using a simple model of weakly colliding Alfv\\'en waves, we demonstrate that the kinetic-magnetic equipartition indeed gets broken as a result of nonlinear interaction of Alfv\\'en waves. We establish that magnetic energy is indeed generated more efficiently as a result of these interactions, which proposes an explanation for the solar wind observations.

Stanislav Boldyrev; Jean Carlos Perez; Vladimir Zhdankin

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

Polarized inelastic neutron scattering of the partially ordered Tb2Sn2O7 K. C. Rule,1 G. Ehlers,2 J. R. Stewart,3 A. L. Cornelius,4 P. P. Deen,3 Y. Qiu,5,6 C. R. Wiebe,7,8 J. A. Janik,7 H. D. Zhou,7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polarized inelastic neutron scattering of the partially ordered Tb2Sn2O7 K. C. Rule,1 G. Ehlers,2 J 17 August 2007; published 21 December 2007 We present inelastic neutron scattering results neutron scattering, susceptibility, and specific heat techniques have shown that below 0.87 K Tb2Sn2O7

Weston, Ken

420

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural residues Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use in the United States Summary: , livestock commodities, agricultural residues, and bioenergy crops. Drawing on ORNL and APAC county... , developed and maintained at the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile shredder residue Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile shredder residue Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NASHVILLE INCINERATOR PERFORMANCE TESTS...

422

Neutron scattering residual stress measurements on gray cast iron brake discs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron diffraction was used to investigate the effects of a heat treatment designed to remove internal residual stresses in brake discs. It is believed that residual stresses may change the rate of deformation of the discs during severe braking conditions when the disc temperature is increased significantly. Neutron diffraction was used to map out residual strain distributions in a production disc before and after a stress-relieving heat treatment. Results from these neutron diffraction experiments show that some residual strains were reduced by as much as 400 microstrain by stress relieving. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Spooner, S.; Payzant, E.A.; Hubbard, C.R. [and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

424

Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

425

Table A3. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Marketing Annual 1999 441 Table A3. RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

426

Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 245 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

427

E-Print Network 3.0 - acs residual ischemic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: acs residual ischemic Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Brain Research 961 (2003) 2231 www.elsevier.comlocatebrainres Summary: further...

428

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues required Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 13 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

429

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues determine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 14 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

430

alters less-conserved residues: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The theory describes this...

431

Neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections of /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differential-neutron-emission cross sections of /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu are measured between approx. = 1.0 and 3.5 MeV with the angle and magnitude detail needed to provide angle-integrated emission cross sections to approx. < 3% accuracies. Emitted-neutron resolutions are quantitatively defined and vary from approx. = 0.1 to 0.35 MeV. The experimental results are corrected for fisson-neutron contributions to obtain pseudo-elastic-neutron-scattering cross sections which, together with the neutron total cross sections, define the non-elastic cross sections to within well specified energy resolutions. These results imply inelastic-neutron-scattering cross sections which are compared with comparable quantities derived from ENDF/B-V. Good general agreement is noted for /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U and /sup 238/U inelastic-scattering values, poor agreement is observed for /sup 240/Pu, and a serious discrepancy exists in the case of /sup 239/Pu.

Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry in Deep-Inelastic Scattering from the Reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry in deep-inelastic scattering from the inclusive reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X on a 3He gas target polarized normal to the lepton plane. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero in the Born approximation. The experiment, conducted at Jefferson Lab using a 5.89 GeV electron beam, covers a range of 1.72 GeV, which is non-zero at the 2.75sigma level. Theoretical calculations, which assume two-photon exchange with quasi-free quarks, predict a neutron asymmetry of O(10?4) when both photons couple to one quark, and O(10?2) for the photons coupling to different quarks. Our measured asymmetry agrees both in sign and magnitude with the prediction that uses input based on the Sivers transverse momentum distribution obtained from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

Katich, Joseph; Qian, Xin; Zhao, Yuxiang; Allada, Kalyan; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Bradshaw, Elliott; Bosted, Peter; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chen, Wei; Chirapatpimol, Khem; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Cornejo, Juan; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De Jager, Cornelis; De Leo, Raffaele; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Ding, Huaibo; Dolph, Peter; Dutta, Chiranjib; Dutta, Dipangkar; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Frullani, Salvatore; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gilad, Gilad; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Guo, Lei; Hamilton, David; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jijun; Huang, Min; Ibrahim Abdalla, Hassan; Iodice, Mauro; Jin, Ge; Jones, Mark; Kelleher, Aidan; Kim, Wooyoung; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; LeRose, John; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Y.; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lu, Hai-jiang; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Oh, Yoomin; Osipenko, Mikhail; Parno, Diana; Peng, Jen-chieh; Phillips, Sarah; Posik, Matthew; Puckett, Andrew; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Ransome, Ronald; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Schulte, Elaine; Shahinyan, Albert; Hashemi Shabestari, Mitra; Sirca, Simon; Stepanyan, Stepan; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tang, Liguang; Tobias, William; Urciuoli, Guido; Vilardi, Ignazio; Wang, Kebin; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Z.; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Y.-W.; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zong, Xing

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Inelastic tunneling conductance and magnetoresistance investigations in dual ion-beam sputtered CoFeB(110)/MgO/CoFeB (110) magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) comprising Ta(5)/NiFe(5)/IrMn(15)/CoFeB(5)/Mg(1)/MgO(3.5)/ CoFeB(5)/Ta(5)/Ag(20) (thickness in nm) with (110) oriented CoFeB layers are grown using dual ion beam sputtering. The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of MTJs is found to be significantly bias dependent and exhibits zero bias anomaly (ZBA) which is attributed to the presence of magnetic impurities or diffusion of Mn from antiferromagnetic IrMn in the barrier. Adjacent to the ZBA, two peaks at 24?±?3?mV and 34?±?3?mV are also observed, which differ both in intensity as well as their position in the antiparallel and parallel magnetic states, suggesting that they are due to magnon excitations. In addition to this, a phonon peak at 65?±?3?mV is also observed. The effect of temperature on the inelastic and elastic tunneling contributions is studied in detail in 25–300?K range using the Glazman and Matveev model. Ten series of localized states are found to be involved in hopping conduction in the forbidden gap of MgO barrier. The effect of presence of such inelastic channels is found to be insignificant at low temperatures yielding sizeable enhancement in TMR.

Bhusan Singh, Braj; Chaudhary, Sujeet, E-mail: sujeetc@physics.iitd.ac.in [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

434

Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Lepton Scattering: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Gehrmann, Roberts, and Whalley in their 1999 paper, A Compilation of Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Scattering, published in volume 25 of Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics) note that these data will continue to be relevant to the next generation of hadron colliders. They present data on the unpolarized structure functions F2 and xF3, R D ._L=_T /, the virtual photon asymmetries A1 and A2 and the polarized structure functions g1 and g2, from deep inelastic lepton scattering off protons, deuterium and nuclei. Data are presented in both tabular and graphical format and include predictions based on the MRST98 and CTEQ4 parton distribution functionsö as well. The data gathered from the relevant collaborations at DOE's Fermilab, SLAC, and JLAB are available, and so are data from related collaborations based at CERN and DESY. The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also include in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

Gehrmann, T; Roberts, R.G.; Whalley, M.R.; Durham HEP Database Group

435

Semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering off few-nucleon systems: Tagging the EMC effect and hadronization mechanisms with detection of slow recoiling nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons off {sup 2}H and {sup 3}He with detection of slow protons and deuterons, respectively, i.e., the processes {sup 2}H(e,e{sup '}p)X and {sup 3}He(e,e{sup '}d)X, are calculated within the spectator mechanism, taking into account the final state interaction of the nucleon debris with the detected protons and deuterons. It is shown that by a proper choice of the kinematics the origin of the EMC effect and the details of the interaction between the hadronizing quark and the nuclear medium can be investigated at a level which cannot be reached by inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. A comparison of the results of our calculations, containing no adjustable parameters, with recently available experimental data on the process {sup 2}H(e,e{sup '}p)X shows a good agreement in the backward hemisphere of the emitted nucleons. Theoretical predictions at energies that will be available at the upgraded Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility are presented, and the possibility to investigate the proposed semi-inclusive processes at electron-ion colliders is briefly discussed.

Ciofi degli Atti, C.; Kaptari, L. P. [Department of Physics, University of Perugia, Piazza dell' Universita 1, I-06123 Perugia (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

POST-OPERATIONAL TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL NA COOLLANT IN EBR-2 USING CARBONATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the end of 2002, the Experimental Breeder Reactor Two (EBR-II) facility became a U.S. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted site, and the RCRA permit1 compelled further treatment of the residual sodium in order to convert it into a less reactive chemical form and remove the by-products from the facility, so that a state of RCRA 'closure' for the facility may be achieved (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k, 2002). In response to this regulatory driver, and in recognition of project budgetary and safety constraints, it was decided to treat the residual sodium in the EBR-II primary and secondary sodium systems using a process known as 'carbonation.' In early EBR-II post-operation documentation, this process is also called 'passivation.' In the carbonation process (Sherman and Henslee, 2005), the system containing residual sodium is flushed with humidified carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The water vapor in the flush gas reacts with residual sodium to form sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the CO{sub 2} in the flush gas reacts with the newly formed NaOH to make sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}). Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced as a by-product. The chemical reactions occur at the exposed surface of the residual sodium. The NaHCO{sub 3} layer that forms is porous, and humidified carbon dioxide can penetrate the NaHCO{sub 3} layer to continue reacting residual sodium underneath. The rate of reaction is controlled by the thickness of the NaHCO{sub 3} surface layer, the moisture input rate, and the residual sodium exposed surface area. At the end of carbonation, approximately 780 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II primary tank ({approx}70% of original inventory), and just under 190 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II secondary sodium system ({approx}50% of original inventory), were converted into NaHCO{sub 3}. No bare surfaces of residual sodium remained after treatment, and all remaining residual sodium deposits are covered by a layer of NaHCO{sub 3}. From a safety standpoint, the inventory of residual sodium in these systems was greatly reduced by using the carbonation process. From a regulatory standpoint, the process was not able to achieve deactivation of all residual sodium, and other more aggressive measures will be needed if the remaining residual sodium must also be deactivated to meet the requirements of the existing environmental permit. This chapter provides a project history and technical summary of the carbonation of EBR-II residual sodium. Options for future treatment are also discussed.

Sherman, S.; Knight, C.

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

437

An Integrated Model for Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion from wind and water and in maintaining soil organic carbon. Because of this, multiple factors must be considered when assessing sustainable residue harvest limits. Validated and accepted modeling tools for assessing these impacts include the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation Version 2 (RUSLE2), the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), and the Soil Conditioning Index. Currently, these models do not work together as a single integrated model. Rather, use of these models requires manual interaction and data transfer. As a result, it is currently not feasible to use these computational tools to perform detailed sustainable agricultural residue availability assessments across large spatial domains or to consider a broad range of land management practices. This paper presents an integrated modeling strategy that couples existing datasets with the RUSLE2 water erosion, WEPS wind erosion, and Soil Conditioning Index soil carbon modeling tools to create a single integrated residue removal modeling system. This enables the exploration of the detailed sustainable residue harvest scenarios needed to establish sustainable residue availability. Using this computational tool, an assessment study of residue availability for the state of Iowa was performed. This study included all soil types in the state of Iowa, four representative crop rotation schemes, variable crop yields, three tillage management methods, and five residue removal methods. The key conclusions of this study are that under current management practices and crop yields nearly 26.5 million Mg of agricultural residue are sustainably accessible in the state of Iowa, and that through the adoption of no till practices residue removal could sustainably approach 40 million Mg. However, when considering the economics and logistics of residue harvest, yields below 2.25 Mg ha-1 are generally considered to not be viable for a commercial bioenergy system. Applying this constraint, the total agricultural residue resource available in Iowa under current management practices is 19 million Mg. Previously published results have shown residue availability from 22 million Mg to over 50 million Mg in Iowa.

D. Muth; K. M. Bryden

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

The influence of quench sensitivity on residual stresses in the aluminium alloys 7010 and 7075  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most critical stage in the heat treatment of high strength aluminium alloys is the rapid cooling necessary to form a supersaturated solid solution. A disadvantage of quenching is that the thermal gradients can be sufficient to cause inhomogeneous plastic deformation which in turn leads to the development of large residual stresses. Two 215 mm thick rectilinear forgings have been made from 7000 series alloys with widely different quench sensitivity to determine if solute loss in the form of precipitation during quenching can significantly affect residual stress magnitudes. The forgings were heat treated and immersion quenched using cold water to produce large magnitude residual stresses. The through thickness residual stresses were measured by neutron diffraction and incremental deep hole drilling. The distribution of residual stresses was found to be similar for both alloys varying from highly triaxial and tensile in the interior, to a state of biaxial compression in the surface. The 7010 forging exhibited larger tensile stresses in the interior. The microstructural variation from surface to centre for both forgings was determined using optical and transmission electron microscopy. These observations were used to confirm the origin of the hardness variation measured through the forging thickness. When the microstructural changes were accounted for in the through thickness lattice parameter, the residual stresses in the two forgings were found to be very similar. Solute loss in the 7075 forging appeared to have no significant effect on the residual stress magnitudes when compared to 7010. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Through thickness residual stress measurements made on large Al alloy forgings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residual stress characterised using neutron diffraction and deep hole drilling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biaxial compressive surface and triaxial subsurface residual stresses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quench sensitivity of 7075 promotes significant microstructural differences to 7010. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When precipitation is accounted for, residual stress in both forgings are similar.

Robinson, J.S., E-mail: jeremy.robinson@ul.ie [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland); Tanner, D.A. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland); Truman, C.E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol (United Kingdom); Paradowska, A.M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Wimpory, R.C. [Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn Meitner Platz 1, Berlin (Germany)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Structural group analysis of residues from Athabasca bitumen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-distillable fractions of hydrocarbons such as bitumen are a challenge for analysis because of their molecular complexity and high heteroatom content. One method for characterizing their composition is by analysis for a relatively small number of structures expected to predominate in the mixture, i.e. for the significant structural groups. Because NMR spectroscopy can give quantitative data on the distribution of hydrogen and carbon types, it is an ideal method for group-based analysis. This study uses a structural group formalism which combines data from several analytical methods into a single profile. Residue fractions derived from Athabasca bitumen were investigated to determine the different chemical structures which could have an impact on subsequent processing. Structural analysis is the identification of key structures from analytical data that characterize a complex mixture. Higher accuracy data, from elemental, /sup 1/H-NMR, IR and titration analyses, are used to construct balance equations which must be satisfied. The spectral envelope of /sup 13/C-NMR is more difficult to resolve quantatitively, and hence /sup 13/C-NMR data are used as constraints to compute the concentrations of structural groups. The mathematical notation and methods have been presented previously. The structural analysis transforms the spectrometric data into a more useable form; the maximum number of groups that can be calculated is limited to the number of useful analytical measurements.

Gray, M.R.; Choi, J.H.K.; Egiebor, N.O.; Kirchen, R.P.; Sanford, E.C.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Processing Effects for Integrated PZT: Residual Stress, Thickness, and Dielectric Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Processing Effects for Integrated PZT: Residual Stress, Thickness, and Dielectric Properties Ryan J (PZT) films integrated onto Pt/Ti/SiO2//Si substrates are reported. Sol­gel synthesis and deposition orientation (nominally (111) fiber tex- tured), and measured residual stress. The Stoney method, using laser

Sottos, Nancy R.

442

UPTAKE, ASSIMILATION, AND LOSS OF DDT RESIDUES BY Euphausia pacifica, A EUPHAUSIID SHRIMP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPTAKE, ASSIMILATION, AND LOSS OF DDT RESIDUES BY Euphausia pacifica, A EUPHAUSIID SHRIMP ABSTRACT acquire sufficient DDT residue from its food to account for amounts found in its tissues. Assimilation effii- ciencies for DDT in ingested food are similar to published figures for assimilation of carbon

443

Speciation of Sb in airborne particulate matter, vehicle brake linings, and brake pad wear residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Speciation of Sb in airborne particulate matter, vehicle brake linings, and brake pad wear residues: XAS XANES EXAFS Antimony Particulate matter Brake linings a b s t r a c t Insights into the speciation of Sb in samples of brake linings, brake pad wear residues, road dust, and atmospheric particulate

Short, Daniel

444

Measuring the Residual Ferrite Content of Rapidly Solidified Stainless Steel Alloys-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Gage and ferrite meters have been developed to measure the amount of residual ferrite in duplex stainless steel) ) Measuring the Residual Ferrite Content of Rapidly Solidified Stainless Steel Alloys. Electron beam welds, laser beam welds and rapidly solidified stainless steel alloys have small physical

Eagar, Thomas W.

445

Prediction of catalytic residues in proteins using machine-learning techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of catalytic residues in proteins using machine-learning techniques Natalia V. Petrova) and prediction of protein function using various properties of proteins and amino acids (2). Prediction of the functional residues is a challenging and interesting task. The results of such prediction could

446

Prediction of Interface Residues in ProteinProtein Complexes by a Consensus Neural Network Method: Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of Interface Residues in Protein­Protein Complexes by a Consensus Neural Network Method important information for predicting struc- tures of new protein complexes. This motivated us to develop the PPISP method for predicting inter- face residues in protein­protein complexes. In PPISP, sequence

Weston, Ken

447

Management of high sulfur coal combustion residues, issues and practices: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Papers presented at the following sessions are included in this proceedings: (1) overview topic; (2) characterization of coal combustion residues; (3) environmental impacts of residues management; (4) materials handling and utilization, Part I; and (5) materials handling and utilization, Part II. Selected paper have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Chugh, Y.P.; Beasley, G.A. [eds.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects Vijay Babbar1 weaker flux signals. KEY WORDS: Magnetic flux leakage; residual magnetization; pipeline defects; pipeline pipelines, which may develop defects such as corrosion pits as they age in service.(1) Under the ef- fect

Clapham, Lynann

449

MALATHION RESIDUES IN GREEK HONEY Andreas T. THRASYVOULOU Michael D. IFANTIDIS Nikos L. PAPPAS*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1982 were analyzed for malathion residues. Residues were extracted with acetonitrile/water solution, parti the north, the south, and some Greek islands as well. Reagents Acetonitrile - Nanograde (Mallinckrodt, Inc. Fifty ml of a 10/90 wa- ter/acetonitrile solution was added and the funnel shaken vigorously until

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

450

Pharmacokinetic and residue studies of quinolone compounds and olaquindox in poultry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pharmacokinetic and residue studies of quinolone compounds and olaquindox in poultry A Anadón MR of these quinolones and fluoroquinolones for which clinical experience or experimental informa- tion exists in poultry residues in poultry. This paper presents information about the pharmacokinetic profile of olaquindox

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

451

Justification of RHIC EBIS vacuum system. 1. Requirements to the pressure of residual gas inside the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volume, the influx and accumulation of residual gas ions reduces the number of working ions in a trap for internal elements, technology of processing and equipment should be adequate. The components of the gasJustification of RHIC EBIS vacuum system. A. Pikin 1. Requirements to the pressure of residual gas

452

Experimental determination of residual stress by neutron diffraction in a boiling water reactor core shroud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual strains in a 51 mm (2-inch) thick 304L stainless steel plate have been measured by neutron diffraction and interpreted in terms of residual stress. The plate, measuring (300 mm) in area, was removed from a 6m (20-ft.) diameter unirradiated boiling water reactor core shroud, and included a multiple-pass horizontal weld which joined two of the cylindrical shells which comprise the core shroud. Residual stress mapping was undertaken in the heat affected zone, concentrating on the outside half of the plate thickness. Variations in residual stresses with location appeared consistent with trends expected from finite element calculations, considering that a large fraction of the residual hoop stress was released upon removal of the plate from the core shroud cylinder.

Payzant, A.; Spooner, S.; Zhu, Xiaojing; Hubbard, C.R. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welding: a review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant amounts of residual stresses are often generated during welding and result in critical degradation of the structural integrity and performance of components. Neutron diffraction has become a well established technique for the determination of residual stresses in welds because of the unique deep penetration, three-dimensional mapping capability, and volume averaged bulk measurements characteristic of the scattering neutron beam. Friction stir welding has gained prominence in recent years. The authors reviewed a number of neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welds and highlighted examples addressing how the microstructures and residual stresses are correlated with each other. An example of in situ neutron diffraction measurement result shows the evolution of the residual stresses during welding.

Woo, Wan Chuck [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Wang, Xun-Li [ORNL; David, Stan A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Application of neutron diffraction to measure residual strains in high temperature composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental neutron diffraction technique was used to measure residual thermal strains developed in high temperature composites during postfabrication cooling. Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide (over the temperature range 20--950{degree}C) and tungsten and saphikon fiber-reinforced nickel aluminide composites (at room temperature) were investigated. As a result of thermal expansion mismatch, compressive residual strains and stresses were generated in the silicon carbide fibers during cooldown. The axial residual strains were tensile in the matrix and were lower in nickel aluminide matrix as compared to those in titanium aluminide matrix. The average transverse residual strains in the matrix were compressive. Liquid-nitrogen dipping and thermal-cycling tend to reduce the fabrication-induced residual strains in silicon carbide fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide matrix composite. However, matrix cracking can occur as a result of these processes. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Saigal, A. (Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Kupperman, D.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

K*(892)0 and K? *(892)0 production in central Pb + Pb, Si + Si, C + C, and inelastic p + p collisions at 158A GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production of the K?(892)0 and K?(892)0 resonances was studied via their K+?? and K??+ decay modes in central Pb + Pb, Si + Si, C + C, and inelastic p + p collisions at 158A GeV(?sNN = 17.3 GeV) with the NA49 detector at ...

Roland, Christof E.

456

Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

457

Neutrino Data from IceCube and its Predecessor at the South Pole, the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

IceCube is a neutrino observatory for astrophysics with parts buried below the surface of the ice at the South Pole and an air-shower detector array exposed above. The international group of sponsors, led by the National Science Foundation (NSF), that designed and implemented the experiment intends for IceCube to operate and provide data for 20 years. IceCube records the interactions produced by astrophysical neutrinos with energies above 100 GeV, observing the Cherenkov radiation from charged particles produced in neutrino interactions. Its goal is to discover the sources of high-energy cosmic rays. These sources may be active galactic nuclei (AGNs) or massive, collapsed stars where black holes have formed.[Taken from http://www.icecube.wisc.edu/] The data from IceCube's predecessor experiment and detector, AMANDA, IceCube’s predecessor detector and experiment is also available at this website. AMANDA pioneered neutrino detection in ice. Over a period of years in the 1990s, detecting “strings” were buried and activated and by 2000, AMANDA was successfully recording an average of 1,000 neutrino events per year. This site also makes available many images and video from the two experiments.

Abbasi, R.

458

Chandra Survey in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Deep Field. I. X-ray Data, Point-like Source Catalog, Sensitivity Maps, and Number Counts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present data products from the 300 ks Chandra survey in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) deep field. This field has a unique set of 9-band infrared photometry covering 2-24 micron from the AKARI Infrared Camera, including mid-infrared (MIR) bands not covered by Spitzer. The survey is one of the deepest ever achieved at ~15 micron, and is by far the widest among those with similar depths in the MIR. This makes this field unique for the MIR-selection of AGN at z~1. We design a source detection procedure, which performs joint Maximum Likelihood PSF fits on all of our 15 mosaicked Chandra pointings covering an area of 0.34 square degree. The procedure has been highly optimized and tested by simulations. We provide a point source catalog with photometry and Bayesian-based 90 per cent confidence upper limits in the 0.5-7, 0.5-2, 2-7, 2-4, and 4-7 keV bands. The catalog contains 457 X-ray sources and the spurious fraction is estimated to be ~1.7 per cent. Sensitivity and 90 per cent confidence upper flux limit...

Krumpe, M; Brunner, H; Hanami, H; Ishigaki, T; Takagi, T; Markowitz, A G; Goto, T; Malkan, M A; Matsuhara, H; Pearson, C; Ueda, Y; Wada, T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Testing of the Pole Face Winding crimpings Measurements carried out on the 100 PS main units before start up of the PS machine in 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The crimpings of the Pole Face Windings (PFW), used to connect the rectangular copper conductor of the main windings with its supply cable, could have defects due to the manufacture process. They could lead to an extensive high electrical resistance. To locate these defects, the PFW are powered with 80 Ampere DC and the voltage drop over the electrical resistances of the crimping is measured. The measurements are done between the PFW current leads and the corresponding pick-up. By subtracting the resistance of the supply cable and the interconnection cable the crimping resistance is calculated. During the long shutdown 2005 and the annual shutdown 2006/2007 a total of 34 main units, and their PFWs, have been refurbished [1]. The refurbished main units are equipped with new PFW. On this PFW the crimping technique was improved and the defect of high crimping contact resistance should not appear. Nevertheless to have complete picture of the situation the 34 refurbished main units and the 66 none refurbished unit...

Hans, O

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Deeply-bound $K^- pp$ state in the $^3$He(in-flight $K^-$, $n$) spectrum and its moving pole near the $??N$ threshold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formation of a deeply-bound $K^- pp$ state with $I=1/2$, $J^\\pi=0^-$ by the $^3$He(in-flight $K^-$, $n$) reaction is theoretically investigated in a distorted-wave impulse approximation using the Green's function method. The expected inclusive and semi-exclusive spectra at $p_{K^-} = 1.0$ GeV/c and $\\theta_{\\rm lab} = 0^{\\circ}$ are calculated for the forthcoming J-PARC E15 experiment. We demonstrate these spectra with several types of phenomenological $K^-$-``$pp$'' optical potentials $U^{\\rm opt}(E)$ which have an energy-dependent imaginary part multiplied by a phase space suppression factor, fitting to recent theoretical predictions or experimental candidates of the $K^-pp$ bound state. The results show that a cusp-like peak at the $\\pi \\Sigma N$ threshold is an unique signal for the $K^-pp$ bound state in the spectrum including the [$K^-pp$] $\\to$ $Y + N$ decay process from the two-nucleon $K^-$ absorption, as well as a distinct peak of the $K^-pp$ bound state. The shape of the spectrum is explained by a trajectory of a moving pole of the $K^-pp$ bound state in the complex energy plane. The importance of the spectrum with [$K^-pp$] $\\to$ $Y + N$ from the two-nucleon $K^-$ absorption is emphasized in order to extract clear evidence of the $K^-pp$ bound state.

T. Koike; T. Harada

2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) residues in transformer carcasses: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had three objectives. The first was to assess the population of PCB-containing transformers remaining in service in the US in 1988. While this could not be done with great precision, it appears that the population of oil-filled transformers containing > 50 /mu/g PCB/g oil has decreased by some 15% since 1982 and that the population of askarel-filled transformers has decreased by some 40% in the same time period. This progress could be continued and accelerated if additional reliable and accepted routes for disposal of PCBs contained in transformers would be developed. The second and third objectives of this project have been to examine two simplified approaches to this end. The second objective was to determine if, by draining PCB-containing oil from transformers and refilling with PCB-free oil, a level of PCBs below 50 ppM (/mu/g/g oil) could be reached with assurance. It appears that reclassification of ''PCB-contaminated'' oil-filled transformers (50--500 /mu/g PCB/g oil) of all ratings by draining and refilling could be done routinely. The third objective was to determine the level of residual PCBs left on the metallic surfaces of askarel-filled transformers which, if these units were refilled with PCB-free mineral transformer oil, would have resulted in concentrations of <50 /mu/g PCB/g oil. It appears that cleaning the surfaces of the metallic components, after careful separation and disposal of the liquid and impregnated solid insulations, to a level of 400 /mu/gPCB/100 cm/sup 2/ would result in transformer carcasses of all sizes which would contain less PCBs than would be found were these transformers to have contained oil at the level of 50 /mu/gPCB/g oil. 7 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

Rouse, T.O.; Raymond, C.T.; Fessler, W.A.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Auto shredder residue recycling: Mechanical separation and pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this work, we exploited mechanical separation and pyrolysis to recycle ASR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrolysis of the floating organic fraction is promising in reaching ELV Directive targets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zeolite catalyst improve pyrolysis oil and gas yield. - Abstract: sets a goal of 85% material recycling from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) by the end of 2015. The current ELV recycling rate is around 80%, while the remaining waste is called automotive shredder residue (ASR), or car fluff. In Europe, this is mainly landfilled because it is extremely heterogeneous and often polluted with car fluids. Despite technical difficulties, in the coming years it will be necessary to recover materials from car fluff in order to meet the ELV Directive requirement. This study deals with ASR pretreatment and pyrolysis, and aims to determine whether the ELV material recycling target may be achieved by car fluff mechanical separation followed by pyrolysis with a bench scale reactor. Results show that flotation followed by pyrolysis of the light, organic fraction may be a suitable ASR recycling technique if the oil can be further refined and used as a chemical. Moreover, metals are liberated during thermal cracking and can be easily separated from the pyrolysis char, amounting to roughly 5% in mass. Lastly, pyrolysis can be a good starting point from a 'waste-to-chemicals' perspective, but further research should be done with a focus on oil and gas refining, in order both to make products suitable for the chemical industry and to render the whole recycling process economically feasible.

Santini, Alessandro [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Passarini, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.passarini@unibo.it [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Vassura, Ivano [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Serrano, David; Dufour, Javier [Department of Chemical and Energy Technology, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Instituto IMDEA Energy, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Morselli, Luciano [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Measurement of the Inclusive ep Deep Inelastic Scattering Cross Section at Low Q2 with the H1 Detector at HERA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this report are the recent measurements of the cross section and proton structure function F2 in ep deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at low virtuality of the exchanged boson, Q2, with the H1 detector at the HERA accelerator in Hamburg. The region of low Q2 and low Bjorken x allows precision tests of perturbative QCD at high gluon densities to be performed and also the transition from the perturbative to non-perturbative QCD domains to be explored. The recent H1 measurements of charm and beauty cross sections and structure functions, F{sub 2}{sup cc-bar} ans F{sub 2}{sup bb-bar}, for photon virtuality 12 < Q2 < 60 GeV2 will also be discussed.

Raicevic, N. [Faculty of Science, University of Montenegro, Cetinjski put BB, 81000 Podgorica (Montenegro)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

464

Measurement of Feynman-x Spectra of Photons and Neutrons in the Very Forward Direction in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of normalised cross sections for the production of photons and neutrons at very small angles with respect to the proton beam direction in deep-inelastic $ep$ scattering at HERA are presented as a function of the Feynman variable $x_F$ and of the centre-of-mass energy of the virtual photon-proton system $W$. The data are taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of $131 \\mathrm{pb}^{-1}$. The measurement is restricted to photons and neutrons in the pseudorapidity range $\\eta>7.9$ and covers the range of negative four momentum transfer squared at the positron vertex $6scattering models and of models for hadronic interactions of high energy cosmic rays are compared to the measured cross sections.

H1 Collaboration

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Level crossings and zero-field splitting in the {Cr8}-cubane spin-cluster studied using inelastic neutron scattering and magnetization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in variable magnetic field and high-field magnetization measurements in the millikelvin temperature range were performed to gain insight into the low-energy magnetic excitation spectrum and the field-induced level crossings in the molecular spin cluster {Cr8}-cubane. These complementary techniques provide consistent estimates of the lowest level-crossing field. The overall features of the experimental data are explained using an isotropic Heisenberg model, based on three distinct exchange interactions linking the eight CrIII paramagnetic centers (spins s = 3/2), that is supplemented with a relatively large molecular magnetic anisotropy term for the lowest S = 1 multiplet. It is noted that the existence of the anisotropy is clearly evident from the magnetic field dependence of the excitations in the INS measurements, while the magnetization measurements are not sensitive to its effects.

Vaknin, D. [Ames Laboratory; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL; Demmel, F. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Nojiri, H [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan; Martin, Catalin [Florida State University; Chiorescu, Irinel [Florida State University; Qiu, Y. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Luban, M. [Ames Laboratory; Kogerler, P. [Ames Laboratory; Fielden, J. [Ames Laboratory; Engelhardt, L [Francis Marion University, Florence, South Sarolina; Rainey, C [Francis Marion University, Florence, South Sarolina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d(sigma)/dQ2, d(sigma)/dx and d(sigma)/dy and the reduced cross-section were measured in the kinematic region Q2 > 185 GeV2 and y energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions F3 and F3(gamma)Z were determined by combining the e+p results presented in this paper with previously published e-p neutral current results. The asymmetry parameter A+ is used to demonstrate the parity violation predicted in electroweak interactions. The measurements are well described by the predictions of the Standard Model.

ZEUS Collaboration; H. Abramowicz; I. Abt; L. Adamczyk; M. Adamus; R. Aggarwal; S. Antonelli; P. Antonioli; A. Antonov; M. Arneodo; O. Arslan; V. Aushev; Y. Aushev; O. Bachynska; A. Bamberger; A. N. Barakbaev; G. Barbagli; G. Bari; F. Barreiro; N. Bartosik; D. Bartsch; M. Basile; O. Behnke; J. Behr; U. Behrens; L. Bellagamba; A. Bertolin; S. Bhadra; M. Bindi; C. Blohm; V. Bokhonov; T. Bold; K. Bondarenko; E. G. Boos; K. Borras; D. Boscherini; D. Bot; I. Brock; E. Brownson; R. Brugnera; N. Brummer; A. Bruni; G. Bruni; B. Brzozowska; P. J. Bussey; B. Bylsma; A. Caldwell; M. Capua; R. Carlin; C. D. Catterall; S. Chekanov; J. Chwastowski; J. Ciborowski; R. Ciesielski; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; A. Contin; A. M. Cooper-Sarkar; N. Coppola; M. Corradi; F. Corriveau; M. Costa; G. D'Agostini; F. Dal Corso; J. del Peso; R. K. Dementiev; S. De Pasquale; M. Derrick; R. C. E. Devenish; D. Dobur; B. A. Dolgoshein; G. Dolinska; A. T. Doyle; V. Drugakov; L. S. Durkin; S. Dusini; Y. Eisenberg; P. F. Ermolov; A. Eskreys; S. Fang; S. Fazio; J. Ferrando; M. I. Ferrero; J. Figiel; B. Foster; G. Gach; A. Galas; E. Gallo; A. Garfagnini; A. Geiser; I. Gialas; A. Gizhko; L. K. Gladilin; D. Gladkov; C. Glasman; O. Gogota; Yu. A. Golubkov; P. Gottlicher; I. Grabowska-Bold; J. Grebenyuk; I. Gregor; G. Grigorescu; G. Grzelak; O. Gueta; M. Guzik; C. Gwenlan; T. Haas; W. Hain; R. Hamatsu; J. C. Hart; H. Hartmann; G. Hartner; E. Hilger; D. Hochman; R. Hori; A. Huttmann; Z. A. Ibrahim; Y. Iga; R. Ingbir; M. Ishitsuka; H. -P. Jakob; F. Januschek; T. W. Jones; M. Jungst; I. Kadenko; B. Kahle; S. Kananov; T. Kanno; U. Karshon; F. Karstens; I. I. Katkov; M. Kaur; P. Kaur; A. Keramidas; L. A. Khein; J. Y. Kim; D. Kisielewska; S. Kitamura; R. Klanner; U. Klein; E. Koffeman; N. Kondrashova; O. Kononenko; P. Kooijman; Ie. Korol; I. A. Korzhavina; A. Kotanski; U. Kotz; H. Kowalski; O. Kuprash; M. Kuze; A. Lee; B. B. Levchenko; A. Levy; V. Libov; S. Limentani; T. Y. Ling; M. Lisovyi; E. Lobodzinska; W. Lohmann; B. Lohr; E. Lohrmann; K. R. Long; A. Longhin; D. Lontkovskyi; O. Yu. Lukina; J. Maeda; S. Magill; I. Makarenko; J. Malka; R. Mankel; A. Margotti; G. Marini; J. F. Martin; A. Mastroberardino; M. C. K. Mattingly; I. -A. Melzer-Pellmann; S. Mergelmeyer; S. Miglioranzi; F. Mohamad Idris; V. Monaco; A. Montanari; J. D. Morris; K. Mujkic; B. Musgrave; K. Nagano; T. Namsoo; R. Nania; A. Nigro; Y. Ning; T. Nobe; D. Notz; R. J. Nowak; A. E. Nuncio-Quiroz; B. Y. Oh; N. Okazaki; K. Olkiewicz; Yu. Onishchuk; K. Papageorgiu; A. Parenti; E. Paul; J. M. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; P. G. Pelfer; A. Pellegrino; W. Perlanski; H. Perrey; K. Piotrzkowski; P. Plucinski; N. S. Pokrovskiy; A. Polini; A. S. Proskuryakov; M. Przybycien; A. Raval; D. D. Reeder; B. Reisert; Z. Ren; J. Repond; Y. D. Ri; A. Robertson; P. Roloff; I. Rubinsky; M. Ruspa; R. Sacchi; U. Samson; G. Sartorelli; A. A. Savin; D. H. Saxon; M. Schioppa; S. Schlenstedt; P. Schleper; W. B. Schmidke; U. Schneekloth; V. Schonberg; T. Schorner-Sadenius; J. Schwartz; F. Sciulli; L. M. Shcheglova; R. Shehzadi; S. Shimizu; I. Singh; I. O. Skillicorn; W. Slominski; W. H. Smith; V. Sola; A. Solano; D. Son; V. Sosnovtsev; A. Spiridonov; H. Stadie; L. Stanco; N. Stefaniuk; A. Stern; T. P. Stewart; A. Stifutkin; P. Stopa; S. Suchkov; G. Susinno; L. Suszycki; J. Sztuk-Dambietz; D. Szuba; J. Szuba; A. D. Tapper; E. Tassi; J. Terron; T. Theedt; H. Tiecke; K. Tokushuku; J. Tomaszewska; V. Trusov; T. Tsurugai; M. Turcato; O. Turkot; T. Tymieniecka; M. Vazquez; A. Verbytskyi; O. Viazlo; N. N. Vlasov; R. Walczak; W. A. T. Wan Abdullah; J. J. Whitmore; K. Wichmann; L. Wiggers; M. Wing; M. Wlasenko; G. Wolf; H. Wolfe; K. Wrona; A. G. Yagues-Molina; S. Yamada; Y. Yamazaki; R. Yoshida; C. Youngman; O. Zabiegalov; A. F. . Zarnecki; L. Zawiejski; O. Zenaiev; W. Zeuner; B. O. Zhautykov; N. Zhmak; A. Zichichi; Z. Zolkapli; D. S. Zotkin

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

467

Single Spin Asymmetries in Charged Kaon Production from Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized $^3{\\rm{He}}$ Target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized $^3{\\rm{He}}$ target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1$<$$x_{bj}$$<$0.4 for $K^{+}$ and $K^{-}$ production. While the Collins and Sivers moments for $K^{+}$ are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties, both moments for $K^{-}$ favor negative values. The Sivers moments are compared to the theoretical prediction from a phenomenological fit to the world data. While the $K^{+}$ Sivers moments are consistent with the prediction, the $K^{-}$ results differ from the prediction at the 2-sigma level.

Y. X. Zhao; Y. Wang; K. Allada; K. Aniol; J. R. M. Annand; T. Averett; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; P. C. Bradshaw; P. Bosted; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; C. Chen; J. -P. Chen; W. Chen; K. Chirapatpimol; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; J. C. Cornejo; F. Cusanno; M. M. Dalton; W. Deconinck; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; X. Deng; A. Deur; H. Ding; P. A. M. Dolph; C. Dutta; D. Dutta; L. El Fassi; S. Frullani; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; O. Glamazdin; S. Golge; L. Guo; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; J. Huang; M. Huang; H. F Ibrahim; M. Iodice; X. Jiang; G. Jin; M. K. Jones; J. Katich; A. Kelleher; W. Kim; A. Kolarkar; W. Korsch; J. J. LeRose; X. Li; Y. Li; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; E. Long; H. -J. Lu; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; D. McNulty; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; C. Muñoz Camacho; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; B. Norum; Y. Oh; M. Osipenko; D. Parno; J. -C. Peng; S. K. Phillips; M. Posik; A. J. R. Puckett; X. Qian; Y. Qiang; A. Rakhman; R. Ransome; S. Riordan; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; E. Schulte; A. Shahinyan; M. H. Shabestari; S. Širca; S. Stepanyan; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; L. -G. Tang; A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; I. Vilardi; K. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; Y. Ye; Z. Ye; L. Yuan; X. Zhan; Y. Zhang; Y. -W. Zhang; B. Zhao; X. Zheng; L. Zhu; X. Zhu; X. Zong

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

468

Measurement of pretzelosity asymmetry of charged pion production in Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering on a polarized $^3$He target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized $^3$He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of $0.16

Y. Zhang; X. Qian; K. Allada; C. Dutta; J. Huang; J. Katich; Y. Wang; K. Aniol; J. R. M. Annand; T. Averett; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; P. C. Bradshaw; P. Bosted; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; C. Chen; J. -P. Chen; W. Chen; K. Chirapatpimol; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; J. C. Cornejo; F. Cusanno; M. M. Dalton; W. Deconinck; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; X. Deng; A. Deur; H. Ding; P. A. M. Dolph; D. Dutta; L. El Fassi; S. Frullani; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; O. Glamazdin; S. Golge; L. Guo; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; M. Huang; H. F. Ibrahim; M. Iodice; X. Jiang; G. Jin; M. K. Jones; A. Kelleher; W. Kim; A. Kolarkar; W. Korsch; J. J. LeRose; X. Li; Y. Li; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; E. Long; H. -J. Lu; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; D. McNulty; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; C. Muñoz Camacho; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; B. Norum; Y. Oh; M. Osipenko; D. Parno; J. C. Peng; S. K. Phillips; M. Posik; A. J. R. Puckett; Y. Qiang; A. Rakhman; R. D. Ransome; S. Riordan; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; E. Schulte; A. Shahinyan; M. H. Shabestari; S. Sirca; S. Stepanyan; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; L. -G. Tang; W. A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; I. Vilardi; K. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; Y. Ye; Z. Ye; L. Yuan; X. Zhan; Y. -W. Zhang; B. Zhao; X. Zheng; L. Zhu; X. Zhu; X. Zong

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

Measurement of the Inclusive e{\\pm}p Scattering Cross Section at High Inelasticity y and of the Structure Function FL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A measurement is presented of the inclusive neutral current e\\pm p scattering cross section using data collected by the H1 experiment at HERA during the years 2003 to 2007 with proton beam energies Ep of 920, 575, and 460 GeV. The kinematic range of the measurement covers low absolute four-momentum transfers squared, 1.5 GeV2 < Q2 < 120 GeV2, small values of Bjorken x, 2.9 \\cdot 10-5 < x < 0.01, and extends to high inelasticity up to y = 0.85. The structure function FL is measured by combining the new results with previously published H1 data at Ep = 920 GeV and Ep = 820 GeV. The new measurements are used to test several phenomenological and QCD models applicable in this low Q2 and low x kinematic domain.

Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baghdasaryan, S; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Behrend, O; Belov, P; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, D; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bylinkin, A; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Ceccopieri, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Delcourt, B; Delvax, J; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dobre, M; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Grebenyuk, A; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C.W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Huber, F; Jacquet, M; Janssen, X; Jonsson, L; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Kretzschmar, J; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P.J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lipka, K; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nikitin, D; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Pahl, P; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pirumov, H; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Radescu, V; Raicevic, N; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P.C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sykora, T; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas, A; Vazdik, Y; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Measurement of the Azimuthal Correlation between the most Forward Jet and the Scattered Positron in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering events at low photon virtuality Q^2 with a forward jet, produced at small angles with respect to the proton beam, are measured with the H1 detector at HERA. A subsample of events with an additional jet in the central region is also studied. For both samples differential cross sections and normalised distributions are measured as a function of the azimuthal angle difference, Delta phi, between the forward jet and the scattered positron. The sensitivity to QCD evolution mechanisms is tested by comparing the data to predictions of Monte Carlo generators based on different evolution approaches as well as to next-to-leading order calculations.

Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baghdasaryan, S; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Belov, P; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, D; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Ceccopieri, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Delcourt, B; Delvax, J; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dobre, M; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Grebenyuk, A; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Huber, F; Jacquet, M; Janssen, X; Jonsson, L; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Kogler, R; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Kretzschmar, J; Kruger, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lipka, K; List, B; List, J; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikitin, D; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Olsson, J E; Ozerov, D; Pahl, P; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pirumov, H; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Radescu, V; Raicevic, N; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sykora, T; Thompson, P D; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vazdik, Y; Wegener, D; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Measurement of the structure function of the nearly free neutron using spectator tagging in inelastic $^2$H(e, e'p)X scattering with CLAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Much less is known about neutron structure than that of the proton due to the absence of free neutron targets. Neutron information is usually extracted from data on nuclear targets such as deuterium, requiring corrections for nuclear binding and nucleon off-shell effects. These corrections are model dependent and have significant uncertainties, especially for large values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. The Barely Off-shell Nucleon Structure (BONuS) experiment at Jefferson Lab measured the inelastic electron deuteron scattering cross section, tagging spectator protons in coincidence with the scattered electrons. This method reduces nuclear binding uncertainties significantly and has allowed for the first time a (nearly) model independent extraction of the neutron structure function. A novel compact radial time projection chamber was built to detect protons with momentum between 70 and 150 MeV/c. For the extraction of the free neutron structure function $F_{2n}$, spectator protons at backward angle and with momenta below 100 MeV/c were selected, ensuring that the scattering took place on a nearly free neutron. The scattered electrons were detected with Jefferson Lab's CLAS spectrometer. The extracted neutron structure function $F_{2n}$ and its ratio to the deuteron structure function $F_{2d}$ are presented in both the resonance and deep inelastic regions. The dependence of the cross section on the spectator proton momentum and angle is investigated, and tests of the spectator mechanism for different kinematics are performed. Our data set can be used to study neutron resonance excitations, test quark hadron duality in the neutron, develop more precise parametrizations of structure functions, as well as investigate binding effects (including possible mechanisms for the nuclear EMC effect) and provide a first glimpse of the asymptotic behavior of d/u as x goes to 1.

S. Tkachenko; N. Baillie; S. E. Kuhn; J. Zhang; J. Arrington; P. Bosted; S. Bültmann; M. E. Christy; D. Dutta; R. Ent; H. Fenker; K. A. Griffioen; M. Ispiryan; N. Kalantarians; C. E. Keppel; W. Melnitchouk; V. Tvaskis; K. P. Adhikari; M. Aghasyan; M. J. Amaryan; S. Anefalos Pereira; H. Avakian; J. Ball; N. A. Baltzell; M. Battaglieri; I. Bedlinskiy; A. S. Biselli; W. J. Briscoe; W. K. Brooks; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; G. Charles; P. L. Cole; M. Contalbrigo; O. Cortes; V. Crede; A. D'Angelo; N. Dashyan; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; A. Deur; C. Djalali; G. E. Dodge; D. Doughty; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; J. A. Fleming; B. Garillon; N. Gevorgyan; Y. Ghandilyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; E. Golovatch; R. W. Gothe; M. Guidal; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; C. Hanretty; N. Harrison; M. Hattawy; K. Hicks; D. Ho; M. Holtrop; C . E. Hyde; Y. Ilieva; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; H. S. Jo; D. Keller; M. Khandaker; A. Kim; W. Kim; A. Klein; F. J. Klein; S. Koirala; V. Kubarovsky; S. V. Kuleshov; P. Lenisa; S. Lewis; K. Livingston; H. Lu; M. MacCormick; I. J. D. MacGregor; N. Markov; M. Mayer; B. McKinnon; T. Mineeva; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; R. A. Montgomery; H. Moutarde; C. Munoz Camacho; P. Nadel-Turonski; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Paremuzyan; K. Park; E. Pasyuk; J. J. Phillips; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; J. W. Price; S. Procureur; D. Protopopescu; A. J . R. Puckett; D. Rimal; M. Ripani; A. Rizzo; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; P. Roy; F. Sabatié; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; I. Senderovich; Y. G. Sharabian; A. Simonyan; G. D. Smith; D. I. Sober; D. Sokhan; S. Stepanyan; S. S. Stepanyan; S. Strauch; W. Tang; M. Ungaro; A. V. Vlassov; H. Voskanyan; E. Voutier; N. K. Walford; D. Watts; X. Wei; L. B. Weinstein; M. H. Wood; L. Zana; I. Zonta

2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

472

Effects of weld residual stresses on crack-opening area analysis of pipes for LBB applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes four different studies undertaken to evaluate the effects of weld residual stresses on the crack-opening behavior of a circumferential through-wall crack in the center of a girth weld. The effect of weld residual stress on the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses of a pipe is not well understood. There are no simple analyses to account for these effects, and, therefore, they are frequently neglected. The four studies involved the following efforts: (1) Full-field thermoplastic finite element residual stress analyses of a crack in the center of a girth weld, (2) A comparison of the crack-opening displacements from a full-field thermoplastic residual stress analysis with a crack-face pressure elastic stress analysis to determine the residual stress effects on the crack-opening displacement, (3) The effects of hydrostatic testing on the residual stresses and the resulting crack-opening displacement, and (4) The effect of residual stresses on crack-opening displacement with different normal operating stresses.

Dong, P.; Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal for Bioenergy: A Spatially Comprehensive National Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainably removable agricultural residues across the conterminous United States. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10 – 100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time.

D. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden; R. G. Nelson

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Injection, flow, and mixing of CO2 in porous media with residual gas.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic structures associated with depleted natural gas reservoirs are desirable targets for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) as evidenced by numerous pilot and industrial-scale GCS projects in these environments world-wide. One feature of these GCS targets that may affect injection is the presence of residual CH{sub 4}. It is well known that CH{sub 4} drastically alters supercritical CO{sub 2} density and viscosity. Furthermore, residual gas of any kind affects the relative permeability of the liquid and gas phases, with relative permeability of the gas phase strongly dependent on the time-history of imbibition or drainage, i.e., dependent on hysteretic relative permeability. In this study, the effects of residual CH{sub 4} on supercritical CO{sub 2} injection were investigated by numerical simulation in an idealized one-dimensional system under three scenarios: (1) with no residual gas; (2) with residual supercritical CO{sub 2}; and (3) with residual CH{sub 4}. We further compare results of simulations that use non-hysteretic and hysteretic relative permeability functions. The primary effect of residual gas is to decrease injectivity by decreasing liquid-phase relative permeability. Secondary effects arise from injected gas effectively incorporating residual gas and thereby extending the mobile gas plume relative to cases with no residual gas. Third-order effects arise from gas mixing and associated compositional effects on density that effectively create a larger plume per unit mass. Non-hysteretic models of relative permeability can be used to approximate some parts of the behavior of the system, but fully hysteretic formulations are needed to accurately model the enti