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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Magnet pole tips  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved magnet more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

1981-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

2

Single phase two pole/six pole motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single phase alternating current two pole/six pole motor is provided with a main stator winding having six coils disposed unequally around the periphery of the machine. These coils are divided into two groups. When these groups are connected such that their magnetomotive forces are additive, two pole motor operation results. When the polarity of one of the groups is then reversed, six pole motor operation results. An auxiliary stator winding which is similar to the main stator winding is displaced from the main stator winding by 90 electrical degrees on a two pole basis. 12 figs.

Kirschbaum, H.S.

1984-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

3

Single phase two pole/six pole motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single phase alternating current two pole/six pole motor is provided with a main stator winding having six coils disposed unequally around the periphery of the machine. These coils are divided into two groups. When these groups are connected such that their magnetomotive forces are additive, two pole motor operation results. When the polarity of one of the groups is then reversed, six pole motor operation results. An auxiliary stator winding which is similar to the main stator winding is displaced from the main stator winding by 90 electrical degrees on a two pole basis.

Kirschbaum, Herbert S. (Asheville, NC)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Lightweight extendable and retractable pole  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole.

Warren, John L. (Santa Barbara, CA); Brandt, James E. (Santa Barbara, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Lightweight extendable and retractable pole  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole. 18 figs.

Warren, J.L.; Brandt, J.E.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

6

Six pole/eight pole single-phase motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single phase alternating current electric motor is provided with a main stator winding having two coil groups which are connected to form eight poles for eight-pole operation and to form six poles for six-pole operation. Each group contains four series connected coil elements with each element spanning approximately one-seventh of the periphery of the machine. The coil groups are spaced 180 mechanical degrees apart such that each end coil of one group overlaps one of the end coils of the other group. An auxiliary stator winding having two coil groups with the same relative angular displacement as the main stator winding coil groups is included. 10 figs.

Kirschbaum, H.S.

1984-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

vod do programovn 2 (YUP2) Vcerozmrn pole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dvourozmrné pole ­ souhrn píklad deklarace: int poleA[2][3]; nejjednodussí zpsob vytvoení pole rozmry pole

Krupka, Michal

8

Diffractive deep inelastic scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new approach to the analysis of diffractive deep inelastic data is presented. We show that the collinear factorisation theorem, which holds for diffractive DIS, has important modifications in the sub-asymptotic HERA regime, which can be quantified by using perturbative QCD. In fact the diffractive parton densities are shown to satisfy an inhomogeneous evolution equation. Moreover it is necessary to include both the gluonic and sea-quark t-channel components of the perturbative Pomeron.

Martin, A.D.; Ryskin, M.G. [IPPP, Physics Department, University of Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Watt, G. [DESY, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

9

Categorical Exclusion for Wood Pole  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wood Pole Wood Pole Replacement at two structures (11/6 & 11/9) located along the Oracle-Tucson 115-kV Transmission Line, in Oro Valley, Pima County, Arizona. RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western plans to replace deteriorated wood poles, cross arms and X-braces at two existing H-frame structures (11/6 & 1119) located along the Oracle Tucson 115-kV Transmission Line in Pima, Arizona (Figure 1). Built in 1943, its aging components are beyond repair and require replacement. These poles performed poorly during structural tests, and we consider them unstable. This replacement project will ensure the safety of Western's workers and the public as well as reliability of the bulk electric system. Western will accomplish the work by clearing vegetation and blading a level pad at

10

Inelastic Neutron Scattering from Glass Formers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles Inelastic Neutron Scattering from Glass Formers U. Buchenau...transition. Coherent inelastic neutron scattering data indicate a mixture of...Supplement No. 126, 1997 Inelastic Neutron Scattering from Glass Formers U. BUCHENAU......

U. Buchenau

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Single phase four pole/six pole motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single phase alternating current electric motor is provided with a main stator winding having two coil groups each including the series connection of three coils. These coil groups can be connected in series for six pole operation and in parallel for four pole operation. The coils are approximately equally spaced around the periphery of the machine but are not of equal numbers of turns. The two coil groups are identically wound and spaced 180 mechanical degrees apart. One coil of each group has more turns and a greater span than the other two coils. 10 figs.

Kirschbaum, H.S.

1984-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

12

Inelastic Neutron Scattering Instrumentation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy spans an enormous energy range, which is equivalent to a wide range of timescales. It is convenient to divide the whole energy range into three sectors, while recognising that there is significant overlap between them. In the lowest energy range, 10meV the applications are principally quasielastic scattering and tunneling spectroscopy. The second range, 01000meV covers the regions of vibrational spectroscopy and magnetic excitations. The highest range above 1000meV is the province of neutron Compton scattering. The instrumentation used in each of these energy regimes is described.

S.F. Parker

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Method and apparatus for assembling a permanent magnet pole assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pole assembly for a rotor, the pole assembly includes a permanent magnet pole including at least one permanent magnet block, a plurality of laminations including a pole cap mechanically coupled to the pole, and a plurality of laminations including a base plate mechanically coupled to the pole.

Carl, Jr., Ralph James (Clifton Park, NY); Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY); Dawson, Richard Nils (Voorheesville, NY); Qu, Ronghai (Clifton Park, NY); Avanesov, Mikhail Avramovich (Moscow, RU)

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

14

Inelastic neutron scattering study on bioprotectant systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...22 December 2005 Inelastic neutron scattering study on bioprotectant systems...UK We collected inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra of homologous...vibrational properties|neutron scattering| 1. Introduction In recent...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) Data from CDIAC's HIPPO Data Archive  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) study of the carbon cycle and greenhouse gases measured meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and aerosol constituents along transects from approximately pole-to-pole over the Pacific Ocean. HIPPO flew hundreds of vertical profiles from the ocean/ice surface to as high as the tropopause, at five times during different seasons over a three year period from 2009-2011. HIPPO provides the first high-resolution vertically-resolved global survey of a comprehensive suite of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols pertinent to understanding the carbon cycle and challenging global climate models.

16

residual magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetization, i.e., the magnetic polarization, that remains in a magnetized material after all attempts to remove the magnetization have been made. Note: An example of residual magnetization is the magnetiza...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Surface energy budget over the South Pole and turbulent heat fluxes as a function of an empirical bulk Richardson number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface energy budget over the South Pole and turbulent heat fluxes as a function of an empirical in the monthly mean surface energy budget and to investigate the behavior of turbulent heat fluxes under stable and one as the residual of the surface energy budget (i.e., subsurface heat fluxes minus net radiation

Walden, Von P.

18

Stability of autonomous systems The pole placement problem Stabilization by state feedback State observers Pole placement and Stability, Pole Placement, Observers and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stability of autonomous systems The pole placement problem Stabilization by state feedback State University of Groningen Stability, Pole Placement, Observers and Stabilization #12;Stability of autonomous and Outline 1 Stability of autonomous systems 2 The pole placement problem 3 Stabilization by state feedback 4

Trentelman, Harry L.

19

Muon Flux at the Geographical South Pole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The muon flux at the South-Pole was measured for five zenith angles, $0^{\\circ}$, $15^{\\circ}$, $35^{\\circ}$, $82.13^{\\circ}$ and $85.15^{\\circ}$ with a scintillator muon telescope incorporating ice Cherenkov tank detectors as the absorber. We compare the measurements with other data and with calculations.

X. Bai; T. K. Gaisser; A. Karle; K. Rawlins; G. M. Spiczak; Todor Stanev

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

Pole structure from energy-dependent and single-energy fits to $\\pi N$ elastic scattering data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The pole structure of the current GW/SAID partial-wave analysis of elastic $\\pi N$ scattering and $\\eta N$ production data is studied. Pole positions and residues are extracted from both the energy-dependent and single-energy fits, using two different methods. For the energy-dependent fits, both contour integration and a Laurent+Pietarinen approach are used. In the case of single-energy fits, the Laurent+Pietarinen approach is used. Errors are estimated and the two sets of results are compared to other recent and older fits to data.

varc, Alfred; Osmanovi?, Hedim; Stahov, Jugoslav; Workman, Ron L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Cosmology of Composite Inelastic Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Composite dark matter is a natural setting for implementing inelastic dark matter - the O(100 keV) mass splitting arises from spin-spin interactions of constituent fermions. In models where the constituents are charged under an axial U(1) gauge symmetry that also couples to the Standard Model quarks, dark matter scatters inelastically off Standard Model nuclei and can explain the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal. This article describes the early Universe cosmology of a minimal implementation of a composite inelastic dark matter model where the dark matter is a meson composed of a light and a heavy quark. The synthesis of the constituent quarks into dark hadrons results in several qualitatively different configurations of the resulting dark matter composition depending on the relative mass scales in the system.

Spier Moreira Alves, Daniele; Behbahani, Siavosh R.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP; Schuster, Philip; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

22

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA IRVINE Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of the Intermediate Valence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Inelastic Neutron Scattering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.a Neutron Scattering Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.b

Lawrence, Jon

23

Heavy-quark correlations in deep inelastic scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss results for heavy quark correlations in next-to-leading order QCD in deep inelastic electroproduction.

J. Smith; B. W. Harris

1996-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

POLE ASSIGNMENT FOR A VIBRATING SYSTEM WITH AERODYNAMIC EFFECT #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLE ASSIGNMENT FOR A VIBRATING SYSTEM WITH AERODYNAMIC EFFECT # J. N. WANG + , S. H. CHOU # , Y. C­input state feedback control arising from a one­dimensional vibrating system with aerodynamic e real axis. Key words. vibrating system, aerodynamic e#ect, state feedback control, pole assignment AMS

Chou, So-Hsiang

25

POLE ASSIGNMENT FOR A VIBRATING SYSTEM WITH AERODYNAMIC EFFECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLE ASSIGNMENT FOR A VIBRATING SYSTEM WITH AERODYNAMIC EFFECT J. N. WANG, S. H. CHOU, Y. C. CHEN feedback control arising from a one-dimensional vibrating system with aerodynamic effect. On the practical real axis. Key words. vibrating system, aerodynamic effect, state feedback control, pole assignment AMS

Lin, Wen-Wei

26

Nuclear deexcitation via an inelastic electronic bridge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first experimental observation of nuclear deexcitation via an electronic-bridge mechanism has been reported recently by us. We observed deexcitation of the 30.7-keV (T1/2?13.6 yr) isomeric level of Nb93 via an inelastic electronic-bridge mechanism involving initial-state L electrons and final-state N5, or higher, electrons. In this work we report a general theoretical analysis of nuclear deexcitation via the inelastic electronic-bridge mechanism. Our estimate of the matrix element is based on solving the inhomogeneous Dirac equation for the external nuclear Coulomb field. Relativistic effects are allowed for and the external field is included in all orders. Specific calculations for Nb93 agree, within a factor of 4, with the experimental result.

D. Kekez; K. Pisk; A. Ljubii?; B. A. Logan

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Inelastic neutron scattering from confined molecular oxygen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inelastic neutron-scattering measurements were carried out on condensed bulk and confined molecular oxygen. The phase transitions of the oxygen confined in cylindrical pores with diameter of ?94? are suppressed below their bulk temperatures or in the case of the lowest-temperature transition to the ? phase are suppressed entirely. This last observation is possibly due to the low latent heat of transition for this transition. Both elastic and inelastic neutron-scattering data indicate a mixing of oxygen crystal phases upon confinement. Magnetic ordering fluctuations in the ? phase are found to have similar energy-dependent profiles for confined and bulk excitations showing that the magnetic correlation function decay is unaffected by the finite crystal size in confinement.

Duncan Kilburn; Paul E. Sokol; Craig M. Brown

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

28

Inelastic X-ray and Nuclear Resonant Scattering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... Search About User Information News & Events Science & Education Beamlines Divisions Argonne Home > Advanced Photon Source > Inelastic X-ray and Nuclear Resonant Scattering...

29

Theory of Inelastic Electric Current through Single Molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An electronic structure theory has been developed for an inelastic electric current of electron-intramolecular vibration coupling origin in terms of the Keldysh Green function method and the self-consistent Born approximation. Numerical calculations were made for the benzenedithiol molecule linking the two Au(111) electrodes. The calculations successfully reproduce typical features commonly observed in inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. The vibrational excitation energy due to the inelastic current was estimated. The inelastic electric current is quite important for the structural stability and the switching possibility of the molecular device.

Yoshihiro Asai

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pole-Dipole Array) Pole-Dipole Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Profiling Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png

31

A comparison of all-pole, all-zero and pole-zero predictor performance in ADPCM speech coding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of all-zero predictors over all-pole predictors for noisy channels. Using synthetic sources, the performance of the three types of predictors with both fixed and adaptive coefficients is investigated. The best signal-to-noise ratio(SNR) that can.... Predictors 5 8 13 111 ANALYSIS OF PREDICTORS 14 A. All-Pole Predictors B. Pole-Zero Predictors C. All-Zero Predictors D. Comparing Performance of Adaptive Predictors 14 20 23 26 IV SIMULATION WITH SYNTHETIC SOURCES 28 A. Generating Synthetic...

Koo, Boneung

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

32

Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

Negret, Alexandru [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

GENERATING BINARY PROCESSES WITH ALL-POLE SPECTRA Petros Boufounos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERATING BINARY PROCESSES WITH ALL-POLE SPECTRA Petros Boufounos MIT Digital signal Processing presents an algorithm to generate autoregressive random binary processes with predefined mean spectrum. The process is generated recursively using a linear combination of the previously generated

Boufounos, Petros T.

34

SciTech Connect: Neutron inelastic scattering in natural Pb as...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Article: Neutron inelastic scattering in natural Pb as a background in neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron inelastic...

35

Angular Momentum Poles of the Nonrelativistic S Matrix for Spin Particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of the structure of the two-particle S matrix as a function of the angular momentum in potential theory is extended to spin-dependent interactions between two spin particles, including the tensor force. The results reveal considerable similarity with the spin zero case, including the symmetry properties. The main differences are two branch points at j=0 and j=-1 and a pole at j=-12. It is shown that judicious combinations of S-matrix elements contain none of these singularities, and, as a result, neither do the scattering amplitudes. Certain modifications of the canonical situation are found in the presence of spin-orbit forces or other orbital angular momentum-dependent potentials. The factorization of the residue of the S matrix is also discussed.

Bipin R. Desai and Roger G. Newton

1963-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Inelastic Neutron Scattering in F19  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energies and yields of the ? rays following inelastic neutron scattering in F19 have been studied as a function of neutron bombarding energy up to 2.2 Mev. In this range four ? rays only, of energies 1111.5 kev, 1962 kev, 1.2400.015 Mev and 1.3710.016 Mev, have been found. The first two correspond to the first two excited states of F19. The second pair of ? rays appear, from the threshold curves, to arise from F19 levels at 1.430.03 and 1.550.03 Mev respectively. The alternative of a 1.35-Mev level and the decay scheme are discussed.

Joan M. Freeman

1955-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Pole placement design for linear multivariable control systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assignment. 4. Accuracy of the solution of FX=G. 5. Examples. IV MINIMUM NORM STATE FEEDBACK PROBLEM 1. Introduction. 2. Minimum norm algorithm. A lower bourd 4. Examples. ROBUST EIGENSTRUCTURE POLE PLACEMENT COMPENSATOR DESIGN. g 7 39 61 61 61.... 82758 4. 68965 2. 65517 L 2. 06896 -1. 72413 -3. 13793 Condition No. oi' X = 9. $0778 Closed Loop System Poles I -3 -0 99999-j. -0 99999+ii 16 B the new al orithm(A com anion form) A 0 1 0 0 0 1 -6 -8 -5 -3 ~ 2 -2 ~ 3 -0. 8 X = -7 -6. 5 ? 2 5...

Keel, Leehyun

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Photon Sciences | Beamlines | IXS: Inelastic X-ray Scattering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IXS: Inelastic X-ray Scattering IXS: Inelastic X-ray Scattering Poster | Fact Sheet | Preliminary Design Report Scientific Scope Many hot topics related to the high frequency dynamics of condensed matter require both a narrower and steeper resolution function and access to a broader dynamic range than what are currently available. This represents a sort of "no man's land" that falls right in the dynamic gap lying between the high frequency spectroscopies, such as inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS), and the low frequency ones. New IXS spectrometers with improved energy and momentum resolutions would be required to fill this gap. To achieve this goal, a new x-ray optics concept for both the monochromatization and energy analysis of x-rays will be implemented at the NSLS-II Inelastic X-ray Scattering beamline. This solution exploits the

39

Muon Inelasticity in High-Energy Neutrino Interaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Copyright (c) 1972 Progress of Theoretical Physics December 1972 research-article Letters to the Editor Muon Inelasticity in High-Energy Neutrino Interaction Yoshitaka Okumura Research Institute for Fundamental Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto......

Yoshitaka Okumura

1972-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hydrodynamic Burnett equations for inelastic Maxwell models of granular gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hydrodynamic Burnett equations and the associated transport coefficients are exactly evaluated for generalized inelastic Maxwell models. In those models, the one-particle distribution function obeys the inelastic Boltzmann equation, with a velocity-independent collision rate proportional to the $\\gamma$ power of the temperature. The pressure tensor and the heat flux are obtained to second order in the spatial gradients of the hydrodynamic fields with explicit expressions for all the Burnett transport coefficients as functions of $\\gamma$, the coefficient of normal restitution, and the dimensionality of the system. Some transport coefficients that are related in a simple way in the elastic limit become decoupled in the inelastic case. As a byproduct, existing results in the literature for three-dimensional elastic systems are recovered, and a generalization to any dimension of the system is given. The structure of the present results is used to estimate the Burnett coefficients for inelastic hard spheres.

Nagi Khalil; Vicente Garz; Andrs Santos

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Mechanics of inelastic deformation and delamination in paperboard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paperboard is one of the most widely used materials. The inelastic deformation of paperboard plays a crucial role during many manufacturing processes (e.g., the converting process whereby paperboard is converted into a ...

Xia, Qingxi, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Simple model of bulk and surface excitation effects to inelastic scattering in low-energy electron beam irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of bulk and surface excitations to inelastic scattering in low-energy electron beam irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) is studied using the dielectric formalism. Calculations are based on a semiempirical dielectric response function for MWCNTs determined by means of a many-pole plasmon model with parameters adjusted to available experimental spectroscopic data under theoretical sum-rule constrains. Finite-size effects are considered in the context of electron gas theory via a boundary correction term in the plasmon dispersion relations, thus, allowing a more realistic extrapolation of the electronic excitation spectrum over the whole energy-momentum plane. Energy-loss differential and total inelastic scattering cross sections as a function of electron energy and distance from the surface, valid over the energy range {approx}50-30,000 eV, are calculated with the individual contribution of bulk and surface excitations separated and analyzed for the case of normally incident and escaping electrons. The sensitivity of the results to the various approximations for the spatial dispersion of the electronic excitations is quantified. Surface excitations are shown to have a strong influence upon the shape and intensity of the energy-loss differential cross section in the near surface region whereas the general notion of a spatially invariant inelastic mean free path inside the material is found to be of good approximation.

Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris [Medical Physics Lab, University of Ioannina Medical School, 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Fisica - CIOyN, Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain); Abril, Isabel [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat d'Alacant, Apartat 99, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Kostarelos, Kostas [Nanomedicine Lab, Centre for Drug Delivery Research, The School of Pharmacy, University of London, London WC1N 1AX (United Kingdom)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

WindPole Ventures LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WindPole Ventures LLC WindPole Ventures LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: WindPole Ventures LLC Name WindPole Ventures LLC Address 48 Pleasant Street Place Lexington, Massachusetts Zip 02421 Sector Wind energy Product Will create, develop and operate commercial-scale wind powered electric generating facilities Website http://www.windpoleventures.co Coordinates 42.423694°, -71.207449° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.423694,"lon":-71.207449,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Relative electrical resistivities and poling of nonlinear optical polymeric waveguides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relative electrical resistivities and poling of nonlinear optical polymeric waveguides Toma to determine the relative dc electrical resistivities of a series of linear and nonlinear optical polymers. The method can be used to identify low resistivity linear cladding materials for optimized electric field

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

45

Pion inelastic scattering from sup 20 Ne  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Angular distributions for {sup 20}Ne({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime}) were measured on the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS) at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). Data were taken with both {pi}{sup {plus}} and {pi}{sup {minus}} over an angular range of 12{degree} to 90{degree} for T{sub {pi}}=180 MeV and with {pi}{sup +} from 15{degree} to 90{degree} for T{sub {pi}}=120 MeV. The data were analyzed using both the distorted-wave impulse approximation (DWIA) and the coupled-channels impulse approximation (CCIA) with collective transition densities. In addition, microscopic transition densities were used in the DWIA analysis for states in the lowest rotational bands. The transitions to the 6.73-MeV 0{sup +} and several 1{sup {minus}} states, including the states at 5.79 MeV and 8.71 MeV, were studied using several models for the transition density. Strong evidence for the importance of two-step routes in pion inelastic scattering was seen in several angular distributions, including the 5.79-MeV 1{sup {minus}}, the first three 4{sup +} states, and the 8.78-MeV 6{sup +}. 100 refs., 81 figs., 33 tabs.

Burlein, M. (Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

North Pole, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pole, Alaska: Energy Resources Pole, Alaska: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 64.7511111°, -147.3494444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.7511111,"lon":-147.3494444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

47

HADES - Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) is located in the upper part of the optical neutrino observatory IceCube, currently under construction. SPATS consists of four strings at depths between 80 m and 500 m below the surface of the ice with seven stages per string. Each stage is equipped with an acoustic sensor and a transmitter. Three strings (string A-C) were deployed in the austral summer 2006/07. SPATS was extended by a fourth string (string D) with second generation sensors and transmitters in 2007/08. One second generation sensor type HADES (Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole) consists of a ring-shaped piezo-electric element coated with polyurethane. The development of the sensor, optimization of acoustic transmission by acoustic impedance matching and first in-situ results will be discussed.

Semburg, Benjamin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

HADES - Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) is located in the upper part of the optical neutrino observatory IceCube, currently under construction. SPATS consists of four strings at depths between 80 m and 500 m below the surface of the ice with seven stages per string. Each stage is equipped with an acoustic sensor and a transmitter. Three strings (string A-C) were deployed in the austral summer 2006/07. SPATS was extended by a fourth string (string D) with second generation sensors and transmitters in 2007/08. One second generation sensor type HADES (Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole) consists of a ring-shaped piezo-electric element coated with polyurethane. The development of the sensor, optimization of acoustic transmission by acoustic impedance matching and first in-situ results will be discussed.

Benjamin Semburg; for the IceCube Collaboration

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

49

A study of the drag on pole-supported cascades  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND CONSTRUCTION EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES AND RESULTS Plate Flutter and Pole Buffeting THEORETICAL RESULTS CURVED PLATE MODELS 17 21 VI. COMPARISON OF RESULTS AND EVOLUTION OF EMPIRICAL EQUATIONS 29 VII. CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES APPENDIX 35 36 LIST... OF FIGURES FIGURE PAGE Plate Orientation Wind Tunnel Facility Wind Tunnel Console Convention for Model Rotation Angle Interference Test 10 Variable Plate Angle Test Variable Plate Chord Test 12 13 10 ~ 12 ' Reynolds Number Test Aspect Ratio Test...

Baker, Sterling Jackson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Automatic Pole and Q-Value Extraction for RF Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental characterization of RF structures like accelerating cavities often demands for measuring resonant frequencies of Eigenmodes and corresponding (loaded) Q-values over a wide spectral range. A common procedure to determine the Q-values is the -3dB method, which works well for isolated poles, but may not be applicable directly in case of multiple poles residing in close proximity (e.g. for adjacent transverse modes differing by polarization). Although alternative methods may be used in such cases, this often comes at the expense of inherent systematic errors. We have developed an automation algorithm, which not only speeds up the measurement time significantly, but is also able to extract Eigenfrequencies and Q-values both for well isolated and overlapping poles. At the same time the measurement accuracy may be improved as a major benefit. To utilize this procedure merely complex scattering parameters have to be recorded for the spectral range of interest. In this paper we present the proposed algorithm applied to experimental data recorded for superconducting higher-order-mode damped multi-cell cavities as an application of high importance.

C. Potratz, H.-W. Glock, U. van Rienen, F. Marhauser

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Factorization and resummation for collinear poles in QCD amplitudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the origin of subleading soft and collinear poles of form factors and amplitudes in dimensionally-regulated massless gauge theories. In the case of form factors of fundamental fields, these poles originate from a single function of the coupling, denoted G({alpha}{sub s}), depending on both the spin and gauge quantum numbers of the field. We relate G({alpha}{sub s}) to gauge-theory matrix elements involving the gluon field strength. We then show that G({alpha}{sub s}) is the sum of three terms: a universal eikonal anomalous dimension, a universal non-eikonal contribution, given by the coefficient B{sub {delta}}({alpha}{sub s}) of {delta}(1-z) in the collinear evolution kernel, and a process-dependent short-distance coefficient function, which does not contribute to infrared poles. Using general results on the factorization of soft and collinear singularities in fixed-angle massless gauge theory amplitudes, we conclude that all such singularities are captured by the eikonal approximation, supplemented only by the knowledge of B{sub {delta}}({alpha}{sub s}). We explore the consequences of our results for conformal gauge theories, where in particular we find a simple exact relation between the form factor and the cusp anomalous dimension.

Dixon, Lance J.; Magnea, Lorenzo; Sterman, George

2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

Inelastic Production of J/psi Mesons in Photoproduction and Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A measurement is presented of inelastic photo- and electroproduction of J/psi mesons in ep scattering at HERA. The data were recorded with the H1 detector in the period from 2004 to 2007. Single and double differential cross sections are determined and the helicity distributions of the J/psi mesons are analysed. The results are compared to theoretical predictions in the colour singlet model and in the framework of non-relativistic QCD. Calculations in the colour singlet model using a k_T factorisation ansatz are able to give a good description of the data, while colour singlet model calculations to next-to-leading order in collinear factorisation underestimate the data.

Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; Delcourt, B; Delvax, J; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Falkiewicz, A; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Grebenyuk, A; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C.W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, X; Jonsson, L; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P.J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nikitin, D; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Pahl, P; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Radescu, V; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P.C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Volchinski, V; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Materials - Recycling - Shredder Residue  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Obsolete automobiles, home appliances and other metal-containing scrap are shredded for the recovery of metals. More than 50% of the material shredded is automobiles. In the United States, shredders generate about 5 million tons of shredder residue every year. Similar amounts are produced in Europe and in the Pacific Rim. Because recycling shredder waste has not been profitable, most of it ends up in landfills; smaller amounts are incinerated. Argonne researchers have developed and tested a process to recover polymers and metals from shredder residue. A 2-ton/hr pilot plant, consisting of a mechanical separation facility and a six-stage wet density/froth flotation plant, was built at Argonne. In the mechanical part of the plant, the shredder waste was separated into five primary components: a polymer fraction (about 45% by weight), a residual metals concentrate (about 10% by weight), a polyurethane foam portion (about 5% by weight), an organic-rich fraction (about 25% by weight) and a metal oxides fraction (about 15% by weight). The polymer fraction was then separated further in the wet density/froth flotation system to recover individual plastic types or compatible families of polymers.

54

Method of analysis of multiphonon and multiple-scattering effects in inelastic neutron scattering experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present experimental results of inelastic neutron scattering experiments on a TiZr alloy, together ... measurements. A method of analysis of inelastic neutron scattering experiments is proposed, aimed at obta...

J. Dawidowski; G.J. Cuello; M. Koza; J.J. Blostein; G. Aurelio

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Concentration dependence of vibrational properties of bioprotectant/water mixtures by inelastic neutron scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...water mixtures by inelastic neutron scattering S Magazu 1 * F Migliardo 1...LaboratoryChilton, Didcot,OX11 0QX, UK Neutron scattering has been demonstrated to be...to investigate by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) the vibrational behaviour...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Friction coefficient for deep-inelastic heavy-ion collisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the microscopic model, the friction coefficient for the relative motion of nuclei in deep-inelastic heavy-ion collisions is calculated. An advantage of the suggested method is that it allows one to consider the relative motion of nuclei and the intrinsic motion self-consistently. The radial dependence of the friction coefficient is studied and the results are compared with those found by other methods. It was demonstrated that the kinetic energy dissipation in deep-inelastic heavy-ion collisions is a gradual process which takes up a significant part of a reaction time. A decrease of the radial friction coefficient with a heating of nuclei is shown.

G. G. Adamian; 1; 2; R. V. Jolos; 1; A. K. Nasirov; 1; 2; A. I. Muminov2

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

North Pole's Holiday Wish for An Energy Efficient 2012 | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

North Pole's Holiday Wish for An Energy Efficient 2012 North Pole's Holiday Wish for An Energy Efficient 2012 North Pole's Holiday Wish for An Energy Efficient 2012 December 23, 2011 - 4:20pm Addthis The city of North Pole, Alaska, is hoping to use $100,000 in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funds to improve the energy efficiency of several key city facilities.| Photo courtesy of the a href"http://www.northpolefire.org/">North Pole Fire Department. The city of North Pole, Alaska, is hoping to use $100,000 in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funds to improve the energy efficiency of several key city facilities.| Photo courtesy of the a href"http://www.northpolefire.org/">North Pole Fire Department. Chris Galm Marketing & Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency &

58

INELASTIC NEUTRON SCATTERING SELECTION RULES OF 03B1 HgI2 M. SIESKIND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

899 INELASTIC NEUTRON SCATTERING SELECTION RULES OF 03B1 HgI2 M. SIESKIND Laboratoire de The inelastic neutron scattering selection rules of 03B1 HgI2 in the directions 0394, 03A3 and 039B are derived Abstracts 63.20D Introduction. - Inelastic neutron scattering is a powerful technique for the determination

Boyer, Edmond

59

Study of gamma rays from neutron inelastic scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy and intensity of the inelastic gamma rays of twenty low atomic number elements: Li, C, N, 0, Mg, Al, Na, Si, S, Cl, K, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Pb, are measured with a 30 cc Ge(Li) detector using an ...

Hui, Bertram Ho Wai

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Heavy Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss two topics in the production of heavy quarks in deep-inelastic scattering: the next-to-leading order Monte-Carlo HVQDIS and the next-to-leading logarithmic resummation of soft gluon effects, including estimates of next-to-next-to-leading order corrections therefrom.

B. W. Harris; E. Laenen; S. Moch; J. Smith

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Microsoft Word - CX-Snohomish-MurrayWoodPoles_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Joyce Vaughn Project Manager - TELP-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Snohomish-Murray No.1 structure 9/4 modification PP&A Project No.: 1990 Budget Information: Work Order 00251084, Task 03 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6: Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the previously developed facility area including, but not limited to, switchyard rock grounding upgrades, secondary containment projects, paving projects, seismic upgrading, tower modifications, changing insulators, replacement of poles, circuit breakers, conductors, transformers, and crossarms.

62

Acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos in South Pole ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When high-energy particles interact in dense media to produce a particle shower, most of the shower energy is deposited in the medium as heat. This causes the medium to expand locally and emit a shock wave with a medium-dependent peak frequency on the order of 10 kHz. In South Pole ice in particular, the elastic properties of the medium have been theorized to provide good coupling of particle energy to acoustic energy. The acoustic attenuation length has been theorized to be several km, which could enable a sparsely instrumented large-volume detector to search for rare signals from high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. We simulated a hybrid optical/radio/acoustic extension to the IceCube array, specifically intended to detect cosmogenic (GZK) neutrinos with multiple methods simultaneously in order to achieve high confidence in a discovered signal and to measure angular, temporal, and spectral distributions of GZK neutrinos. This work motivated the design, deployment, and operation of the South Pole Acoustic Te...

Vandenbroucke, Justin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

NEUTRON: a program for computing phonon extinction rules of inelastic neutron scattering and thermal diffuse scattering experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NEUTRON is a program for the determination of phonon extinction rules in inelastic neutron scattering experiments.

Kirov, A.K.

2003-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

64

Lab Trials of an Electricity Transmission Line Voltage Sensor Based on Thermally Poled Silica Fibre  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Voltage sensing using helically coiled lengths of thermally poled twin-hole silica optical fibre is presented. Lab accuracy test results showing good linearity and signal to noise...

Michie, Andrew M; Hambley, Philip; Bassett, Ian M; Haywood, John H; Henry, Peter; Ingram, John

65

Microsoft Word - CX-BigEddy-RedmondWoodPoles_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Celilo SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Darrell Aaby Line Foreman III - TFDF-Redmond Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements at select locations...

66

Microsoft Word - CX-CowlitzTaptoChehalis-CovingtonWoodPoles_WEB...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Covington SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Clay Grande Line Foreman III - TFCF-Covington Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement at...

67

Microsoft Word - CX-AlveyDistrictWoodPoles-FY14_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8, 2014 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Alvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Stacey Hensley Project Manager - TEP-TPP-4 Proposed Action: 2014 Alvey District Wood Pole...

68

Liquid Argon Cryogenic Detector Calibration by Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method for calibration of cryogenic liquid argon detector response to recoils with certain energy -8.2 keV - is proposed. The method utilizes a process of inelastic scattering of monoenergetic neutrons produced by fusion DD neutron generator. Features of kinematics of inelastic scattering cause sufficient (forty times) increase in count rate of useful events relative to traditional scheme exploited elastic scattering with the same recoil energy and compatible energy resolution. The benefits of the proposed scheme of calibration most well implemented with the use of tagged neutron generator as a neutron source that allows to eliminate background originated from casual coincidence of signals on cryogenic detector and additional detector of scattered neutrons.

Polosatkin, Sergey; Dolgov, Alexander

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Liquid Argon Cryogenic Detector Calibration by Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method for calibration of cryogenic liquid argon detector response to recoils with certain energy -8.2 keV - is proposed. The method utilizes a process of inelastic scattering of monoenergetic neutrons produced by fusion DD neutron generator. Features of kinematics of inelastic scattering cause sufficient (forty times) increase in count rate of useful events relative to traditional scheme exploited elastic scattering with the same recoil energy and compatible energy resolution. The benefits of the proposed scheme of calibration most well implemented with the use of tagged neutron generator as a neutron source that allows to eliminate background originated from casual coincidence of signals on cryogenic detector and additional detector of scattered neutrons.

Sergey Polosatkin; Evgeny Grishnyaev; Alexander Dolgov

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

70

Microsoft Word - CX-Murray-CusterWoodPoles_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Covington Covington SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Steve Scott Line Foreman III - TFNF-Snohomish Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement at selected locations along the Murray-Custer #1 transmission line right-of-way (ROW). PP&A Project No.: 1963 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective...are required to maintain...infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: The proposed project is located in Snohomish and Skagit Counties, Washington, in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Snohomish District.

71

THE SPITZER-WISE SURVEY OF THE ECLIPTIC POLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have carried out a survey of the north and south ecliptic poles, EP-N and EP-S, respectively, with the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The primary objective was to cross-calibrate WISE with the Spitzer and Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) photometric systems by developing a set of calibration stars that are common to these infrared missions. The ecliptic poles were continuous viewing zones for WISE due to its polar-crossing orbit, making these areas ideal for both absolute and internal calibrations. The Spitzer IRAC and MIPS imaging survey covers a complete area of 0.40 deg{sup 2} for the EP-N and 1.28 deg{sup 2} for the EP-S. WISE observed the whole sky in four mid-infrared bands, 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 {mu}m, during its eight-month cryogenic mission, including several hundred ecliptic polar passages; here we report on the highest coverage depths achieved by WISE, an area of {approx}1.5 deg{sup 2} for both poles. Located close to the center of the EP-N, the Sy-2 galaxy NGC 6552 conveniently functions as a standard calibrator to measure the red response of the 22 {mu}m channel of WISE. Observations from Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS/IRS-LL and WISE show that the galaxy has a strong red color in the mid-infrared due to star-formation and the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN), while over a baseline >1 year the mid-IR photometry of NGC 6552 is shown to vary at a level less than 2%. Combining NGC 6552 with the standard calibrator stars, the achieved photometric accuracy of the WISE calibration, relative to the Spitzer and MSX systems, is 2.4%, 2.8%, 4.5%, and 5.7% for W1 (3.4 {mu}m), W2 (4.6 {mu}m), W3 (12 {mu}m), and W4 (22 {mu}m), respectively. The WISE photometry is internally stable to better than 0.1% over the cryogenic lifetime of the mission. The secondary objective of the Spitzer-WISE Survey was to explore the poles at greater flux-level depths, exploiting the higher angular resolution Spitzer observations and the exceptionally deep (in total coverage) WISE observations that potentially reach down to the confusion limit of the survey. The rich Spitzer and WISE data sets were used to study the Galactic and extragalactic populations through source counts, color-magnitude and color-color diagrams. As an example of what the data sets facilitate, we have separated stars from galaxies, delineated normal galaxies from power-law-dominated AGNs, and reported on the different fractions of extragalactic populations. In the EP-N, we find an AGN source density of {approx}260 deg{sup -2} to a 12 {mu}m depth of 115 {mu}Jy, representing 15% of the total extragalactic population to this depth, similar to what has been observed for low-luminosity AGNs in other fields.

Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Cutri, R. M.; Marsh, K.; Padgett, D.; Tsai, C. W. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cohen, M. [Monterey Institute for Research in Astronomy, 200 8th Street, Marina CA 93933 (United States); Wright, E.; Petty, S. [UCLA, Physics and Astronomy Building, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Stern, D.; Eisenhardt, P.; Mainzer, A.; Ressler, M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Benford, D. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Blain, A. [University of Leicester, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Carey, S.; Surace, J. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lonsdale, C. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Skrutskie, M. [University of Virginia, Department of Astronomy, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Stanford, S. [UC Davis, Department of Physics, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616-8677 (United States)

2011-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

72

Radio-frequency probes of Antarctic ice at South Pole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System Sciences O p e n A cce ss Discussions Radio-frequency probes of Antarctic ice at South Pole D. Besson1 and I. Kravchenko2 1University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582, USA 2University of Nebraska Lincoln... to successive waveforms. Each 0.5 meter division horizontally corresponds to approximately 5 ns. -20 -10 0 10 20 Rx v ol ta ge ( V, a ft er s ca li ng ; of fs e Time (ns, relative) 6 us echo (Vx1) 9.6 us echo (Vx1.3) 13.9 us echo (Vx3.5) 17.2 us echo (Vx10...

Besson, David Zeke; Kravchenko, I.

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Spin Measurements in lp -> hX Deep Inelastic Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of hadrons in polarized lepton-nucleon deep inelastic scattering is discussed. The helicity density matrix of the hadron is computed within the QCD hard scattering formalism and its elements are shown to yield information on the spin structure of the nucleon and the spin dependence of the quark fragmentation process. The case of $\\rho$ vector mesons is considered in more detail and estimates are given.

Anselmino, M; Hansson, J; Murgia, F

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Correlated Motions in Glasses Studied by Coherent Inelastic Neutron Scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coherent inelastic neutron scattering provides detailed information about the correlated atomic displacements in the vibrational modes of a glass. As an example, we show the wave-vector dependence of the scattering function of vitreous SiO2 corresponding to different peaks in the one-phonon density of states. Pending the availability of results from computer simulations, we give a qualitative comparison with the Sen-Thorpe model.

J. M. Carpenter and D. L. Price

1985-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

75

Competition of Brazil nut effect, buoyancy, and inelasticity induced segregation in a granular mixture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been recently reported that a granular mixture in which grains differ in their restitution coefficients presents segregation: the more inelastic particles sink to the bottom. When other segregation mechanisms as buoyancy and the Brazil nut effect are present, the inelasticity induced segregation can compete with them. First, a detailed analysis, based on numerical simulations of two dimensional systems, of the competition between buoyancy and the inelasticity induced segregation is presented, finding that there is a transition line in the parameter space that determines which mechanism is dominant. In the case of neutrally buoyant particles having different sizes the inelasticity induced segregation can compete with the Brazil nut effect (BNE). Reverse Brazil nut effect (RBNE) could be obtained at large inelasticities of the intruder. At intermediate values, BNE and RBNE coexist and large inelastic particles are found both near the bottom and at the top of the system.

Ricardo Brito; Rodrigo Soto

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

Transient Simulation of On-Chip Transmission Lines via Exact Pole Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transient Simulation of On-Chip Transmission Lines via Exact Pole Extraction Guoqing Chen and Eby G response at the far end of a transmission line is proposed in this paper. Unlike approximating the poles, on-chip interconnects exhibit significant transmission line behavior. An efficient solution

Friedman, Eby G.

77

Pioneering the New Grid: Pole-mounted Solar | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pioneering the New Grid: Pole-mounted Solar Pioneering the New Grid: Pole-mounted Solar Pioneering the New Grid: Pole-mounted Solar May 7, 2010 - 10:54am Addthis SunWave solar power systems are attached to utility poles, where they can gather sun power as well as provide a point of data gathering for utility companies to monitor the grid. | Photo courtesy Petra Solar SunWave solar power systems are attached to utility poles, where they can gather sun power as well as provide a point of data gathering for utility companies to monitor the grid. | Photo courtesy Petra Solar Joshua DeLung What does this mean for me? About 25,000 SunWave panels -- which generate energy for the grid as well as communicate an energy snapshot at that point -- are already in operation, with a further expected 200,000 installations.

78

Pioneering the New Grid: Pole-mounted Solar | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pioneering the New Grid: Pole-mounted Solar Pioneering the New Grid: Pole-mounted Solar Pioneering the New Grid: Pole-mounted Solar May 7, 2010 - 10:54am Addthis SunWave solar power systems are attached to utility poles, where they can gather sun power as well as provide a point of data gathering for utility companies to monitor the grid. | Photo courtesy Petra Solar SunWave solar power systems are attached to utility poles, where they can gather sun power as well as provide a point of data gathering for utility companies to monitor the grid. | Photo courtesy Petra Solar Joshua DeLung What does this mean for me? About 25,000 SunWave panels -- which generate energy for the grid as well as communicate an energy snapshot at that point -- are already in operation, with a further expected 200,000 installations.

79

CHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS), complementary to other more established inelastic scattering probes, such as light scattering, electron scattering, and neutron scattering, is becoming an important experimental technique in the study of elementary excitations in condensed matters. Over the past decade, IXS with total energy resolution of few meV has been achieved, and is being used routinely in the study of phonon dispersions in solids and liquids as well as dynamics in disordered and biological systems. In the study of electronic excitations, IXS with total energy resolution on the order of 100 meV to 1 eV is gaining wider applications also. For example, IXS has been used to study collective excitations of valence electrons, single electron excitations of valence electrons, as well as core electron excitations. In comparison with the alternative scattering techniques mentioned above, IXS has several advantages. First, IXS probes the full momentum transfer range of the dielectric response of the sample, whereas light scattering is limited to very small momentum transfers, and electron scattering suffers the effects of multiple scattering at large momentum transfers. Second, since IXS measures the bulk properties of the sample it is not surface sensitive, therefore it does not require special preparation of the sample. The greater flexibility in sample conditions and environments makes IXS an ideal probe in the study of liquids and samples under extreme temperature, pressure, and magnetic field. Third, the tunability of synchrotron radiation sources enables IXS to exploit element specificity and resonant enhancement of scattering cross sections. Fourth, IXS is unique in the study of dynamics of liquids and amorphous solids because it can probe the particular region of energy-momentum transfer phase space, which is inaccessible to inelastic neutron scattering. On the other hand, the main disadvantages of IXS are the small cross sections and the strong absorption of x-rays in high Z elements.

HAYASHI,H.; UDAGAWA,Y.; GILLET,J.M.; CALIEBE,W.A.; KAO,C.C.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Measurement of cross sections and leptonic forward-backward asymmetries at the Z pole and determination of electroweak parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurement of cross sections and leptonic forward-backward asymmetries at the Z pole and determination of electroweak parameters

Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Bentez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; An, Q; Anderhub, H; Anderson, A L; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Antonov, L; Antreasyan, D; Alkhazov, G; Arce, P; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Baba, P V K S; Bagnaia, P; Bakken, J A; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bao, J; Barillre, R; Barone, L; Baschirotto, A; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bencze, G L; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Bizzarri, R; Blaising, J J; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Bck, R K; Bhm, A; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Bouwens, B T; Brambilla, Elena; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Brooks, M; Bujak, A T; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Burgos, C; Busenitz, J K; Buytenhuijs, A O; Bykov, A; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castello, R; Cavallo, N; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, C; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Chung, S; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coan, T E; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Contin, A; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Cui, X T; Cui, X Y; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degr, A; Deiters, K; Dnes, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Dimitrov, H R; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Djambazov, L; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durn, I; Easo, S; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Ern, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabbretti, R; Fabre, M; Falciano, S; Fan, S J; Favara, A; Fay, J; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Fernndez, D; Fernndez, G; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Friebel, W; Fukushima, M; Gailloud, M; Galaktionov, Yu; Gallo, E; Ganguli, S N; Garca-Abia, P; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Gong, Z F; Gonzlez, E; Gougas, Andreas; Goujon, D; Gratta, Giorgio; Grnewald, M W; Gu, C; Guanziroli, M; Guo, J K; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gustafson, H R; Gutay, L J; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hauschildt, D; He, C F; He, J T; Hebbeker, T; Hebert, M; Herv, A; Hilgers, K; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Hu, G Q; Ille, B; Ilyas, M M; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janssen, H; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapinos, P; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Khokhar, S; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirsch, S; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; Knig, A C; Koffeman, E; Kornadt, O; Koutsenko, V F; Koulbardis, A; Krmer, R W; Kramer, T; Krastev, V R; Krenz, W; Kuijten, H; Kumar, K S; Kunin, A; Ladrn de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lanske, D; Lanzano, S; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, D M; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Leedom, I D; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Lenti, M; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Li, H T; Li, P J; Liao, J Y; Lin, W T; Lin, Z Y; Linde, Frank L; Lindemann, B; Lista, L; Liu, Y; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; L, Y S; Lubbers, J M; Lbelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Ludovici, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma, J M; Ma Wen Gan; MacDermott, M; Malgeri, L; Malik, R; Malinin, A; Maa, C; Maolinbay, M; Marchesini, P A; Marion, F; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McBride, P; McMahon, T; McNally, D; Merk, M; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Mills, G B; Mir, Y; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mller, M; Monteleoni, B; Morand, R; Morganti, S; Moulai, N E; Mount, R; Mller, S; Nagy, E; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niaz, M A; Nippe, A; Nowak, H; Organtini, G; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Perrier, J; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Pirou, P A; Plasil, F; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Qi, Z D; Qian, J M; Qureshi, K N; Raghavan, R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Redaelli, M; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Ricker, A; Riemann, S; Riemers, W; Riles, K; Rind, O; Rizvi, H A; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodrguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Rhner, M; Rhner, S; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosmalen, R; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubbia, Andr; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Sachwitz, M; Salicio, J; Salicio, J M; Snchez, E; Sanders, G S; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sartorelli, G; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Shotkin, S

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A QCD analysis of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a novel type of analysis of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering data, in which the input parton distributions of the Pomeron are parameterised using the perturbative QCD expressions. In particular, we treat individually the components of the Pomeron of different size. We are able to describe simultaneously both the recent ZEUS and H1 diffractive data. In addition to the usual two-gluon model for the perturbative Pomeron, we allow for the possibility that it may be made from two sea quarks.

Martin, A D; Watt, G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Nuclear medium effects in $?(\\bar?)$-nucleus deep inelastic scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the nuclear medium effects in the weak structure functions $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $F_3(x,Q^2)$ in the deep inelastic neutrino/antineutrino reactions in nuclei. We use a theoretical model for the nuclear spectral functions which incorporates the conventional nuclear effects, such as Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions calculated from a microscopic model for meson-nucleus self-energies. The calculations have been performed using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations. Our results are compared with the experimental data of NuTeV and CDHSW.

H. Haider; I. Ruiz Simo; M. Sajjad Athar; M. J. Vicente Vacas

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

83

Antiproton-induced elastic and inelastic scattering at intermediate energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the construction and subsequent operation of LEAR, beams of low-energy antiproton with previously unobtainable intensity and quality were possible. Elastic and inelastic scattering experiments were performed on several nuclei in both the p- and sd-shell as well as targets of heavier mass. In the very near future experiments with antiproton having momentum of up to 2 Gev/c will be possible. It is the purpose of this brief article to report results of initial calculations of {anti p}-nucleus scattering for energies that span this new energy region and for which the elementary {anti p}N amplitudes are known. 4 figs.

Ma, W.H.; Strottman, D.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Inelastic scattering of fast neutrons from $^{56}$Fe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic scattering of fast neutrons from $^{56}$Fe was studied at the photoneutron source nELBE. The neutron energies were determined on the basis of a timeof- flight measurement. Gamma-ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium detector. The total scattering cross sections deduced from the present experiment in an energy range from 0.8 to 9.6 MeV agree within 15% with earlier data and with predictions of the statistical-reaction code Talys.

Beyer, R; Hannaske, R; Junghans, A R; Massarczyk, R; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Ferrari, A; Kgler, T; Rder, M; Schmidt, K; Wagner, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Heavy-quark correlations in deep-inelastic electroproduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have completed the next-to-leading order perturbative QCD corrections to the virtual-photon exclusive differential cross sections for heavy quark production in deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering, i.e. $e + P \\rightarrow Q + \\overline{Q} + X$. Using these results, we have computed distributions which are sensitive to correlations among the heavy quark, the heavy antiquark, and the associated jet. Some predictions for charm and bottom heavy quark production at the electron-proton collider HERA are presented.

B. W. Harris; J. Smith

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Graphene nanoribbon molecular sensor based on inelastic transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of phonon-assisted inelastic quantum transport calculations are presented for graphene nanoribbons. We consider a single molecule attached to a carbon atom and describe the electronic structure by a tight-binding model, taking into account a local phonon mode associated with the attached molecule characteristic vibration. The calculated transmission spectra reveal a striking sensitivity for molecules attached to the edges of asymmetric zigzag graphene nanoribbons. Our results show that the differential conductance may be used to identify the presence as well as the characteristic vibration frequency of a target molecule at finite temperatures.

Ritter, C. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Muniz, R. B.; Latg, A. [Instituto de Fsica, Universidade Federal Fluminense SN, 24210-360 Niteri-RJ (Brazil)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

87

Theory of deep-inelastic scattering from light nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a theory of deep-inelastic scattering from light nuclei that may be formulated in the target rest frame. (In our approach we can avoid the ambiguities that arise when boosting wave functions of light nuclei to an infinite momentum frame.) The resulting theory is applicable at relatively low values of momentum transfer and allows for a systematic treatment of off-mass-shell effects. We calculate the asymmetry in polarized leptoproduction from polarized H2 and He3 targets and also provide expressions for the spin-independent and spin-dependent structure functions of these nuclei.

L. S. Celenza; A. Pantziris; C. M. Shakin

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

89

Neutron Inelastic Cross-Sections between 55 and 140 MeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

10 July 1956 research-article Neutron Inelastic Cross-Sections between 55 and 140 MeV R. G. P. Voss R. Wilson The neutron inelastic cross-sections for lead, cadmium, copper, aluminium and carbon have been measured at 140, 105, 81...

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Simplest piston problem. II. Inelastic collisions Pablo I. Hurtado1,2,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simplest piston problem. II. Inelastic collisions Pablo I. Hurtado1,2, * and S. Redner3, 1 particles are separated by a heavy "piston," with elastic collisions between particles but inelastic collisions between the light particles and the interval ends. A symmetry breaking occurs in which the piston

Redner, Sidney

91

Simplest piston problem. II. Inelastic collisions Pablo I. Hurtado 1,2, * and S. Redner 3,+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simplest piston problem. II. Inelastic collisions Pablo I. Hurtado 1,2, * and S. Redner 3,+ 1 particles are separated by a heavy ``piston,'' with elastic collisions between particles but inelastic collisions between the light particles and the interval ends. A symmetry breaking occurs in which the piston

Redner, Sidney

92

Dynamic Rate and Power Allocation in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks with Elastic and Inelastic Traffic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we focus on the problem of dynamic rate and power allocation in wireless ad hoc networks with slow-fading channels, where a mixture of elastic and inelastic traffic is supported. A stochastic optimization problem incorporating the quality ... Keywords: Dynamic resource allocation, Elastic flows, Inelastic flows, Particle swarm optimization (PSO), QoS requirements, Stochastic duality theory

Fei Wang; Xiaofeng Liao; Songtao Guo; Hongyu Huang; Tingwen Huang

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Capture and Indirect Detection of Inelastic Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the capture rate for Dark Matter in the Sun for models where the dominant interaction with nuclei is inelastic -- the Dark Matter up-scatters to a nearby dark "partner" state with a small splitting of order a 100 keV. Such models have previously been shown to be compatible with DAMA/LIBRA data, as well as data from all other direct detection experiments. The kinematics of inelastic Dark Matter ensures that the dominant contribution to capture occurs from scattering off of iron. We give a prediction for neutrino rates for current and future neutrino telescopes based on the results from current direct detection experiments. Current bounds from Super--Kamiokande and IceCube-22 significantly constrain these models, assuming annihilations are into two-body Standard Model final states, such as W+W-, t-tbar, b-bbar or tau+tau-. Annihilations into first and second generation quarks and leptons are generally allowed, as are annihilations into new force carriers which decay dominantly into e+e-, mu+mu- and pi+pi-.

Arjun Menon; Rob Morris; Aaron Pierce; Neal Weiner

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

94

A New Polyethylene Scattering Law Determined Using Inelastic Neutron Scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monte Carlo neutron transport codes such as MCNP rely on accurate data for nuclear physics cross-sections to produce accurate results. At low energy, this takes the form of scattering laws based on the dynamic structure factor, S (Q, E). High density polyethylene (HDPE) is frequently employed as a neutron moderator at both high and low temperatures, however the only cross-sections available are for T =300 K, and the evaluation has not been updated in quite some time. In this paper we describe inelastic neutron scattering measurements on HDPE at 5 and 300 K which are used to improve the scattering law for HDPE. We describe the experimental methods, review some of the past HDPE scattering laws, and compare computations using these models to the measured S (Q, E). The total cross-section is compared to available data, and the treatment of the carbon secondary scatterer as a free gas is assessed. We also discuss the use of the measurement itself as a scattering law via the 1 phonon approximation. We show that a scattering law computed using a more detailed model for the Generalized Density of States (GDOS) compares more favorably to this experiment, suggesting that inelastic neutron scattering can play an important role in both the development and validation of new scattering laws for Monte Carlo work.

Lavelle, Christopher M [ORNL; Liu, C [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Modern Techniques for Inelastic Thermal Neutron Scattering Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A predictive approach based on ab initio quantum mechanics and/or classical molecular dynamics simulations has been formulated to calculate the scattering law, S ( ? ? , ? ) , and the thermal neutron scattering cross sections of materials. In principle, these atomistic methods make it possible to generate the inelastic thermal neutron scattering cross sections of any material and to accurately reflect the physical conditions of the medium (i.e, temperature, pressure, etc.). In addition, the generated cross sections are free from assumptions such as the incoherent approximation of scattering theory and, in the case of solids, crystalline perfection. As a result, new and improved thermal neutron scattering data libraries have been generated for a variety of materials. Among these are materials used for reactor moderators and reflectors such as reactor-grade graphite and beryllium (including the coherent inelastic scattering component), silicon carbide, cold neutron media such as solid methane, and neutron beam filters such as sapphire and bismuth. Consequently, it is anticipated that the above approach will play a major role in providing the nuclear science and engineering community with its needs of thermal neutron scattering data especially when considering new materials where experimental information may be scarce or nonexistent.

A.I. Hawari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Geek-Up[12.23.2010]: Muons at the South Pole and Dr. Nick Holoynak |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2.23.2010]: Muons at the South Pole and Dr. Nick Holoynak 2.23.2010]: Muons at the South Pole and Dr. Nick Holoynak Geek-Up[12.23.2010]: Muons at the South Pole and Dr. Nick Holoynak December 23, 2010 - 12:05pm Addthis Illustration of the IceCube neutrino observatory. Source: LBNL Illustration of the IceCube neutrino observatory. Source: LBNL Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Earlier today, the Energy Blog featured Los Alamos National Lab's system to track Santa. However, while there is a lot of attention focused on the North Pole right now, the Geek-Up[date] team is taking a look at the opposite end of the Earth. This past weekend, a collaborative group of 40 institutions from around the world, including DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, celebrated the completion of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory

97

Old Y-12 utility poles put to use for recreation and training | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Old Y-12 utility poles put to use for recreation and training | National Old Y-12 utility poles put to use for recreation and training | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Old Y-12 utility poles put to use ... Old Y-12 utility poles put to use for recreation and training Posted By Office of Public Affairs Logs and trucks Maintenance Support and Utilities Management personnel at NNSA's Y-12

98

Pentachlorophenol (PCP)-treated wood poles and crossarms: Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative database on leachable concentrations of pentachlorophenol (PCP) from a population of treated utility wood poles and crossarms as obtained by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). An ancillary objective was to carefully document a subsampling method in preparing wood samples for tests by the TCLP. Data obtained in this study indicate that PCP-treated utility wood poles and crossarms are non-hazardous. Measured concentrations of PCP and other organic compounds subject to TCLP analysis were an order of magnitude or more below TC limits in 47 samples of wood derived from three different sections of 13 utility wood poles and from 9 crossarms. Wedge shaped subsamples, removed from full cross sectional slices of poles and crossarms, were prepared according to EPA procedures, subjected to the TCLP, and resultant leachates analyzed for the presence of PCP. 4 refs., 3 figs., 10 tab.

Horn, M.E. (Environmental Management Services, Waupaca, WI (USA)); Holcombe, L.; Owens, J.B. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

New pole tip shapes mitigating torque ripple in short pitched and fully pitched switched reluctance motors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High torque ripple is one of the major disadvantages of switched reluctance motor (SRM). Although there are several publications in the literature addressing the full or partial solution to the problem for conventional SRM, no publication exists for the torque ripple reduction of recently emerging fully pitched SRM. This paper deals with finding best dimension set for a particular stator and rotor pole tip shape aiming to reduce torque ripple in both short pitched and fully pitched SRMs. Five new stator and rotor pole tip structures have been investigated and compared with conventional pole tip. Analyses have been performed with the finite element (FE) models of 6/43-phase short pitched and fully pitched SRM with unipolar excitation. With the proposed pole tips, torque ripple is reduced by 24.1% in short pitched SRM for 10A phase current and by 22.6% in fully pitched SRM for 5.59A phase current.

Yusuf Ozoglu; Muhammet Garip; Erkan Mese

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Price, Attenuation of acoustic waves in glacial ice and saltacoustics, South Pole, sound speed, pressure waves,shear waves PACS: 47.35.De, 47.35.Rs, 62.65. +k, 92.40.Vq,

Klein, Spencer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Nested Saturation with Guaranteed Real Poles1 Eric N. Johnson2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nested Saturation with Guaranteed Real Poles1 Eric N. Johnson2 and Suresh K. Kannan 3 School Assistant Professor of Avionics Integration eric.johnson@ae.gatech.edu 3Graduate Research Assistant suresh

Johnson, Eric N.

102

Microsoft Word - CX-Driscoll-NaselleWood PolesFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPAlvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Ryan Brady Line Foreman III - TFOK-Chehalis Proposed Action: In-kind wood pole replacements as needed on...

103

Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0908.3251. [29] B. Semburg, HADESHydrophone for Acousticand two sensor modules of the HADES design with one sensorDetection at South Pole, HADES [29]). The sensors are

Klein, Spencer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Low-frequency Vibrational Anomalies in -Lactoglobulin: Contribution of Different Hydrogen Classes Revealed by Inelastic Neutron Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revealed by Inelastic Neutron Scattering A. Orecchini, A. Paciaroni, A. R. Bizzarri, and S. Cannistraro -lactoglobulin has been investigated by inelastic neutron scattering, on both dry and D2O-hydrated samples. Both typically accessible energy and momentum transfers, inelastic thermal neutron scattering is probably

Tuscia, Università Degli Studi Della

105

Elasticity of single-crystalline graphite: Inelastic x-ray scattering study Alexey Bosak and Michael Krisch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. IXS overcomes the intrinsic difficulties of inelastic neutron scattering INS -- namely, sample sizeElasticity of single-crystalline graphite: Inelastic x-ray scattering study Alexey Bosak of the five independent elastic moduli of single-crystalline graphite, using inelastic x-ray scattering IXS

Nabben, Reinhard

106

Essential Substrate Residues for Action of Endopeptidases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Endopeptidases, which are influenced in their specificity primarily by basic residues of arginine or lysine are treated in seven sections, according to the position of the essential residue: ...

Prof. Dr. Borivoj Keil

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nuclear spin response studies in inelastic polarized proton scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spin-flip probabilities S/sub nn/ have been measured for inelastic proton scattering at incident proton energies around 300 MeV from a number of nuclei. At low excitation energies S/sub nn/ is below the free value. For excitation energies above about 30 MeV for momentum transfers between about 0.35 fm/sup /minus/1/ and 0.65 fm/sup / minus/1/ S/sub nn/ exceeds free values significantly. These results suggest that the relative ..delta..S = 1(..delta..S = 0 + ..delta..S = 1) nuclear spin response approaches about 90% in the region of the enhancement. Comparison of the data with slab response calculations are presented. Decomposition of the measured cross sections into sigma(..delta..S = 0) and sigma(..delta..S = 1) permit extraction of nonspin-flip and spin-flip dipole and quadrupole strengths. 29 refs., 11 figs.

Jones, K.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Noise Rectification and Fluctuations of an Asymmetric Inelastic Piston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a massive inelastic piston, whose opposite faces have different coefficients of restitution, moving under the action of an infinitely dilute gas of hard disks maintained at a fixed temperature. The dynamics of the piston is Markovian and obeys a continuous Master Equation: however, the asymmetry of restitution coefficients induces a violation of detailed balance and a net drift of the piston, as in a Brownian ratchet. Numerical investigations of such non-equilibrium stationary state show that the velocity fluctuations of the piston are symmetric around the mean value only in the limit of large piston mass, while they are strongly asymmetric in the opposite limit. Only taking into account such an asymmetry, i.e. including a third parameter in addition to the mean and the variance of the velocity distribution, it is possible to obtain a satisfactory analytical prediction for the ratchet drift velocity.

G. Costantini; U. Marini Bettolo Marconi; A. Puglisi

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

109

DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

Kyser, E

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

110

Energy losses of high-energy muons and ?-leptons in inelastic scattering by nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hybrid model is used to calculate the losses of muons and ?-leptons in inelastic scattering by...0...-boson. In the calculations, nuclear effects, such as shading and antiscreening of nucleons, the EMC effect, ...

K. S. Lokhtin; S. I. Sinegovskii

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Parallel Computational Modelling of Inelastic Neutron Scattering in Multi-node and Multi-core Architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper examines the initial parallel implementation of SCATTER, a computationally intensive inelastic neutron scattering routine with polycrystalline averaging capability, for the General Utility Lattice Program (GULP). Of particular importance...

Garba, M.T.; Gonzales-Velez, H.; Roach, D.L.

2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

Inelastic X-Ray Scattering at Sector 30, Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

synchrotron radiation produced at the APS to study a wide variety of complex materials with inelastic x-ray scattering. Please feel free to explore our site and learn more...

113

A one-dimensional Lattice Boltzmann method for modeling the dynamic pole-to-pole oscillations of Min proteins for determining the position of the midcell division plane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determining the middle of the bacteria cell and the proper placement of the septum is essential to the division of the bacterial cell. In E. coli, this process depends on the proteins MinC, MinD, and MinE. Here, the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to study the dynamics of the oscillations of the min proteins from pole to pole. This determines the midcell division plane at the cellular level. The LBM is applied to the set of the deterministic reaction diffusion equations proposed by Howard et. al. [1] to describe the dynamics of the Min proteins. The LBM results are in good agreement with those of Howard et al, and agree qualitatively with the experimental results. Our good results indicate that the LBM can be an alternative computational tool for simulating problems dealing with complex biological system which are described by the reaction-diffusion equations.

Waipot Ngamsaad; Wannapong Triampo; Paisan Kanthang; I-Ming Tang; Narin Nuttawut; Charin Modjung

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

114

Revised Born-Oppenheimer approach and a reprojection method for inelastic collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantum reprojection method within the standard adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approach is derived for multielectron collision systems. The method takes nonvanishing asymptotic nonadiabatic couplings into account and distinguishes asymptotic currents in molecular-state channels and in atomic-state channels. The method is demonstrated for the example of low-energy inelastic Li + Na collisions for which the conventional application of the standard adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approach fails and leads to paradoxes such as infinite inelastic cross sections.

Belyaev, Andrey K. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Herzen University, St. Petersburg 191186 (Russian Federation) and Department of Chemistry, University of Rome 'La Sapienza', I-00185 Rome (Italy)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Paramagnon contribution to the inelastic scattering time in two-dimensional disordered metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The particle-particle diffusion propagator is evaluated diagrammatically in two dimensions in the presence of inelastic electron-electron scattering due to paramagnon exchange. The paramagnon effect enters when there is a strong short-range opposite-spin Hubbard- type repulsion. An inelastic scattering rate 1/?? ?Tln min{(1-I)EF/T, EF?} cuts off the backscattering divergence responsible for localization, where 1-I is the Stoner enhancement factor.

Mau-chung Chang and Elihu Abrahams

1985-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Microsoft Word - CX-AlveyDistWoodPoles_FY13_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alvey District Wood Pole Replacement Projects Alvey District Wood Pole Replacement Projects PP&A Project No.: 2663 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Various transmission lines located in Douglas, Linn, and Lane counties, Oregon. Refer to Project Location Attachment for transmission lines and corresponding structure locations. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace deteriorating wood poles and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. cross arms, insulators, guy anchors, etc.) along the subject transmission lines. Replacement will be in-kind and will utilize the existing holes to minimize ground disturbance. If necessary, an auger will be used to remove any loose soil from

117

Microsoft Word - CX-HillsCreek-LookoutPointWoodPolesFY12_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Alvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Chad Hamel Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Hills Creek-Lookout Point No. 1 wood pole replacements PP&A Project No.: 2315 (WO# 297311) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Lane County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Alvey District Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace four deteriorating wood pole structures and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. cross arms, insulators, guy anchors) along the subject transmission line. The poles are located on private residential and US Forest Service land. Landowners will be notified prior to replacement activities. Replacement will be in-

118

Microsoft Word - CX-NorthBendWoodPoles_FY13_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

North Bend District Wood Pole Replacement Projects North Bend District Wood Pole Replacement Projects PP&A Project No.: 2658 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Various transmission lines located in Douglas, Linn, and Lane counties, Oregon. Refer to Project Location Attachment for transmission lines and corresponding structure locations. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace deteriorating wood poles and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. cross arms, insulators, guy anchors, etc.) along the subject transmission lines. Replacement will be in-kind and will utilize the existing holes to minimize ground disturbance. If necessary, an auger will be used to remove any loose soil from

119

Microsoft Word - CX-PilotButte-LaPineWoodPoleFY12_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

30, 2012 30, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project PP&A Project No.: 2188 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions and modifications to transmission facilities ... include ... replacement of wood poles. Location: Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 transmission line located in Deschutes County, Oregon, at the following structures: Mile Structure 5 7 6 5 7 4 16 7 16 8 17 5 18 1 18 3 21 3 21 8 25 3 30 5 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to replace 12 deteriorating wood pole

120

Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) Agency/Company /Organization: European Commission, Enerdata, in collaboration with LEPII Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Greenhouse Gas Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.enerdata.net/docssales/press-office-20th-world-energy-congress.pdf Cost: Free Related Tools Modular Applied General Equilibrium Tool (MAGNET) WorldScan SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hybrid stator-pole switched reluctance motor to improve radial force for bearingless application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel hybrid stator-pole switched reluctance motor (HSPSRM) to improve radial force for bearingless application is presented in this paper. The proposed motor can generate a constant suspending force independent of rotor position only using small current excitation. And torque control can be naturally decoupled form suspending force control. Measured data and the results of numerical analysis are given to evaluate the motor structure. In the numerical analysis, the finite element method (FEM) is employed due to the highly nonlinear nature of the motor. A prototype hybrid stator-pole SRM is manufactured and tested in the experimental studies. The obtained test and simulation results show that the hybrid stator-pole SRM structure has a constant suspending force, which can be controlled independent from torque control.

Huijun Wang; Dong-Hee Lee; Tae-Hub Park; Jin-Woo Ahn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Age-Dependent Fragility and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of Timber and Steel Distribution Poles Subjected to Hurricanes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Power distribution systems are susceptible to extreme damage from natural hazards especially hurricanes. Hurricane winds can knock down distribution poles thereby causing damage to (more)

Salman, Abdullahi M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Residual stresses in annealed zircaloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron diffraction has been used to measure the lattice constants of single crystal and rod-textured polycrystalline Zircaloy-2 in the temperature range 300-900 K. While the single crystal remains strain-free during heating or cooling, large residual grain-interaction strains occur in the polycrystalline sample as the result of compatibility being maintained among grains with anisotropic thermal expansion coefficients. These residual thermal strains have been determined as a function of temperature from the difference between the single and polycrystal lattice constants. Analysis of the data has been done using a polycrystalline deformation model, QUEST, which accounts for anisotropic elasticity, plasticity and thermal expansion, and for crystallographic texture of the sample. It is found that slow cooling from 900 K introduces residual stresses of the order of 100 MPa in the polycrystalline sample. The calculations demonstrate that these residual stresses can explain not only the difference in the proportional limits in tension and compression (strength differential) but also differences in the initial work hardening behaviour when Zircaloy-2 is deformed in tension or compression.

Tome, C.; Faber, J.; MacEwen, S.R.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Microsoft Word - CX-AlveyMaintenanceHQ_PoleStorageUpgrade_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Brett Sherer Project Manager - KEP-4 Proposed Action: Environmental protection system upgrades at pole storage facility at Alvey Maintenance Headquarters. Budget Information: Work Order #00283226 Categorical Exclusion Applied (Appendix B to Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6: Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the previously developed facility area including, but not limited to, switchyard rock grounding upgrades, secondary containment projects, paving projects, seismic upgrading, tower modifications, changing insulators, and replacement of poles, circuit breakers, conductors, transformers, and crossarms.

125

Character of Z-pole data constraints on standard model parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the impressive precision of the Z-pole measurements made at the e+e- colliders at CERN (LEP) and SLAC (SLC), the allowed region for the principal standard model parameters responsible for radiative corrections [mH, mt, and ?(mZ2)] is still large enough to encompass significant nonlinearities. The nature of the experimental constraints therefore depends in an interesting way on the accidental relationships among the various measurements. In particular, the fact that the Z-pole measurements favor values of mH excluded by direct searches leads us to examine the effects of external Higgsstrahlung, a process ignored by the usual precision electroweak calculations.

T. Kawamoto and R. G. Kellogg

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

126

Muon-Nucleon Inelastic Interactions at High Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The inelastic interactions of 10.1-GeV/c positive and 15.8-GeV/c negative muons produced at the Brookhaven alternating gradient synchrotron have been studied in nuclear emulsions. Secondary particles produced in these interactions have been identified; their energy spectrum and angular distribution (in the c.m. system) are given for pions, kaons, and protons along with their partial cross sections. The inclusive pion-production reaction is studied and the relative shapes of the pt2 (squared transverse momentum) and pl (longitudinal momentum) distributions are discussed and compared with ?p, ?p, and pp reactions. The partial and integral cross sections have been measured for both beams along with the energy dependence of their total cross sections and are compared with theory by using the first, second, and fourth powers of 1(1+q2m?2) for ?exp(q2,?), the quantity commonly called the "virtual-photon-nucleon total cross section." The values of the structural function ?W2 are calculated for 0.025~10. The present data are compared with the previous muon data of Perl at low q2 values, and various theoretical models are considered to test scaling at low q2 values.

P. L. Jain, R. D. Malucci, M. J. Potoczak, and N. J. Wixon

1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Dynamic radial distribution function from inelastic neutron scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A real-space, local dynamic structure function g(r,?) is defined from the dynamic structure function S(Q,?), which can be measured using inelastic neutron scattering. At any particular frequency ?, S(Q,?) contains Q-dependent intensity oscillations which reflect the spatial distribution and relative displacement directions for the atoms vibrating at that frequency. Information about local and dynamic atomic correlations is obtained from the Fourier transform of these oscillations g(r,?) at the particular frequency. g(r,?) can be formulated such that the elastic and frequency-summed limits correspond to the average and instantaneous radial distribution function, respectively, and is thus called the dynamic radial distribution function. As an example, the dynamic radial distribution function is calculated for fcc nickel in a model which considers only the harmonic atomic displacements due to phonons. The results of these calculations demonstrate that the magnitude of the atomic correlations can be quantified and g(r,?) is a well-defined correlation function. This leads to a simple prescription for investigating local lattice dynamics.

R. J. McQueeney

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Inelastic neutron scattering study of a quantum spin trimer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present an inelastic neutron scattering (INS) study of the excitation spectrum of a quantum S=1?2 equilateral Heisenberg trimer, Cu3(O2C16H23)61.2C6H12. The magnetic properties of the system can be described by an ensemble of independent equilateral triangles of S=1?2 Cu2+ ions. With antiferromagnetic Heisenberg coupling, the ground state of each trimer is a degenerate pair of S=1?2 doublets, with a quartet S=3?2 excited state. Previous bulk measurements led to an estimate for the excitation energy of 28meV. Here, we report INS measurements that can provide a direct measurement of magnetic excitation energies. These measurements are challenging since inter- and intramolecular vibrational modes associated with the organic ligands are at frequencies similar to the magnetic excitations. Measurements on a nonmagnetic compound with the same ligands as well as the temperature dependence of the neutron scattering cross section are used to identify the vibrational modes. This leads to an identification of the magnetic excitation energy as being approximately 37meV at T=10K, with a gradual softening with increasing temperature.

M. B. Stone; F. Fernandez-Alonso; D. T. Adroja; N. S. Dalal; D. Villagrn; F. A. Cotton; S. E. Nagler

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

129

Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

Conner, W.V.

1994-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

130

Single-Molecule Microscopy Studies of Electric-Field Poling in Chromophore-Polymer Composite Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-Molecule Microscopy Studies of Electric-Field Poling in Chromophore-Polymer Composite electrooptic devices based on chromophore-polymer composite materials is to improve chromophore ordering of susceptibility.16 Chromophore-polymer composite materials lack inherent non- centrosymmetry, which is required

Reid, Philip J.

131

Pion Pole Contribution to Hadronic Light-By-Light Scattering and Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We derive an analytic result for the pion pole contribution to the light-by-light scattering correction to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a?=(g?-2)/2. Using the vector meson dominance model for the pion transition form factor, we obtain a?LBL,?0=+5610-11.

Ian Blokland; Andrzej Czarnecki; Kirill Melnikov

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Creosote-treated wood poles and crossarms: Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative database on leachable concentrations of cresols (i.e., m-, o- and p-cresol isomers) from a population of creosote-treated utility wood poles and crossarms by application of the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The TCLP was promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in March 1990 (55FR 11798). Data generated in this study indicate that creosote-treated utility poles and crossarms are non-hazardous. Measured concentrations of total cresols and other semi-volatile organic compounds, from wood subjected to TCLP analysis, were an order of magnitude or more below their current Toxicity Characteristic (TC) regulatory levels. The wood analyzed in this study consisted of 54 samples of wood poles and 6 crossarms. Subsamples, removed from full cross sectional slices of poles and crossarms, were prepared according to EPA procedures, subjected to the TCLP, and the resultant leachates analyzed for the presence of cresols and other semi-volatile compounds.

Horn, M.E. (Environmental Management Services, Waupaca, WI (United States)); Holcombe, L.; Owens, J.B. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Interaction between Poly(ADP-ribose) and NuMA Contributes to Mitotic Spindle Pole Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr), made by PARP-5a/tankyrase-1, localizes to the poles of mitotic spindles and is required for bipolar spindle assembly, but its molecular function in the spindle is poorly understood. To investigate ...

Coughlin, M.

134

Looking Deep from the South Pole: Star Formation in the Thermal Infrared  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Looking Deep from the South Pole: Star Formation in the Thermal Infrared Michael G.Burton, John W extra-galactic star formation through a deep survey of the Hubble Deep Field{South in this band. We-eminent conditions on the Earth for wide- eld imaging at thermal infrared wavelengths. We describe a project to equip

Ashley, Michael C. B.

135

Control of Delayed Recycling Systems with an Unstable Pole at Forward Path  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control of Delayed Recycling Systems with an Unstable Pole at Forward Path J. F. Marquez Rubio, B. del Muro Cu´ellar and Olivier Sename Abstract-- Unstable time delay system and recycling system pose a challenge problem in their own. When unstable time delay system have recycle the control problem becomes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

136

Temperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: Implications for life nearby subglacial lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: Implications for life nearby subglacial lake deep of South of #9°C, which is 7°C below pressure­induced melting temperature freshwater produce contamination Lake Vostok. semiempirical expression strain vs. stress, estimate shear depth show Ice

Woschnagg, Kurt

137

The South Pole Telescope: A white paper for the Dark Energy Task Force  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

redshifts, the statistical power of the survey yields are sufficient to measure the dark energy equation energy constraints are derived from the SPT SZE survey results. To test theories of dark energyThe South Pole Telescope: A white paper for the Dark Energy Task Force J. E. Carlstrom, C. Chang, T

Collar, Juan I.

138

Residue management at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past plutonium production and manufacturing operations conducted at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) produced a variety of plutonium-contaminated by-product materials. Residues are a category of these materials and were categorized as {open_quotes}materials in-process{close_quotes} to be recovered due to their inherent plutonium concentrations. In 1989 all RFETS plutonium production and manufacturing operations were curtailed. This report describes the management of plutonium bearing liquid and solid wastes.

Olencz, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

High-quality quartz single crystals for high-energy-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering analyzers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-quality quartz (-SiO2) crystals are characterized, and their use for inelastic X-ray scattering analyzers is presented and discussed.

H?nnicke, M.G.

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

A novel optimization-based pole-figure inversion method: comparison with WIMV and maximum entropy methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An optimization-based pole-figure inversion method is presented that utilizes the orientation distribution function gradient for conditional control of the solution. The novel pole-figure inversion method, coined the hybrid -seminorm minimization, is empirically shown to be versatile, general and robust in the presence of simulated experimental errors.

Bernier, J.V.

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Transforms for prediction residuals in video coding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Typically the same transform, the 2-D Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT), is used to compress both image intensities in image coding and prediction residuals in video coding. Major prediction residuals include the motion ...

Kam??l?, Fatih

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Inelastic neutron scattering from single crystal Zn under high pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inelastic neutron-scattering experiments have been performed for single crystals of Zn under pressures up to 8.8 GPa at 300 K. The phonon modes q/qmax=?=0.075 and ?=0.10 were measured in the transverse acoustic branch ?3, where q=0 corresponds with the elastic constant C44. The phonon energy showed a substantial hardening with increasing pressure. The experimental data below 6.8 GPa for ?=0.075 yield a constant Grneisen mode ?i=-ln?i/lnV of 2.25 in good agreement with a previous calculation [H. Ledbetter, Phys. Status Solidi B 181, 81 (1994)]. Above 6.8 GPa, there is a very rapid increase of ?i which is indicative of the presence of a giant Kohn anomaly. This rapid divergence at high pressure indicates that a phonon softening may occur at pressures higher than 8.8 GPa caused by the collapse of the giant Kohn anomaly via an electronic topological transition (ETT). In an earlier Mssbauer Zn study at 4 K [W. Potzel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1139 (1994)], a drastic drop of the Lamb-Mssbauer factor was observed at 6.6 GPa, which was interpreted as being due to phonon softening, indicating this ETT had occurred. This paper also compares the compressibility data for single crystal Zn and Zn powder using neutron scattering. The results were found to be similar to an earlier x-ray Zn powder experiment [O. Schulte et al., High Pressure Res. 6, 169 (1991)]. 1996 The American Physical Society.

J. G. Morgan; R. B. Von Dreele; P. Wochner; S. M. Shapiro

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Process to recycle shredder residue  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

SOFT INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING (SIX) Group Leader: Ignace Jarrige  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING (SIX) INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING (SIX) Group Leader: Ignace Jarrige 1 Proposal Team: D. Arena 1 , A. Baron 2 , Y. Cai 1 , Y.-D. Chuang 3 , F. de Groot 4 , J. Guo 3 , J.P. Hill 1 , S. Hulbert 1 , C. McGuinness 5 , R. Reininger 9 , J.E. Rubenson 6 , C. Sanchez-Hanke 1 , T. Schmitt 7 , K. Smith 8 1 Brookhaven National Laboratory, 2 SPring-8, 3 Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 4 Utrecht University, 5 Trinity College Dublin, 6 Uppsala University, 7 Paul Scherrer Institute, 8 Boston University, 9 Argonne National Laboratory TECHNIQUE AND CAPABILITIES APPLICATIONS ADDITIONAL INFORMATION * Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at unprecedented resolution (10 meV @ 1000 eV) to revolutionize study of low energy excitations in many important materials. * Continuously tunable momentum transfer (q) to study the

145

Test of the consistency of various linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions in application to inelastic neutron scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

functions in application to inelastic neutron scattering from liquid para-hydrogen Jian Liua and William H for inelastic neutron scattering from liquid para-hydrogen at 14 K. Various time correlations functions were neutron scattering experimental data all suggest that the LSC-IVR is indeed a good short

Miller, William H.

146

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 205440 (2012) Inelastic neutron scattering investigations of the quantum molecular dynamics of a H2 molecule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 205440 (2012) Inelastic neutron scattering investigations of the quantum transfer arising from the neutron scattering event has also been investigated. The -dependence spectra investigations using infrared (IR),3,13­15 inelastic neutron scattering (INS),3,16,17 and nuclear magnetic

Turro, Nicholas J.

147

Deep inelastic cross-section measurements at large y with the ZEUS detector at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reduced cross sections for $e^{+}p$ deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different centre-of-mass energies, $318$, $251$ and $225$ GeV. The cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken $x$ and the virtuality, $Q^2$, were obtained in the region $0.13\\ \\leq\\ y\\ \\leq\\ 0.75$, where $y$ denotes the inelasticity and $5\\ \\leq\\ Q^2\\ \\leq\\ 110$ GeV$^2$. The proton structure functions $F_2$ and $F_L$ were extracted from the measured cross sections.

ZEUS Collaboration; H. Abramowicz; I. Abt; L. Adamczyk; M. Adamus; R. Aggarwal; S. Antonelli; O. Arslan; V. Aushev; Y. Aushev; O. Bachynska; A. N. Barakbaev; N. Bartosik; O. Behnke; J. Behr; U. Behrens; A. Bertolin; S. Bhadra; I. Bloch; V. Bokhonov; E. G. Boos; K. Borras; I. Brock; R. Brugnera; A. Bruni; B. Brzozowska; P. J. Bussey; A. Caldwell; M. Capua; C. D. Catterall; J. Chwastowski; J. Ciborowski; R. Ciesielski; A. M. Cooper-Sarkar; M. Corradi; F. Corriveau; G. D'Agostini; R. K. Dementiev; R. C. E. Devenish; G. Dolinska; V. Drugakov; S. Dusini; J. Ferrando; J. Figiel; B. Foster; G. Gach; A. Garfagnini; A. Geiser; A. Gizhko; L. K. Gladilin; O. Gogota; Yu. A. Golubkov; J. Grebenyuk; I. Gregor; G. Grzelak; O. Gueta; M. Guzik; W. Hain; G. Hartner; D. Hochman; R. Hori; Z. A. Ibrahim; Y. Iga; M. Ishitsuka; A. Iudin; F. Januschek; I. Kadenko; S. Kananov; T. Kanno; U. Karshon; M. Kaur; P. Kaur; L. A. Khein; D. Kisielewska; R. Klanner; U. Klein; N. Kondrashova; O. Kononenko; Ie. Korol; I. A. Korzhavina; A. Kotanski; U. Kotz; N. Kovalchuk; H. Kowalski; O. Kuprash; M. Kuze; B. B. Levchenko; A. Levy; V. Libov; S. Limentani; M. Lisovyi; E. Lobodzinska; W. Lohmann; B. Lohr; E. Lohrmann; A. Longhin; D. Lontkovskyi; O. Yu. Lukina; J. Maeda; I. Makarenko; J. Malka; J. F. Martin; S. Mergelmeyer; F. Mohamad Idris; K. Mujkic; V. Myronenko; K. Nagano; A. Nigro; T. Nobe; D. Notz; R. J. Nowak; K. Olkiewicz; Yu. Onishchuk; E. Paul; W. Perlanski; H. Perrey; N. S. Pokrovskiy; A. S. Proskuryakov; M. Przybycien; A. Raval; P. Roloff; I. Rubinsky; M. Ruspa; V. Samojlov; D. H. Saxon; M. Schioppa; W. B. Schmidke; U. Schneekloth; T. Schorner-Sadenius; J. Schwartz; L. M. Shcheglova; R. Shevchenko; O. Shkola; I. Singh; I. O. Skillicorn; W. Slominski; V. Sola; A. Solano; A. Spiridonov; L. Stanco; N. Stefaniuk; A. Stern; T. P. Stewart; P. Stopa; J. Sztuk-Dambietz; D. Szuba; J. Szuba; E. Tassi; T. Temiraliev; K. Tokushuku; J. Tomaszewska; A. Trofymov; V. Trusov; T. Tsurugai; M. Turcato; O. Turkot; T. Tymieniecka; A. Verbytskyi; O. Viazlo; R. Walczak; W. A. T. Wan Abdullah; K. Wichmann; M. Wing; G. Wolf; S. Yamada; Y. Yamazaki; N. Zakharchuk; A. F. Zarnecki; L. Zawiejski; O. Zenaiev; B. O. Zhautykov; N. Zhmak; D. S. Zotkin

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

Deep inelastic cross-section measurements at large y with the ZEUS detector at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reduced cross sections for $e^{+}p$ deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different centre-of-mass energies, $318$, $251$ and $225$ GeV. The cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken $x$ and the virtuality, $Q^2$, were obtained in the region $0.13\\ \\leq\\ y\\ \\leq\\ 0.75$, where $y$ denotes the inelasticity and $5\\ \\leq\\ Q^2\\ \\leq\\ 110$ GeV$^2$. The proton structure functions $F_2$ and $F_L$ were extracted from the measured cross sections.

Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Aggarwal, R; Antonelli, S; Arslan, O; Aushev, V; Aushev, Y; Bachynska, O; Barakbaev, A N; Bartosik, N; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Behrens, U; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bokhonov, V; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Brock, I; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Brzozowska, B; Bussey, P J; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Catterall, C D; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; D'Agostini, G; Dementiev, R K; Devenish, R C E; Dolinska, G; Drugakov, V; Dusini, S; Ferrando, J; Figiel, J; Foster, B; Gach, G; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Gizhko, A; Gladilin, L K; Gogota, O; Golubkov, Yu A; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Grzelak, G; Gueta, O; Guzik, M; Hain, W; Hartner, G; Hochman, D; Hori, R; Ibrahim, Z A; Iga, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Iudin, A; Januschek, F; Kadenko, I; Kananov, S; Kanno, T; Karshon, U; Kaur, M; Kaur, P; Khein, L A; Kisielewska, D; Klanner, R; Klein, U; Kondrashova, N; Kononenko, O; Korol, Ie; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, A; Kotz, U; Kovalchuk, N; Kowalski, H; Kuprash, O; Kuze, M; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Libov, V; Limentani, S; Lisovyi, M; Lobodzinska, E; Lohmann, W; Lohr, B; Lohrmann, E; Longhin, A; Lontkovskyi, D; Lukina, O Yu; Maeda, J; Makarenko, I; Malka, J; Martin, J F; Mergelmeyer, S; Idris, F Mohamad; Mujkic, K; Myronenko, V; Nagano, K; Nigro, A; Nobe, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Olkiewicz, K; Onishchuk, Yu; Paul, E; Perlanski, W; Perrey, H; Pokrovskiy, N S; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M; Raval, A; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Ruspa, M; Samojlov, V; Saxon, D H; Schioppa, M; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schwartz, J; Shcheglova, L M; Shevchenko, R; Shkola, O; Singh, I; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Sola, V; Solano, A; Spiridonov, A; Stanco, L; Stefaniuk, N; Stern, A; Stewart, T P; Stopa, P; Sztuk-Dambietz, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tassi, E; Temiraliev, T; Tokushuku, K; Tomaszewska, J; Trofymov, A; Trusov, V; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Turkot, O; Tymieniecka, T; Verbytskyi, A; Viazlo, O; Walczak, R; Abdullah, W A T Wan; Wichmann, K; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Zakharchuk, N; Zarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zenaiev, O; Zhautykov, B O; Zhmak, N; Zotkin, D S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

High energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering at the SRI-CAT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a combination of vugraphs and two papers. The vugraphs give information on the beamline at the APS for IXS and the science addressable by IXS. They also cover the 10 milli-eV resolution spectrometer and the 200 milli-eV resolution spectrometer. The first paper covers the performance of the focusing Ge(444) backscattering analyzers for the inelastic x-ray scattering. The second paper discusses inelastic x-ray scattering from TiC and Ti single crystals.

Macrander, A.T.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Microsoft Word - CX Mid Way - Grand View Wood Pole Replacement-KEP.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

27, 2010 27, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Terry Kugler Lineman Foreman III - TFWF/Schultz Proposed Action: Replacing 11 wood pole structures on the Midway - Grandview transmission line and 12 wood pole structures on the Grandview - Red Mountain transmission line. PP&A Project No.: 1522 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): * B1.3 Routine maintenance activities for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures (such as roads), are required to maintain infrastructures in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Routine maintenance may result in replacement to the extent that replacement is in kind and is not a substantial upgrade or improvement. In kind

151

Microsoft Word - CX-FY11PascoDistrictWoodPoleReplacement_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1, 2011 1, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-PASCO SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Toby Cossairt Lineman Foreman III - TFPF-PASCO Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement and minor access road maintenance along various transmission line rights-of-way (ROW) in the Pasco District. The following lines will have pole change-outs in 2011: Benton-Scooteney #1, Benton-Othello #1, Franklin-Hedges #1, Franklin-Walla Walla #1, Grandview-Red Mountain #1, Franklin-Badger Canyon #2, Kennewick Tap to Franklin- Badger Canyon #2, McNary-Franklin #2, and White Bluffs-Richland #1. Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads,

152

Microsoft Word - CX-ChemawaDistrictWoodPoles2013_FY13.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Alvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Chad Hamel Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: 2013 Chemawa District Wood Pole Replacement Projects PP&A Project No.: 2736 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Various transmission lines located in Douglas, Linn and Lane counties, Oregon. Refer to Project Location Attachment for transmission lines and corresponding structure locations. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace deteriorating wood poles and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. cross arms, insulators, guy anchors, etc.) along the

153

Microsoft Word - CX-WenatcheeDistrictPoleReplacementFY13_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2013 2, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Pasco SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Joseph Lauer Lineman Foreman III - TFWF-SCHULTZ Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement and minor access road maintenance along various transmission line right-of-ways in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wenatchee District. The following lines will have pole change-outs in 2013: Grandview-Red Mountain #1 and Columbia-Valhalla #2. PP&A Project No.: 2604 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities. Location: Various transmission lines located within the Wenatchee District. See Project Location Attachment for structure locations and corresponding transmission lines.

154

Microsoft Word - CX-FY11WenatcheeDistrictWoodPoleReplacement_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4, 2011 4, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-PASCO SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Terry Kugler Lineman Foreman III - TFWF-SCHULTZ Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement and minor access road maintenance along various transmission line rights-of-way (ROW) in the Wenatchee District. The following lines will have pole change-outs in 2011: Chandler Tap, Grandview-Red Mt. #1 and Midway-Moxee #1. Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain... infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose.

155

Microsoft Word - CX_Maupin-TyghValley_PoleReplacement_FY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

, 2012 , 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Supervisory Civil Engineer - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Maupin-Tygh Valley #1 Pole Replacement Project Budget Information: Work Order #00297894 PP&A Project No.: 2196 Categorical Exclusions Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: Project activities would take place in Wasco County, Oregon, T04S R14E S20 Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace one aged and unsound wood pole structure (structure 3/2) on the BPA Maupin-Tygh Valley #1 transmission line. The new structure would be placed in the same location and have the same appearance as the old

156

Microsoft Word - CX-PilotButte-LaPine-WoodPoles-FY13_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2013 3, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements on Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 transmission line PP&A Project No.: 2484 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine Maintenance Location: Deschutes County, Oregon, at the following structures: Mile Structure 3 1 3 2 7 3 7 5 9 2 11 3 13 5 13 8 14 1 15 1 16 3 16 5 21 7 21 9 22 2 22 4 22 5 23 5 27 2 Proposed by: BPA Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to replace 19 deteriorating wood pole structures along its Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1, 230-kilovolt transmission line located in Deschutes County, Oregon. The 19 structures

157

Microsoft Word - CX-Redmond-PilotButte-WoodPoleFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2012 3, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Redmond-Pilot Butte No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project PP&A Project No.: 2189 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: Redmond-Pilot Butte No. 1 transmission line in Deschutes County, Oregon at structures 4/7 and 11/6. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to replace two deteriorating wood pole structures along its Redmond-Pilot Butte No. 1 230-kV transmission line located in Deschutes County, Oregon. The two structures

158

Microsoft Word - CX-TheDalles-DiscoveryWoodPolesFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2012 3, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Alvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Wood Pole Replacement on The Dalles-Discovery #1 transmission line PP&A Project No.: 2323 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Project activities would take place in Wasco County, Oregon Line Corridor Structures TRS County, State The Dalles-Discovery #1 2/4, 2/5, 2/6, 2/9, 2/10 2N, 13E, Section 28 Wasco, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace deteriorating wood poles and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. cross arms, insulators, guy anchors, etc.) along the

159

South Pole Telescope helps Argonne scientists study earliest ages of the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Related Content Related Content Employee Spotlight: Clarence Chang South Pole Telescope helps Argonne scientists study earliest ages of the universe By Louise Lerner * October 28, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint For physicist Clarence Chang at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, looking backward in time to the earliest ages of the universe is all in a day's work. Chang helped design and operate part of the South Pole Telescope, a project that aims a giant telescope at the night sky to track tiny bits of radiation that are still traveling across the universe from the period just after it was born. "Basically, what we're looking at is the afterglow light of the Big Bang," Chang said. In the wake of the Big Bang, all the matter in the universe was just hot,

160

Microsoft Word - CX-FY10_Ross-VanShip_Wood_Pole_Replacement_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clearance Memorandum Clearance Memorandum Troy Dalrymple Lineman Foreman I - TFVK-LMT Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement of Ross-Vancouver Shipyard No. 1, Structure 2/3 in Fog Chamber Dump Area #2 PP&A Project No: 1721 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain...infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: Ross Complex, Vancouver, WA. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace deteriorating wood poles and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. cross arms, insulators, guy anchors) on

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161

A Search for the Dark Matter Annual Modulation in South Pole Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astrophysical observations and cosmological data have led to the conclusion that nearly one quarter of the Universe consists of dark matter. Under certain assumptions, an observable signature of dark matter is the annual modulation of the rate of dark matter-nucleon interactions taking place in an Earth-bound experiment. To search for this effect, we introduce the concept for a new dark matter experiment using NaI scintillation detectors deployed deep in the South Pole ice. This experiment complements dark matter search efforts in the Northern Hemisphere and will investigate the observed annual modulation in the DAMA/LIBRA and DAMA/NaI experiments. The unique location will permit the study of background effects correlated with seasonal variations and the surrounding environment. This paper describes the experimental concept and explores the sensitivity of a 250 kg NaI experiment at the South Pole.

Cherwinka, J; Cowen, D F; Grant, D; Halzen, F; Heeger, K M; Hsu, L; Karle, A; Kudryavtsev, V A; Maruyama, R; Pettus, W; Robinson, M; Spooner, N J C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Microsoft Word - CX-RossDistrictWoodPolesFY13_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2013 9, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Alvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Stacie Hensley Realty Specialist - TEP-TPP-4 Proposed Action: 2013 Ross District Wood Pole Replacement Projects PP&A Project No.: 2737 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Various transmission lines located in Clark and Cowlitz counties, Washington, and , Columbia, Clatsop, and Washington counties, Oregon. Refer to Project Location Attachment for transmission lines and corresponding structure locations. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace deteriorating wood poles and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. cross arms, insulators, guy anchors, etc.) along the

163

Theory of coherent neutron scattering by hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics at low temperatures. I. General expression for inelastic coherent scattering of slow neutrons and effective thermal factors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The differential cross section for inelastic coherent scattering of slow neutrons scattered by hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics at low temperatures...

S. Stamenkovi?

1972-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Development of joining procedure for pole pieces of the electromagnet of the diverse safety rod in a fast breeder reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the prototype fast breeder reactor, the electromagnet for the diverse safety rod is welded using a non-magnetic filler to separate the magnetic poles. The pole pieces are made of soft iron, and the non-magnetic nickel base ERNiCr-3 was chosen as non-magnetic filler wire. The procedure followed for joining the pole pieces consisted of weld build-up of the inner and outer core pieces with ERNiCr-3 filler material and machining to the required dimensions. The final joining of the electromagnet was by a circular joint at the contact end. The joints were qualified by stringent inspection procedures, including leak testing.

H.C. Dey; V. Shankar; R. Vijayashree; P. Sivaraman; A. Banerjee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

166

Inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of H2@C60 and its temperature dependence decoded using rigorous quantum calculations and a new  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of H2@C60 and its temperature dependence decoded using://jcp.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 139, 064309 (2013) Inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of H2@C60 quantum cal- culations of the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra of this prototypical endohedral

Turro, Nicholas J.

167

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah Savannah River Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 1 November 6, 2008 Presentation By Sherri R. Ross Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office The Issue * How clean is clean? * Ultimate Challenge - Justify highly radioactive radionuclides have been removed to the maximum extent practical? 2 removed to the maximum extent practical? - Building compelling regulatory documentation that will withstand intense scrutiny §3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent practical 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 3 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C 4. Waste disposed pursuant to a State-approved closure plan or permit Note: If it is anticipated that Class C disposal limits will be exceeded, additional

168

Residual stress patterns in steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron strain scanning of residual stress is a valuable nondestructive tool for evaluation of residual stress in welds. The penetrating characteristic of neutrons permits mapping of strain patterns with a spatial resolution approaching 1mm at depths of 20mm in steels. While the overall patterns of the residual stress tensor in a weld are understood, the detailed patterns depend on welding process parameters and the effects of solid state transformation. The residual strain profiles in two multi-pass austenitic welds and a ferritic steel weld are presented. The stress-free lattice parameters within the fusion zone and the adjacent heat affected zone in the two austenitic welds show that the interpretation of residual stress from strains are affected by welding parameters. An interpretation of the residual strain pattern in the ferritic steel plate can be made using the strain measurements of a Gleeble test bar which has undergone the solid state austenite decomposition.

Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, X.L.; David, S.A.; Holden, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Root, J.H.; Swainson, I. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of simulated wind and rain on the residues. Tempera- ture and humidity conditions incident to the holding period were sufficient to destroy most of the residual toxicity of this material. Effect of Simulated Wind Among the chlorinated... hydrocarbon insecticides, there was little difference between the effects of simu- lated wind and rain on residual toxicities. However, it is likely that under field conditions the effects of rain would be more noticeable. Simulated wind was less damaging...

Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

DOE/EA-1636: Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Mitigation Action Plan (March 2009)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project DOE/EA-1636 Summary This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project. The project involves replacing wood pole structures on about 26 miles of the Albany-Burnt Woods single-circuit, 115- kilovolt (kV) transmission line and about 21 miles of the Santiam-Toledo single circuit, 230-kV transmission line in Linn, Benton and Lincoln counties, Oregon. This MAP is for the Proposed Action and includes all of the integral elements and commitments made in the Environmental Assessment (EA) to mitigate any potential adverse environmental impacts. The purpose of this MAP is to explain how the mitigation measures will be

171

Elimination of PZT thin film breakage caused by electric current arcing and intrinsic differential strains during poling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historically, substrate breakage during the poling process has been responsible for a 2% yield loss for a contract manufacturer specializing in volume production of lead zirconate titatate (PZT) thin film devices. In this ...

AlSaeed, Abdulelah (Abdulelah Ibrahim)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A-432411, a novel indolinone compound that disrupts spindle pole formation and inhibits human cancer cell growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

American Association for Cancer Research Article A-432411, a novel indolinone compound that disrupts spindle pole formation...therapies and for the development of new anticancer drugs. A-432411 is a novel small molecule that destabilizes microtubules...

Zehan Chen; Philip J. Merta; Nan-Hong Lin; Stephen K. Tahir; Peter Kovar; Hing L. Sham; and Haiying Zhang

173

862 / JOURNAL OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING / AUGUST 1999 INELASTIC BEHAVIOR OF MULTISTORY PARTIALLY RESTRAINED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limitations in concentrated plastic-hinge analysis methods and have proposed modifications (King et al. 1990862 / JOURNAL OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING / AUGUST 1999 INELASTIC BEHAVIOR OF MULTISTORY PARTIALLY Fellow, ASCE ABSTRACT: The plastic-zone method of analysis described in a companion paper is used

Foley, Christopher M.

174

Spin-Orbit Suppression of Cold Inelastic Collisions of Aluminum and Helium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a quantitative study of suppression of cold inelastic collisions by the spin-orbit interaction. We prepare cold ensembles of >10[superscript 11] Al([superscript 2]P[subscript 1/2]) atoms via cryogenic buffer-gas ...

Connolly, Colin Bryant

175

Inelastic light scattering and light emission from single and double wall carbon , Stephen Cronin2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surfactant suspensions. Keywords: carbon nanotubes, optical transition energies, chirality, photoluminescence of excitation energy from a distribution of single wall carbon nanotubes, in a surfactant suspensionInelastic light scattering and light emission from single and double wall carbon nanotubes Yan Yin1

176

N/z equilibration in deep inelastic collisions and the fragmentation of the resulting quasiprojectiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When target and projectile nuclei have a difference in neutron to proton ratio (N/Z), the quasiprojectiles formed in a deep inelastic collision (DIC) should have a mean N/Z between the N/Z of the target and the N/Z of the projectile, depending...

Keksis, August Lawrence

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

177

Open charm production in deep inelastic scattering at next-to-leading order at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An introduction and overview of charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA is given. The existing next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations are then reviewed, and key results are summarized. Finally, comparisons are made with the most recent HERA data, and unresolved issues are highlighted.

B. W. Harris

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

178

Charm quark and D^* cross sections in deeply inelastic scattering at DESY HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A next-to-leading order Monte Carlo program for the calculation of heavy quark cross sections in deeply inelastic scattering is described. Concentrating on charm quark and D^*(2010) production at HERA, several distributions are presented and their variation with respect to charm quark mass, parton distribution set, and renormalization-factorization scale is studied.

B. W. Harris; J. Smith

1997-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

Invariant mass distributions for heavy quark-antiquark pairs in deep inelastic electroproduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have completed the ${\\cal O}(\\alpha_s)$ QCD corrections to exclusive heavy quark-antiquark distributions in deep inelastic electroproduction and present here the differential distributions in the masses of charm-anticharm and bottom-antibottom pairs at the electron-proton collider HERA.

B. W. Harris; J. Smith

1995-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Randomly accelerated particle in a box: Mean absorption time for partially absorbing and inelastic boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Randomly accelerated particle in a box: Mean absorption time for partially absorbing and inelastic which is randomly accelerated by Gaussian white noise on the line segment 0 x 1 and is absorbed as soon accelerated particle which moves on the half line x 0 with an absorbing boundary at x=0. The motion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A scaler-based data acquisition system for measuring parity violation asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experiment that measured the parity violating (PV) asymmetry Ad in e- 2H deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at Q2 ~ 1.10 and 1.90 (GeV/c) 2 and XB ~ 0.3 was completed in experimental Hall A at the Thomas Jefferson National ...

Pan, Kai, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Residual Gas Mobility in Ormen Lange.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The topic of this report is "Mobility of Residual Gas in Ormen Lange" and it has been prepared as a part of the course (more)

Undeland, Elisabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Standard Errors for Table 10.5;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","...

184

Methods of separating particulate residue streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Christopher T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

185

Inhomogeneous quasi-stationary state of dense fluid of inelastic hard spheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study closed dense collections of hard spheres that collide inelastically with constant coefficient of normal restitution. We find inhomogeneous states (IS) where the density profile is spatially non-uniform but constant in time. The states are exact solutions of non-linear partial differential equations that describe the coupled distributions of density and temperature when inelastic losses of energy per collision are small. The derivation is performed without modelling the equations' coefficients that are unknown in the dense limit (such as the equation of state), using only their scaling form specific for hard spheres. The IS is exact non-linear state of this many-body system. It captures a fundamental property of inelastic collections of particles: the possibility of preserving non-uniform temperature via the interplay of inelastic cooling and heat conduction, generalizing previous results in the dilute case. We perform numerical simulations to demonstrate that arbitrary initial state evolves to the IS in the limit of long times where the container has the geometry of the channel. The evolution is like gas-liquid transition. The liquid condenses in a vanishing part of the total volume but takes most of the mass of the system. However, the gaseous phase, which mass grows only logarithmically with the system size, is relevant because its fast particles carry most of the energy of the system. Remarkably, the system self-organizes to dissipate no energy: the inelastic decay of energy is a power-law $[1+t/t_c]^{-2}$ where $t_c$ diverges in the thermodynamic limit. This behavior is caused by unusual spatial distribution of particles: on approach to one of the container's walls the density grows inversely with the distance. We discuss the relation of our results to the recently proposed finite-time singularity in other container's geometries.

Itzhak Fouxon

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

186

Assessment of secondary crop residues. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the first of three reports assessing the feasibility of converting secondary agricultural residues to energy in the form of either methane gas or ethyl alcohol. Secondary agricultural residues are defined in this study as those residues resulting from biomass processing to produce primary products; e.g., whey from cheese processing, vegetable processing wastes, residues from paper pulping, etc. This report summarizes the first two phases of this study, data compilation, and evaluation. Subsequent reports will analyze the technical and economic feasibility of converting these residues to energy and the implementability of this technology. The industries for which data has been compiled in this report include vegetable, fruit, seafood, meat, poultry, and dairy processing and the pulp, paper, and paperboard industry. The data collected include raw product input, final processed product output, residue types, and quantity, residue concentration, biodegradability, seasonality of production, and geographic distribution of processing facilities. In general, these industries produce a relatively solid residue ranging in total solids concentration from 10 to 50% and a dilute liquid residue with an organic content (measured as COD or BOD) ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand mg/l. Due to the significant quantities of residues generated in each of the industries, it appears that the potential exists for generating a substantial quantity of energy. For a particular industry this quantity of energy can range from only one percent upwards to nearly thirty-five percent of the total processing energy required. The total processing energy required for the industries included in this study is approximately 2.5 quads per year. The potential energy which can be generated from these industrial residues will be 0.05 to 0.10 quads per year or approximately 2 to 4 percent of the total demand.

Ashare, E.; Leuschner, A.P.; West, C.E.; Langton, B.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Predicting protein residueresidue contacts using deep networks and boosting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......structure prediction, protein residue-residue contacts...i.e. homologous proteins with known structure...train large boosted ensembles of DN classifiers achieving...advanced search of the Protein Data Bank filtering...contained fewer than 20% disordered residues (i.e. coordinates......

Jesse Eickholt; Jianlin Cheng

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Seismic Travel-Time Residuals and Plates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......United States, Canada and Greenland under the auspices of Project Vela Uniform (Long Range Seismic Measurements 1966). Arrival...1 that if we plot residuals on the focal sphere, we are at liberty to ascribe these residuals to source effects, receiver effects......

D. Davies; D. P. McKenzie

1969-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing process for PVDF polymer-based piezoelectric device applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a new additive manufacturing (AM) process to directly and continuously print piezoelectric devices from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymeric filament rods under a strong electric field. This process, called 'electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing or EPAM, combines AM and electric poling processes and is able to fabricate free-form shape piezoelectric devices continuously. In this process, the PVDF polymer dipoles remain well-aligned and uniform over a large area in a single design, production and fabrication step. During EPAM process, molten PVDF polymer is simultaneously mechanically stresses in-situ by the leading nozzle and electrically poled by applying high electric field under high temperature. The EPAM system was constructed to directly print piezoelectric structures from PVDF polymeric filament while applying high electric field between nozzle tip and printing bed in AM machine. Piezoelectric devices were successfully fabricated using the EPAM process. The crystalline phase transitions that occurred from the process were identified by using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. The results indicate that devices printed under a strong electric field become piezoelectric during the EPAM process and that stronger electric fields result in greater piezoelectricity as marked by the electrical response and the formation of sharper peaks at the polar ? crystalline wavenumber of the PVDF polymer. Performing this process in the absence of an electric field does not result in dipole alignment of PVDF polymer. The EPAM process is expected to lead to the widespread use of AM to fabricate a variety of piezoelectric PVDF polymer-based devices for sensing, actuation and energy harvesting applications with simple, low cost, single processing and fabrication step.

ChaBum Lee; Joshua A Tarbutton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Mach-Zehnder Modulator Performance on the NIF South Pole Bang Time Diagnostic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present performance data for Mach-Zehnder optical modulators fielded on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a potential signal path upgrade for the South Pole Bang Time diagnostic. A single channel demonstration system has been deployed utilizing two modulators operating in a 90-degree In phase and Quadrature (I/Q) configuration. X-ray target emission signals are split and fed into two recording systems: a reference CRT based oscilloscope, Greenfield FTD10000, and the dual Mach-Zehnder system. Results of X-ray implosion time (bang time) determination from these two recording systems are compared and presented.

Beeman, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Chow, R.; Carpenter, A.; Bond, E.; Zayas-Rivera, Z.; Bell, P.; Celeste, J.; Clancy, T.; Miller, E. K.; Edgell, D.; Donaldson, W. R.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Coupled tunnelling motion of a pair of methyl groups in lithium acetate studied by inelastic neutron scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The tunnelling and torsional motions of methyl groups in lithium acetate dihydrate (CH3COOLi2H2O) have been studied in detail by incoherent inelastic neutron scattering. The results are interpreted by a model of...

S. Clough; A. Heidemann; A. H. Horsewill

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Microsoft Word - CX-LaPine-ChiloquinWoodPoleFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: La Pine-Chiloquin No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project PP&A Project No.: 2236 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6, Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: La Pine-Chiloquin No. 1 230-kV transmission line in Klamath County, Oregon, at the following structure locations: 11/5, 16/1, 16/4, 17/3, 17/8, 18/2, 18/3, 20/4, 22/2, 22/5, 28/1, 42/3, 43/6, 44/4, and 45/1. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to replace 15 deteriorating wood pole structures along its La Pine-Chiloquin 230-kV transmission line located in Klamath County,

193

Extension of the Application of the generalized pole representation to the treatment of resonance cross sections.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One reliable and convenient way of processing the cross sections in the resolved energy region is by use of the generalized pole representation, whereby the Doppler-broadening calculation can be carried out rigorously using the analytical approach. So far, its applications have been limited to cases with resonance parameters specified by the Reich-Moore formalism. Although such an approach, in principle, can be extended to all three remaining representations of resolved resonance parameters specified by the ENDF data format, there is no computational tool for handling such a task at present. Given that Breit-Wigner formalisms are probably the most widely used by any evaluated nuclear data library to represent cross sections, a special effort has to be made to convert the single level and multilevel Breit-Wigner resonance parameters to pole parameters. A FORTRAN computer code BW2PR has been developed for this purpose. Extensive calculations have been performed to demonstrate that the proposed method ensures the conservation of the information contained originally in Breit-Wigner resonance parameters. This will make it possible to apply the exact Doppler-broadening method to a larger collection of nuclides.

Hwang, R. N.; Jammes, C.

1999-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

194

Mapping Residual Structure in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins at Residue Resolution Using Millisecond Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange and Residue Averaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurement of residual structure in intrinsically disordered proteins can provide insights into the mechanisms by which such proteins undergo coupled binding and folding. The present ... describes an approach to...

Theodore R. Keppel; David D. Weis

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Coulomb and Nuclear-Excitation of Giant-Dipole Resonances in (Alpha,alpha') Inelastic-Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 36, NUMBER 4 OCTOBER 1987 Coulomb and nuclear excitation of giant dipole resonances in (a, a') inelastic scattering S. Sh-lomo Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, and Cyclotron Institute, Texas A... January 1987) Cross sections of inelastic a-particle scattering to isovector giant dipole resonances are calculat- ed including both nuclear and Coulomb excitation. It is shown that the calculated cross sections are rather small and can be safely...

Shlomo, S.; Lui, YW; Youngblood, David H.; Udagawa, T.; Tamura, T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Sensitivity improvement of a laser interferometer limited by inelastic back-scattering, employing dual readout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic back-scattering of stray light is a long-standing problem in high-sensitivity interferometric measurements and a potential limitation for advanced gravitational-wave detectors, in particular at sub-audio-band frequencies. The emerging parasitic interferences cannot be distinguished from a scientific signal via conventional single readout. In this work, we propose and demonstrate the subtraction of inelastic back-scatter signals by employing dual homodyne detection on the output light -- here -- of a table-top Michelson interferometer. The additional readout contains solely parasitic signals and is used to model the scatter source. Subtraction of the scatter signal reduces the noise spectral density and thus improves the measurement sensitivity. Our scheme is qualitatively different from the previously demonstrated vetoing of scatter signals and opens a new path for improving the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors.

Meinders, Melanie

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Magnetic excitations in Dy/Y superlattices as seen via inelastic neutron scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of the spin excitations propagating normal to the interfaces in Dy/Y superlattices using neutron inelastic scattering are presented. For a given magnon momentum, a neutron-scattering spectrum shows multiple peaks at different energies, which indicates discrete energy spectra. The results are compared with theoretical calculations developed here to describe magnetic excitations in rare-earth superlattices. The theory accounts for Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) and Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interactions in incommensurate helicoidal structures and achieves a quantitative agreement with the experimental data. This work demonstrates that neutron inelastic scattering can be used for systematic studies of the exchange interactions and spin dynamics in nanomagnetic systems over wide areas of the Brillouin zone.

A. T. D. Grnwald; A. R. Wildes; W. Schmidt; E. V. Tartakovskaya; J. Kwo; C. Majkrzak; R. C. C. Ward; A. Schreyer

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

Simultaneous QCD analysis of diffractive and inclusive deep-inelastic scattering data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We perform a next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD analysis of deep-inelastic scattering data, in which we account for absorptive corrections. These corrections are determined from a simultaneous analysis of diffractive deep-inelastic data. The absorptive effects are found to enhance the size of the gluon distribution at small x, such that a negative input gluon distribution at Q{sup 2}=1 GeV{sup 2} is no longer required. We discuss the problem that the gluon distribution is valence-like at low scales, whereas the sea quark distribution grows with decreasing x. Our study hints at the possible importance of power corrections for Q{sup 2}{approx_equal}1-2 GeV{sup 2}.

Martin, A.D.; Watt, G. [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Ryskin, M.G. [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, St. Petersburg, 188300 (Russian Federation)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Measurement of Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Electron-Deuteron Inelastic Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were published earlier, but are presented here in more detail.

D. Wang; K. Pan; R. Subedi; Z. Ahmed; K. Allada; K. A. Aniol; D. S. Armstrong; J. Arrington; V. Bellini; R. Beminiwattha; J. Benesch; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; J. -P. Chen; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; M. M. Dalton; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; W. Deconinck; X. Deng; A. Deur; C. Dutta; L. El Fassi; J. Erler; D. Flay; G. B. Franklin; M. Friend; S. Frullani; F. Garibaldi; S. Gilad; A. Giusa; A. Glamazdin; S. Golge; K. Grimm; K. Hafidi; J. -O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; R. Holmes; T. Holmstrom; R. J. Holt; J. Huang; C. E. Hyde; C. M. Jen; D. Jones; Hoyoung Kang; P. M. King; S. Kowalski; K. S. Kumar; J. H. Lee; J. J. LeRose; N. Liyanage; E. Long; D. McNulty; D. J. Margaziotis; F. Meddi; D. G. Meekins; L. Mercado; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; M. Mihovilovic; N. Muangma; K. E. Mesick; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; A. Nuruzzaman; Y. Oh; D. Parno; K. D. Paschke; S. K. Phillips; X. Qian; Y. Qiang; B. Quinn; A. Rakhman; P. E. Reimer; K. Rider; S. Riordan; J. Roche; J. Rubin; G. Russo; K. Saenboonruang; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; A. Shahinyan; R. Silwal; S. irca; P. A. Souder; R. Suleiman; V. Sulkosky; C. M. Sutera; W. A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; B. Waidyawansa; B. Wojtsekhowski; L. Ye; B. Zhao; X. Zheng

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

200

IBIS: An inverse geometry Brillouin inelastic neutron spectrometer for the SNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high power target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) currently has about 20 completed neutron scattering instruments. With a broad coverage of the momentum transfer (Q)-energy (E) space, these instruments serve an extensive user community. In an effort to further expand the scientific capabilities of the SNS instrument suites, we propose a low background, inverse geometry Brillouin inelastic spectrometer for the SNS which will expand the Q-E coverage of the current instrument suite and facilitate the study of inelastic and quasi-elastic scatterings at low Q values. The possible location for the proposed instrument is either beamline 8 which views the decoupled water moderator, or beamline 14A, which views a cold, coupled super critical hydrogen moderator. The instrument parameters, optimizations, and performances at these two beamline locations are discussed.

Zhao, J. K.; Robertson, Lee; Herwig, Kenneth W. [Instrument and Source Development Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Wildgruber, Christoph U. [Chemical and Engineering Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Probing spin frustration in high-symmetry magnetic nanomolecules by inelastic neutron scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low temperature inelastic neutron scattering studies have been performed to characterize the low energy magnetic excitation spectrum of the magnetic nanomolecule {Mo72Fe30}. This unique highly symmetric cluster features spin frustration and is one of the largest discrete magnetic molecules studied to date by inelastic neutron scattering. The 30s=5?2 FeIII ions, embedded in a spherical polyoxomolybdate molecule, occupy the vertices of an icosidodecahedron and are coupled via nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic interactions. The overall energy scale of the excitation and the gross features of the temperature dependence of the observed neutron scattering are explained by a quantum model of the frustrated spin cluster. However, no satisfactory theoretical explanation is yet available for the observed magnetic field dependence.

V. O. Garlea; S. E. Nagler; J. L. Zarestky; C. Stassis; D. Vaknin; P. Kgerler; D. F. McMorrow; C. Niedermayer; D. A. Tennant; B. Lake; Y. Qiu; M. Exler; J. Schnack; M. Luban

2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

202

Polarized Deep Inelastic Scattering Off the "Neutron" From Gauge/String Duality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate deep inelastic scattering off the polarized "neutron" using gauge/string duality. The "neutron" corresponds to a supergravity mode of the neutral dilatino. Through introducing the Pauli interaction term into the action in $\\textrm{AdS}_{5}$ space, we calculate the polarized deep inelastic structure functions of the "neutron" in supergravity approximation at large t' Hooft coupling $\\lambda$ and finite $x$ with $\\lambda^{-1/2}\\ll xneutron" are power suppressed at the same order as the ones of the "proton." Especially, we find the Burkhardt-Cottingham-like sum rule, which is satisfied in the work by Gao and Xiao, is broken due to the Pauli interaction term. We also illustrate how such a Pauli interaction term can arise naturally from higher dimensional fermion-graviton coupling through the usual Kaluza-Klein reduction.

Jian-Hua Gao; Zong-Gang Mou

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

203

Nuclear level density as a tool for probing the inelastic scattering of 6He  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cross sections are calculated for the both elastic and inelastic scattering of 6He from 12C and 4He. A phenomenological optical potential is used to describe the elastic scattering. 4He is taken as spherical and inelastic couplings to the first excited states of 6He and 12C are described with collective rotational model and coupled-channels method. Deformation lengths for 6He and 12C are determined from semi-classical nuclear level density model by using Laplace-like formula for the nuclear level density parameter. The comparison of the predicted and the measured cross sections are presented to test the applicability of nuclear level density model to the light exotic nuclei reactions. Good agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured cross sections.

Bora Canbula; Halil Babacan

2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

204

Measurement of Leading Neutron Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of leading neutrons, where the neutron carries a large fraction x_L of the incoming proton's longitudinal momentum, is studied in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at HERA. The data were taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 122 pb^{-1}. The semi-inclusive cross section is measured in the phase space defined by the photon virtuality 6 neutron transverse momentum p_T neutron structure function, F_2^{LN(3)}(Q^2,x,x_L), and the fraction of deep-inelastic scattering events containing a leading neutron are studied as a function of Q^2, x and x_L. Assuming that the pion exchange mechanism dominates leading neutron production, the data provide constraints on the shape of the pion structure function.

H1 Collaboration

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

205

Variation of Q with energy in mosaic analyzers for inelastic x-ray measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Curved mosaic graphite analyzers have been used for many years for inelastic scattering measurements with both conventional x-ray sources as well as synchrotron sources (1). The trend in recent years has been to use spherically bent perfect crystal analyzers to collect large solid angles with high energy resolution. Although, these spherical analyzers achieve excellent energy resolution, the large solid angle limits the Q resolution. For cylindrically bent mosaic graphite, it is possible to obtain good energy and Q resolution simultaneously, while maintaining a large solid angle by collecting a range of energies dispersed along a linear position detector. However, if the mosaic spread of the crystal is less than the acceptance angle subtended in the scattering plane, the energy spectrum from a mosaic analyzer as collected in a linear detector will have Q varying with energy. The resolution and the variation in Q with energy along a linear detector are discussed in relation to inelastic x-ray scattering measurements.

Tischler, J. Z.; Larson, B. C. [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6030 (United States); Zschack, Paul [Univ. of Illinois, UNICAT, Bldg. 438D, Argonne National Lab., Argonne, Illinois 60439-4863 (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Strangeness Production at low $Q^2$ in Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of neutral strange hadrons is investigated using deep-inelastic scattering events measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The measurements are made in the phase space defined by the negative four-momentum transfer squared of the photon 2 < Q^2 < 100 GeV^2 and the inelasticity 0.1 < y < 0.6. The K_s and Lambda production cross sections and their ratios are determined. K_s production is compared to the production of charged particles in the same region of phase space. The Lambda - anti-Lambda asymmetry is also measured and found to be consistent with zero. Predictions of leading order Monte Carlo programs are compared to the data.

Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Bacchetta, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H.-U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, Paul R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Peng, H; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wegener, D; Wessels, M; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Yeganov, V; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Measurement of Charm and Beauty Jets in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of cross sections for events with charm and beauty jets in deep inelastic scattering at HERA are presented. Events with jets of transverse energy E_T^jet > 6 GeV and pseudorapidity -1.0 6 GeV^2 and inelasticity variable 0.07 6 GeV. The data were collected with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 189 pb^-1. The numbers of charm and beauty jets are determined using variables reconstructed using the H1 vertex detector with which the impact parameters of the tracks to the primary vertex and the position of secondary vertices are measured. The measurements are compared with QCD predictions and with previous measurements where heavy flavours are identified using muons.

Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, D; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Ceccopieri, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; Delcourt, B; Delvax, J; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dobre, M; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Grebenyuk, A; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C.W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Huber, F; Jacquet, M; Janssen, X; Jonsson, L; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P.J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lipka, K; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nikitin, D; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Pahl, P; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pirumov, H; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Tabasco, J E.Ruiz; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P.C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Trevino, A Vargas; Vazdik, Y; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80~K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

Niedziela, Jennifer L [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Probing Hole-Induced Ferromagnetic Exchange in Magnetic Semiconductors by Inelastic Neutron Scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of hole doping on the exchange coupling of the nearest neighbor (NN) Mn pairs in Zn1-xMnxTe is probed by inelastic neutron scattering. The difference in the NN exchange energy ?J1 in the presence and in the absence of the holes is determined. The obtained value of ?J1 is in good agreement with the predictions of the Zener/RKKY model, even on the insulator side of the metal-insulator transition.

H. K?pa; Le Van Khoi; C. M. Brown; M. Sawicki; J. K. Furdyna; T. M. Giebultowicz; T. Dietl

2003-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

210

Nuclear Effects in Deep Inelastic Scattering of Charged-Current Neutrino off Nuclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear effect in the neutrino-nucleus charged-Current inelastic scattering process is studied by analyzing the CCFR and NuTeV data. Structure functions $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $xF_3(x,Q^2)$ as well as differential cross sections are calculated by using CTEQ parton distribution functions and EKRS and HKN nuclear parton distribution functions, and compared with the CCFR and NuTeV data. It is found that the corrections of nuclear effect to the differential cross section for the charged-current anti-neutrino scattering on nucleus are negligible, the EMC effect exists in the neutrino structure function $F_2(x,Q^2)$ in the large $x$ region, the shadowing and anti-shadowing effect occurs in the distribution functions of valence quarks in the small and medium $x$ region,respectively. It is also found that shadowing effects on $F_2(x,Q^2)$ in the small $x$ region in the neutrino-nucleus and the charged-lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering processes are different. It is clear that the neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering data should further be employed in restricting nuclear parton distributions.

Duan ChunGui; Li GuangLie; Shen PengNian

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

211

Predicting residual stresses in gas turbine components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes work carried out by a major aircraft-engine builder and one of its suppliers to validate the numerical prediction of heat-treatment-induced residual stresses. For verification, the proje...

R. A. Wallis Ph.D.; I. W. Craighead B.Sc. Eng.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

SAR impulse response with residual chirps.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Mechanisms of hydrocracking of heavy oil residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on research data, a technology of low-pressure residual fuel oil hydrocracking with a suspended catalyst has been developed. The process has been refined on a laboratory setup. The reaction kinetics has ...

Kh. I. Abad-zade; F. M. Velieva

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Residual stress in nanocrystalline nickel tungsten electrodeposits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We employ a three-dimensional ...

Ziebell, Tiffany D. (Tiffany Dawn)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Microsoft Word - CX-ChemawaWoodPolesCT-KFG12-KOCFGT-FY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2012 Chemawa District Wood Pole Replacement Projects 2012 Chemawa District Wood Pole Replacement Projects PP&A Project No.: 2325 (Carlton-Tillamook #1, Keeler-Forest Grove #2, Keeler-Oregon City #2, Keeler-Forest Grove #1, Forest Grove-Tillamook #1) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Various transmission lines located in Washington, Yamhill, and Tillamook counties, Oregon. Refer to Project Location Attachment for transmission lines and corresponding structure locations. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace deteriorating wood poles and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. cross arms, insulators, guy anchors, etc.) along the subject transmission lines. Replacement will be in-kind and will utilize the existing holes to

216

Microsoft Word - CX-Alvey-FairviewAlvey-MartinCreek-DrainWoodPolesFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wood pole replacements on the Alvey-Fairview No. 1 230-kV, Alvey- Wood pole replacements on the Alvey-Fairview No. 1 230-kV, Alvey- Martin Creek 115-kV, and Martin Creek-Drain #1 115-kV transmission line rights-of-way (ROW) PP&A Project No.: 2308 (WO# 297303), 2310 (WO# 297305), 2319 (WO# 297996) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Alvey and Douglas counties, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace 18 deteriorating wood poles and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. cross arms, insulators, guy anchors, etc.) as well as cross arms on three other structures along the subject transmission lines. Replacement will be in-kind and will utilize the existing holes to minimize ground disturbance. If necessary, an auger

217

Microsoft Word - CX-AlveyWoodPolesA-LE-AE-LH-AC-TBRT-FY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2012 Alvey District Wood Pole Replacement Projects 2012 Alvey District Wood Pole Replacement Projects PP&A Project No.: 2307 (Albany-Lebanon #1), 2309 (Blue River Tap), 2311 (Cougar- Thurston #1), 2312 (Eugene-Alvey #2), 2313 (Eugene-Lane #1), 2314 (Hawkins-Alvey #1) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Various transmission lines located in Linn and Lane counties, Oregon. Refer to Project Location Attachment for transmission lines and corresponding structure locations. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace deteriorating wood poles and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. cross arms, insulators, guy anchors, etc.) along the subject transmission lines. Replacement will be in-kind and will utilize the existing holes to

218

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a Densified Large Square Bale Format ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a...

219

DOE/EA-1636: Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment (March 2009)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Albany-Burnt Woods and Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1636 March 2009 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1636 Bonneville Power Administration March 2009 Bonneville Power Administration i Table of Contents Chapter 1 Need for and Purpose of Action ............................................................... 1-1 1.1 Introduction .....................................................................................................

220

Microsoft Word - CX-AlveyDistrict_2011WoodPoles_No1957_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0, 2011 0, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Alvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Nick Wenzl John Carter Line Foreman III-TFE-Alvey Line Foreman I-TFE-Alvey Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements and minor access road maintenance along portions of the Eugene-Lane #1, Eugene-Alvey #2, and Hawkins-Alvey #1 transmission line rights-of- way (ROW) PP&A Project No: 1957 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights of way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain...infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designated purpose. Location: The project area is located in Lane County, Oregon, in Bonneville Power

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221

Microsoft Word - CX-Brasada-Harney-WoodPoles_FY13_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2013 2, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Brasada-Harney No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project PP&A Project No.: 2187 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Brasada-Harney No. 1 transmission line in Deschutes and Harney counties, Oregon, at the following locations: Mile Structure Landowner Township Range Section 23 8 Private 19 16 22 26 6 BLM 19 17 30 28 1 BLM 19 17 32 29 2 Private 19 17 4 29 5 Private 19 17 4 29 7 BLM 19 17 4 30 8 Private 19 17 10 31 5 BLM 19 17 11 46 5 DSL 21 19 13 49 8 BLM 21 20 21

222

Microsoft Word - CX-KalispellTLMDistrictFY11WoodPoleReplacement_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cleareance Memorandum Cleareance Memorandum Michael Stolfus Lineman Foreman III - TFKF-Kalispell Kurt Marsh Lineman Foreman I - TFKF-Kalispell Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement and minor access road maintenance along various transmission line rights-of-way in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Kalispell District. PP&A Project No: 1839 (Garrison-Anaconda #1), 1840 (Hot Springs-Rattlesnake #1), 1841 (Rattlesnake-Garrison #1), 1842 (Columbia Falls-Kalispell #1), 1843 (Kalispell-Kerr #1), 1844 (Libby-Bonners Ferry #1), 1845 (Columbia Falls-Trego #1) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights of way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain...infrastructures...in a

223

Microsoft Word - CX-ForestGrove-McMinnvilleWoodPolesFY12_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5, 2012 5, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Alvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum James Semrau Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Forest Grove-McMinnville #1 Wood Pole Replacement Projects PP&A Project No.: 2326 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: The project is located in Washington and Yamhill counties, Oregon, in BPA's Salem District. Structure locations are as follows: Structure Legal Description County, State 2\5 1S, 3W, Sec. 6 Washington, OR 3\3 1S, 3W, Sec. 7 Washington, OR 3\6, 4\3 1S. 4W, Sec. 12 Washington, OR 4\8, 4\9, 5\3 1S, 4W, Sec. 14 Washington, OR 6\2, 6\5 1S, 4W, Sec. 23 Washington, OR

224

Microsoft Word - CX-Cardwell-Cowlitz2011WoodPoles_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Erich Orth Project Manager - TEP-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Replacement of all aging wood pole transmission line support structures along the Cardwell-Cowlitz No. 1, 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line Budget Information: Work Order #00279267 PP&A Project No.: 2021 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities... for...rights of way, infrastructures (e.g.. structures)... routine maintenance activities, corrective...are required to maintain and preserve infrastructures...in a condition suitable for the facility to be used for its designated purpose. Location: The project area is located along Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA)

225

Microsoft Word - CX-PascoDistrictPoleReplacement_FY13_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Pasco SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Greg Wilfong Lineman Foreman III - TFPF-PASCO Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement and minor access road maintenance along the Franklin-Badger Canyon #2 and Walla Walla-Pendleton #1 transmission line rights-of-way in the Pasco District. PP&A Project No.: 2655 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities Location: Franklin-Badger Canyon #2 and Walla Walla-Pendleton #1 transmission lines located within the Pasco District. See table below for structure locations on the corresponding transmission lines: Transmission Line/ROW Structure # Township Range Section County, State Franklin-Badger Canyon

226

Microsoft Word - CX-NBendFY11WoodPolesWEND-TAHK_TAHK-RDSPT_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Alvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Andy Crosby Todd Stringer Line Foreman III - TFEP-North Bend Line Foreman I - TFEP-North Bend Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement and minor access road maintenance along the Wendson-Tahkenitch #1 and the Tahkenitch-Reedsport #1 transmission line rights-of-way. PP&A Project No: 1960 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain...infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designated purpose. Location: The project area is located in Lane and Coos counties, Oregon, in Bonneville Power

227

Microsoft Word - CX-Drummond-MacksInn_WoodPoleReplacementFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10, 2012 10, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-CELILO SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Mark Hadley Lineman Foreman III - TFIF-Idaho Falls Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements along the Drummond-Macks Inn, Macks Inn- Madison, and Targhee Tap 115-kV transmission line rights-of-way. PP&A Project Number: 2191 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities... Location: The project area is located in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Idaho Falls District. Project locations are listed below: Project Location Township Range Section(s) County Line Name Structures Use Ownership 4N 45E 11 Teton Targhee Tap 8/8 Agriculture Private 14N 44E 22 Fremont Macks Inn- Madison

228

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-ChiefJoseph_ARandWood Poles_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Cleareance Memorandum Todd Wehner Road Engineer - TELF-TPP-3 Robert Keudell Line Foreman III - TFWK-Grand Coulee Robert Zellar Line Foreman I - TFWK-Grand Coulee Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement, equipment landing construction and access road construction/maintenance along portions of the Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph #1 and #2 230-kV transmission line rights-of-way. PP&A Project No: 1777 Work Order No.: 275582 and 275583 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021):  B1.13 Construction, acquisition, and relocation of onsite pathways and short onsite access roads and railroads.  B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such

229

Microsoft Word - CX-Chehalis-CentraliaNo2WoodPolesFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0, 2012 0, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Olympia SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Ryan Brady Line Foreman III - TFOK-Chehalis Proposed Action: Wood pole structure replacements on the Chehalis-Centralia No. 2 115-kV transmission line PP&A Project No.: 2372, WO# 298136 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities... Location: The subject transmission line is located in Lewis County, Washington, in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Olympia Maintenance District. The transmission line ROW corridors cross public and privately-owned lands that are mostly rural residential property. No U.S. Forest service or tribal lands are within the project boundaries.

230

Microsoft Word - CX-Shelton-Fairmount-WoodPolesFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4, 2012 4, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Olympia SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Lee Web Line Foreman III - TFOF-Olympia Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements as needed on the Shelton-Fairmount No. 1, 115-kV transmission line PP&A Project No.: 2371; Work Order # 298004 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities Location: The subject transmission line is located in Mason and Jefferson counties, Washington, in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Olympia Maintenance District. The transmission line ROW corridors cross public and privately-owned lands that include industrial forestlands and rural residential property. Four structures requiring replacement including 43/1,

231

Microsoft Word - CX-EllensburgTLMDistrictFY11WoodPoleReplacement_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clearance Memorandum Clearance Memorandum Terry Kugler Lineman Foreman III - TFWF-Schultz Joe Lauer Line Foreman I - TFWF-Schultz Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement and minor access road maintenance along portions of the Columbia-Valhalla #1 and #2 transmission line rights-of-way. PP&A Project No: 1851 (Columbia-Valhalla #1), 1852 (Columbia-Valhalla #2) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights of way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain...infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: The project area is located in Douglas and Chelan counties, Washington. Project

232

Microsoft Word - CX-CentraliaTap_Chehalis-Covington_TransAlta_WoodPoles_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6, 2011 6, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Chad Caldwell Customer Service Engineer - TPC-Olympia Proposed Action: Replace aging wood poles on Trans Alta's Centralia Tap to Chehalis- Covington No. 1 230-kV transmission line. Budget Information: As per agreement with Trans Alta PP&A Project No.: N/A Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities... for...rights-of-way, infrastructures (e.g.. roads)... routine maintenance activities, corrective...are required to maintain and preserve infrastructures...in a condition suitable for the facility to be used for its designated purpose. Location: The project is located on Trans Alta's Centralia Tap to Chehalis-Covington No. 1

233

Microsoft Word - CX-FY10_Kalispell_District_Wood_Pole_Replacement_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6, 2010 6, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Cleareance Memorandum Michael Stolfus Lineman Foreman III - TFKF-Kalispell Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement and minor access road maintenance along various transmission line right-of-ways in the Kalispell District PP&A Project No: 1536 (Columbia Falls-Kalispell #1), 1537 (Anaconda-Silver Bow #1), 1538 (Columbia Falls-Trego #1), 1541 (Libby-Bonners Ferry #1), 1542 (Rattlesnake-Garrison #1) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain...infrastructures...in a

234

Microsoft Word - CX-SpokaneDistrictWoodPoleReplacementsFY13_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1, 2013 1, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Amanda Williams Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: 2013 Spokane District Wood Pole Replacement Projects PP&A Project No.: 2131 (Albeni Falls-Sand Creek No. 1), 2132 (Bronx-Sand Creek No. 1), 2492 (Albeni Falls-Pine Street No. 1), 2133 (Bell-Boundary No. 3), 2134 (Bell-Addy No. 1), 2135 (Bell-Trentwood No. 1), 2136 (Bell-Trentwood No. 2), 2137 (Libby-Bonners Ferry No. 1), 2493 (Boundary-Nelway #1), 2494 (Colville-Boundary #1), 1547 (Four Lakes Tap), 2138 (Green Bluff Tap), 2495 (Sand Creek-Bonners Ferry No. 1 and No. 2), and 1929 (Spirit Tap) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance

235

Microsoft Word - CX-BadgerCanyon-RichlandNo1_WoodPoles_FY13.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7, 2013 7, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Pasco SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Walker Miller Electrical Engineer - TPCF-W RICHLAND Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements on the Badger Canyon-Richland #1 transmission line PP&A Project No.: 2670 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities. Location: City of Richland, Benton County, WA Transmission Line/ROW Structure # Township Range Section County, State Badger Canyon-Richland #1 4/9 and 4/10 9N 28E 26 Benton, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA, at the expense of the City of Richland, proposes to raise structures 4/9 and 4/10 of the Badger Canyon-Richland #1 115-kilovolt transmission line to

236

Microsoft Word - CX-Minidoka-Unity_Wood PoleReplacementFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

, 2012 , 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-CELILO SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Mark Hadley Lineman Foreman III - TFIF-Idaho Falls Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement along the Minidoka Power House-Unity No. 1 and Unity-Heyburn No. 1, 138-kV transmission line rights-of-way. PP&A Project No.: 2192 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain... infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designated purpose. Location: The project area is located in Cassia County, Idaho, in Bonneville Power

237

Microsoft Word - CX-PacificCoWAWoodPolesFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6, 2012 6, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Olympia SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Ryan Brady Line Foreman III - TFOK-Chehalis Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements as needed on the Naselle-Tarlett No. 1, Holcomb- Naselle No. 1, and Raymond-Willapa River No. 1, 115-kV transmission lines PP&A Project No.: 2367, 2368, and 2369; Work Order #: 298132, 298134, and 298133 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities Location: The subject transmission lines are located in Pacific County, Washington, in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Chehalis Maintenance District. The transmission line right-of-way corridors cross public and privately-owned lands that include industrial

238

Microsoft Word - CX-Big Eddy-Redmond-WoodPolesFY13_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4, 2013 4, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Big Eddy-Redmond No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project PP&A Project No.: 2500 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Big Eddy-Redmond No. 1 transmission line in Deschutes County, Oregon, at the following locations: Mile Structure Township Range Section 35 6 5 14 24 36 6 5 14 25 36 7 5 14 25 36 8 5 14 25 37 6 5 14 36 40 9 6 15 18 43 2 6 15 29 48 4 7 1 21 49 1 7 1 21 50 6 7 15 33 51 8 8 15 5 52 8 8 15 8 53 3 8 15 8 54 2 8 15 17 56 1 8 1 30 58 2 9 14 1

239

Microsoft Word - CX-Drummond-MacksInn-WoodPoleReplacementFY13_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

29, 2012 29, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-CELILO SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Mark Hadley Lineman Foreman III - TFIF-Idaho Falls Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements along the Drummond-Macks Inn, Macks Inn- Madison, and Swan Valley-Teton 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line rights-of-way. PP&A Project Number: 2486 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities Location: The project area is located in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Idaho Falls District. Project locations are listed below: Project Location Township Range Section(s) County Line Name Structures Use Ownership 3N 44E 28 Teton Swan Valley - Teton 10/6 Forest Forest Service 14S 5E 19 Fremont

240

Final environmental assessment for vegetation control at VHF stations, microwave stations, electrical substations, and pole yards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Southwestern Power Adm. operates very high frequency (VHF) and microwave radio stations, electrical substations, and pole yards for electric power transmission throughout AR, MO, and OK. Vegetation growth at the stations must be suppressed for safety of operation and personnel. Southwestern has been using a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control for this purpose; Federally- mandated reductions in staff and budgetary resources require Southwestern to evaluate all potentially efficient methods for vegetation control. Three alternatives were examined: no action, mechanical/manual control, and (proposed) a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control. Environmental impacts on air and water quality, wetlands, wildlife, endangered species, archaeological and other resources, farmland, human health, transportation, etc. were evaluated.

NONE

1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

South pole bang-time diagnostic on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The south pole bang-time (SPBT) diagnostic views National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosions through the lower hohlraum laser entrance hole to measure the time of peak x-ray emission (peak compression) in indirect drive implosions. Five chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) diamond photoconductive detectors (PCD's) with different filtrations and sensitivities record the time-varying x rays emitted by the target. Wavelength-selecting highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) crystal mirror monochromators increase the x-ray signal-to-background ratio by filtering for 11-keV emission. Diagnostic timing and the in-situ temporal instrument response function are determined from laser impulse shots on the NIF. After signal deconvolution and background removal, the bang time is determined to 45-ps accuracy. The x-ray 'yield' (mJ/sr/keV at 11 keV) is determined from the total area under the peak.

MacPhee, A; Edgell, D; Bradley, D K; Bond, E J; Burns, S; Callahan, D A; Celeste, J; Kimbrough, J; Mackinnon, A J; Magoon, J; Eckart, M J; Glebov, V; Hey, D; Lacielle, G; Kilkenny, J; Parker, J; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C; Thomas, T

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Microsoft Word - CX-RedmondWoodPoles_multiSub_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

15, 2011 15, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Celilo SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Darrell Aaby Line Foreman III - TFDF-Redmond Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement at selected locations along the La Pine - Chiloquin and Brasada - Harney No. 1 transmission line right-of-ways. PP&A Project No.: 1930 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective...are required to maintain...infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: The proposed project is located in Klamath, Deschutes, and Harney counties,

243

Balloon observations of ultra-low-frequency waves in the electric field above the South Pole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physics of ultra-low-frequency waves in the magnetosphere, near the cusp and in the polar cap, is important because this region is one where ultra-low-frequency wave energy from the magnetopause can most easily enter the magnetosphere. During the 1985-1986 South Pole balloon campaign, eight stratospheric balloon payloads were launched from Amundsen-Scott Station, South Geographic Pole, Antarctica, to record data on ultra-low-frequency waves. The payloads were instrumented with three-axis double-probe electric field detectors and X-ray scintillation counters. This paper concentrates on the third flight of this series, which was launched at 2205 universal time on 21 December 1985. Good data were received from the payload until the transmitter failed at 0342 universal time on 22 December. During most of the four hours that the balloon was afloat, an intense ultra-low-frequency wave event was in progress. The electric-field data from this period have been examined in detail and compared with magnetic field data, obtained with ground-based fluxgate and induction magnetometers to determine the characteristics of the waves. After float was reached, the electric-field data in figure 1 show large-amplitude, quasi-periodic fluctuations suggesting the presence of intense ultra-low-frequency wave activity. In conclusion, the electric-field signature observed from flight 3 appears to have been essentially an electrostatic event or possibly a short-wavelength hydromagnetic wave with a varying and interesting polarization character. The authors are continuing the analysis of the data to determine the source of the observed ultra-low-frequency waves.

Liao, B.; Benbrrook, J.R.; Bering E.A. III; Byrne, G.J.; Theall, J.R. (Univ. of Houston, TX (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Test of the consistency of various linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions in application to inelastic neutron scattering from liquid para-hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory of Thermal Neutron Scattering. (Dover Publications,S. W. Lovesey, Theory of Neutron Scattering from Condensedwith the inelastic neutron scattering experiment results.

Liu, Jian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Nature of the Surface Species Formed on Au/TiO2 during the Reaction of H2 and O2: An Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron Scattering Study Chinta Sivadinarayana, Tushar V. Choudhary, Luke L. Daemen, Juergen Eckert of obvious interest for understanding this process. Vibrational spectroscopy by inelastic neutron scattering

Goodman, Wayne

246

Inelastic neutron scattering studies of magnetic fluctuations in the tetragonal and collapsed tetragonal phases of CaFe2As2.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The relationship between magnetism and superconductivity has become a central topic of research in studies of superconductivity in the iron pnictides. This thesis presents inelastic (more)

Soh, Jing Han

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Rivera, M.A. [Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant); Rivera, M.A. (Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Temperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: Implications for life in a nearby subglacial lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-induced melting temperature of freshwater ice. To produce the strong radar signal, the frozen lake must consistTemperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: Implications for life in a nearby subglacial by P. Buford Price, April 22, 2002 Airborne radar has detected 100 lakes under the Antarctic ice cap

Price, P. Buford

250

A FAMILY OF TWENTY-AMPERES POWER SUPPLIES FOR MULTI-POLE CORRECTORS FOR ACCELERATORS AND STORAGE RINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A FAMILY OF TWENTY-AMPERES POWER SUPPLIES FOR MULTI- POLE CORRECTORS FOR ACCELERATORS AND STORAGE of accelerator facilities and storage ring complexes in broad range of output power. Some tasks, e.g. powering-150, correspondingly. The power supplies developed meet the requirements of the up-to-date accelerator facilities

Kozak, Victor R.

251

Please leave this heading unchanged! Sound radiation of a non-rigid piston and pole cap compared with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Please leave this heading unchanged! Sound radiation of a non-rigid piston and pole cap compared are often modelled as a rigid piston in an infinite baffle. This model is for real loudspeakers somewhat of the baffled-piston radiation the spatial impulse response is presented. 1. Nijboer-Zernike approach

252

Sound radiation from a loudspeaker, from a spherical pole cap, and from a piston in an infinite baffle1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sound radiation from a loudspeaker, from a spherical pole cap, and from a piston in an infinite are often modelled as a rigid piston in an infinite baffle. As a model for real loudspeakers, this approach of the baffled-piston radiation the spatial impulse response is presented. 1. Nijboer-Zernike approach

253

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE FOR THE NFSS CENTRAL DRAINAGE DITCH DECEMBER 1986 Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE Under Contract No. DE-AC05-81OR20722 By Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 I 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 1.1 OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used for establishing a supplemental residual contamination guideline for the NFSS vicinity property known as the Central Drainage Ditch (CDD). Supplemental guidelines may exceed authorized guidelines if the resultant dose will not exceed the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr (Ref. 1). This evaluation is based on realistic exposure pathways that were

254

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 45, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2009 5399 Modeling of the Starting Performance of Large Solid-Pole Synchronous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refineries, steel mills, and power plants [1]­[6]. Large solid pole motors are a special category of large virtual windings. Therefore, the two-axis theory can be used for the solid pole synchronous motor. We, starting performance, transformation coefficient, two-axis theory, virtual windings. I. INTRODUCTION LARGE

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

255

Minimal Residual Disease in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...treatment with chemotherapy. In a hematologic complete remission, we know that a large portion of the leukemic cells remain out of sight. These cells, invisible to the microscopist, are the components of an important clinical problem termed "minimal residual disease." The concept of minimal residual disease... For many years hematologists have used the microscope to identify a complete remission of leukemia after treatment with chemotherapy. In a hematologic complete remission, we know that a large portion of the leukemic cells remain out of sight. These cells, ...

Lwenberg B.

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

256

Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments on B[subscript 4]C under high static pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron K-edge inelastic X-ray scattering experiments were performed on clean B{sub 4}C and shock impact recovered boron carbide up to 30 GPa and at ambient temperature to understand the pressure induced bonding changes. The spectral features corresponding to the boron site in the interlinking chain remained unchanged up to 30 GPa. The results of our experiments indicate that pressure induces less distortion to the boron sites and the local amorphization observed in the previous reports are due to the rearrangement of carbon atoms under extreme conditions without affecting the boron environment.

Kumar, Ravhi S.; Dandekar, Dattatraya; Leithe-Jasper, Andres; Tanaka, Takaho; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Nicol, Malcolm F.; Cornelius, Andrew L. (UNLV); (MXPL-M); (CIW); (USARL)

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

257

The excitation of high spin states with quasi-elastic and deep inelastic reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of populating high spin states using reactions induced by a 220 MeV {sup 22}Ne beam on a {sup 170}Er target was studied. The experiment was carried out using a multidetector array for high resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy, a 14 element sum multiplicity spectrometer and six {Delta}E-E particle telescopes. Detailed information was obtained concerning the reaction mechanisms associated with various reaction channels. Deep inelastic collisions are shown to be a promising tool for high spin spectroscopy in regions of the chart of nuclides which are not accessible by other reactions.

Knott, C.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Population of high spin states by quasi-elastic and deep inelastic collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of populating high spin states using reactions induced by a 10 MeV/nucleon /sup 22/Ne beam on /sup 170/Er was studied. The experiment was carried out using a multidetector array for high resolution ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy, a 14 element sum-multiplicity spectrometer and six ..delta..E-E telescopes. Detailed information was obtained concerning the reaction mechanisms associated with various reaction channels. Deep inelastic collisions are shown to be a promising tool for high spin spectroscopy in regions of the chart of nuclides which are not accessible by other reactions.

Takai, H.; Knott, C.N.; Winchell, D.F.; Saladin, J.X.; Kaplan, M.S.; de Faro, L.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Blue, R.A.; Ronningen, R.M.; Morrissey, D.J.; and others

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Measurement of Dijet Production in Diffractive Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A measurement is presented of single- and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic $ep$ scattering at HERA using data collected by the H1 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 290 pb^{-1}. The investigated phase space is spanned by the photon virtuality in the range of 4100 GeV^{2} and by the fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss x_pom<0.03. The resulting cross sections are compared with next-to-leading order QCD predictions based on diffractive parton distribution functions and the value of the strong coupling constant is extracted.

,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Inelastic neutron scattering study of light-induced dynamics of a photosynthetic membrane system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inelastic neutron scattering was employed to study photoeffects on the molecular dynamics of membranes of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis. The main photoactive parts of this biomolecular system are the chlorophyll molecules whose dynamics were found to be affected under illumination by visible light in a twofold manner. First, vibrational modes are excited at energies of 12(2) and 88(21)?cm?1. Second, a partial freezing of rotational modes is observed at energies of 1.2(3) and 2.9(5)?cm?1. These results are attributed to a possible coupling between molecular motions and particular mechanisms in the photosynthetic process.

A. Furrer and A. Stckli

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Bent crystal analyzer without grooves for inelastic scattering -- first experimental results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new design of a bent crystal analyzer for high energy resolution inelastic X-ray scattering has been recently proposed. It has been theoretically predicted that an analyzer with reflecting planes at a certain angle with respect to a crystal surface, bent with two different radii of curvature, will have the same energy resolution as a perfect crystal. The first experimental measurement obtained at the Advanced Photon Source of a bandwidth of such an analyzer is presented. The overall energy resolution of the analyzer and monochromator observed with a narrow beam is equal to 16.4 meV (FWHM) at 13.84 KeV.

Kushnir, V.I.; Macrander, A.T.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Measurement of high-Q2 deep inelastic scattering cross sections with longitudinally polarised positron beams at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first measurements of the cross sections for neutral and charged current deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions with longitudinally polarised positron beams are presented. The total cross section for e+p charged current deep inelastic scattering is presented at positive and negative values of positron beam longitudinal polarisation for an integrated luminosity of 37.0 pb^-1 H1 data and 30.5 pb^-1 ZEUS data collected in 2003 and 2004 at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. In addition, the ZEUS collaboration measured the single differential cross sections for charged and neutral current deep inelastic scattering in the kinematic region Q^2>200 GeV^2. The measured cross sections are compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. The H1 collaboration extrapolate the cross section to a fully left handed positron beam and find it to be consistent with the Standard Model expectation.

Julian Rautenberg

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in-situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of the three most significant mobile contaminants of concern from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. For uranium, all three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective MCLs for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste. This innovative approach has the potential to revolutionize Hanfords tank retrieval process, by allowing larger volumes of residual waste to be left in tanks while providing an acceptably low level of risk with respect to contaminant release that is protective of the environment and human health. Such an approach could enable DOE to realize significant cost savings through streamlined retrieval and closure operations.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Automatic Methods for Predicting Functionally Important Residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pazos and Alfonso Valencia* Protein Design Group National Center for Biotechnology, Cantoblanco Madrid of protein families into subfamilies in the search for those positions that could have some functional families, testing the statistical meaning of the Tree-determinant residues predicted by three different

Pazos, Florencio

265

Residual Stresses in Weldments by Neutron Diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residual Stresses in Weldments by Neutron Diffraction Shanmukha Rao M, Jon James, Shirley Northover :- The neutron diffraction is determined from Bragg's law. When neutron propagate through crystal sample, Coherent, Incoherent and Absorption Scattering phenomena take place Weld MaterialsPlate materials Stress

Bandara, Arosha

266

Specific Nucleoprotein Residues Affect Influenza Virus Morphology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these residues to the crystal structure of NP, we...in the production of spherical virions, as indicated...WSN-AichiM1 virus. (A) Crystal structure of NP highlighting...M1 to form straight or bent elongated ribbons and...filamentous virions to spherical ones. We anticipate...

Kristy M. Bialas; Kendra A. Bussey; Raychel L. Stone; Toru Takimoto

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive shredder residue Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

residue Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automotive shredder residue...

268

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive shredder residues Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

residues Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automotive shredder residues...

269

Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt percent graphite, 15 wt percent calcium fluoride (CaF2), and 12 wt percent plutonium oxide (PuO2). Approximately 950 kilograms of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 degrees C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO2 concentration in the residue averages 12 wt percent, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF2 dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO2) as a surrogate for PuO2 and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF2 and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.In general, the recovery of cerium from the full-scale waste forms was higher than for smaller scale experiments. The presence of CaF2 also caused a dramatic increase in cerium recovery not seen in the small-scale experiments. However, the results from experiments with actual graphite fines were encouraging. A 4:1 frit to residue ratio, a temperature of 700 degrees C, and a 2 hr heating time produced waste forms with plutonium recoveries of 4 plus/minus 1 g/kg. With an increase in the frit to residue ratio, waste forms fabricated at this scale should meet the Rocky Flats product specification. The scale-up of the waste form fabrication process to nominally 3 kg is expected to require a 5:1 to 6:1 frit to residue ratio and maintaining the waste form centerline temperature at 700 degrees C for 2 hr.

Rudisill, T. S.

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

270

Inelastic neutron scattering study of hydrogen in d8-THF/D2O ice clathrate Kimberly T. Tait,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic neutron scattering study of hydrogen in d8-THF/D2O ice clathrate Kimberly T. Tait,a Frans Trouw,b and Yusheng Zhao Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los October 2007 In situ neutron inelastic scattering experiments on hydrogen adsorbed into a fully deutrated

Downs, Robert T.

271

Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering W. Wang, D. A. Sokolov, A. D. Huxley, and K. V. Kamenev  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering W. Wang, D. A. Sokolov, A. D for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of quantum fluids and solids Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 015101 (2013) TOF-SEMSANS--Time-of-flight spin-echo modulated small-angle neutron scattering J. Appl. Phys. 112

Hall, Christopher

272

Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have determined ''effective'' Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I. [Medical Physics Laboratory, University of Ioannina Medical School, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Garcia-Molina, R. [Departamento de Fisica-CIOyN, Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain); Abril, I. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat d'Alacant, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Kostarelos, K. [Nanomedicine Laboratory, Centre for Drug Delivery Research, School of Pharmacy, University of London, London WC1N 1AX (United Kingdom)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Inelastic Thermal Neutron Scattering Cross Sections for Reactor-grade Graphite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Current calculations of the inelastic thermal neutron scattering cross sections of graphite are based on representing the material using ideal single crystal models. However, the density of reactor-grade graphite is usually in the range of 1.5 g/cm3 to approximately 1.8 g/cm3, while ideal graphite is characterized by a density of nearly 2.25 g/cm3. This difference in density is manifested as a significant fraction of porosity in the structure of reactor-grade graphite. To account for the porosity effect on the cross sections, classical molecular dynamics (MD) techniques were employed to simulate graphite structures with porosity concentrations of 10% and 30%, which are taken to be representative of reactor-grade graphite. The phonon density of states for the porous systems were generated as the power spectrum of the MD velocity autocorrelation functions. The analysis revealed that for porous graphite the phonon density of states exhibit a rise in the lower frequency region that is relevant to neutron thermalization. Using the generated phonon density of states, the inelastic thermal neutron scattering cross sections were calculated using the NJOY code system. While marked discrepancies exist between measurements and calculations based on ideal graphite models, favorable agreement is found between the calculations based on the porous graphite models and measured data.

A.I. Hawari; V.H. Gillete

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Energy production rates in fluid mixtures of inelastic rough hard spheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this work is to explore the combined effect of polydispersity and roughness on the partial energy production rates and on the total cooling rate of a granular fluid mixture. We consider a mixture of inelastic rough hard spheres of different number densities, masses, diameters, moments of inertia, and mutual coefficients of normal and tangential restitution. Starting from the first equation of the BBGKY hierarchy, the collisional energy production rates associated with the translational and rotational temperatures ($T_i^\\text{tr}$ and $T_i^\\text{rot}$) are expressed in terms of two-body average values. Next, those average values are estimated by assuming a velocity distribution function based on maximum-entropy arguments, allowing us to express the energy production rates and the total cooling rate in terms of the partial temperatures and the parameters of the mixture. Finally, the results are applied to the homogeneous cooling state of a binary mixture and the influence of inelasticity and roughness on the temperature ratios $T_1^\\text{tr}/T_1^\\text{rot}$, $T_2^\\text{tr}/T_1^\\text{tr}$, and $T_2^\\text{rot}/T_1^\\text{rot}$ is analyzed.

Andrs Santos; Gilberto M. Kremer; Vicente Garz

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

275

Measurement of Leading Neutron Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of leading neutrons, where the neutron carries a large fraction x_L of the incoming proton's longitudinal momentum, is studied in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at HERA. The data were taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 122 pb^{-1}. The semi-inclusive cross section is measured in the phase space defined by the photon virtuality 6 < Q^2 < 100 GeV^2, Bjorken scaling variable 1.5x10^{-4} < x < 3x10^{-2}, longitudinal momentum fraction 0.32 < x_L < 0.95 and neutron transverse momentum p_T < 0.2 GeV. The leading neutron structure function, F_2^{LN(3)}(Q^2,x,x_L), and the fraction of deep-inelastic scattering events containing a leading neutron are studied as a function of Q^2, x and x_L. Assuming that the pion exchange mechanism dominates leading neutron production, the data provide constraints on the shape of the pion structure function.

Aaron, F D; Alimujiang, K; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; Delcourt, B; Delvax, J; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Falkiewicz, A; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D.-J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, X; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; INSPIRE-00183962; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nikitin, D; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Pahl, P; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Microsoft Word - CX-OregonCity-ChemawaWoodPolesFY12_WEB .docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alvey Alvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum James Semrau Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Oregon City-Chemawa #2 Wood Pole Replacement Projects PP&A Project No.: 2327 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: The project is located in Clackamas and Marion counties, Oregon, in BPA's Salem District. Structure locations are as follows: Structure Legal Description County, State 3\14 3S, 1W, Sec. 14 Clackamas, OR 16\12 5S, 2W, Sec. 15 Marion, OR 17\6 5S, 2W, Sec. 22 Marion, OR 20\9 5S, 2W, Sec. 32 Marion, OR 21\3 6S, 2W, Sec. 5 Marion, OR 21\13 - 21\15 6S, 2W, Sec. 6 Marion, OR 21\16 - 22\25 6S, 2W, Sec. 7 Marion, OR

277

Axial gap permanent-magnet machine with reluctance poles and PM element covers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electric machine (10) has a disk-shaped rotor (24) disposed in an operating space between two opposing stator assemblies (11, 12) to provide two axial air gaps (15, 16). The rotor (24) has a hub (28) and an outer ring (26) of non-magnetic material and is further provided with a plurality of permanent magnetic elements (25) for coupling flux that is induced by the magnetic field of the stator assemblies (11, 12). The permanent magnetic elements (25) are spaced apart and reluctance poles (27) are positioned in spaces between the magnetic elements (25) to couple additional flux induced by the magnetic field of the stator assemblies (11, 12). Various constructions and shapes (40-45) for the PM magnetic elements (25) are disclosed, and including PM covers (60) of ferromagnetic material for enhancing q-axis flux in the air gaps (15, 16) and for reducing harmonics where toothed stators are used. Methods of providing increased torque using the the various rotor constructions are also disclosed.

Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W [Oak Ridge, TN

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

278

Effect of wind and altitude on record performance in foot races, pole vault, and long jump  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using only elementary physics one can estimate the effect of wind and altitude on performance in several track and field events. Experiments have shown that the power lost to aerodynamicdrag forces is about a tenth of the total power expended in running at sprint speeds. From this observation one can calculate the effect of wind or of air density changes on sprinting speed. In pole vaulting the sprinter converts his kinetic energy into potential energy to clear the bar. In long jumping he is a projectile but he is prevented from reaching his optimum distance expected for his initial velocity by the height which he can attain during his jump. For each of these events performance in moderate winds of 2.0 m/s or at altitudes comparable to Mexico City differ by several percent from performances at sea level or in still air. In longer running races and in bicycle races aerodynamic forces play an important role in racing strategy. However since the athletes perform in groups it is difficult to calculate the effect on individual performances.

Cliff Frohlich

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Design and testing of a four-pole superconducting motor stator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A four-pole, dc superconducting stator for a novel axial-gap superconducting motor has been designed and fabricated for the Superconducting Motor Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The four solenoidal coils are mounted in a heavy aluminum plate in a square array with alternating polarity. The coils are wound with monolithic multifilamentary NbTi conductor and produce a maximum field at the conductor of 7 T with a current of 2800 A. The windings are immersed in liquid helium (LHe) in a close-fitting rectangular case that surrounds the coil array. A liquid-nitrogen-cooled copper radiation shield and vacuum case insulate the cold mass, which is supported off the top and bottom plates of the vacuum case by four lengths of stainless steel pipe. The stator has been installed in the motor test stand and cooled down to LHe temperatures several times. Currents up to 2000 A have been applied so far with the motor operating at speeds up to 600 rpm and several horsepower, with no evidence of magnet instability. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Schwenterly, S.W.; Luton, J.N.; Lue, J.W.; Kenney, W.J.; Lubell, M.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The 2 to 24 micron source counts from the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present herein galaxy number counts of the nine bands in the 2-24 micron range on the basis of the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) surveys. The number counts are derived from NEP-deep and NEP-wide surveys, which cover areas of 0.5 and 5.8 deg2, respectively. To produce reliable number counts, the sources were extracted from recently updated images. Completeness and difference between observed and intrinsic magnitudes were corrected by Monte Carlo simulation. Stellar counts were subtracted by using the stellar fraction estimated from optical data. The resultant source counts are given down to the 80% completeness limit; 0.18, 0.16, 0.10, 0.05, 0.06, 0.10, 0.15, 0.16, and 0.44 mJy in the 2.4, 3.2, 4.1, 7, 9, 11, 15, 18 and 24 um bands, respectively. On the bright side of all bands, the count distribution is flat, consistent with the Euclidean Universe, while on the faint side, the counts deviate, suggesting that the galaxy population of the distant universe is evolving. These results are generally consistent...

Murata, K; Goto, T; Kim, S J; Matsuhara, H; Wada, T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Inelastic neutron scattering of a quantum translator-rotator encapsulated in a closed fullerene cage: Isotope effects and translation-rotation coupling in H2@C60 and HD@C60  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic neutron scattering of a quantum translator-rotator encapsulated in a closed fullerene, New York 10027, USA Received 1 July 2010; published 20 August 2010 We report an inelastic neutron-scattering inelastic neutron scattering INS ,6 and specific heat7 inves- tigations have recently been reported

Turro, Nicholas J.

282

Phonon dispersion of graphite by inelastic x-ray scattering * J. Maultzsch,1, E. Dobardzi,2 S. Reich,3 I. Milosevi,2 M. Damnjanovi,2 A. Bosak,4 M. Krisch,4 and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality. It has been partly measured by inelastic neutron scattering INS , electron- energy lossPhonon dispersion of graphite by inelastic x-ray scattering M. Mohr,1, * J. Maultzsch,1, E-plane phonon dispersion of graphite obtained from inelastic x-ray scattering, including the optical

Nabben, Reinhard

283

Chapter 8 - Coal Combustion Residue Disposal Options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal combustion residues (CCRs) are presently regulated as solid waste (Subtitle D) under the Resource Conservation Recovery Act. Such classification promotes beneficial use by end-users i.e. mitigating excessive liability. According to the US Environmental Protection agency (USEPA), about 131million tons of coal combustion residualsincluding 71million tons of fly ash, 20million tons of bottom ash and boiler slag, and 40million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materialwere generated in the US in 2007. Of this, approximately 36% was disposed of in landfills, 21% was disposed of in surface impoundments, 38% was beneficially reused, and 5% was used as minefill. Stringent regulation, as Subtitle C (hazardous waste), would impose a perceived liability upon end-users; greatly reducing beneficial use opportunities. Mandatory use of synthetic linerswould not have prevented dike wall failure and fails to consider inherent engineering characteristics of CCRs.

Richard W. Goodwin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Thin layer chromatography residue applicator sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin layer chromatograph residue applicator sampler. The residue applicator sampler provides for rapid analysis of samples containing high explosives, chemical warfare, and other analyses of interest under field conditions. This satisfied the need for a field-deployable, small, hand-held, all-in-one device for efficient sampling, sample dissolution, and sample application to an analytical technique. The residue applicator sampler includes a sampling sponge that is resistant to most chemicals and is fastened via a plastic handle in a hermetically sealed tube containing a known amount of solvent. Upon use, the wetted sponge is removed from the sealed tube and used as a swiping device across an environmental sample. The sponge is then replaced in the hermetically sealed tube where the sample remains contained and dissolved in the solvent. A small pipette tip is removably contained in the hermetically sealed tube. The sponge is removed and placed into the pipette tip where a squeezing-out of the dissolved sample from the sponge into the pipette tip results in a droplet captured in a vial for later instrumental analysis, or applied directly to a thin layer chromatography plate for immediate analysis.

Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Kelly, Fredrick R. (Modesto, CA); Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA)

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

285

Site clean up of coal gasification residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coal gasification plant residues tested in this research consists of various particle sizes of rock, gravel, tar-sand agglomerates, fine sand and soil. Most of the soils particles were tar free. One of the fractions examined contained over 3000 ppM polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The residues were subjected to high pressure water jet washing, float and sink tests, and soil washing. Subsequent PAH analyses found less than 1 ppM PAHs in the water jet washing water. Soils washed with pure water lowered PAH concentrations to 276 ppM; the use of surfactants decreased PAHs to 47, 200, and 240 ppM for different test conditions. In the 47 ppM test, the surfactant temperature had been increased to 80 C, suggesting that surfactant washing efficiency can be greatly improved by increasing the solution temperature. The coal tar particles were not extracted by the surfactants used. Coke and tar-sand agglomerates collected from the float and sink gravimetric separation were tested for heating value. The tar exhibited a very high heating value, while the coke had a heating value close to that of bituminous coal. These processes are believed to have the potential to clean up coal gasification plant residues at a fairly low cost, pending pilot-scale testing and a feasibility study.

Wilson, J.W.; Ding, Y. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Cost-effective upgrade of a focusing system for inelastic X-ray scattering experiments under high pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a scheme utilizing a set of low-cost and compact Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors for upgrading the optical system of the Taiwan Inelastic X-ray Scattering beamline at SPring-8 for high-pressure experiments using diamond-anvil cells. The scheme as implemented improves the focus to 13 m 16 m with transmission of up to 72%.

Huang, C.-Y.

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

287

Unpolarised TMD Distribution and Fragmentation Functions from recent HERMES and COMPASS Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering Multiplicities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unpolarised transverse momentum dependent distribution and fragmentation functions (TMDs) are extracted from HERMES and COMPASS experimental measurements of semi- inclusive deep inelastic scattering multiplicities for charged hadron production. A simple factorised functional form of the TMDs is adopted, with a Gaussian dependence on the intrinsic transverse momentum, which turns out to be quite adequate in shape.

Prokudin, Alexey; Anselmino, Mauro; Boglione, Mariaelena; Melis, Stefano; Gonzalez, J. O.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The effect of mantle inelasticity on tidal gravity: a comparison between the spherical and the elliptical Earth model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......as well as the perturbing effects of the ocean and the atmosphere...behaviour as a possibly significant effect in Earth tide gravity recordings. In this paper we estimate the effect of inelasticity of the mantle...the stress-strain relation- ship. In order to shift from these......

V. Dehant; J. Zschau

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Inelastic neutron and low-frequency Raman scattering in a niobium-phosphate glass for Raman gain applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic neutron and low-frequency Raman scattering in a niobium-phosphate glass for Raman gain: Raman scattering; Neutron scattering; Raman gain; Boson peak We present measurements of the vibrational, extracted from specific-heat or neutron scattering measurements [7,8]. Only very recently two of the present

Schirmacher, Walter

290

Investigation of magnetic-pole-enhanced inductively coupled nitrogen-argon plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article presented the features of the mixed mode and H mode in magnetic pole enhanced, inductively coupled Ar-N{sub 2} plasmas using RF-compensated Langmuir probe measurements. To fully characterize plasma parameters and electron energy probability functions (EEPFs), the gas pressure and argon content were varied. It was observed that with increasing the nitrogen content and gas pressure, the critical RF power to sustain H mode increases; this increase was more prominent for pure nitrogen discharge at higher pressure. The electron number density (n{sub e}) shows increasing trend with increasing RF power, while at higher gas pressures, the electron number density decreases at fixed RF power. Mostly, the EEPFs show a Maxwellian distribution even at low RF power (for higher argon content in the discharge) and at moderate RF power (for higher or pure nitrogen content in the discharge) for pressures of 15-60 mTorr. With increasing the nitrogen content in the mixture, the low energy part of the EEPF is more Druyvesteyn with a distorted high energy tail at low RF power. At fixed RF power, the slope of EEPF changes sharply with increasing pressure. It was observed that in hybrid mode, the EEPF at higher gas pressure (75 mTorr) in a pure nitrogen discharge shows a flat hole near the average electron energy of 3 eV and changes to Maxwellian distribution in H mode. The skin depth versus RF power shows that the skin depth is smaller than the critical dimension of the chamber, regardless of the gas type and the gas pressure.

Jan, F.; Zakaullah, M. [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Khan, A. W.; Saeed, A. [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus Islamabad, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

292

In-situ method for treating residual sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Henslee, S. Paul (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in Water-Wet Porous Media. A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in Water-Wet Porous Media....

294

Heat transport by residual gases in multilayer vacuum insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of an experimental investigation of residual gas heat-transfer in multilayer vacuum insulation are reported. The thermal paradox observed ... variation of the residual gas pressure in the insulation

R. S. Mikhal'chenko; A. G. Gerzhin; V. T. Arkhipov

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Quantifying Residual Strains in Specimens Prepared by Additive Layer Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Residual stresses and strains are prevalent in many components, especially those that are made using additive layer manufacturing. The residual strains are superposed onto any ... analysis may lead to inaccurate ...

A. N. Okioga; R. J. Greene; R. A. Tomlinson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Testing regression models with residuals as data by Xia Hua.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract In polynomial regression ... . In this thesis, I developed a residual based test, the turning point test for residuals, which tests the hypothesis that the kth order polynomial regression holds with ... while the ...

Hua, Xia, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

NEURAL NETWORK RESIDUAL STOCHASTIC COSIMULATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on radioactive soil contamination from the Chernobyl fallout. Introduction The problem of analysing environmentalNEURAL NETWORK RESIDUAL STOCHASTIC COSIMULATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS V. Demyanov, M original method of stochastic simulation of environmental data -- Neural Network Residual Sequential

298

1-D Transforms for the Motion Compensation Residual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforms used in image coding are also commonly used to compress prediction residuals in video coding. Prediction residuals have different spatial characteristics from images, and it is useful to develop transforms that ...

Kamisli, Fatih

299

Bioassays of weathered residues of several organic phosphorus insecticides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residues on fruit, forage crops, and animals. The effects of temperature, relative humid? ity, light, wind, and simulated rain on the residual toxicities of many of the chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides used for the control of cotton insects were... humidity. Sunlight was found to be an important factor in reducing the residual effectiveness of dieldrin. Wind and simulated rain reduced the period of residual effectiveness of many of the compounds tested. These investigators have shown...

Hightower, Billie Gene

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

300

Precision Measurements of $A_1^n$ in the Deep Inelastic Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have performed precision measurements of the double-spin virtual-photon asymmetry $A_1$ on the neutron in the deep inelastic scattering regime, using an open-geometry, large-acceptance spectrometer. Our data cover a wide kinematic range $0.277 \\leq x \\leq 0.548$ at an average $Q^2$ value of 3.078~(GeV/c)$^2$, doubling the available high-precision neutron data in this $x$ range. We have combined our results with world data on proton targets to extract the ratio of polarized-to-unpolarized parton distribution functions for up quarks and for down quarks in the same kinematic range. Our data are consistent with a previous observation of an $A_1^n$ zero crossing near $x=0.5$. We find no evidence of a transition to a positive slope in $(\\Delta d + \\Delta \\bar{d})/(d + \\bar{d})$ up to $x=0.548$.

D. S. Parno; D. Flay; M. Posik; K. Allada; W. Armstrong; T. Averett; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; C. Chen; J. -P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; M. M. Dalton; W. Deconinck; C. W. de Jager; X. Deng; A. Deur; C. Dutta; L. El Fassi; G. B. Franklin; M. Friend; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; O. Glamazdin; S. Golge; J. Gomez; L. Guo; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; J. Huang; C. Hyde; H. F. Ibrahim; X. Jiang; G. Jin; J. Katich; A. Kelleher; A. Kolarkar; W. Korsch; G. Kumbartzki; J. J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; E. Long; A. Lukhanin; V. Mamyan; D. McNulty; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; M. Mihovilovi?; B. Moffit; N. Muangma; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; B. Norum; Nuruzzaman; Y. Oh; J. C. Peng; X. Qian; Y. Qiang; A. Rakhman; S. Riordan; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; M. H. Shabestari; A. Shahinyan; S. irca; P. Solvignon; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; W. A. Tobias; W. Troth; D. Wang; Y. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; Y. Ye; Z. Ye; L. Yuan; X. Zhan; Y. Zhang; Y. -W. Zhang; B. Zhao; X. Zheng

2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Ferromagnetic cluster spin waves in molecular disks studied by inelastic neutron scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Structurally, the two mixed-valence manganese disks Mn7-11 and Mn7-16 differ only in the peripheral ligand but, as a result of a subtle interplay of intramolecular exchange interactions, differ strongly in their magnetic properties, e.g., Mn7-11 possesses a ground-state spin of S=11 and Mn7-16 of S=16. The exchange interactions in the disks were studied by inelastic neutron scattering. The analysis of the Q dependence of the observed magnetic transition intensities reveals that ferromagnetic cluster spin-wave excitations were observed. In this framework, it was possible to successfully model the experimental data and provide a physical understanding of the magnetism in the two disks.

J. Nehrkorn; S. Mukherjee; S. Stuiber; H. Mutka; Th. Strssle; G. Christou; O. Waldmann

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

302

On the lepton-nucleon neutral and charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the requirement in the simulation of lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering (DIS), we construct a fortran program LDCS 1.0 calculating the differential and total cross sections for the unpolarized charged lepton-unpolarized nucleon and neutrino-unpolarized nucleon neutral current (charged current) DIS at leading order. Any set of the experimentally fitted parton distribution functions could be employed directly. The mass of incident and scattered leptons is taken into account and the boundary conditions calculating the single differential and total cross section are studied. The calculated results well agree with the corresponding experimental data which indicating the LDCS 1.0 program is good. It is also turned out that the effect of tauon mass is not negligible in the GeV energy level.

Xing-Long Li; Yu-Liang Yan; Xiao-Mei Li; Dai-Mei Zhou; Xu Cai; Ben-Hao Sa

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

303

Final-state interactions in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We explore the role of final-state interactions (FSI) in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Relating the inclusive cross section to the deuteron forward virtual Compton scattering amplitude, a general formula for the FSI contribution is derived in the generalized eikonal approximation, utilizing the diffractive nature of the effective hadron-nucleon interaction. The calculation uses a factorized model with a basis of three resonances with mass W~ 0.6 and Q2 2 increasing in magnitude for lower Q2, but vanishing in the high-Q2 limit due to phase space constraints. The off-shell rescattering contributes at x ~> 0.8 and is taken as an uncertainty on the on-shell result.

Cosyn, Wim [FL Intl U.; Melnitchouk, Wally [JLAB; Sargsian, Misak M. [JLAB

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Theory of lifetime of exciton incoherently created below its resonance frequency by inelastic scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When an exciton in semiconductor is scattered and its energy is decreased far below the resonance energy of the bare exciton state, it has been considered that an exciton-polariton is created immediately by the scattering process, because there is no exciton level at that energy. However, according to recent time-resolved measurements of P emission originating from inelastic exciton-exciton scattering, it looks rather natural to consider that the exciton-polariton is created in a finite time scale which is restricted by a coherence volume of the exciton after the scattering. In this interpretation, the exciton remains in this time scale far below its resonance energy as a transient state in a series of processes without violating the quantum physics.

Bamba, Motoaki; Ichida, Hideki; Mizoguchi, Kohji; Kim, DaeGwi; Nakayama, Masaaki; Kanematsu, Yasuo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Parity Violation in Deep Inelastic Scattering at JLab 6 GeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The parity-violating asymmetry in e-$^2$H deep inelastic scattering (DIS) can be used to extract the weak neutral-current coupling constants $C_{2q}$. A measurement of this asymmetry at two $Q^2$ values is planned at Jefferson Lab. Results from this experiment will provide a value of $2C_{2u}-C_{2d}$ to a precision of $\\pm 0.03$, a factor of eight improvement over our current knowledge. If all hadronic effects can be understood, this results will provide information on possible extensions of the Standard Model, complementary to other experiments dedicated to new physics searches. Presented here are the physics motivation, experimental setup, potential hadronic effects and their implications, and the future of PV DIS at Jefferson Lab.

Xiaochao Zheng

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

306

Effects of Inelastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering on Supernova Dynamics and Radiated Neutrino Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the shell model for Gamow-Teller and the Random Phase Approximation for forbidden transitions, we have calculated reaction rates for inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (INNS) under supernova (SN) conditions, assuming a matter composition given by Nuclear Statistical Equilibrium. The rates have been incorporated into state-of-the-art stellar core-collapse simulations with detailed energy-dependent neutrino transport. While no significant effect on the SN dynamics is observed, INNS increases the neutrino opacities noticeably and strongly reduces the high-energy tail of the neutrino spectrum emitted in the neutrino burst at shock breakout. Relatedly the expected event rates for the observation of such neutrinos by earthbound detectors are reduced by up to about 60%.

K. Langanke; G. Martinez-Pinedo; B. Mueller; H. -Th. Janka; A. Marek; W. R. Hix; A. Juodagalvis; J. M. Sampaio

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Leading neutron energy and pT distributions in deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of energetic neutrons in $ep$ collisions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The neutron energy and $p_T^2$ distributions were measured with a forward neutron calorimeter and tracker in a $40 \\pb^{-1}$ sample of inclusive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) data and a $6 \\pb^{-1}$ sample of photoproduction data. The neutron yield in photoproduction is suppressed relative to DIS for the lower neutron energies and the neutrons have a steeper $p_T^2$ distribution, consistent with the expectation from absorption models. The distributions are compared to HERA measurements of leading protons. The neutron energy and transverse-momentum distributions in DIS are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and to the predictions of particle exchange models. Models of pion exchange incorporating absorption and additional secondary meson exchanges give a good description of the data.

ZEUS Collaboration; S. Chekanov

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

308

Performance of spherically focusing Ge(444) backscattering analyzers for inelastic x-ray scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A spectrometer designed to use an undulator source and having targeted resolutions of 0.01 eV in one mode of use and 0.2 eV in another will operate at the APS. We report here on analyzers that we have, constructed for use on this spectrometer for 0.2-eV resolution. We have tested them at NSLS beamline X21 using focused wiggler radiation and at CHESS using radiation from the CHESS-ANL undulator. Analyzers were constructed by gluing and pressing 90-mm-diameter, (111) oriented Ge wafers into concave glass forms having a radius near 1 m. An overall inelastic scattering resolution of 0.3 eV using the (444) reflection was demonstrated at CHESS. Recent results at X21 revealed a useful diameter of 74 mm at an 870 Bragg angle.

Macrander, A.T.; Kushnir, V.I.; Blasdell, R.C.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Dirac Phenomenological Analyses of Unpolarized Proton Inelastic Scattering from $^{22}$Ne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unpolarized 800 MeV proton inelastic scatterings from an s-d shell nucleus $^{22}$Ne are analyzed using phenomenological optical potentials in the Dirac coupled channel formalism. The first-order rotational collective model is used to obtain the transition optical potentials for the low lying excited collective states that belong to the ground state rotational band of the nucleus. The optical potential parameters of Woods-Saxon shape and the deformation parameters of the excited states are varied phenomenologically using the sequential iteration method to reproduce the experimental differential cross section data. The effective central and spin-orbit optical potentials are obtained by reducing the Dirac equations to the Schr\\"odinger-like second-order differential equations and the surface-peaked phenomena are observed at the real effective central potentials when the scattering from $^{22}$Ne is considered. The obtained deformation parameters of the excited states are compared with those of the nonrelativist...

Kim, Moon-Won

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Study of Charm Fragmentation into $D^{*\\pm}$ Mesons in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The process of charm quark fragmentation is studied using $D^{*\\pm}$ meson production in deep-inelastic scattering as measured by the H1 detector at HERA. Two different regions of phase space are investigated defined by the presence or absence of a jet containing the $D^{*\\pm}$ meson in the event. The parameters of fragmentation functions are extracted for QCD models based on leading order matrix elements and DGLAP or CCFM evolution of partons together with string fragmentation and particle decays. Additionally, they are determined for a next-to-leading order QCD calculation in the fixed flavour number scheme using the independent fragmentation of charm quarks to $D^{*\\pm}$ mesons.

Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Bacchetta, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, Paul R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G.D; Pejchal, O; Peng, H; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P.D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wegener, D; Wessels, M; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Yeganov, V; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; 10.1140/epjc/s10052-008-0792-2

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Dirac Phenomenological Analyses of Unpolarized Proton Inelastic Scattering from $^{22}$Ne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unpolarized 800 MeV proton inelastic scatterings from an s-d shell nucleus $^{22}$Ne are analyzed using phenomenological optical potentials in the Dirac coupled channel formalism. The first-order rotational collective model is used to obtain the transition optical potentials for the low lying excited collective states that belong to the ground state rotational band of the nucleus. The optical potential parameters of Woods-Saxon shape and the deformation parameters of the excited states are varied phenomenologically using the sequential iteration method to reproduce the experimental differential cross section data. The effective central and spin-orbit optical potentials are obtained by reducing the Dirac equations to the Schr\\"odinger-like second-order differential equations and the surface-peaked phenomena are observed at the real effective central potentials when the scattering from $^{22}$Ne is considered. The obtained deformation parameters of the excited states are compared with those of the nonrelativistic calculations and another s-d shell nucleus $^{20}$Ne. The deformation parameters for the $2^+$ and the $4^+$ states of the ground state rotational band at the nucleus $^{22}$Ne are found to be smaller than those of $^{20}$Ne, indicating that the couplings of those states to the ground state are weaker at the nucleus $^{22}$Ne compared to those at the nucleus $^{20}$Ne. The multistep channel coupling effect is confirmed to be important for the $4^+$ state excitation of the ground state rotational band at the proton inelastic scattering from the s-d shell nucleus $^{22}$Ne.

Moon-Won Kim; Sugie Shim

2015-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

312

Poker Face of Inelastic Dark Matter: Prospects at Upcoming Direct Detection Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The XENON100 and CRESST experiments will directly test the inelastic dark matter explanation for DAMA's 8.9{sigma} anomaly. This article discusses how predictions for direct detection experiments depend on uncertainties in quenching factor measurements, the dark matter interaction with the Standard Model and the halo velocity distribution. When these uncertainties are accounted for, an order of magnitude variation is found in the number of expected events at CRESST and XENON100. The process of testing the DAMA anomaly highlights many of the challenges inherent to direct detection experiments. In addition to determining the properties of the unknown dark matter particle, direct detection experiments must also consider the unknown flux of the incident dark matter, as well as uncertainties in converting a signal from one target nucleus to another. The predictions for both the CRESST 2009 run and XENON100 2010 run show an order of magnitude uncertainty. The nuclear form factor for {sup 184}W, when combined with additional theoretical and experimental uncertainties, will likely prevent CRESST from refuting the iDM hypothesis with an exposure of {Omicron}(100 kg-d) in a model-independent manner. XENON100, on the other hand, will be able to make a definitive statement about a spin-independent, inelastically scattering dark matter candidate. Still, the CRESST 2009 data can potentially confirm iDM for a large range of parameter space. In case of a positive signal, the combined data from CRESST and XENON100 will start probing the properties of the Milky Way DM profile and the interaction of the SM with the dark matter.

Alves, Daniele S.M.; Lisanti, Mariangela; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

313

DOE/EA-1636: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project EA (March 2009)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings DOE/EA-1636 Summary The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) announces its environmental findings on the Albany- Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project. This project involves replacing wood pole structures on the existing Albany-Burnt Woods single-circuit, 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line and along a portion of the existing Santiam-Toledo single circuit, 230-kV transmission line. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1636) evaluating the proposed project and its alternative. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the Proposed Action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the

314

Increasing the solid angle of the Enge Split-Pole Magnetic Spectrograph and continuing the development of the hybrid detector system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INCREASING THE SOLID ANGLE OF THK ENGR SPLIT-POLE MAGNETIC SPECTROGRAPH AND CONTINUING THK DEVELOPMENT OF THE HYBRID DETECTOR SYSTEM A Thesis by PHILIP WILLIAM BOWMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Physics INCREASING THE SOLID ANGLE OF THE ENGR SPLIT-POLE NAGNETIC SPECTROGRAPH AND CONTINUING THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE HYBRID DETECTOR SYSTEN A Thesis...

Bowman, Philip William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

315

Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . -slide #1 The SQ-universality and residual properties of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #1 The SQ-universality Main Results Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #2 SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #2 SQ-universality A group G is called SQ-universal if any countable group

Minasyan, Ashot

316

Rotational spectrum of HD perturbed by He or Ar gases: The effects of rotationally inelastic collisions on the interference between allowed and collisionally induced components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The spectral line shapes for the HD rotational spectra perturbed by He and Ar gases, which show interference between allowed and collisionally induced dipole transitions, are calculated including the effects of inelastic rotational collisions. The general parametrization of the line shape, including inelastic collisions, requires six independent real parameters as opposed to four in the theory of Herman, Tipping, and Poll [Phys. Rev. A 20, 2006 (1979)]. Semiclassical calculations based on classical trajectories indicate the importance of the inelastic effects and show qualitative agreement with the experimental parameters. However, it is clear that a full explanation of experimental data will eventually require a full quantum treatment.

Bo Gao; J. Cooper; G. C. Tabisz

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Evaluation of agricultural residues for paper manufacture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five agricultural residues-olive tree fellings, wheat straw, sunflower stalks, vine shoots, and cotton stalks-were evaluated for use as raw materials for paper manufacture. The untreated raw materials and their pulps were tested for hot-water solubles, 1%-NaOH solubles, alcohol-benzene extractables, ash, holocellulose, lignin, [alpha]-cellulose, and pentosans. Handsheets were tested for breaking length, stretch, burst index, and tear index. The results showed wheat straw to be the most promising material. Vine shoots showed the least promise.

Alcaide, L.J.; Baldovin, F.L.; Herranz, J.L.F. (Univ. of Cordoba (Spain))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd. Place Nanping City, Fujian Province, China Zip 365001 Sector Biomass Product Chinese developer of a CDM registered biomass plant. References Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd. is a company located in Nanping City, Fujian Province, China . References ↑ "[ Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd.]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Kaisheng_Biomass_Residue_Power_Co_Ltd&oldid=347879" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

319

Washing treatment of automotive shredder residue (ASR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Worldwide, the amount of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) reaches 50million units per year. Once the ELV has been processed, it may then be shredded and sorted to recover valuable metals that are recycled in iron and steelmaking processes. The residual fraction, called automotive shredder residue (ASR), represents 25% of the ELV and is usually landfilled. In order to deal with the leachable fraction of ASR that poses a potential threat to the environment, a washing treatment before landfilling was applied. To assess the potential for full-scale application of washing treatment, tests were carried out in different conditions (L/S=3 and 5L/kgTS; t=3 and 6h). Moreover, to understand whether the grain size of waste could affect the washing efficiency, the treatment was applied to ground (<4mm) and not-ground samples. The findings obtained revealed that, on average, washing treatment achieved removal rates of more than 60% for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN). With regard to metals and chlorides, sulphates and fluoride leachable fraction, a removal efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained, as confirmed also by EC values. The comparison between the results for ground and not-ground samples did not highlight significant differences.

Raffaello Cossu; Tiziana Lai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Optical design and performance of the inelastic scattering beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase I of the X21 beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source was commissioned during 1993. The research program at the X21 beamline is focused on the study of electronic excitations in condensed matter with total energy resolution of 0.1 eV to 1.0 eV. The source is a 27 pole hybrid wiggler. A water-cooled horizontal focusing Si(220) monochromator and a spherically bent Si(444) analyzer were installed and commissioned. At 8 keV the energy resolution of the monochromator is about 0.7 eV, and the energy resolution of the analyzer is about 0.1 eV. Results from several selected experiments are also discussed.

Kao, C.C.; Siddons, D.P.; Oversluizen, T.; Hastings, J.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hamalainen, K. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Krisch, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Measurement and correlation of conditions for entrapment and mobilization of residual oil. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six tasks are reported: capillary number relationships for rock samples, residual oil saturation near wellbore, residual oil structure, effect of gravity on residual saturation, magnitude of residual oil saturation, and effects of wettability on capillary number relationships. (DLC)

Morrow, N.R.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Comment on X-Ray Inelastic Scattering of Li Metal in the Region of Intermediate Momentum Transfer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The observation of a peak near the Fermi energy in the x-ray inelastic scattering spectrum of lithium has been variously explained as resulting from optical transitions in lithium, and as being attributable to an "oil-Mylar" protective cover. A new experiment sensitive to the surface impurities of the scattering sample and insensitive to instrumental distortion demonstrates that the observed feature is not due to oil or Mylar but rather arises from the lithium scattering process.

N. G. Alexandropoulos and G. G. Cohen

1975-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

323

Chapter 9 - Zinc and Residue Recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Annual global production of zinc is more than 13million tons. More than 50% of this amount is used for galvanizing while the rest is mainly split into brass production, zinc-based alloys, semi manufacturers and zinc compounds such as zinc oxide and zinc sulfate. For the zinc and steel industries, recycling of zinc-coated steel provides an important new source of raw material. Historically, the generation of zinc-rich dusts from steel recycling was a source of loss from the life-cycle (landfill); however, technologies today provide incentive for steel recyclers to minimize waste. Thus, the recycling loop is endlessboth zinc and steel can be recycled again and again without losing any of their physical or chemical properties. Depending on the composition of the scrap being recycled, it can either be remelted or returned to the refining process. This chapter describes the main processes for zinc recycling from different scraps and residues.

Jrgen Antrekowitsch; Stefan Steinlechner; Alois Unger; Gernot Rsler; Christoph Pichler; Rene Rumpold

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

EXPLORING THE TIME DISPERSION OF THE IBEX-HI ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM SPECTRA AT THE ECLIPTIC POLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has observed energetic neutral atom (ENA) hydrogen emissions from the edge of the solar system for more than three years. The observations span energies from 0.01 to 6 keV FWHM. At energies greater than 0.5-6 keV, and for a travel distance of {approx}100 AU, the travel time difference between the slowest and the fastest ENA is more than a year. Therefore, we construct spectra including the effect that slower ENAs left the source at an earlier time than faster ones. If the source produces a steady rate of ENAs and the extinction does not vary, then we expect that the spectral shape would be time independent. However, while the extinction of ENAs has been fairly constant during the first two and a half years, the source appears to have changed, and thus the spectra at a single time may not represent the conditions at the source. IBEX's viewing allows continuous sampling of the ecliptic poles where fluxes can be continuously monitored. For a given source distance we construct spectra assuming that the measured ENAs left the source at roughly the same time. To accomplish this construction, we apply time lag corrections to the signal at different ENA energies that take into account the travel time difference. We show that the spectral shape at the poles exhibits a statistically significant change with time.

Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, P.O. Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Bzowski, M.; Kubiak, M. A. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bartycka 18A, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); DeMajistre, R. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Funsten, H. O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, Bikini Atoll Road, SM 30, NM 87545 (United States); Janzen, P. H.; Reisenfeld, D. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Montana, 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT (United States); Schwadron, N. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Morse Hall Room 407, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Vanderspek, R., E-mail: fallegrini@swri.edu [Massachussetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

325

Final-state interactions in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the role of final-state interactions (FSI) in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Relating the inclusive cross section to the deuteron forward virtual Compton scattering amplitude, a general formula for the FSI contribution is derived in the generalized eikonal approximation, utilizing the diffractive nature of the effective hadron-nucleon interaction. The calculation uses a factorized model with a basis of three resonances with mass W~<2 GeV and a continuum contribution for larger W as the relevant set of effective hadron states entering the final-state interaction amplitude. The results show sizeable on-shell FSI contributions for Bjorken x ~> 0.6 and Q2 < 10 GeV2 increasing in magnitude for lower Q2, but vanishing in the high-Q2 limit due to phase space constraints. The off-shell rescattering contributes at x ~> 0.8 and is taken as an uncertainty on the on-shell result.

Cosyn, Wim [FL Intl U.; Melnitchouk, Wally [JLAB; Sargsian, Misak M. [JLAB

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

On the Determination of Elastic and Inelastic Nuclear Observables from Lattice QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Currently, lattice QCD (LQCD) provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of low-energy hadronic observables. LQCD calculations are necessarily performed in a finite Euclidean spacetime. As a result, it is necessary to construct formalism that maps the finite-volume observables determined via LQCD to the infinite-volume quantities of interest. This methodology is commonly referred to as the Luscher method, as it was Martin Luscher who first developed such formalism for scalar bosons with zero total momentum below inelastic thresholds. In this work, we review recent progress on the generalization of this formalism. We present a detailed derivation of the extension of Luscher's seminal work for multi-channel two-body scalar systems, two-nucleon non-relativistic systems, and three-body non-relativistic scalar systems. For all of these scenarios we allow for the total momenta of the systems of interest to be nonzero. We also present steps towards being able to study weak processes involving two-nucleon systems, in particular we show how to determine the transition amplitude for proton-proton fusion (pp->e^+ + nu_e) directly from LQCD.

Raul A. Briceno

2013-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

327

Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for fission reactor applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear data important for the design and development of the next generation of light-water reactors and future fast reactors include neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections on important structural materials, such as Fe, and on coolant materials, such as Na. These reaction probabilities are needed since neutron reactions impact fuel performance during irradiations and the overall efficiency of reactors. While neutron scattering cross sections from these materials are available for certain incident neutron energies, the fast neutron region, particularly above 2 MeV, has large gaps for which no measurements exist, or the existing uncertainties are large. Measurements have been made at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory to measure neutron scattering cross sections on both Fe and Na in the region where these gaps occur and to reduce the uncertainties on scattering from the ground state and first excited state of these nuclei. Results from measurements on Fe at incident neutron energies between 2 and 4 MeV will be presented and comparisons will be made to model calculations available from data evaluators.

Hicks, S. F.; Combs, B.; Downes, L.; Girgis, J.; Kersting, L. J.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; Schniederjan, J.; Sidwell, L.; Sigillito, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Dallas, Irving TX 75019 (United States); Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; Kumar, A.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estevz, F. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Vanhoy, J. R.; Watts, D. [Department of Physics, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis MD 21402 (United States); Yates, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States) and Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

328

Discrimination of gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering in AGATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Possibilities of discriminating neutrons and gamma rays in the AGATA gamma-ray tracking spectrometer have been investigated with the aim of reducing the background due to inelastic scattering of neutrons in the high-purity germanium crystals. This background may become a serious problem especially in experiments with neutron-rich radioactive ion beams. Simulations using the Geant4 toolkit and a tracking program based on the forward tracking algorithm were carried out by emitting neutrons and gamma rays from the center of AGATA. Three different methods were developed and tested in order to find 'fingerprints' of the neutron interaction points in the detectors. In a simulation with simultaneous emission of six neutrons with energies in the range 1-5 MeV and ten gamma rays with energies between 150 and 1450 keV, the peak-to-background ratio at a gamma-ray energy of 1.0 MeV was improved by a factor of 2.4 after neutron rejection with a reduction of the photopeak efficiency at 1.0 MeV of only a factor of 1.25.

A. Ata; A. Ka?ka?; S. Akkoyun; M. ?enyi?it; T. Hyk; S. O. Kara; J. Nyberg

2009-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

329

Discrimination of gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering in AGATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Possibilities of discriminating neutrons and ? rays in the AGATA ?-ray tracking spectrometer have been investigated with the aim of reducing the background due to inelastic scattering of neutrons in the high-purity germanium crystals. This background may become a serious problem especially in experiments with neutron-rich radioactive ion beams. Simulations using the Geant4 toolkit and a tracking program based on the forward tracking algorithm were carried out by emitting neutrons and ? rays from the center of AGATA. Three different methods were developed and tested in order to find fingerprints of the neutron interaction points in the detectors. In a simulation with simultaneous emission of six neutrons with energies in the range 1-5 MeV and ten ? rays with energies between 150 and 1450 keV, the peak-to-background ratio at a ?-ray energy of 1.0 MeV was improved by a factor of 2.4 after neutron rejection with a reduction of the photopeak efficiency at 1.0 MeV of only a factor of 1.25.

A. Ata; A. Kaskas A; S. Akkoyun A; M. Senyi?git A; T. Hyk A; S. O. Kara A; J. Nyberg B

330

Longitudinal-Transverse Separation of Deep-Inelastic Scattering at Low Q on Nucleons and Nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the early experiments at SLAC, which discovered the nucleon substructure and led to the development of the quark parton model, deep inelastic scattering (DIS) has been the most powerful tool to investigate the partonic substructure of the nucleon. After about 30 years of experiments with electron and muon beams the nucleon structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) is known with high precision over about four orders of magnitude in x and Q{sup 2}. In the region of Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2} the results of the DIS measurements are interpreted in terms of partons (quarks and gluons). The theoretical framework is provided in this case by perturbative Quantum Chromo Dynamics (pQCD), which includes scaling violations, as described by the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) equations. The description starts to fail when Q{sup 2} becomes of the order of 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}, where non-perturbative effects (higher-twist effects), which are still not fully understood, become important (non-pQCD). The sensitivity for order-n twist effects increases with decreasing Q{sup 2}, since they include a factor 1/(Q{sup 2}{sup n}) (n {ge} 1).

Vladas Tvaskis

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

331

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection The Maine Department of Environmental Protection's Residuals, Sludge, and Composting program regulates the land application and post-processing of organic wastes, including sewage sludge, septage, food waste, and wood

332

Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996...

333

Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997...

334

Posters Residual Analysis of Surface Spectral Radiances Between...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Posters Residual Analysis of Surface Spectral Radiances Between Instrument Observations and Line-by-Line Calculations S. A. Clough and P. D. Brown Atmospheric and Environmental...

335

Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

Gao, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Huaiqiu, E-mail: hqzhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yao, Xin-Qiu [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); She, Zhen-Su, E-mail: she@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

336

Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction in Vehicle Components: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Residual Stresses for Structural...

337

Disappearance of fusionlike residues and the nuclear equation of state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross sections for massive residues from {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca and {sup 40}Ar+{sup 27}Al collisions were calculated with an improved Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation. The calculated residue cross sections decrease with incident energy, an effect which does not appear related to the residue excitation energy. Larger residue cross sections result from calculations with larger in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections or with equations of state which are less attractive at subnuclear density. This dual sensitivity may be eliminated by measurements of observables associated with the coincident light particles.

Xu, H.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Danielewicz, P.; Bertsch, G.F. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA) Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA))

1990-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

338

Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of high level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington and Savannah River, South Carolina. These tanks will eventually be emptied and decommissioned. This will leave a residue of sludge adhering to the interior tank surfaces that may contaminate nearby groundwaters with radionuclides and RCRA metals. Performance assessment (PA) calculations must be carried out prior to closing the tanks. This requires developing radionuclide release models from the sludges so that the PA calculations can be based on credible source terms. These efforts continued to be hindered by uncertainties regarding the actual nature of the tank contents and the distribution of radionuclides among the various phases. In particular, it is of vital importance to know what radionuclides are associated with solid sludge components. Experimentation on actual tank sludges can be difficult, dangerous and prohibitively expensive. The research funded under this grant for the past three years was intended to provide a cost-effective method for developing the needed radionuclide release models using non-radioactive artificial sludges. Insights gained from this work will also have more immediate applications in understanding the processes responsible for heel development in the tanks and in developing effective technologies for removing wastes from the tanks.

J.L. Krumhansl

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

339

Phytoplankton biomass and residual nitrate in the pelagic ecosystem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research Article Phytoplankton biomass and residual nitrate in the pelagic ecosystem...are linked to changes in the chlorophyll biomass. The model can be treated analytically...Mathematical bounds are found for the autotrophic biomass and the residual nitrate in terms of the...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Maximum Residual Energy Routing with Reverse Energy Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

node consumes energy, but the receiving node does not. This assumption is not true if acknowledgementsMaximum Residual Energy Routing with Reverse Energy Cost Qiling Xie, Chin-Tau Lea, Mordecai J-The Maximum Residual Energy Path (MREP) routing has been shown an effective routing scheme for energy

Fleischer, Rudolf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

342

AIAA-2001-0025 SPECTRUM FATIGUE LIFETIME AND RESIDUAL STRENGTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fit of the two. Direct lifetime under a variety of loads spectra for wind tests of residual strength for a modified standard wind bone coupons were manufactured, tested and favorably turbine spectrum. When a single and residual strength. Over 900 tests spectrum loading and fatigue lifetimes of a typical wind have been run

343

Exploring the practical issues and use of modern power, control and sensing circuitries of a 6/4-pole switched reluctance motor drive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper explores practical issues and use of modern power, control and sensing circuitries of a 6/4-pole Switched Reluctance Motor (SRM) drive. A DSP-based SRM drive system consists of classic bridge converter including power MOSFETs and their gate drivers, freewheeling diodes, sensing circuit, DSP controller and a SRM that is being controlled by the controller. Few logic components are also required that will interface with the DSP for communication. The complete practical issues experienced with modern power, control and sensing circuitries of a 6/4-pole SRM drive is presented.

Shanmugam Paramasivam; R. Arumugam

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Determination of Pentachlorophenol and Its Oil Solvent in Wood Pole Samples by SFE and GC with Postcolumn Flow Splitting for Simultaneous Detection of the Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An alternative approach is described for the measurement of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and its oil solvent in wood samples by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and gas chromatography (GC). ... Pentachlorophenol (PCP), which was commercially introduced in Canada in the early 1950s, is still widely used by many public utilities as a biocide for wood pole preservation in new installations.1 It is dissolved in a diesel-type oil and pressure-injected into wood poles. ... Those usually used by the wood preservative industry, such as X-ray spectrometry,2 are nonspecific to the PCP molecule and subject to matrix interference as they are based only on chlorine atom determination. ...

Yves G. Leblanc; Roland Gilbert; Joseph Hubert

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

345

Microsoft Word - CX-Chehalis-OlympiaChehalis-MayfieldLewisCoWoodPolesFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Olympia SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Lee Webb Ryan Brady Line Foreman III - TFOF-Olympia TFOK-Chehalis - Line Foreman III Proposed Action: Wood pole structure replacements on the Chehalis-Olympia No. 1 and Chehalis-Mayfield No. 1, 115-kV transmission lines PP&A Project No.: 2370 & 2373, Work Order # 298130, 298138, and 297997 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities... Location: The subject transmission lines are located in Lewis and Thurston counties, Washington, in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Olympia Maintenance District. The transmission line right-of-way (ROW) corridors cross public and privately-owned lands that

346

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCouleeDistrictWoodPoleReplacementsAccessRoadsFY13_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Todd Wehner Civil Design/Access Roads - TELF-TPP-3 James Semrau Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement, equipment landing construction, and access road improvements along various transmission lines in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Grand Coulee District. PP&A Project No.: 2152 (Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph No. 1), 2151 (Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph No. 2), 2121 (Grand Coulee-Foster Creek No. 1) and 1776 (Grand Coulee-Okanogan No. 2) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Douglas and Okanogan counties, Washington. Refer to table below for project locations: Line Name Structure Township Range Section County

347

MINIMIZING WASTE AND COST IN DISPOSITION OF LEGACY RESIDUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) which is directed toward development of a quantitative basis for disposition of actinide-bearing process residues (both legacy residues and residues generated from ongoing programmatic operations). This research is focused in two directions: (1) identifying minimum negative consequence (waste, dose, cost) dispositions working within regulatory safeguards termination criteria, and (2) evaluating logistics/consequences of across-the-board residue discards such as authorized at Rocky Flats under a safeguards termination variance. The first approach emphasizes Laboratory commitments to environmental stewardship, worker safety, and fiscal responsibility. This approach has been described as the Plutonium Disposition Methodology (PDM) in deference to direction provided by DOE Albuquerque. The second approach is born of the need to expedite removal of residues from storage for programmatic and reasons and residue storage safety concerns. Any disposition path selected must preserve the legal distinction between residues as Special Nuclear Material (SNM) and discardable materials as waste in order to insure the continuing viability of Laboratory plutonium processing facilities for national security operations.

J. BALKEY; M. ROBINSON

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Characterisation of rotary kiln residues from the pyrolysis of shredder residues: Issues with lead  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stringent legislation is being to be implemented across Europe relating to heavy metal contamination into the environment. This study thus focuses on developing a method for reliably determining the lead content of automotive shredder residue (ASR). The material is first pyrolysed to remove organic fractions. Different analytical methods were then used to investigate the concentrations of heavy metals in the burned char, which varies from chunks of metals in larger sized fractions to fine powders of mostly non-metals. By considering results from ICP-MS, EDXRF, WDXRF and a portable EDXRF, it was found that varying values were obtained but that consistent consensus values could be determined. Such consensus values of lead, copper, iron and zinc are thus reported, and show that properly depolluted \\{ELVs\\} have significantly lower lead levels than normal shredder residue (SR) feed ?8000ppm versus 16,000ppm. The finest fraction, <850?m, makes up around half of the mass of the SR and has only 2700ppm and 5400ppm lead concentration values for depolluted \\{ELVs\\} and normal SR, respectively, making it of interest for further work to develop uses as a feed in other industries.

Osric T. Forton; Lucas McGrady; M.M. Singh; E.R.M. Taylor; Norman R. Moles; Marie K. Harder

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Ocean circulation plays a key role in distributing solar energy and maintaining climate, by moving heat from Earth's equator to the poles. At  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat from Earth's equator to the poles. At the ocean surface, currents are primarily driven by windOcean circulation plays a key role in distributing solar energy and maintaining climate, by moving. Deep below the surface however, currents are controlled by water density, which depends

Waliser, Duane E.

350

Pesticide and heavy metal residues in Louisiana river otter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chromatography. Hercury levels averaged 1. 29 porn in liver (N=100) and 3. 88 ppm in hair (N=24), Liver and hair mercury residues were highly correlated (r=0. 98). Fetal whole body mercury levels averaged 0. 07 ppm (N=4). Fetal and maternal mercury levels... correlations between ani- mal weights and residue levels were observed for mercury, dieldrin, and mirex. There were no apparent relationships between residue levels of mercury and liver weight or liver:carcass weight ratio. There was no significant...

Beck, Debra Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

351

Automobile Shredder Residue (ASR) destruction in a plasma gasification reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Test results on Automobile Shredder Residue (ASR), or car fluff, demonstrated destruction efficiency and safe conversion to synthesis gas and a glass residue, in a plasma gasification system. The synthesis gas consists primarily of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the range between 20 and 22 vol-% respectively, or 45 and 55 vol-% dry basis, when corrected for nitrogen. In dry reforming operation, carbon dioxide conversion approached 90%. The system is designed to work with oxygen in autothermal conditions, reducing thus the electric power requirement for the plasma reactor. The vitrified residue leach rate makes the product suitable for construction works.

Marco G. Tellini; Paolo Centola; James A. Batdorf; William J. Quapp

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material at sites identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. 36 refs., 16 figs, 22 tabs.

Gilbert, T.L.; Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Zielen, A.J.; Jusko, M.J.; Wallo, A. III

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Sustainable Heat and Electricity from Sugarcane Residues Gasification in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sugarcane residues, in the form of bagasse and cane tops and leaves, represent a large renewable biomass energy resource in Brazil. Bagasse is currently used to satisfy the energy needs of the sugar and alcohol i...

Ausilio Bauen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Infrared thermography to detect residual ceramic in gas turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A serious problem in the production of gas turbine blades is the detection of residual ceramic cores inside the cooling passages; in ... the presence of even small ceramic pieces affects turbine performance and m...

C. Meola; G.M. Carlomagno; M. Di Foggia; O. Natale

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Erratum to: Crop Residue Considerations for Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Supplies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two regrettable errors occurred in citing a critical funding source for the multi-location research summarized in the 2014 article entitled Crop Residue Considerations for Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Supplie...

Douglas L. Karlen; Jane M. F. Johnson

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999 After completion of all deliverables required under a fixed-price award, after costs in fulfilling the requirements of the award have been

Weston, Ken

357

Tropical Residual Soils Geological Society Engineering Group Working Party Report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Clanan, M. B. 1982. Settlement of a tower on residual soil. Proceedings of Conference...i trench [ ] ~-~=___ ,~'A dolly ;' ;i i [ l Jacking undisturbed core-cutter sampler. excavation...

358

Modeling, Optimization and Economic Evaluation of Residual Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification is a thermo-chemical process which transforms biomass into valuable synthesis gas. Integrated with a biorefinery it can address the facilitys residue handling challenges and input demands. A number of feedstock, technology, oxidizer...

Georgeson, Adam

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

359

Present safeguards in Great Britain against pesticide residues and hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A description of the direct legislative measures taken in Great Britain to protect the public from contamination of food by pesticide residues would be brief for, today, but two regulations exist, specifying t...

H. Martin

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

An urban infill : a residual site in Boston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is concerned with the treatment of residual sites in the context of the urban environment and in particular with the wounds inflicted by the passage of the Massachusetts Turnpike through the city of Boston. The ...

Savvides, Andreas L. (Andreas Loucas)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

RetroFILL : residual spaces as urban infill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In any city there are small slivers and chunks of awkward spaces - in between buildings, occupying edge conditions, not large enough to warrant many forms of traditional use - which can be termed residual. These areas of ...

Kobel, Marika

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

RELATIVE RESIDUAL BOUNDS FOR INDEFINITE SINGULAR HERMITIAN MATRICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residual bounds, indefinite Hermitian matrix, eigen- values, perturbation theory, relative perturbations. These theorems are proper generalization of results on a semi-definite Hermitian matrix SIAM Journal on Matrix

Truhar, Ninoslav

363

Inelastic Neutron Study ofTHF+D, Clathrates K.T. Tait!.', F. R. Trouw', M.P. Hehlen', A. H. Shapiro', Y. Zhao' and R.T. Downs'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P34-01 Inelastic Neutron Study ofTHF+D, Clathrates K.T. Tait!.', F. R. Trouw', M.P. Hehlen', A. H, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA ktaitCd;geo.arizona.edu 'Los -'Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE), Los improvements could result in suitable materials relevant to the future hydrogen economy. Neutron inelastic

Downs, Robert T.

364

GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

365

Residual strain measurements on drill cores from Reydarfjordur, Iceland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDUAL STRAIN MEASUREMENTS ON DRILL CORES FROM REYDARFJORDUR, ICELAND A Thesis BESIM BASLANGIC Submitted to the Office oi' Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements I' or the degree of MAST...'ER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Geophysics RESIDUAL STRAIN MEASLREMENTS ON DRILL CORES FROM REYDARFJORDUR, ICELAVD A Thesis BESIM BASLANGIC Approved as to style and content by: Earl R. Hoskins (Chair of Committee) Richard L. Carlson (Member...

Baslangic, Besim

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

Inelastic neutron scattering investigation of ball-milled FeSiB described as a magnetic nanoglass-like structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An inelastic neutron scattering study has been carried out to assess the effects of mechanical milling treatments (10, 20 and 70h) on an amorphous melt-spun FeSiB ribbon. Faint traces of crystallization were observed after 10 and 20h milling by X-ray diffraction and Mssbauer spectroscopy and a minor fraction of bcc-Fe was clearly detected after 70h. Whilst the neutron spectrum S(E) of the 10h-milled sample, at temperature T=300K, does not differ from that of the precursor FeSiB ribbon, the area of the inelastic region of S(E) decreases more and more after 20 and 70h milling. Moreover, in the samples milled for 20 and 70h, also the area of the elastic region of the S(E) spectrum is definitely smaller than the one of the FeSiB ribbon. This is consistent with a reduction of the magnetic cross section upon milling and it agrees also with magnetization measurements. We interpret this behavior assuming that the milling treatment causes local alterations of the short-range atomic order within the amorphous phase, and hence of the precursor collinear ferromagnetic order, finally giving rise to a sort of magnetic nanoglass structure.

L. Del Bianco; F. Spizzo; A. Deriu; A. Orecchini

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

THE INFLUENCE OF INELASTIC NEUTRINO REACTIONS WITH LIGHT NUCLEI ON THE STANDING ACCRETION SHOCK INSTABILITY IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We perform numerical experiments to investigate the influence of inelastic neutrino reactions with light nuclei on the standing accretion shock instability (SASI). The time evolution of shock waves is calculated with a simple light-bulb approximation for the neutrino transport and a multi-nuclei equation of state. The neutrino absorptions and inelastic interactions with deuterons, tritons, helions, and alpha particles are taken into account in the hydrodynamical simulations. In addition, the effects of ordinary charged-current interactions with nucleons is addressed in the simulations. Axial symmetry is assumed but no equatorial symmetry is imposed. We show that the heating rates of deuterons reach as high as {approx}10% of those of nucleons around the bottom of the gain region. On the other hand, alpha particles are heated near the shock wave, which is important when the shock wave expands and the density and temperature of matter become low. It is also found that the models with heating by light nuclei evolve differently in the non-linear phase of SASI than do models that lack heating by light nuclei. This result is because matter in the gain region has a varying density and temperature and therefore sub-regions appear that are locally rich in deuterons and alpha particles. Although the light nuclei are never dominant heating sources and they work favorably for shock revival in some cases and unfavorably in other cases, they are non-negligible and warrant further investigation.

Furusawa, Shun; Nagakura, Hiroki; Yamada, Shoichi [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke, E-mail: furusawa@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Opportunities and Challenges for Nondestructive Residual Stress Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a long time, nondestructive residual stress assessment has been one of the greatest opportunities as well as one of the greatest challenges for the NDE community, and probably it will remain so in the foreseeable future. The most critical issue associated with nondestructive residual stress assessment seems to be that of selectivity. Numerous NDE methods have been found to be sufficiently sensitive to the presence of residual stress, but unfortunately also rather sensitive to other spurious variations that usually accompany residual stresses, such as anisotropic texture, microstructural inhomogeneity, plastic deformation, etc., which could interfere with, or even overshadow, the elastic strain caused by the sought residual stress. The only sufficiently selective NDE method that is more or less immune from these spurious effects is X-ray diffraction measurement, which however does not have the required penetration depth in most applications unless high-energy neutron radiation is used. It is timely for the community to sit back and ask where we are in this important area. This paper presents an overview of the various indirect techniques that have been used to measure residual stress in the past. It is shown that traditional techniques have a number of limitations, which have spurred several recent research programs. Some of the new techniques that are presently being examined in the NDE community are reviewed and the current status of these research efforts is assessed.

Nagy, P. B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0070 (United States)

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

369

Hanford tank residual waste contaminant source terms and release models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual waste is expected to be left in 177 underground storage tanks after closure at the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site in Washington State (USA). In the long term, the residual wastes represent a potential source of contamination to the subsurface environment. Residual materials that cannot be completely removed during the tank closure process are being studied to identify and characterize the solid phases and estimate the release of contaminants from these solids to water that might enter the closed tanks in the future. As of the end of 2009, residual waste from five tanks has been evaluated. Residual wastes from adjacent tanks C-202 and C-203 have high U concentrations of 24 and 59 wt%, respectively, while residual wastes from nearby tanks C-103 and C-106 have low U concentrations of 0.4 and 0.03 wt%, respectively. Aluminum concentrations are high (8.2 to 29.1 wt%) in some tanks (C-103, C-106, and S-112) and relatively low (<1.5 wt%) in other tanks (C-202 and C-203). Gibbsite is a common mineral in tanks with high Al concentrations, while non-crystalline U-Na-C-O-PH phases are common in the U-rich residual wastes from tanks C-202 and C-203. Iron oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual waste samples studied to date. Contaminant release from the residual wastes was studied by conducting batch leach tests using distilled deionized water, a Ca(OH)2-saturated solution, or a CaCO3-saturated water. Uranium release concentrations are highly dependent on waste and leachant compositions with dissolved U concentrations one or two orders of magnitude higher in the tests with high U residual wastes, and also higher when leached with the CaCO3-saturated solution than with the Ca(OH)2-saturated solution. Technetium leachability is not as strongly dependent on the concentration of Tc in the waste, and it appears to be slightly more leachable by the Ca(OH)2-saturated solution than by the CaCO3-saturated solution. In general, Tc is much less leachable (<10 wt% of the available mass in the waste) than previously predicted. This may be due to the coprecipitation of trace concentrations of Tc in relatively insoluble phases such as Fe oxide/hydroxide solids.

Deutsch, William J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

370

Pressure-induced valence change in YbAl3: A combined high-pressure inelastic x-ray scattering and theoretical investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA 5 HPCAT, Carnegie-ray emission RXES measurements were performed on the intermediate-valence com- pound YbAl3 under pressure of up-liquid coherence and the crossover to the local-moment regime have been studied by transport,15 inelastic nuclear

Svane, Axel Torstein

371

Inelastic interaction induced by high-energy muons (6 GeV, 12 GeV) at low momentum-transfer in nuclear emulsion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inelastic scattering of 6 and 12 GeV muons has been studied in Ilford K5 nuclear emulsions. For energy transfers greater than 150 MeV (for ?...2..., the cross-sections are respectively (11.11.4) ?b/nucleon at 12...

J. C. Montret; B. Coupat; B. Michel; F. Vazeille

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarizedHe3target  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1

Zhao, Y. X.; Wang, Y.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J.-P.; Chen, W.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Cornejo, J. C.; Cusanno, F.; Dalton, M. M.; Deconinck, W.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Ding, H.; Dolph, P. A.; Dutta, C.; Dutta, D.; El Fassi, L.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Guo, L.; Hamilton, D.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Ibrahim, H. F.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Jin, G.; Jones, M. K.; Katich, J.; Kelleher, A.; Kim, W.; Kolarkar, A.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J. J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Lu, H.-J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; McNulty, D.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Mu??oz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B.; Oh, Y.; Osipenko, M.; Parno, D.; Peng, J.-C.; Phillips, S. K.; Posik, M.; Puckett, A. J.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shahinyan, A.; Shabestari, M. H.; ??irca, S.; Stepanyan, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tang, L.-G.; Tobias, A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yuan, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Zhu, X.; Zong, X.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of the Specific Features of the Phase Transitions in (NH4)2WO2F4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxyfluoride (NH4)2WO2F4 has been studied by the inelastic neutron scattering method over a wide temperature range 10 300 K at two initial neutron energies of 15 and 60 meV. The role of tetrahedral ammonium groups in the mechanism of sequential phase transitions at T1 = 201 K and T2 = 160 K has been discussed.

Smirnov, Lev S [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia; Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL; Flerov, I. N. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Krasnoyarsk, Russia; Laptash, N. M. [Institute of Chemistry, Vladivostok, Russia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Nuclear inelastic scattering spectroscopy of tris(acetylacetonate)iron(III); A vibrational probe via the iron atom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report application of nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) spectroscopy to the compound tris(acetylacetonate)iron(III), [Fe(III)(acac)3] enriched in 57Fe. Experimental results are compared with the simulated spectrum based on the normal mode analysis of the isolated [57Fe(III)(acac)3] molecule using DFT calculations. Good agreement between the peak positions and intensities of the simulated and experimental spectra enables complete and reliable assignment of the Fe-selective vibrational modes. It is concluded that in the solid state E modes are enhanced by coupling with the lattice modes. Additionally, infrared and Raman spectra of [Fe(III)(acac)3] are calculated from DFT and compared with experiment thus demonstrating the complementarity of these three vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

Upali A. Jayasooriya; Jamie N.T. Peck; J. Elaine Barclay; Sinead M. Hardy; Aleksandr I. Chumakov; David J. Evans; Christopher J. Pickett; Vasily S. Oganesyan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Vibrational Density of States of Strongly H-Bonded Interfacial Water: Insights from Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vibrational dynamics of water and OH sorbed on SnO2 nanoparticles were probed with inelastic neutron scattering and analyzed with the assistance of ab-initio molecular dynamics. The combined analysis points to the existence of very strong hydrogen bonds at the surface with a formation enthalpy twice the average value for liquid water. This unusually large interaction results in (i) decoupling of the hydrated surface from the water system due to an epitaxially-induced screening layer, resulting in an apparent ice-like INS signal at multilayer coverage, (ii) splitting of OH wagging modes that can be used as an experimental indication of the strength of the surface hydrogen bonds, and (iii) high proton exchange rates and high degree of water dissociation at the interface. Our analysis provides general guidance into the tuning of surface hydrophobicity at the molecular level.

Wang, Hsiu-Wen [ORNL; Dellostritto, Mark J [ORNL; Kumar, Nitin [ORNL; Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL; Kent, Paul R [ORNL; Kubicki, James D. [Pennsylvania State University; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Sofo, Jorge O. [Pennsylvania State University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Acoustic plasmons and doping evolution of Mott physics in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering from cuprate superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By incorporating a long-range Coulomb interaction into the framework of the one-band Hubbard model, they delineate how the low-energy plasmon around 1 eV, which is a universal feature of the charge dynamics of the cuprates, manifests itself in the resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra. The long-range Coulomb interaction in the doped system control sthe form of the intraband RIXS dispersion near the Brillouin zone center around the {Gamma} point. The out-of-plane momentum transfer component q{sub z} is found to play a key role in determining whether or not the RIXS spectrum shows a plasmon-related gap at {Gamma}.

Markiewicz, R.S.; Hasan, M.Z.; Bansil, A.; (NEU); (Princeton)

2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

378

Quasi-zero dimensional CuB2O4: a resonant inelastic X-ray scattering case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the general phenomenology of resonant inelastic scattering (RIXS) using CuB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, a network of CuO{sub 4} plaquettes electronically isolated by B{sup +3} ions. Spectra show a small number of well-separated features, and we exploit the simple electronic structure to explore RIXS phenomenology by developing a calculation which allows for intermediate-state effects ignored in standard approaches. These effects are found to be non-negligible and good correspondence between our model and experiment leads to a simple picture of such phenomenology as the genesis of d {yields} d excitations at the K edge and intermediate-state interference effects.

Hancock, J.N.

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

379

Single-spin Azimuthal Asymmetries in Electroproduction of Neutral Pions in Semi-inclusive Deep-inelastic Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A single-spin asymmetry in the azimuthal distribution of neutral pions relative to the lepton scattering plane has been measured for the first time in deep-inelastic scattering of positrons off longitudinally polarized protons. The analysing power in the sin(phi) moment of the cross section is 0.019 +/- 0.007(stat.) +/- 0.003(syst.). This result is compared to single-spin asymmetries for charged pion production measured in the same kinematic range. The pi^0 asymmetry is of the same size as the pi^+ asymmetry and shows a similar dependence on the relevant kinematic variables. The asymmetry is described by a phenomenological calculation based on a fragmentation function that represents sensitivity to the transverse polarization of the struck quark.

Airapetian, A; Amarian, M; Aschenauer, E C; Avakian, H; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Bains, B; Baturin, V; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Bttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Bouhali, O; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brauksiepe, S; Brckner, W; Brll, A; Brunn, I; Bulten, H J; Capitani, G P; Chumney, P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Court, G R; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Devitsin, E G; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; Di Nezza, P; Dzhordzhadze, V; Dren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G M; Ellinghaus, F; Ely, J; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Felawka, L; Filippone, B W; Fischer, H; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Grber, Y; Garibaldi, F; Garutti, E; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Golendukhin, A; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Green, P W; Greeniaus, L G; Gute, A; Haeberli, W; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Heinsius, F H; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hofman, G J; Holler, Y; Holt, R J; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Izotov, A A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Jung, P; Kaiser, R; Kanesaka, J; Kinney, E R; Kiselev, A; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, H; Koch, N; Knigsmann, K C; Kolster, H; Korotkov, V A; Kotik, E; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kyle, G S; Lagamba, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Lindemann, T; Lorenzon, W; Maas, A; Makins, N C R; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; McAndrew, M; McIlhany, K; Meissner, F; Menden, F; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Milner, R; Muccifora, V; Mussa, R; Nagaitsev, A P; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaeva, K; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganesyan, K A; O'Neill, T G; Owen, B R; Pate, S F; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Rakness, G; Rappoport, V; Redwine, R P; Reggiani, D; Reolon, A R; Rith, K; Robinson, D; Rostomyan, A; Ruh, M; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Sanjiev, I; Sato, F; Savin, I A; Scarlett, C; Schfer, A; Schill, C; Schmidt, F; Schnell, G; Schler, K P; Schwind, A; Seibert, J; Seitz, B; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V B; Simani, M C; Simon, A; Sinram, K; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stsslein, U; Suetsugu, K; Taroian, S P; Terkulov, A R; Teryaev, O V; Tessarin, S; Thomas, E; Tipton, B; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van den Brand, J F J; van der Steenhoven, G; Van de Vyver, R; Van Hunen, J J; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Wise, T; Yen, S; Yoneyama, S; Zohrabyan, H G

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Prototype grooved and spherically bent Si backscattering crystal analyzer for meV resolution inelastic x-ray scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high-order backscattering reflections from single crystals of silicon have mrad rocking curve widths that can be exploited to produce meV energy-resolution focusing analyzer crystals for use in inelastic x-ray scattering experiments at third-generation synchrotron sources. The first generation of these analyzers has been limited in efficiency principally by slope and/or figure errors. We calculate the effect of slope errors on the theoretical energy resolution and focus spot size of a typical analyzer design using a ray-tracing code to ensure that there are no unforeseen contributions to the energy resolution and efficiency. We also present measurements of the slope errors of the atomic planes for a prototype, spherically bent, strain-relief grooved analyzer as proof that it is in principle possible to obtain the slope and figure error limits required for a high efficiency meV resolution backscattering crystal.

Blasdell, R.C.; Macrander, A.T. (Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439-4814 (United States))

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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381

A unified view of coherent and incoherent dihydrogen exchange in transition metal hydrides by nuclear resonance and inelastic neutron scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper a unified view of coherent and incoherent dihydrogen exchange in transition metal hydrides by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is presented. It is shown that both exchange processes coexist i.e. do not transform into each other although they may dominate the spectra in different temperature ranges. This superposition is the consequence of the incorporation of the tunnel frequency J of the coherent process into the nuclear two-spin hamiltonian of hydrogen pairs which allows to treat the problem using the well known density matrix theory of NMR line-shapes developed by Alexander and Binsch. It is shown that this theory can also be used to predict the line-shapes of the rotational tunneling transitions observed in the INS spectra of transition metal dihydrogen complexes and that both NMR and INS spectra depend on similar parameters.

Limbach, H.H.; Ulrich, S.; Buntkowsky, G. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Organische Chemie; Sabo-Etienne, S.; Chaudret, B. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Lab. de Chimie de Coordination du C.N.R.S.; Kubas, G.J.; Eckert, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

382

Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Deep Inelastic Scattering at JLab 6 GeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS) offers us a useful tool to study the weak neutral couplings and the hadronic structure of the nucleon, and provides high precision tests on the Standard Model. During the 6 GeV PVDIS experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, the parity-violating asymmetries A{sub PV} of a polarized electron beam scattering off an unpolarized deuteron target in the deep inelastic scattering region were precisely measured at two Q{sup 2} values of 1.1 and 1.9 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The asymmetry at Q{sup 2}=1.9 (GeV/c){sup 2} can be used to extract the weak coupling combination 2C{sub 2u} - C{sub 2d}, assuming the higher twist effect is small. The extracted result from this measurement is in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction, and improves the precision by a factor of five over previous data. In addition, combining the asymmetries at both Q{sup 2} values provides us extra knowledge on the higher twist effects. The parity violation asymmetries in the resonance region were also measured during this experiment. These results are the first A{sub PV} data in the resonance region beyond the {Delta}#1;(1232). They provide evidence that the quark hadron duality works for A{sub PV} at the (10-15)% level, and set constraints on nucleon resonance models that are commonly used for background calculations to other parity-violating electron scattering measurements.

Wang, Diancheng [UVA

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Distorted spin dependent spectral function of {sup 3}He and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spin dependent spectral function, relevant to describe polarized electron scattering off polarized {sup 3}He, is studied, within the Plane Wave Impulse Approximation and taking into account final state interaction effects (FSI). In particular, the case of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SiDIS) is considered, evaluating the FSI of the hadronizing quark with the nuclear remnants. It is shown that particular kinematical regions can be selected to minimize the latter effects, so that parton distributions in the neutron can be accessed. On the other side, in the regions where FSI dominates, the considered reactions can elucidate the mechanism of hadronization of quarks during the propagation in the nuclear medium. It is shown that the obtained spin dependent spectral function can be directly applied to investigate the SiDIS reaction e-vector + {sup 3}He-vector to h+X, where the hadron h originates from the current fragmentation. Experiments of this type are being performed at JLab to extract neutron transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. As a case study, a different SiDIS process, with detection of slow (A-1) systems in the final state, is considered in more details, in order to establish when nuclear structure effects and FSI can be distinguished from elementary reactions on quasi-free nucleons. It is argued that, by a proper choice of kinematics, the origin of nuclear effects in polarized DIS phenomena and the details of the interaction between the hadronizing quark and the nuclear medium can be investigated at a level which is not reachable in inclusive deep inelastic scattering.

Kaptari, Leonya P. [University of Perugia (Italy); INFN-Perugia (Italy); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russia); Del Dotto, Alessio [University of Rome, Rome (Italy); INFN-Roma (Italy); Pace, Emanuele [University of Rome (Italy); INFN-Tor Vergata (Italy); Salme, Giovanni [INFN-Roma (Italy); Scopetta, Sergio [University of Perugia (Italy); INFN-Perugia (Italy)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Evidence for residual elastic strain in deformed natural quartz  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual elastic strain in naturally deformed, quartz-containing rocks can be measured quantitatively in a petrographic thin section with high spatial resolution using Laue microdiffraction with white synchrotron x-rays. The measurements with a resolution of one micrometer allow the quantitative determination of the deviatoric strain tensor as a function of position within the crystal investigated. The observed equivalent strain values of 800-1200 microstrains represent a lower bound of the actual preserved residual strain in the rock, since the stress component perpendicular to the cut sample surface plane is released. The measured equivalent strain translates into an equivalent stress in the order of {approx} 50 MPa.

Kunz, Martin; Chen, Kai; Tamura,Nobumichi; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Residual Fuel Oil Prices, Average - Sales to End Users  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product/Sales Type: Residual Fuel, Average - Sales to End Users Residual Fuel, Average - Sales for Resale Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales for Resale Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales for Resale Period: Monthly Annual Product/Sales Type: Residual Fuel, Average - Sales to End Users Residual Fuel, Average - Sales for Resale Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales for Resale Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales for Resale Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product/Sales Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. - - - - - - 1983-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) - - - - - - 1983-2013 New England (PADD 1A) - - - - - - 1983-2013 Connecticut - - - - - - 1983-2013 Maine - - - - - - 1983-2013 Massachusetts - - - - - - 1983-2013

387

Automotive shredder residue (ASR) characterization for a valuable management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Car fluff is the waste produced after end-of-life-vehicles (ELVs) shredding and metal recovery. It is made of plastics, rubber, glass, textiles and residual metals and it accounts for almost one-third of a vehicle mass. Due to the approaching of Directive 2000/53/EC recycling targets, 85% recycling rate and 95% recovery rate in 2015, the implementation of automotive shredder residue (ASR) sorting and recycling technologies appears strategic. The present work deals with the characterization of the shredder residue coming from an industrial plant, representative of the Italian situation, as for annual fluxes and technologies involved. The aim of this study is to characterize ASR in order to study and develop a cost effective and environmentally sustainable recycling system. Results show that almost half of the residue is made of fines and the remaining part is mainly composed of polymers. Fine fraction is the most contaminated by mineral oils and heavy metals. This fraction produces also up to 40% ashes and its LHV is lower than the plastic-rich one. Foam rubber represents around half of the polymers share in car fluff. Moreover, some chemicalphysical parameters exceed the limits of some parameters fixed by law to be considered refuse derived fuel (RDF). As a consequence, ASR needs to be pre-treated in order to follow the energy recovery route.

Luciano Morselli; Alessandro Santini; Fabrizio Passarini; Ivano Vassura

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Pyrolysis of automotive shredder residues: a lumped kinetic characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lumped kinetic model for the pyrolysis of industrial wastes of unknown chemical composition is developed. The model is applied to the pyrolysis of automotive shredder residues (ASRs), studied by means of thermogravimetric and calorimetric analyses, in isothermal and non-isothermal conditions.

Oreste Patierno; Paola Cipriani; Fausto Pochetti; Massimiliano Giona

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Removal of heavy metals from samples of residual sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitric acid leaching processes were evaluated for removal of heavy metals from samples of residual sludge from an industrial and municipal wastewater plant. The study showed that an acid:water ratio of 1:1 and a nitric acid concentration of 2 mol 1?1 gave efficient removal of 86.7%, 100% and 100% of copper, nickel and arsenic.

Jose Abrego

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Removal of residual particulate matter from filter media  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing residual filter cakes that remain adhered to a filter after typical particulate removal methodologies have been employed, such as pulse-jet filter element cleaning, for all cleanable filters used for air pollution control, dust control, or powder control.

Almlie, Jay C; Miller, Stanley J

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

391

COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus Evolutionarily Conserved? Yan Yuan Tseng is the hallmark of life. It is important to understand how protein folding and evolution influence each other in protein folding nucleus as measured by experi- mental f-value and selection pressure as measured by v

Dai, Yang

392

Microwave calcination for plutonium immobilization and residue stabilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1980`s development was begun on a process using microwave energy to vitrify low level mixed waste sludge and transuranic mixed waste sludge generated in Building 374 at Rocky Flats. This process was shown to produce a dense, highly durable waste form. With the cessation of weapons production at Rocky Flats, the emphasis has changed from treatment of low level and TRU wastes to stabilizaiton of plutonium oxide and residues. This equipment is versatile and can be used as a heat source to calcine, react or vitrify many types of residues and oxides. It has natural economies in that it heats only the material to be treated, significantly reducing cycle times over conventional furnaces. It is inexpensive to operate in that most of the working components remain outside of any necessary contamination enclosure and therefore can easily be maintained. Limited testing has been successfully performed on cerium oxide (as a surrogate for plutonium oxide), surrogate electrorefining salts, surrogate residue sludge and residue ash. Future plans also include tests on ion exchange resins. In an attempt to further the usefullness of this technology, a mobile, self-contained microwave melting system is currently under development and expected to be operational at Rocky Flats Enviromental Technology Site by the 4th quarter of FY96.

Harris, M.J.; Rising, T.L.; Roushey, W.J.; Sprenger, G.S. [Kaiser-Hill Co., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Sorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aluminum smelter residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature carbon oxidation in primary aluminum smelters results in the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the environment. The main source of PAH are the anodes, which are composed of petroleum coke (black carbon, BC) and coal tar pitch. To elucidate the dominant carbonaceous phase controlling the environmental fate of PAH in aluminum smelter residues (coke BC and/or coal tar), the sorptive behavior of PAHs has been determined, using passive samplers and infinite-sink desorption methods. Samples directly from the wet scrubber were studied as well as ones from an adjacent 20-year old storage lagoon and roof dust from the smelter. Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. Sorption isotherms of laboratory-spiked deuterated phenanthrene showed strong (about 100 times stronger than AOC) but nonetheless linear sorption in both fresh and aged aluminum smelter residues. The absence of nonlinear behavior typical for adsorption to BC indicates that PAH sorption in aluminum smelter residues is dominated by absorption into the semi-solid coal tar pitch matrix. Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35-50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11-16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. Weathering of the coal tar residue and/or redistribution of PAH between coal tar and BC phases could explain the reduced availability in aged samples. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Gijs D. Breedveld; Emilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen [Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo (Norway)

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Residual Stresses in 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Warm Forgings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forging residual stresses are detrimental to the production and performance of derived machined parts due to machining distortions, corrosion drivers and fatigue crack drivers. Residual strains in a 21-6-9 stainless steel warm High Energy Rate Forging (HERF) were measured via neutron diffraction. The finite element analysis (FEA) method was used to predict the residual stresses that occur during forging and water quenching. The experimentally measured residual strains were used to calibrate simulations of the three-dimensional residual stress state of the forging. ABAQUS simulation tools predicted residual strains that tend to match with experimental results when varying yield strength is considered.

Everhart, Wesley A.; Lee, Jordan D.; Broecker, Daniel J.; Bartow, John P.; McQueen, Jamie M.; Switzner, Nathan T.; Neidt, Tod M.; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Brown, Donald W.

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

395

Resonant inelastic soft-x-ray scattering spectra at the N1s and C1s edges of poly(pyridine-2,5-diyl)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resonant inelastic scattering measurements of poly(pyridine-2,5-diyl) have been performed at the N1s and C1s edges using synchrotron radiation. For comparison, molecular orbital calculations of the spectra have been carried out with the repeat unit as a model molecule of the polymer chain. The resonant emission spectra show depletion of the p electron bands which is consistent with symmetry selection and momentum conservation rules. The depletion is most obvious in the resonant inelastic scattering spectra of carbon while the nitrogen spectra are dominated by lone pair n orbital emission of s symmetry and are less excitation energy dependent. By comparing the measurements to calculations an isomeric dependence of the resonant spectra is found giving preference to two of the four possible isomers in the polymer.

Magnuson, M; Guo, J - H; Sthe, C; Agui, A; Nordgren, J; Luo, Y; gren, H; Johansson, N; Salaneck, W R; Horsburgh, L E; Monkman, A P; 10.1016/S0368-2048(98)00354-5

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry in Deep-Inelastic Scattering from the Reaction $^{3}\\mathrm{He}^{\\uparrow}(e,e')X$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first measurement of the target-normal single-spin asymmetry in deep-inelastic scattering from the inclusive reaction $^3$He$^{\\uparrow}\\left(e,e' \\right)X$ on a polarized $^3$He gas target. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero in the Born approximation but can be non-zero if two-photon-exchange contributions are included. The experiment, conducted at Jefferson Lab using a 5.89 GeV electron beam, covers a range of $1.7 2$ GeV, which is non-zero at the $2.89\\sigma$ level. Our measured asymmetry agrees both in sign and magnitude with a two-photon-exchange model prediction that uses input from the Sivers transverse momentum distribution obtained from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

J. Katich; X. Qian; Y. X. Zhao; K. Allada; K. Aniol; J. R. M. Annand; T. Averett; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; P. C. Bradshaw; P. Bosted; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; C. Chen; J. -P. Chen; W. Chen; K. Chirapatpimol; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; J. C. Cornejo; F. Cusanno; M. M. Dalton; W. Deconinck; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; X. Deng; A. Deur; H. Ding; P. A. M. Dolph; C. Dutta; D. Dutta; L. El Fassi; S. Frullani; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; O. Glamazdin; S. Golge; L. Guo; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; J. Huang; M. Huang; H. F. Ibrahim; M. Iodice; X. Jiang; G. Jin; M. K. Jones; A. Kelleher; W. Kim; A. Kolarkar; W. Korsch; J. J. LeRose; X. Li; Y. Li; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; E. Long; H. -J. Lu; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; D. McNulty; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; C. Mu?oz Camacho; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; B. Norum; Y. Oh; M. Osipenko; D. Parno; J. C. Peng; S. K. Phillips; M. Posik; A. J. R. Puckett; Y. Qiang; A. Rakhman; R. D. Ransome; S. Riordan; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; E. Schulte; A. Shahinyan; M. H. Shabestari; S. irca; S. Stepanyan; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; L. -G. Tang; A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; I. Vilardi; K. Wang; Y. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; Y. Ye; Z. Ye; L. Yuan; X. Zhan; Y. Zhang; Y. -W. Zhang; B. Zhao; X. Zheng; L. Zhu; X. Zhu; X. Zong

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

397

Measurement of the Inelastic Proton-Proton Cross-Section at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A first measurement of the inelastic cross-section is presented for proton-proton collisions at a center of mass energy sqrt{s}=7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. In a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20 mub-1, events are selected by requiring hits on scintillation counters mounted in the forward region of the detector. An inelastic cross-section of $60.3 +/- 2.1 mb is measured for xi > 5x10^-6, where xi=M_X^2/s is calculated from the invariant mass, M_X, of hadrons selected using the largest rapidity gap in the event. For diffractive events this corresponds to requiring at least one of the dissociation masses to be larger than 15.7 GeV.

Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; ?kesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amors, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonelli, Stefano; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; ?sman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimares da Costa, Joo; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jrg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Inelastic and Reactive Scattering Dynamics of Hyperthermal Oxygen Atoms on Ionic Liquid Surfaces: [emim][NTf{sub 2}] and [C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collisions of hyperthermal oxygen atoms, with an average translational energy of 520 kJ mol{sup -1}, on continuously refreshed ionic liquids, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([emim][NTf{sub 2}]) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}]), were studied with the use of a beam-surface scattering technique. Time-of-flight and angular distributions of inelastically scattered O and reactively scattered OH and H{sub 2}O were collected for various angles of incidence with the use of a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. For both O and OH, two distinct scattering processes were identified, which can be empirically categorized as thermal and non-thermal. Non-thermal scattering is more probable for both O and OH products. The observation of OH confirms that at least some reactive sites, presumably alkyl groups, must be exposed at the surface. The ionic liquid with the longer alkyl chain, [C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}], is substantially more reactive than the liquid with the shorter alkyl chain, [emim][NTf{sub 2}], and proportionately much more so than would be predicted simply from stoichiometry based on the number of abstractable hydrogen atoms. Molecular dynamics models of these surfaces shed light on this change in reactivity. The scattering behavior of O is distinctly different from that of OH. However, no such differences between inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics have been seen in previous work on pure hydrocarbon liquids, in particular the benchmark, partially branched hydrocarbon, squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}). The comparison between inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics indicates that inelastic scattering from the ionic liquid surfaces takes place predominantly at non-reactive sites that are effectively stiffer than the reactive alkyl chains, with a higher proportion of collisions sampling such sites for [emim][NTf{sub 2}] than for [C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}].

Wu Bohan; Zhang Jianming; Minton, Timothy K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); McKendrick, Kenneth G. [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Slattery, John M. [Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Yockel, Scott; Schatz, George C. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113 (United States)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

399

Renormalized O(N) model at next-to-leading order of the 1/N expansion: Effects of the Landau pole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Apparently convergent contributions of resummed perturbative series at the next-to-leading order of the 1/N expansion in the O(N) model are reanalyzed in terms of renormalizability. Compared to our earlier article [G. Fej?s etal., Phys. Rev. D 80, 025015 (2009)], an additional subtraction is performed. We show numerically that this is indispensable for diminishing the cutoff sensitivity of some integrals below the scale of the Landau pole. Following the method of our earlier article, an improved counterterm Lagrangian is constructed in the two-particle irreducible formalism, with and without the use of an auxiliary field formulation.

G. Fej?s; A. Patks; Zs. Szp

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

400

Analysis of the Use of Wind Energy to Supplement the Power Needs at McMurdo Station and Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster summarizes the analysis of the inclusion of wind-driven power generation technology into the existing diesel power plants at two U.S. Antarctic research stations, McMurdo and Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Staff at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted the analysis. Available data were obtained on the wind resources, power plant conditions, load, and component cost. We then used NREL's Hybrid2 power system modeling software to analyze the potential and cost of using wind turbine generators at the two aforementioned facilities.

Baring-Gould, E. I.; Robichaud, R.; McLain, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A vertical drift chamber as a high resolution focal plane detector for heavy ion spectroscopy with the Enge split-pole spectrometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designed for future heavy ion I spectroscopy applications in the split-pole spectrograph. The hybrid t detector will be capable of identifying heavy iona having masses through A - 20 and energies up to 35 MeV/amu to be available from the new K-500... will be an important tool in the study of reaction products up to its 35 MeV/amu bending limit. Heavy ion reactions excite closely spaced (or even overlapping) discrete and continuum energy states and produce a number of reaction products concentrated at forward...

Yates, Kenneth Warren

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

FIRST DRAFT OF OUTLINE: RPSEA 1 RESIDUAL OIL ZONE RESEARCH  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Exploitation and the Origin of Commercial Exploitation and the Origin of Residual Oil Zones: Developing a Case History in the Permian Basin of New Mexico and West Texas RPSEA PROJECT NUMBER.FINAL Commercial Exploitation and the Origin of Residual Oil Zones: Developing a Case History in the Permian Basin of New Mexico and West Texas Contract 81.089 08123-19-RPSEA June 28, 2012 Dr. Robert Trentham Director, Center for Energy and Economic Diversification The University of Texas of the Permian Basin Odessa, Texas 79762 L. Steven Melzer Melzer Consulting Midland, Texas 79701 David Vance Arcadis, U. S. Midland, Texas 79701 LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Dr Robert Trentham as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA

403

The Particle Adventure | What holds it together? | Residual EM force  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EM force EM force Residual EM force Atoms usually have the same numbers of protons and electrons. They are electrically neutral, therefore, because the positive protons cancel out the negative electrons. Since they are neutral, what causes them to stick together to form stable molecules? The answer is a bit strange: we've discovered that the charged parts of one atom can interact with the charged parts of another atom. This allows different atoms to bind together, an effect called the residual electromagnetic force. So the electromagnetic force is what allows atoms to bond and form molecules, allowing the world to stay together and create the matter you interact with all of the time. Amazing, isn't it? All the structures of the world exist simply because protons and electrons have opposite charges!

404

In situ ultrahigh vacuum residual gas analyzer 'calibration'  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing the residual gas spectrum is essential for many applications and research in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Residual gas analyzers (RGAs) are used for both qualitative and quantitative gas analyses, where the quadrupole mass analyzers are now the most popular. It was found that RGAs supplied by different manufacturers are not necessarily well calibrated for quantitative gas analysis. A procedure applied for in situ RGA 'calibration' against a calibrated UHV total pressure gauge is described in this article. It was found that special attention should be paid to H{sub 2} calibration, as RGAs are usually much more sensitive to H{sub 2} than ionization gauges. The calibration coefficients are quite reproducible in Faraday cup mode, however, using the secondary electron multiplier requires frequent checks of the calibration coefficients. The coefficients obtained for the RGA allow the use of the RGA as an accurate device for gas spectrum analysis.

Malyshev, O. B.; Middleman, K. J. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Vacuum pyrolysis of bark residues and primary sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black spruce bark residues and primary sludges derived from the operation of the Daishowa pulp and paper plant in Quebec City, PQ, were processed by vacuum pyrolysis in a laboratory-scale batch reactor. The pyrolysis oil, water, charcoal, and gas were recovered and analyzed. The bark residues yielded 30.6% oil and 34.1% charcoal, and the primary sludges gave 40.1% oil and 30.1% charcoal on a feedstock air-dry basis. The oil phases recovered from the two pyrolysis experiments were fractionated into eight fractions; they were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Both pyrolysis oil samples had a high content of phenolic compounds. These oils contained various fine chemicals that have possible commercial potential. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as long- and short-chain carboxylic acids, are also present in both pyrolysis oils.

Pakdel, H.; Couture, G.; Roy, C. (Univ. Laval, Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Combustion of textile residues in a packed bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Textile is one of the main components in the municipal waste which is to be diverted from landfill for material and energy recovery. As an initial investigation for energy recovery from textile residues, the combustion of cotton fabrics with a minor fraction of polyester was investigated in a packed bed combustor for air flow rates ranging from 117 to 1638 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.027-0.371 m/s). Tests were also carried out in order to evaluate the co-combustion of textile residues with two segregated waste materials: waste wood and cardboard. Textile residues showed different combustion characteristics when compared to typical waste materials at low air flow rates below 819 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.186 m/s). The ignition front propagated fast along the air channels randomly formed between packed textile particles while leaving a large amount of unignited material above. This resulted in irregular behaviour of the temperature profile, ignition rate and the percentage of weight loss in the ignition propagation stage. A slow smouldering burn-out stage followed the ignition propagation stage. At air flow rates of 1200-1600 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.272-0.363 m/s), the bed had a maximum burning rate of about 240 kg/m{sup 2} h consuming most of the combustibles in the ignition propagation stage. More uniform combustion with an increased burning rate was achieved when textile residues were co-burned with cardboard that had a similar bulk density. (author)

Ryu, Changkook; Phan, Anh N.; Sharifi, Vida N.; Swithenbank, Jim [Sheffield University Waste Incineration Centre (SUWIC), Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Wave induced residual pore-water pressures in sandbeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for her help in typing and proofreading the text, and especially for her undying moral support during our stay in College Station. ACKNOWLED6NENTS The author is grateful to Drs. John B. Herbich and Wayne A. Dunlap for their advice and guidance... Size Analysis for Glass Beads . . . . . . . . 24 Waterproof Housing for Pressure Transducers 27 10 Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Experiment 3 Experiment 4 Experiment 5 Experiment 6 32 33 34 35 36 37 12 13 Effect of Residual Pore...

DeVries, Jack Walter

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

408

Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kim et al. (2013) [K13] introduced a new methodology for determining peak- brightness absolute magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band light curves. We examine the relation between their parameterization of light curves and Hubble residuals, based on photometry synthesized from the Nearby Supernova Factory spec- trophotometric time series, with global host-galaxy properties. The K13 Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.013 ? 0.031 mag for a supernova subsample with data coverage corresponding to the K13 training; at ? 1?, the step is not significant and lower than previous measurements. Relaxing the data coverage requirement the Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.045 ? 0.026 mag for the larger sample; a calculation using the modes of the distributions, less sensitive to outliers, yields a step of 0.019 mag. The analysis of this article uses K13 inferred luminosities, as distinguished from previous works that use magnitude corrections as a function of SALT2 color and stretch param- eters: Steps at> 2? significance are found in SALT2 Hubble residuals in samples split by the values of their K13 x(1) and x(2) light-curve parameters. x(1) affects the light- curve width and color around peak (similar to the?m15 and stretch parameters), and x(2) affects colors, the near-UV light-curve width, and the light-curve decline 20 to 30 days after peak brightness. The novel light-curve analysis, increased parameter set, and magnitude corrections of K13 may be capturing features of SN Ia diversity arising from progenitor stellar evolution.

Nearby Supernova Factory; Kim, A. G.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Bongard, S.; Buton, C.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Childress, M.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Feindt, U.; Fleury, M.; Gangler, E.; Greskovic, P.; Guy, J.; Kowalski, M.; Lombardo, S.; Nordin, J.; Nugent, P.; Pain, R.; Pecontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigault, M.; Runge, K.; Saunders, C.; Scalzo, R.; Smadja, G.; Tao, C.; Thomas, R. C.; Weaver, B. A.

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

409

Diesel engine lubrication with poor quality residual fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quality of marine residual fuel is declining. This is being caused by a gradual trend towards production of heavier crudes and increased residuum conversion processes in refineries to meet light product demand while holding down crude runs. Additionally, more stringent inland fuel sulfur regulations have caused the higher sulfur residues to be used for marine residual fuel blending. Engine manufacturers are making major efforts in design so that their engines can burn these fuels at high efficiency with minimum adverse effects. The oil industry is developing improved lubricants to reduce as much as possible the increased wear and deposit formation caused by these poor quality fuels. To guide the development of improved lubricants, knowledge is required about the impact of the main fuel characteristics on lubrication. This paper summarizes work conducted to assess the impact of fuel sulfur, Conradson carbon and asphaltenes on wear and deposit formation in engines representative of full scale crosshead diesel engines and medium speed trunk piston engines. Results obtained with improved lubricants in these engines are reviewed.

Van der Horst, G.W.; Hold, G.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Residual Stress Evaluation within a Crimped Splice Connector Assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In power transmission, connectors play an important role in the efficiency and reliability of the system. Due to the increase of power demand and lack of new infrastructure, existing overhead power transmission lines often need to operate at temperatures higher than the original design criteria. However, this had led to the accelerated aging and degradation of splice connectors, which has been manifested by the formation of hot-spots that have been revealed by infrared imaging during inspection of transmission lines operating at elevated temperatures. The implications of connector aging is two-fold: (1) significant increase in resistivity of the splice connector (i.e., less efficient transmission of electricity) and (2) significant reduction in the connector clamping strength, which ultimately results in separation of the power transmission line at the joint. Therefore, the splice connector has become the weakest link in the electric power transmission infrastructure. The compressive residual stresses induced by the crimping process within the splice provide the clamping forces to secure the conductor and therefore, the determination of the state of residual stresses in splice connectors is a necessary requirement to provide an accurate estimate of their service lifetime. This paper presents a protocol of utilizing finite-element analysis and neutron scattering experiments for evaluating the residual stress fields within a crimped single-stage splice connector assembly.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; King Jr, Thomas J [ORNL; Graziano, Joe [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Chan, John [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Washing of Rocky Flats Combustible Residues (Conducted March - May 1995)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this project is to determine the feasibility of washing plutonium-containing combustible residues using ultrasonic disruption as a method for dislodging particulate. Removal of plutonium particulate and, to a lesser extent, solubilized plutonium from the organic substrate should substantially reduce potential fire, explosion or radioactive release hazards due to radiolytic hydrogen generation or high flammability. Tests were conducted on polypropylene filters which were used as pre-filters in the rich-residue ion-exchange process at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. These filters are similar to the Ful-Flo{reg_sign} cartridges used at Rocky Flats that make up a substantial fraction of the combustible residues with the highest hazard rating. Batch experiments were run on crushed filter material in order to determine the amount of Pu removed by stirring, stirring and sonication, and stirring and sonication with the introduction of Pu-chelating water-soluble polymers or surfactants. Significantly more Pu is removed using sonication and sonication with chelators than is removed with mechanical stirring alone.

Mary E. Barr; Ann R. Schake; David A. Romero; Gordon D. Jarvinen

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Inelastic exchange scattering in electron-energy-loss spectroscopy: Localized excitations in transition-metal and rare-earth systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cross sections for quasiatomic excitation by exchange scattering of electrons are calculated in the Born-Ochkur approximation for 3p-3d and 3d-3d transitions in transition-metal systems, and for 4d-4f and 4f-4f transitions in rare earths. The energy dependence of the spin polarization of 3p-3d and 4d-4f losses in reflection electron-energy-loss spectroscopy from ferromagnetic surfaces involves a balance of small-angle spin-dependent inelastic processes accompanied by a high-angle elastic scattering, and large-angle spin-flip exchange scattering without the need for elastic scattering. Both 3d-3d excitations, e.g., in transition-metal compounds, and 4f-4f excitations in rare earths involve spin-flip transitions whose scattering amplitudes g fall off with momentum transfer q such that the full width at half maximum q1/2 (in a.u.) is given by q1/2?rnl??2, where ?rnl? is the expectation value of r for the 3d or 4f electron. The angular width of the spin-flip differential cross section is then much greater than for dipole transitions, a pattern that helps to account for how these intra-atomic transitions compete with dipole processes for primary energies in excess of 100 eV.

S. J. Porter; J. A. D. Matthew; R. J. Leggott

1994-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Anharmonic lattice dynamics of Ag2O studied by inelastic neutron scattering and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on silver oxide (Ag2O) with the cuprite structure were performed at temperatures from 40 to 400 K, and Fourier transform far-infrared spectra were measured from 100 to 300 K. The measured phonon densities of states and the infrared spectra showed unusually large energy shifts with temperature, and large linewidth broadenings. First principles molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were performed at various temperatures, successfully accounting for the negative thermal expansion (NTE) and local dynamics. Using the Fourier-transformed velocity autocorrelation method, the MD calculations reproduced the large anharmonic effects of Ag2O, and were in excellent agreement with the neutron scattering data. The quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) was less successful in accounting for much of the phonon behavior. The QHA could account for some of the NTE below 250 K, although not at higher temperatures. Strong anharmonic effects were found for both phonons and for the NTE. The lifetime broadenings of Ag2O were explained by anharmonic perturbation theory, which showed rich interactions between the Ag-dominated modes and the O-dominated modes in both up- and down-conversion processes.

Lan, Tian [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Li, Chen [ORNL] [ORNL; Niedziela, Jennifer L [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, Hillary [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL] [ORNL; Rossman, George [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Fultz, B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Neutron inelastic scattering and reactions in natural Pb as a background in neutrinoless double-beta-decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic neutron scattering and reactions on Pb isotopes can result in gamma rays near the signature endpoint energy in a number of double-beta decay isotopes. In particular, there are gamma-ray transitions in Pb-206,207,208 that might produce energy deposits at the 76-Ge Q value in Ge detectors used for double-beta decay searches. The levels that produce these gamma rays can be excited by (n,n'gamma) or (n,xngamma) reactions, but the cross sections are small and previously unmeasured. This work uses the pulsed neutron beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center to directly measure reactions of interest to double-beta decay experiments. The cross section on natural Pb to produce the 2041-keV gamma ray from Pb-206 is measured to be 3.6 +/- 0.7 (stat.) +/- 0.3 (syst.) mb at ~9.6 MeV. The cross section on natural Pb to produce the 3062-keV gamma ray from Pb-207 and Pb-208 is measured to be 3.9 +/- 0.8 (stat.) +/- 0.4 (syst.) mb at the same energy. We report cross sections or place upper limits on the cross sections for exciting some other levels in Pb that have transition energies corresponding to Q value in other double-beta decay isotopes.

V. E. Guiseppe; M. Devlin; S. R. Elliott; N. Fotiades; A. Hime; D. -M. Mei; R. O. Nelson; D. V. Perepelitsa

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

415

Peripheral elastic and inelastic scattering of 17,18O on light targets at 12 MeV/nucleon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of interaction of neutron rich oxygen isotopes $^{17,18}$O with light targets has been undertaken in order to determine the optical potentials needed for the transfer reaction $^{13}$C($^{17}$O,$^{18}$O)$^{12}$C. Optical potentials in both incoming and outgoing channels have been determined in a single experiment. This transfer reaction was used to infer the direct capture rate to the $^{17}$F(p,$\\gamma$)$^{18}$Ne which is essential to estimate the production of $^{18}$F at stellar energies in ONe novae. The success of the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) as indirect method for astrophysics is guaranteed if the reaction mechanism is peripheral and the DWBA cross section calculations are warranted and stable against OMP used. We demonstrate the stability of the ANC method and OMP results using good quality elastic and inelastic scattering data with stable beams before extending the procedures to rare ion beams. The peripherality of our reaction is inferred from a semiclassical decomposition of the total scattering amplitude into barrier and internal barrier components. Comparison between elastic scattering of $^{17}$O, $^{18}$O and $^{16}$O projectiles is made.

T. Al-Abdullah; F. Carstoiu; C. A. Gagliardi; G. Tabacaru; L. Trache; R. E. Tribble

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Crop Residue Removal for Bioenergy Reduces Soil Carbon Pools: How Can We Offset Carbon Losses?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crop residue removal for bioenergy can deplete soil organic carbon (SOC) ... been, however, widely discussed. This paper reviews potential practices that can be used to offset the SOC lost with residue removal. Literature

Humberto Blanco-Canqui

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A Systematic Investigation for Reducing Shredder Residue for Complex Automotive Seat Subassemblies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automotive shredder residue is a byproduct of the automotive recycling infrastructure and represents 15% of the ... in order to remove a large portion of automotive shredder residue before the shredding process i...

Siobhan Barakat; Jill Urbanic

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford and P. Westerhoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford to global warming. Biofuel from phototrophic microbes like algae and bacteria provides a viable substitute improves biofuel sustainability by refining phosphorus recycling. Biomass Production Residual Biomass

Hall, Sharon J.

419

Bioenergy Production via Microbial Conversion of Residual Oil to Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology May 15, 2008 ARTICLE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY Bioenergy Production via Microbial Conversion of Residual Oil to Natural...alkanes by anaerobic microorganisms. Nature 401: 266-269. Bioenergy production via microbial conversion of residual oil to natural...

Lisa M. Gieg; Kathleen E. Duncan; Joseph M. Suflita

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Techniques for identifying long-range residue correlations in the fifth binding module of LDLR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of correlations between residues in distal regions of a protein structure may provide insights into the mechanism of protein folding. Such long-range correlations may exist between distant residues that are ...

Lin, Jennifer W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-pollution-control residues leaching...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

leaching Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air-pollution-control residues leaching Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Solid Residues from...

422

Residual Strain Distribution in Bent Composite Boiler Tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kraft recovery boilers are typically constructed of carbon steel boiler tubes clad with a corrosion resistant layer, and these composite tubes are bent and welded together to form air port panels which enable the combustion air to enter the boiler. In this paper, the through-thickness residual strain in the carbon steel layer of non-heat-treated and heat-treated composite bent tubes were measured by neutron diffraction techniques and modeled by finite element modeling. The results can be used to optimize material selection and manufacturing processes to prevent stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue cracking in the boiler tubes.

Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Tang, Fei [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Sorption Characteristics of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Aluminum Smelter Residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. ... Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35?50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11?16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. ... To determine the BC levels, the Gelinas modification (15) of the chemo-thermal oxidation (CTO) method by Gustafsson (16) was applied. ...

Gijs D. Breedveld; milien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen

2007-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

424

Heavy residue properties in intermediate energy nuclear collisions with gold  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the target fragment production cross sections and angular distributions for the interaction of 32, 44 and 93 MeV/nucleon argon, 35 and 43 MeV/nucleon krypton with gold. The fragment isobaric yield distributions, moving frame angular distributions and velocities have been deduced from these data. This fission cross section decreases with increasing projectile energy and the heavy residue cross section increases. The ratio v{sub {parallel}}/v{sub cn} increases approximately linearly with mass removed from the target. 21 refs., 8 figs.

Aleklett, K.; Sihver, L. (Uppsala Univ., Nykoeping (Sweden). Studsvik Neutron Research Lab.); Loveland, W. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA)); Liljenzin, J.O. (Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg (Sweden)); Seaborg, G.T. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Nuclear Science Div.)

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Subsidiary Regge Trajectories with Singular Residues. Nucleon-Nucleon Scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is pointed out that the existence of secondary Regge trajectories with intercepts ?(0) which differ by integers from that of the leading trajectory at t=0, and residues which are singular at that point, is a very general phenomenon which should occur both in the scattering of particles with spin, and in the scattering of particles of unequal mass. Rules are given for determining if such trajectories exist, and for determining their properties. The case of nucleon-nucleon scattering is discussed as an example.

Loyal Durand; III

1967-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

426

Alternative cooling resource for removing the residual heat of reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Recirculated Cooling Water (RCW) system of a Candu reactor is a closed cooling system which delivers demineralized water to coolers and components in the Service Building, the Reactor Building, and the Turbine Building and the recirculated cooling water is designed to be cooled by the Raw Service Water (RSW). During the period of scheduled outage, the RCW system provides cooling water to the heat exchangers of the Shutdown Cooling System (SDCS) in order to remove the residual heat of the reactor, so the RCW heat exchangers have to operate at all times. This makes it very hard to replace the inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers because the replacement work requires the isolation of the RCW. A task force was formed to prepare a plan to substitute the recirculated water with the chilled water system in order to cool the SDCS heat exchangers. A verification test conducted in 2007 proved that alternative cooling was possible for the removal of the residual heat of the reactor and in 2008 the replacement of inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers for both Wolsong unit 3 and 4 were successfully completed. (authors)

Park, H. C.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, D. S.; Jung, C. Y.; Choi, K. Y. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 260 Naa-ri Yangnam-myeon Gyeongju-si, Gyeonasangbuk-do, 780-815 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Estimating Residual Solids Volume In Underground Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site liquid waste system consists of multiple facilities to safely receive and store legacy radioactive waste, treat, and permanently dispose waste. The large underground storage tanks and associated equipment, known as the 'tank farms', include a complex interconnected transfer system which includes underground transfer pipelines and ancillary equipment to direct the flow of waste. The waste in the tanks is present in three forms: supernatant, sludge, and salt. The supernatant is a multi-component aqueous mixture, while sludge is a gel-like substance which consists of insoluble solids and entrapped supernatant. The waste from these tanks is retrieved and treated as sludge or salt. The high level (radioactive) fraction of the waste is vitrified into a glass waste form, while the low-level waste is immobilized in a cementitious grout waste form called saltstone. Once the waste is retrieved and processed, the tanks are closed via removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations and severing/sealing external penetrations. The comprehensive liquid waste disposition system, currently managed by Savannah River Remediation, consists of 1) safe storage and retrieval of the waste as it is prepared for permanent disposition; (2) definition of the waste processing techniques utilized to separate the high-level waste fraction/low-level waste fraction; (3) disposition of LLW in saltstone; (4) disposition of the HLW in glass; and (5) closure state of the facilities, including tanks. This paper focuses on determining the effectiveness of waste removal campaigns through monitoring the volume of residual solids in the waste tanks. Volume estimates of the residual solids are performed by creating a map of the residual solids on the waste tank bottom using video and still digital images. The map is then used to calculate the volume of solids remaining in the waste tank. The ability to accurately determine a volume is a function of the quantity and quality of the waste tank images. Currently, mapping is performed remotely with closed circuit video cameras and still photograph cameras due to the hazardous environment. There are two methods that can be used to create a solids volume map. These methods are: liquid transfer mapping / post transfer mapping and final residual solids mapping. The task is performed during a transfer because the liquid level (which is a known value determined by a level measurement device) is used as a landmark to indicate solids accumulation heights. The post transfer method is primarily utilized after the majority of waste has been removed. This method relies on video and still digital images of the waste tank after the liquid transfer is complete to obtain the relative height of solids across a waste tank in relation to known and usable landmarks within the waste tank (cooling coils, column base plates, etc.). In order to accurately monitor solids over time across various cleaning campaigns, and provide a technical basis to support final waste tank closure, a consistent methodology for volume determination has been developed and implemented at SRS.

Clark, Jason L.; Worthy, S. Jason; Martin, Bruce A.; Tihey, John R.

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

428

Optical breakdown threshold in nanosecond high repetition second harmonic generation by periodically poled Mg-doped LiTaO{sub 3} crystal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our study shows that a local temperature increase of ?1 K in the crystal lattice caused by second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon absorption of 532 nm radiation at the rear of periodically poled stoichiometric LiTaO{sub 3} crystal by changing spontaneous polarization induces a pyroelectric field ?10 kV/cm, accelerating free electrons to an energy of ?10 eV, followed by optical breakdown and crystal damage. Theoretical analysis leads to an explicit expression for the threshold laser fluence of optical breakdown giving ?1.2 J/cm{sup 2} for 1064 nm input radiation in 6.8 kHz pulsed SHG operation, agreeing well with the experimentally found value ?1.32 J/cm{sup 2}.

Louchev, Oleg A.; Wada, Satoshi [Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hatano, Hideki; Kitamura, Kenji [Division of Environment and Energy Materials, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)] [Division of Environment and Energy Materials, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

429

Effect of suppression of the inelastic scattering rate on the penetration depth and conductivity in a dx2-y2 superconductor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use a separable d-wave model to describe the momentum dependence of the pairing interaction in the gap channel. We include the inelastic scattering through a spectral density which describes the fluctuation spectrum responsible for superconductivity. The collapse of the scattering rate observed in microwave experiments is modeled through a low-frequency cutoff on the fluctuation spectrum. The effect of this cutoff on the temperature dependence of the magnetic-field penetration depth and on the infrared conductivity and associated scattering rates is calculated.

E. Schachinger; J. P. Carbotte; F. Marsiglio

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Elastic and inelastic scattering of 240-MeV (6)Li ions from (40)Ca and (48)Ca and tests of a systematic optical potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 044612 (2010) Elastic and inelastic scattering of 240-MeV 6Li ions from 40Ca and 48Ca and tests of a systematic optical potential Krishichayan, X. Chen,* Y.-W. Lui, J. Button, and D. H. Youngblood Cyclotron Institute, Texas.... ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This work was supported in part by the US Department of Energy under Grant DE-FG02?93ER40773 and by the Robert A. Welch Foundation under Grant A-0558. [1] D. H. Youngblood, H. L. Clark, and Y.-W. Lui, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 691 (1999). [2] S...

Chen, Krishichayan X.; Lui, Y. -W; Button, J.; Youngblood, David H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Elastic and inelastic scattering to low-lying states of (58)Ni and (90)Zr using 240-MeV (6)Li  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 014603 (2010) Elastic and inelastic scattering to low-lying states of 58Ni and 90Zr using 240-MeV 6Li Krishichayan, X. Chen,* Y.-W. Lui, Y. Tokimoto, J. Button, and D. H. Youngblood Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University...] D. H. Youngblood, H. L. Clark, and Y.-W. Lui, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 691 (1999). [2] D. H. Youngblood, Y.-W. Lui, B. John, Y. Tokimoto, H. L. Clark, and X. Chen, Phys. Rev. C 69, 054312 (2004). [3] T. Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 162503 (2007...

Krishichayan; Chen, X.; Lui, Y. -W; Tokimoto, Y.; Button, J.; Youngblood, David H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

J. Fauth and Yee Soong J. Fauth and Yee Soong U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh PA, 15236-0940 Mineral Sequestration Workshop National Energy Technology Laboratory August 8, 2001 Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Introduction - Objective - Goals - NETL Facilities * Effect of Solution Chemistry on Carbonation Efficiency - Buffered Solution + NaCl - Buffered Solution + MEA * Effect of Pretreatment on Carbonation Efficiency - Thermal Treatments - Chemical Treatments * Carbonation Reaction with Ultramafic Minerals - Serpentine - Olivine Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Carbonation Reaction with Industrial By-products

433

Residual energy in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations indicate that kinetic and magnetic energies are not in equipartition in the solar wind turbulence. Rather, magnetic fluctuations are more energetic and have somewhat steeper energy spectrum compared to the velocity fluctuations. This leads to the presence of the so-called residual energy E_r=E_v-E_b in the inertial interval of turbulence. This puzzling effect is addressed in the present paper in the framework of weak turbulence theory. Using a simple model of weakly colliding Alfv\\'en waves, we demonstrate that the kinetic-magnetic equipartition indeed gets broken as a result of nonlinear interaction of Alfv\\'en waves. We establish that magnetic energy is indeed generated more efficiently as a result of these interactions, which proposes an explanation for the solar wind observations.

Stanislav Boldyrev; Jean Carlos Perez; Vladimir Zhdankin

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

434

Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 0.54 10{sup ?12} Pa{sup ?1}. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASAs Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented.

Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 (United States); Hayward, Maurice [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

435

Evaluation of the residue from microset on various metal surfaces.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast-curing impression materials are sometimes used to cast negative-mold replications of physical defects on material surfaces. The negative-mold impressions can then be used for further measurements to record the nature of the defect. These impression materials have been designed to cure quickly, and with very low adhesion, so that they can be easily removed from the surface leaving little residual contamination. Unfortunately, some contaminant is retained by the substrate material. This investigation seeks to identify the composition and quantity of the remaining material upon removal of Microset Synthetic Rubber Replicating Compound from several material surfaces. Coe-Flex was used as a relative comparison to Microset. On fifteen different substrate materials the Microset leaves no visible trace of contaminant, however, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows evidence of a thin silicone-based contaminant film of approximately 2 nm thickness.

Brumbach, Michael Todd

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Residual Stress Determination for A Ferritic Steel Weld Plate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this experiment is to demonstrate the capability of neutron diffraction technique to reproducibly map residual strains in a ferritic steel weld. The objective includes the identification of corrections for variations in metal composition due to the welding process which produces changes in lattice parameter that are not due to mechanical effects. The second objective is to develop and demonstrate a best practice for neutron diffraction strain mapping of steel welds. The appropriate coordinate system for the measurement of a weld, which is strongly distorted from planar geometry, has to be defined. The coordinate system is important in determining the procedures for mounting and positioning of the weld so that mapping details, especially in regions of high gradients, can be conveniently inter-compared between laboratories.

Wang, D.-Q.; Hubbard, C.R.; Spooner, S.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Residue temperatures in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an improved Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model, we have investigated the reaction dynamics leading to the thermal freeezout for [sup 40]Ar+[sup 124]Sn collisions. Several criteria are assessed for defining the proper thermal freezout time which separates preequilibrium processes from equilbrium processes. One of these criteria, the time dependence of the thermal excitation energy, provides consistent results for defining the thermal freezeout. The other two criteria, the emission rate of nucleons and the quadrupole moment of the momentum distributions, do not consistently provide accurate freezeout times due to the existence of long time scale collective vibrations. The predicted values for the excitation energies and temperatures, obtained assuming Fermi gas level densities, are quite sensitive to the equation of state and the impact parameter. Surprisingly, both the thermal excitation energies and the residue temperatures, in the limit of a large ensemble of parallel collisions, show little sensitivity to the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section.

Xu, H.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Danielewicz, P. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States) Cyclotron Institute, Texas A M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Differential measurements of ionization and inelastic energy losses in 0.253.0-MeV collisions of Kr ions with Kr and Xe targets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The final charge states of the scattered ions and the inelastic energy losses have been measured for single collisions of 0.253.0-MeV Kr ions with Kr and Xe targets. The charge states of the scattered ions were measured as functions of scattering angle (from 0.8 to 45) ion energies from 0.25 to 3.0 MeV. The total inelastic energy losses were measured using the scattered- and recoil-particle coincidence technique for 0.4-, 0.6-, and 1.0-MeV Kr+-Kr collision energies and from 0.4 to 1.4 MeV for the Kr+-Xe combination. The results show the impact-parameter dependence of several inner-shell excitations and confirm the quasimolecular nature of heavy-ionatom collisions within the framework of the Fano-Lichten model. For the Kr-Kr case, excitations are observed for values of the distance of closest approach, R0, of 0.40, 0.30, and 0.20 ; and for the Kr-Xe case, excitations are observed at R0 values of 0.28, 0.18, and 0.09 . The data show agreement with the molecular-potential calculations of Eichler and co-workers.

Ali A. Antar and Quentin C. Kessel

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry in Deep-Inelastic Scattering from the Reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry in deep-inelastic scattering from the inclusive reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X on a 3He gas target polarized normal to the lepton plane. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero in the Born approximation. The experiment, conducted at Jefferson Lab using a 5.89 GeV electron beam, covers a range of 1.72 GeV, which is non-zero at the 2.75sigma level. Theoretical calculations, which assume two-photon exchange with quasi-free quarks, predict a neutron asymmetry of O(10?4) when both photons couple to one quark, and O(10?2) for the photons coupling to different quarks. Our measured asymmetry agrees both in sign and magnitude with the prediction that uses input based on the Sivers transverse momentum distribution obtained from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

Katich, Joseph; Qian, Xin; Zhao, Yuxiang; Allada, Kalyan; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Bradshaw, Elliott; Bosted, Peter; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chen, Wei; Chirapatpimol, Khem; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Cornejo, Juan; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De Jager, Cornelis; De Leo, Raffaele; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Ding, Huaibo; Dolph, Peter; Dutta, Chiranjib; Dutta, Dipangkar; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Frullani, Salvatore; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gilad, Gilad; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Guo, Lei; Hamilton, David; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jijun; Huang, Min; Ibrahim Abdalla, Hassan; Iodice, Mauro; Jin, Ge; Jones, Mark; Kelleher, Aidan; Kim, Wooyoung; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; LeRose, John; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Y.; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lu, Hai-jiang; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Oh, Yoomin; Osipenko, Mikhail; Parno, Diana; Peng, Jen-chieh; Phillips, Sarah; Posik, Matthew; Puckett, Andrew; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Ransome, Ronald; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Schulte, Elaine; Shahinyan, Albert; Hashemi Shabestari, Mitra; Sirca, Simon; Stepanyan, Stepan; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tang, Liguang; Tobias, William; Urciuoli, Guido; Vilardi, Ignazio; Wang, Kebin; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Z.; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Y.-W.; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zong, Xing

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Inelastic tunneling conductance and magnetoresistance investigations in dual ion-beam sputtered CoFeB(110)/MgO/CoFeB (110) magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) comprising Ta(5)/NiFe(5)/IrMn(15)/CoFeB(5)/Mg(1)/MgO(3.5)/ CoFeB(5)/Ta(5)/Ag(20) (thickness in nm) with (110) oriented CoFeB layers are grown using dual ion beam sputtering. The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of MTJs is found to be significantly bias dependent and exhibits zero bias anomaly (ZBA) which is attributed to the presence of magnetic impurities or diffusion of Mn from antiferromagnetic IrMn in the barrier. Adjacent to the ZBA, two peaks at 24??3?mV and 34??3?mV are also observed, which differ both in intensity as well as their position in the antiparallel and parallel magnetic states, suggesting that they are due to magnon excitations. In addition to this, a phonon peak at 65??3?mV is also observed. The effect of temperature on the inelastic and elastic tunneling contributions is studied in detail in 25300?K range using the Glazman and Matveev model. Ten series of localized states are found to be involved in hopping conduction in the forbidden gap of MgO barrier. The effect of presence of such inelastic channels is found to be insignificant at low temperatures yielding sizeable enhancement in TMR.

Bhusan Singh, Braj; Chaudhary, Sujeet, E-mail: sujeetc@physics.iitd.ac.in [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Lepton Scattering: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Gehrmann, Roberts, and Whalley in their 1999 paper, A Compilation of Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Scattering, published in volume 25 of Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics) note that these data will continue to be relevant to the next generation of hadron colliders. They present data on the unpolarized structure functions F2 and xF3, R D ._L=_T /, the virtual photon asymmetries A1 and A2 and the polarized structure functions g1 and g2, from deep inelastic lepton scattering off protons, deuterium and nuclei. Data are presented in both tabular and graphical format and include predictions based on the MRST98 and CTEQ4 parton distribution functions as well. The data gathered from the relevant collaborations at DOE's Fermilab, SLAC, and JLAB are available, and so are data from related collaborations based at CERN and DESY. The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also include in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

Gehrmann, T; Roberts, R.G.; Whalley, M.R.; Durham HEP Database Group

442

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural residues Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use in the United States Summary: , livestock commodities, agricultural residues, and bioenergy crops. Drawing on ORNL and APAC county... , developed and maintained at the...

443

E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile shredder residue Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile shredder residue Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NASHVILLE INCINERATOR PERFORMANCE TESTS...

444

Recycling waste polymers from automotive shredder residue (ASR); application in iron making.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An investigation was performed on characterisation of automotive shredder residue which resulted in application of its polymeric fraction as a substitute for coke, as reducing (more)

Fahandej Sadi, Seyed Habib

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Methods of analysis modified size exchange chromatography method for analysis of heavy oil residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A modified size exchange chromatography method is used to obtain molecular weight distributions, average molecular weight, and other characteristics of heavy oil residues: coal asphalt, petroleum asphalt, vacu...

Changming Zhang; Adnan Alhajji

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

An Experimental Investigation into Additive Manufacturing-Induced Residual Stresses in 316L Stainless Steel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Additive manufacturing (AM) technology provides unique opportunities for...i.e., neutron diffraction). Good agreement between the two measurement techniques is observed. Furthermore, a reduction in residual stres...

Amanda S. Wu; Donald W. Brown; Mukul Kumar

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

A SAFEGUARDED DUAL WEIGHTED RESIDUAL METHOD RICARDO H. NOCHETTO, ANDREAS VEESER, AND MARCO VERANI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SAFEGUARDED DUAL WEIGHTED RESIDUAL METHOD RICARDO H. NOCHETTO, ANDREAS VEESER, AND MARCO VERANI safeguarded by additional asymptotically higher order a posteriori terms. In particular, the enhanced

Nochetto, Ricardo H.

448

E-Print Network 3.0 - acs residual ischemic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: acs residual ischemic Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Brain Research 961 (2003) 2231 www.elsevier.comlocatebrainres Summary: further...

449

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues required Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 13 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

450

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues determine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 14 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

451

Residual Stress Evaluation of Materials Manufactured by High-Energy Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents several applications of the step by step hole drillling method for measuring residual stress distribution introduced in different components manufactured by the high energy process.

J. F. Flavenot; J. Lu

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The preparation of a cabbage candidate reference material to be certified for residues of agrochemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new cabbage candidate reference material has been prepared for the determination of residues of agrochemicals. The cabbage was grown with deliberate application...

Rolf Zeisler; Vladimir Strachnov

453

E-Print Network 3.0 - africa quantifying residual Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: africa quantifying residual Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Satellite observations of the...

454

"Table A10. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" 0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Barrels per Day)" ,,,," Inputs for Heat",,," Primary Consumption" " "," Primary Consumption for all Purposes",,," Power, and Generation of Electricity",,," for Nonfuel Purposes",,,"RSE" ," ------------------------------------",,," ------------------------------------",,," -------------------------------",,,"Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","Factors"

455

Gas Generation Test Support for Transportation and Storage of Plutonium Residue Materials - Part 1: Rocky Flats Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present experimental results that can be used to establish one segment of the safety basis for transportation and storage of plutonium residue materials.

Livingston, R.R.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

456

POST-OPERATIONAL TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL NA COOLLANT IN EBR-2 USING CARBONATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the end of 2002, the Experimental Breeder Reactor Two (EBR-II) facility became a U.S. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted site, and the RCRA permit1 compelled further treatment of the residual sodium in order to convert it into a less reactive chemical form and remove the by-products from the facility, so that a state of RCRA 'closure' for the facility may be achieved (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k, 2002). In response to this regulatory driver, and in recognition of project budgetary and safety constraints, it was decided to treat the residual sodium in the EBR-II primary and secondary sodium systems using a process known as 'carbonation.' In early EBR-II post-operation documentation, this process is also called 'passivation.' In the carbonation process (Sherman and Henslee, 2005), the system containing residual sodium is flushed with humidified carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The water vapor in the flush gas reacts with residual sodium to form sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the CO{sub 2} in the flush gas reacts with the newly formed NaOH to make sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}). Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced as a by-product. The chemical reactions occur at the exposed surface of the residual sodium. The NaHCO{sub 3} layer that forms is porous, and humidified carbon dioxide can penetrate the NaHCO{sub 3} layer to continue reacting residual sodium underneath. The rate of reaction is controlled by the thickness of the NaHCO{sub 3} surface layer, the moisture input rate, and the residual sodium exposed surface area. At the end of carbonation, approximately 780 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II primary tank ({approx}70% of original inventory), and just under 190 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II secondary sodium system ({approx}50% of original inventory), were converted into NaHCO{sub 3}. No bare surfaces of residual sodium remained after treatment, and all remaining residual sodium deposits are covered by a layer of NaHCO{sub 3}. From a safety standpoint, the inventory of residual sodium in these systems was greatly reduced by using the carbonation process. From a regulatory standpoint, the process was not able to achieve deactivation of all residual sodium, and other more aggressive measures will be needed if the remaining residual sodium must also be deactivated to meet the requirements of the existing environmental permit. This chapter provides a project history and technical summary of the carbonation of EBR-II residual sodium. Options for future treatment are also discussed.

Sherman, S.; Knight, C.

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

457

Continued development of the residue baler. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The baling concept discussed in this report has evolved from work started in 1975. The objective of this activity was to develop a method for transporting entire above ground portions of both pine and hardwood stems to a mill or centralized processing point in a form that was compatible with truck, trailer, rail and barge hauls and with sufficient bulk density to optimize load sizes on the various carriers while expending a minimum amount of capital and energy in the woods operations. The year's work resulted in the baling concept and a prototype baler being tested under a wide variety of field conditions material types and operating scenarios. The work in the Pacific Northwest demonstrated that baling offers a means of preparing forest residues for transport which results in a near maximum solid wood content in a load. The reworking of the hydraulic circuits significantly reduced the cycle time on the prototype without increasing the power requirements. The installation of the wire feed assembly moved the development of an automatic banding and tying system one step closer. Both sets of field trials also pointed out that a true field demonstration of the commercial ability of the baline concept will have to await the construction of a second generation prototype producing a larger bale and designed to accept several different infeed types. 7 figures, 3 tables.

Stuart, W.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Catalytic gasification of automotive shredder residues with hydrogen generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen is a clean and new energy carrier to generate power through the Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system. Hydrogen can be effectively turned out through the catalytic gasification of organic material such as automotive shredder residues (ASR). The main objective of this manuscript is to present an analysis of the catalytic gasification of ASR for the generation of high-purity hydrogen in a lab-scale fixed-bed downdraft gasifier using 15wt.% NiO/Al2O3 catalysts at 760900K. In the catalytic gasification process, reduction of Ni(II) catalyst into Ni(0) has been confirmed through XANES spectra and consequently EXAFS data shows that the central Ni atoms have NiO and NiNi bonds with bond distances of 2.030.05 and 2.460.05, respectively. ASR is partially oxidized and ultimately converts into hydrogen rich syngas (CO and H2) and increases of the reaction temperature are favored the generation of hydrogen with decomposition of the CO. As well, approximately 220kgh?1 of ASR would be catalytically gasified at 760900K and 46.2atm with the reactor volume 0.27m3 to obtain approximately 3.42נ105kcalh?1 of thermal energy during over 87% syngas generation with the generation of 100kW electric powers.

Kuen-Song Lin; Sujan Chowdhury; Ze-Ping Wang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Analysis of lead content in automotive shredder residue (ASR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automotive shredder residue (ASR) is a very heterogeneous waste, which could have a very high metal content on finest fractions ? <6mm produced by the shredding of end of live vehicles. The approval of Directive 2000/53/EC and its transposition to the European Union member states requires an analytical technique for in-situ checking of the content of some metals in ASR wastes. The objective of this study is the evaluation of total Pb content in the different fractions using a rapid measurement method to easily accomplish the current legislation. An experimental Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer with tri-axial geometry was used to analyse the ASR in order to test the feasibility of this analytical technique. Likewise, a correction of the intensities by the incoherent scattering (Compton) radiation was made to compensate the matrix effects. The results show that values in the smaller fractions are bigger (11,600mgkg?1 in the fraction <125?m) than in the coarser fractions (4600 mgkg?1 in the fraction between 2 and 6mm) and that such type of instrumentation enables a fast measurement with a limit of detection of 1.1mgkg?1 for 1000s measurement).

Oscar Gonzalez-Fernandez; Sofia Pessanha; Ignacio Queralt; Maria Luisa Carvalho

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Valorization of automotive shredder residue in building materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Every year in EU nations, it is estimated that 3 million tonnes of automotive shredder residue (ASR) are generated. Half of the ASR is composed of rubber, textiles and plastics, which can be either transformed into alternative fuel or recycled. The second half, which is landfilled, is incombustible and has not yet been valorized. This waste contains 30% organic matter, as well as inorganic compounds such as quartz, calcite, magnetite, hematite, and anhydrite. It is also very rich in zinc (13.5%) and lead (0.73.3%). These elements are powerful retarders of ordinary Portland cement. For this reason, two ways of processing of this waste have been investigated: (1) transformation into aggregates after a thermal treatment followed by a chemical treatment or (2) directly into concrete with the use of calcium sulfoaluminate cement. This second way is especially very interesting for engineers and scientists. As established by leaching tests, zinc and lead are integrated and fixed in the structure of ettringite, the main hydration product of calcium sulfoaluminate cement. Therefore, it is possible to produce concrete for some applications including road construction from this currently landfilled waste (i.e., the ASR is shown to be useful recyclable material that can be converted into an environmentally friendly green concrete).

J. Pra; J. Ambroise; M. Chabannet

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inelastic pole residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Auto shredder residue recycling: Mechanical separation and pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Directive 2000/53/EC sets a goal of 85% material recycling from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) by the end of 2015. The current ELV recycling rate is around 80%, while the remaining waste is called automotive shredder residue (ASR), or car fluff. In Europe, this is mainly landfilled because it is extremely heterogeneous and often polluted with car fluids. Despite technical difficulties, in the coming years it will be necessary to recover materials from car fluff in order to meet the ELV Directive requirement. This study deals with ASR pretreatment and pyrolysis, and aims to determine whether the ELV material recycling target may be achieved by car fluff mechanical separation followed by pyrolysis with a bench scale reactor. Results show that flotation followed by pyrolysis of the light, organic fraction may be a suitable ASR recycling technique if the oil can be further refined and used as a chemical. Moreover, metals are liberated during thermal cracking and can be easily separated from the pyrolysis char, amounting to roughly 5% in mass. Lastly, pyrolysis can be a good starting point from a waste-to-chemicals perspective, but further research should be done with a focus on oil and gas refining, in order both to make products suitable for the chemical industry and to render the whole recycling process economically feasible.

Alessandro Santini; Fabrizio Passarini; Ivano Vassura; David Serrano; Javier Dufour; Luciano Morselli

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Production of aggregate from non-metallic automotive shredder residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the results of an experimentation on the production of granules suitable to be used as aggregates in cementitious or asphalt mixes are presented and discussed. The granules were obtained by granulating the non-metallic fraction of automotive shredder residues. In a preliminary separation step the fluff fraction containing mainly inert and non-metallic materials was sieved and analyzed for the metal content. In the following granulation step, the sieved fraction was mixed with binding materials, fly ash and a densifier agent, to produce granules of 530mm of diameter and up to 1400kg/m3 of specific weight. The granulation was carried out at room temperature in a rotating tank. Concrete samples prepared using as aggregates the produced granules showed a specific weight up to 1800kg/m3 and a compressive strength up to about 55% of reference samples prepared using a calcareous aggregate, depending on the fluff content of the mixes, and on the nature of the binder and of the other components used.

Vito Alunno Rossetti; Luca Di Palma; Franco Medici

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

464

Experimental program to assess the effect of residual stresses on fracture behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of ``model material`` tests were previously undertaken on aluminium alloy tensile loaded plate specimens containing a central through-thickness crack to investigate the effect of in-plane self-balancing residual stresses on ductile tearing behavior in the context of the R6 methodology. Residual stresses were generated by an electron-beam welding method and this resulted in stress levels of the order of 1/3 yield stress in the test specimens. Provisional results of these tests were presented at the 1993 ASME PVP conference. The value of 1/3 yield is commonly considered as the level of residual stress for fracture assessments of structural components which have been stress relieved. For non stress relieved components, higher values of residual stress need to be considered. A new design of test specimen has therefore been developed. Further ductile tearing experiments have been undertaken on this new design of specimen. The results obtained from these, and the previous tests, have quantitatively demonstrated the influence of residual stress on fracture behavior in terms of both the level of residual stress and the region under consideration on the R6 failure assessment diagram. The general conservatism of the current R6 method for dealing with residual stresses has been confirmed for the type of geometry, loading and residual stress field under consideration.

Sharples, J.K.; Sanderson, D.J.; Bowdler, B.R.; Wightman, A.P. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom). Technical Services Division; Ainsworth, R.A. [Nuclear Electric plc, Berkeley (United Kingdom)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Residual stress and self-assembly during deposition and etching of MEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with no residual stresses. Residual stresses are investigated as a means of self-assembling MEMS and NEMS during material deposition and etching. The assembly of two components is considered: one component is subjected to deposition or etching and is modeled...

Mani, Sathyanarayanan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects Vijay Babbar1 weaker flux signals. KEY WORDS: Magnetic flux leakage; residual magnetization; pipeline defects; pipeline pipelines, which may develop defects such as corrosion pits as they age in service.(1) Under the ef- fect

Clapham, Lynann

467

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) More Documents & Publications

468

Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says July 20, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Billions of barrels of oil that could increase domestic supply, help reduce imports, and increase U.S. energy security may be potentially recoverable from residual oil zones, according to initial findings from a study supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The recently completed study, conducted by researchers at the University of Texas-Permian Basin (UTPB), is one of several FE-supported research projects providing insight that will help tap this valuable-but-overlooked resource. Residual oil zones, called ROZs, are areas of immobile oil found below the oil-water contact of a reservoir. ROZs are similar to reservoirs in the

469

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) More Documents & Publications

470

Model for Gasification of Residual Fuels from Petroleum Refineries Using the Equation Oriented (EO) Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An attractive way to use residual fuels from petroleum refineries (vacuum residue and petcoke) is their gasification to produce syngas, which contains mainly H2, CO and small quantities of CH4, CO2, as well as nitrogen and sulfur compounds. ... Vacuum residue and petroleum coke (petcoke) are, respectively, heavy liquid and solid byproducts from crude oil refining, they are often used as fuel in boilers for power production, natural gas has been more commonly used in the past few years in power generation; reducing the market for both vacuum residue and petcoke. ... Regarding petroleum refinery residuals Uson et al.(1) developed a model for cogasification of coal, petcoke and biomass, based on reaction kinetics. ...

Jorge E. Marin-Sanchez; Miguel A. Rodriguez-Toral

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

471

Experimental determination of residual stress by neutron diffraction in a boiling water reactor core shroud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual strains in a 51 mm (2-inch) thick 304L stainless steel plate have been measured by neutron diffraction and interpreted in terms of residual stress. The plate, measuring (300 mm) in area, was removed from a 6m (20-ft.) diameter unirradiated boiling water reactor core shroud, and included a multiple-pass horizontal weld which joined two of the cylindrical shells which comprise the core shroud. Residual stress mapping was undertaken in the heat affected zone, concentrating on the outside half of the plate thickness. Variations in residual stresses with location appeared consistent with trends expected from finite element calculations, considering that a large fraction of the residual hoop stress was released upon removal of the plate from the core shroud cylinder.

Payzant, A.; Spooner, S.; Zhu, Xiaojing; Hubbard, C.R. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the 0: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to stabilize, if necessary, and/or repackage the residues for safe interim storage at the Site while awaiting the completion and opening of a suitable repository to which they would be shipped for disposal from the U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden, Colorado. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 1, 1996 EA-1120: Finding of No Significant Impact Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats

473

Deeply-bound $K^- pp$ state in the $^3$He(in-flight $K^-$, $n$) spectrum and its moving pole near the $??N$ threshold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formation of a deeply-bound $K^- pp$ state with $I=1/2$, $J^\\pi=0^-$ by the $^3$He(in-flight $K^-$, $n$) reaction is theoretically investigated in a distorted-wave impulse approximation using the Green's function method. The expected inclusive and semi-exclusive spectra at $p_{K^-} = 1.0$ GeV/c and $\\theta_{\\rm lab} = 0^{\\circ}$ are calculated for the forthcoming J-PARC E15 experiment. We demonstrate these spectra with several types of phenomenological $K^-$-``$pp$'' optical potentials $U^{\\rm opt}(E)$ which have an energy-dependent imaginary part multiplied by a phase space suppression factor, fitting to recent theoretical predictions or experimental candidates of the $K^-pp$ bound state. The results show that a cusp-like peak at the $\\pi \\Sigma N$ threshold is an unique signal for the $K^-pp$ bound state in the spectrum including the [$K^-pp$] $\\to$ $Y + N$ decay process from the two-nucleon $K^-$ absorption, as well as a distinct peak of the $K^-pp$ bound state. The shape of the spectrum is explained by a trajectory of a moving pole of the $K^-pp$ bound state in the complex energy plane. The importance of the spectrum with [$K^-pp$] $\\to$ $Y + N$ from the two-nucleon $K^-$ absorption is emphasized in order to extract clear evidence of the $K^-pp$ bound state.

T. Koike; T. Harada

2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

474

Testing of the Pole Face Winding crimpings Measurements carried out on the 100 PS main units before start up of the PS machine in 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The crimpings of the Pole Face Windings (PFW), used to connect the rectangular copper conductor of the main windings with its supply cable, could have defects due to the manufacture process. They could lead to an extensive high electrical resistance. To locate these defects, the PFW are powered with 80 Ampere DC and the voltage drop over the electrical resistances of the crimping is measured. The measurements are done between the PFW current leads and the corresponding pick-up. By subtracting the resistance of the supply cable and the interconnection cable the crimping resistance is calculated. During the long shutdown 2005 and the annual shutdown 2006/2007 a total of 34 main units, and their PFWs, have been refurbished [1]. The refurbished main units are equipped with new PFW. On this PFW the crimping technique was improved and the defect of high crimping contact resistance should not appear. Nevertheless to have complete picture of the situation the 34 refurbished main units and the 66 none refurbished unit...

Hans, O

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

476

Measurement of Feynman-x Spectra of Photons and Neutrons in the Very Forward Direction in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of normalised cross sections for the production of photons and neutrons at very small angles with respect to the proton beam direction in deep-inelastic $ep$ scattering at HERA are presented as a function of the Feynman variable $x_F$ and of the centre-of-mass energy of the virtual photon-proton system $W$. The data are taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of $131 \\mathrm{pb}^{-1}$. The measurement is restricted to photons and neutrons in the pseudorapidity range $\\eta>7.9$ and covers the range of negative four momentum transfer squared at the positron vertex $6scattering models and of models for hadronic interactions of high energy cosmic rays are compared to the measured cross sections.

H1 Collaboration

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d(sigma)/dQ2, d(sigma)/dx and d(sigma)/dy and the reduced cross-section were measured in the kinematic region Q2 > 185 GeV2 and y energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions F3 and F3(gamma)Z were determined by combining the e+p results presented in this paper with previously published e-p neutral current results. The asymmetry parameter A+ is used to demonstrate the parity violation predicted in electroweak interactions. The measurements are well described by the predictions of the Standard Model.

ZEUS Collaboration; H. Abramowicz; I. Abt; L. Adamczyk; M. Adamus; R. Aggarwal; S. Antonelli; P. Antonioli; A. Antonov; M. Arneodo; O. Arslan; V. Aushev; Y. Aushev; O. Bachynska; A. Bamberger; A. N. Barakbaev; G. Barbagli; G. Bari; F. Barreiro; N. Bartosik; D. Bartsch; M. Basile; O. Behnke; J. Behr; U. Behrens; L. Bellagamba; A. Bertolin; S. Bhadra; M. Bindi; C. Blohm; V. Bokhonov; T. Bold; K. Bondarenko; E. G. Boos; K. Borras; D. Boscherini; D. Bot; I. Brock; E. Brownson; R. Brugnera; N. Brummer; A. Bruni; G. Bruni; B. Brzozowska; P. J. Bussey; B. Bylsma; A. Caldwell; M. Capua; R. Carlin; C. D. Catterall; S. Chekanov; J. Chwastowski; J. Ciborowski; R. Ciesielski; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; A. Contin; A. M. Cooper-Sarkar; N. Coppola; M. Corradi; F. Corriveau; M. Costa; G. D'Agostini; F. Dal Corso; J. del Peso; R. K. Dementiev; S. De Pasquale; M. Derrick; R. C. E. Devenish; D. Dobur; B. A. Dolgoshein; G. Dolinska; A. T. Doyle; V. Drugakov; L. S. Durkin; S. Dusini; Y. Eisenberg; P. F. Ermolov; A. Eskreys; S. Fang; S. Fazio; J. Ferrando; M. I. Ferrero; J. Figiel; B. Foster; G. Gach; A. Galas; E. Gallo; A. Garfagnini; A. Geiser; I. Gialas; A. Gizhko; L. K. Gladilin; D. Gladkov; C. Glasman; O. Gogota; Yu. A. Golubkov; P. Gottlicher; I. Grabowska-Bold; J. Grebenyuk; I. Gregor; G. Grigorescu; G. Grzelak; O. Gueta; M. Guzik; C. Gwenlan; T. Haas; W. Hain; R. Hamatsu; J. C. Hart; H. Hartmann; G. Hartner; E. Hilger; D. Hochman; R. Hori; A. Huttmann; Z. A. Ibrahim; Y. Iga; R. Ingbir; M. Ishitsuka; H. -P. Jakob; F. Januschek; T. W. Jones; M. Jungst; I. Kadenko; B. Kahle; S. Kananov; T. Kanno; U. Karshon; F. Karstens; I. I. Katkov; M. Kaur; P. Kaur; A. Keramidas; L. A. Khein; J. Y. Kim; D. Kisielewska; S. Kitamura; R. Klanner; U. Klein; E. Koffeman; N. Kondrashova; O. Kononenko; P. Kooijman; Ie. Korol; I. A. Korzhavina; A. Kotanski; U. Kotz; H. Kowalski; O. Kuprash; M. Kuze; A. Lee; B. B. Levchenko; A. Levy; V. Libov; S. Limentani; T. Y. Ling; M. Lisovyi; E. Lobodzinska; W. Lohmann; B. Lohr; E. Lohrmann; K. R. Long; A. Longhin; D. Lontkovskyi; O. Yu. Lukina; J. Maeda; S. Magill; I. Makarenko; J. Malka; R. Mankel; A. Margotti; G. Marini; J. F. Martin; A. Mastroberardino; M. C. K. Mattingly; I. -A. Melzer-Pellmann; S. Mergelmeyer; S. Miglioranzi; F. Mohamad Idris; V. Monaco; A. Montanari; J. D. Morris; K. Mujkic; B. Musgrave; K. Nagano; T. Namsoo; R. Nania; A. Nigro; Y. Ning; T. Nobe; D. Notz; R. J. Nowak; A. E. Nuncio-Quiroz; B. Y. Oh; N. Okazaki; K. Olkiewicz; Yu. Onishchuk; K. Papageorgiu; A. Parenti; E. Paul; J. M. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; P. G. Pelfer; A. Pellegrino; W. Perlanski; H. Perrey; K. Piotrzkowski; P. Plucinski; N. S. Pokrovskiy; A. Polini; A. S. Proskuryakov; M. Przybycien; A. Raval; D. D. Reeder; B. Reisert; Z. Ren; J. Repond; Y. D. Ri; A. Robertson; P. Roloff; I. Rubinsky; M. Ruspa; R. Sacchi; U. Samson; G. Sartorelli; A. A. Savin; D. H. Saxon; M. Schioppa; S. Schlenstedt; P. Schleper; W. B. Schmidke; U. Schneekloth; V. Schonberg; T. Schorner-Sadenius; J. Schwartz; F. Sciulli; L. M. Shcheglova; R. Shehzadi; S. Shimizu; I. Singh; I. O. Skillicorn; W. Slominski; W. H. Smith; V. Sola; A. Solano; D. Son; V. Sosnovtsev; A. Spiridonov; H. Stadie; L. Stanco; N. Stefaniuk; A. Stern; T. P. Stewart; A. Stifutkin; P. Stopa; S. Suchkov; G. Susinno; L. Suszycki; J. Sztuk-Dambietz; D. Szuba; J. Szuba; A. D. Tapper; E. Tassi; J. Terron; T. Theedt; H. Tiecke; K. Tokushuku; J. Tomaszewska; V. Trusov; T. Tsurugai; M. Turcato; O. Turkot; T. Tymieniecka; M. Vazquez; A. Verbytskyi; O. Viazlo; N. N. Vlasov; R. Walczak; W. A. T. Wan Abdullah; J. J. Whitmore; K. Wichmann; L. Wiggers; M. Wing; M. Wlasenko; G. Wolf; H. Wolfe; K. Wrona; A. G. Yagues-Molina; S. Yamada; Y. Yamazaki; R. Yoshida; C. Youngman; O. Zabiegalov; A. F. . Zarnecki; L. Zawiejski; O. Zenaiev; W. Zeuner; B. O. Zhautykov; N. Zhmak; A. Zichichi; Z. Zolkapli; D. S. Zotkin

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

478

Single Spin Asymmetries in Charged Kaon Production from Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized $^3{\\rm{He}}$ Target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized $^3{\\rm{He}}$ target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1$<$$x_{bj}$$<$0.4 for $K^{+}$ and $K^{-}$ production. While the Collins and Sivers moments for $K^{+}$ are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties, both moments for $K^{-}$ favor negative values. The Sivers moments are compared to the theoretical prediction from a phenomenological fit to the world data. While the $K^{+}$ Sivers moments are consistent with the prediction, the $K^{-}$ results differ from the prediction at the 2-sigma level.

Y. X. Zhao; Y. Wang; K. Allada; K. Aniol; J. R. M. Annand; T. Averett; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; P. C. Bradshaw; P. Bosted; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; C. Chen; J. -P. Chen; W. Chen; K. Chirapatpimol; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; J. C. Cornejo; F. Cusanno; M. M. Dalton; W. Deconinck; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; X. Deng; A. Deur; H. Ding; P. A. M. Dolph; C. Dutta; D. Dutta; L. El Fassi; S. Frullani; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; O. Glamazdin; S. Golge; L. Guo; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; J. Huang; M. Huang; H. F Ibrahim; M. Iodice; X. Jiang; G. Jin; M. K. Jones; J. Katich; A. Kelleher; W. Kim; A. Kolarkar; W. Korsch; J. J. LeRose; X. Li; Y. Li; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; E. Long; H. -J. Lu; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; D. McNulty; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; C. Muoz Camacho; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; B. Norum; Y. Oh; M. Osipenko; D. Parno; J. -C. Peng; S. K. Phillips; M. Posik; A. J. R. Puckett; X. Qian; Y. Qiang; A. Rakhman; R. Ransome; S. Riordan; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; E. Schulte; A. Shahinyan; M. H. Shabestari; S. irca; S. Stepanyan; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; L. -G. Tang; A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; I. Vilardi; K. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; Y. Ye; Z. Ye; L. Yuan; X. Zhan; Y. Zhang; Y. -W. Zhang; B. Zhao; X. Zheng; L. Zhu; X. Zhu; X. Zong

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

479

Measurement of pretzelosity asymmetry of charged pion production in Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering on a polarized $^3$He target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized $^3$He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of $0.16

Y. Zhang; X. Qian; K. Allada; C. Dutta; J. Huang; J. Katich; Y. Wang; K. Aniol; J. R. M. Annand; T. Averett; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; P. C. Bradshaw; P. Bosted; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; C. Chen; J. -P. Chen; W. Chen; K. Chirapatpimol; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; J. C. Cornejo; F. Cusanno; M. M. Dalton; W. Deconinck; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; X. Deng; A. Deur; H. Ding; P. A. M. Dolph; D. Dutta; L. El Fassi; S. Frullani; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; O. Glamazdin; S. Golge; L. Guo; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; M. Huang; H. F. Ibrahim; M. Iodice; X. Jiang; G. Jin; M. K. Jones; A. Kelleher; W. Kim; A. Kolarkar; W. Korsch; J. J. LeRose; X. Li; Y. Li; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; E. Long; H. -J. Lu; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; D. McNulty; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; C. Muoz Camacho; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; B. Norum; Y. Oh; M. Osipenko; D. Parno; J. C. Peng; S. K. Phillips; M. Posik; A. J. R. Puckett; Y. Qiang; A. Rakhman; R. D. Ransome; S. Riordan; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; E. Schulte; A. Shahinyan; M. H. Shabestari; S. Sirca; S. Stepanyan; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; L. -G. Tang; W. A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; I. Vilardi; K. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; Y. Ye; Z. Ye; L. Yuan; X. Zhan; Y. -W. Zhang; B. Zhao; X. Zheng; L. Zhu; X. Zhu; X. Zong

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

480