Sample records for industry transfers offsite

  1. Evaluation of offsite dose assessment methodologies used in the nuclear industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Robert Orwell

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CPSES . . . . . IV EXPOSURE PATHWAYS TO MAN Page VI V I I IX 15 21 V DESCRIPTION OF DOSE ASSESSMENT METHODS . . . . 28 NCRP COMMENTARY No. 3 COMPLY AIRDOS-PC ODCM . REGULATORY GUIDE 1. 109 . . . VI COMPARISONS OF DOSE CALCULATION RESULTS...) Commentary No. 3, the Offsite Dose Calculation Manual (ODCM) from CPSES and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1. 109 were utilized as dose assessment tools during this study The amount of site-specific information entered...

  2. "Goodbye Doesn’t Mean Forever:" Selection Strategies for the Transfer of Slavic to Off-Site Remote Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giullian, Jon C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the storage crisis, several of the nation’s top research libraries have constructed off-site, high-density shelving facilities. This paper first summarizes the discussion about the nature and function of these facilities. The paper goes on to document a case...

  3. "Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced Industrial Heat Transfer Fluids"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Amit Singhal; Mr. Kenneth Eberts; Mr. Damian Sobrevilla; Prof. Jerry Shan; Stephen Tse; Toby Rossmann

    2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced industrial Heat Transfer Fluids” Improving the efficiency of Industrial Heat Exchangers offers a great opportunity to improve overall process efficiencies in diverse industries such as pharmaceutical, materials manufacturing and food processing. The higher efficiencies can come in part from improved heat transfer during both cooling and heating of the material being processed. Additionally, there is great interest in enhancing the performance and reducing the weight of heat exchangers used in automotives in order to increase fuel efficiency. The goal of the Phase I program was to develop nanoparticle containing heat transfer fluids (e.g., antifreeze, water, silicone and hydrocarbon-based oils) that are used in transportation and in the chemical industry for heating, cooling and recovering waste heat. Much work has been done to date at investigating the potential use of nanoparticle-enhanced thermal fluids to improve heat transfer in heat exchangers. In most cases the effect in a commercial heat transfer fluid has been marginal at best. In the Phase I work, we demonstrated that the thermal conductivity, and hence heat transfer, of a fluid containing nanoparticles can be dramatically increased when subjected to an external influence. The increase in thermal conductivity was significantly larger than what is predicted by commonly used thermal models for two-phase materials. Additionally, the surface of the nanoparticles was engineered so as to have a minimal influence on the viscosity of the fluid. As a result, a nanoparticle-laden fluid was successfully developed that can lead to enhanced heat transfer in both industrial and automotive heat exchangers

  4. Effective Transfer of Industrial Energy Conservation Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, M.; Vallario, R. W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and acceptance by industry of new energy conserving technologies. These new technologies were developed through cost sharing programs between the Department of Energy and private industry. These joint efforts reduced the risk to industry, thus making them willing...

  5. Benchmarking of RESRAD-OFFSITE : transition from RESRAD (onsite) toRESRAD-OFFSITE and comparison of the RESRAD-OFFSITE predictions with peercodes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Biwer, B.

    2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this report is to document the benchmarking results and verification of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code as part of the quality assurance requirements of the RESRAD development program. This documentation will enable the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its licensees and other stakeholders to use the quality-assured version of the code to perform dose analysis in a risk-informed and technically defensible manner to demonstrate compliance with the NRC's License Termination Rule, Title 10, Part 20, Subpart E, of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E); DOE's 10 CFR Part 834, Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment''; and other Federal and State regulatory requirements as appropriate. The other purpose of this report is to document the differences and similarities between the RESRAD (onsite) and RESRAD-OFFSITE codes so that users (dose analysts and risk assessors) can make a smooth transition from use of the RESRAD (onsite) code to use of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code for performing both onsite and offsite dose analyses. The evolution of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code from the RESRAD (onsite) code is described in Chapter 1 to help the dose analyst and risk assessor make a smooth conceptual transition from the use of one code to that of the other. Chapter 2 provides a comparison of the predictions of RESRAD (onsite) and RESRAD-OFFSITE for an onsite exposure scenario. Chapter 3 documents the results of benchmarking RESRAD-OFFSITE's atmospheric transport and dispersion submodel against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) CAP88-PC (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) and ISCLT3 (Industrial Source Complex-Long Term) models. Chapter 4 documents the comparison results of the predictions of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code and its submodels with the predictions of peer models. This report was prepared by Argonne National Laboratory's (Argonne's) Environmental Science Division. This work is jointly sponsored by the NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health and Office of Environmental Management. The approaches and or methods described in this report are provided for information only. Use of product or trade names is for identification purposes only and does not constitute endorsement either by DOE, the NRC, or Argonne.

  6. Seeing the light about burning offsite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwanicki, S.; Schaefer, P.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past year, three environmental engineers undertook three very different remediation efforts that each posed unique challenges. In one case, an environmental manager for a consulting firm, representing a trust with a number of different potentially responsible parties (PRPs), was faced with cleaning up a complex brownfield industrial site. In another instance, the environmental manager for a manufacturing firm had to manage the clean out of a warehouse containing outdates and out-of-spec consumer products. And in the third case, a remediation contractor needed to dispose of 1,800 tons of contaminated soil in a nine-week time period; this project also had unique packaging and transportation requirements. While each of these environmental engineers faced different circumstances, they are linked by their decision to use off-site waste incineration for the treatment of the materials generated by their remediation activities.

  7. Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility August 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Idaho...

  8. Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies ORSSAB recommends...

  9. Secure Data Transfer Guidance for Industrial Control and SCADA Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahan, Robert E.; Fluckiger, Jerry D.; Clements, Samuel L.; Tews, Cody W.; Burnette, John R.; Goranson, Craig A.; Kirkham, Harold

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was developed to provide guidance for the implementation of secure data transfer in a complex computational infrastructure representative of the electric power and oil and natural gas enterprises and the control systems they implement. For the past 20 years the cyber security community has focused on preventative measures intended to keep systems secure by providing a hard outer shell that is difficult to penetrate. Over time, the hard exterior, soft interior focus changed to focus on defense-in-depth adding multiple layers of protection, introducing intrusion detection systems, more effective incident response and cleanup, and many other security measures. Despite much larger expenditures and more layers of defense, successful attacks have only increased in number and severity. Consequently, it is time to re-focus the conventional approach to cyber security. While it is still important to implement measures to keep intruders out, a new protection paradigm is warranted that is aimed at discovering attempted or real compromises as early as possible. Put simply, organizations should take as fact that they have been, are now, or will be compromised. These compromises may be intended to steal information for financial gain as in the theft of intellectual property or credentials that lead to the theft of financial resources, or to lie silent until instructed to cause physical or electronic damage and/or denial of services. This change in outlook has been recently confirmed by the National Security Agency [19]. The discovery of attempted and actual compromises requires an increased focus on monitoring events by manual and/or automated log monitoring, detecting unauthorized changes to a system's hardware and/or software, detecting intrusions, and/or discovering the exfiltration of sensitive information and/or attempts to send inappropriate commands to ICS/SCADA (Industrial Control System/Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems.

  10. Offsite Manufacturing: A Survey on the Current Status and Risks of Offsite Construction in Iran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashemi, Arman

    2015-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    . “Code for Sustainable Homes: Opportunities or Threats for Offsite Manufacturing and Mass-Customization?.” In Proceedings of ZEMCH (Zero Energy Mass Custom Home) 2013 International Conference: The Visibility of Zero-Energy Housing, 111-22. [4...

  11. ELUCIDATING THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ONSITE AND OFFSITE SHIPMENT OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftin, B.; Watkins, R.

    2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal regulations stipulate how radioactive materials are transported within the United States. However, the Department of Energy, under Department of Energy Order, has the authority to operate, within the boundaries of their physical site, to other stipulations. In many cases the DOE sites have internal reviews for onsite transfers that rival reviews performed by the regulatory authorities for offsite shipments. Most of the differences are in the level or type of packaging that is required, but in some cases it may be in the amount and type of material that is allowed to be transferred. This paper will describe and discuss those differences and it will discuss ways to effectively align the onsite rules for transferring materials with those for offsite shipment.

  12. Commercial feasibility and impact of embryo transfer technology on the diary industry: case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Daniel Lee

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry: A Case Study (August 1985) Daniel Lee Martin, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ronald D. Knutson )( commercial dairy producer using embryo transfer (ET) proce- dures in its herd was used as a case study... to analyze the commer- cial feasibility and impacts of ET technology. The dairy used the procedures to accelerate the rate at which replacements were raised from the better cows in the herd. Embryo transfer costs at the dairy are about one...

  13. Nevada Offsites Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T en Y ear R enewable E nergyEnergyNeedNevada Offsites

  14. Nevada Offsites Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartment of EnergyofPROTECTINGofNavy'sNet-ZeroNevada Offsites Fact

  15. Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels and the Resin Regeneration Facility Safety Analysis Report, Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety Analysis Report documents the safety authorization basis for the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) and the Resin Regeneration Facility (RRF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The present mission of the RBOF and RRF is to continue in providing a facility for the safe receipt, storage, handling, and shipping of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from power and research reactors in the United States, fuel from SRS and other Department of Energy (DOE) reactors, and foreign research reactors fuel, in support of the nonproliferation policy. The RBOF and RRF provide the capability to handle, separate, and transfer wastes generated from nuclear fuel element storage. The DOE and Westinghouse Savannah River Company, the prime operating contractor, are committed to managing these activities in such a manner that the health and safety of the offsite general public, the site worker, the facility worker, and the environment are protected.

  16. Offsite commercial disposal of oil and gas exploration and production waste :availability, options, and cost.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puder, M. G.; Veil, J. A.

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey conducted in 1995 by the American Petroleum Institute (API) found that the U.S. exploration and production (E&P) segment of the oil and gas industry generated more than 149 million bbl of drilling wastes, almost 18 billion bbl of produced water, and 21 million bbl of associated wastes. The results of that survey, published in 2000, suggested that 3% of drilling wastes, less than 0.5% of produced water, and 15% of associated wastes are sent to offsite commercial facilities for disposal. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) collected information on commercial E&P waste disposal companies in different states in 1997. While the information is nearly a decade old, the report has proved useful. In 2005, Argonne began collecting current information to update and expand the data. This report describes the new 2005-2006 database and focuses on the availability of offsite commercial disposal companies, the prevailing disposal methods, and estimated disposal costs. The data were collected in two phases. In the first phase, state oil and gas regulatory officials in 31 states were contacted to determine whether their agency maintained a list of permitted commercial disposal companies dedicated to oil. In the second stage, individual commercial disposal companies were interviewed to determine disposal methods and costs. The availability of offsite commercial disposal companies and facilities falls into three categories. The states with high oil and gas production typically have a dedicated network of offsite commercial disposal companies and facilities in place. In other states, such an infrastructure does not exist and very often, commercial disposal companies focus on produced water services. About half of the states do not have any industry-specific offsite commercial disposal infrastructure. In those states, operators take their wastes to local municipal landfills if permitted or haul the wastes to other states. This report provides state-by-state summaries of the types of offsite commercial disposal facilities that are found in each state. In later sections, data are presented by waste type and then by disposal method.

  17. Enhancing RESRAD-OFFSITE for Low Level Waste Disposal Facility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The RESRAD-OFFSITE code was developed to evaluate the radiological dose and excess cancer risk to an individual who is exposed while located within or outside the area of...

  18. User's Manual for RESRAD-OFFSITE Version 2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Biwer, B. M.; Kamboj, S.; Cheng, J. -J.; Klett, T.; LePoire, D.; Zielen, A. J.; Chen, S. Y.; Williams, W. A.; Wallo, A.; Domotor, S.; Mo, T.; Schwartzman, A.; Environmental Science Division; DOE; NRC

    2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The RESRAD-OFFSITE code is an extension of the RESRAD (onsite) code, which has been widely used for calculating doses and risks from exposure to radioactively contaminated soils. The development of RESRAD-OFFSITE started more than 10 years ago, but new models and methodologies have been developed, tested, and incorporated since then. Some of the new models have been benchmarked against other independently developed (international) models. The databases used have also expanded to include all the radionuclides (more than 830) contained in the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 38 database. This manual provides detailed information on the design and application of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code. It describes in detail the new models used in the code, such as the three-dimensional dispersion groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model, the Gaussian plume model for atmospheric dispersion, and the deposition model used to estimate the accumulation of radionuclides in offsite locations and in foods. Potential exposure pathways and exposure scenarios that can be modeled by the RESRAD-OFFSITE code are also discussed. A user's guide is included in Appendix A of this manual. The default parameter values and parameter distributions are presented in Appendix B, along with a discussion on the statistical distributions for probabilistic analysis. A detailed discussion on how to reduce run time, especially when conducting probabilistic (uncertainty) analysis, is presented in Appendix C of this manual.

  19. Improvement of industrial drying of natural rubber through analysis of heat and mass transfers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naon, B.; Berthomieu, G.; Benet, J.C.; Saix, C. [Univ. Montpellier II (France). Laboratoire de Mecanique et Genie Civil

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis is presented of convective drying of natural rubber in granule form. Exploitation of the mathematical model developed from analysis of internal transfers requires determination of the drying rate and the energy exchange coefficient between the material and the drying air. This was performed using a portable laboratory dryer at the production site, avoiding the problem of changes in the material during transport. Analysis of the drying kinetics of material in thin layers led to modelling the drying rate at the temperatures, rates and relative humidity values encountered in industrial dryers. The energy exchange coefficient was found by measurement of air and granule temperatures. Thick layer trials showed the suitability of the model for simulation of changes in moisture content and temperature of air and granules in a granular environment. The study as a whole led to the development of a computer program for simulating a zone dryer. This software can be used to optimize the management of an industrial natural rubber drying installation.

  20. LHCb: The LHCb off-Site HLT Farm Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Guoming

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHCb High Level Trigger (HLT) farm consists of about 1300 nodes, which are housed in the underground server room of the experiment point. Due to the constraints of the power supply and cooling system, it is difficult to install more servers in this room for the future. Off-site computing farm is a solution to enlarge the computing capacity. In this paper, we will demonstrate the LHCb off-site HLT farm which locate in the CERN computing center. Since we use private IP addresses for the HLT farm, we would need virtual private network (VPN) to bridge both sites. There are two kinds of traffic in the event builder: control traffic for the control and monitoring of the farm and the Data Acquisition (DAQ) traffic. We adopt IP tunnel for the control traffic and Network Address Translate (NAT) for the DAQ traffic. The performance of the off-site farm have been tested and compared with the on-site farm. The effect of the network latency has been studied. To employ a large off-site farm, one of the potential bottle...

  1. Analysis of Loss-of-Offsite-Power Events 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Loss of offsite power (LOOP) can have a major negative impact on a power plant’s ability to achieve and maintain safe shutdown conditions. Risk analyses performed loss of all alternating current power contributes over 70% of the overall risk at some U.S. nuclear plants. LOOP event and subsequent restoration of offsite power are important inputs to plant probabilistic risk assessments. This report presents a statistical and engineering analysis of LOOP frequencies and durations at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. The data used in this study are based on the operating experience from fiscal year 1998 through 2012. Frequencies and durations were determined for four event categories: plant-centered, switchyard-centered, grid-related, and weather-related. The EDG failure modes considered are failure to start, failure to load and run, and failure to run more than 1 hour. The component reliability estimates and the reliability data are trended for the most recent 10-year period while yearly estimates for reliability are provided for the entire active period. A statistically significant increase in industry performance was identified for plant-centered and switchyard-centered LOOP frequencies. There is no statistically significant trend in LOOP durations.

  2. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SHIP - Solar heat for industrial processes. Internationalsolar power could be used to provide process heat for

  3. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil, starch and corn refining, since these can be a source of fuel products. The sugar cane industry

  4. Improved Technology Transfer Processes for the U.S. Upstream Petroleum Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowell, Deborah; Cole, E. Lance

    2003-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers PTTC's technical progress during the 1st half of FY99, and illustrates its increasing impact on the independent oil and gas producing industry.

  5. The Impact of Heat Transfer Enhancement Techniques on Energy Savings in the U.S. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebello, W. J.; Peterson, G. R.; Sohal, M.

    : the chemical, petroleum, electrical utility and other industries. The total U.S. sales of all industrial heat exchangers, except boilers and automotive radiators, was approximately $1.6 billion (about 285,000 units) in 1982. About 59% of the total represented...

  6. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of its electricity requirements in the USA (US DOE, 2002)USA, where motor-driven systems account for 63% of industrial electricity

  7. Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota"Dakota" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012,West1 Offsite-Produced Fuel

  8. Table 4.2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota"Dakota" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012,West1 Offsite-Produced Fuel4.2

  9. Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota"Dakota" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012,West1 Offsite-Produced Fuel4.23

  10. Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota"Dakota" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012,West1 Offsite-Produced Fuel4.233

  11. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iron and steel production. IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,tempera- ture range. IEA/Caddet, Sittard, The Netherlands.industry. Cheltenham, UK, IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,

  12. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process residual like bagasse are now available (Cornland etsugar in- dustry uses bagasse and the edible oils industrySection 7.4.7. ). The use of bagasse for energy is likely to

  13. Technology transfer, resources import, and economic growth of newly industrializing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Y.H.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The general characteristics of developing economies are poor resources endowments and relatively backward technologies. These characteristics are considered to be obstacles to economic growth. Yet, despite embodying these characteristics, Hong Kong, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan have grown rapidly in the past two decades. Their phenomenal growth is attributed to rapid export expansion which serves as a vehicle in securing the financing of resources import and technology transfer. The important role of export expansion was investigated in models of economic growth and international trade. The models generally fall into two classes. The first class is solely concerned with the importation of resources while the second class emphasizes transfer of technology. This dissertation presents a new class of model combining the two existing classes. In the new model, resources are being introduced into the technology transfer model developed by Feldstein and Hartman, Berglas and Jones, and Khang. Thus, the new model contains two types of imports instead of one. The two imports are advanced capital, which embodies advanced technology, and resources. The new model explains fully the phenomenal growth of the four Asian NICs by demonstrating that rapid economic growth requires massive technology transfer and the alleviation of resource constraints.

  14. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

  15. 10 years and 20,000 sources: the offsite source recovery project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitworth, Julia R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Cristy L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pearson, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Offsite Source Recovery Project (OSRP) has been recovering excess and unwanted sealed sources for ten years. In January 2009, GTRI announced that the project had recovered 20,000 sealed radioactive sources. This project grew out of early efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to recover and disposition excess Plutonium-239 (Pu-239) sealed sources that were distributed in the 1960s and 1970s under the Atoms for Peace Program. Sealed source recovery was initially considered a waste management activity, as evidenced by its initial organization under the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) program. After the terrorist attacks of 2001, however, the interagency community began to recognize the threat posed by excess and unwanted radiological material, particularly those that could not be disposed at the end of their useful life. After being transferred to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to be part of GTRI, OSRP's mission was expanded to include not only material that would be classified as Greater-than-Class-C (GTCC) when it became waste, but also any other materials that might be a 'national security consideration.' This paper discusses OSRP's history, recovery operations, expansion to accept high-activity beta-gamma-emitting sealed sources and devices and foreign-possessed sources, and more recent efforts such as cooperative projects with the Council on Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) and involvement in GTRI's Search and Secure project. Current challenges and future work will also be discussed.

  16. Taiwan industrial cooperation program technology transfer for low-level radioactive waste final disposal - phase I.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Cochran, John Russell; Arnold, Bill Walter; Jow, Hong-Nian; Mattie, Patrick D.; Schelling, Frank Joseph Jr. (; .)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan have collaborated in a technology transfer program related to low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Phase I of this program included regulatory analysis of LLW final disposal, development of LLW disposal performance assessment capabilities, and preliminary performance assessments of two potential disposal sites. Performance objectives were based on regulations in Taiwan and comparisons to those in the United States. Probabilistic performance assessment models were constructed based on limited site data using software including GoldSim, BLT-MS, FEHM, and HELP. These software codes provided the probabilistic framework, container degradation, waste-form leaching, groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and cover infiltration simulation capabilities in the performance assessment. Preliminary performance assessment analyses were conducted for a near-surface disposal system and a mined cavern disposal system at two representative sites in Taiwan. Results of example calculations indicate peak simulated concentrations to a receptor within a few hundred years of LLW disposal, primarily from highly soluble, non-sorbing radionuclides.

  17. Savannah River Site radioiodine atmospheric releases and offsite maximum doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marter, W.L.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioisotopes of iodine have been released to the atmosphere from the Savannah River Site since 1955. The releases, mostly from the 200-F and 200-H Chemical Separations areas, consist of the isotopes, I-129 and 1-131. Small amounts of 1-131 and 1-133 have also been released from reactor facilities and the Savannah River Laboratory. This reference memorandum was issued to summarize our current knowledge of releases of radioiodines and resultant maximum offsite doses. This memorandum supplements the reference memorandum by providing more detailed supporting technical information. Doses reported in this memorandum from consumption of the milk containing the highest I-131 concentration following the 1961 1-131 release incident are about 1% higher than reported in the reference memorandum. This is the result of using unrounded 1-131 concentrations of I-131 in milk in this memo. It is emphasized here that this technical report does not constitute a dose reconstruction in the same sense as the dose reconstruction effort currently underway at Hanford. This report uses existing published data for radioiodine releases and existing transport and dosimetry models.

  18. Fluid management plan for the Project Shoal Area Offsites Subproject

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has initiated the Offsites Subproject to characterize the hazards posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at facilities other than the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A primary Subproject objective is to gather adequate data to characterize the various Subproject sites through the collection of surface and subsurface soil samples and by drilling several wells for the collection of groundwater data. The Project Shoal Area (PSA) is one of the Subproject`s Nevada sites and is subject to the requirements set forth in the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (DOE, 1996a). In accordance with the FFACO, a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed for work at the PSA (designated as Corrective Action Unit Number 416). This Fluid Management Plan (FMP) provides guidance for the management of fluids generated from wells constructed at the PSA. Long-term monitoring and future activities at the site, if required, will be set forth in additional documents as required by the FFACO. The ultimate method for disposition of fluids generated by site operations depends upon sample analysis and process knowledge in relation to fluid management criteria. Section 2 describes well site operations; Section 3 discusses fluid management criteria; Section 4 includes the fluid monitoring program; Section 5 presents the fluid management strategy; Section 6 provides for fluid management during routine well monitoring; and Section 7 contains reporting criteria.

  19. Offsite Construction Comparative Study of Panelized and Modular Construction for Rio Mesa Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Offsite Construction Comparative Study of Panelized and Modular Construction: This research is to evaluate the opportunities of prefabricated construction for remote the logistics of prefab construction on the Rio Mesa site, we hope that this project

  20. Examination of offsite radiological emergency protective measures for nuclear reactor accidents involving core melt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrich, David C.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evacuation, sheltering followed by population relocation, and iodine prophylaxis are evaluated as offsite public protective measures in response to nuclear reactor accidents involving core-melt. Evaluations were conducted ...

  1. Flammability and Combustion Behaviors in Aerosols Formed by Industrial Heat Transfer Fluids Produced by the Electrospray Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lian, Peng

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of flammable aerosols presents a high potential for fire hazards in the process industry. Various industrial fluids, most of which operate at elevated temperatures and pressures, can be atomized when released under high pressure...

  2. Waste transfer leaks technical basis document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZIMMERMAN, B.D.

    2003-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides technical support for the onsite radiological and toxicological, and offsite toxicological, portions of the waste transfer leak accident presented in the Documented Safety Analysis. It provides the technical basis for frequency and consequence bin selection, and selection of safety SSCs and TSRs.

  3. Evaluation of offsite dose assessment methodologies used in the nuclear industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Robert Orwell

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power plant, special studies have been done to estimate the doses due to releases from these facilities. To establish a consistent methodology to be used in the determination of the radiation doses from nuclear power plants the U. S. Nuclear..., Part 20, "Standards for Protection Against Radiation" (10CFR20). Specific design objectives for light-water-cooled nuclear power reactors on exposure levels in unrestricted areas outside these facilities are presented in 10CFR50. Some of the newly...

  4. Table 1c. Off-Site Produced Energy (Site Energy)For Selected Industries,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 1773 January1998, and

  5. Low-level radioactive waste management: transitioning to off-site disposal at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorries, Alison M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Facing the closure of nearly all on-site management and disposal capability for low-level radioactive waste (LLW), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is making ready to ship the majority of LLW off-site. In order to ship off-site, waste must meet the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility's (TSDF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). In preparation, LANL's waste management organization must ensure LANL waste generators characterize and package waste compliantly and waste characterization documentation is complete and accurate. Key challenges that must be addressed to successfully make the shift to off-site disposal of LLW include improving the detail, accuracy, and quality of process knowledge (PK) and acceptable knowledge (AK) documentation, training waste generators and waste management staff on the higher standard of data quality and expectations, improved WAC compliance for off-site facilities, and enhanced quality assurance throughout the process. Certification of LANL generators will allow direct off-site shipping of LLW from their facilities.

  6. Incineration of DOE offsite mixed waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J.D.; Harvego, L.A.; Jacobs, A.M. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Willcox, M.V. [Dept. of Energy Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is one of three incinerators in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Complex capable of incinerating mixed low-level waste (MLLW). WERF has received MLLW from offsite generators and is scheduled to receive more. The State of Idaho supports receipt of offsite MLLW waste at the WERF incinerator within the requirements established in the (INEEL) Site Treatment Plan (STP). The incinerator is operating as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status Facility, with a RCRA Part B permit application currently being reviewed by the State of Idaho. Offsite MLLW received from other DOE facilities are currently being incinerated at WERF at no charge to the generator. Residues associated with the incineration of offsite MLLW waste that meet the Envirocare of Utah waste acceptance criteria are sent to that facility for treatment and/or disposal. WERF is contributing to the treatment and reduction of MLLW in the DOE Complex.

  7. COLLECTlOWo OF CORRESPONDENCE AND : L-LWIJSCRIPT Shelved off-site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    COLLECTlOWo OF CORRESPONDENCE AND : L-LWIJSCRIPT Shelved off-site N.,n3 OF COLLECTION i Robert organized; CCWDITION: (give number of vols«, boxes, or shelves) Bound: Boxad: S5 Stored: LOCATION: (Library Marxism Radio "12 Case Press Comment Shelved off-sfte' Box 6 Minor, B-cbert: "To tell the truth" o

  8. Offsite source recovery project - ten years of sealed source recovery and disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitworth, Julia Rose [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pearson, Mike [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Witkowski, Ioana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wald - Hopkins, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuthbertson, A [NNSA

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Offsite Source Recovery Project (OSRP) has been recovering excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources for ten years. In January 2009, GTRI announced that the project had recovered 20,000 sealed radioactive sources (this number has since increased to more than 23,000). This project grew out of early efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to recover and disposition excess Plutonium-239 (Pu-239) sealed sources that were distributed in the 1960s and 1970s under the Atoms for Peace Program. Decades later, these sources began to exceed their special form certifications or fall out of regular use. As OSRP has collected and stored sealed sources, initially using 'No Path Forward' waste exemptions for storage within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, it has consistently worked to create disposal pathways for the material it has recovered. The project was initially restricted to recovering sealed sources that would meet the definition of Greater-than-Class-C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste, assisting DOE in meeting its obligations under the Low-level Radioactive Waste Policy Act Amendments (PL 99-240) to provide disposal for this type of waste. After being transferred from DOE-Environmental Management (EM) to the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to be part of GTRI, OSRP's mission was expanded to include not only material that would be classified as GTCC when it became waste, but also any other materials that might constitute a 'national security consideration.' It was recognized at the time that the GTCC category was a waste designation having to do with environmental consequence, rather than the threat posed by deliberate or accidental misuse. The project faces barriers to recovery in many areas, but disposal continues to be one of the more difficult to overcome. This paper discusses OSRP's disposal efforts over its 10-year history. For sources meeting the DOE definition of 'transuranic,' OSRP has achieved many milestones, including defense determinations for various isotopes, a WIPP RCRA permit modification to accommodate headspace gas sampling requirements, and approval of a peer-reviewed non-assay radiological characterization methodology. For non-transuranic sources, which OSRP began to recover in 2004, OSRP has achieved NEP A coverage for storage and implemented consolidated storage at both DOE and commercial locations, as well as completing several specific disposal operations. The closure of the Barnwell low-level waste disposal site in 2008 has left 36 states with absolutely no commercial disposal pathway for most sealed sources, increasing the demands on OSRP. This and other current challenges and future work will also be discussed.

  9. Exhibit G Off-site Moderate Risk Cloud Computing Services (Rev 0, 2/27/2014) P.R. No. * Date*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exhibit G Off-site Moderate Risk Cloud Computing Services (Rev 0, 2/27/2014) P.R. No. * Date* Subcontract No. or PO No. * 1 EXHIBIT G OFF-SITE MODERATE RISK CLOUD COMPUTING SERVICES SECURITY REQUIREMENTS Clauses Incorporated By Reference #12;Exhibit G Off-site Moderate Risk Cloud Computing Services (Rev 0, 2

  10. Costs for off-site disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes: Salt caverns versus other disposal methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to an American Petroleum Institute production waste survey reported on by P.G. Wakim in 1987 and 1988, the exploration and production segment of the US oil and gas industry generated more than 360 million barrels (bbl) of drilling wastes, more than 20 billion bbl of produced water, and nearly 12 million bbl of associated wastes in 1985. Current exploration and production activities are believed to be generating comparable quantities of these oil field wastes. Wakim estimates that 28% of drilling wastes, less than 2% of produced water, and 52% of associated wastes are disposed of in off-site commercial facilities. In recent years, interest in disposing of oil field wastes in solution-mined salt caverns has been growing. This report provides information on the availability of commercial disposal companies in oil-and gas-producing states, the treatment and disposal methods they employ, and the amounts they charge. It also compares cavern disposal costs with the costs of other forms of waste disposal.

  11. Enhancing RESRAD-OFFSITE for Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Abstract: The RESRAD-OFFSITE code was developed to evaluate the radiological dose and excess cancer risk to an individual who is exposed while located within or outside the area of initial (primary) contamination. The primary contamination, which is the source of all releases modeled by the code, is assumed to be a layer of soil. The code considers the release of contamination from the source to the atmosphere, to surface runoff, and to groundwater. The radionuclide leaching was modeled as a first order (without transport) release using radionuclide distribution coefficient and infiltration rate calculated from water balance (precipitation, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, etc.). Recently, a new source term model was added the RESRAD-OFFSITE code so that it can be applied to the evaluation of Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal facility performance assessment. This new improved source term model include (1) first order with transport, (2) equilibrium desorption (rinse) release, and (3) uniform release (constant dissolution). With these new source release options, it is possible to simulate both uncontainerized (soil) contamination and containerized (waste drums) contamination. A delay time in the source release was also added to the code. This allows modeling the LLW container degradation as a function of time. The RESRAD-OFFSITE code also allows linking to other codes using improved flux and concentration input options. Additional source release model such as diffusion release may be added later. In addition, radionuclide database with 1252 radionuclides (ICRP 107) and the corresponding dose coefficients (DCFPAK 3.02) and the Department of Energy’s new gender- and age-averaged Reference Person dose coefficients (DOE-STD-1196-2011) which is based on the US census data will be added to the next version of RESRAD-OFFSITE code

  12. Offsite environmental monitoring report; radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, Calendar Year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Huff, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs). No nuclear weapons testing was conducted in 1996 due to the continuing nuclear test moratorium. During this period, R and IE personnel maintained readiness capability to provide direct monitoring support if testing were to be resumed and ascertained compliance with applicable EPA, DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no airborne radioactivity from diffusion or resuspension detected by the various EPA monitoring networks surrounding the NTS. There was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater and no radiation exposure above natural background was received by the offsite population. All evaluated data were consistent with previous data history.

  13. Packaging and Transportation for Offsite Shipment of Materials of National Security Interest

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Order is to make clear that the packaging and transportation of all offsite shipments of materials of national security interest for DOE must be conducted in accordance with DOT and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations that would be applicable to comparable commercial shipments, except where an alternative course of action is identified in this Order. Cancels DOE O 461.1A.

  14. The impact of offsite factors on the safety performance of small nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranaev, Yu.D.; Viktorov, A.N. [Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of an analysis of the influence of offsite factors on small nuclear power-plant (SNPP) safety performance during postulated severe accidents are presented. Given the plant locations in the immediate vicinity of residential areas and the impossibility of accomplishing the expeditious evacuation of the public, the risk caused by an SNPP severe accident may be considerably less than that for such an event in a large nuclear power plant. 3 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Savannah River Site offsite hazardous waste shipment data validation report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, C.; Kudera, D.E.; Page, L.A.; Rohe, M.J.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this data validation is to verify that waste shipments reported in response to the US Department of Energy Headquarters data request are properly categorized according to DOE-HQ definitions. This report documents all findings and actions resulting from the independent review of the Savannah River Site data submittal, and provides a summary of the SRS data submittal and data validation strategy. The overall hazardous waste management and offsite release process from 1987--1991 is documented, along with an identification and description of the hazardous waste generation facilities. SRS did not ship any hazardous waste offsite before 1987. Sampling and analysis and surface surveying procedures and techniques used in determining offsite releasability of the shipments are also described in this report. SRS reported 150 manifested waste shipments from 1984 to 1991 that included 4,755 drums or lab packs and 13 tankers. Of these waste items, this report categorizes 4,251 as clean (including 12 tankers), 326 as likely clean, 138 as likely radioactive, and 55 as radioactive (including one tanker). Although outside the original scope of this report, 14 manifests from 1992 and 1993 are included, covering 393 drums or lab packs and seven tankers. From the 1992--1993 shipments, 58 drums or lab packs are categorized as radioactive and 16 drums are categorized as likely radioactive. The remainder are categorized as clean.

  16. The valuation of off-site ecosystem service ows: Deforestation, erosion and the amenity value of lakes in Prescott, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis The valuation of off-site ecosystem service ows: Deforestation, erosion and the amenity service-based strategy for managing public lands and, to support this, the development of the methods

  17. Review of nuclear power plant offsite power source reliability and related recommended changes to the NRC rules and regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battle, R.E.; Clark, F.H.; Reddoch, T.W.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NRC has stated its concern about the reliability of the offsite power system as the preferred emergency source and about the possible damage to a pressurized water reactor (PWR) that could result from a rapid decay of power grid frequency. ORNL contracted with NRC to provide technical assistance to establish criteria that can be used to evaluate the offsite power system for the licensing of a nuclear power plant. The results of many of the studies for this contract are recommendations to assess and control the power grid during operation. This is because most of the NRC regulations pertaining to the offsite power system are related to the design of the power grid, and we believe that additional emphasis on monitoring the power grid operation will improve the reliability of the nuclear plant offsite power supply. 46 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Mitigated subsurface transfer line leak resulting in a surface pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCOTT, D.L.

    1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis evaluates the mitigated consequences of a potential waste transfer spill from an underground pipeline. The spill forms a surface pool. One waste composite, a 67% liquid, 33% solid, from a single shell tank is evaluated. Even drain back from a very long pipeline (50,000 ft), does not pose dose consequences to the onsite or offsite individual above guideline values.

  19. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 98-02: DOE Enforcement Activities where Off-site Transportation Issues are also Present.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recently several questions have arisen regarding the scope of Price-Anderson enforcement when transportation issues are directly or indirectly involved in an incident. These questions can be separated into two areas, (1) transportation issues that involve on-site transportation typically not regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOT), and (2) transportation issues that involve off-site transportation. This guidance addresses off-site transportation that is regulated by DOT and other state and federal agencies.

  20. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

  1. Offsite Source Recovery Program (OSRP) Workshop Module: Tianjin, China, July 16-July 17, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlton, Robert J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovering and disposal of radioactive sources that are no longer in service in their intended capacity is an area of high concern Globally. A joint effort to recover and dispose of such sources was formed between the US Department of Energy and the Chinese Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), in preparation for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. LANL involvement in this agreement continues today under the DOE-Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program. LANL will be presenting overview information on their Offsite Source Recovery (OSRP) and Source Disposal programs, in a workshop for the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) at Tianjin, China, on July 16 and 17, 2012.

  2. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Hennessey, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (OREMP) conducted during 1997 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPAs), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling and analyzing milk, water, and air; by deploying and reading thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) to measure ambient gamma exposure rates with a sensitivity capable of detecting low level exposures not detected by other monitoring methods.

  3. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G. [and others

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

  4. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program Report: Third Quarter 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Evans

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Science and Research Foundation conducts an offsite environmental surveillance program for the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Foundation's environmental surveillance program monitors the effects, if any, of US Department of Energy (DOE) activities on the offsite environment, collects data to confirm compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, and observes any trends in the environmental levels of radioactivity. This report for the third quarter of 1999 is based on 704 samples of air, fine particulates, atmospheric moisture, precipitation, milk, and food. All concentrations of radioactivity found in these samples were consistent with concentrations which have been found in sampling during recent quarters and which have been attributed in the past to natural background radiation, worldwide fallout from past nuclear weapons testing, and nuclear operations around the world. No! measured concentrations could be directly attributed to operations at the INEEL. Concentrations in all samples were below the guidelines set by both the DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for protection of the public.

  5. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program Report: Fourth Quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Saffle; R. Evans

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Science and Research Foundation conducts the Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program at the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Foundation's environmental surveillance program monitors the effects, if any, of US Department of Energy (DOE) activities on the offsite environment, collects data to confirm compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, and observes any trends in the environmental levels of radioactivity. This report for the fourth quarter 1998 is based on 622 samples collected of air, fine particulates, atmospheric moisture, precipitation, water, milk, potatoes, and game animals. All concentrations of radioactivity found in these samples were consistent with concentrations which have been found in sampling during recent quarters and which have been attributed in the past to natural background radioactivity, worldwide fallout from past nuclear weapons testing, an! d nuclear operations around the world. No measured concentrations could be directly attributed to operations at the INEEL, although statistical differences did exist between on-site and distant gross beta concentrations. No evidence could be found to link these differences with a specific INEEL source. Concentrations in all samples were below the guidelines set by both the DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for protection of the public.

  6. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program Report: First Quarter 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Evans

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Science and Research Foundation conducts an Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program at the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Foundation's environmental surveillance program monitors the effects, if any, of US Department of Energy (DOE) activities on the offsite environment, collects data to confirm compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, and observes any trends in the environmental levels of radioactivity. This report for the first quarter 1999 is based on 564 samples of air (including airborne radioactivity, fine particulates, and atmospheric moisture), precipitation, milk, and wild game tissues. All concentrations of radioactivity found in these samples were consistent with concentrations which have been found in sampling during recent quarters and which have been attributed in the past to natural background radiation, worldwide fallout from past nuclear weapons ! testing, an d nuclear operations around the world. No measured concentrations could be directly attributed to operations at the INEEL. Concentrations in all samples were below the guidelines set by both the DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for protection of the public.

  7. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program Report: Second Quarter 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Evans

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Science and Research Foundation conducts an Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program at the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Foundation's environmental surveillance program monitors the effects, if any, of US Department of Energy (DOE) activities on the offsite environment, collects data to confirm compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, and observes any trends in the environmental levels of radioactivity. This report for the second quarter 1999 is based on 618 samples of air (including airborne radioactivity, fine particulates, and atmospheric moisture), precipitation, milk, drinking water, sheep, wild game tissues, and environmental radiation. All concentrations of radioactivity found in these samples were consistent with concentrations which have been found in sampling during recent quarters and which have been attributed in the past to natural background radiation, worldwide fallout from past nuclear weapons testing, and nuclear operations around the world. No measured concentrations could be directly attributed to operations at the INEEL. Concentrations in all samples were below the guidelines set by both the DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for protection of the public.

  8. Offsite radiological consequence analysis for the bounding unplanned excavation/drilling of 200 area soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEPHENS, L.S.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis calculates the offsite radiological consequence of the bounding unplanned excavation/drilling of 200 Area soils accident. The US. Department of Energy (DOE) standard DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', requires the formal quantification of a limited subset of accidents representing a complete set of bounding conditions. The results of these analyses are then evaluated to determine if they challenge the DOE-STD-3009-94 Appendix A, ''Evaluation Guideline,'' of 25 rem total effective dose equivalent to identify and evaluate safety-class structures, systems, and components. This document supports the development of the unplanned excavation/drilling of 200 Area soils accident in the tank farm documented safety analysis. Consequently, it: (1) Provides a comprehensive review of potential unplanned excavation scenarios (i.e., backhoe, buried pressurized line ruptures, drilling, Guzzler vacuum) to determine the representative activity that would bound unmitigated, unplanned, or inadvertent excavations of 200 Area soils. (2) Evaluates radiological isotope inventories of all current Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) liquid waste disposal sites [i.e., cribs, ditches, and ponds (including French drains)], and isotope inventories of unplanned release sites (UPR) and plume columns. (3) Establishes the radiological consequences to the maximum offsite individual (MOI) from an unplanned/inadvertent 200 Area soil disturbance based on bounding site development and representative accident determination.

  9. EA-1924: Consolidation and Relocation of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) OffSite Research Programs to a New Off-Site Location that also Allows for Future Growth, San Francisco East Bay Area, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to consolidate and relocate LBNL research programs that are currently in leased off-site buildings at various locations around the San Francisco East Bay Area in California, to a new single location that also provides room for future growth of LBNL research programs.

  10. Pollution Prevention Plan for the Y-12 Analytical Chemistry Organization Off-Site Union Valley Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J. G.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Y-12 Analytical Chemistry Organization (ACO) Off-Site Union Valley Facility (Union Valley Facility) is managed by Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, L.L.C. (B and W Y-12) through the Y-12 National Security Complex organization. Accordingly, the Y-12 Pollution Prevention Program encompasses the operations conducted at the Union Valley Facility. The Y-12 Program is designed to fully comply with state, federal and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements concerning waste minimization/pollution prevention as documented in the Y-12 Pollution Prevention Program Plan. The Program is formulated to reduce the generation and toxicity of all Y-12 wastes in all media, including those wastes generated by the Union Valley Facility operations. All regulatory and DOE requirements are met by the Y-12 Program Plan.

  11. RHF RELAP5 Model and Preliminary Loss-Of-Offsite-Power Simulation Results for LEU Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Dionne, B. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Thomas, F. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble (Switzerland). RHF Reactor Dept.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current state of the RELAP5 model for the Institut Laue-Langevin High Flux Reactor (RHF) located in Grenoble, France, and provide an update to the key information required to complete, for example, simulations for a loss of offsite power (LOOP) accident. A previous status report identified a list of 22 items to be resolved in order to complete the RELAP5 model. Most of these items have been resolved by ANL and the RHF team. Enough information was available to perform preliminary safety analyses and define the key items that are still required. Section 2 of this document describes the RELAP5 model of RHF. The final part of this section briefly summarizes previous model issues and resolutions. Section 3 of this document describes preliminary LOOP simulations for both HEU and LEU fuel at beginning of cycle conditions.

  12. Comparative study of selected Brazilian and Nigerian policies to promote the transfer and development of technology: the role of regime and non-regime factors, and some results from the automobile industry, 1967-80

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gusau, B.H.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is concerned with the policies adopted by Brazil and Nigeria to promote the transfer and development of technology in industry. The objectives are two-fold: (1) to compare and analyze the policies with respect to the automobile industries in the 1967-1980 period; (2) to investigate whether their adoption was solely a function of the different ideological values and issue levels of economic development of the countries, or whether the regimes are solely an expression of the patterns of that development. The study adopted the Comparative Public Policy approach to explore the various hypotheses formulated. The findings showed that Brazil realized more significant results than Nigeria in technology development, while in other areas, such as the curtailment of imports, employment generation, etc., the results are mixed. The study concludes that both regime and industrial development factors influence the variation in the policies, although the regime factor seems to explain more of the variation.

  13. Potential Offsite Radiological Doses Estimated for the Proposed Divine Strake Experiment, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ron Warren

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the potential radiation dose that residents offsite of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) might receive from the proposed Divine Strake experiment was made to determine compliance with Subpart H of Part 61 of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. The Divine Strake experiment, proposed by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, consists of a detonation of 700 tons of heavy ammonium nitrate fuel oil-emulsion above the U16b Tunnel complex in Area 16 of the NTS. Both natural radionuclides suspended, and historic fallout radionuclides resuspended from the detonation, have potential to be transported outside the NTS boundary by wind. They may, therefore, contribute radiological dose to the public. Subpart H states ''Emissions of radionuclides to the ambient air from Department of Energy facilities shall not exceed those amounts that would cause any member of the public to receive in any year an effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem/yr'' (Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 61.92) where mrem/yr is millirem per year. Furthermore, application for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approval of construction of a new source or modification of an existing source is required if the effective dose equivalent, caused by all emissions from the new construction or modification, is greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/yr (40 CFR 61.96). In accordance with Section 61.93, a dose assessment was conducted with the computer model CAP88-PC, Version 3.0. In addition to this model, a dose assessment was also conducted by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This modeling was conducted to obtain dose estimates from a model designed for acute releases and which addresses terrain effects and uses meteorology from multiple locations. Potential radiation dose to a hypothetical maximally exposed individual at the closest NTS boundary to the proposed Divine Strake experiment, as estimated by the CAP88-PC model, was 0.005 mrem with wind blowing directly towards that location. Boundary dose, as modeled by NARAC, ranged from about 0.006 to 0.007 mrem. Potential doses to actual offsite populated locations were generally two to five times lower still, or about 40 to 100 times lower then the 0.1 mrem level at which EPA approval is required pursuant to Section 61.96.

  14. Isotopic constraints on off-site migration of landfill CH{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desrocher, S.; Lollar, B.S. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Geology

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occurrences of CH{sub 4} in residential areas in the vicinity of the Beare Road landfill, Toronto, Canada, have raised public concern about potential off-site migration of CH{sub 4} from the landfill site. Carbon isotopic analysis of dissolved and gas phase CH{sub 4} at the Beare Road site, however, indicates that CH{sub 4} in the ground water systems in the vicinity of the landfill is related to naturally occurring microbial methanogenesis within these geologic units, rather than to contamination by landfill CH{sub 4}. CH{sub 4} gas in the landfill and landfill cover has {delta}{sup 13}C values typical of microbially produced gas. Concentrations of CH{sub 4} found in deep ground water in the Scarborough, Don, and Whitby Formations underlying the landfill are isotopically distinct from the landfill gases. They are isotopically and compositionally similar, however, to naturally occurring microbial CH{sub 4} identified in organic-rich glacial deposits throughout Ontario. The lack of any significant CH{sub 4} concentrations or concentration gradients in the upper tin zone between the landfill and the deep ground water aquifer is further evidence that no transport between the landfill and deep ground water is occurring.

  15. Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1987.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B. (Idaho Dept. of Fish and Game, Boise, ID (USA)

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has been monitoring and evaluating existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for steelhead (Salmo gairdneri) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages over the last four years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. A mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production at full seeding as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed nature of upriver anadromous stocks have precluded attainment of full benefit of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit will be credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration. According to the BPA Work Plan, project implementors have the primary responsibility for measuring physical habitat and estimating habitat change. To date, Idaho habitat projects have been implemented primarily by the US Forest Service (USFS). The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) have sponsored three projects (Bear Valley Mine, Yankee Fork, and the proposed East Fork Salmon River projects). IDFG implemented two barrier-removal projects (Johnson Creek and Boulder Creek) that the USFS was unable to sponsor at that time. The role of IDFG in physical habitat monitoring is primarily to link habitat quality and habitat change to changes in actual, or potential, fish production. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

  16. Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1985.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation approaches to document a record of credit for mitigation were developed in 1984-1985 for most of the habitat projects. Restoration of upriver anadromous fish runs through increased passage survival at main stem Columbia and Snake River dams is essential to the establishment of an off-site mitigation record, as well as to the success of the entire Fish and Wildlife program. The mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production (i.e., yield) at full-seeding as the basic measure of benefit from a habitat project. The IDFG evaluation approach consists of three basic, integrated levels: general monitoring, standing crop evaluations, and intensive studies. Annual general monitoring of anadromous fish densities in a small number of sections for each project will be used to follow population trends and define full-seeding levels. For most projects, smolt production will be estimated indirectly from standing crop estimates by factoring appropriate survival rates from parr to smolt stages. Intensive studies in a few key production streams will be initiated to determine these appropriate survival rates and provide other basic biological information that is needed for evaluation of the Fish and Wildlife program. A common physical habitat and fish population data base is being developed for every BPA habitat project in Idaho to be integrated at each level of evaluation. Compatibility of data is also needed between Idaho and other agencies and tribes in the Columbia River basin. No final determination of mitigation credit for any Idaho habitat enhancement project has been attainable to date.

  17. Evaluation of TVA`s model site and individual technology pollution prevention demonstration programs and their impact on the agrichemical industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, G.S.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high volume of fertilizer and pesticides funneled through a relatively small number of distribution outlets has made these agribusiness sites potential sources of surface/groundwater contamination in watersheds surrounding the agrichemical facilities. The agrichemical industry came under increased pressures in the mid-1980s to implement environmentally sound management practices and to install containment structures around fertilizer and chemical storage/handling areas to prevent future contamination of existing sites or the movement of contaminants offsite. TVA`s long and successful history of technology transfer to the retail fertilizer industry, as well as the technical expertise of the Agency`s staff, made TVA ideally suited to handle the new environmental challenge. It was during this time period that TVA`s Model Site Demonstration Program (MSD) and Individual Technology Demonstration Program (ITD) were conceived. Since inception, the pollution prevention program and the technologies advanced by it have made a very positive impact on the US agrichemical industry, as well as on other TVA programs. This paper is an attempt to document these impacts, with primary focus being placed on the program`s impact on the agribusiness dealer who implements the pollution prevention technologies/practices recommended by TVA.

  18. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traeger, R.K.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

  19. Utilities and offsites design baseline. Outside Battery Limits Facility 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1984-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the overall Solvent Refined Coal (SRC-1) project baseline being prepared by International Coal Refining Company (ICRC), the RUST Engineering Company is providing necessary input for the Outside Battery Limits (OSBL) Facilities. The project baseline is comprised of: design baseline - technical definition of work; schedule baseline - detailed and management level 1 schedules; and cost baseline - estimates and cost/manpower plan. The design baseline (technical definition) for the OSBL Facilities has been completed and is presented in Volumes I, II, III, IV, V and VI. The OSBL technical definition is based on, and compatible with, the ICRC defined statement of work, design basis memorandum, master project procedures, process and mechanical design criteria, and baseline guidance documents. The design basis memorandum is included in Paragraph 1.3 of Volume I. The baseline design data is presented in 6 volumes. Volume I contains the introduction section and utility systems data through steam and feedwater. Volume II continues with utility systems data through fuel system, and contains the interconnecting systems and utility system integration information. Volume III contains the offsites data through water and waste treatment. Volume IV continues with offsites data, including site development and buildings, and contains raw materials and product handling and storage information. Volume V contains wastewater treatment and solid wastes landfill systems developed by Catalytic, Inc. to supplement the information contained in Volume III. Volume VI contains proprietary information of Resources Conservation Company related to the evaporator/crystallizer system of the wastewater treatment area.

  20. Industrial Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Industrial Permit Industrial Permit The Industrial Permit authorizes the Laboratory to discharge point-source effluents under the...

  1. Preparing for Transfer Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Environmental Engineering Game Design Industrial Systems & Information Technology Information Science MaterialsPreparing for Transfer Majors: Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering

  2. Technology transfer 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  3. ASSEMBLY TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Gorpani

    2000-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assembly Transfer System (ATS) receives, cools, and opens rail and truck transportation casks from the Carrier/Cask Handling System (CCHS). The system unloads transportation casks consisting of bare Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) assemblies, single element canisters, and Dual Purpose Canisters (DPCs). For casks containing DPCs, the system opens the DPCs and unloads the SNF. The system stages the assemblies, transfer assemblies to and from fuel-blending inventory pools, loads them into Disposal Containers (DCs), temporarily seals and inerts the DC, decontaminates the DC and transfers it to the Disposal Container Handling System. The system also prepares empty casks and DPCs for off-site shipment. Two identical Assembly Transfer System lines are provided in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Each line operates independently to handle the waste transfer throughput and to support maintenance operations. Each system line primarily consists of wet and dry handling areas. The wet handling area includes a cask transport system, cask and DPC preparation system, and a wet assembly handling system. The basket transport system forms the transition between the wet and dry handling areas. The dry handling area includes the dry assembly handling system, assembly drying system, DC preparation system, and DC transport system. Both the wet and dry handling areas are controlled by the control and tracking system. The system operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area. The cask preparation operations consist of cask cavity gas sampling, cask venting, cask cool-down, outer lid removal, and inner shield plug lifting fixture attachment. Casks containing bare SNF (no DPC) are filled with water and placed in the cask unloading pool. The inner shield plugs are removed underwater. For casks containing a DPC, the cask lid(s) is removed, and the DPC is penetrated, sampled, vented, and cooled. A DPC lifting fixture is attached and the cask is placed into the cask unloading pool. In the cask unloading pool the DPC is removed from the cask and placed in an overpack and the DPC lid is severed and removed. Assemblies are removed from either an open cask or DPC and loaded into assembly baskets positioned in the basket staging rack in the assembly unloading pool. A method called ''blending'' is utilized to load DCs with a heat output of less than 11.8 kW. This involves combining hotter and cooler assemblies from different baskets. Blending requires storing some of the hotter fuel assemblies in fuel-blending inventory pools until cooler assemblies are available. The assembly baskets are then transferred from the basket staging rack to the assembly handling cell and loaded into the assembly drying vessels. After drying, the assemblies are removed from the assembly drying vessels and loaded into a DC positioned below the DC load port. After installation of a DC inner lid and temporary sealing device, the DC is transferred to the DC decontamination cell where the top area of the DC, the DC lifting collar, and the DC inner lid and temporary sealing device are decontaminated, and the DC is evacuated and backfilled with inert gas to prevent prolonged clad exposure to air. The DC is then transferred to the Disposal Container Handling System for lid welding. In another cask preparation and decontamination area, lids are replaced on the empty transportation casks and DPC overpacks, the casks and DPC overpacks are decontaminated, inspected, and transferred to the Carrier/Cask Handling System for shipment off-site. All system equipment is designed to facilitate manual or remote operation, decontamination, and maintenance. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks and DPCs. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal WHB support systems.

  4. Spent nuclear fuel characterization for a bounding reference assembly for the receiving basin for off-site fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahook, S.D.; Garrett, R.L.; Canas, L.R.; Beckum, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) for the Receiving Basin for Off-Site Fuel (RBOF) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear materials production complex, developed in accordance with draft DOE-STD-0019-93, required a hazard categorization for the safety analysis section as outlined in DOE-STD-1027-92. The RBOF facility was thus established as a Category-2 facility (having potential for significant on-site consequences from a radiological release) as defined in DOE 5480.23. Given the wide diversity of spent nuclear fuel stored in the RBOF facility, which made a detailed assessment of the total nuclear inventory virtually impossible, the categorization required a conservative calculation based on the concept of a hypothetical, bounding reference fuel assembly integrated over the total capacity of the facility. This scheme not only was simple but also precluded a potential delay in the completion of the BIO.

  5. Linking RESRAD-OFFSITE and HYDROGEOCHEM Model for Performance Assessment of Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility - 13429

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wen-Sheng [Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China)] [Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Yu, Charley; Cheng, Jing-Jy; Kamboj, Sunita; Gnanapragasam, Emmanuel [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Liu, Chen-Wuing [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Li, Ming-Hsu [Institute of Hydrological and Oceanic Sciences, National Central University, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Hydrological and Oceanic Sciences, National Central University, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance assessments are crucial steps for the long-term radiological safety requirements of low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility. How much concentration of radionuclides released from the near-field to biosphere and what radiation exposure levels of an individual can influence on the satisfactory performance of the LLW disposal facility and safety disposal environment. Performance assessment methodology for the radioactive waste disposal consists of the reactive transport modeling of safety-concerned radionuclides released from the near-field to the far-field, and the potential exposure pathways and the movements of radionuclides through the geosphere, biosphere and man of which the accompanying dose. Therefore, the integration of hydrogeochemical transport model and dose assessment code, HYDROGEOCHEM code and RESRAD family of codes is imperative. The RESRAD family of codes such as RESRAD-OFFSITE computer code can evaluate the radiological dose and excess cancer risk to an individual who is exposed while located within or outside the area of initial (primary) contamination. The HYDROGEOCHEM is a 3-D numerical model of fluid flow, thermal, hydrologic transport, and biogeochemical kinetic and equilibrium reactions in saturated and unsaturated media. The HYDROGEOCHEM model can also simulate the crucial geochemical mechanism, such as the effect of redox processes on the adsorption/desorption, hydrogeochemical influences on concrete degradation, adsorption/desorption of radionuclides (i.e., surface complexation model) between solid and liquid phase in geochemically dynamic environments. To investigate the safety assessment of LLW disposal facility, linking RESRAD-OFFSITE and HYDROGEOCHEM model can provide detailed tools of confidence in the protectiveness of the human health and environmental impact for safety assessment of LLW disposal facility. (authors)

  6. H FINAL REPORT OF OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE FOR THE FAULTLESS EVENT,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? . -. .- *'

  7. Industrial Engineering Industrial Advisory Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    Industrial Engineering Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) #12;PURPOSE: The Texas Tech University - Industrial Engineering Industrial Ad- visory Board (IAB) is an association of professionals with a com- mon goal - promoting and developing the Texas Tech Department of Industrial Engineering and its students

  8. Closeout of IE Bulletin 80-15: Possible loss of Emergency Notification System (ENS) with loss of offsite power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, W.J.; Dean, R.S.; Hennick, A. (Parameter, Inc., Elm Grove, WI (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Documentation is provided in this report for the closeout of IE Bulletin 80-15 for nuclear power reactors. This bulletin pertained to a possible loss of the Emergency Notification System (ENS) upon loss of offsite power. Closeout is based on the implementation and verification of six (6) required actions by licensees of nuclear power reactors in operation or near to receiving an operating license when the bulletin was issued on June 18, 1980. Evaluation of utility responses and NRC/Region inspection reports indicates that the bulletin is closed for all of the 69 nuclear power reactors to which it was issued for action and which were not shut down indefinitely or permanently at the time of issuance of this report. Background information is supplied in the Introduction and Appendix A. Nuclear fuel facilities as well as nuclear power facilities were identified in the enclosures to the bulletin. However, per an NRC memorandum, the closeout of the bulletin for nuclear fuel facilities is not within the scope of this report.

  9. Analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) for the Rocky Flats Plant. Phase 3, Sitewide spectrum-of-accidents and bounding EPZ analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrocchi, A.J.; Zimmerman, G.A.

    1994-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    During Phase 3 of the EPZ project, a sitewide analysis will be performed applying a spectrum-of-accidents approach to both radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials release scenarios. This analysis will include the MCA but will be wider in scope and will produce options for the State of Colorado for establishing a bounding EPZ that is intended to more comprehensively update the interim, preliminary EPZ developed in Phase 2. EG&G will propose use of a hazards assessment methodology that is consistent with the DOE Emergency Management Guide for Hazards Assessments and other methods required by DOE orders. This will include hazards, accident, safety, and risk analyses. Using this methodology, EG&G will develop technical analyses for a spectrum of accidents. The analyses will show the potential effects from the spectrum of accidents on the offsite population together with identification of offsite vulnerable zones and areas of concern. These analyses will incorporate state-of-the-art technology for accident analysis, atmospheric plume dispersion modeling, consequence analysis, and the application of these evaluations to the general public population at risk. The analyses will treat both radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials and mixtures of both released accidentally to the atmosphere. DOE/RFO will submit these results to the State of Colorado for the State`s use in determining offsite emergency planning zones for the Rocky Flats Plant. In addition, the results will be used for internal Rocky Flats Plant emergency planning.

  10. Development of a robust work transfer iomplementation process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murdoch, Kimberly R

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industry-wide need for a robust method of transferring the manufacturing of a component from one location to another is addressed in this thesis. Work transfer activities can be initiated due to a number of business ...

  11. Technology transfer 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

  12. Fermilab | Office of Partnerships and Technology Transfer | Columns...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    President Obama recently issued a directive to all the national laboratories to improve technology transfer. "Innovation fuels economic growth, the creation of new industries,...

  13. advanced heat transfer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to save energy in industrial processes. The approach has emphasized developing better heat pump technology and transferring that technology to the private sector. DOE requires...

  14. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traeger, R.K.; Dugan, V.L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs in geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel technologies have been effective in transferring research concepts to applications in private industry. This report updates the previous summary (SAND82-0211, March 1982) to include recent technology transfers and to reflect recent changes in philosophy on technology transfer. Over 40 items transferred to industry have been identified in the areas of Hardware, Risk Removal and Understanding. Successful transfer is due largely to personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staffs of private industry.

  15. Sandia Energy - JBEI Research Receives Strong Industry Interest...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Receives Strong Industry Interest in DOE Technology Transfer Call Home Renewable Energy Energy Biofuels Facilities Partnership JBEI News News & Events Research &...

  16. Business Plan Competitions and Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worley, C.M.; Perry, T.D., IV

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of business plan competitions, with a focus on the NREL-hosted Industry Growth Forum, and how it helps cleantech startups secure funding and transfer their technology to market.

  17. Clean Boiler Waterside Heat Transfer Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on cleaning boiler water-side heat transfer surfaces provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  18. OFFSITE USE FORM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOERecoveryNuclearLifeMeals

  19. OFF-SITE S

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 +New York, New6 O E2 54FORS e

  20. Design Considerations for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bywaters, R. P.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recovery design considerations as well as a summary of typical "waste heat" sources and application sites. A procedure for conducting industrial waste heat surveys is presented. Thermodynamic and heat transfer factors are discussed. Problems associated...

  1. Technology innovation in financial services industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roxo da Fonseca, Gustavo J. C. (Gustavo José Costa), 1967-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last few decades, we have seen an enormous evolution in the financial services industry driven by technology innovations. Indeed, we cannot imagine the current financial system without electronic fund transfers, ...

  2. Development Requirements for Advanced Industrial Heat Pumps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, R. N.; Priebe, S. J.; Bliem, C. J.; Mills, J. I.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE is attempting to advance the use of heat pumps to save energy in industrial processes. The approach has emphasized developing better heat pump technology and transferring that technology to the private sector. DOE requires that heat pump...

  3. Development Requirements for Advanced Industrial Heat Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, R. N.; Priebe, S. J.; Bliem, C. J.; Mills, J. I.

    DOE is attempting to advance the use of heat pumps to save energy in industrial processes. The approach has emphasized developing better heat pump technology and transferring that technology to the private sector. DOE requires that heat pump...

  4. Design Considerations for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bywaters, R. P.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recovery design considerations as well as a summary of typical "waste heat" sources and application sites. A procedure for conducting industrial waste heat surveys is presented. Thermodynamic and heat transfer factors are discussed. Problems associated...

  5. Applicability of Loss of Offsite Power (LOSP) Events in NUREG/CR-6890 for Entergy Nuclear South (ENS) Plants LOSP Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yunlong; Yilmaz, Fatma; Bedell, Loys [Entergy Nuclear South (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant differences have been identified in loss of offsite power (LOSP or LOOP) event description, category, duration, and applicability between the LOSP events used in NUREG/CR-6890 and ENS'LOSP packages, which were based on EPRI LOSP reports with plant-specific applicability analysis. Thus it is appropriate to reconcile the LOSP data listed in the subject NUREG and EPRI reports. A cross comparison showed that 62 LOSP events in NUREG/CR-6890 were not included in the EPRI reports while 4 events in EPRI reports were missing in the NUREG. Among the 62 events missing in EPRI reports, the majority were applicable to shutdown conditions, which could be classified as category IV events in EPRI reports if included. Detailed reviews of LERs concluded that some events did not result in total loss of offsite power. Some LOSP events were caused by subsequent component failures after a turbine/plant trip, which have been modeled specifically in most ENS plant PRA models. Moreover, ENS has modeled (or is going to model) the partial loss of offsite power events with partial LOSP initiating events. While the direct use of NUREG/CR-6890 results in SPAR models may be appropriate, its direct use in ENS' plant PRA models may not be appropriate because of modeling details in ENS' plant-specific PRA models. Therefore, this paper lists all the differences between the data in NUREG/CR-6890 and EPRI reports and evaluates the applicability of the LOSP events to ENS plant-specific PRA models. The refined LOSP data will characterize the LOSP risk in a more realistic fashion. (authors)

  6. OTHER INDUSTRIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO funded research results in novel technologies in diverse industries beyond the most energy intensive ones within the U.S. Manufacturing sector. These technologies offer quantifiable energy...

  7. PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navara, Kristen

    TRAINING FOR LIQUID MANURE SYSTEMS IN THE LAYER INDUSTRY Receive training and certification regarding lagoon or slurry design, construction, and management. 4. Monitoringandrecordkeeping. Several components and environmental hazards; documentation of manure use and off-site transfer. 5. Pollution prevention

  8. How One Utility is Building Industrial Consumer Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, D. E.

    HOW ONE UT1~ITY IS BUILDING INDUSTRIAL CONSUMER RELATIONSHIPS DONALD E. HAMILTON Manager-Industrial Services and Cogeneration Gulf States Utilities Company Beaumont, Texas COMPETITION AND THE UTILITY INDUSTRY The refining and petrochemical... in the eighties: depletion of old low cost oil and gas fields within the United States, the formation of OPEC, a run-up in oil and gas prices, leveling of demand in the petrochemical industry, the transfer of substantial wealth from industrial to oil...

  9. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal.

  10. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 code using loss of offsite power transient data of KNU (Korea Nuclear Unit) No. 1 Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Bud-Dong; Kim, Hho-Jung (Korea Advanced Energy Research Inst., Daeduk-Danji (Republic of Korea). Korea Nuclear Safety Center); Lee, Young-Jin (Seoul National Univ. (Republic of Korea))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a code assessment study based on a real plant transient that occurred on June 9, 1981 at the KNU {number sign}1 (Korea Nuclear Unit Number 1). KNU {number sign}1 is a two-loop Westinghouse PWR plant of 587 Mwe. The loss of offsite power transient occurred at the 77.5% reactor power with 0.5%/hr power ramp. The real plant data were collected from available on-line plant records and computer diagnostics. The transient was simulated by RELAP5/MOD2/36.05 and the results were compared with the plant data to assess the code weaknesses and strengths. Some nodalization studies were performed to contribute to developing a guideline for PWR nodalization for the transient analysis. 5 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Heat transfer rates for filmwise, dropwise, and superhydrophobic condensation on silicon substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hery, Travis M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Condensation, a two-phase heat transfer processes, is commonly utilized in industrial systems. Condensation heat transfer can be optimized by using surfaces in which dropwise condensation (DWC) occurs, and even further ...

  12. MIT and Automotive Industries MIT Industry Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    MIT and Automotive Industries MIT Industry Brief MIT's Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) can bring@ilp.mit.edu, or visit http://ilp-www.mit.edu. MIT and Automotive Industries The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a leading center of research and education on topics important to the automotive industry

  13. Energy And The Foods Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, R.

    temperature of the outside air. Other factors limiting downward progression of SCT inc lude gas pressure-driven pumping systems and improperly designed hot-gas defrost systems. The chief factors limiting upward progression of the SST include excess... flows is performed, with the objective of determining where heat can be transferred from cooling to heating streams. The heat transfer can be either via recuperative heat exchangers or industrial heat pumps; the choice of which is defined...

  14. Measurement and prediction of aerosol formation for thesafe utilization of industrial fuids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna, Kiran

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mist or aerosol explosions present a serious hazard to process industries. Heat transfer fluids are widely used in the chemical process industry, are flammable above their flash points, and can cause aerosol explosions. Though the possibility...

  15. Measurement and prediction of aerosol formation for thesafe utilization of industrial fuids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna, Kiran

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mist or aerosol explosions present a serious hazard to process industries. Heat transfer fluids are widely used in the chemical process industry, are flammable above their flash points, and can cause aerosol explosions. ...

  16. The Office of Industrial Technologies technical reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) conducts R D activities which focus on the objectives of improving energy efficiency and providing for fuel flexibility within US industry in the area of industrial energy conservation. The Office also conducts programs to reduce waste generation, increase recycling efforts, and improve the use of wastes as process feedstocks. An active program of technology transfer and education supports these activities and encourages adoption of new technologies. To accomplish these objectives OIT cooperates with the private sector to identify its technological needs and to share R D efforts. R D is conducted to the point that a new technology is shown to work and that it can be transferred to the private sector end-users. This bibliography contains information on all scientific and technical reports sponsored by the DOE Industrial Energy Conservation Program during the years 1988--1990.

  17. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials Center at CornellOf SmartIndustrial Users The

  18. Industry @ ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials Center at CornellOf SmartIndustrial Users

  19. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP »summerlectures [ICO]default Sign InIndustrial

  20. Non-intrusive characterization of heat transfer fluid aerosol formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna, Kiran

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer fluids are widely used in the chemical process industry and are available in a wide range of properties. These fluids are flammable above their flash points and can cause explosions. Though the possibility of aerosol explosions has...

  1. Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 1 Welcome MIE Industrial Advisory Board October 15, 2010 #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 2 MIE Dorothy Adams Undergraduate/Graduate Secretary David Schmidt Associate Professor & Graduate Program Director #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 3 MIE James Rinderle

  2. Industrial Decision Making 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, R. N.; McKinney, V.; Shipley, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and industrial investment decision-making. The paper will also address several important questions: • Why has industrial investment declined? • What is the outlook for industrial investment? • How can programs engage industry for future opportunities?...

  3. Numerical investigation of the heating process inside an industrial furnace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolper, Pierre

    Numerical investigation of the heating process inside an industrial furnace Proposition: Combined furnace taking into account convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer. The model: Catalysis, Energy Materials, Performance Materials and Recycling. Each business area is divided into market

  4. The Analysis and Development of Large Industrial Steam Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterland, A. F.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemicals, petroleum, pulp and paper, and many other industries depend heavily on extensive complex steam systems for thermal and mechanical energy delivery. Steam's versatility and desirable characteristics as both a heat transfer medium and a...

  5. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned with looking at the "big picture" of systems that allow organizations and individuals to perform at their best. Industrial engineers bridge should be used and how they should be used. The focus of industrial engineering is on process improvement

  6. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned with looking at the "big picture" of systems that allow organizations and individuals to perform at their best. Industrial engineers bridge should be used and how they should be used. Industrial engineers design and run the factories and systems

  7. Transferring Data at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Transferring Data Advice and Overview NERSC provides many facilities for storing data and performing analysis. However, transfering data - whether over the wide area network...

  8. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  9. Uranium industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

  10. CASL Industry Council Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IndustryCouncil.shtml The new members that joined the Industry Council include NPP owneroperators with analysis capability: Tyrone Stevens of Exelon, and SMR vendors:...

  11. The Picatinny Technology Transfer Innovation Center: A business incubator concept adapted to federal laboratory technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittig, T. [Geo-Centers, Inc. (United States); Greenfield, J. [Armaments Research, Development and Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the US defense industrial base spawned the aerospace industry, among other successes, and served as the nation`s technology seed bed. However, as the defense industrial base shrinks and public and private resources become scarcer, the merging of the commercial and defense communities becomes necessary to maintain national technological competencies. Cooperative efforts such as technology transfer provide an attractive, cost-effective, well-leveraged alternative to independently funded research and development (R and D). The sharing of knowledge, resources, and innovation among defense contractors and other public sector firms, academia, and other organizations has become exceedingly attractive. Recent legislation involving technology transfer provides for the sharing of federal laboratory resources with the private sector. The Army Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC), Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, a designer of weapons systems, is one of the nation`s major laboratories with this requirement. To achieve its important technology transfer mission, ARDEC reviewed its capabilities, resources, intellectual property, and products with commercial potential. The purpose of the review was to develop a viable plan for effecting a technology transfer cultural change within the ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal and with the private sector. This report highlights the issues identified, discussed, and resolved prior to the transformation of a temporarily vacant federal building on the Picatinny installation into a business incubator. ARDEC`s discussions and rationale for the decisions and actions that led to the implementation of the Picatinny Technology Transfer Innovation Center are discussed.

  12. HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenert, Andrej

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

  13. Industry Analysis February 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    technology ­ Clean tech/ clean technology #12;7 Industry Studies · IbisWorld ­ U.S. and global industry-Industries · Biodiesel ­ Biofuel ­ Alternate fuels ­ Green fuels ­ Renewable fuels/energy ­ Green energy ­ Green Canada, Census, Industry Canada, the OECD, European Union, IMF, World Bank, UN . . . Never pay for stats

  14. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    : Occupational biomechanics, work physiology, industrial ergonomics, environmental hygiene, cognitive engineeringINDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS The Master of Science in Industrial Engineering (M Systems and Engineering (M.S.M.S.E.), the Doctor of Philosophy in Industrial Engineering, and the Doctor

  15. Heat Transfer Guest Editorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    Journal of Heat Transfer Guest Editorial We are indeed delighted in bringing out this special issue was showcased in diverse areas such as traditional heat and mass transfer, lab-on-chip, sensors, biomedical applica- tions, micromixers, fuel cells, and microdevices. Selected papers in the field of heat transfer

  16. Technology transfer of geopressured/geothermal resources to industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorfman, M.H.; Morton, R.A.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research, conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Center for Energy Studies, includes the following areas of interest; geological studies depicting pressure gradients and thermal gradients, sand distribution and fault patterns, all of which are used in petroleum exploration; geophysical data for interpretation of seismic velocities based upon lithologic changes and subsurface discontinuities; sandstone consolidation data involving changes of permeabilities with depth and diagenetic histories of Cenozoic rocks in the Gulf Coast Basin - this work also covers fluid migration pathways and resulting rock-water interactions and has led to a better understanding of generation, maturation and accumulation of hydrocarbons; work on salinity of formation waters covering several areas of study, such as chemical analysis to anticipate scale and corrosion problems, and investigations of logging techniques to better ascertain salinity of use of well logs; reservoir continuity studies, together with computational modelling to assist in estimation of ultimate recoveries and formation drives; rock mechanics studies, which have recently led to the development of new models to account for creep and determine compressibilities of sandstones and shales in geopressured environments; co-production of gas and water in watered-out gas reservoirs.

  17. Knowledge Transfer Partnerships Williams Industrial Services Ltd & Queen's University Belfast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    of biogas plant Use of QUESTOR laboratories for sample analysis Company Quote "Through the Knowledge reductions in energy footprint while maintaining treatment performance. Key Benefits Results of sludge

  18. Industrial Steam System Heat-Transfer Solutions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment andJuneJobs Thomas

  19. Industrial Steam System Heat-Transfer Solutions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovementINDIAN COUNTRYBarriers toHeat Pumps

  20. The Office of Industrial Technologies - enhancing the competitiveness, efficiency, and environmental quality of American industry through technology partnerships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical component of the Federal Government`s effort to stimulate improved industrial energy efficiency is the DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT). OIT funds research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) efforts and transfers the resulting technology and knowledge to industry. This document describes OIT`s program, including the new Industries of the Future (IOF) initiative and the strategic activities that are part of the IOF process. It also describes the energy, economic, and environmental characteristics of the materials and process industries that consume nearly 80% of all energy used by manufacturing in the United States. OIT-supported RD&D activities relating to these industries are described, and quantitative estimates of the potential benefits of many OIT-supported technologies for industry are also provided.

  1. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization to address the increasingly urgent need to improve the technology-transfer process in the U.S. upstream petroleum industry. Coordinated from a Headquarters (HQ) office in Houston, PTTC maintains an active grassroots program executed by 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and two satellite offices (Figure 1). Regional Directors interact with domestic oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, technical publications and cooperative outreach efforts. HQ facilitates inter-regional technology transfer and implements a comprehensive communications program. Active volunteers on the National Board and in Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs) in each of the 10 regions focus effort in areas that will create the most impact for domestic producers. Focused effort by dedicated individuals across the country has enabled PTTC to achieve the milestones outlined in Appendix A.

  2. Cash Flow Impacts of Industrial Steam Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, C.

    of thermal transfer tasks within the majority of manufacturing industries, it is widely perceived as a "support" utility. In other words, steam is considered a power source subordinate to process lines that are the real focus of manufacturing activity... be directed to productive functions, enabling the plant to extend production runs or perhaps even begin new product lines. RETURN ON INVESTMENT Global competition and decentralized corporate structures provide formidable challenges for manufacturing...

  3. Fuel transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

  4. Technology transfer handbook for Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. , employees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared, D.W. (ed.)

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) established the Office of Technology Applications (OTA) to promote the transfer of technology from the national facilities in Oak Ridge to industries in the private sector. This handbook provides specific information about OTA and establishes a coherent procedure for licensing technologies. This handbook also explains the benefits and constraints involved with technology transfer and identifies the resources available to entrepreneurs and researchers who are interested in collaborative R D.

  5. The Industrial Electrification Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry, I. L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPRI's role as the research organization of the electric power industry, in coordination with potential user industries, is to 1) define the viability of candidate electrification technologies by monitoring the state-of-the-art and continuously...

  6. Electrotechnologies in Process Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amarnath, K. R.

    The Industrial Program at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) promotes the efficient use of electricity to improve the competitive position of the American industry. Electrotechnologies that improve productivity, improve quality...

  7. and Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    technologicalandlogisticssystemsbygathering, structuring, and managing information. Indus- trial engineers apply their knowledge not only45 Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 220 Engineering Lab Degrees: Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering Contact: James R. Rinderle

  8. Demographics and industry returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollet, Joshua A.; DellaVigna, Stefano

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry category Child care Children’s books Children’s clothing Toysindustry Child care Children’s books Children’s clothing ToysIndustries are associated with high demand by children (child care, toys) and

  9. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEER APPRENTICE OPPORTUNITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Karsten

    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEER APPRENTICE OPPORTUNITY SUMMER 2013 Industrial Engineering COOP Student needed-Fri, for summer 2013. Student must be enrolled in BS Engineering program. (Preferably completed 2-3 yrs

  10. Industry Analysis October 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    Different regulations for some industries in Canada, the U.S. and Europe ie. telecommunications, energy of energy, materials, industrial waste, byproducts #12;Contact Constance Adamson Stauffer Library adamsonc

  11. HIGEE Mass Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, R. J.; Fowler, R.

    HIGEE MASS TRANSFER R.J. Mohr and R. Fowler GLITSCH, INC. Dallas, Texas ABSTRACT Distillation, absorption, and gas stripping have traditionally been performed in tall columns utilizing trays or packing. Columns perform satisfactorily... transfer system which utilizes a rotating bed of packing to achieve high efficiency separations, and consequent reduction in size and weight. INTRODUCTION HIGEE is probably one of the most interesting developments in mass transfer equipment made...

  12. Geothermal Industry Partnership Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you'll find links to information about partnership opportunities and programs for the geothermal industry.

  13. MATERIALS TRANSFER AGREEMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MTAXX-XXX 1 MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT for Manufacturing Demonstration Facility and Carbon Fiber Technology Facility In order for the RECIPIENT to obtain materials, the RECIPIENT...

  14. Tunable transfer | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 29, 2013 Scientists gain first quantitative insights into electron transfer from minerals to microbes Scientists have gained the first quantitative insights into electron...

  15. Technology Transfer Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Oil & Gas Technology Transfer Initiatives USEFUL LINKS Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory...

  16. Bus transfer analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weronick, R.; Hassan, I.D. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Lyndhurst, NJ (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses bus transfer schemes and the methodology used in modeling and analysis. Due to the unavailability of generic acceptance criteria, simulations were performed to analyze the actual fast bus transfer operations at four operating nuclear power generating stations. Sample simulation results illustrating the transient variations in motors currents and torques are included. The analyses were performed to ensure that motors and other rotating parts are not subjected to excessive or accumulated stresses caused by bus transfer operations. A summary of the experience gained in the process of performing this work and suggested bus transfer acceptance criteria are also presented.

  17. Facility Survey & Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

  18. Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Mario A. Rotea Professor and Department Head #12;2Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Outline · Undergraduate Degree Programs · Graduate Degree Programs · The Faculty · The Research · Summary #12;3Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Undergraduate Programs ­ BSME & BSIE 0 20 40 60

  19. Industrial Dojo Program Fosters Industrial Internet Development...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) GE Launches Cloud Foundry 'Industrial Dojo,' Contributes to Open Source to Foster Continued...

  20. Industrial policy and the Indian electronics industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, Robert (Robert Eric)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, production within India's Electronics sector amounted to a low $12 billion when compared to the global output of $1400 billion. The slow growth in the local industry is often judged to be the result of late ...

  1. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Users The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center offers a diverse set of capabilities and instruments for industrial projects. Industrial users are invited to contact Fredrik...

  2. The use of real-time off-site observations as a methodology for increasing forecast skill in prediction of large wind power ramps one or more hours ahead of their impact on a wind plant.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin Wilde, Principal Investigator

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Application of Real-Time Offsite Measurements in Improved Short-Term Wind Ramp Prediction Skill Improved forecasting performance immediately preceding wind ramp events is of preeminent concern to most wind energy companies, system operators, and balancing authorities. The value of near real-time hub height-level wind data and more general meteorological measurements to short-term wind power forecasting is well understood. For some sites, access to onsite measured wind data - even historical - can reduce forecast error in the short-range to medium-range horizons by as much as 50%. Unfortunately, valuable free-stream wind measurements at tall tower are not typically available at most wind plants, thereby forcing wind forecasters to rely upon wind measurements below hub height and/or turbine nacelle anemometry. Free-stream measurements can be appropriately scaled to hub-height levels, using existing empirically-derived relationships that account for surface roughness and turbulence. But there is large uncertainty in these relationships for a given time of day and state of the boundary layer. Alternatively, forecasts can rely entirely on turbine anemometry measurements, though such measurements are themselves subject to wake effects that are not stationary. The void in free-stream hub-height level measurements of wind can be filled by remote sensing (e.g., sodar, lidar, and radar). However, the expense of such equipment may not be sustainable. There is a growing market for traditional anemometry on tall tower networks, maintained by third parties to the forecasting process (i.e., independent of forecasters and the forecast users). This study examines the value of offsite tall-tower data from the WINDataNOW Technology network for short-horizon wind power predictions at a wind farm in northern Montana. The presentation shall describe successful physical and statistical techniques for its application and the practicality of its application in an operational setting. It shall be demonstrated that when used properly, the real-time offsite measurements materially improve wind ramp capture and prediction statistics, when compared to traditional wind forecasting techniques and to a simple persistence model.

  3. Uranium industry annual 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  4. Uranium industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  5. INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    78 INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering and business principles companies compete in today's global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems engineer's task is to take of industries including consulting, technology development, software, supply chain manufacturing, engineering

  6. Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Vish V.; Davies, Richard W.; Holbery, Jim D.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    United States industry consumed 32.5 Quads (34,300 PJ) of energy during 2003, which was 33.1% of total U.S. energy consumption (EIA 2003 Annual Energy Review). The U.S. industrial complex yields valuable goods and products. Through its manufacturing processes as well as its abundant energy consumption, it supports a multi-trillion dollar contribution to the gross domestic product and provides millions of jobs in the U.S. each year. Industry also yields waste products directly through its manufacturing processes and indirectly through its energy consumption. These waste products come in two forms, chemical and thermal. Both forms of waste have residual energy values that are not routinely recovered. Recovering and reusing these waste products may represent a significant opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of the U.S. industrial complex. This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program (DOE-ITP). It analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities. A primary part of this analysis was to characterize the quantity and energy value of the emissions. For example, in 2001, the industrial sector emitted 19% of the U.S. greenhouse gases (GHG) through its industrial processes and emitted 11% of GHG through electricity purchased from off-site utilities. Therefore, industry (not including agriculture) was directly and indirectly responsible for emitting 30% of the U.S. GHG. These emissions were mainly comprised of carbon dioxide (CO2), but also contained a wide-variety of CH4 (methane), CO (carbon monoxide), H2 (hydrogen), NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compound), and other chemicals. As part of this study, we conducted a survey of publicly available literature to determine the amount of energy embedded in the emissions and to identify technology opportunities to capture and reuse this energy. As shown in Table E-1, non-CO2 GHG emissions from U.S. industry were identified as having 2180 peta joules (PJ) or 2 Quads (quadrillion Btu) of residual chemical fuel value. Since landfills are not traditionally considered industrial organizations, the industry component of these emissions had a value of 1480 PJ or 1.4 Quads. This represents approximately 4.3% of the total energy used in the United States Industry.

  7. Heat Pipe Technology for Energy Conservation in the Process Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, B. L. Jr.

    HEAT PIPE TECHNOLOGY FOR ENERGY CONSERVATION IN THE PROCESS INDUSTRY Berwin L. Price. Jr. Q-dot Corporation Garland. Texas ABSTRACT Many applications for heat pipe technology have emerged in the relatively short time this technology has been... and utility industries. The heat pipe offers a unique. efficient heat transfer device that can recover valuable thermal energy resulting in reduced equipment and operating costs. Q-dot is the world leader in heat pipe technology and we have applied our...

  8. Technology Transfer and Commercialization Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelle R. Blacker

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. In other interactions, INL employees work cooperatively with researchers and other technical staff of our partners to further develop emerging technologies. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to other parties. This report was compiled from primary records, which were readily available to the INL’s Office of Technology Transfer & Commercialization. The accomplishments cataloged in the report, however, reflect the achievements and creativity of the highly skilled researchers, technicians, support staff, and operators of the INL workforce. Their achievements and recognized capabilities are what make the accomplishments cataloged here possible. Without them, none of these transactions would occur.

  9. Closing the loop : improving technology transfer by learning from the past

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witinski, Paul (Paul F.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology transfer is a significant challenge within the highly regulated pharmaceutical industry. While much focus is put on the logistics and strategy of the process, less attention has been paid to how to change the ...

  10. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry during the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortner, E. C.

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by proton transfer reaction – mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) on a rooftop in the urban mixed residential and industrial area North Northeast of downtown Mexico City as part of ...

  11. POSITION DESCRIPTION 2012 TRANSFER MENTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POSITION DESCRIPTION 2012 TRANSFER MENTOR TRANSFER MENTOR AS A STAFF MEMBER Thank you for your interest in the Transfer Mentor position with Orientation and Transition Programs' (OTP) Transfer Mentoring Program. The Transfer Mentor (TM) is a member of the Orientation and Transition Programs' staff

  12. Research in Industrial Combustion Systems - Current and Future R&D 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebello, W. J.; Keller, J. G.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the future research needs in industrial combustion systems have been identified. These include improved techniques of heat transfer to the load, improved sensors, plasmas to process materials and flash or pneumatic reactors for the metals, non-metals...

  13. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement in the United States Petroleum Refining Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    offsites (e.g. , boiler efficiency improvements) have beenEfficiency Measures /  Technologies  Reduce Stand?By Boiler Efficiency Measures /  Technologies  Reduce Stand?By Boiler 

  14. Industrial Retrofits are Possible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stobart, E. W.

    . In April of 1987, the provincial government initiated a program to assist industrial energy users to reduce their energy usage. This program was designed to concentrate on an in-depth analysis of the complete operations of industrial plants... with the analyses being performed by specialist, private sector, engineering consultants. The program is in 3 phases providing an Ontario industrial plant with an Energy Analysis, a Feasibility Analysis Grant and a Project Engineering Design Grant...

  15. HEAT AND MOISTURE TRANSFER THROUGH CLOTHING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voelker, Conrad; Hoffmann, Sabine; Kornadt, Oliver; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Huizenga, Charlie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. C. Eberhart (ed), Heat transfer in medicine and biology.between convective heat transfer and mass transferConvective and radiative heat transfer coefficients for

  16. Heat and moisture transfer through clothing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voelker, Conrad; Hoffmann, Sabine; Kornadt, Oliver; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Huizenga, Charlie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. C. Eberhart (ed), Heat transfer in medicine and biology.Convective and radiative heat transfer coefficients forbetween convective heat transfer and mass transfer

  17. Presentations for Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn energy-saving strategies from leading manufacturing companies and energy experts. The presentations are organized below by topic area. In addition, industrial energy managers, utilities, and...

  18. About Industrial Distributed Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Manufacturing Office's (AMO's) Industrial Distributed Energy activities build on the success of predecessor DOE programs on distributed energy and combined heat and power (CHP) while...

  19. Industrial Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Boiler, Steam, and Cogeneration (BSC) Component. The BSC Component satisfies the steam demand from the PA and BLD Components. In some industries, the PA Component produces...

  20. Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Covey, Debra

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

  1. Heat transfer education : Keeping it relevant and vibrant.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khounsary, A. M.

    1998-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for a fresh look at heat transfer education, both in content and in methodology, is generated by a number of trends in engineering practice. These include the increasing demand for engineers with interdisciplinary skills, rapid integration of technology, emergence of computerized and interactive problem-solving tools, shortening time of concept-to-market, availability of new technologies, and an increasing number of new or redesigned products and processes in which heat transfer plays a part. Examination of heat transfer education in this context can be aided by considering the changes, both qualitatively and quantitatively, in the student, educator, and researcher populations, employment opportunities, in the needs of corporations, government, industry, and universities, and in the relevant technical problems and issues of the day. Such an overview provides the necessary background for charting a response to the difficult question of how to maintain excellence and continuity in heat transfer education in the face of rapid, widespread, and complex changes. The present paper addresses how to make heat transfer education more relevant and stimulating. This paper represents a written summary of a 1996 panel discussion at the 1996 International Mechanical Engineering Conference and Exhibition (IMECE) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in Atlanta, Georgia, on ''Heat Transfer Education: Keeping it Relevant and Vibrant,'' with significant expansion and amplification by the authors and the panelists in the 1997-98 period. The consensus of the participants is that the steps necessary to ensure the desired outcome in heat transfer education should include: (1) a better understanding of the interaction between the student, course content, and market needs; (2) an appreciation of the need in multidisciplinary industrial environments for engineers trained with a broad background: (3) a revision of the introductory heat transfer course to incorporate illustrative and insightful industrial examples and case studies reducible to order-of-magnitude analyses; (4) a reinforcement of real-world problem-solving abilities in students by introducing them to examples that emphasize multidisciplinary issues in modern thermal management problems and finally (5) industrial collaboration that would provide the educator with meaningful thermal management case studies (and possible funding), the student with an appreciation of industrial practices, and the industrial sponsor with access to academia for assistance in problem solving. Also suggested is an effective regular review program to provide assessment, feedback, and suggestions for quality control to interested institutions on their teaching methodology and materials.

  2. Transfer reactions at ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    64 Ni+ 64 Ni Strong entrance-channel dependence of fusion enhancement Beckerman et al., PRL 45, 1472 (1980), PRC 25, 837 (1982) Coupling of transfer channels, in addition to...

  3. Laboratory/industry partnerships for environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beskid, N.J.; Zussman, S.K.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two measures of ``successful`` technology transfer in DOE`s environmental restoration and waste management program. The first is remediation of DOE sites, and the second is commercialization of an environmental remediation process or product. The ideal case merges these two in laboratory/industry partnerships for environmental remediation. The elements to be discussed in terms of their effectiveness in aiding technology transfer include: a decision-making champion; timely and sufficient funding; well organized technology transfer function; well defined DOE and commercial markets; and industry/commercial partnering. Several case studies are presented, including the successful commercialization of a process for vitrification of low-level radioactive waste, the commercial marketing of software for hazardous waste characterization, and the application of a monitoring technique that has won a prestigious technical award. Case studies will include: vitrification of low-level radioactive waste (GTS Duratek, Columbia, MD); borehole liner for emplacing instrumentation and sampling groundwater (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Santa Fe, NM); electronic cone penetrometer (Applied Research Associates, Inc., South Royalton, VT); and software for hazardous waste monitoring ConSolve, Inc. (Lexington, MA). The roles of the Department of Energy and Argonne National Laboratory in these successes will be characterized.

  4. Quality and Reuse in Industrial Software Engineering Greg Butler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Gregory

    Quality and Reuse in Industrial Software Engineering Greg Butler Department of Computer Science on the costs and benefits of the approaches, and the criteria which determine a successful transfer the effort and costs of maintenance and understanding are the primary means to increased productivity

  5. Resources, framing, and transfer p. 1 Resources, framing, and transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammer, David

    Resources, framing, and transfer p. 1 Resources, framing, and transfer David Hammer Departments. #12;Resources, framing, and transfer p. 2 Resources, framing, and transfer David Hammer, Andrew Elby of activating resources, a language with an explicitly manifold view of cognitive structure. In this chapter, we

  6. Technology Roadmap Research Program for the Steel Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph R. Vehec

    2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The steel industry's Technology Roadmap Program (TRP) is a collaborative R&D effort jointly sponsored by the steel industry and the United States Department of Energy. The TRP program was designed to develop new technologies to save energy , increase competitiveness, and improve the environment. TRP ran from July, 1997 to December, 2008, with a total program budget of $38 million dollars. During that period 47 R&D projects were performed by 28 unique research organizations; co-funding was provided by DOE and 60 industry partners. The projects benefited all areas of steelmaking and much know-how was developed and transferred to industry. The American Iron and Steel Institute is the owner of all intellectual property developed under TRP and licenses it at commercial rates to all steelmakers. TRP technologies are in widespread use in the steel industry as participants received royalty-free use of intellectual property in return for taking the risk of funding this research.

  7. Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program Overview Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry, one business at a time Website: http-3547 agincubator@ctahr.hawaii.edu Grow Your Business If you are looking to start an agriculture-related business with our program · Positively impact the agriculture industry in Hawaii with their success

  8. Geothermal industry assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the geothermal industry is presented, focusing on industry structure, corporate activities and strategies, and detailed analysis of the technological, economic, financial, and institutional issues important to government policy formulation. The study is based principally on confidential interviews with executives of 75 companies active in the field. (MHR)

  9. Industrial Optimization Compact Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirches, Christian

    Industrial Optimization Compact Course and Challenge Workshop Optimization plays a crucial role of the processes are typically nonlinear and dyna- mic. Thus, complex dynamic optimization or optimal control in industrial optimization. February 17­20, 2014 ·9.00­17.00 IWR ·Im Neuenheimer Feld 368 ·69120 Heidelberg www

  10. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  11. INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    78 INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering and business principles companies compete in today's global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems engineer's task is to take · Industrial and Systems Engineering Bachelor of Science 128 units · Industrial and Systems Engineering

  12. Uranium industry annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  13. A Roadmap for NEAMS Capability Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the design and analysis of nuclear energy systems. From its inception, the NEAMS program has always envisioned a broad user base for its software and scientific products, including researchers within the DOE complex, nuclear industry technology developers and vendors, and operators. However activities to date have focused almost exclusively on interactions with NEAMS sponsors, who are also near-term users of NEAMS technologies. The task of the NEAMS Capability Transfer (CT) program element for FY2011 is to develop a comprehensive plan to support the program's needs for user outreach and technology transfer. In order to obtain community input to this plan, a 'NEAMS Capability Transfer Roadmapping Workshop' was held 4-5 April 2011 in Chattanooga, TN, and is summarized in this report. The 30 workshop participants represented the NEAMS program, the DOE and industrial user communities, and several outside programs. The workshop included a series of presentations providing an overview of the NEAMS program and presentations on the user outreach and technology transfer experiences of (1) The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, (2) The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) project, and (3) The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), followed by discussion sessions. Based on the workshop and other discussions throughout the year, we make a number of recommendations of key areas for the NEAMS program to develop the user outreach and technology transfer activities: (1) Engage not only DOE, but also industrial users sooner and more often; (2) Engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to facilitate their understanding and acceptance of NEAMS approach to predictive M&S; (3) Place requirements gathering from prospective users on a more formal footing, updating requirements on a regular basis and incorporate them into planning and execution of the project in a traceable fashion; (4) Seek out the best available data for validation purposes, and work with experimental programs to design and carry out new experiments that satisfy the need for data suitable for validation of high-fidelity M&S codes; (5) Develop and implement program-wide plans and policies for export control, licensing, and distribution of NEAMS software products; (6) Establish a program of sponsored alpha testing by experienced users in order to obtain feedback on NEAMS codes; (7) Provide technical support for NEAMS software products; (8) Develop and deliver documentation, tutorial materials, and live training classes; and (9) Be prepared to support outside users who wish to contribute to the codes.

  14. Advanced technology options for industrial heating equipment research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, R.C.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a strategy for a comprehensive program plan that is applicable to the Combustion Equipment Program of the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies (the program). The program seeks to develop improved heating equipment and advanced control techniques which, by improvements in combustion and beat transfer, will increase energy-use efficiency and productivity in industrial processes and allow the preferred use of abundant, low grade and waste domestic fuels. While the plan development strategy endeavors to be consistent with the programmatic goals and policies of the office, it is primarily governed by the needs and concerns of the US heating equipment industry. The program, by nature, focuses on energy intensive industrial processes. According to the DOE Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), the industrial sector in the US consumed about 21 quads of energy in 1988 in the form of coal, petroleum, natural gas and electricity. This energy was used as fuels for industrial boilers and furnaces, for agricultural uses, for construction, as feedstocks for chemicals and plastics, and for steel, mining, motors, engines and other industrial use over 75 percent of this energy was consumed to provide heat and power for manufacturing industries. The largest consumers of fuel energy were the primary metals, chemical and allied products, paper and allied products, and stone, clay and glass industry groups which accounted for about 60% of the total fuel energy consumed by the US manufacturing sector.

  15. Industrial process surveillance system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.; Singer, R.M.; Mott, J.E.

    1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy. 96 figs.

  16. Compact microwave ion source for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Yong-Sub; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Han-Sung; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Hong, In-Seok [Proton Engineering Frontier Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source for ion implanters has many good properties for industrial application, such as easy maintenance and long lifetime, and it should be compact for budget and space. But, it has a dc current supply for the solenoid and a rf generator for plasma generation. Usually, they are located on high voltage platform because they are electrically connected with beam extraction power supply. Using permanent magnet solenoid and multi-layer dc break, high voltage deck and high voltage isolation transformer can be eliminated, and the dose rate on targets can be controlled by pulse duty control with semiconductor high voltage switch. Because the beam optics does not change, beam transfer components, such as focusing elements and beam shutter, can be eliminated. It has shown the good performances in budget and space for industrial applications of ion beams.

  17. Applied heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapathy, V.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer principles are discussed with emphasis on the practical aspects of the problems. Correlations for heat transfer and pressure drop from several worldwide sources for flow inside and outside of tubes, including finned tubes are presented, along with design and performance calculations of heat exchangers economizers, air heaters, condensers, waste-heat boilers, fired heaters, superheaters, and boiler furnaces. Vibration analysis for tube bundles and heat exchangers are also discussed, as are estimating gas-mixture properties at atmospheric and elevated pressures and life-cycle costing techniques. (JMT)

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearce, T.D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From its beginning in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has traditionally used science and technology to fine creative, but practical solutions to complex problems. Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California, under contact to the Department of Energy. We are a Government Owned-contractor Operated (GOCO) facility, and a Federally-funded research and Development Center (FFRDC). At Los Alamos, our mission is to apply science and engineering capabilities to problems of national security. Recently our mission has been broadened to include technology transfer to ensure the scientific and technical solutions are available to the marketplace. We are, in staff and technical capabilities, one of the worlds largest multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratories. We conduct extensive research in energy, nuclear safeguards and security, biomedical science, conventional defense technologies, space science, computational science, environmental protection and cleanup, materials science, and other basic sciences. Since 1980, by a series of laws and executive orders, the resources of the federal laboratories have been made increasingly available to private industry via technology transfer efforts. Los Alamos National Laboratory uses a variety of technology transfer methods including laboratory visits, cooperative research, licensing, contract research, user facility access, personnel exchanges, consulting, publications, and workshops, seminars and briefings. We also use unique approaches, such as our negotiating teams, to ensure that transfer of our developed technology takes place in an open and competitive manner. During my presentation, I will discuss the overall process and some of the mechanism that we use at Los Alamos to transfer laboratory developed technology.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearce, T.D.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From its beginning in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has traditionally used science and technology to fine creative, but practical solutions to complex problems. Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California, under contact to the Department of Energy. We are a Government Owned-contractor Operated (GOCO) facility, and a Federally-funded research and Development Center (FFRDC). At Los Alamos, our mission is to apply science and engineering capabilities to problems of national security. Recently our mission has been broadened to include technology transfer to ensure the scientific and technical solutions are available to the marketplace. We are, in staff and technical capabilities, one of the worlds largest multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratories. We conduct extensive research in energy, nuclear safeguards and security, biomedical science, conventional defense technologies, space science, computational science, environmental protection and cleanup, materials science, and other basic sciences. Since 1980, by a series of laws and executive orders, the resources of the federal laboratories have been made increasingly available to private industry via technology transfer efforts. Los Alamos National Laboratory uses a variety of technology transfer methods including laboratory visits, cooperative research, licensing, contract research, user facility access, personnel exchanges, consulting, publications, and workshops, seminars and briefings. We also use unique approaches, such as our negotiating teams, to ensure that transfer of our developed technology takes place in an open and competitive manner. During my presentation, I will discuss the overall process and some of the mechanism that we use at Los Alamos to transfer laboratory developed technology.

  20. Industrial Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, R. N.; McKinney, V.; Shipley, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Domestic industrial investment has declined due to unfavorable energy prices, and external markets. Investment behavior has changed over the past few years, and will continue due to high labor costs, tight markets and an unstable U.S. economy...

  1. AI Industrial Engineering 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the California Energy Commission’s (Commission) energy policies and programs that save energy and money for California’s manufacturing and food processing industries to help retain businesses in-state and reduce greenhouse gases...

  2. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  3. Industrial energy use indices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanegan, Andrew Aaron

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy use index (EUI) is an important measure of energy use which normalizes energy use by dividing by building area. Energy use indices and associated coefficients of variation are computed for major industry categories ...

  4. Animal Industries Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant managers around the world are interested in improving the energy efficiency of their facilities while both growing and modernizing their manufacturing capabilities. Emerging industrial technologies, both at the ...

  5. Animal Industries Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial steam users recognize the need to reduce system cost in order to remain internationally competitive. Steam systems are a key utility that influence cost significantly, and represent a high value opportunity ...

  6. Utility and Industrial Partnerships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sashihara, T. F.

    In the past decade, many external forces have shocked both utilities and their large industrial customers into seeking more effective ways of coping and surviving. One such way is to develop mutually beneficial partnerships optimizing the use...

  7. Engineering Industrial & Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    powerful tool sets used in industry today. -Brent Gillett, BSIE 2007 Advanced Planning Engineer at BMW I the skills necessary to be successful in today's global environment. EDGE exposes and trains engineering

  8. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Addthis Description Industrial...

  9. NEMS industrial module documentation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2010) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of output of industrial activity. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

  10. Industrial Development Fund (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Industrial Development Fund provides financing grants and loans through designated municipalities and counties to assist in infrastructure improvements for targeted industrial projects. The...

  11. Three Dimensional Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel

    2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative Transfer (RT) effects play a crucial role in the thermal history of the intergalactic medium. Here I discuss recent advances in the development of numerical methods that introduce RT to cosmological hydrodynamics. These methods can also readily be applied to time dependent problems on interstellar and galactic scales.

  12. Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial...

  13. Proceedings of the 1992 DOE-industry thermal distribution conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, J.W. [ed.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of the conference was thermal distribution in small buildings. Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork, piping, or other means used to transport heat or cooling effect from the equipment in which the heat or cooling is produced to the building spaces in which it is used. The small buildings category is defined to include single-family residential and multifamily and commercial buildings with less than 10,000 ft{sup 2} floor area. The 1992 DOE-Industry Thermal Distribution Conference was conceived as the beginning of a process of information transfer between the DOE and the industries having a stake in thermal distribution systems, whereby the DOE can make the industry aware of its thinking and planned directions early enough for changes to be made, and whereby the industries represented can provide this input to the DOE on a timely and informed basis. In accordance with this, the objectives of the Conference were: To present--to a representative group of researchers and industry representative--the current industry thinking and DOE`s current directions for research in small-building thermal distribution. To obtain from industry and the research community a critique of the DOE priorities and additional ideas concerning how DOE can best assist the industry in promoting energy conservation in thermal distribution systems.

  14. Proceedings of the 1992 DOE-industry thermal distribution conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, J.W. (ed.)

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of the conference was thermal distribution in small buildings. Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork, piping, or other means used to transport heat or cooling effect from the equipment in which the heat or cooling is produced to the building spaces in which it is used. The small buildings category is defined to include single-family residential and multifamily and commercial buildings with less than 10,000 ft{sup 2} floor area. The 1992 DOE-Industry Thermal Distribution Conference was conceived as the beginning of a process of information transfer between the DOE and the industries having a stake in thermal distribution systems, whereby the DOE can make the industry aware of its thinking and planned directions early enough for changes to be made, and whereby the industries represented can provide this input to the DOE on a timely and informed basis. In accordance with this, the objectives of the Conference were: To present--to a representative group of researchers and industry representative--the current industry thinking and DOE's current directions for research in small-building thermal distribution. To obtain from industry and the research community a critique of the DOE priorities and additional ideas concerning how DOE can best assist the industry in promoting energy conservation in thermal distribution systems.

  15. Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Industry Advisory Board University of Massachusetts Amherst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    9/13/2007 Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Industry Advisory Board University of Massachusetts Amherst Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering About the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Industry Advisory Board The purpose of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Industry Advisory

  16. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 2 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  17. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  18. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  19. Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Using the efficiency-number of transfer units method ( ), the heat-transfer efficiencies of the parallel-flow and reverse-flow TDTH...

  20. Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Using the efficiency-number of transfer units method ( ), the heat-transfer efficiencies of the parallel-flow and reverse-flow TDTH...

  1. Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and Thermal/Energy Sciences Naval Postgraduate School Monterey-track faculty position at the assistant professor level in the areas of Heat Transfer and Thermal/Fluid Sciences

  2. Policies on Japan's Space Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with space emerging countries 3. Step up leading-edge science and technology as an innovation engine (1Policies on Japan's Space Industry Shuichi Kaneko Director, Space Industry Office Manufacturing Industries Bureau Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) #12;Japan's Space Policy is based

  3. QER- Comment of Energy Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From: Lee Hanse Executive Vice President Interstate Energy Transfer Mobile - 210 464 2929 Office - 210 403 6455

  4. AUTOMATED RADIOANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY: APPLICATIONS FOR THE LABORATORY AND INDUSTRIAL PROCESS MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hara, Matthew J.; Farawila, Anne F.; Grate, Jay W.

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification and quantification of targeted ?- and ?-emitting radionuclides via destructive analysis in complex radioactive liquid matrices is highly challenging. Analyses are typically accomplished at on- or off-site laboratories through laborious sample preparation steps and extensive chemical separations followed by analysis using a variety of detection methodologies (e.g., liquid scintillation, alpha energy spectroscopy, mass spectrometry). Analytical results may take days or weeks to report. When an industrial-scale plant requires periodic or continuous monitoring of radionuclides as an indication of the composition of its feed stream, diversion of safeguarded nuclides, or of plant operational conditions (for example), radiochemical measurements should be rapid, but not at the expense of precision and accuracy. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed and characterized a host of automated radioanalytical systems designed to perform reproducible and rapid radioanalytical processes. Platforms have been assembled for 1) automation and acceleration of sample analysis in the laboratory and 2) automated monitors for monitoring industrial scale nuclear processes on-line with near-real time results. These methods have been applied to the analysis of environmental-level actinides and fission products to high-level nuclear process fluids. Systems have been designed to integrate a number of discrete sample handling steps, including sample pretreatment (e.g., digestion and valence state adjustment) and chemical separations. The systems have either utilized on-line analyte detection or have collected the purified analyte fractions for off-line measurement applications. One PNNL system of particular note is a fully automated prototype on-line radioanalytical system designed for the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford, WA, USA. This system demonstrated nearly continuous destructive analysis of the soft ?-emitting radionuclide 99Tc in nuclear tank waste feed solutions. The system is compact, fully self-calibrating, and analytical results can be immediately transmitted to on- or off-site locations. This platform exemplifies how automation can be integrated into reprocessing facilities to support the needs of international nuclear safeguards and reprocessing plant operational monitoring.

  5. Type B package for the transport of large medical and industrial sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Darrell Dwaine [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Noss, Philip W [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    AREVA Federal Services LLC, under contract to the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Offsite Source Recovery Project, is developing a new Type B(U)-96 package for the transport of unwanted or abandoned high activity gamma and neutron radioactive sealed sources (sources). The sources were used primarily in medical or industrial devices, and are of domestic (USA) or foreign origin. To promote public safety and mitigate the possibility of loss or misuse, the Offsite Source Recovery Project is recovering and managing sources worldwide. The package, denoted the LANL-B, is designed to accommodate the sources within an internal gamma shield. The sources are located either in the IAEA's Long Term Storage Shield (LTSS), or within intact medical or industrial irradiation devices. As the sources are already shielded separately, the package does not include any shielding of its own. A particular challenge in the design of the LANL-B has been weight. Since the LTSS shield weighs approximately 5,000 lb [2,270 kg], and the total package gross weight must be limited to 10,000 lb [4,540 kg], the net weight of the package was limited to 5,000 lb, for an efficiency of 50% (i.e., the payload weight is 50% of the gross weight of the package). This required implementation of a light-weight bell-jar concept, in which the containment takes the form of a vertical bell which is bolted to a base. A single impact limiter is used on the bottom, to protect the elastomer seals and bolted joint. A top-end impact is mitigated by the deformation of a tori spherically-shaped head. Impacts in various orientations on the bottom end are mitigated by a cylindrical, polyurethane foam-filled impact limiter. Internally, energy is absorbed using honeycomb blocks at each end, which fill the torispherical head volumes. As many of the sources are considered to be in normal form, the LANL-B package offers leak-tight containment using an elastomer seal at the joint between the bell and the base, as well as on the single vent port. Leak testing prior to transport may be either using helium mass spectrometry or the pressure-rise concept.

  6. Emulsified industrial oils recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabris, T.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial lubricant market has been analyzed with emphasis on current and/or developing recycling and re-refining technologies. This task has been performed for the United States and other industrialized countries, specifically France, West Germany, Italy and Japan. Attention has been focused at emulsion-type fluids regardless of the industrial application involved. It was found that emulsion-type fluids in the United States represent a much higher percentage of the total fluids used than in other industrialized countries. While recycling is an active matter explored by the industry, re-refining is rather a result of other issues than the mere fact that oil can be regenerated from a used industrial emulsion. To extend the longevity of an emulsion is a logical step to keep expenses down by using the emulsion as long as possible. There is, however, another important factor influencing this issue: regulations governing the disposal of such fluids. The ecological question, the respect for nature and the natural balances, is often seen now as everybody's task. Regulations forbid dumping used emulsions in the environment without prior treatment of the water phase and separation of the oil phase. This is a costly procedure, so recycling is attractive since it postpones the problem. It is questionable whether re-refining of these emulsions - as a business - could stand on its own if these emulsions did not have to be taken apart for disposal purposes. Once the emulsion is separated into a water and an oil phase, however, re-refining of the oil does become economical.

  7. Plastic container bagless transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tibrea, Steven L.; D'Amelio, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Brent A.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus are provided for transferring material from an isolated environment into a storage carrier through a conduit that can be sealed with a plug. The plug and conduit can then be severed to provide a hermetically sealed storage carrier containing the material which may be transported for storage or disposal and to maintain a seal between the isolated environment and the ambient environment.

  8. Mass transfer andMass transfer and Mass transfer andMass transfer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    't be determined A correlation for Sherwood number (Sh) based on di i l l i b d l i Sh diff idimensional analysis for mass transfer with convection: I l f d fl d b (l b l )­ Internal forced flow: inside a tube (laminar A in fluid medium B in a flow with characteristic velocity and size characteristic d: kA = f(d, w, (= fluid

  9. Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Diane Schaub

    2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its inception, the University of Florida Industrial Assessment Center has successfully completed close to 400 energy assessments of small to medium manufacturing facilities in Florida, southern Georgia and southern Alabama. Through these efforts, recommendations were made that would result in savings of about $5 million per year, with an implementation rate of 20-25%. Approximately 80 engineering students have worked for the UF-IAC, at least 10 of whom went on to work in energy related fields after graduation. Additionally, through the popular course in Industrial Energy Management, many students have graduated from the University of Florida with a strong understanding and support of energy conservation methods.

  10. Libyan oil industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddams, F.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three aspects of the growth and progress of Libya's oil industry since the first crude oil discovery in 1961 are: (1) relations between the Libyan government and the concessionary oil companies; (2) the impact of Libyan oil and events in Libya on the petroleum markets of Europe and the world; and (3) the response of the Libyan economy to the development of its oil industry. The historical review begins with Libya's becoming a sovereign nation in 1951 and traces its subsequent development into a position as a leading world oil producer. 54 references, 10 figures, 55 tables.

  11. Solar industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumsdaine, E.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the assessment reported is to candidly examine the contribution that solar industrial process heat (SIPH) is realistically able to make in the near and long-term energy futures of the United States. The performance history of government and privately funded SIPH demonstration programs, 15 of which are briefly summarized, and the present status of SIPH technology are discussed. The technical and performance characteristics of solar industrial process heat plants and equipment are reviewed, as well as evaluating how the operating experience of over a dozen SIPH demonstration projects is influencing institutional acceptance and economoc projections. Implications for domestic energy policy and international implications are briefly discussed. (LEW)

  12. Industrial Equipment Impacts Infrastructure

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf05 IdentifiedPathways to SustainedIndustrial AssessmentIndustrial

  13. Ontario's Industrial Energy Services Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ploeger, L. K.

    .8%! ! ! ! OTHER 8.4%! l4.9%! l4.0%! ! ! ! TOTAL 100.0%! 100.0%! 100.0%! ! PROGRAM STRATEGY Ontario's Industrial Energy Services Program was designed to: lead industrial energy consumers to the realization that increased energy efficiency generates... ONTARIO'S INDUSTRIAL ENERGY SERVICES PROGRAM LINDA K. PLOEGER, GENERAL MANAGER, INDUSTRY PROGRAMS ONTARIO MINISTRY OF ENERGY TORONTO, ONTARIO, ABSTRACT The Ontario Ministry of Energy began offering its new Industrial Energy Services Program...

  14. SWAMI II technology transfer plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

  15. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  16. Industry Partners Panel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Industry Panel presenters include: Michael G. Andrew, Director - Academic and Technical Programs, Advanced Products and Materials, Johnson Controls Power Solutions Michael A. Fetcenko, Vice President and Managing Director, BASF Battery Materials – Ovonic, BASF Corporation Adam Kahn, Founder and CEO, AKHAN Technologies, Inc. Stephen E. Zimmer, Executive Director, United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR)

  17. Industrial Energy Use Indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanegan, A.; Heffington, W. M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of variations for all industry types in warm versus cold regions of the U.S. generally is greater than unity. Data scatter may have several explanations, including climate, plant area accounting, the influence of low cost energy and low cost buildings used...

  18. INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

  19. Wireless Power Transfer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

  20. Wireless Power Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

  1. An overview of heat exchanger enhancement techniques for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaram, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Ohadi, M.M. (Maryland Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)); Richlen, S. (US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (US))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment is make of selected currently available heat exchanger enhancement techniques for single- and two-phase heat transfer mechanisms to determine their practicality and commercialization potential for different industrial applications. The assessment includes a screening review of the major techniques being investigated in the research community, and identification of selected passive techniques and determine their potential limitations with respect to industrial applications. A more detailed study of the research needs and the technology gaps is being conducted to address the issues of concern for each practical application of the chosen techniques. The technical and economic feasibility and the performance benefits of incorporating a particular technique in a heat transfer process is also discussed. The potential design, operational, and manufacturing cost issues that have prevented a technique from being widely commercialized are identified.

  2. Manipulator mounted transfer platform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dobbins, James C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hoover, Mark A. (Idaho Falls, ID); May, Kay W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ross, Maurice J. (Pocatello, ID)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transfer platform for the conveyance of objects by a manipulator includes a bed frame and saddle clamp secured along an edge of the bed frame and adapted so as to secure the bed frame to a horizontal crosspiece of the manipulator. The platform may thus move with the manipulator in a reciprocal linear path defined by a guide rail. A bed insert may be provided for the support of conveyed objects and a lifting bail may be provided to permit the manipulator arm to install the bed frame upon the crosspiece under remote control.

  3. Data Transfer and Access

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOfficeOctoberDanielDTN Data Transfer Nodes

  4. Technology Transfer Reporting Form

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy Solar Decathlon |1999Energy-Technology TransferThis

  5. New Concept for Industrial Energy/Utility Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, W. J.

    -up for emergencies and waste heat ooiler outages. It is also inflated because all steam fran waste heat ooilers is credited at full offsite boiler steam cost. Detennining an equitable value for a utility, particularly steam, is a canp1ex problem involving many... with three 500 klb/hr offsite boilers i operating normally at 400 klb/hr total in at system that has 1150 klb/hr of CO and waste t boiler steam production. I lao PSIG o---%-.~7~::-----,-....L_----r-_--I.._+---o 1&0 PSIG o--'--:";-;:::--~':'::'-"T:"13...

  6. Transforming the Oil Industry into the Energy Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transforming the Oil Industry into the Energy Industry BYculprit. It consumes half the oil used in the world andconsuming two thirds of the oil and causing about one third

  7. Innovative New Industrial Technologies: An Industry/DOE Joint Endeavor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, T. J.

    The Department of Energy’s Office of Industrial Programs supports research and development leading to improved energy efficiency and greater overall productivity in the industrial sector. Its basic strategy is a program of cost-shared R...

  8. INDUSTRIAL ASSOCIATESHIP SCHEME Centre for Industrial Consultancy and Sponsored Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhashyam, Srikrishna

    this scheme: #12;(i) Energy Energy Storage (1990) Strategies for Energy Saving in Industry (1993) Pollution Control Equipment (2001) Acoustics and Noise Control for Industry (2005) Urban Air Quality

  9. INDUSTRIAL & SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    78 INDUSTRIAL & SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering and business principles of physical and human resources. These engineers are involved in developing manufacturing systems to help companies compete in todays global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems engineers task is to take limited

  10. Coal industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  11. Coal industry annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

  12. BTU Accounting for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redd, R. O.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , salesmen cars, over the highway trucks, facilities startup, waste used as fuel and fuels received for storage. This is a first step in the DOE's effort to establish usage guidelines for large industrial users and, we note, it requires BTU usage data...-generated electricity, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, in-plant transportation, ore hauling, raw material storage and finished product warehousing. Categories which are excluded are corporate and divisional offices, basic research, distribution centers...

  13. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, M. E.; Solomon, N. G.; Tabb, E. S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INDUSTRIAL WASTE HEAT RECOVREY M. E. Ward and N. G. Solomon E. S. Tabb Solar Turbines International and Gas Research Institute San Diego, California Chicago, Illinois ABSTRACT i I One hundred fifty reports were reviewed along with interviews... tests, promising low temperature heat exchanger tube alloys and coated surfaces were identified. 1INTROUCTION of advanced technology heat recovery techniques 1_ Recovering waste heat from the flue gases of the pr~ary objective. Specific objectives...

  14. Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovementINDIAN COUNTRYBarriers to Industrial

  15. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Lance Cole

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers, working in conjunction with the Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPAA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and selected universities, in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization. Its goal is to transfer Exploration and Production (E&P) technology to the domestic upstream petroleum industry, in particular to the small independent operators. PTTC connects producers, technology providers and innovators, academia, and university/industry/government research and development (R&D) groups. From inception PTTC has received federal funding through DOE's oil and natural gas program managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). With higher funding available in its early years, PTTC was able to deliver well more than 100 workshops per year, drawing 6,000 or more attendees per year. Facing the reality of little or no federal funding in the 2006-2007 time frame, PTTC and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) worked together for PTTC to become a subsidiary organization of AAPG. This change brings additional organizational and financial resources to bear for PTTC's benefit. PTTC has now been 'powered by AAPG' for two full fiscal years. There is a clear sense that PTTC has stabilized and is strengthening its regional workshop and national technology transfer programs and is becoming more entrepreneurial in exploring technology transfer opportunities beyond its primary DOE contract. Quantitative accomplishments: PTTC has maintained its unique structure of a national organization working through Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) to deliver local, affordable workshops. During the contract period PTTC consolidated from 10 to six regions efficiency and alignment with AAPG sections. The number of workshops delivered by its RLOs during the contract period is shown below. Combined attendance over the period was approximately 32,000, 70% of whom were repeat attendees. Participant feedback established that 40% of them said they had applied a technology they learned of through PTTC. Central/Eastern Gulf Univ. of Alabama, LSU Center for Energy Studies 77 Eastern West Virginia University, Illinois Geological Survey, W. Michigan Univ. 99 Midcontinent University of Kansas, University of Tulsa, Okla. Geological Survey (past) 123 Rocky Mountains Colorado School of Mines 147 Texas/SE New Mexico Bureau of Economic Geology, U. of Texas at Austin 85 West Coast Conservation Committee of California O&G Producers, Univ. So. Cal. (past) 54 At the national level HQ went from an office in Houston to a virtual office in the Tulsa, Okla. area with AAPG providing any physical assets required. There are no employees, rather several full time and several part time contractors. Since inception, PTTC has produced quarterly and mailed the 16-page Network News newsletter. It highlights new advances in technology and has a circulation of 19,000. It also produces the Tech Connections Column in The American Oil & Gas Reporter, with a circulation of 13,000. On an approximate three-week frequency, the electronic Email Tech Alert goes out to 9,000 readers. The national staff also maintains a central website with information of national interest and individual sections for each of the six regions. The national organization also provides legal and accounting services, coordinates the RLO activities, exhibits at at least major national and other meetings, supports the volunteer Board as it provides strategic direction, and is working to restore the Producer Advisory Groups to bolster the regional presence. Qualitative Value: Three qualitative factors confirm PTTC's value to the domestic O&G producing industry. First, AAPG was willing to step in and rescue PTTC, believing it was of significant interest to its domestic membership and of potential value internationally. Second, through a period of turmoil and now with participant fees dramatically increased, industry participants 'keep coming back' to wo

  16. The impact of government policies on industrial evolution : the case of China's automotive industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Jianxi

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Governmental industrial policies have great influence on industrial performances and development trajectories. The infant industry theory has been the dominating theoretical foundation of the industrial policies in developing ...

  17. Industrial Heat Pump Design Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    There are numerous industries that can incorporate heat pumps into their operations to save energy costs and payoff the investment in well under two years. Many of these industries can cut energy costs associated with evaporation by over 75...

  18. Industrial Heat Pump Design Options 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are numerous industries that can incorporate heat pumps into their operations to save energy costs and payoff the investment in well under two years. Many of these industries can cut energy costs associated with evaporation by over 75...

  19. A National Resource for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alloys, and metal matrix composite products carbon fibe's manufacturing industries. These industries call upon ORNL's expertise in materials synthesis, characterization-efficient manufacturing processes and materials targeting products of the future. The Department of Energy's first

  20. Electrotechnologies and Industrial Pollution Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, P. S.

    The role of electrotechnologies in the control of emissions and effluents from industrial processes is discussed. Matrices are presented identifying those electrotechnologies which impact pollution in various industries. Specific examples...

  1. Deaerators in Industrial Steam Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on deaerators in industrial steam systems provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  2. Modeling the semiconductor industry dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Kailiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The semiconductor industry is an exciting and challenging industry. Strong demand at the application end, plus the high capital intensity and rapid technological innovation in manufacturing, makes it difficult to manage ...

  3. Texas Industries of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferland, K.

    The purpose of the Texas Industries of the Future program is to facilitate the development, demonstration and adoption of advanced technologies and adoption of best practices that reduce industrial energy usage, emissions, and associated costs...

  4. Fracking: An Industry Under Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melville, Jo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is able to squeeze out of oil and gas wells, it is a hugehugely to the local oil and gas industries, household incomeMore importantly, the oil and gas industry -- mostly through

  5. Innovative Utility Pricing for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, J. A.

    tariffs can re a market for power during the time when it has sult in benefits to industry, to the electric abundant capacity available. From the other rate utility, and to other ratepayers on the electric payers' perspective, there will be a continued...INNOVATIVE UTILITY PRICING FOR INDUSTRY James A. Ross Drazen-Brubaker &Associates, Inc. St. Louis, Missouri ABSTRACT The electric utility industry represents only one source of power available to industry. Al though the monopolistic...

  6. Technology transfer | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology transfer Technology Development and Commercialization at Argonne Read more about Technology Development and Commercialization at Argonne New Director to lead Technology...

  7. Insights gained from in-depth reviews of several industry generated PRAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, W.T.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Bari, R.A.; Rosenthal, J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last several years BNL staff have performed in-depth reviews of the containment failure modes and fission product release analyses of all the ''industry'' PRAs submitted to the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, NRC. This program started with a reevaluation of the risks reported in the Zion and Indian Point Probabilistic Safety Studies (PWRs with large dry containments) and was followed by reviews of the Limerick (BWR with Mark II containment) and Big Rock Point (early BWR design) PRAs. We are currently completing reviews of the GESSAR-II (BWR with a Mark III containment) and Millstone-3 (PWR with a subatmospheric containment) PRAs. This paper therefore presents the insights gained from extensive reevaluations of the risk associated with a wide range of reactor and containment designs. In particular, the paper shows how changing methodology has influenced our understanding of containment performance under degraded core conditions and how this influences the frequency, timing and magnitude of fission product release to the environment, which in turn impacts potential off-site consequences. 18 refs.

  8. NREL Quickens its Tech Transfer Efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammers, H.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovations and 'aha' movements in renewable energy and energy efficiency, while exciting in the lab, only truly live up to their promise once they find a place in homes or business. Late last year President Obama issued a directive to all federal agencies to increase their efforts to transfer technologies to the private sector in order to achieve greater societal and economic impacts of federal research investments. The president's call to action includes efforts to establish technology transfer goals and to measure progress, to engage in efforts to increase the speed of technology transfer and to enhance local and regional innovation partnerships. But, even before the White House began its initiative to restructure the commercialization process, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory had a major effort underway designed to increase the speed and impact of technology transfer activities and had already made sure its innovations had a streamlined path to the private sector. For the last three years, NREL has been actively setting commercialization goals and tracking progress against those goals. For example, NREL sought to triple the number of innovations over a five-year period that began in 2009. Through best practices associated with inventor engagement, education and collaboration, NREL quadrupled the number of innovations in just three years. Similar progress has been made in patenting, licensing transactions, income generation and rewards to inventors. 'NREL is known nationally for our cutting-edge research and companies know to call us when they are ready to collaborate,' William Farris, vice president for commercialization and technology transfer, said. 'Once a team is ready to dive in, they don't want be mired in paperwork. We've worked to make our process for licensing NREL technology faster; it now takes less than 60 days for us to come to an agreement and start work with a company interested in our research.' While NREL maintains a robust patent portfolio, often companies are looking to do more than just license a technology. These relationships are invaluable in successfully moving technologies from NREL to the marketplace. 'We may generate new and potentially valuable innovations, but our commercialization partners do the heavy work of building a successful business around our technology,' Farris said. Tools such as CRADAs (Cooperative Research and Development Agreements) allow NREL to continue working with companies to refine and develop technologies. And, working with businesses is an area where NREL excels. NREL is responsible for one quarter of the CRADAs in the DOE system. 'When you look at the results of our CRADA program, you can demonstrate that we are actively engaged with companies in collaborating on research and moving technologies to market,' Farris said. NREL is first among DOE labs with 186 active CRADAs. And last year, NREL also was first with the number of new CRADAs signed. 'Part of the success in our working with industry goes back to NREL's mission to grow and support new industries,' Farris added. 'NREL has basic research capabilities, but we are never going to be the ultimate producer of a commercial product. That is the role of the private sector.' Farris also credits the advocacy and support that the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at DOE provides for these technology transfer activities. 'EERE's support is critical to our success,' Farris said. To assist the private sector in moving a technology from the lab to the manufacturing line, NREL has a number of programs in place to give that first, or even final, nudge toward commercialization. For instance, the Commercialization Assistance Program helps startups overcome technical barriers by granting free access to 40 hours of work at the lab. Through the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Center, NREL also helps clean energy businesses develop strong links with the financial community, as well as other key stakeholders in the commercialization process. In March, NREL formally opened the Colorado Center for Renewable Ene

  9. Heat transfer probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Jeffrey I.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kasza, Ken; Yu, Wenhua; Chien, Tai-Hsin; Franklin, Jeff

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatuses, systems, methods, and computer code for, among other things, monitoring the health of samples such as the brain while providing local cooling or heating. A representative device is a heat transfer probe, which includes an inner channel, a tip, a concentric outer channel, a first temperature sensor, and a second temperature sensor. The inner channel is configured to transport working fluid from an inner inlet to an inner outlet. The tip is configured to receive at least a portion of the working fluid from the inner outlet. The concentric outer channel is configured to transport the working fluid from the inner outlet to an outer outlet. The first temperature sensor is coupled to the tip, and the second temperature sensor spaced apart from the first temperature sensor.

  10. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Knop; P. H. Hauschildt; E. Baron

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general method to calculate radiative transfer including scattering in the continuum as well as in lines in spherically symmetric systems that are influenced by the effects of general relativity (GR). We utilize a comoving wavelength ansatz that allows to resolve spectral lines throughout the atmosphere. The used numerical solution is an operator splitting (OS) technique that uses a characteristic formal solution. The bending of photon paths and the wavelength shifts due to the effects of GR are fully taken into account, as is the treatment of image generation in a curved spacetime. We describe the algorithm we use and demonstrate the effects of GR on the radiative transport of a two level atom line in a neutron star like atmosphere for various combinations of continuous and line scattering coefficients. In addition, we present grey continuum models and discuss the effects of different scattering albedos on the emergent spectra and the determination of effective temperatures and radii of neutron star atmospheres.

  11. Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industry Resource Type: Guidemanual Website: china.lbl.govsiteschina.lbl.govfilesLBNL-3991E.Industrial%20Energy Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting...

  12. Local Option- Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Utah Industrial Facilities and Development Act, counties, municipalities, and state universities in Utah may issue Industrial Revenue Bonds (IRBs) or Industrial Development Bonds (IDBs)...

  13. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry Commitment Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment Investor-owned electric utility industry members of the Edison Electric Institute pledge to assist...

  14. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk Jr., Michael; Wisecarver, Keith D.; Sheppard, Charles M.

    2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The coking test facilities include three reactors (or cokers) and ten utilities. Experiments were conducted using the micro-coker, pilot-coker, and stirred-batch coker. Gas products were analyzed using an on-line gas chromatograph. Liquid properties were analyzed in-house using simulated distillation (HP 5880a), high temperature gas chromatography (6890a), detailed hydrocarbon analysis, and ASTM fractionation. Coke analyses as well as feedstock analyses and some additional liquid analyses (including elemental analyses) were done off-site.

  15. A framework for evaluation of technology transfer programs. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this volume is to describe a framework with which DOE can develop a program specific methodology to evaluate it`s technology transfer efforts. This approach could also be applied to an integrated private sector technology transfer organization. Several benefits will be realized from the application of this work. While the immediate effect will be to assist program managers in evaluating and improving program performance, the ultimate benefits will accrue to the producing industry, the states, and the nation in the form of sustained or increased domestic oil production. This benefit depends also, of course, on the effectiveness of the technology being transferred. The managers of the Technology Transfer program, and the larger federal oil and gas R&D programs, will be provided with a means to design and assess the effectiveness of program efforts as they are developed, tested and performed. The framework allows deficiencies in critical aspects of the program to be quickly identified, allowing for timely corrections and improvements. The actual process of developing the evaluation also gives the staff of the Oil R&D Program or Technology Transfer subprogram the opportunity to become oriented to the overall program goals. The structure and focus imposed by the evaluation paradigm will guide program staff in selecting activities which are consistent with achieving the goals of the overall R&D program.

  16. IDAHO HABITAT EVALUATION FOR OFFSITE MITIGATION RECORD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1 #12;This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), U.S. Department of Energy Mitigation Record, Annual Report FY 1984, Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract No. 1984BP13381 Administration Environment, Fish and Wildlife Division P.O. Box 3621 905 N.E. 11th Avenue Portland, OR 97208

  17. Hi-Res WIPP onsite_offsite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment ofHeatHenryDuncan - Atomic

  18. Off-site Intensive Operational Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA2Odds and2

  19. Coal Industry Annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

  20. Industrial Cogeneration Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mozzo, M. A.

    INDUSTRIAL COGENERATION APLLICATION Martin A. Mozzo, Jr., P.E. American Standard, Inc. New York,New York ABSTRACT Cogeneration is the sequential use of a single fuel source to generate electrical and thermal energy. It is not a new technology... been reviewing the potential of cogeneration at some of our key facilities. Our plan is to begin with a Pilot Plant 500 KW steam turbine generator to be install~d and operating in 1986. Key points to be discuss~d in the paper are: 1...

  1. Coal industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  2. Industrial energy use indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanegan, Andrew Aaron

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    and colder are determined by annual average temperature weather data). Data scatter may have several explanations, including climate, plant area accounting, the influence of low cost energy and low cost buildings used in the south of the U.S. iv... the average EUI for an energy type. The combined CoV from all of the industries considered, which accounts for 8,200 plants from all areas of the continental U.S., is 290%. This paper discusses EUIs and their variations based on electricity and natural...

  3. Natural Gas Industrial Price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year Jan Feb2009 20103 5.53

  4. Industrial Green | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News link to facebook link to04948Industrial Green

  5. CASL - Industry Council

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Siteandscience, and8 FY0Link to Resources Industry

  6. CASL - Industry Council Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Siteandscience, and8 FY0Link to Resources IndustryCASL

  7. Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovementINDIAN COUNTRYBarriers to Industrial Energy

  8. Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovementINDIAN COUNTRYBarriers to IndustrialEnergy

  9. The United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment: Key Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, M.

    industry groups (SICs) are derived from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: 1994 (MECS) and various surveys conducted by the Bureau of the Census. Information on the breakdown of that energy by application and motor size, as well..., and total onsite electricity generation, minus sales and transfers off site. See MECS 1994. Other sources; Department of Agriculture, 1992, Census of Mineral Industries, 1992, ADL 1980, EPRI 1988, EPRI 1992. 206 ESL-IE-99-05-30 Proceedings from...

  10. TARGETED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO US INDEPENDENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers with timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2004 (FY04). PTTC has active grassroots programs through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and 2 satellite offices. They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, technical publications and other cooperative outreach efforts. PTTC's Headquarters (HQ) staff receives direction from a National Board of Directors predominantly comprised of American natural gas and oil producers to plan and manage the overall technology transfer program. PTTC HQ implements a comprehensive communications program by interconnecting the talents of the National Board, 10 Regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAG) and the RLOs with industry across the U.S. PTTC effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, namely the Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil with state and industry contributions to share application of upstream technologies. Ultimately, these efforts factor in to provide a safe, secure and reliable energy supply for American consumers. This integrated resource base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results regarding domestic production figures. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies by providing direct contact with research, development and demonstration (RD&D) results. A key to the program is demonstrating proven technologies that can be applied broadly and rapidly. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY04. Activities remained at high levels. Board and staff interaction has defined strategic thrusts to further outreach. Networking, involvement in technical activities and an active exhibit schedule are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the service sector. PTTC's reputation for unbiased bottom line information stimulates cooperative ventures with other organizations. Efforts to build the contact database and a growing E-mail Technology Alert service are expanding PTTC's audience.

  11. Steady-state bumpless transfer under controller uncertainty using the state/output feedback topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, K.; Lee, A.H.; Bentsman, J.; Taft, C.W. [University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear quadratic (LQ) bumpless transfer design introduced recently by Turner and Walker gives a very convenient and straightforward computational procedure for the steady-state bumpless transfer operator synthesis. It is, however, found to be incapable of providing convergence of the output of the offline controller to that of the online controller in several industrial applications, producing bumps in the plant output in the wake of controller transfer. An examination of this phenomenon reveals that the applications in question are characterized by a significant mismatch, further referred to as controller uncertainty, between the dynamics of the implemented controllers and their models used in the transfer operator computation. To address this problem, while retaining the convenience of the Turner and Walker design, a novel state/output feedback bumpless transfer topology is introduced that employs the nominal state of the offline controller and, through the use of an additional controller/model mismatch compensator, also the offline controller output. A corresponding steady-state bumpless transfer design procedure along with the supporting theory is developed for a large class of systems. Due to these features, it is demonstrated to solve a long-standing problem of high-quality steady-state bumpless transfer from the industry standard low-order nonlinear multiloop PID-based controllers to the modern multiinput-multioutput (MIMO) robust controllers in the megawatt/throttle pressure control of a typical coal-fired boiler/turbine unit.

  12. Whitacre College of Engineering Industrial Engineering Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    Whitacre College of Engineering Industrial Engineering Department Department Chair and Professor of Industrial Engineering. The Industrial Engineering Department at Texas Tech University has a distinguished industrial engineering education and provide appropriate service to the department, university

  13. Faculty of Engineering & Design Industrial Placements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Faculty of Engineering & Design Industrial Placements A guide for industry #12;Industrial placements The Faculty of Engineering & Design has built close links with engineering companies through research, projects, placements and graduate employees. We know that working with industry ensures our

  14. Competitive developments in the electric supply industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruder, G.F.; Lively, M.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Competition in the electric supply industry is outlined. The following topics are discussed: six impending major developments in the electric industry; recent and projected developments in the industry; where is the industry headed?; and what the future holds.

  15. Research Projects in Industrial Technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

  16. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid?base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron?proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ ?. Multiple-Site Electron?Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron?proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron?proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e{sup -}/2H{sup +} MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving force for long-range proton transfer in Photosysem II and through other biological membranes. In EPT, simultaneous transfer of electrons and protons occurs on time scales short compared to the periods of coupled vibrations and solvent modes. A theory for EPT has been developed which rationalizes rate constants and activation barriers, includes temperature- and driving force (?G)-dependences implicitly, and explains kinetic isotope effects. The distance-dependence of EPT is dominated by the short-range nature of proton transfer, with electron transfer being far less demanding.Changes in external pH do not affect an EPT elementary step. Solvent molecules or buffer components can act as proton donor acceptors, but individual H2O molecules are neither good bases (pK{sub a}(H{sub 3}O{sup +}) = ?1.74) nor good acids (pK{sub a}(H{sub 2}O) = 15.7). There are many examples of mechanisms in chemistry, in biology, on surfaces, and in the gas phase which utilize EPT. PCET and EPT play critical roles in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II and other biological reactions by decreasing driving force and avoiding high-energy intermediates.

  17. Biomedical | Chemical & Biomolecular | Civil & Environmental | Electrical & Computer | Industrial | Mechanical | Petroleum Careers in Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glowinski, Roland

    | Mechanical | Petroleum Careers in Industrial Engineering Manufacturing, service and retail industries hireBiomedical | Chemical & Biomolecular | Civil & Environmental | Electrical & Computer | Industrial a significant number of industrial engineers. Specific industries include automobile manufacturers, electronics

  18. The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology Presents module and system requirements for...

  19. ITP Industrial Materials: Development and Commercialization of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Materials: Development and Commercialization of Alternative Carbon Fiber Precursors and Conversion Technologies ITP Industrial Materials: Development and...

  20. SPIDERS Joint Capability Technology Demonstration Industry Day...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SPIDERS Joint Capability Technology Demonstration Industry Day Presentations SPIDERS Joint Capability Technology Demonstration Industry Day Presentations Presentations from the...

  1. Office of Industry Research and Technology Programs Greetings to Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Assistant Vice President, Corporate & Foundation Relations Inside this issue... Greetings to Industry. The founding members are American Axle and Manufacturing, Eaton Corpora- tion and John Deere. This applied

  2. Energy, Cost-Savings and Pollution-Reduction Impacts of Industrial Programs Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Placet, M.; Weakley, S. A.; Roop, J. M.

    -efficient technologies. OIT's cost-shared research, development, and demonstration (RD&D), technology transfer, and information-sharing efforts have helped industry not only use energy and materials more efficiently but also improve environmental performance, enhance...

  3. adoptively transferred indium-111: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Afshin J. 140 Mass transfer andMass transfer and Mass transfer andMass transfer and Fossil Fuels Websites Summary: eknik Mass transfer andMass transfer and arationste Mass...

  4. Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supply Chain Development programs are focused on targeted industries that have significant growth opportunities for Ohio's existing manufacturing sector from emerging energy resources and...

  5. FAQS Reference Guide – Industrial Hygiene

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the November 2007 edition of DOE-STD-1138-2007, Industrial Hygiene Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  6. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s Nuclear Industry After Fukushima Jingdong YUAN SummaryT he March 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident has had aand speedy responses to Fukushima-like and other unexpected

  7. Technical Challenges of Computing Available Transfer Capability (ATC) in Electric Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Challenges of Computing Available Transfer Capability (ATC) in Electric Power Systems-Champaign Urbana, IL sauer@ece.uiuc.edu Abstract A key concept in the restructuring of the electric power industry limitation (either MW, MVA, or SIL). As such, ATC for a given transmission line at a given time could

  8. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatzinger, Viola; Chapman, Kathy; Lovendahl, Kristi

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) is a unique not-for-profit network that focuses on transferring Exploration and Production (E&P) technology to the domestic oil and natural gas producing industry. PTTC connects producers, technology providers and innovators, academia, research and development (R&D) consortiums and governments. Local affordable workshops delivered by Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs), which are typically a university or geological survey, are a primary tool. PTTC also maintains a website network, issues a national newsletter, provides a column in a major trade publication, and exhibits at major industry events. It also encourages industry to ask technology-related questions, striving to find relevant answers that will save questioners significant time. Working since late 1993, the PTTC network has a proven track record of providing industry with technology insights they can apply. Volunteers at the regional and national level provide key guidance regarding where to focus technical effort and help connect PTTC with industry. At historical funding levels, PTTC had been able to hold well more than 100 workshops per year, drawing 6,000+ attendees. As funding decreased in the early 2000s, the level of activity decreased and PTTC sought a merger with the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG), becoming an AAPG-managed organization at the start of FY08. This relationship with AAPG was terminated by mutual consent in May 2011 and PTTC once again operates independently. Chris Hall, California continued to serve as Chairman of the Board of Directors until December 2013. At the time PTTC reorganized into a RLO led organization with Mary Carr and Jeremy Viscomi as co-Executive Directors. Jerry Anderson became the Chairman of the PTTC Board of Directors and Chris Hall continues to serve on the Board. Workshop activity stabilized at 55-65 workshops per year averaging 3,100 attendees. FY14 represented the fifth year in a multi-year contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) for providing technology transfer services. This report summarizes activity and results during for five years, FY10 through FY14. In FY12 changes occurred in responsibilities of consultants serving HQ, because funding was reduced below the threshold level of $500,000 audits were no longer required and consultant time was reduced on the primary contract. Contracts for Permian Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS) training, and providing tech transfer services to the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA) provided work that enabled HQ to retain services of regular consultants. Both CCUS and RPSEA were five year contracts with PTTC, and providing services for these DOE funded contracts provided synergy for PTTC and the oil and gas industry. With further decreases in DOE funding the regions conducted workshops with no PTTC funding starting in June FY11. Since 2011 the number of workshops has declined from 79 in FY10 and FY11 to 49 in FY12, and risen to 54 in FY13 and 63 in FY14. The attendee's numbers dipped slightly below 3,000 per year in FY 10, FY12, and FY13, but rose to over 3,800 in FY 11 and 3105 in FY14. Quantitative accomplishments: PTTC has maintained its unique structure of a national organization working through Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) to deliver local, affordable workshops. During the contract period PTTC consolidated from 10 to five regions to increase efficiency, and because no active RLO's would be maintained in the Central and Eastern Gulf Coast regions. RLO's for the regions are located at: Eastern - West Virginia University, (Illinois Geol. Survey., W. Michigan Univ. FY10-12); Midwest created in FY13 - Illinois Geological Survey, W. Michigan University; Midcontinent - University of Kansas, expanded to Houston, TX (2013-14); Rocky Mountain - Colorado School of Mines; Texas/SE New Mexico (FY10-FY11) - Bureau of Economic Geology, Univ. of Texas at Austin; West Coast - Conservation Committee of California O&G Producers.

  9. Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project The U.S. Department of Energy has provided six computers to...

  10. Knowledge Capture and Transfer Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Learning and Workforce Development is working with Heads of Departmental Elements, DOE senior leaders and subject-matter-experts to capture and transfer the knowledge and experiences...

  11. Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Spring 2014 Heat Transfer - 2 A thin electronic chip is in the shape of a square wafer, b = 1 cm surface of the chip with a heat transfer coefficient of h = 100 W/m2 -K. Assume the chip has a uniform per side with a mass of m = 0.3 grams and specific heat of C = 103 J/kg-K. The chip is mounted

  12. Thermodynamics -2 An industrial plant produces a waste stream of hot compressed air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Thermodynamics - 2 An industrial plant produces a waste stream of hot compressed air: Pressure P, produce the maximum work predicted in (b). Show all turbines, heat exchangers, heat engines, etc. Also show all mass, work, and heat transfers within the system and between the system and the environment

  13. Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part A, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 1 and 2, A summary of historical activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation with emphasis on information concerning off-site emissions of hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, G.M.; Buddenbaum, J.E.; Lamb, J.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phase I feasibility study has focused on determining the availability of information for estimating exposures of the public to chemicals and radionuclides released as a result of historical operation of the facilities at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The estimation of such past exposures is frequently called dose reconstruction. The initial project tasks, Tasks 1 and 2 were designed to identify and collect information that documents the history of activities at the ORR that resulted in the release of contamination and to characterize the availability of data that could be used to estimate the magnitude of the contaminant releases or public exposures. A history of operations that are likely to have generated off-site releases has been documented as a result of Task 1 activities. The activities required to perform this task involved the extensive review of historical operation records and interviews with present and past employees as well as other knowledgeable individuals. The investigation process is documented in this report. The Task 1 investigations have led to the documentation of an overview of the activities that have taken place at each of the major complexes, including routine operations, waste management practices, special projects, and accidents and incidents. Historical activities that appear to warrant the highest priority in any further investigations were identified based on their likely association with off-site emissions of hazardous materials as indicated by the documentation reviewed or information obtained in interviews.

  14. Creating Value Wood Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisiana Forest Products Development Center #12;2 Louisiana is blessed with quality timberland for the Wood Products Industry The forest industry contributes more than 50 percent of the total value of all for quality information, research and education in forest products in Louisiana, recognized regionally

  15. Forschungsschwerpunkt S92 Industrial Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jüttler, Bert

    Forschungsschwerpunkt S92 Industrial Geometry http://www.ig.jku.at Computational Geometry Robot Kinematics Computer Aided Geometric Design Image Processing INDUSTRIAL GEOMETRY Classical Geometry Computer unwanted branches of the implicitly defined curves. Moreover, it is required for many applications, e

  16. Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. C.; Webb, R. E.; Phillips, J. M.; Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for sound energy management is no longer worthy of debate. Action is necessary and much is being done by U.S. industry. Unfortunately, however, the majority of the work is being done by the few large energy intensive industries throughout...

  17. Industrial Wastes as a Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, G.; Hendrix, W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    available for coal since it was at one time a major industrial fuel and is still used extensively for electric power generation. However, combustion data for other fuels such as wood and solid materials typically generated as industrial wastes can only...

  18. Petroleum industry assists hurricane relief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that the petroleum industry is aiding victims of last month's Hurricane Andrew with cash, clothing, food, water, and other supplies. Cash contributions announced as of last week totaled more than $2.7 million for distribution in South Florida and South Louisiana. Petroleum industry employees were collecting relief items such as bottled water and diapers for distribution in those areas.

  19. Career Choices: Industry vs. Academia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Career Choices: Industry vs. Academia Yan Liu Assistant Professor Computer Science Department, IBM TJ Watson Research Center · Now, USC #12;1) What career path did you consider most during your Ph industry, and where can one make the most impact? · Best virtues in all jobs ­ Hardworking ­ Good attitude

  20. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration, new technologies enabling energy efficiencies and environment-friendly improvements are slow to develop, and have trouble obtaining a broad application. The CMC team was able to effectively and efficiently transfer the results of DOE's metalcasting R&D projects to industry by utilizing and delivering the numerous communication vehicles identified in the proposal. The three metalcasting technical associations achieved significant technology transition results under this program. In addition to reaching over 23,000 people per year through Modern Casting and 28,000 through Engineered Casting Solutions, AFS had 84 national publications and reached over 1,200 people annually through Cast Metals Institute (CMI) education courses. NADCA's education department reached over 1,000 people each year through their courses, in addition to reaching over 6,000 people annually through Die Casting Engineer, and publishing 58 papers. The SFSA also published 99 research papers and reached over 1,000 people annually through their member newsletters. In addition to these communication vehicles, the CMC team conducted numerous technical committee meetings, project reviews, and onsite visits. All of these efforts to distribute the latest metalcasting technologies contributed to the successful deployment of DOE's R&D projects into industry. The DOE/CMC partnership demonstrated significant success in the identification and review of relevant and easy-to-implement metalcasting energy-saving processes and technologies so that the results are quickly implemented and become general practice. The results achieved in this program demonstrate that sustained technology transfer efforts are a critical step in the deployment of R&D projects to industry.

  1. 31 from R&D Innovator Volume 2, Number 4 April 1993 Three Silly Notions About Technology Transfer: And One That's Not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    31 from R&D Innovator Volume 2, Number 4 April 1993 Three Silly Notions About Technology Transfer://chemistry.uchicago.edu/fac/berry.shtml Innovation: What are the roles of basic and applied research? What are the roles of industries and universities? Industries need innovation just to stay in business, let alone compete successfully in the global

  2. Reinventing the Industrial Heartland: Supply Chain Sustainability and the New Automotive Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Reinventing the Industrial Heartland: Supply Chain Sustainability and the New Automotive Industry Swindall, VP, Business & Industry Development, WI Economic Development Corporation Manuel Sattig, BMW Group

  3. AVLIS industrial access program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document deals with the procurements planned for the construction of an Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) production plant. Several large-scale AVLIS facilities have already been built and tested; a full-scale engineering demonstration facility is currently under construction. The experience gained from these projects provides the procurement basis for the production plant construction and operation. In this document, the status of the AVLIS process procurement is presented from two viewpoints. The AVLIS Production Plant Work Breakdown Structure is referenced at the level of the items to be procured. The availability of suppliers for the items at this level is discussed. In addition, the work that will result from the AVLIS enrichment plant project is broken down by general procurement categories (construction, mechanical equipment, etc.) and the current AVLIS suppliers are listed according to these categories. A large number of companies in all categories are currently providing AVLIS equipment for the Full-Scale Demonstration Facility in Livermore, California. These companies form an existing and expanding supplier network for the AVLIS program. Finally, this document examines the relationship between the AVLIS construction project/operational facility and established commercial suppliers. The goal is to utilize existing industrial capability to meet the needs of the project in a competitive procurement situation. As a result, costs and procurement risks are both reduced because the products provided come from within the AVLIS suppliers' experience base. At the same time, suppliers can benefit by the potential to participate in AVLIS technology spin-off markets. 35 figures.

  4. Nanoscale heat transfer - from computation to experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Tengfei

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer can differ distinctly at the nanoscale from that at the macroscale. Recent advancement in

  5. Energy conservation guide for industrial processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Th Energy Conservation Guide for industrial processes has simple instructions to survey energy use areas at Navy industrial activities like shipyards, Naval air rework facilities and government owned, contractor operated (GOCO) plants. This guide includes information and procedures on: organizing and conducting an industrial energy survey; evaluating purchased energy data; descriptions of industrial systems; and evaluation of industrial processes for conservation.

  6. AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY ANALYSIS Submitted by Team A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY ANALYSIS Submitted by Team A Donald Bradley Morgan Bruns Adam Fleming Jay Ling on the automotive industry, specifically, large-scale manufacturers of automobiles. The automotive industry of the automotive industry. This is followed by an analysis of the industry's structural characteristics using

  7. Canister Transfer System Description Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canister Transfer System receives transportation casks containing large and small disposable canisters, unloads the canisters from the casks, stores the canisters as required, loads them into disposal containers (DCs), and prepares the empty casks for re-shipment. Cask unloading begins with cask inspection, sampling, and lid bolt removal operations. The cask lids are removed and the canisters are unloaded. Small canisters are loaded directly into a DC, or are stored until enough canisters are available to fill a DC. Large canisters are loaded directly into a DC. Transportation casks and related components are decontaminated as required, and empty casks are prepared for re-shipment. One independent, remotely operated canister transfer line is provided in the Waste Handling Building System. The canister transfer line consists of a Cask Transport System, Cask Preparation System, Canister Handling System, Disposal Container Transport System, an off-normal canister handling cell with a transfer tunnel connecting the two cells, and Control and Tracking System. The Canister Transfer System operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area with the Cask Transport System. The Cask Preparation System prepares the cask for unloading and consists of cask preparation manipulator, cask inspection and sampling equipment, and decontamination equipment. The Canister Handling System unloads the canister(s) and places them into a DC. Handling equipment consists of a bridge crane/hoist, DC loading manipulator, lifting fixtures, and small canister staging racks. Once the cask has been unloaded, the Cask Preparation System decontaminates the cask exterior and returns it to the Carrier/Cask Handling System via the Cask Transport System. After the DC is fully loaded, the Disposal Container Transport System moves the DC to the Disposal Container Handling System for welding. To handle off-normal canisters, a separate off-normal canister handling cell is located adjacent to the canister transfer cell and is interconnected to the transfer cell by means of the off-normal canister transfer tunnel. All canister transfer operations are controlled by the Control and Tracking System. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal Waste Handling Building (WHB) support systems.

  8. CANISTER TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Gorpani

    2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canister Transfer System receives transportation casks containing large and small disposable canisters, unloads the canisters from the casks, stores the canisters as required, loads them into disposal containers (DCs), and prepares the empty casks for re-shipment. Cask unloading begins with cask inspection, sampling, and lid bolt removal operations. The cask lids are removed and the canisters are unloaded. Small canisters are loaded directly into a DC, or are stored until enough canisters are available to fill a DC. Large canisters are loaded directly into a DC. Transportation casks and related components are decontaminated as required, and empty casks are prepared for re-shipment. One independent, remotely operated canister transfer line is provided in the Waste Handling Building System. The canister transfer line consists of a Cask Transport System, Cask Preparation System, Canister Handling System, Disposal Container Transport System, an off-normal canister handling cell with a transfer tunnel connecting the two cells, and Control and Tracking System. The Canister Transfer System operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area with the Cask Transport System. The Cask Preparation System prepares the cask for unloading and consists of cask preparation manipulator, cask inspection and sampling equipment, and decontamination equipment. The Canister Handling System unloads the canister(s) and places them into a DC. Handling equipment consists of a bridge crane hoist, DC loading manipulator, lifting fixtures, and small canister staging racks. Once the cask has been unloaded, the Cask Preparation System decontaminates the cask exterior and returns it to the Carrier/Cask Handling System via the Cask Transport System. After the DC is fully loaded, the Disposal Container Transport System moves the DC to the Disposal Container Handling System for welding. To handle off-normal canisters, a separate off-normal canister handling cell is located adjacent to the canister transfer cell and is interconnected to the transfer cell by means of the off-normal canister transfer tunnel. All canister transfer operations are controlled by the Control and Tracking System. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal Waste Handling Building (WHB) support systems.

  9. Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Hamilton

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p (~ 0 ~ p) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

  10. MECH 386 INDUSTRIAL FLUID MECHANICS INDUSTRIAL FLUID MECHANICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technologies - Wind turbine - Wave energy (Wells turbine) - Tidal power 7. Flow in porous media - Darcy's law 8 - Positive displacement pumps - Systems of pumps - Industrial practice (Guest speaker) 6. Renewable energy

  11. The industrial ecology of the iron casting industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alissa J. (Alissa Jean)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal casting is an energy and materials intensive manufacturing process, which is an important U.S. industry. This study analyzes iron casting, in particular, for possible improvements that will result in greater efficiencies ...

  12. Energy efficiency opportunities in China. Industrial equipment and small cogeneration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quick glance at comparative statistics on energy consumption per unit of industrial output reveals that China is one of the least energy efficient countries in the world. Energy waste not only impedes economic growth, but also creates pollution that threatens human health, regional ecosystems, and the global climate. China`s decision to pursue economic reform and encourage technology transfer from developed countries has created a window of opportunity for significant advances in energy efficiency. Policy changes, technical training, public education, and financing can help China realize its energy conservation potential.

  13. Journal of Heat Transfer1999 JHT Heat Transfer Gallery Department of Mechanical 8. Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihm, IconKenneth David

    Journal of Heat Transfer1999 JHT Heat Transfer Gallery S. M. You Department of Mechanical 8 Transfer Visualization Committee organized two photo gallery sessions in 1998. The International Heat Transfer Photo Gallery was held at the l la' International Heat Transfer Conference (IHTC) in Kyongju

  14. Transfer of hot dry rock technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

  15. Office of Industrial Technologies: Summary of program results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working in partnership with industry, the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) is helping reduce industrial energy use, emissions, and waste while boosting productivity. Operating within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE), OIT conducts research, development, demonstration, and technology transfer efforts that are producing substantial, measurable benefits to industry. This document summarizes some of the impacts of OIT`s programs through 1997. OIT tracks energy savings as well as other benefits associated with the successfully commercialized technologies resulting from OIT-supported research partnerships. Specifically, a chart shows current and cumulative energy savings as well as cumulative reductions of various air pollutants including particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}), and the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The bulk of the document consists of four appendices. Appendix 1 describes the technologies currently available commercially, along with their applications and benefits; Appendix 2 describes the OIT-supported emerging technologies that are likely to be commercialized within the next year or two; Appendix 3 describes OIT-sponsored technologies used in commercial applications in the past that are no longer tracked; and Appendix 4 describes the methodology used to assess and track OIT-supported technologies.

  16. Canada's Voluntary Industrial Energy Conservation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, C. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial Energy Conservation in Canada is organized and promoted through a voluntary program that is administered by industry. Industry is divided into fifteen sectors, each of which is represented by a Voluntary Task Force. Information exchange...

  17. Heat Recovery in the Forge Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shingledecker, R. B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy figures reveal that in 1979 the forging and stamping operations were the primary consumers of energy (27%) within the 'Fabricated Metals Products Industry' (SIC 34). Industrial furnaces utilized by the forging industry often...

  18. Industrial Geospatial Analysis Tool for Energy Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkadi, N.; Starke, M.; Ma, O.; Nimbalkar, S.; Cox, D.; Dowling, K.; Johnson, B.; Khan, S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of manufacturing industries based on each type of industries using information from DOE's Industrial Assessment Center database (IAC-DB) and DOE's Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey database (EIA-MECS DB), in addition...

  19. GRADUATE STUDENT INFORMATION MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    GRADUATE STUDENT INFORMATION MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 2011/2012 September).................1 REQUIREMENTS FOR A MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING AND OPERATIONS RESEARCH (30).....................................................................................................2 DUAL MASTER IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING (72 CREDITS

  20. GRADUATE STUDENT INFORMATION MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    GRADUATE STUDENT INFORMATION MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 2010/2011 September).................1 . REQUIREMENTS FOR A MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING AND OPERATIONS RESEARCH)...................................................................................................1 DUAL MASTER IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING (72 CREDITS

  1. GRADUATE STUDENT INFORMATION MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    GRADUATE STUDENT INFORMATION MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 2009/2010 September).................1 . REQUIREMENTS FOR A MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING (30 CREDITS)...............1 DUAL MASTER IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING (72 CREDITS

  2. GRADUATE STUDENT INFORMATION MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    GRADUATE STUDENT INFORMATION MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 2013/2014 September..............................3 C. COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR A MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING AND OPERATIONS............................4 E. DUAL MASTER IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING AND OPERATIONS RESEARCH

  3. Industrial Heat Pumps: Where and When 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranade, S. M.; Chao, Y. T.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of the types of industrial heat pumps is presented. General guidelines are provided for appropriate placement of industrial heat pumps. Industrial applications are used as examples to illustrate key points.

  4. Radiative transfer in molecular lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Asensio Ramos; J. Trujillo Bueno; J. Cernicharo

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly convergent iterative methods developed by Trujillo Bueno and Fabiani Bendicho (1995) for radiative transfer (RT) applications are generalized to spherical symmetry with velocity fields. These RT methods are based on Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel (GS), and SOR iteration and they form the basis of a new NLTE multilevel transfer code for atomic and molecular lines. The benchmark tests carried out so far are presented and discussed. The main aim is to develop a number of powerful RT tools for the theoretical interpretation of molecular spectra.

  5. Energy Transfer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas Energyof 2005 at Iowa WindUnion7Transfer Energy Transfer Below

  6. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief 2013-9 January 2013 China’s Nuclear Industry Aftera significant impact on the future of China’s nuclear power.the importance of safety as China builds more nuclear power

  7. Energy Savings in Industrial Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and electricity for equipment such as pumps, air compressors, and fans. Lesser, yet significant, amounts of energy are used for industrial buildings – heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), lighting and facility use (such as office equipment). Due...

  8. CALIFORNIA ENERGY PETROLEUM INDUSTRY INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PETROLEUM AND NON-PETROLEUM ................................................... 40 PRODUCT DEFINITIONS Major Petroleum Product Storer and Terminal Weekly Report Major petroleum product storers, terminalCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION PETROLEUM INDUSTRY INFORMATION REPORTING ACT (PIIRA) PROGRAM REPORTING

  9. Industrial Plans for AEO2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    you for your attention 10 Industrial Team Washington DC, July 30, 2013 Macro Team: Kay Smith (202) 586-1132 | kay.smith@eia.gov Vipin Arora (202) 586-1048 | vipin.arora@eia.gov...

  10. Three Essays on Industrial Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yang Seung

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissertation discusses issues in the field of industrial organization. When the government provides better infrastructure to competing firms for innovation, private firms' R&D expenditures are affected. When the ...

  11. Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section describes standards that must be met by facilities generating and processing hazardous and industrial waste, as well as required permits for the construction and operation of such a...

  12. Uncertainty, investment, and industry evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caballero, Ricardo J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of aggregate and idiosyncratic uncertainty on the entry of firms, total investment, and prices in a competitive industry with irreversible investment. We first use standard dynamic programming methods ...

  13. Outlook for Industrial Energy Benchmarking 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Z.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OUTLOOK FOR INDUSTRIAL ENERGY BENCHMARKING Zoe Hartley Environmental Protection Specialist U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC ABSTRACT The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is exploring options to sponsor an ~d~ ~~gy...

  14. Changing Trends in Telecommunications Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathyanarayanan, Ramachandran

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobile telecommunication industry is one of the fastest growing and continually changing markets in the world today. The greatest achievement of wireless technology is that it has made communications possible in the ...

  15. Innovative Energy Efficient Industrial Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litomisky, A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    factories, we found striking dichotomy between the classical “static” design of ventilation systems and constantly changing workflow and business demands. Using data from real factories, we are able to prove that classical industrial ventilation design...

  16. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2013-9 January 2013 China’s Nuclear Industry After FukushimaMarch 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident has had a significanton the future of China’s nuclear power. First, it highlights

  17. Industrial Mathematics and Inverse Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulmek, Markus

    #12;The Industrial Mathematics Structure in Linz 5 #12;The Blast Furnace Process 6 #12;Aims": Looking for causes of an observed or desired effect! A.Tikhonov ( 1936), geophysical problems. F

  18. Outlook for Industrial Energy Benchmarking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Z.

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is exploring options to sponsor an industrial energy efficiency benchmarking study to identify facility specific, cost-effective best practices and technologies. Such a study could help develop a common...

  19. Integrated Industrial Wood Chip Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, E. T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sources of supply of wood residues for energy generation are described and the rationale for exploring the potential available from forest harvesting is developed. Details of three industrial-scale projects are presented and the specific...

  20. Electric Utility Industrial Conservation Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norland, D. L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alliance to Save Energy conducted a study, funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation, of industrial and commercial electricity conservation opportunities in the service territory of Arkansas Power and Light Company (AP&L). The study determined...

  1. EPRI's Industrial Energy Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mergens, E.; Niday, L.

    EPRI's INDUSTRIAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ED MERGENS MANAGER EPRI's CHEMICALS & PETROLEUM OFFICE HOUSTON, TEXAS ABSTRACT The loss of American industry jobs to foreign competition is made worse by national concerns over fuels combustion... are funded at a level in excess of SlO million annually. By providing technical guidance and sponsoring research and development projects, these Centers and Offices are a key element in EPRI's role of improving the value of electricity to consumers...

  2. Colorado State University Industrial Assessment Center Saves...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Assessment Center, inspects equipment at a manufacturing facility during an energy audit. | Photo courtesy of University of Missouri IAC. Industrial Assessment Centers...

  3. Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1998. “Emerging Energy-Saving Technologies and Practices for2000. “Emerging Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies,”Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry Ernst

  4. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1998. “Emerging Energy-Saving Technologies and Practices for200 emerging energy-efficient technologies in industry, of2000. “Emerging Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies,”

  5. Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1998. “Emerging Energy-Saving Technologies and Practices for2000. “Emerging Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies,”Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry Ernst

  6. Green Industrial Policy: Trade and Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry; Stevenson, Megan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers Year 2012 Paper 1126 Green Industrial Policy: Trade© 2012 by author(s). Green Industrial Policy: Trade andreality and the potential for green indus- trial policy. We

  7. Industrial and Organizational Psychology Doctoral Program Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Industrial and Organizational Psychology Doctoral Program Handbook University of Central Florida chosen the University of Central Florida for your graduate training in Industrial and Organizational

  8. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program Project Profile: Verizon Central Office Building ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program Project...

  9. Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds are issued by cities and counties for the purchase, construction, improvement or remodeling of a facility for agricultural, commercial, hospital, industrial,...

  10. EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    8: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS...

  11. ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions for a Dynamic World ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions for a Dynamic World alumvision.pdf More Documents...

  12. EIS-0429: Indiana Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9: Indiana Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Rockport, IN and CO2 Pipeline EIS-0429: Indiana Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Rockport,...

  13. Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Industry Day...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Industry Day Agenda Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Industry Day Agenda Agenda outlines the activities of the 2014...

  14. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mitigate 21 MtCO 2 . Cogeneration (also called Combined Heatefficiencies. Industrial cogeneration is an important partpotential for industrial cogeneration is estimated at almost

  15. EPA and the Federal Technology Transfer Act: Opportunity knocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gatchett, A.M.; Fradkin, L.; Moore, M.; Gorman, T.; Ehrlich, A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1986, the Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA) was established to promote a closer, collaborative relationship between federal government agencies and the private sector. With the increasing need for new cost-effective technologies to prevent and control pollution, both the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and private industry are encouraged to facilitate the transfer of knowledge and technology under this Act. The FTTA removed several of the legal and institutional barriers to cooperative research that existed before the Act`s passage. Through the FTTA, the government strives to promote the movement of its products, processes, skills, and knowledge into the private sector for further development and commercialization by encouraging the exchange of technical personnel and the sharing of facilities and other resources. Collaborative efforts between industry, federal agencies, and academia are made possible through cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs). Forty-two CRADAs and five licensing agreements have been initiated with EPA under this program. This paper provides an overview of this new and innovative program within the EPA. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. Mass Transfer from Giant Donors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlovskii, K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of mass transfer in binaries with convective giant donors remains an open question in modern astrophysics. There is a significant discrepancy between what the existing methods predict for a response to mass loss of the giant itself, as well as for the mass transfer rate during the Roche lobe overflow. Here we show that the recombination energy in the superadiabatic layer plays an important and hitherto unaccounted-for role in he donor's response to mass loss, in particular on its luminosity and effective temperature. Our improved optically thick nozzle method to calculate the mass transfer rate via $L_1$ allows us to evolve binary systems for a substantial Roche lobe overflow. We propose a new, strengthened criterion for the mass transfer instability, basing it on whether the donor experiences overflow through its outer Lagrangian point. We find that with the new criterion, if the donor has a well-developed outer convective envelope, the critical initial mass ratio for which a binary would evolv...

  17. Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Spring 2014 1 Heat Transfer - 1 Consider a cylindrical nuclear fuel rod of length L and diameter df the fuel rod, and the volumetric generation rate is known to vary sinusoidally with distance along the rod to exist between the surface of the rod and the water. Axial conduction can be neglected in rod and fluid

  18. Entrepreneurial separation to transfer technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairbanks, Richard R.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entrepreneurial separation to transfer technology (ESTT) program is that entrepreneurs terminate their employment with Sandia. The term of the separation is two years with the option to request a third year. Entrepreneurs are guaranteed reinstatement by Sandia if they return before ESTT expiration. Participants may start up or helpe expand technology businesses.

  19. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guardiani, Richard F. (Ohio Township, Allegheny County, PA); Pollick, Richard D. (Sarver, PA); Nyilas, Charles P. (Monroeville, PA); Denmeade, Timothy J. (Lower Burrell, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transfer pump used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank.

  20. BUS DISPATCHING AT TIMED TRANSFER TRANSIT STATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dessouky, Maged

    Dessouky Randolph Hall Ali Nowroozi Karen Mourikas Dept. of Industrial and Systems Engineering University

  1. amenagement durables industrie: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CLUSTERS? INDUSTRY CLUSTERS IN MINNESOTA INDUSTRY CLUSTER APPROACHES IN MINNESOTA INDUSTRY CLUSTER Levinson, David M. 379 Energy Conservation in China North Industries...

  2. Theoretical Design of Thermosyphon for Process Heat Transfer from NGNP to Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely produce electricity and process heat, with both being considered for hydrogen production. To capture nuclear process heat, and transport it to a distant industrial facility requires a high temperature system of heat exchangers, pumps and/or compressors. The heat transfer system is particularly challenging not only due to the elevated temperatures (up to ~ 1300K) and industrial scale power transport (=50 MW), but also due to a potentially large separation distance between the nuclear and industrial plants (100+m) dictated by safety and licensing mandates. The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase thermosyphon heat transfer performance with alkali metals. A thermosyphon is a device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. In contrast to single-phased forced convective heat transfer via ‘pumping a fluid’, a thermosyphon (also called a wickless heat pipe) transfers heat through the vaporization / condensing process. The condensate is further returned to the hot source by gravity, i.e. without any requirement of pumps or compressors. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. Two-phase heat transfer by a thermosyphon has the advantage of high enthalpy transport that includes the sensible heat of the liquid, the latent heat of vaporization, and vapor superheat. In contrast, single-phase forced convection transports only the sensible heat of the fluid. Additionally, vapor-phase velocities within a thermosyphon are much greater than single-phase liquid velocities within a forced convective loop. Thermosyphon performance can be limited by the sonic limit (choking) or vapor flow and/or by condensate entrainment. Proper thermosyphon requires analysis of both.

  3. Group transfer and electron transfer reactions of organometallic complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, J.D.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1994, despite the disruptions, the authors have made progress in several aspects of their research on electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes. This summary covers three areas that are relatively complete: (1) reactions between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl halides, (2) reactions of hydrido- and alkyl-containing anions (RFe(CO){sup {minus}}{sub 4} and RW (CO){sub 5}{sup {minus}}) with metal carbonyl cations and (3) reactions of a seventeen-electron complex (Cp{asterisk}Cr(CO){sub 3}{lg_bullet}) with metal carbonyl derivatives. Two areas of examination that have just begun (possible carbene transfer and the possible role of metal carbonyl anions in carbon-hydrogen bond activation) will also be described.

  4. EA-1947: Transfer of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates potential environmental impacts of a proposal to transfer the NNSA's KCP property either in whole or in part. This includes considering the No Action Alternative, where NNSA relocates operations from the KCP and maintains ownership of its property; and the Proposed Action Alternative, where NNSA transfers the KCP property for mixed use (industrial, warehouse, commercial, office). Under the proposed action, the EA addresses the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts of using the KCP property for uses consistent with current zoning. NNSA also analyzes the potential environmental impacts of partial and/or complete demolition of some KCP structures.

  5. The effect of the number of wavebands used in spectral radiation heat transfer calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S. L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectral radiation heat transfer model that conserves emitted and absorbed energy has been developed and used to model the combustion space of an industrial glass furnace. This comprehensive radiation heat transfer model coupled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code was used to investigate the effect of spectral dependencies on the computed results. The results of this work clearly indicate the need for a spectral approach as opposed to a gray body approach since the gray body approach (one waveband) severely underestimates the energy emitted via radiation.

  6. Economic analysis of the European cement industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Economic analysis of the European cement industry Marcel Boyer1 and JeanPierre Ponssard2 December 2013. The methodology is applied to the European cement industry over the period 20042012 (Part I) and over the next and industry experts. Key words: return on assets, capital intensive industry, business cycle, European cement

  7. What does an Industrial Engineer really do???

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    What does an Industrial Engineer really do??? #12;What you will learn · What Industrial Engineering is · Examples of Industrial Engineering (IE) activities · The advantages of an IE college degree #12;Engineering does that engineer do? Where? #12;Industrial Engineers Find a Better Way... · A better way to make

  8. Mechanical and Industrial Engineering John Stuart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Mechanical and Industrial Engineering John Stuart Paul Washburn Co-Chairs MIE IAB Meeting #12;2Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Dean Tim Anderson #12;3Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Strategic vision for growing College Goal Method Current resources #12;4Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

  9. Faculty of Engineering Industrial and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Engineering Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering Industrial engineers answer the needs of organizations to operate efficiently and cost effectively. As an industrial engineer, you may of Windsor is one of only a few institutions in Ontario to offer industrial engineering. Your education

  10. Industrial & Systems Engineering Areas of Engineering Interests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Industrial & Systems Engineering Areas of Engineering Interests The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering understands our students may work as Industrial Engineers in other engineering industries, and to help prepare them for these careers, the ISE Areas of Interest was formulated. The courses

  11. Pollution Prevention and New Industrial Estates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    1 Pollution Prevention and New Industrial Estates Chris Pittner Associate Director WSP 21 May 2012 POLLUTION PREVENTION AND NEW INDUSTRIAL ESTATES Pollution within Industrial Estates Legal Framework and Guidance Surface Water Management Project Examples #12;2 POLLUTION WITHIN INDUSTRIAL ESTATES Sources Poor

  12. Agricultural productivity and industrialization: A reformulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Agricultural productivity and industrialization: A reformulation Debasis Mondal Sept 20, 2014 Abstract In this paper we examine the role of agricultural productivity on the process of industrialization industrialization by releasing labor from agriculture to industry. In fact, when agriculture is highly productive

  13. Advanced Manufacturing Office (Formerly Industrial Technologies Program)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Manufacturing Office (Formerly Industrial Technologies Program) Leo Christodoulou Jamie August 11, 2011 #12;Background and Opportunity Background Industry accounts for 30% of energy consumption-value industries such as the renewable energy industry. Example materials include low-cost carbon fiber, low

  14. Attn Technology Transfer Questions.txt - Notepad

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Attn Technology Transfer Questions.txt From: eschaput esandc@prodigy.net Sent: Monday, January 26, 2009 10:31 PM To: GC-62 Subject: Attn: Technology Transfer Questions We have...

  15. Data Communication Principles Reliable Data Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramkumar, Mahalingam

    Data Communication Principles Switching Reliable Data Transfer Data Communication Basics Mahalingam Ramkumar Mississippi State University, MS September 8, 2014 Ramkumar CSE 4153 / 6153 #12;Data Communication Principles Switching Reliable Data Transfer 1 Data Communication Principles Data Rate of a Communication

  16. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araujo, P. T.

    In this paper we explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate ...

  17. Power transfer through strongly coupled resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurs, André

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using self-resonant coils in a strongly coupled regime, we experimentally demonstrate efficient non-radiative power transfer over distances of up to eight times the radius of the coils. We use this system to transfer 60W ...

  18. Engineering nanocarbon interfaces for electron transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilmer, Andrew J. (Andrew Joseph)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-transfer reactions at nanometer-scale interfaces, such as those presented by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), are important for emerging optoelectronic and photovoltaic technologies. Electron transfer also ...

  19. Industrial applications of electron accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleland, M R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the industrial applications of electron accelerators for modifying the physical, chemical or biological properties of materials and commercial products by treatment with ionizing radiation. Many beneficial effects can be obtained with these methods, which are known as radiation processing. The earliest practical applications occurred during the 1950s, and the business of radiation processing has been expanding since that time. The most prevalent applications are the modification of many different plastic and rubber products and the sterilization of single-use medical devices. Emerging applications are the pasteurization and preservation of foods and the treatment of toxic industrial wastes. Industrial accelerators can now provide electron energies greater than 10 MeV and average beam powers as high as 700 kW. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron beams is stimulating interest in the use of X-rays (bremsstrahlung) as an alternative to gamma rays from radioactive nuclides.

  20. Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JULYK, L.J.

    2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a documented basis for the required design pressure rating and pump pressure capacity of the Hanford Site waste-transfer system in support of the waste feed delivery to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The scope of the analysis includes the 200 East Area double-shell tank waste transfer pipeline system and the associated transfer system pumps for a11 Phase 1B and Phase 2 waste transfers from AN, AP, AW, AY, and A2 Tank Farms.

  1. Academic Knowledge Transfer in Social Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slater, Mark David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.3 Digital Library Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . 4.43.1.1 Digital Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . .A Prototype Personal Digital Library Knowledge Transfer

  2. AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE HEAT TRANSFER FROM A BUOYANT GAS PLUME TO A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Temperature E. Heat Transfer Model 1. Determining the Ceiling Heat Transfer 2. Ceiling Heat Transfer

  3. SymposiumandIndustrialAffiliatesProgramLightinAction Industrial Affiliates Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    Session I Abstract: Recently Additive Manufacturing (AM) has been hailed as the "third industrial Platform for precision additive manufacturing largely depends on the speed and accuracy of in-situ optical Dean & Director, CREOL, UCF Symposium: Light in Action Session I. Manufacturing 9:15 Advances

  4. MIT and Life Sciences & Health Care Industries MIT Industry Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    the interface between inorganic and organic materials for applications to energy, medicine, electronics have been used in applications as varied as solar cells, batteries, medical diagnostics and basic. The Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies (ISN) is a team of MIT, U.S. Army, and industry partners working

  5. MIT and the Building/Construction Industries MIT Industry Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    devoted to improving the ability of companies to efficiently customize products and services in various in these areas. Please note that this is not a comprehensive summary of research being conducted at MIT in the topic areas listed above. MIT's Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) can bring the intellectual power of MIT

  6. Automating An Industrial Power Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, D. R.; McCowen, R. R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and electricity requirements of the Component Works as well as all of the heat and a portion of the electricity needed by the adjacent John Deere Foundry. This paper describes the automation of an eXisting industrial power plant and tells how the project...AUTlliATING AN INDUSTRIAL POWER PLANT DAVID R. WILLIAMS, P.E. Energy Coordi?nator John Deere Component Works Waterloo, Iowa ABSTRACT The need for an upgrade of boiler and turbine controls in the 15 MW coal-fired cogeneration plant...

  7. Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kaviany and B.P. Singh, “Radiative heat transfer in porousmedia”, Advances in Heat Transfer, vol. 23, no. 23, pp. 133–Thermal radiation heat transfer, Hemisphere Publishing Co. ,

  8. Heat transfer via dropwise condensation on hydrophobic microstructured surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruleman, Karlen E. (Karlen Elizabeth)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dropwise condensation has the potential to greatly increase heat transfer rates. Heat transfer coefficients by dropwise condensation and film condensation on microstructured silicon chips were compared. Heat transfer ...

  9. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.; Nyilas, C.P.; Denmeade, T.J.

    1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A transfer pump is described which is used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank. 17 figs.

  10. Enhanced heat transfer using nanofluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Stephen U. S. (Lisle, IL); Eastman, Jeffrey A. (Naperville, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to a method of and apparatus for enhancing heat transfer in fluids such as deionized water. ethylene glycol, or oil by dispersing nanocrystalline particles of substances such as copper, copper oxide, aluminum oxide, or the like in the fluids. Nanocrystalline particles are produced and dispersed in the fluid by heating the substance to be dispersed in a vacuum while passing a thin film of the fluid near the heated substance. The fluid is cooled to control its vapor pressure.

  11. Alterna(ve Roadmap For Transfer Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Alterna(ve Roadmap For Transfer Students 8/11/14 EE Program #12;Transfer with the roadmap · NEXT STEP: ­ Share this with all other transfer students and make 1 (LACKING ES220) SEE THE ROADMAP: h`p://www.sonoma.edu/engineering/bsee/bsee_roadmap

  12. Technology Transfer from the University of Oxford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    Technology Transfer from the University of Oxford www.isis-innovation.com #12;Isis Innovation Ltd Oxford Technology Transfer IP, Patents, Licences, Spin-outs, Material Sales, Seed Funds, Isis Angels Network Oxford Expertise Consulting, Services Isis Consulting Business Technology Transfer and Innovation

  13. Transferring to The University of New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Transferring to The University of New Mexico From Central New Mexico College A Transfer Articulation Guide based on Central New Mexico Community College Catalog Year 2007 ­ 2009 Apply to UNM on-line at www.unm.edu #12;Transferring to The University of New Mexico from Central New Mexico Community College

  14. Transferring to The University of New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Transferring to The University of New Mexico From Central New Mexico College A Transfer Articulation Guide based on Central New Mexico Community College Catalog Year 2009 ­ 2011 Apply to UNM on-line at www.unm.edu #12;Transferring to The University of New Mexico from Central New Mexico Community College

  15. Heat Transfer Research, 2010, Vol. 41, No. 6 Turbine Aero-Heat Transfer Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camci, Cengiz

    AU TH O R PR O O F Heat Transfer Research, 2010, Vol. 41, No. 6 Turbine Aero-Heat Transfer Studies in Rotating Research Facilities CENGIZ CAMCI Turbomachinery Aero-Heat Transfer Laboratory, Department The present paper deals with the experimental aero-heat transfer studies performed in rotating turbine

  16. Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raade, Justin; Roark, Thomas; Vaughn, John; Bradshaw, Robert

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are comprised of many miles of fluid-filled pipes arranged in large grids with reflective mirrors used to capture radiation from the sun. Solar radiation heats the fluid which is used to produce steam necessary to power large electricity generation turbines. Currently, organic, oil-based fluid in the pipes has a maximum temperature threshold of 400 °C, allowing for the production of electricity at approximately 15 cents per kilowatt hour. The DOE hopes to foster the development of an advanced heat transfer fluid that can operate within higher temperature ranges. The new heat transfer fluid, when used with other advanced technologies, could significantly decrease solar electricity cost. Lower costs would make solar thermal electricity competitive with gas and coal and would offer a clean, renewable source of energy. Molten salts exhibit many desirable heat transfer qualities within the range of the project objectives. Halotechnics developed advanced heat transfer fluids (HTFs) for application in solar thermal power generation. This project focused on complex mixtures of inorganic salts that exhibited a high thermal stability, a low melting point, and other favorable characteristics. A high-throughput combinatorial research and development program was conducted in order to achieve the project objective. Over 19,000 candidate formulations were screened. The workflow developed to screen various chemical systems to discover salt formulations led to mixtures suitable for use as HTFs in both parabolic trough and heliostat CSP plants. Furthermore, salt mixtures which will not interfere with fertilizer based nitrates were discovered. In addition for use in CSP, the discovered salt mixtures can be applied to electricity storage, heat treatment of alloys and other industrial processes.

  17. A novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system. Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rue, D.M. [Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Fridman, A. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (United States); Viskanta, R. [Purdue Univ. (United States); Neff, D. [Cumbustion Tec, Inc. (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase I of the project focused on acquiring the market needs, modeling, design, and test plan information for a novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system. All goals and objectives were achieved. The key component of the system is an innovative burner technology which combines high temperature natural gas preheating with soot formation and subsequent soot burnout in the flame, increases the system`s energy efficiency and furnace throughput, while minimizing the furnace air emissions, all without external parasitic systems. Work has included identifying industry`s needs and constraints, modeling the high luminosity burner system, designing the prototype burner for initial laboratory-scale testing, defining the test plan, adapting the burner technology to meet the industry`s needs and constraints, and outlining the Industrial Adoption Plan.

  18. FY05 Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization to address the increasingly urgent need to improve the technology-transfer process in the U.S. upstream petroleum industry. PTTC's technology-transfer programs enhance U.S. national security. PTTC administers the only nation-wide, comprehensive program dedicated to maximizing America's supplies of domestic oil and gas. PTTC conducts grassroots programs through 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and two satellite offices, leveraging their preexisting connections with industry. This organizational structure helps bring researchers and academia to the table. Nationally and regionally, volunteers within a National Board and Regional Producer Advisory Groups guide efforts. The National Board meets three times per year, an important function being approving the annual plans and budgets developed by the regions and Headquarters (HQ). Between Board meetings, an active Management and Budget Committee guide HQ activity. PTTC itself undergoes a thorough financial audit each year. The PTTC's HQ staff plans and manages all aspects of the PTTC program, conducts nation-wide technology-transfer activities, and implements a comprehensive communications program. Networking, involvement in technical activities, and an active exhibit schedule are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the oilfield service sector. Circulation for ''PTTC Network News'', the quarterly newsletter, has risen to nearly 17,500. About 7,500 people receive an email Technology Alert on an approximate three-week frequency. Case studies in the ''Petroleum Technology Digest in World Oil'' appear monthly, as do ''Tech Connections'' columns in ''The American Oil and Gas Reporter''. As part of its oversight responsibility for the regions, the PTTC from the start has captured and reported data that document the myriad ways its programs impact industry. Of 119 workshops in FY05 where repeat attendance was reported, 59 percent of attendees on average had attended a PTTC event previously, indicating that a majority felt they were receiving enough value to come back. It also is encouraging that, after 11 years, PTTC events continue to attract new people. The form used at workshops to get participants feedback asks for a ''yes'' or ''no'' response to the question: ''Have you used any new technologies based on knowledge gained through PTTC?'' With data now available from 611 workshops, 41 percent of respondents said, ''yes'', confirming that people are applying the information they receive at PTTC workshops. PTTC in FY04 asked RLO directors, oilfield service companies and producers in 11 areas with significant technological barriers to adding new reserves to estimate the ''PTTC Impact Factor''--that is, the percentage of the total reserves added in their areas that logically could be attributed to PTTC's efforts. Of the estimated 1,266 million barrels of oil equivalent (BOE) added in the 11 areas, participants estimated that roughly 88 million BOE had been added as a result of PTTC's techtransfer efforts. PTTC's 10 regions are the primary delivery mechanism for technology transfer. Attendance at PTTC regional activities set a record in FY05, with 8,900 individuals attending 154 workshops, lunch-and-learn events, or student training and internships. When appropriate, regional workshops incorporate R&D findings from DOE-funded projects. This year HQ began a ''Microhole Technology Integration'' Initiative with DOE to more clearly present their microhole program to producers. Often events are held cooperatively with other national organizations, regional producer associations and professional society groups. This practice leverages outreach and engenders future cooperation. Of the more than 61,000 individuals PTTC has attracted to its events since its inception, more than 15,000 have attended in the past two years. Eight-eight percent of PTTC event attendees during FY05 were from industry. The numb

  19. NPDES Individual Permit for Industrial Facilities - Mail Merge...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WATER DISCHARGES ASSOCIATED WITH INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITY FROM FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS INDUSTRY......44 I. CONTENTS OF PLAN. ......

  20. Certificate Industrial and Systems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Six Sigma Certificate Industrial and Systems Engineering San José State University September, 2008 #12;1 Lean Enterprise and Six Sigma Lean Enterprise about transforming the old mass production-to-cradle design, incorporating design for manufacturability, reproducibility, product lifecycle, etc. Six Sigma

  1. Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. C.; Estes, C. B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Oklahoma, industry consumes about 35% of the total energy consumed. While it is true that much work has been done in the larger companies, most small to medium sized companies have yet to undertake a substantial energy management program. Often...

  2. PETROLEUM INDUSTRY INFORMATION REPORTING ACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    compliance. The Energy Commission uses the new refinery reports when creating the Weekly Fuels Watch Report refinery production and inventories. Monthly data of refinery inputs and outputs have a variety of regular use data by refineries to support analyses of total energy use by industry type within the state

  3. Electrified Separation Processes in Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appleby, A. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distillation, in the chemical and related industries is very considerable. The majority of the energy used for these separations is thermal input in the form of the low heating-value of oil or gas. From the national viewpoint, it would be advantageous...

  4. Benchmarks for industrial energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amarnath, K.R. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Kumana, J.D. [Linnhoff March, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shah, J.V. [Electric Power Research Inst., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Chemicals and Petroleum Center

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    What are the standards for improving energy efficiency for industries such as petroleum refining, chemicals, and glass manufacture? How can different industries in emerging markets and developing accelerate the pace of improvements? This paper discusses several case studies and experiences relating to this subject emphasizing the use of energy efficiency benchmarks. Two important benchmarks are discussed. The first is based on a track record of outstanding performers in the related industry segment; the second benchmark is based on site specific factors. Using energy use reduction targets or benchmarks, projects have been implemented in Mexico, Poland, India, Venezuela, Brazil, China, Thailand, Malaysia, Republic of South Africa and Russia. Improvements identified through these projects include a variety of recommendations. The use of oxy-fuel and electric furnaces in the glass industry in Poland; reconfiguration of process heat recovery systems for refineries in China, Malaysia, and Russia; recycling and reuse of process wastewater in Republic of South Africa; cogeneration plant in Venezuela. The paper will discuss three case studies of efforts undertaken in emerging market countries to improve energy efficiency.

  5. Optimization of Industrial Refrigeration Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flack, P. J.; Sharp, M. K.; Case, M. E.; Gregory, R. W.; Case, P. L.

    A computer program designed to optimize the size of an evaporative condenser in a two-stage industrial refrigeration plant was created. The program sizes both the high-stage and low-stage compressors and an evaporative condenser. Once the initial...

  6. Shale Play Industry Transportation Challenges,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    ­ High volume commodi-es flows in and out of shale plays · Sand In....Oil in excess of 50 MMT/Yr. · Life of current Shale Oil & Gas explora-on trend ­ 2012) #12;Shale Play Oil Industry A Look at the Baaken · 2-3 Unit Trains

  7. Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

  8. Photovoltaic industry progress through 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, R.L.; Smith, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of the US photovoltaics (PV) industry over the past decade has been impressive. First designed to provide power for satellites using high-cost production techniques, PV is now the economical choice in many remote terrestrial applications. The remarkable growth of PV in terms of quality of cells and modules, production techniques, and system design, was initiated by a cooperative effort of the US Government and the domestic PV manufacturers. European and Japanese firms entered the PV industry later, but are also growing rapidy. The Europeans continue to supply PV systems for village electrification and water pumping to many Third World countries. The Japanese have been developing the amorphous silicon (A-Si) technology by expanding its use in consumer goods. The world PV industry saw dramatic changes in industry ownership and in the emphasis on developing new and improved technology during 1984. The objective of this report is to present information on the developments of the world PV industry and focuses on developments occurring in 1984. Information is presented on a regional basis (US, Europe, Japan, other) to avoid disclosing company-confidential data. All information was gleaned from several sources, including a review of the technical literature and direct contacts with PV manufacturers. Prior to publishing the regional totals, all numbers were compared with those of other sources. The information contained in this report is prepared for use by the Department of Energy for their use in long-term R and D planning. However, this information should also be of interest by PV manufacturers and to those who may be contemplating entering the PV market. PV shipments for 1984, government supports for PV, and various PV market sectors are discussed.

  9. An Embedded Boundary Method for the Modeling of Unsteady Combustion in an Industrial GasFired Furnace \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the convective, viscous, and radiative heat transport terms in the mixed cells, while a finite element [20] which accounts for species diffusion, convective and radiative heat transfer, viscous transportAn Embedded Boundary Method for the Modeling of Unsteady Combustion in an Industrial Gas

  10. Session 13: Technology Transfer of Geopressured/Geothermal Resources to Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorfman, Myron H.; Morton, Robert A.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research, conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Center for Energy Studies, includes the following areas of interest; geological studies depicting pressure gradients and thermal gradients, sand distribution and fault patterns, all of which are used in petroleum exploration; geophysical data for interpretation of seismic velocities based upon lithologic changes and subsurface discontinuities; sandstone consolidation data involving changes of permeabilities with depth and diagenetic histories of Cenozoic rocks in the Gulf Coast Basin--this work also covers fluid migration pathways and resulting rock-water interactions and has led to a better understanding of generation, maturation and accumulation of hydrocarbons; work on salinity of formation waters covering several areas of study, such as chemical analysis to anticipate scale and corrosion problems, and investigations of logging techniques to better ascertain salinity of use of well logs; reservoir continuity studies, together with computational modeling to assist in estimation of ultimate recoveries and formation drives; rock mechanics studies, which have recently led to the development of new models to account for creep and determine compressibilities of sandstones and shales in geopressured environments; co-production of gas and water in watered-out gas reservoirs.

  11. Energy Technology Transfer for Industry Through the Texas Energy Extension Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riter, S.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas Energy Extension Service (EES) is one of ten Department of Energy funded pilot programs designed to test methods for assisting small energy users to reduce energy costs. A major thrust of EES in Texas is directed toward providing...

  12. Industrial Steam System Heat-Transfer SolutionsL: A BestPractices Steam Technical Brief

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovementINDIAN COUNTRYBarriers toHeat PumpsSteam

  13. Available transfer capability and first order sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gravener, M.H. [PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Valley Forge, PA (United States)] [PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Valley Forge, PA (United States); Nwankpa, C. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of calculating Available Transfer Capability and the exploration of the first order effects of certain power system network variables are described. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ordered that bulk electrical control areas must provide to market participants a ``commercially viable`` network transfer capability for the import, export, and through-put of energy. A practical method for deriving this transfer capability utilizing both linear and non-linear power flow analysis methods is developed that acknowledges both thermal and voltage system limitations. The Available Transfer Capability is the incremental transfer capability derived by the method reduced by margins. A procedure for quantifying the first order effect of network uncertainties such as load forecast error and simultaneous transfers on the calculated transfer capability of a power system snapshot are explored. The quantification of these network uncertainties can provide information necessary for system operation, planning, and energy market participation.

  14. First Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this second volume cover Transportation Fuels, and Chemicals and Products. Transportation Fuels topics include: Biodiesel, Pyrolytic Liquids, Ethanol, Methanol and Ethers, and Commercialization. The Chemicals and Products section includes specific topics in: Research, Technology Transfer, and Commercial Systems. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  15. industrial & systems (ISE) Industrial and Systems Engineers use engineering and business principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    to linear programming; transportation and assignment problems; dynamic program- ming; deterministic to programing, software and multimedia. USC's undergraduate ISE curriculum prepares students for industry. Programs Available · Industrial and Systems Engineering Bachelor of Science 129 units · Industrial

  16. Reinventing the Industrial Heartland: Supply Chain Sustainability and the New Automotive Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    1 Report Reinventing the Industrial Heartland: Supply Chain Sustainability and the New Automotive Industry Thursday, October 6, 2011 Room 221 · Fluno Center · 601 University Avenue · Madison · WI industry through supply chain management, public policies and innovative technologies to help

  17. Energy Analysis and Diagnostics Data Analysis From Industrial Energy Assessments for Manufacturing Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalakrishnan, B.; Plummer, R. W.; Srinath, S.; Meffe, C. M.; Ipe, J. J.; Veena, R.

    . The data shows the types of industries in our geographical area which have benefited from the industrial assessments and outlines the relationships between these industry types and variables such as energy consumption, types of recommendations, sales, plant...

  18. Nuclear reactor safety heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, O.C.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reviewed is a book which has 5 parts: Overview, Fundamental Concepts, Design Basis Accident-Light Water Reactors (LWRs), Design Basis Accident-Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs), and Special Topics. It combines a historical overview, textbook material, handbook information, and the editor's personal philosophy on safety of nuclear power plants. Topics include thermal-hydraulic considerations; transient response of LWRs and LMFBRs following initiating events; various accident scenarios; single- and two-phase flow; single- and two-phase heat transfer; nuclear systems safety modeling; startup and shutdown; transient response during normal and upset conditions; vapor explosions, natural convection cooling; blockages in LMFBR subassemblies; sodium boiling; and Three Mile Island.

  19. Concurrent Transfers Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization andComputer SimulationsConcentrating SolarAboutTransfers

  20. Data Transfer Nodes Yield Results!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOfficeOctoberDanielDTN Data Transfer Nodes

  1. Aggregate Transfers Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, a highlyTransfers Historical

  2. Aggregate Transfers Last 8 Days

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, a highlyTransfers

  3. Development and Field Trial of Dimpled-Tube Technology for Chemical Industry Process Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaroslav Chudnovsky; Aleksandr Kozlov

    2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Most approaches to increasing heat transfer rates in the convection sections of gas-fired process heaters involve the incorporation of fins, baffles, turbulizers, etc. to increase either the heat transfer surface area or turbulence or both. Although these approaches are effective in increasing the heat transfer rates, this increase is invariably accompanied by an associated increase in convection section pressure drop as well as, for heaters firing ‘dirty’ fuel mixtures, increased fouling of the tubes – both of which are highly undesirable. GTI has identified an approach that will increase heat transfer rates without a significant increase in pressure drop or fouling rate. Compared to other types of heat transfer enhancement approaches, the proposed dimpled tube approach achieves very high heat transfer rates at the lowest pressure drops. Incorporating this approach into convection sections of chemical industry fired process heaters may increase energy efficiency by 3-5%. The energy efficiency increase will allow reducing firing rates to provide the required heating duty while reducing the emissions of CO2 and NOx.

  4. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A.T, 2001: Prospects for biogas harvesting at Sungunn WongseRenewables Biomass, Biogas, PV, Wind turbines, Hydropowermill, fluidized bed kiln Biogas, Biomass Cullet preheating

  5. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: Biomass energy included Source: Price et al. , 2006.Note: Biomass energy included Source: Price et al. (2006).

  6. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    incineration and the demand for fossil fuels. In Japan, useincineration and the demand for fossil fuels. In Brazil,

  7. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    competitiveness in the EU emissions trading scheme: Optionson NO x and CO 2 emissions trading. Emissions Trader -Economy. DTI, 2005: EU Emissions trading scheme: Benchmark

  8. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    driven systems; high efficiency boilers and process heaters;aims to develop boilers with an efficiency of 94%. However,much lower. Efficiency measures exist for both boilers and

  9. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14 pp. IEA, 2006c: World Energy Outlook 2006. Internationalan extrapolation of its World Energy Outlook 2005 ReferenceCO 2 gases The IEA’s World Energy Outlook 2006 (IEA, 2006c)

  10. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    about 1.2% of world energy consumption and is responsible7.2: Design energy consumption trends in world ammonia

  11. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for carbon capture and storage technologies. Annual Reviewof carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology offers aCarbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS), including oxy-fuel combustion21 Process-specific technologies

  12. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20 about 20 about 20 CCS Potential (tCO 2 /t) Mitigationstream, which is a potential candidate for CCS technology.reduces the potential for applying CCS technology. Chlorine

  13. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Schleich, J. , 2004: Do energy audits help reduce barriersof organizational barriers. Energy audit and managementa; US EPA, n.d. ). Energy Audits and Management Systems.

  14. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy-efficiency investments can be planned and implemented. There are also voluntary agreements covering process emissions in Australia,

  15. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission reduction at Engen refinery in South Durban. Paperenergy consumed in refineries and other energy conversionCement Membrane separation Refinery gas Natural gas Bio-

  16. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air bottoming cycle Black liquor gasification combined cycleCEPI, 2001), and that use continues to grow. Black liquorgasification: Black liquor is the residue from chemical

  17. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2002: Profiles in SMEs and SME Issues, 1990-2000. Asia-Energy management practices in SME- Case study of bakery incountries. Integrating SME development strategy into the

  18. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Europe Former Soviet Union Developing Asia Latin America Sub-Saharan Africa Middle East & North Africa World B2 Scenario Note: Biomass

  19. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and fuel used in the primary smelter. PFC emission includedto current state-of-the art smelter electricity use and 50%commonly been connected to smelter retrofit, conversion, or

  20. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006: Supply-side energy efficiency and fossil fuel switch.use, from non-energy uses of fossil fuels and from non-emissions from non-energy uses of fossil fuels and from non-

  1. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7.2: Design energy consumption trends in world ammoniagoes up: Recent trends in China’s Energy Consumption. Energy

  2. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    communication to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.Communications - Report by the Secretariat. UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.

  3. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency and energy awareness in Botswana; ESI,attitudes towards and awareness of energy efficiency; •limited awareness of the availability of energy-saving and

  4. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    both emis- sions from incineration and the demand for fossilyr (Okazaki et al. , 2004). Incineration of wastes (e.g. ,by reducing emissions from incineration and the demand for

  5. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eidt, B. , 2004: Cogeneration opportunities - Global EnergyP.R.K. , 2003: Sugar cogeneration for power challenges andnewsletter in sugar and cogeneration. STAPPA/ALAPCO, 1999:

  6. Industrial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP »summerlectures [ICO]default Sign In About |

  7. Industrial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News link to facebook link to04948 Site Map6871

  8. Industrial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News link to facebook link to04948 Site

  9. Licensing and {open_quotes}CRADA`s{close_quotes} in Oak Ridge technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prosser, G.A.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the belief that effective technology transfer is a ``contact sport,`` Martin Marietta Energy Systems (Energy Systems), the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) management contractor in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, encourages its research and engineering employees to directly interact with their commercial-sector counterparts. Over the years, relationships which have been initiated through such technical interactions have led to many of the patent licenses ad cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs) which currently exist among Energy Systems, US companies, universities, and industrial consortia. The responsibility for creating and implementing Energy Systems policies and procedures to accomplish DOE`s technology transfer objectives in Oak Ridge lies with the Office of Technology Transfer (OTT). In addition, licensing executives within OTT are responsible for negotiating the terms and conditions of patent licenses and CRADAs for the commercialization of government-funded technologies and research expertise. Other technology transfer initiatives in Oak Ridge help companies in a wide range of industries overcome manufacturing obstacles, enabling them to retain existing jobs and to create new business opportunities.

  10. Tools to Boost Steam System Efficiency, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program steam software tools can help industrial plants identify steam system improvements to save energy and money.

  11. Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estes, C. B.; Turner, W. C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    usage continues to rise. With this informa tion, Oklahoma embarked upon a program to help indus try (particularly small to medium sized ones) meet the challenge. Program Objectives The primary objective of the program can be stated simply as: "To... for the country and necessary for her to be competitive in the International marketplace. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The first step was to develop a symbol that year tenure of the.program. The conferences have concentrated on the industrialized areas of Tulsa...

  12. The Industry Viewpoint Mike Shepherd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leeds, University of

    1 UK WIR MTU2 The Industry Viewpoint Mike Shepherd Client Manager ­ Distribution and Streetworks UK in Hampstead 1851 #12;3 UK WIR Where are we now? UK WIR MAINS AND SEWERS #12;4 UK WIR FIBRE OPTICS UK WIR GAS companies dig 500,000 holes/yr · Gas, electricity and telecoms dig 250,000/yr each · Many jobs take longer

  13. Electrotechnologies and Industrial Pollution Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, P. S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    content, and nonferrfms industrial efficiency and productivity has been cited in reverb melting furnaces produce high percentage~ of a number of publications [1-4]; these benefits continue metal oxides. These pollutants are greatly reduced in to drive... or in furnaces are capable of heat treating metals in vacu~m, development and which could be of value to low oxygen, or inert atmospheres, and operate witH no manufacturers in meeting productivity and exhaust gases. Thus, metal oxide formationl...

  14. Biomonitoring for the photovoltaics industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernholc, N.M.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomonitoring often is used as a method for estimating the dose to an individual. Therefore, a parameter of measurement, or biomarkers must be identified. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of biomonitoring protocols for metals used in the photovoltaics industry. Special attention is given to areas that often are skimmed over, to gain insights into some of the problems that may arise when these tasks are carried out. Biological monitoring can be used to determine current human exposures to chemicals, as well as to detect past exposures, and the effects that these exposures may have on human health. It is used in conjunction with environmental monitoring to describe more completely worker`s exposures to, and absorption of, chemicals in the workplace. Biological specimens (e.g., blood, hair or urine) are analyzed for chemical agents, metabolites, or for some specific effect on the person (Lowry 1994). Biomonitoring can assess a workers exposure to industrial chemicals by all routes including skin absorption and ingestion. Although the methodology still is in its infancy, in cases where the procedures have been developed, it can be an invaluable component of an ongoing program of industrial hygiene monitoring. Like any technology, there are limitations to its effectiveness because of a lack of knowledge, contamination of specimens, and the introduction of errors.

  15. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2000 (FY00). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) who bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors connect with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the Regional Lead Organizations. The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and market movements, the organization has built a reputation and expectation to address industry needs of getting information distributed quickly which can impact the bottom line immediately.

  16. Energy Matters: Industrial Energy Efficiency | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Dr. Kathleen Hogan to Host Live Chat on Industrial Energy Efficiency LiveChat Wed, 1116, 2 pm ET: Industrial Energy Efficiency VIDEO: Who Was the Better Inventor, Tesla or Edison?...

  17. Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, WestStandard for Industrial Energy Efficiency A. McKane 1 , R.

  18. Energy Programs of the Texas Industrial Commission 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heare, J.; dePlante, L. E.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    workshops and seminars; an annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference; the coordination of a university program for the training of industrial energy auditors; and organizational assistance in the establishment of regional energy conservation groups...

  19. 2008 Industrial Technologies Market Report, May 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Energetics; DOE

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial sector is a critical component of the U.S. economy, providing an array of consumer, transportation, and national defense-related goods we rely on every day. Unlike many other economic sectors, however, the industrial sector must compete globally for raw materials, production, and sales. Though our homes, stores, hospitals, and vehicles are located within our borders, elements of our goods-producing industries could potentially be moved offshore. Keeping U.S. industry competitive is essential to maintaining and growing the U.S. economy. This report begins with an overview of trends in industrial sector energy use. The next section of the report focuses on some of the largest and most energy-intensive industrial subsectors. The report also highlights several emerging technologies that could transform key segments of industry. Finally, the report presents policies, incentives, and drivers that can influence the competitiveness of U.S. industrial firms.

  20. General overview of the Nigerian construction industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dantata, Sanusi (Sanusi A.)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to investigate and provide a general overview of the Nigerian construction industry, its role in the national economy, the main participants in the industry, the problems that they face, and ...

  1. The State of the Industrial Compressor Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, W.

    The industrial compressor industry in the United States has been operating in a textbook example of a mature market. No truly new compressor technology has been introduced in the past thirty years and there is none on the horizon. Competitive...

  2. Qualified Target Industry Tax Refund (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Qualified Target Industry Tax Refund incentive is available for companies that create high wage jobs in targeted high value-added industries. The incentive refunds up to $3,000 per new full...

  3. New or Expanding Industries Tax Credit (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the New or Expanding Industries Tax Credit, property used by certain new or expanding industries is eligible for reduced taxable valuation (up to 50% of their taxable value for the first 5...

  4. A New Approach to Industrial Air Conditioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravenstreter, T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -dryer Systems Division, has marketed industrial drying machinery. These heat reactivated dryers can handle latent loads in industrial air conditioning systems. Through waste heat conservation, air conditioning costs can be reduced 25 to 50%, with applications...

  5. FINLAND SOURCES 2007 -Forest industry production Authorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINLAND SOURCES 2007 - Forest industry production Print Home Finland Government Authorities Local » Turnover » Profit » Energy Year 2006 » Shipping Business services Infrastructure Economy Education strategy of the EU's Forest-Based Industries Technology Platform provides a good basis for preparing

  6. Energy Programs of the Texas Industrial Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heare, J.; dePlante, L. E.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Industrial Energy Conservation Program are to assist Texas industry in using energy more efficiently through seminars, workshops, technical information exchange and other supportive programs with the goal of conserving at least...

  7. UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES Industrial and Systems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    control, information technologies, and electronics and solar power assembly and reliability. Students solving. Students delve into systems modeling and simulation, systems design and the simplificationUNDERGRADUATE DEGREES Industrial and Systems Engineering The Bachelor's Degree in Industrial

  8. Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session IA—Conversion Technologies I: Industrial Perspectives on Pathways to Advanced Biofuels Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels David C. Carroll, President and Chief Executive Officer, Gas Technology Institute

  9. Daylighting Application and Effectiveness in Industrial Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCowan, B.; Birleanu, D.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    artificial lighting became available, most older industrial buildings had their daylighting features boarded over. With modern glazing systems and sophisticated designs that minimize glare issues, daylighting for industrial buildings is making a strong...

  10. Practical Procedures for Auditing Industrial Boiler Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neil, J. P.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial boiler plants are an area of opportunity in virtually every industry to save energy and reduce costs by using relatively simple, inexpensive auditing procedures. An energy audit consists of inspection, measurement, analysis...

  11. Scottish Energy Research Academy Energy Industry Doctorates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Scottish Energy Research Academy (SERA) Energy Industry Doctorates in Renewable Energy Technologies for Guidance 1. Introduction The Energy Technology Partnership (ETP) has established an Energy Industry · Energy conversion and storage · Energy materials · Grid and networks · Energy utilisation in buildings

  12. Technology Development, Validation, and Transfer Via the FAA Airworthiness Assurance Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, R.L.

    1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) established an Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) at Sandia National Laboratories. Its primary mission is to support technology development, validation, and transfer to industry in order to enhance the airworthiness and improve the aircraft maintenance practices of the U.S. commercial aviation industry. The Center conducts projects in a myriad of engineering disciplines. The results are placed in the public domain so that the industry at-large can reap the benefits of FAA-funded Research and Development efforts. To support the Center's goals, the FAA/AANC has set up a hangar facility at the Albuquerque International Airport which contains a collection of transport and commuter aircraft as well as other test specimens. The facility replicates a working maintenance environment by incorporating both the physical inspection difficulties as well as the environmental factors which influence maintenance reliability.

  13. The Texas Industrial Energy Conservation Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldrop, T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cesses listed. Chart1-lndustrial Target Groups SIC CODE INDUSTRY 201 Meat Products 204 Feed and Grain 207 Fats and Oils 26 Paper and Allied Products 28 Chemicals and Allied Products 30 Rubber and Plastics 33 Primary Metals 34 Fabricated Metals... industry seminars. In the preparation of workbooks for industrial processes, a screening of engineering firms was 763 ESL-IE-82-04-139 Proceedings from the Fourth Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 4-7, 1982 conducted in order...

  14. Guiding Principles for Successfully Implementing Industrial Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Assessment Recommendations Guiding Principles for Successfully Implementing Industrial Energy Assessment Recommendations This implementation guide provides key principles and...

  15. Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Industrial Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Brian K.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document provides a methodology to estimate unmetered industrial water use for evaporative cooling systems, steam generating boiler systems, batch process applications, and wash systems. For each category standard mathematical relationships are summarized and provided in a single resource to assist Federal agencies in developing an initial estimate of their industrial water use. The approach incorporates industry norms, general rules of thumb, and industry survey information to provide methodologies for each section.

  16. Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information about the Department of Energy’s Industrial Technologies Program and its Combined Heat and Power program.

  17. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

  18. Green Industrial Policy: Trade and Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry; Stevenson, Megan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and solar panels, and the renewables industry employs well over a million workers (NYT Bradsher, The opportunity cost

  19. Industrial Robotics Prof. Alessandro De Luca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    Robotics 1 Industrial Robotics Prof. Alessandro De Luca Robotics 1 1 #12;What is a robot? ! industrial definition (RIA = Robotic Institute of America) re-programmable multi-functional manipulator;Evolution toward industrial robots ! with respect to the ancestors ! flexibility of use ! adaptability

  20. Missouri Industrial Assessment Center College of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    , education, outreach and industrial energy audit. The audit is completely free, with summary recommendationMissouri Industrial Assessment Center College of Engineering University of Missouri-Columbia #12;Mo Department of Energy's requirement, the ultimate goal of Missouri Industrial Assessment Center is to be "the