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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota Represented by the Price (Percent) Percent of Industrial Natural Gas...

2

Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Industrial Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Deliveries (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Industrial Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

3

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Minnesota ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices ; Minnesota Natural Gas Prices ...

4

INDUSTRY COMPOSITION CHANGES AND WAGES ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper I use longitudinal data to study the effects of changes in industrial composition on wages during the 1970s and 1980s. I find that over ten year periods, workers who are initially in industries that subsequently expand have faster wage growth. Also, wage growth is strongly related to employment changes in industries the individual is likely to move to. These effects are larger during the 1980s than earlier in the sample period. I use the estimates to evaluate the role played by industrial composition changes in affecting relative wages during the 1980s. I find that changes in industrial composition can account for all of the increase in the wages of women relative to men and about 40-50 percent of the increase in the relative wage of more educated groups. These estimates are larger than estimates in the literature derived from analysis of repeated cross sections. I thank Janet Currie, Joe Hotz, Guido Imbens, and Kanika Kapur for helpful conversations.

Paul J. Devereux

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices ; U.S. Natural Gas Prices ...

6

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers by State, 1996 Table State Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Alabama..................................... 1.08 0.92 2.27 0.08 0.23 Alaska ........................................ 0.31 0.87 0.85 - 1.16 Arizona....................................... 0.53 0.92 0.30 3.91 0.70 Arkansas.................................... 0.88 0.98 1.59 0.11 1.24 California.................................... 9.03 7.44 7.82 43.11 11.64 Colorado .................................... 2.12 2.18 0.94 0.58 0.20 Connecticut................................ 0.84 1.26 0.37 1.08 0.38 D.C............................................. 0.33 0.52 - 0.21 - Delaware.................................... 0.19 0.21 0.16 0.04 0.86 Florida........................................

7

The changing battery industry  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an economic and technological assessment of the electrical battery industry, highlighting major trends. Among those systems considered are lithium-based, sodium-sulfur nickel-zinc, nickel-iron, nickel-hydrogen, zinc-chloride, conductive polymer, and redox cells. Lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, and manganese dioxide-based batteries and direct solar power and fuel cells are discussed in relation to these new techniques. New applications, including electric vehicles, solar power storage, utility load leveling, portable appliances, computer power and memory backup, and medical implants are discussed. Predictions and development scenarios for the next twenty years are provided for the U.S. market.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1996 Table State Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) Marketed Production Total Consumption Alabama................................................................... 3.02 2.69 1.48 Alaska ...................................................................... 5.58 2.43 2.04 Arizona..................................................................... NA 0 0.55 Arkansas.................................................................. 0.88 1.12 1.23 California.................................................................. 1.25 1.45 8.23 Colorado .................................................................. 4.63 2.90 1.40 Connecticut.............................................................. 0 0 0.58 D.C...........................................................................

9

Changes related to "Biofuel Industries Group LLC" | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Biofuel Industries Group LLC" Biofuel Industries Group LLC Jump to: navigation, search...

10

Changes related to "Battery Park Industries Inc formerly Moltech...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Battery Park Industries Inc formerly Moltech Power Systems Inc" Battery Park Industries...

11

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Paper n Other Industries, Electricity Conservation s65% of electricity consumed by industry is used by motorof the main industries include electricity savings. q

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Structural Change and Futures for the Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technological change and evolving customer needs have already combined to precipitate fundamental structural change in several capital-intensive industries, notably the telecommunications, natural gas, and transportation sectors. These forces are now being unleashed in the electric utility sector. This report outlines some common patterns of change across several industries and presents scenarios of structural change for the electric power industry.

1995-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

13

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trends in the iron and steel industry. Energy Policy 30:initiatives of Japan’s steel industry against globalenergy use in the steel industry, but can reduce both energy

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mitigate 21 MtCO 2 . Cogeneration (also called Combined Heatefficiencies. Industrial cogeneration is an important partpotential for industrial cogeneration is estimated at almost

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Estimating energy-augmenting technological change in developing country industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

over time is calculated. Second, prices and the energy costTime averages of sectoral productivity and autonomous energy efficiency trend Industry Prices and energy costTime averages (in percent) of sectoral productivity and autonomous energy efficiency trend Prices and energy cost

Sanstad, Alan H.; Roy, Joyashree; Sathaye, Jayant A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

17

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Improve Energy Efficiency and Reduce Greenhouse Gasand Industrial Energy Efficiency. Energy Policy, 33: 949-Galitsky (2005) Energy efficiency improvement opportunities

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Changes related to "ET Solar Group Formerly CNS Solar Industry...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"http:en.openei.orgwikiSpecial:RecentChangesLinkedETSolarGroupFormerlyCNSSolarIndustry" Atom Special pages About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Developer services OpenEI...

19

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

casting technology. Energy Policy 31: 1339-1356. Martin,Energy Efficiency. Energy Policy, 33: 949-962. Worrell, E.and pulp industry. Energy Policy 25: 745-758. Flannery,

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO 2 Emission reduction in 2030. Results are presented forand paper industries. Area b 2030 production (Mt) a A1 B2electrode technology by 2030. g Humphreys and Mahasenan,

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Spanish Electricity Industry: Plus ça change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crampes Université de Toulouse (GREMAQ and IDEI) ccrampes@cict.fr Natalia Fabra Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and CEPR nfabra@eco.uc3m.es November 18, 2004 Abstract In this paper we describe the Spanish electricity industry and its... decrease hides the lack of a real reform. 1 Protocolo para el Establecimiento de una Nueva Regulación del Sistema Eléctrico Nacional, December 1996; (text, in Spanish, available at http...

Crampes, Claude; Fabra, Natalia

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

22

Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: Selected Issues, 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides an analytical assessment of the changes taking place in the electric power industry, including market structure, consumer choice, and ratesetting and transition costs. Also presents Federal and State initiatives in promoting competition.

Information Center

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: An Update, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides a comprehensive overview of the structure of the U.S. electric power industry over the past 10 years, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects.

Information Center

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Revised Industry Steam Generator Program Generic License Change Package  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

License Change Package for NRC review and endorsement. Industry events during the subsequent months have delayed the NRC review and presented an opportunity for the industry to improve the submittal. A summary of the major changes from the February submittal is provided in Enclosure 1. The resulting package (Enclosures 2 through 8), which supercedes the earlier version in its entirety, is enclosed for your endorsement. Although the events of the last ten months have resulted in some changes to the industry steam generator program guidance, the fundamental principles remain sound. Equally as important, the program has demonstrated its resiliency. The steam generator program guidance is designed to accommodate new knowledge and experience, and that is precisely what is occurring. The enclosed Generic License Change Package includes changes that reflect recent experience. In addition, the appropriate underlying technical documents are currently being revised or supplemental guidance is being developed as necessary to reflect new information. The industry and the NRC worked diligently to address the technical and licensing issues that ultimately resulted in the February 2000 version of the Steam Generator Program Generic License Change Package. Although these documents have been revised since the previous submittal, the differences do not represent a change in our position on the issues.

David J. Modeen; Mr. Samuel; J. Collins; U. S. Nuclear; Regulatory Commission; Xuo Mr; Samuel J. Collins

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

U.S. Percent Utilization of Refinery Operable Capacity (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual : Download Data (XLS File) U.S. Percent Utilization of Refinery Operable Capacity (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1985: 74.0 ...

26

Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: 1970-1991  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive overview of the ownership of the U.S. electric power industry over the past two decades, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects.

Information Center

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Changing Trends in the Refining Industry (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

There have been some major changes in the U.S. refining industry recently, prompted in part by a significant decline in the quality of imported crude oil and by increasing restrictions on the quality of finished products. As a result, high-quality crudes, such as the WTI crude that serves as a benchmark for oil futures on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), have been trading at record premiums to the OPEC Basket price.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

29

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

30

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

31

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

32

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

33

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

34

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

35

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

36

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

37

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

38

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

39

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

40

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

42

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

43

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

44

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

45

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

46

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

47

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

48

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

49

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

50

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

51

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

52

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

53

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

54

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

55

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

56

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

57

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

58

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

59

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

60

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

62

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

63

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

64

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

65

Performance issues for a changing electric power industry  

SciTech Connect

Extremely cold weather created record demands for electricity in the eastern two-thirds of the United States during the week of January 16, 1994. Fuel-related problems, mostly the result of transportation constraints resulting from ice accumulation on roads and water-ways, and unexpected generating capacity outages at utilities and nonutilities resulted in demand not being met. Some utilities asked nonessential customers along with State governments and a portion of the Federal Government to shut down. Two electric control areas, the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland Interconnection (PJM) and Virginia Electric & Power Company (VEPCO), instituted rolling blackouts. This disturbance was reported widely in the press and, along with other disturbances, peaked renewed interest in the reliability of the electric power system. The renewed interest in reliability has coincided with substantial changes that are beginning to occur in the structure and competitiveness of the electric power industry. Juxtaposing the question of reliability and the issue of changing industry structure leads to the central concern of this report: What effect, if any, will the changing structure of the industry have on the reliability of the system?

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" 1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Delaware"," W"," $28.49",," W",," $131.87"," 21.6%", 59," W"," 100.0%"

67

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" 9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $14.43",," W",," $65.38"," 22.1%"," 4,509"," W"," 81.8%"

68

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" 2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Florida"," W"," $38.51",," W",," $140.84"," 27.3%", 134," W"," 100.0%"

69

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" 0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $13.59",," W",," $63.63"," 21.4%"," 3,612"," W"," 100.0%"

70

Indiana, Illinois, and Kentucky Refining District Percent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indiana, Illinois, and Kentucky Refining District Percent Utilization of Refinery Operable Capacity (Percent)

71

Estimating energy-augmenting technological change in developing country industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trend due to the constant energy price bias assumption. ThisIndian industries, Energy price bias (standard error)industries, 1980–1997 Energy price bias (standard error)

Sanstad, Alan H.; Roy, Joyashree; Sathaye, Jayant A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

73

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

74

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

75

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

76

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

77

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

78

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

79

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

80

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

82

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

83

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

84

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

85

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

86

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

87

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

88

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

89

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

90

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

91

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

92

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

93

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

94

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

95

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

96

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

97

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

98

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

99

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

100

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

102

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

103

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

104

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

105

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

106

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

107

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

108

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

109

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

110

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

111

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

112

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

113

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

114

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Exploration of Innovation and An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Prepared by Margaret Taylor, K. Sydny Fujita, Larry Dale, and James McMahon For the European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy March 29, 2012 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL - 5689E An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and direction of technological change of product industries; the factors that underlie the outcomes of innovation in these industries; and the ways the innovation system might respond to any given intervention. The report provides an overview of the dynamics of energy efficiency policy and innovation in the appliance

115

Changing Trends in the Bulk Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Compared with the experience of the 1990s, rising energy prices in recent years have led to questions about expectations of growth in industrial output, particularly in energy-intensive industries. Given the higher price trends, a review of expected growth trends in selected industries was undertaken as part of the production of AEO2005. In addition, projections for the industrial value of shipments, which were based on the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system in AEO2004, are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) in AEO2005. The change in industrial classification leads to lower historical growth rates for many industrial sectors. The impacts of these two changes are highlighted in this section for two of the largest energy-consuming industries in the U.S. industrial sectorbulk chemicals and pulp and paper.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from refrigeration equipment used in industrial processesfrom refrigeration equipment used in industrial processesfrom refrigeration equipment used in industrial processes

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Understanding the Industrial Market Sector: Responding to Changing Energy Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial customers, particularly larger industrial customers, have always been an important customer population for energy providers. Because of their sometimes massive size, industrials have often had dedicated account representatives, and even customized rate plans and service delivery structures. As competition in energy markets develops, this population has often been the first customer population to encounter both the benefits and the problems associated with deregulation. It is important to recog...

1999-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

118

Understanding the Industrial Market Sector: Responding to Changing Energy Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial customers, particularly larger industrial customers, have always been an important customer population for energy providers. Because of their sometimes massive size, industrials have often had dedicated account representatives, and even customized rate plans and service delivery structures. As competition in energy markets develops, this population has often been the first customer population to encounter both the benefits and the problems associated with deregulation. It is important to recog...

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

The changing structure of the electric power industry: An update  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. electric power industry today is on the road to restructuring a road heretofore uncharted. While parallels can be drawn from similar journeys taken by the airline industry, the telecommunications industry, and, most recently, the natural gas industry, the electric power industry has its own unique set of critical issues that must be resolved along the way. The transition will be from a structure based on a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to one equipped to function successfully in a competitive market. The long-standing traditional structure of the electric power industry is the result of a complex web of events that have been unfolding for over 100 years. Some of these events had far-reaching and widely publicized effects. Other major events took the form of legislation. Still other events had effects that are less obvious in comparison (e.g., the appearance of technologies such as transformers and steam and gas turbines, the invention of home appliances, the man-made fission of uranium), and it is likely that their significance in the history of the industry has been obscured by the passage of time. Nevertheless, they, too, hold a place in the underpinnings of today`s electric industry structure. The purpose of this report, which is intended for both lay and technical readers, is twofold. First, it is a basic reference document that provides a comprehensive delineation of the electric power industry and its traditional structure, which has been based upon its monopoly status. Second, it describes the industry`s transition to a competitive environment by providing a descriptive analysis of the factors that have contributed to the interest in a competitive market, proposed legislative and regulatory actions, and the steps being taken by the various components of the industry to meet the challenges of adapting to and prevailing in a competitive environment.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Variable Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Gross Domestic Product Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2) 1.0 42.6 Petroleum Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a) 35.2 18.6 Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b) 34.7 19.7 Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4) 6.2 66.5 Crude Oil Production (Table 5) 6.0 59.6 Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6) 13.3 67.0 Natural Gas Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Constant $) (Table 7a) 30.7 26.1 Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Nominal $) (Table 7b) 30.0 27.1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (Table 8) 7.8 70.2 Natural Gas Production (Table 9) 7.1 66.0 Natural Gas Net Imports (Table 10) 29.3 69.7 Coal Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants (Constant $)** (Table 11a)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxide emission reductions in industry in the EU. Europeanissues: Annual survey of industries. Central StatisticalDesiccated coconut industry of Sri- Lanka’s opportunities

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Oil, gas tanker industry responding to demand, contract changes  

SciTech Connect

Steady if slower growth in demand for crude oil and natural gas, low levels of scrapping, and a moderate newbuilding pace bode well for the world`s petroleum and natural-gas shipping industries. At year-end 1997, several studies of worldwide demand patterns and shipping fleets expressed short and medium-term optimism for seaborne oil and gas trade and fleet growth. The paper discusses steady demand and shifting patterns, the aging fleet, the slowing products traffic, the world`s fleet, gas carriers, LPG demand, and LPG vessels.

True, W.R.

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

124

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the paper, glass or ceramics industry) making it difficulttechnology in the ceramic manufacturing industry. industries: iron and steel, non-ferrous metals, chemicals (including fertilisers), petroleum refining, minerals (cement, lime, glass and ceramics) and

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the iron and steel industry: a global model. Energy, 30,report of the world steel industry 2005. International Irontrends in the iron and steel industry. Energy Policy, 30,

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry 2000: An Update, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides a comprehensive overview of the structure of the U.S. electric power industry over the past 10 years, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects

Information Center

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Potential industrial applications for composite phase-change materials as thermal energy storage media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable effort has been spent by the US Department of Energy and its contractors over the last few years to develop composite phase-change materials (CPCMs) for thermal energy storage (TES). This patented TES medium consists of a phase-change material (typically a salt or metal alloy) that is retained within the porous structure of a supporting material (typically a ceramic). The objectives of this study were to (1) introduce CPCMs to industries that may not otherwise be aware of them, (2) identify potentially attractive applications for CPCM in industry, (3) determine technical requirements that will affect the design of CPCM's for specific applications, and (4) generate interest among industrial firms for employing CPCM TES in their processes. The approach in this study was to examine a wide variety of industries using a series of screens to select those industries that would be most likely to adopt CPCM TES in their processes. The screens used in this study were process temperature, presence of time-varying energy flows, energy intensity of the industry, and economic growth prospects over the next 5 years. After identifying industries that passed all of the screens, representatives of each industry were interviewed by telephone to introduce them to CPCM TES, assess technical requirements for CPCM TES in their industry, and determine their interest in pursuing applications for CPCM TES. 11 refs., 4 tabs.

Spanner, G.E.; Wilfert, G.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

This Traveler is the industry’s Steam Generator Program Generic License Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Package (GLCP) that we have been developing in coordination with the NRC staff for the past several years. The format of the documents in this submittal has been changed from the GLCP that the staff has reviewed previously in order to comply with standard technical specification convention, but the information contained therein is unchanged. The information in this Traveler is consistent with the Catawba license amendment request for steam generator technical specification changes that was submitted by the licensee on February 25, 2003. The two submittals need to remain consistent to ensure an unambiguous template for other licensees to follow when submitting related steam generator technical specification changes. We therefore request that your review of these two submittals proceed in parallel.

Anthony R. Pietrangelo; Dr. William; D. Beckner

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power in US industry. Energy Policy, 29, pp. 1243-1254.Paris. IEA, 2004: Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Finlandand steel industry. Energy Policy, 30, pp. 827-838. Kim, Y.

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Michigan Natural Gas Percentage Total Industrial Deliveries (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 3.91: 4.01: 3.81: 3.91: 2.86: 2.59: 2.96: 2000's: 2.91: 3.05: 3.15: 2.98: 2.91 ...

131

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Utah Represented...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 8.9 8.6 9.5 2000's 10.0 10.4 13.6 13.6 19.8 19.5 20.1 14.1 12.7 12.2 2010's 12.1 12.7 11.0...

132

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Hampshire Represented  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 13.5 16.2 17.9 15.4 9.9 5.0 3.7 8.5 13.7 14.1 17.5 16.5 2002 16.4 11.2 14.6 9.0 8.3 9.0 5.2 10.1 7.7 29.4 32.3 17.4 2003 6.7 7.2 19.4 17.0 10.6 13.5 13.0 12.3 13.4 15.5 21.1 26.3 2004 30.3 9.1 10.7 10.4 7.1 5.5 3.9 4.3 5.6 8.7 9.7 17.0 2005 17.6 17.5 12.0 6.5 6.9 6.6 3.3 10.0 5.5 6.4 13.7 13.0 2006 16.3 24.3 18.2 18.2 17.7 12.9 4.8 9.1 8.0 12.8 8.8 15.6 2007 11.7 16.6 12.0 8.4 15.3 8.9 5.4 7.0 6.0 8.5 10.7 45.8 2008 23.0 22.9 22.0 15.0 16.4 16.2 14.6 12.3 11.2 13.6 16.1 20.0 2009 30.5 28.1 25.0 16.7 15.5 16.3 14.5 13.7 13.3 16.5 18.7 23.1 2010 18.0 16.4 15.4 12.2 10.3 8.8 8.6 10.9 8.0 10.7 13.6 14.1

133

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Ohio Represented...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 5.7 4.3 4.1 2000's 5.3 6.5 4.0 3.9 3.5 3.6 3.0 2.7 2.7 2.8 2010's 2.1 2...

134

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Wisconsin Represented...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 25.3 26.6 26.1 18.3 12.5 11.2 12.3 12.4 10.9 15.9 19.9 23.0 2002 25.3 23.6 25.8 21.2 18.5 14.3 11.1 13.3 14.7 20.9 24.7...

135

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Wisconsin Represented...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 27.1 22.0 20.2 2000's 22.1 19.5 21.4 20.2 18.8 18.1 18.3 18.5 18.3 18.1 2010's 17.4 17.8 17.6...

136

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Pennsylvania...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 14.3 13.1 11.8 2000's 11.8 9.9 7.3 6.6 6.4 7.0 5.5 5.4 5.7 4.5 2010's 3.8 2.0...

137

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Pennsylvania...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17.0 16.4 11.3 10.2 7.7 5.1 7.3 7.5 8.2 8.8 7.3 8.4 2002 8.8 8.3 7.0 5.9 5.7 5.5 4.8 5.0 7.2 7.5 8.1 11.4 2003 8.5 8.5 8.8...

138

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Michigan Represented...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 12.5 10.8 11.1 2000's 10.2 11.3 10.2 10.9 10.7 10.1 10.2 12.6 12.5 11.8 2010's 8.8 9.3 7.6...

139

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Michigan Represented...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 18.6 17.2 15.3 13.3 9.0 5.7 5.4 5.8 6.0 7.3 9.9 12.0 2002 14.4 13.3 14.0 11.4 8.1 5.7 4.3 5.2 3.9 6.5 10.9 17.6 2003 15.4...

140

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.0 2.5 2.7 2000's 2.7 2.2 2.0 2.1 2.4 2.3 2.1 2.0 1.9 1.7 2010's 1.8 2.0 1.9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3.3 3.2 2.5 2.2 1.9 1.6 1.5 1.8 1.6 1.5 1.8 2.3 2002 2.7 2.9 2.7 2.5 0.9 1.9 1.8 2.0 1.4 1.6 1.3 2.3 2003 2.2 2.5 2.1 1.8...

142

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Vermont Represented...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 100.0 100.0 76.6 2000's 83.8 75.4 74.7 78.8 78.3 81.7 78.4 78.0 79.6 77.9 2010's 77.1 80.9...

143

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Colorado Represented...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 7.3 7.6 7.1 2000's 1.8 0.7 1.2 0.9 0.8 0.6 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.5 2010's 5.2 7.6 6.7...

144

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Illinois Represented...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 14.3 14.6 11.7 8.9 7.1 6.7 5.8 6.1 7.5 8.7 10.3 12.1 2002 11.2 11.2 11.1 10.3 7.6 7.2 3.9 5.4 6.6 9.4 10.7 12.6 2003 13.4...

145

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Illinois Represented...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 11.5 9.3 9.1 2000's 9.0 9.9 9.3 9.9 9.0 9.5 8.7 9.5 9.4 7.7 2010's 7.4 6.3 NA...

146

The changing structure of the electric power industry: Selected issues, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 3,000 electric utilities in the United States provide electricity to sustain the Nation`s economic growth and promote the well-being of its inhabitants. At the end of 1996, the net generating capability of the electric power industry stood at more than 776,000 megawatts. Sales to ultimate consumers in 1996 exceeded 3.1 trillion kilowatthours at a total cost of more than $210 billion. In addition, the industry added over 9 million new customers during the period from 1990 through 1996. The above statistics provide an indication of the size of the electric power industry. Propelled by events of the recent past, the industry is currently in the midst of changing from a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to a functionally unbundled industry with a competitive market for power generation. Advances in power generation technology, perceived inefficiencies in the industry, large variations in regional electricity prices, and the trend to competitive markets in other regulated industries have all contributed to the transition. Industry changes brought on by this movement are ongoing, and the industry will remain in a transitional state for the next few years or more. During the transition, many issues are being examined, evaluated, and debated. This report focuses on three of them: how wholesale and retail prices have changed since 1990; the power and ability of independent system operators (ISOs) to provide transmission services on a nondiscriminatory basis; and how issues that affect consumer choice, including stranded costs and the determination of retail prices, may be handled either by the US Congress or by State legislatures.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Frequency Response Adequacy and Assessment: Global Industry Practices and Potential Impact of Changing Generation Mix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry, the North American Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) have expressed concerns about frequency response of the North American power system, which has declined over the past few decades.  The industry is concerned about having adequate primary frequency control (governing), automatic generation control (AGC), operating reserve and ramping resources to meet frequency response needs, in light of the changing generation ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Frequency Response Adequacy and Assessment: Global Industry Practices and Potential Impact of Changing Generation Mix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry, the North American Reliability Corporation (NERC), and the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) have expressed concerns about frequency response of the North American power system, which has supposedly declined over the past few decades. In light of the changing generation mix due to increasing penetration of variable generation and planned retirement of fossil-fired generation, the industry is concerned about having adequate primary frequency control ...

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

149

Percent Yield and Mass of Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Percent Yield and Mass of Water Percent Yield and Mass of Water Name: Lisa Status: educator Grade: 9-12 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: When doing a percent yield activity in lab, we use MgCl hexahydrate and CaSO4. How do we factor the mass of the water that is released during the reaction? Replies: Lisa, Based on your question, I am not quite sure what the experiment is. Are you heating the hydrates and looking at the percent-yield of water removed during the heating? If so, then you would calculate the theoretical yield (using stoichiometry and the balanced chemical equation: MgCl2.6H2O --> MgCl2 + 6H2O) of water released, and compare it to the actual yield of water released in the experiment to get percent yield. Greg (Roberto Gregorius) Canisius College

150

Photovoltaic industry proposed changes for the 1999 national electrical code for PV applications  

SciTech Connect

An industry supported task group has recently completed writing proposals for changes in bring Article 690 of the 1999 National Electrical Code (NEC{reg_sign}) up to the state-of-the-art in photovoltaic device and system technology. This paper summarizes proposed code changes, discusses background on both new and changed, and presents examples for the proposed changes. Topics such as the proposed new temperature compensation table for calculating maximum system voltage are analyzed. Procedures for calculating conductor sizes with the proposed changes are presented. Impacts on photovoltaic installations, building integrated systems, and AC module installations are also analyzed.

Bower, W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiles, J.C. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Institute

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and...

152

Michigan Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution Companies (Percent)

153

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

milling industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantcement mak- ing - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantre- fineries - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

District of Columbia Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution Companies (Percent) District of Columbia Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution...

155

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota Represented by the Price (Percent) Percent of Commercial Natural Gas...

156

Development of an expert system for tackling the public's perception to climate-change impacts on petroleum industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change could cause significant impacts on human activities, which is especially true for regions that are of high latitude such as Canada. Petroleum industry is a main economic sector in Canada's prairie, where a number of its production and ... Keywords: Adaptation, Climate change, Expert system, Knowledge acquisition, Petroleum industry

Y. F. Huang; G. H. Huang; Z. Y. Hu; I. Maqsood; A. Chakma

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial 8,870,422 44.3% Commercial 3,158,244 15.8% Electric Utilities 2,732,496 13.7% Residential 5,241,414 26.2% Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." T e x a s L o u i s i a n a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Industrial Billion Cubic Meters T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Utilities Billion Cubic Meters N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Commercial Billion Cubic Meters I l l i n o i s C a l i f o r n i a N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Billion Cubic Meters 11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1996 Figure Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Energy Information Administration

158

The changing structure of the US coal industry: An update, July 1993  

SciTech Connect

Section 205(a)(2) of the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 requires the Administrator of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to carry out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program that will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information relevant to energy resources, reserves, production, demand, technology, and related economic and statistical information. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive overview of changes in the structure of the US coal industry between 1976 and 1991. The structural elements examined include the number of mines, average mine size, the size distribution of mines, and the size distribution of coal firms. The report measures changes in the market shares of the largest coal producers at the national level and in various regions. The Central Appalachian low-sulfur coal market is given special attention, and the market for coal reserves is examined. A history of mergers in the coal industry is presented, and changes in the proportions of US coal output that are produced by various types of companies, including foreign-controlled firms, are described. Finally, the impact of post-1991 mergers on the structure of the industry is estimated. The legislation that created the EIA vested the organization with an element of statutory independence. The EIA does not take positions on policy questions. The EIA`s responsibility is to provide timely, high-quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of deliberations by both public and private decisionmakers. Accordingly, this report does not purport to represent the policy positions of the US Department of Energy or the Administration.

Not Available

1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

159

Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Decade...

160

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hawaii Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Hawaii Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Hawaii Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

162

Missouri Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Missouri Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Missouri Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

163

Alaska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Alaska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Alaska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

164

Arizona Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arizona Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Arizona Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

165

Iowa Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Iowa Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Iowa Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Decade...

166

Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

167

Florida Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Florida Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Florida Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

168

Wyoming Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Wyoming Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

169

Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

170

Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

171

Nevada Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Nevada Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Nevada Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

172

Oregon Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oregon Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Oregon Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

173

Kansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Kansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Kansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

174

Tennessee Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Tennessee Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Tennessee Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

175

Maine Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Maine Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Maine Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Decade...

176

Panel: Regulatory governance and adaptation to climate change GREEN POLITICS AND NEW INDUSTRIAL OPPORTUNITIES: THE AQUITAINE PAPER INDUSTRY AND BIOMASS COGENERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: As the European forest industry takes up the challenge of certification, it is also called upon to develop a strategy which mitigates the effects of climate change. From the latter perspective, the forest industry is solicited to pursue the carbon neutrality of its activity (through the Exchange Trade System). Today, public policies have thus led the forestry industry to develop green energy by biomass cogeneration. Cogeneration is the simultaneous production of electricity and heat, both of which are used in paper-making. The aim of policy is to extend such production of electricity to cover domestic consumption. Such a path makes the forest and paper industries go deeper in the sustainability of their activities but it also makes them develop new strategies. From the point of view of political science, this new policy and industrial orientation can be best examined through analyzing the making and implementing of the territorial environmental strategies that cover both certification and forestry programs. In industrial terms, such a strategy not only challenges current practices of local resources provision and the valorisation of wood wastes, but more fundamentally still it constitutes the development of a new path, a new market and new constraints (in terms of norms and competition). The aim of our proposal is to highlight the displacements of

Yves Montouroy I; Arnaud Sergent Ii

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Industrial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Despite a 54-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial energy...

178

Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Commercial Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Deliveries (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Commercial Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

179

Utah Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Utah Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

180

California Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) California Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ohio Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Ohio Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

182

Wisconsin Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Wisconsin Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

183

Michigan Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Michigan Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

184

Idaho Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Idaho Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

185

Vermont Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Vermont Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

186

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

187

Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

188

New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

189

New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Vehicle Fuel Deliveries (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vehicle Fuel Deliveries (Percent) New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Vehicle Fuel Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

190

Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

191

Utah Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

192

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

193

Kansas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kansas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

194

Kentucky Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kentucky Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

195

Mississippi Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

196

West Virginia Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

197

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

198

Alabama Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alabama Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

199

North Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

200

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Florida Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

202

California Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

203

United States Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

204

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

205

Colorado Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

206

Texas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

207

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

208

North Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

209

Wyoming Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wyoming Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

210

Florida Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

211

Michigan Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

212

United States Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

213

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

214

South Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

215

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

216

Third-World Copycats to Emerging Multinationals: Institutional Changes and Organizational Transformation in the Indian Pharmaceutical Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article investigates how Indian pharmaceutical firms, facing discontinuous institutional changes in their domestic environment due to economic liberalization and intellectual property reforms, have undertaken organizational transformation. Internationalization ... Keywords: business groups, economic liberalization, emerging economies, emerging multinationals, globalization, pharmaceutical industry, resource internationalization

Raveendra Chittoor; MB Sarkar; Sougata Ray; Preet S. Aulakh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Presentation 2.3: The sustainable forest products industry, carbon and climate change Mikael Hannus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumption within the industry. · To assist in the efforts to reduce society's energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, the forest products industry can - become more energy efficient and increase its share of biomass in energy production; - help supply society with increasing amounts of wood and fibre for use as a raw

218

Climate Change Concerns and the Likely Impacts on Industrial Energy R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Last December, US negotiators agreed to commit the U.S. to a binding target of reducing its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 30% below business-as-usual (BAU) projections by 1990. Since U.S. Industry is responsible for more than 40% of GHG emissions, efforts to achieve this goal must involve industry. The most cost effective, politically acceptable and sustainable way to reduce GHGs is to invest in low or zero carbon generation technology and energy efficiency. Therefore, industry needs to begin to incorporate GHG emission reduction considerations into its R&D decision making processes. Recently, several industries have worked with government on developing technology roadmaps. This paper describes a structured systematic methodology for companies to develop technology road maps that include GHG emissions reduction goals. It includes a framework to include assessments of various energy generation and energy efficiency technology areas in determining optimum R&D priorities for various industries. It also provides for cross-industry partnerships involving the suppliers and service industries. It also allows consideration of related policy issues such as Clean Air Act implementation, electric utility restructuring and federal tax reform.

Foust, T. D.; Kaarsberg, T. M.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Changing Structure of Electric Power Industry 1999: Mergers and Other Corporate Combinations, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents data about corporate combinations involving investor-owned utilities in the United States, discusses corporate objectives for entering into such combinations, and assesses their cumulative effects on the structure of the electric power industry.

Information Center

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Utah Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

California Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

222

Ohio Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

223

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

224

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

225

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

226

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

227

Texas Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

228

United States Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

229

United States Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

230

Michigan Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

231

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

232

Wt% = Weight percent of undissolved solids in the slurry = Density ...  

high-level radioactive waste stored in underground, tanks at the Hanford site. The ability to continuously monitor the solids weight percent of mixed slurries in these

233

Montana Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Montana Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

234

Ohio Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

235

Florida Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

236

Kentucky Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kentucky Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

237

Arkansas Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Arkansas Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

238

Tennessee Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tennessee Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

239

West Virginia Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

240

Colorado Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Missouri Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

242

Wyoming Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wyoming Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

243

Alaska Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alaska Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

244

South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

245

South Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

246

South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries...

247

New Mexico Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New Mexico Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

248

North Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) North Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

249

New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

250

North Carolina Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Carolina Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) North Carolina Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

251

West Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) West Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

252

Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

253

Impacts of a 10-Percent Renewable Portfolio Standard  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This service report addresses the renewable portfolio standard provision of S. 1766. At Senator Murkowski's request it also includes an analysis of the impacts of a renewable portfolio standard patterned after the one called for in S. 1766, but where the required share is based on a 20 percent RPS by 2020 rather than the 10 percent RPS called for in S. 1766.

Alan Beamon

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Changing role of the nonfuel mineral industry in the state and local economies of Arizona (1981-1986)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bureau of Mines is currently analyzing the impacts of changes in nonfuel mineral industry activity upon regional economies. As part of the project the Bureau examined the impacts on Arizona and four of its counties resulting from significant changes in nonfuel mineral production between 1981 and 1986. Regional input-output models for Arizona and the counties of Gila, Greenlee, Pima, and Pinal were developed through IMPLAN, the U.S. Forest Service's economic impact model. These models generated multipliers to measure total impacts of changes in activity on employment, earnings, and indirect business taxes. From 1981 to 1983 metallic nonfuel mineral production in Arizona declined significantly. Findings show that county economies are quite sensitive to changes in nonfuel mineral production.

Opyrchal, A.M.; Swisko, G.M.; Adams, R.L.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The role of ICT in Korea's economic growth: Productivity changes across industries since the 1990s  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the hypothesis that technological convergence has been a major driving force for the recent productivity increase in Korea. Based on the dynamic panel data of Korean industries, the direct impact of information and communication ... Keywords: ICT development, Productivity, Regulatory policy, Technological convergence

Hyun-Joon Jung, Kyoung-Youn Na, Chang-Ho Yoon

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Energy and Economic Impacts of Implementing Both a 25-Percent RPS and a 25-Percent RFS by 2025  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report responds to a request by Senator James Inhofe for analysis of a "25-by-25" proposal that combines a requirement that a 25-percent share of electricity sales be produced from renewable sources by 2025 with a requirement that a 25-percent share of liquid transportation fuel sales also be derived from renewable sources by 2025.

John J. Conti

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal November 3, 2005 - 12:35pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the federal government has exceeded its goal of obtaining 2.5 percent of its electricity needs from renewable energy sources by September 30, 2005. The largest energy consumer in the nation, the federal government now uses 2375 Gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy -- enough to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important that all Americans - including the

258

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal November 3, 2005 - 12:35pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the federal government has exceeded its goal of obtaining 2.5 percent of its electricity needs from renewable energy sources by September 30, 2005. The largest energy consumer in the nation, the federal government now uses 2375 Gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy -- enough to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important that all Americans - including the

259

BOSS Measures the Universe to One-Percent Accuracy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This and future measures at this precision are the key to determining the nature of dark energy. "One-percent accuracy in the scale of the universe is the most precise such...

260

Impacts of a 15-Percent Renewable Portfolio Standard  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This analysis responds to a request from Senator Jeff Bingaman that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) analyze a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring that 15 percent of U.S. electricity sales be derived from qualifying renewable energy resources.

Alan Beamon

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The effects of regional climate change on space conditioning needs and the energy industry in the Great Lakes region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, studies of the effects of potential climate change on energy use and demand have been done on a macro scale or with coarse model data but, in reality, regional climate change effects will determine the actual behavior of energy users. The output from a 3-year simulation of the coupled NCAR CCM/MM4 regional climate modeling system is used to examine changes in average temperature and temperature variability on a regional scale, the impacts of such change on the need for space conditioning in the Great Lakes region, and the subsequent changes in energy demand. The NCAR modeling system uses general circulation model results to drive a more highly resolved mesoscale model to produce a detailed regional climate. A 3-year run of both base case and doubled CO{sub 2} climate for the United States has been produced. From these results, changes in heating and cooling degree days, and changes in consecutive days above or below various temperature thresholds were calculated. Heating and cooling energy use intensities that are representative of the residential building stock found in the region were used to convert climate data to energy demand. The implications for the energy industry are discussed. The model results indicate that the changed climate under doubled carbon dioxide conditions would have large impacts on energy use, although it is difficult to determine the balance between decreased heating needs and increased cooling needs. It was found that biases present in the temperature output of the modeling system are greater for the Great Lakes region than for the rest of the U.S. and limit the usefulness of the present data set for determining the effects of climate change on energy use in that area.

Fernau, M.E.; Maloney, E.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bates, G.T. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

FERC`s {open_quotes}MegaNOPR{close_quotes} - changes ahead for the natural gas industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On July 31, 1991 the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NOPR) that would fundamentally change the current scheme of transportation and sales of natural gas by interstate pipelines. FERC`s proposal will result in disparate impacts on the various segments of the natural gas industry. These impacts and the major policy issues sought for implementation by FERC can be grouped into five major points, discussed in this article: unbundling of service; pregrated abandonment; capacity reallocation; rate design; and transition/implementation costs.

Stosser, M.A. [Arnold & Porter, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Industrial Utilization of Surfactants: Principles & PracticeChapter 2 How the Adsorption of Surfactants Changes the Properties of Interfaces and Related Performance Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Utilization of Surfactants: Principles & Practice Chapter 2 How the Adsorption of Surfactants Changes the Properties of Interfaces and Related Performance Properties Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents

264

Industrial Utilization of Surfactants: Principles & PracticeChapter 3 How Surfactants Change the Internal Properties of the Solution Phase and Related Performance Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Utilization of Surfactants: Principles & Practice Chapter 3 How Surfactants Change the Internal Properties of the Solution Phase and Related Performance Properties Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents P

265

New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Industrial Delivered for the...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Industrial Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

266

New Mexico Natural Gas Percentage Total Industrial Deliveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Deliveries (Percent) New Mexico Natural Gas Percentage Total Industrial Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

267

U.S. Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edison Electric Institute (EEI) is the association of U.S. shareholder-owned electric companies, international affiliates and industry associates worldwide. Our U.S. members serve over 90 percent of all customers served by the shareholder-owned segment of the industry. They generate approximately three-quarters of all the electricity generated by electric companies in the country and service about 70 percent of all ultimate customers in the nation. Organized in 1933 and incorporated in 1970, EEI works closely with its members, representing their interests and advocating equitable policies in legislative and regulatory arenas. In its leadership role, the Institute provides authoritative analysis and critical industry data to its members, Congress, government agencies, the financial community and other influential audiences. EEI provides forums for member company representatives to discuss issues and strategies to advance the industry and to ensure a competitive position in a changing marketplace. EEI’s mission is to ensure members ’ success in a new competitive environment by:

Eric Hirst; Brendan Kirby; Eric Hirst; Brendan Kirby

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

NETL: News Release - President's Initiative to Seek 90 Percent Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 21, 2004 April 21, 2004 President's Initiative to Seek 90 Percent Mercury Removal We Energies to Test TOXECON(tm) Process in Michigan Coal-fired Power Plant WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) and We Energies today initiated a joint venture to demonstrate technology that will remove an unprecedented 90 percent of mercury emissions from coal-based power plants. Presque Isle Power Plant - We Energies' Presque Isle Power Plant located on the shores of Lake Superior in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. As part of the President's Clean Coal Power Initiative of technology development and demonstration, the new project supports current proposals to reduce mercury emissions in the range of 70 percent through a proposed regulation pending before the Environmental Protection Agency or, in the

269

Electricity matters: A new incentives approach for a changing electric industry  

SciTech Connect

The method of regulating a utility`s rates should be changed fundamentally to promote responses to competition. An approach that addresses price caps, profit sharing and affords flexibility in pricing can offer utilities and those they serve a {open_quotes}win-win{close_quotes} scenario. U.S. businesses face fiercely difficult challenges to compete in the global marketplace, requiring many firms to search for new and innovative competitive strategies. American business must make fundamental changes to cope with the forces of competition - or risk going out of business. Electricity suppliers can facilitate economic progress by providing cost-effective, high-quality and reliable service to their customers. But as many utility managers know too well, this goal is not easy to achieve. For regulators, it is important to frame and resolve the issues in a proactive way. At the outset, American electric utilities must have strong incentives to be efficient. The purpose of this paper is to explore some of the incentive regulation techniques, such as price-cap regulation, which U.S. and foreign electric utilities should use to facilitate change. These techniques can better accomodate the current mixed competitive and regulated environment while providing an appropriate transition to a dynamically competitive electric services market.

Olson, W.P.; Costello, K.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Dairy Industry under New Zealand's Emissions Trading Scheme: Analysis of Farmers' Attitudes towards Climate Change: The Expense Created by the NZETS and the Point that Farmers will Begin to Reduce Emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Adaptation to actual climate change and contingency planning to reduce vulnerability from likely climate change effects is crucial for the New Zealand dairy industry. Thus… (more)

Fowles, Craig

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 4.3: 4.3: 4.3: ...

272

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: 4.4: 4.6: 4.5: 4.3: 4.1: 4.2: 4.4: 4.3: ...

273

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",85.5450237,89.00343643,88.75545852,89.42917548,87.25590956,92.08566108 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",77.22222222,"NA",79.16666667,82.9015544,75.38461538,85.09615385 " New England",88.37209302,"NA",81.81818182,82.9787234,82,88.52459016 " Middle Atlantic ",73.72262774,"NA",78.37837838,82.31292517,74.30555556,83.67346939 " Midwest ",85.51401869,"NA",90.66666667,90.17094017,92.30769231,91.47286822 " East North Central",82,"NA",88.81987578,89.88095238,91.51515152,90.55555556

274

Development of a Dedicated 100 Percent Ventilation Air Heat Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of using dedicated 100 percent ventilation makeup air conditioning units to meet indoor air quality standards is attractive because of the inherent advantages. However, it is challenging to design and build direct expansion unitary equipment for this purpose. EPRI teamed with ClimateMaster to develop and test a prototype of a vapor compression heat pump to advance the state of the art in such equipment. The prototype unit provides deep dehumidification and cooling of ventilation air in the su...

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

275

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Jersey Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 29.3 31.1 27.6 21.9 21.2 19.6 18.6 15.6 18.5 16.8 15.6 21.1 2002 23.5 22.2 23.5 21.5 18.7 18.3 17.4 16.9 18.0 18.5 22.1 26.0 2003 21.1 23.1 26.0 26.8 23.9 18.0 15.3 17.3 13.3 14.9 13.0 18.4 2004 19.5 22.5 18.1 16.6 15.0 13.7 11.6 15.1 13.6 13.6 15.4 18.5 2005 22.4 22.7 21.9 17.6 15.7 15.4 17.7 20.4 16.9 19.4 20.1 25.4 2006 23.6 22.4 21.6 19.0 17.0 16.3 18.5 19.1 15.6 16.6 19.9 21.8 2007 21.5 23.6 20.8 23.0 17.1 17.5 17.7 19.8 19.9 20.0 21.2 23.1 2008 16.5 15.9 16.1 9.9 11.1 8.6 4.0 5.6 4.6 7.7 9.7 13.7 2009 18.4 13.1 12.9 6.5 4.2 4.2 3.1 3.9 4.9 6.2 8.8 11.6 2010 14.6 17.7 9.8 7.1 4.9 3.6 3.0 3.5 3.0 4.2 6.8 12.3

276

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Iowa Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9.5 10.3 7.4 5.5 6.3 3.3 6.0 4.5 5.4 7.8 10.9 9.9 2002 8.5 5.3 8.3 6.1 4.9 5.4 5.4 5.2 5.6 10.4 12.8 10.2 2003 10.3 8.9 9.3 6.7 5.2 6.0 5.5 5.6 6.3 8.8 10.6 9.1 2004 10.4 8.9 8.8 5.7 4.9 5.3 4.0 4.8 5.1 8.4 16.2 12.9 2005 11.8 9.6 9.8 7.7 7.8 8.0 8.8 8.3 9.1 11.5 12.5 10.7 2006 10.3 9.5 9.6 6.1 7.4 6.4 5.7 6.7 7.1 9.4 11.9 10.2 2007 8.9 8.1 6.4 6.1 5.8 5.2 4.2 5.0 5.8 6.6 7.0 7.5 2008 7.9 6.5 5.8 5.0 6.0 5.0 4.6 5.0 5.1 7.2 9.1 10.2 2009 6.9 7.2 6.4 4.7 4.3 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.3 7.3 9.4 10.2 2010 9.3 7.6 5.7 4.9 4.2 4.3 4.4 5.5 5.6 5.0 5.5 6.5 2011 6.5 6.5 5.5 5.3 4.6 5.1 4.2 4.4 5.9 5.6 6.2 5.8

277

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6.1 4.5 3.5 4.7 5.9 3.6 1.9 2.9 2.5 2.5 3.3 4.0 2002 4.1 4.5 4.1 3.6 3.5 4.2 3.2 3.5 3.9 3.4 3.8 4.4 2003 4.2 5.9 4.4 3.9 3.5 3.7 3.3 2.6 3.7 3.2 4.4 3.3 2004 4.6 3.8 4.2 3.3 3.3 3.7 2.9 3.2 4.4 3.3 4.1 3.6 2005 2.7 4.1 3.8 3.4 3.1 3.2 3.4 3.5 3.4 3.7 3.5 3.6 2006 3.0 2.8 3.0 2.8 2.3 2.4 5.3 2.9 3.0 2.4 4.2 3.1 2007 2.6 3.1 3.5 2.3 2.9 4.0 2.8 2.6 3.6 2.5 3.7 3.6 2008 2.9 3.3 3.4 2.5 2.9 2.4 2.8 2.5 3.2 3.0 3.3 3.3 2009 3.5 3.4 4.8 3.3 3.1 2.8 2.8 2.9 2.8 3.4 3.1 2.8 2010 2.6 3.4 2.9 2.7 3.6 2.3 2.5 5.1 3.0 2.8 2.8 2.6 2011 3.1 4.3 2.6 2.8 2.8 2.6 2.9 2.9 2.8 3.1 3.8 2.4

278

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Alaska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 99.6 99.6 99.6 99.7 97.1 92.7 90.5 89.6 94.4 94.9 99.3 99.3 2002 99.3 99.2 99.2 99.3 80.9 79.0 78.8 78.4 86.9 99.4 96.3 99.6 2003 97.3 98.3 81.5 78.0 62.0 62.8 61.5 54.7 55.2 70.5 100.0 95.4 2004 94.3 77.2 72.2 65.1 68.5 66.1 60.9 54.9 55.5 58.7 76.9 73.3 2005 76.0 75.0 71.9 66.3 71.4 64.0 61.8 63.1 67.6 76.6 70.9 69.0 2006 66.8 63.2 71.2 60.6 60.5 63.6 55.1 60.2 64.8 61.6 78.2 70.2 2007 77.8 76.7 78.2 73.6 78.3 72.5 59.1 59.3 73.8 63.5 71.8 68.8 2008 100.0 100.0 83.8 82.2 57.2 60.9 54.5 72.1 75.9 93.1 83.1 100.0 2009 77.2 77.4 82.7 70.6 44.2 54.8 55.5 78.9 84.3 79.0 82.4 83.1

279

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Indiana Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 15.1 14.0 7.1 7.1 4.2 3.7 5.2 1.0 5.5 8.3 6.6 10.2 2002 8.4 8.1 10.1 6.4 5.3 6.2 5.3 5.9 6.6 12.5 12.6 12.4 2003 14.2 12.9 8.9 7.2 7.0 5.9 6.2 5.7 9.3 6.2 11.3 9.3 2004 9.2 8.9 8.9 6.9 6.4 6.2 6.9 6.5 7.3 7.9 10.4 11.6 2005 9.8 7.7 9.6 5.8 6.3 5.5 5.5 6.7 8.2 8.2 10.6 8.9 2006 8.2 9.3 7.4 4.3 7.0 5.0 6.4 5.9 6.3 8.2 8.3 8.4 2007 9.3 9.4 5.8 7.6 6.1 5.5 6.0 5.0 6.9 6.8 9.5 9.1 2008 8.4 7.5 7.0 6.7 5.5 4.5 4.7 4.7 5.3 9.1 8.4 7.6 2009 8.6 8.5 5.3 6.3 7.1 6.2 6.8 5.0 6.2 7.8 6.8 8.1 2010 7.5 6.4 5.7 5.4 4.1 4.4 4.6 4.3 5.0 4.7 5.5 6.3 2011 4.5 4.8 4.8 3.5 3.4 3.2 3.5 2.2 2.5 2.4 3.1 4.0

280

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Utah Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 11.9 9.2 10.7 10.1 9.5 9.5 10.1 11.5 9.4 9.2 11.0 13.8 2002 14.0 13.8 12.6 15.8 13.0 13.4 12.1 13.6 13.5 12.8 15.0 13.7 2003 14.5 14.6 13.1 14.9 14.1 13.2 11.8 12.7 13.8 13.9 13.2 13.1 2004 13.8 15.2 13.3 14.6 12.7 12.7 18.4 46.5 26.9 24.3 23.4 23.8 2005 18.4 18.6 18.4 17.7 18.6 21.3 20.0 21.2 21.3 21.5 18.3 19.9 2006 22.3 23.2 22.5 24.0 24.0 24.7 24.2 13.9 13.4 15.3 15.8 16.0 2007 14.4 13.6 14.4 14.6 13.3 12.7 14.5 14.9 13.8 13.4 14.2 14.8 2008 13.5 13.1 13.1 12.4 12.7 12.8 13.2 12.1 11.6 12.0 12.7 12.3 2009 13.3 10.3 12.0 9.8 11.7 12.8 11.6 13.4 14.0 13.1 12.0 12.5 2010 12.0 9.8 10.9 11.7 12.0 13.3 13.2 12.6 13.4 12.8 11.9 12.6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maryland Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 15.4 11.4 9.7 7.2 6.7 4.5 9.7 6.3 6.3 7.0 6.6 10.3 2002 10.3 11.3 13.0 5.3 5.8 6.0 4.5 5.8 4.3 6.9 7.1 11.9 2003 10.5 13.2 11.4 9.1 7.8 6.6 6.3 6.2 7.1 12.1 11.9 12.9 2004 11.2 10.7 8.8 9.1 6.4 4.7 5.0 5.6 7.2 7.2 9.4 10.9 2005 11.3 11.5 11.3 9.8 5.5 5.1 4.9 5.3 5.2 6.2 9.4 10.7 2006 8.7 10.4 8.9 6.1 4.5 4.4 3.7 3.9 6.5 5.8 7.7 9.2 2007 13.1 13.7 11.0 9.9 6.1 3.7 4.5 3.8 6.9 3.5 8.4 10.4 2008 9.5 10.4 7.5 6.6 4.7 3.1 3.0 4.2 4.5 4.5 6.7 9.6 2009 12.8 10.9 8.0 4.2 1.7 2.2 2.0 2.0 3.6 2.8 3.4 7.6 2010 7.3 7.1 6.3 4.1 3.3 2.3 2.1 4.3 4.6 5.1 6.1 10.6 2011 11.3 10.0 8.0 7.2 4.2 3.5 2.2 3.6 3.9 3.9 4.9 5.0

282

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arizona Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 33.6 44.6 45.1 46.7 45.0 48.3 48.5 41.4 43.8 54.6 54.8 55.3 2002 55.5 54.5 47.0 46.9 41.4 41.7 36.1 34.9 36.7 33.1 32.9 33.0 2003 37.3 38.2 36.6 36.4 36.4 35.7 37.7 38.8 44.8 45.3 45.3 48.8 2004 58.9 65.1 52.4 51.8 51.2 55.8 50.6 52.0 51.7 53.3 55.4 57.8 2005 47.4 48.2 43.8 47.9 46.2 40.8 40.9 38.2 40.1 40.3 42.7 43.5 2006 37.1 41.1 37.8 37.6 36.4 37.6 38.3 35.9 37.9 39.7 37.1 37.6 2007 36.3 35.8 34.0 35.0 32.8 32.4 26.5 26.4 24.4 28.9 29.7 30.4 2008 32.5 30.5 30.2 27.5 28.3 30.7 25.9 25.0 28.6 30.6 31.5 31.3 2009 32.5 34.6 31.8 30.4 29.8 28.5 25.9 23.5 24.4 27.1 28.8 28.4 2010 28.6 28.5 25.4 26.7 21.9 22.5 21.3 21.4 22.8 24.5 29.0 27.8

283

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Colorado Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.2 0.6 1.2 2.9 2.8 1.7 0.4 0.4 0.1 2002 0.1 0.1 1.4 1.1 1.9 1.7 2.1 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 2003 0.1 0.0 0.3 1.2 0.8 0.9 1.9 3.0 2.7 0.9 0.4 0.1 2004 0.1 0.1 0.3 1.1 0.8 1.5 1.5 2.3 2.0 0.3 0.2 0.0 2005 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.4 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.7 2006 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.6 1.1 1.5 1.6 2.0 1.0 0.3 0.1 0.1 2007 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.3 1.5 0.7 0.2 0.2 0.1 2008 0.7 0.8 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.5 2009 0.6 0.8 0.4 0.8 0.2 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.5 2010 8.3 5.3 6.0 5.7 5.3 3.9 2.6 2.9 2.9 5.0 5.5 6.3 2011 8.9 9.0 8.3 8.6 6.5 4.3 5.2 5.5 5.7 6.9 8.5 8.6

284

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Rhode Island Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 41.4 29.5 26.1 37.6 29.0 29.3 26.0 26.2 22.4 26.8 29.3 13.6 2002 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 2003 15.7 18.9 21.5 19.6 26.7 11.7 16.8 18.8 18.6 22.1 18.5 22.3 2004 13.9 16.7 14.5 16.8 21.1 11.7 16.7 15.3 16.0 19.4 10.5 23.0 2005 17.8 14.7 15.9 11.0 16.3 16.5 12.9 13.8 16.3 13.2 16.5 19.7 2006 18.6 18.7 16.4 15.0 12.5 13.3 8.8 10.5 11.4 12.8 10.5 15.7 2007 13.0 19.0 15.1 12.7 10.1 14.3 8.0 6.3 17.1 8.3 9.0 10.9 2008 19.9 14.2 16.6 7.2 8.2 9.5 10.7 7.0 13.2 8.2 15.2 23.1 2009 12.2 14.7 8.0 12.3 9.5 7.8 6.7 9.5 10.8 3.5 8.6 7.0 2010 7.3 6.2 5.2 3.8 3.8 6.3 5.5 4.2 5.7 9.3 7.7 10.4

285

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New York Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 13.3 14.8 13.4 11.3 10.4 10.0 9.2 10.2 4.2 4.8 15.5 9.7 2002 12.2 12.1 11.1 11.1 11.9 10.9 9.4 10.4 13.5 7.7 9.4 11.2 2003 11.5 11.6 12.1 10.9 10.9 12.3 10.5 12.0 8.0 5.8 10.5 10.1 2004 12.4 13.5 11.5 13.0 11.1 11.5 9.3 8.7 8.0 7.6 8.7 9.8 2005 17.0 16.9 17.4 14.3 10.2 11.1 15.9 16.5 14.3 11.9 12.4 14.8 2006 14.8 14.0 11.5 9.6 7.6 11.4 11.0 9.9 9.6 10.8 13.6 13.7 2007 13.5 18.5 12.7 13.3 10.1 7.8 10.2 9.0 11.0 9.7 11.2 15.1 2008 16.6 13.4 13.1 10.6 9.0 9.2 9.0 7.7 9.3 9.8 11.3 12.9 2009 14.7 15.7 13.5 12.0 10.0 9.4 7.5 8.5 8.0 8.2 9.6 15.0 2010 14.2 14.8 11.4 10.3 8.8 7.5 8.0 10.3 9.0 8.1 9.6 11.0

286

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Vermont Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 95.2 80.1 79.2 79.2 69.2 67.8 65.6 67.7 70.7 73.3 76.0 79.0 2002 77.7 78.3 78.6 78.2 72.6 66.8 66.7 65.1 66.8 72.6 76.2 85.5 2003 87.3 100.0 100.0 75.7 74.2 72.4 75.0 67.7 70.4 73.2 77.4 80.1 2004 79.9 84.7 80.7 82.2 78.6 73.8 70.0 68.3 69.2 76.4 82.1 83.7 2005 83.6 86.4 82.6 78.0 74.4 71.5 72.1 83.9 94.3 82.4 75.7 96.4 2006 93.0 87.6 82.4 77.2 73.3 72.9 71.7 69.7 71.5 76.3 75.1 79.5 2007 83.0 84.1 81.8 76.2 72.2 71.7 71.4 71.2 73.9 76.6 78.7 82.2 2008 81.0 84.1 83.3 78.8 76.0 76.0 76.9 76.1 74.1 77.7 80.2 83.2 2009 82.6 85.8 77.5 76.6 74.2 73.8 73.8 72.4 72.8 77.4 76.0 81.5 2010 81.6 78.8 78.4 75.2 73.0 74.0 74.2 73.8 73.0 76.3 77.3 82.7

287

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nebraska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 25.7 29.6 30.3 21.0 19.7 16.7 8.3 12.9 13.3 18.6 12.0 18.7 2002 22.6 19.5 29.3 17.6 15.0 24.0 7.4 8.4 8.8 16.4 18.9 19.6 2003 20.3 22.7 24.9 19.3 17.1 24.1 8.7 9.7 10.9 15.7 17.7 19.4 2004 19.7 21.4 24.7 19.0 18.3 14.2 9.2 10.6 16.5 18.8 16.0 16.6 2005 24.4 20.0 24.6 18.5 19.0 18.2 10.0 8.6 12.9 15.1 14.2 18.3 2006 13.8 15.1 17.1 13.3 13.0 9.8 8.3 7.7 10.5 11.5 10.2 12.4 2007 12.1 13.0 14.5 11.6 9.7 8.9 7.1 6.4 6.9 9.8 8.5 10.5 2008 12.0 13.8 13.2 13.6 12.4 8.5 8.0 7.1 8.6 7.4 8.0 11.4 2009 11.8 12.1 10.5 10.2 8.8 7.6 6.6 6.1 7.3 7.8 9.0 8.7 2010 11.1 11.7 10.5 9.1 7.0 7.8 6.8 6.5 7.2 7.4 7.6 7.5

288

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Montana Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3.0 3.1 2.8 2.6 2.3 1.9 0.9 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.9 3.0 2002 3.0 2.9 3.6 2.3 2.0 1.2 0.9 0.7 0.8 1.1 2.1 3.4 2003 2.9 2.8 3.3 2.1 1.8 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.6 1.2 1.6 2004 1.8 2.4 1.9 1.0 1.5 1.4 1.1 0.7 0.8 1.1 1.8 2.4 2005 3.1 2.9 2.2 2.3 1.8 1.4 0.9 0.6 0.7 1.0 1.3 2.3 2006 1.3 1.0 1.1 0.9 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.6 1.0 2007 1.0 1.2 0.9 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.7 1.0 2008 1.3 1.4 1.8 1.1 0.9 0.5 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 2009 2.5 1.7 1.5 1.2 0.8 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.6 1.0 1.8 2010 2.3 2.4 2.3 1.8 1.4 0.5 0.7 0.6 0.6 1.5 1.0 2.0 2011 1.9 3.3 2.1 1.3 0.9 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.3

289

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Ohio Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 13.1 9.8 10.4 6.2 3.9 3.4 1.5 4.8 1.2 2.9 5.6 6.4 2002 5.4 6.2 5.4 4.8 1.9 1.7 1.6 2.1 2.5 2.3 4.9 6.7 2003 6.3 7.0 5.4 4.0 1.8 2.4 2.0 1.7 1.7 2.4 3.3 4.6 2004 5.1 5.7 4.0 3.8 2.1 2.3 1.7 2.3 2.2 2.7 3.4 4.5 2005 5.7 6.6 4.5 2.6 2.0 1.6 2.1 2.0 1.9 2.6 3.3 4.8 2006 4.6 4.7 4.0 2.7 2.1 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.2 2.2 3.0 3.5 2007 3.9 4.8 3.5 2.6 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.4 1.5 1.2 2.2 3.7 2008 3.9 4.2 3.5 2.5 1.1 1.7 1.9 1.4 1.4 1.6 2.7 4.1 2009 4.8 4.7 3.8 2.2 2.1 2.6 1.7 1.4 1.1 1.6 2.0 3.2 2010 4.7 4.4 3.2 1.4 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.7 1.5 1.7 2.9 2011 4.0 3.5 3.0 1.5 1.0 0.7 0.5 0.7 1.0 0.8 1.9 2.8

290

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2002 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2003 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2004 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2005 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2006 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2007 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2008 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2009 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2010 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2011 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

291

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arkansas Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6.8 10.0 9.1 4.6 6.6 4.9 5.5 3.8 4.0 5.6 5.3 5.4 2002 6.1 6.1 6.5 5.0 4.1 3.9 5.1 3.8 3.8 5.0 4.8 4.9 2003 5.4 5.9 5.8 4.6 4.0 3.8 4.5 5.2 5.9 6.5 6.2 6.1 2004 6.5 6.8 6.3 5.7 5.1 6.0 5.8 4.4 4.9 7.2 7.0 5.0 2005 5.5 6.2 5.6 5.3 4.7 4.6 4.3 3.8 4.6 6.8 5.5 5.1 2006 5.3 5.7 5.2 4.6 4.0 4.1 3.7 3.3 4.1 5.4 5.5 5.8 2007 4.5 5.6 4.4 4.2 3.8 3.8 3.3 3.4 3.7 4.5 4.5 3.7 2008 4.1 4.6 3.9 4.0 3.1 2.8 3.0 2.9 3.2 4.8 5.4 4.4 2009 4.5 4.6 3.9 3.9 2.7 2.9 2.9 2.4 3.1 3.8 4.5 3.9 2010 4.0 3.9 3.6 3.1 2.4 2.5 2.2 2.1 2.4 2.7 2.2 2.0 2011 2.7 3.0 2.1 1.9 1.4 1.3 2.1 1.4 1.7 1.8 2.3 2.5

292

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nevada Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 32.2 25.0 16.8 19.7 13.2 12.9 38.9 31.5 31.7 41.7 48.4 68.2 2002 58.3 44.3 59.1 37.8 44.2 40.0 17.5 18.2 19.5 21.2 23.0 28.8 2003 25.6 28.9 20.3 22.8 14.8 13.2 13.6 11.9 12.5 15.8 23.9 21.7 2004 21.4 23.6 14.9 15.1 12.4 11.3 10.7 11.5 13.4 15.9 20.9 22.6 2005 24.3 25.3 17.8 18.4 14.8 14.1 9.6 12.3 13.6 15.9 18.3 19.5 2006 20.9 21.8 22.3 14.7 14.8 11.9 11.7 10.6 11.5 16.9 16.6 23.7 2007 22.1 26.8 17.9 16.6 14.8 11.6 11.3 10.2 10.6 13.6 20.4 25.3 2008 27.5 26.4 21.5 17.5 17.4 9.7 10.4 9.2 8.1 11.3 23.4 26.0 2009 21.4 23.7 19.2 19.9 13.9 11.5 8.7 9.4 11.2 16.2 20.4 26.7 2010 23.5 26.8 23.1 19.6 18.0 13.4 12.7 11.0 10.9 13.6 22.0 22.3

293

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kentucky Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 27.3 21.8 18.9 13.8 17.8 15.8 17.4 17.4 17.3 19.6 16.5 16.9 2002 16.8 18.2 18.9 17.2 15.5 16.5 18.0 19.1 16.3 18.0 18.8 18.4 2003 20.6 20.1 18.7 19.5 19.2 20.3 16.6 16.0 18.1 18.2 18.1 18.4 2004 18.8 18.3 16.3 16.0 14.6 16.6 16.2 15.2 15.5 15.6 17.5 20.3 2005 16.5 17.5 17.3 16.0 15.8 15.2 16.1 14.9 17.4 17.9 17.2 19.7 2006 15.6 16.9 17.6 14.8 14.9 14.2 16.0 15.7 14.6 15.7 15.5 17.6 2007 16.6 18.1 17.0 17.7 16.1 17.5 16.6 14.7 15.3 16.1 16.6 16.5 2008 19.1 20.3 18.1 17.7 17.7 16.4 16.4 15.9 16.1 17.0 15.8 18.1 2009 17.3 19.7 16.0 17.8 19.4 21.5 18.1 18.8 18.2 16.1 17.4 17.8 2010 18.0 18.5 19.6 19.1 18.5 16.8 15.8 16.9 16.1 18.0 17.6 18.6

294

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maine Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7.1 9.5 8.2 5.5 7.6 14.7 17.1 12.4 4.5 8.9 4.5 3.6 2002 13.5 1.7 6.8 1.5 1.6 1.2 100.0 0.8 100.0 0.7 0.8 1.0 2003 10.9 12.0 11.3 10.5 11.9 9.1 7.6 10.1 9.0 7.3 9.2 16.5 2004 2.0 1.7 1.5 1.7 1.8 2.3 1.3 2.0 1.6 1.5 1.6 1.8 2005 3.8 4.1 3.6 3.0 2.8 2.5 3.2 2.0 1.4 3.4 3.2 3.8 2006 1.3 1.3 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.7 1.0 0.9 0.8 2007 0.9 1.0 4.3 0.9 0.4 0.3 0.6 0.4 0.5 0.7 0.6 1.3 2008 1.1 0.9 1.5 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.8 0.6 0.6 1.0 0.9 0.9 2009 1.8 2.2 1.5 0.8 0.5 1.3 1.0 0.5 2.1 0.8 0.8 1.2 2010 1.2 0.8 1.2 0.7 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.7 2011 0.7 0.9 0.7 1.0 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.6

295

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kansas Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3.0 2.9 3.2 2.9 7.8 9.4 18.1 21.2 16.4 7.7 7.9 4.4 2002 5.0 5.1 6.6 13.0 12.4 16.1 22.4 18.5 11.6 5.7 4.3 4.3 2003 2.4 3.4 3.2 8.2 11.0 6.9 14.8 21.1 9.1 5.3 5.0 3.1 2004 2.7 2.8 4.6 10.3 9.4 14.0 13.4 11.0 9.2 2.6 2.4 2.3 2005 1.7 1.4 1.4 3.2 6.6 8.2 16.3 19.2 9.0 3.8 2.5 1.7 2006 1.7 2.0 3.2 5.7 9.4 12.9 16.2 16.9 9.4 3.6 2.1 2.1 2007 1.3 1.5 1.5 1.4 4.9 9.8 16.2 17.3 9.6 4.0 2.8 1.7 2008 1.6 1.5 2.7 7.5 10.4 13.4 18.9 17.9 10.9 4.1 1.7 1.6 2009 1.5 2.0 4.4 4.6 6.3 9.2 16.6 17.0 11.0 3.3 1.5 1.1 2010 1.2 1.2 1.2 2.5 6.5 10.6 17.3 18.2 12.5 5.8 3.7 1.9 2011 1.5 1.7 5.6 10.4 11.0 17.0 20.8 19.9 12.8 4.9 3.6 1.6

296

The Regional Gas Infrastructure -- Is It Ready for the Power Boom?: How Changes in Gas and Electric Industries Affect Reliability an d Competitiveness of Gas-Fired Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The boom in gas-fired capacity additions, coupled with today's overheated gas market, make questions of gas supply a top priority for gas and electric industry planners. The relationships between the gas and electric industries are changing -- with the latter becoming a premium customer of the former. While the commodity market is national in scope, many of the impacts and planning challenges are best understood on a regional basis. This report examines five regions where gas-fired capacity additions are...

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

297

NIST Budget Request Proposes 7.3 Percent Increase in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... teams as needed to exploit rapidly changing innovation trends. ... Advanced Solar Technologies - Third Generation Photovoltaics (+$5 million); ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

298

Idaho National Laboratory/Nuclear Power Industry Strategic Plan for Light Water Reactor Research and Development An Industry-Government Partnership to Address Climate Change and Energy Security  

SciTech Connect

The dual issues of energy security and climate change mitigation are driving a renewed debate over how to best provide safe, secure, reliable and environmentally responsible electricity to our nation. The combination of growing energy demand and aging electricity generation infrastructure suggests major new capacity additions will be required in the years ahead.

Electric Power Research

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial International Energy Outlook 2010 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by 42 percent, or an average of 1.3 percent per year, from 2007 to 2035 in the IEO2010 Reference case. Ninety-five percent of the growth occurs in non-OECD nations. Overview The world's industries make up a diverse sector that includes manufacturing, agriculture, mining, and construction. Industrial energy demand varies across regions and countries, depending on the level and mix of economic activity and technological development, among other factors. Energy is consumed in the industrial sector for a wide range of activities, such as processing and assembly, space conditioning, and lighting. Industrial energy use also includes natural gas and petroleum products used as feedstocks to produce non-energy products, such as plastics. In aggregate, the industrial sector uses more energy than any other end-use sector, consuming about one-half of the world's total delivered energy.

300

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Industry Iron & Steel Industry Equipment WaterIndustry Glass Ethylene Ammonia Paper Aluminium Cement Iron and Steelsteel, aluminum, paper, ammonia and ethylene, and glass in addition to an “other industry

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Marketing Reordering of the Electric Utility Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELCON is a group of large industrial consumers of electricity with facilities in most of the 50 states and many foreign countries. Our members produce a wide range of products including steel, aluminum, chemicals, industrial gases, glass, motor vehicles, textiles and food. ELCON members consume approximately ten percent of all electricity sold to industrial customers and nearly five percent of all electricity consumed in the United States. We require an adequate and reliable supply of electricity at reasonable prices, so as you can imagine, we have a continuing interest in all aspects of the production, pricing, and delivery of electricity. ELCON member companies believe strongly that the electric utility industry is undergoing a market reordering that is being shaped by technological, institutional and legal forces. We see technical developments that now make small-scale generation economically attractive, if not downright desirable. Key regulatory and consumer institutions are taking fresh, new looks at issues such as wheeling and access to the grid that used to be considered sacred and untouchable. Some states are passing laws and implementing regulations that will require new thinking and new operating procedures on the part of utilities and consumers. I see these developments as logical reactions to changes in market forces. Change will take place. The relevant questions are: How will regulators and policy makers be influenced by market forces in the future? And: Will utilities, consumers and regulators attempt to benefit from market pressures or, alternatively, try to oppose what I believe is inevitable evolution to a more market-oriented electric industry?

Anderson, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Percent of 2010 Luminaire Cost LED Luminaire Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEDs promise to change the world, and few doubt that they will, but a key limiter to more rapid adoption is the cost of the LED themselves. The cost breakdown of LED luminaires vary, but it is safe to put the cost of the LED at around 25% to 40 % of the total luminaire cost. It is projected to remain a significant cost of the total luminaire for many years.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Near Zero Emissions at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a 10 year DOE sponsored heavy-duty truck engine program, hereafter referred to as the NZ-50 program. This program was split into two major phases. The first phase was called â??Near-Zero Emission at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency,â?ť and was completed in 2007. The second phase was initiated in 2006, and this phase was named â??Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems to Enable High-Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engines.â?ť This phase was completed in September, 2010. The key objectives of the NZ-50 program for this first phase were to: â?˘ Quantify thermal efficiency degradation associated with reduction of engine-out NOx emissions to the 2007 regulated level of ~1.1 g/hp-hr. â?˘ Implement an integrated analytical/experimental development plan for improving subsystem and component capabilities in support of emerging engine technologies for emissions and thermal efficiency goals of the program. â?˘ Test prototype subsystem hardware featuring technology enhancements and demonstrate effective application on a multi-cylinder, production feasible heavy-duty engine test-bed. â?˘ Optimize subsystem components and engine controls (calibration) to demonstrate thermal efficiency that is in compliance with the DOE 2005 Joule milestone, meaning greater than 45% thermal efficiency at 2007 emission levels. â?˘ Develop technology roadmap for meeting emission regulations of 2010 and beyond while mitigating the associated degradation in engine fuel consumption. Ultimately, develop technical prime-path for meeting the overall goal of the NZ-50 program, i.e., 50% thermal efficiency at 2010 regulated emissions. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the NZ-50 program. The most noteworthy achievements in this program are summarized as follows: â?˘ Demonstrated technologies through advanced integrated experiments and analysis to achieve the technical objectives of the NZ-50 program with 50.2% equivalent thermal efficiency under EPA 2010 emissions regulations. â?˘ Experimentally demonstrate brake efficiency of 48.5% at EPA 2010 emission level at single steady-state point. â?˘ Analytically demonstrated additional brake efficiency benefits using advanced aftertreatment configuration concept and air system enhancement including, but not limited to, turbo-compound, variable valve actuator system, and new cylinder head redesign, thus helping to achieve the final program goals. â?˘ Experimentally demonstrated EPA 2010 emissions over FTP cycles using advanced integrated engine and aftertreatment system. These aggressive thermal efficiency and emissions results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. It used integrated analytical and experimental tools for subsystem component optimization encompassing advanced fuel injection system, increased EGR cooling capacity, combustion process optimization, and advanced aftertreatment technologies. Model based controls employing multiple input and output techniques enabled efficient integration of the various subsystems and ensured optimal performance of each system within the total engine package. . The key objective of the NZ-50 program for the second phase was to explore advancements in engine combustion systems using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) techniques to minimize cylinder-out emissions, targeting a 10% efficiency improvement. The most noteworthy achievements in this phase of the program are summarized as follows: â?˘ Experimentally and analytically evaluated numerous air system improvements related to the turbocharger and variable valve actuation. Some of the items tested proved to be very successful and modifications to the turbine discovered in this program have since been incorporated into production hardware. â?˘ The combustion system development continued with evaluation of various designs of the 2-step piston bowl. Significant improvemen

None

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Selected Paper Industries, 1994. Paper and paperboard mills emit over 80 percent of the energy-related carbon in ...

305

Saskatchewan House: 100 percent solar in a severe climate  

SciTech Connect

The Saskatchewan Conservation House in Regina, Canada, receives 100% of its heating primarily from passive heat gain. The house incorporates insulation levels three-fold the current Canadian standard, caulked and sealed vapor barriers with an air-to-air heat exchanger utilizing plastic sheeting, south facing windows, a waste water heat exchanger for laundry and bath water, and an active system of 192 ft/sup 2/ of vacuum tube collectors with 2,800 gal water storage. Insulated shutters are used on all the windows. Problems have developed with controls for the active heating system which was designed to supply 100% of the space heating. Infiltration was measured at 5% air change/hr. The heat storage capacity, energy consumption, performance estimates, and system components of the house are reported in detail.

Besant, R.W., Dumont, R.S., Schoenau, G.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Table B28. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated","All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated" "All Buildings ................",4657,641,576,627,2813,67338,5736,7593,10745,43264 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,366,230,272,1479,6774,1091,707,750,4227 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,164,194,149,603,8238,1148,1504,1177,4409

307

Table B29. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled","All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled" "All Buildings ................",4657,1097,1012,751,1796,67338,8864,16846,16966,24662 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,668,352,294,1034,6774,1895,1084,838,2957 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,282,292,188,348,8238,2026,2233,1435,2544

308

Table B30. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspa  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit","All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit" "All Buildings ................",4657,498,835,1228,2096,67338,3253,9187,20665,34233 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,323,351,517,1156,6774,915,1061,1499,3299 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,114,279,351,367,8238,818,2014,2614,2793

309

Analysis of a 10-Percent RPS - Response letter summarizing principal conclusions of supplement  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Transmittal letter for the supplement to the Service Report 'Analysis of a 10-Percent RenewablePortfolio Standard'

Alan Beamon

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

Poultry Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. poultry industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in poultry and egg production and processing. The poultry industry, which consists of poultry production for meat as well as egg production and processing, is one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. food manufacturing industry. It is also an energy-intensive industry. In fact, a 2010 report by the USDA illustrates ...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Industrial Decision Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Domestic industrial investment has declined due to unfavorable energy prices, and external markets. Investment behavior has changed over the past few years, and will continue due to high labor costs, tight markets and an unstable U.S. economy although, freight costs, favorable exchange rates and high capacity utilization will encourage future industrial investment. Industry will eventually enter a new period of major investment. Future industrial investment will be an opportunity to influence the energy efficiency of these facilities for generations to come. Program managers must begin engaging industrial customers now, in order to exploit this unprecedented opportunity to change future energy use patterns. This paper reviews recent market trends and industrial investment decision-making. The paper will also address several important questions: • Why has industrial investment declined? • What is the outlook for industrial investment? • How can programs engage industry for future opportunities?

Elliott, R. N.; McKinney, V.; Shipley, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Impacts of IT on Firm and Industry Stucture: The Personal Computer Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

company reports and industry averages, ,to Rapid Change in the PC Industry,” California ManagementImpacts of IT on Firm and Industry Structure: The Personal

Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Technological Change, Depletion and the U.S. Petroleum Industry: A New Approach to Measurement and Estimation***  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and crude oil reserve additions, respectively, are estimated. These functions enable us to isolate. The impact of technological change on finding costs for U.S. crude oil reserves has been more modest. This paper also looks at finding costs for crude oil. The material on stationarity and cointegration analysis

314

Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, industry is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology will be essential for meeting these challenges. At some point, businesses are faced with investment in new capital stock. At this decision point, new and emerging technologies compete for capital investment alongside more established or mature technologies. Understanding the dynamics of the decision-making process is important to perceive what drives technology change and the overall effect on industrial energy use. The assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies can be useful for: (1) identifying R&D projects; (2) identifying potential technologies for market transformation activities; (3) providing common information on technologies to a broad audience of policy-makers; and (4) offering new insights into technology development and energy efficiency potentials. With the support of PG&E Co., NYSERDA, DOE, EPA, NEEA, and the Iowa Energy Center, staff from LBNL and ACEEE produced this assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies. The goal was to collect information on a broad array of potentially significant emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies and carefully characterize a sub-group of approximately 50 key technologies. Our use of the term ''emerging'' denotes technologies that are both pre-commercial but near commercialization, and technologies that have already entered the market but have less than 5 percent of current market share. We also have chosen technologies that are energy-efficient (i.e., use less energy than existing technologies and practices to produce the same product), and may have additional ''non-energy benefits.'' These benefits are as important (if not more important in many cases) in influencing the decision on whether to adopt an emerging technology. The technologies were characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics, and environmental performance. The results demonstrate that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. We show that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity and worker safety, and reduced capital costs.

Martin, N.; Worrell, E.; Ruth, M.; Price, L.; Elliott, R.N.; Shipley, A.M.; Thorne, J.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: March 26, 0: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Digg

316

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

317

Greenhouse Gas Programs, Energy Efficiency, and the Industrial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States has made significant progress in reducing total energy use through energy efficiency improvements over the past decade, yet the United States still ranks as the highest absolute greenhouse gas (GHG) emitter in the world with 23.6 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per capita in 2006. The industrial sector (agriculture is excluded) is responsible for 28.7 percent of the GHG emissions in the U.S. However, the U.S. industrial sector has numerous economically viable opportunities to reduce energy use and GHG emissions. Energy efficiency, including new clean technologies, plays a significant role in increasing productivity and reducing energy intensity, and thus emissions. Increasing energy efficiency in industrial processes is central to addressing climate change issues in the industrial sector. This paper describes the energy-efficiency programs, methodologies, and technologies that can economically lead to significant GHG reductions in the industrial sector. The paper also discusses the impacts of climate change policies and programs to the application of advanced low-carbon industrial technologies.

Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Dairy Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. dairy industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in milk production and processing. Because of the different processes involved, the characteristics of energy consumption at milk production and processing facilities vary by facility. Most energy used in milk production is in the form of diesel fuel, followed by electricity and then by petroleum products such as gasoline an...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

319

Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 Response to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ERG/200801 Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 Response to The Nova Scotia. Sandy Cook. #12;Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 1 Introduction In April 2007 matters. Central to the act is the government's commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions

Hughes, Larry

320

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monumental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 May 12, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis DOE Report Analyzes U.S. Wind Resources, Technology Requirements, and Manufacturing, Siting and Transmission Hurdles to Increasing the Use of Clean and Sustainable Wind Power WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) today released a first-of-its kind report that examines the technical feasibility of harnessing wind power to provide up to 20 percent of the nation's total electricity needs by 2030. Entitled "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030", the report identifies requirements to achieve this goal including reducing the cost of wind technologies, citing new transmission infrastructure, and

322

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 May 12, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis DOE Report Analyzes U.S. Wind Resources, Technology Requirements, and Manufacturing, Siting and Transmission Hurdles to Increasing the Use of Clean and Sustainable Wind Power WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) today released a first-of-its kind report that examines the technical feasibility of harnessing wind power to provide up to 20 percent of the nation's total electricity needs by 2030. Entitled "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030", the report identifies requirements to achieve this goal including reducing the cost of wind technologies, citing new transmission infrastructure, and

323

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried ... 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL Posted By Office of Public Affairs

324

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of generating 20 percent of my total capacity from say wind? And all of it replaces coal powered electricty ? What happended to GDP ? Is the economy a net gain or net loss ?...

325

Figure 75. U.S. electricity demand growth, 1950-2040 (percent, 3 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 75. U.S. electricity demand growth, 1950-2040 (percent, 3-year moving average) Year 3-year moving average Trendline 1950.00

326

The Impacts of Information Technology, the Internet and Electronic Commerce on Firm and Industry Structure: The Personal Computer Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

network. Impact of IT on PC industry structure for web.docto Rapid Change in the PC Industry. ’ California ManagementDataquest (1995), ‘Computer Industry Forecasts. ’ Dataquest.

Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

DOE Seeks Proposals to Increase Investment in Industrial Carbon Capture and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Seeks Proposals to Increase Investment in Industrial Carbon DOE Seeks Proposals to Increase Investment in Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration Projects DOE Seeks Proposals to Increase Investment in Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration Projects June 15, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement soliciting projects to capture and sequester carbon dioxide from industrial sources and to put CO2 to beneficial use. The successful development of advanced technologies and innovative concepts to prevent CO2 from being emitted into the atmosphere is a key component of national efforts to mitigate climate change. DOE anticipates making multiple awards under this FOA. The projects will be cost-shared, with the award recipients providing at least 20 percent of the

328

Climate change risk and response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

basket, changes in electricity rates can have far-reachingand assuming constant electricity rates, Auffhammer (2008)a rise (30 percent) in electricity rates in 2020 and 2040

Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Research Projects in Industrial Technology.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

331

Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone June 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO - One quarter of the uranium mill tailings pile located in Moab, Utah, has been relocated to the Crescent Junction, Utah, site for permanent disposal. Four million tons of the 16 million tons total has been relocated under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). A little over 2 years ago, Remedial Action Contractor EnergySolutions began

332

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 2, 2012 November 2, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monu- mental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. In 2009, EM identified a goal of 40 percent footprint reduction by September 2011 as its High Priority Performance Goal. EM achieved that goal in April 2011, five months ahead of schedule, and continues to achieve footprint reduction, primarily at Savannah River Site and Hanford. Once

333

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. MOAB, Utah - The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project had a productive year, despite continued budget constraints and a first-ever, three-month curtailment of shipping operations last winter. On June 18, the project reached a significant milestone of having shipped 6

334

Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 November 9, 2011 - 10:00am Addthis This is the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Breakout Session Panel with representatives from the City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability, Southface, the U.S. General Services Administration, and two Atlanta BBC partner organizations. | Photo courtesy of Fred Perry Photography This is the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Breakout Session Panel with representatives from the City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability, Southface, the U.S. General Services Administration, and two Atlanta BBC partner organizations. | Photo courtesy of Fred Perry Photography Maria Tikoff Vargas

335

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

336

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well understood. Some gets to find the fuel and sell it. The fuel and all associated activities factor into the economic equation of the nation and the wrold. What is the economics of generating 20 percent of my total capacity from say wind? And all of it replaces coal powered electricty ? What happended to GDP ? Is the economy a net gain or net loss ? The value of the electricity came into the system, but no coal is bought or sold. Submitted by Jamespr on 6 May, 2013 - 17:46 0 answers Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

337

A numerical study of bench blast row delay timing and its influence on percent-cast  

SciTech Connect

The computer program, DMC (Distinct Motion Code), which was developed for simulating the rock motion associated with blasting, has been used to study the influence of row delay timing on rock motion. The numerical simulations correspond with field observations in that very short delays (< 50ms) and very long delays (> 300ms) produce a lower percent-cast than a medium delay (100 to 200 ms). The DMC predicted relationship between row delay timing and percent-cast is more complex than expected with a dip in the curve where the optimum timing might be expected. More study is required to gain a full understanding of this phenomenon.

Preece, D.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

339

Industrial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Frequently used rubber linings in other industries...Application Lining Power industry Scrubber towers Blended chlorobutyl Limestone slurry tanks Blended chlorobutyl Slurry piping Blended chlorobutyl 60 Shore A hardness natural rubber Seawater cooling water

340

Ninety-nine percent of women will be financially responsible for themselves or their  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or their families at some point in their lives, but less than half (47 percent) of working women have a retirement.S. and has reached more than 19,000 people to date. Wi$eUp is available as both an on-line course Calendar for the exact date and time of your annual update training. Agent Planning Work with other

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Global Percent Tree Cover at a Spatial Resolution of 500 Meters: First Results of the MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first results of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation continuous field algorithm's global percent tree cover are presented. Percent tree cover per 500-m MODIS pixel is estimated using a supervised regression ...

M. C. Hansen; R. S. DeFries; J. R. G. Townshend; M. Carroll; C. Dimiceli; R. A. Sohlberg

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

International industrial sector energy efficiency policies  

SciTech Connect

Over 40 percent of the energy consumed globally is used in the industrial sector. In China, this sector consumes an even larger proportion, reaching nearly 70 percent in 1997. A variety of energy efficiency policies and programs have been instituted in both industrialized and developing countries in an effort to improve the energy efficiency of the industrial sector. There are very few comprehensive evaluations of these industrial sector energy efficiency policies; however a number of recent workshops and conferences have included a focus on these policies. Three important meetings were the International Energy Agency's Industrial Energy Efficiency: Policies and Programs Conference in 1994, Industrial Energy Efficiency Policies: Understanding Success and Failure - A Workshop Organized by the International Network for Energy Demand Analysis in the Industrial Sector in 1998, and the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy's 1999 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Man y articles from these meetings are included as attachments to this memo. This paper provides a brief description of each of seven categories of individual industrial energy efficiency policies and programs, discuss which industrial sectors or types of equipment they apply to, and provide references for articles and reports that discuss each policy or program in more detail. We begin with mandatory-type policies and move to more voluntary-type policies. We then provide a brief description of four integrated industrial energy efficiency policies and provide references for articles and reports that describe these policies in greater detail.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

International industrial sector energy efficiency policies  

SciTech Connect

Over 40 percent of the energy consumed globally is used in the industrial sector. In China, this sector consumes an even larger proportion, reaching nearly 70 percent in 1997. A variety of energy efficiency policies and programs have been instituted in both industrialized and developing countries in an effort to improve the energy efficiency of the industrial sector. There are very few comprehensive evaluations of these industrial sector energy efficiency policies; however a number of recent workshops and conferences have included a focus on these policies. Three important meetings were the International Energy Agency's Industrial Energy Efficiency: Policies and Programs Conference in 1994, Industrial Energy Efficiency Policies: Understanding Success and Failure - A Workshop Organized by the International Network for Energy Demand Analysis in the Industrial Sector in 1998, and the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy's 1999 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Man y articles from these meetings are included as attachments to this memo. This paper provides a brief description of each of seven categories of individual industrial energy efficiency policies and programs, discuss which industrial sectors or types of equipment they apply to, and provide references for articles and reports that discuss each policy or program in more detail. We begin with mandatory-type policies and move to more voluntary-type policies. We then provide a brief description of four integrated industrial energy efficiency policies and provide references for articles and reports that describe these policies in greater detail.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Industries Affected  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Industries affected by microbiologically influenced corrosion...generation: nuclear, hydro, fossil fuel,

345

Energy Savings in Industrial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The industrial sector accounts for more than one-third of total energy use in the United States and emits 28.7 percent of the country’s greenhouse gases. Energy use in the industrial sector is largely for steam and process heating systems, and electricity for equipment such as pumps, air compressors, and fans. Lesser, yet significant, amounts of energy are used for industrial buildings – heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), lighting and facility use (such as office equipment). Due to economic growth, energy consumption in the industrial sector will continue to increase gradually, as will energy use in industrial buildings. There is a large potential for energy saving and carbon intensity reduction by improving HVAC, lighting, and other aspects of building operation and technologies. Analyses show that most of the technologies and measures to save energy in buildings would be cost-effective with attractive rates of return. First, this paper will investigate energy performance in buildings within the manufacturing sector, as classified in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). Energy use patterns for HVAC and lighting in industrial buildings vary dramatically across different manufacturing sectors. For example, food manufacturing uses more electricity for HVAC than does apparel manufacturing because of the different energy demand patterns. Energy saving opportunities and potential from industrial buildings will also be identified and evaluated. Lastly, barriers for deployment of energy savings technologies will be explored along with recommendations for policies to promote energy efficiency in industrial buildings.

Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Secretary Chu Announces More than $155 Million for Industrial Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Chu Announces More than $155 Million for Industrial Secretary Chu Announces More than $155 Million for Industrial Energy Efficiency Projects Secretary Chu Announces More than $155 Million for Industrial Energy Efficiency Projects November 3, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC- Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that the Department of Energy is awarding more than $155 million in funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for 41 industrial energy efficiency projects across the country. These awards include funding for industrial combined heat and power systems, district energy systems for industrial facilities, and grants to support technical and financial assistance to local industry. The industrial sector uses more than 30 percent of U.S. energy and is responsible for nearly 30 percent of U.S.

347

Secretary Chu Announces More than $155 Million for Industrial Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More than $155 Million for Industrial More than $155 Million for Industrial Energy Efficiency Projects Secretary Chu Announces More than $155 Million for Industrial Energy Efficiency Projects November 3, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC- Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that the Department of Energy is awarding more than $155 million in funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for 41 industrial energy efficiency projects across the country. These awards include funding for industrial combined heat and power systems, district energy systems for industrial facilities, and grants to support technical and financial assistance to local industry. The industrial sector uses more than 30 percent of U.S. energy and is responsible for nearly 30 percent of U.S. carbon emissions.

348

Industry @ ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS Print Thursday, 17 October 2013 14:24 New insights into the Romans' ingenious concrete harbor structures emerging from ALS beamline research could move the modern concrete industry toward its goal of a reduced carbon footprint. Summary Slide Read more... Moving Industry Forward: Finding the Environmental Opportunity in Biochar Print Thursday, 12 September 2013 08:41 Using ALS Beamlines 10.3.2 and 8.3.2, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently investigating how biochar sorbs environmental toxins and which kinds of biochar are the most effective. The possibilities for widespread use have already launched entrepreneurial commercial ventures. Summary Slide

349

Meeting the Challenge: The Prospect of Achieving 30 Percent Savings Through the Weatherization Assistance Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Weatherization Assistance Program has been installing energy-efficiency measures in low-income houses for over 25 years, achieving savings exceeding 30 percent of natural gas used for space heating. Recently, as part of its Weatherization Plus initiative, the Weatherization Assistance Program adopted the goal of achieving 30 percent energy savings for all household energy usage. The expansion of the Weatherization Assistance Program to include electric baseload components such as lighting and refrigerators provides additional opportunities for saving energy and meeting this ambitious goal. This report documents an Oak Ridge National Laboratory study that examined the potential savings that could be achieved by installing various weatherization measures in different types of dwellings throughout the country. Three different definitions of savings are used: (1) reductions in pre-weatherization expenditures; (2) savings in the amount of energy consumed at the house site, regardless of fuel type (''site Btus''); and (3) savings in the total amount of energy consumed at the source (''source Btus''), which reflects the fact that each Btu* of electricity consumed at the household level requires approximately three Btus to produce at the generation source. In addition, the effects of weatherization efforts on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions are examined.

Schweitzer, M.

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Industrial motor-driven systems use more than 2194 billionkWh annually on a global basis and offer one of the largest opportunitiesfor energy savings.1 The International Energy Agency estimates thatoptimization of motor driven systems could reduce global electricitydemand by 7 percent through the application of commercially availabletechnologies and using well-tested engineering practices. Yet manyindustrial firms remain either unaware of or unable to achieve theseenergy savings. The same factors that make it so challenging to achieveand sustain energy efficiency in motor-driven systems (complexity,frequent changes) apply to the production processes that they support.Yet production processes typically operate within a narrow band ofacceptable performance. These processes are frequently incorporated intoISO 9000/14000 quality and environmental management systems, whichrequire regular, independent audits to maintain ISO certification, anattractive value for international trade. It is our contention that acritical step in achieving and sustaining energy efficiency ofmotor-driven systems specifically, and industrial energy efficiencygenerally, is the adoption of a corporate energy management standard thatis consistent with current industrial quality and environmentalmanagement systems such as ISO. Several energy management standardscurrently exist (US, Denmark, Ireland, Sweden) and specifications(Germany, Netherlands) others are planned (China, Spain, Brazil, Korea).This paper presents the current status of energy management standardsdevelopment internationally, including an analysis of their sharedfeatures and differences, in terms of content, promulgation, andimplementation. The purpose of the analysis is to describe the currentstate of "best practices" for this emerging area of energy efficiencypolicymaking and tosuggest next steps toward the creation of a trulyinternational energy management standard that is consistent with the ISOprinciples of measurement, documentation, and continuousimprovement.

McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge Challenge for Industry Professional Engineers' Guide for Validating Statements of Energy Improvement Office of Air and Radiation Climate Protection Partnerships Division May 2013 Revised ii Introduction The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) ENERGY STAR program provides guidance, tools, and recognition to help companies improve their energy performance. ENERGY STAR is a voluntary partnership program that companies choose to join. Through ENERGY STAR, U.S. EPA offers a number of forms of recognition for achievements in energy efficiency. The ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry recognizes individual industrial sites for achieving a 10 percent reduction in energy intensity within 5 years from the conclusion of an established baseline. To be

352

California Industrial Energy Efficiency Potential  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the modeling approach andhighlights key findings of a California industrial energy efficiencypotential study. In addition to providing estimates of technical andeconomic potential, the study examines achievable program potential undervarious program-funding scenarios. The focus is on electricity andnatural gas savings for manufacturing in the service territories ofCalifornia's investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The assessment is conductedby industry type and by end use. Both crosscutting technologies andindustry-specific process measures are examined. Measure penetration intothe marketplace is modeled as a function of customer awareness, measurecost effectiveness, and perceived market barriers. Data for the studycomes from a variety of sources, including: utility billing records, theEnergy Information Association (EIA) Manufacturing Energy ConsumptionSurvey (MECS), state-sponsored avoided cost studies, energy efficiencyprogram filings, and technology savings and cost data developed throughLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The study identifies 1,706GWh and 47 Mth (million therms) per year of achievable potential over thenext twelve years under recent levels of program expenditures, accountingfor 5.2 percent of industrial electricity consumption and 1.3 percent ofindustrial natural gas consumption. These estimates grow to 2,748 GWh and192 Mth per year if all cost-effective and achievable opportunities arepursued. Key industrial electricity end uses, in terms of energy savingspotential, include compressed air and pumping systems that combine toaccount for about half of the total achievable potential estimates. Fornatural gas, savings are concentrated in the boiler and process heatingend uses, accounting for over 99 percent to total achievablepotential.

Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; RafaelFriedmann; Rufo, Mike

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and...

354

Table 40. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code 0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 40. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 NAICS Code June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 311 Food Manufacturing 875 926 1,015 -13.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 26 17 19 35.8 313 Textile Mills 22 22 25 -13.9 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w w 322 Paper Manufacturing 570 583

355

Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 2,256 2,561 1,864 4,817 4,343 10.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 38 50 48 88 95 -7.7 313 Textile Mills 31 29 21 60 59 2.2 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w

356

Utah Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Utah Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 48.7 19.2...

357

California Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Percent) California Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 5.1...

358

Competitive position of natural gas: Industrial baking  

SciTech Connect

Industrial baking is one of the largest natural gas consumers in the food industry. In 1985, bread, rolls, cookies, and crackers accounted for over 82 percent of all baked goods production. Bread accounting for 46 percent of all production. The baking industry consumed approximately 16 trillion Btu in 1985. About 93 percent was natural gas, while distillate fuel oil accounted for seven percent, and electricity accounted for much less than one percent. The three main types of baking ovens are the single lap, tunnel, and Lanham ovens. In the single lap oven, trays carry the product back and forth through the baking chamber once. The single lap oven is the most common type of oven and is popular due to its long horizontal runs, extensive steam zone, and simple construction. The tunnel oven is slightly more efficient and more expensive that the single lap oven. IN the tunnel oven, the hearth is a motorized conveyor which passes in a straight line through a series of heating zones, with loading and unloading occurring at opposite ends of the oven. The advantages of the tunnel oven include flexibility with respect to pan size and simple, accurate top and bottom heat control. The tunnel oven is used exclusively in the cookie and cracker baking, with the product being deposited directly on the oven band. The most recently developed type of oven is the Lanham oven. The Lanham oven is the most efficient type of oven, with a per pound energy consumption approaching the practical minimum for baking bread. Between one--half and two--thirds of all new industrial baking ovens are Lanham ovens. In the Lanham oven, the product enters the oven near the top of the chamber, spirals down through a series of heating zones, and exits near the bottom of the oven. The oven is gas--fired directly by ribbon burners. 31 refs.

Minsker, B.S.; Salama, S.Y.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

"EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" "Areas",38353,38384,38412,38443,38473,38504,38534,38565,38596,38626,38657,38687,38718,38749,38777,"application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

360

Examination of temperature-induced shape memory of uranium--5. 3-to 6. 9 weight percent niobium alloys  

SciTech Connect

The uranium-niobium alloy system was examined in the range of 5.3-to-6.9 weight percent niobium with respect to shape memory, mechanical properties, metallography, Coefficients of linear thermal expansion, and differential thermal analysis. Shape memory increased with increasing niobium levels in the study range. There were no useful correlations found between shape memory and the other tests. Coefficients of linear thermal expansion tests of as-quenched 5.8 and 6.2 weight percent niobium specimens, but not 5.3 and 6.9 weight percent niobium specimens, had a contraction component on heating, but the phenomenon was not a contributor to shape memory.

Hemperly, V.C.

1976-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Does One Know the Properties of a MICE Solid or Liquid Absorber toBetter than 0.3 Percent?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the report discusses whether the MICE absorbers can be characterized to {+-}0.3 percent, so that one predict absorber ionization cooling within the absorber. This report shows that most solid absorbers can be characterized to much better than {+-}0.3 percent. The two issues that dominate the characterization of the liquid cryogen absorbers are the dimensions of the liquid in the vessel and the density of the cryogenic liquid. The thickness of the window also plays a role. This report will show that a liquid hydrogen absorber can be characterized to better than {+-}0.3 percent, but a liquid helium absorber cannot be characterized to better and {+-}1 percent.

Green, Michael A.; Yang, Stephanie Q.

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

362

Spatial and Temporal Variations in Long-Term Normal Percent Possible Solar Radiation Levels in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to analyze the time and space variations in long-term monthly-averaged daily percent possible solar radiation levels in the United States. Both principal components analysis and harmonic analysis were used to ...

Robert C. Balling Jr.; Randall S. Cerveny

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Associations and Industry - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Associations and Industry, Research Programs, ==== Basic Metallurgy ==== ... FORUMS > ASSOCIATIONS AND INDUSTRY, Replies, Views, Originator, Last ...

364

Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy savings are related to energy price changes through1997 dollars. All energy prices and savings were evaluatedthe relationship of energy prices to industry-wide energy

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Does Bankruptcy Protection Harm the Airline Industry?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does Bankruptcy Protection Harm the Airline Industry?lower fare during bankruptcy does not necessarily mean thatof this opportunity and how does the resulting change a¤ect

Lee, Hwa Ryung

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Industrial alliances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is emerging from the Cold War era into an exciting, but challenging future. Improving the economic competitiveness of our Nation is essential both for improving the quality of life in the United States and maintaining a strong national security. The research and technical skills used to maintain a leading edge in defense and energy now should be used to help meet the challenge of maintaining, regaining, and establishing US leadership in industrial technologies. Companies recognize that success in the world marketplace depends on products that are at the leading edge of technology, with competitive cost, quality, and performance. Los Alamos National Laboratory and its Industrial Partnership Center (IPC) has the strategic goal to make a strong contribution to the nation`s economic competitiveness by leveraging the government`s investment at the Laboratory: personnel, infrastructure, and technological expertise.

Adams, K.V.

1993-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

367

Whither Industrial Relations: Does It Have a Future in Post-Industrial Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article addresses the difficulties that industrial relations is experiencing both as a set of practices and as an intellectual tradition. It traces those difficulties to the changes in the basic structures of industrial ...

Piore, Michael J.

368

Strategies for an evolving generation industry  

SciTech Connect

This article deals with the changing structure of the power generation industry to include nonutility generation resources. The topics discussed include the permanence of nonutility generation as a power source, the evolving industry, and the strategies for an evolving industry. The emphasis is on developing sound, sophisticated purchasing procedures to fully benefit from this new generation resource.

Kee, E.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

369

transportation Total Percent delivered cost transportation Percent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

$12.75 - - - - - 36.0% - 2005 $13.64 - $13.64 - - - - - 36.8% - 2006; $14.50 - $14.04 - - - - - 34.3% - 2007 $15 ...

370

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Industrial Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Industrial Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 6 - Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by an average of 1.4 percent per year from 2006 to 2030 in the IEO2009 reference case. Much of the growth is expected to occur in the developing non-OECD nations. Figure 63. OECD and Non-OECD Industrial Sector Energy Consumption, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 64. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2006 and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 65. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Major Energy-Intensive Industry Shares, 2005 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

371

Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, society is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology is essential in achieving these challenges. We report on a recent analysis of emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry, focusing on over 50 selected technologies. The technologies are characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics and environmental performance. This paper provides an overview of the results, demonstrating that we are not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency, economic and environmental performance, and neither will we in the future. The study shows that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity, and reduced capital costs compared to current technologies.

Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Price, Lynn; Ruth, Michael; Elliott, Neal; Shipley, Anna; Thorne, Jennifer

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Meeting President Bush's Climate Change Challenge to Business...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting President Bush's Climate Change Challenge to Business and Industry Meeting President Bush's Climate Change Challenge to Business and Industry An article describing the...

373

A Banner Year for the U.S. Wind Industry | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

made clear, we need an all-of-the-above approach to American energy and the U.S. wind industry is a critical part of this strategy. In fact, wind energy contributed 32 percent of...

374

"Table 1. Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated" "Gross Domestic Product" "Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2)",0.9772689079,42.55319149 "Petroleum" "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a)",35.19047501,18.61702128 "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b)",34.68652106,19.68085106 "Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4)",6.150682783,66.4893617 "Crude Oil Production (Table 5)",5.99969572,59.57446809 "Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6)",13.27260615,67.0212766 "Natural Gas"

375

Transforming the Freight Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transforming the Freight Industry From Regulation to Icommon-carrier freight industry was Competition to backwardjourneys. When the freight industry was deregulated, it was

Regan, Amelia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Demographics and industry returns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demographics and Industry Returns By Stefano DellaVigna andand returns across industries. Cohort size fluc- tuationspredict profitability by industry. Moreover, forecast demand

Pollet, Joshua A.; DellaVigna, Stefano

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

California is the largest cement producing state in theU.S., accounting for between 10 percent and 15 percent of U.S. cementproduction and cement industry employment. The cement industry inCalifornia consists of 31 sites that consume large amounts of energy,annually: 1,600 GWh of electricity, 22 million therms of natural gas, 2.3million tons of coal, 0.25 tons of coke, and smaller amounts of wastematerials, including tires. The case study summarized in this paperfocused on providing background information, an assessment ofenergy-efficiency opportunities and barriers, and program recommendationsthat can be used by program planners to better target products to thecement industry. The primary approach to this case study involvedwalk-through surveys of customer facilities and in depth interviews withcustomer decision makers and subsequent analysis of collected data. Inaddition, a basic review of the cement production process was developed,and summary cement industry energy and economic data were collected, andanalyzed. The analysis of secondary data provides background informationon the cement industry and identification of potential energy-efficiencyopportunities. The interviews provide some understanding of the customerperspective about implementation of energy-efficiencyprojects.

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Innovative Energy Efficient Industrial Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper was written to describe an innovative “on-demand” industrial ventilation system for woodworking, metalworking, food processing, pharmaceutical, chemical, and other industries. Having analyzed existing industrial ventilation in 130 factories, we found striking dichotomy between the classical “static” design of ventilation systems and constantly changing workflow and business demands. Using data from real factories, we are able to prove that classical industrial ventilation design consumes 70 % more energy than necessary. Total potential electricity saving achieved by using on-demand systems instead of classically designed industrial ventilation in the U.S. could be 26 billion kWh. At the average electricity cost of 7 cents per kWh, this would represent $1.875 billion. Eighty such systems are already installed in the USA and European Union.

Litomisky, A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Pulp & Paper Industry- A Strategic Energy Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pulp and paper industry with yearly energy purchases of $5 billion per year including 50 billion kWh of power is one of the largest industrial energy producers in the U.S. However, structural changes in the global pulp and paper industry could greatly impact the energy purchases of U.S. firms. Depending on how energy suppliers react, this change could represent a threat or an opportunity.

Stapley, C. E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Industry Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

idatech.com idatech.com info@idatech.com 63065 NE 18 th Street Bend, OR 97701 541.383.3390 Industry Perspective Biogas and Fuel Cell Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory June 11 - 13, 2012 Mike Hicks Chairman of the Board of Directors, FCHEA Treasurer of the Board of Directors, FCS&E Engineering Manager, Technology Development & Integration, IdaTech Outline 1. Critical Factors * Fuel Purity * Fuel Cost 2. Natural Gas - The Wild Card & Competition 3. IdaTech's Experience Implementing Biofuel Critical Factor - Fuel Purity All fuel cell system OEMs have fuel purity specifications * Independent of * Raw materials or feed stocks * Manufacturing process * Depends on * Fuel processor technology * Fuel cell technology - low temp PEM versus SOFC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Electric power industry restructuring in Australia: Lessons from down-under. Occasional paper No. 20  

SciTech Connect

Australia`s electric power industry (EPI) is undergoing major restructuring. This restructuring includes commercialization of state-owned electric organization through privatization and through corporatization into separate governmental business units; structural unbundling of generation, transmission, retailing, and distribution; and creation of a National Electricity Market (NEM) organized as a centralized, market-based trading pool for buying and selling electricity. The principal rationales for change in the EPI were the related needs of enhancing international competitiveness, improving productivity, and lowering electric rates. Reducing public debt through privatization also played an important role. Reforms in the EPI are part of the overall economic reform package that is being implemented in Australia. Enhancing efficiency in the economy through competition is a key objective of the reforms. As the need for reform was being discussed in the early 1990s, Australia`s previous prime minister, Paul Keating, observed that {open_quotes}the engine which drives efficiency is free and open competition.{close_quotes} The optimism about the economic benefits of the full package of reforms across the different sectors of the economy, including the electricity industry, is reflected in estimated benefits of a 5.5 percent annual increase in real gross domestic product and the creation of 30,000 more jobs. The largest source of the benefits (estimated at 25 percent of total benefits) was projected to come from reform of the electricity and gas sectors.

Ray, D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Industrial energy efficiency policy in China  

SciTech Connect

Chinese industrial sector energy-efficiency policy has gone through a number of distinct phases since the founding of the People s Republic in 1949. An initial period of energy supply growth in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s was followed by implementation of significant energy efficiency programs in the 1980s. Many of these programs were dismantled in the 1990s during the continuing move towards a market-based economy. In an effort to once again strengthen energy efficiency, the Chinese government passes the Energy Conservation Law in 1997 which provides broad guidance for the establishment of energy efficiency policies. Article 20 of the Energy Conservation Law requires substantial improvement in industrial energy efficiency in the key energy-consuming industrial facilities in China. This portion of the Law declares that ''the State will enhance energy conservation management in key energy consuming entities.'' In 1999, the industrial sector consumed nearly 30 EJ, or 76 percent of China's primary energy. Even though primary energy consumption has dropped dramatically in recent years, due mostly to a decline in coal consumption, the Chinese government is still actively developing an overall policy for energy efficiency in the industrial sector modeled after policies in a number of industrialized countries. This paper will describe recent Chinese government activities to develop industrial sector energy-efficiency targets as a ''market-based'' mechanism for improving the energy efficiency of key industrial facilities.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Analysis of industrial load management  

SciTech Connect

Industrial Load Management, ILM, has increased the possibilities of changing load profiles and raising load factors. This paper reports on load profile measurements and feasible load management applications that could be implemented in industry e.g. bivalent systems for heating of premises and processes, load priority systems, energy storage and rescheduling processes or parts of processes due to differential electricity rates. Industrial load variations on hourly, daily and seasonal basis are treated as well as the impact by load management on load curves e g peak clipping, valley filling and increased off-peak electricity usage.

Bjork, C.O.; Karlsson, B.G.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Office of Industrial Technologies: Industry partnerships  

SciTech Connect

US industries are making progress in turning the vision of the future into reality: More effective competition in global markets, increased industrial efficiency, more jobs, reduced waste generation and greenhouse gas emissions (to 1990 levels), improved environment. DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies is catalyzing and supporting industry progress in many ways. This pamphlet gives an overview of OIT.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy Consumption and Potential for Energy Conservation in the Steel Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The domestic steel industry, being energy-use intensive, requires between 4 and 5 percent of total annual domestic energy consumption. More than two-thirds of total steel industry energy, however, is derived from coal. During the post-World War II era specific energy consumption exhibited a steady decline of slightly less than 1 percent per year. Potential for future savings is estimated at approximately 25 percent. Full realization of potential savings will require huge sums of capital. These needs will be in competition with other capital needs for modernizing existing facilities, for expansion, and for the large investments required to meet environmental regulations.

Hughes, M. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

For the industrial sector, EIAs analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8 percent of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9 percent of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In AEO2006, energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50 percent of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

387

Deregulation-restructuring: Evidence for individual industries  

SciTech Connect

Several studies have measured the effects of regulation on a particular industry. These studies range widely in sophistication, from simple observation (comparison) of pre-transformation and post-transformation actual industry performance to econometric analysis that attempt to separate the effects of deregulation from other factors in explaining changes in an industry`s performance. The major problem with observation studies is that they are unable to measure the effect of one particular event, such as deregulation, on an industry`s performance. For example, at the same time that the United Kingdom privatized its electric power industry, it also radically restructured the industry to encourage competition and instituted a price-cap mechanism to regulate the prices of transmission, distribution, and bundled retail services. Subsequent to these changes in 1991, real prices for most UK electricity customers have fallen. It is not certain however, which of these factors was most important or even contributed to the decline in price. In any event, one must be cautious in interpreting the results of studies that attempt to measure the effect of deregulation per se for a specific industry. This report highlights major outcomes for five industries undergoing deregulation or major regulatory and restructuring reforms. These include the natural gas, transportation, UK electric power, financial, and telecommunications industries. Particular attention was given to the historical development of events in the telecommunications industry.

Costello, K.W.; Graniere, R.J.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Figure 57. Change in residential delivered energy consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 57. Change in residential delivered energy consumption for selected end uses in four cases, 2011-2040 (percent) Best Available Technology

389

Global Climate Change Electric Power Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-binding national targets have been set for the consumption of electricity from renewable sources and for biofuels - The United States - Developing nations · Biofuels targets · Biofuels policy overview by region - The European renewable fuels targets (gallons bn), 2006-2012 · Biofuels energy targets · Biofuel policy overview

Ford, Andrew

390

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

opportunities for petroleum refineries - An ENERGY STARenergy consumed in refineries and other energy conversionof 2004, there were 735 refineries in 128 countries with a

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refineries - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantcement making - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electric motors and insulation) show energy savings of 20–a third of the savings potential of electric motor systems (

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Biofuel Industries Group LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industries Group LLC Industries Group LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Biofuel Industries Group LLC Place Adrian, Michigan Zip 49221 Product Biofuel Industries Group, LLC owns and operates the NextDiesel biodiesel plant in Adrian, Michigan. References Biofuel Industries Group LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Biofuel Industries Group LLC is a company located in Adrian, Michigan . References ↑ "Biofuel Industries Group LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Biofuel_Industries_Group_LLC&oldid=342814" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

394

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

SciTech Connect

The January 1992 Industry Briefs includes brief articles on: (1) the startup of Chinese and Indian nuclear units, (2) agreements between China and Pakistan for the construction of a nuclear unit, (3) international safeguards agreements, (4) restart of a nuclear unit in Armenia, (5) closure of a German nuclear waste site, (6) restructuring of the Hungarian state-owned utility MVMT, (7) requests for bids for Wolsong Units 3 and 4, (8) signing of the European Energy charter, (9) continued operation of the MAGNOX reactors, and (10) changing Canadian requirements on uranium.

NONE

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Optoelectronics Industry Development Association  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... those systems that meet final demand are information ... One survey found that 45 percent of respondents ... there was a tremendous response from the ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

396

US DOE Industrial Steam BestPractices Software Tools  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOW RESTRICTED For internal DOW RESTRICTED For internal use only US DOE Industrial Steam BestPractices Software Tools Riyaz Papar, PE, CEM Hudson Technologies Company Phone: (281) 298 0975 Email: rpapar@hudsontech.com - Agenda * Introduction * Steam System BP Tools Suite - SSST - SSAT - 3EPlus * Q & A 1 Steam System Management Objective: Minimize Steam Use, Energy Losses And Most Importantly STEAM COST!! Steam Market Assessment Takeaways * Fuel savings estimates - individual projects - ranged from 0.6 percent to 5.2 percent * Estimated payback periods generally very attractive - Ranged from 2 to 34 months - Most less than 2 years * Potential steam savings in target industries - over 12 percent of fuel use 2 Promising Areas To Achieve Steam Energy and Cost Savings? Use Steam System Scoping Tool (SSST) For

397

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Changes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Changes in Lighting Changes in Lighting The percentage of commercial buildings with lighting was unchanged between 1995 and 2003; however, three lighting types did show change in usage. Compact fluorescent lamps and halogen lamps showed a significant increase between 1995 and 2003 while the use of incandescent lights declined. The lighting questions in the 1995, 1999, and 2003 CBECS questionnaires were virtually identical which facilitates comparison across survey years. The use of compact fluorescent lamps more than doubled, from just under 10 percent of lit buildings to more than 20 percent (Figure 17 and Table 5). The use of halogen lamps nearly doubled, from 7 percent to 13 percent of lit buildings. Use of incandescent lights was the only lighting type to decline; their use dropped from 59 percent to just over one-half of lit buildings.

398

Uranium industry annual 1993  

SciTech Connect

Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Industry Leaders Saving Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Leaders Saving Energy Industry Leaders Saving Energy Industry Leaders Saving Energy May 6, 2010 - 11:35am Addthis Joshua DeLung Companies such as 3M, Intel, PepsiCo and Whirlpool are participating in the Energy Department's Save Energy Now LEADER initiative, committing to reducing their energy use by 25 percent or more in 10 years. Another established company participating in the program, AT&T, is also making that commitment to saving energy while producing more renewable power at many of its locations across the country."We're taking meaningful steps to run a more-efficient network and explore alternative and renewable energy use," John Schinter, director of energy for AT&T Services, Inc., says. The company utilizes wind and solar power at some of its buildings. In

400

Sanyo Chemical Industries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemical Industries Chemical Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name Sanyo Chemical Industries Place Tokyo, Japan Zip 103-0023 Product String representation "Sanyo is a petr ... uction process." is too long. References Sanyo Chemical Industries[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sanyo Chemical Industries is a company located in Tokyo, Japan . References ↑ "Sanyo Chemical Industries" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Sanyo_Chemical_Industries&oldid=350614" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Solar Power Industries SPI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Power Industries SPI Solar Power Industries SPI Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Power Industries (SPI) Place Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania Zip 15012 Product US-based manufacturer of mono and multicrystalline PV cells, modules and systems. References Solar Power Industries (SPI)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Solar Power Industries (SPI) is a company located in Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania . References ↑ "Solar Power Industries (SPI)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Solar_Power_Industries_SPI&oldid=351318" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

402

Energy Conservation in Army Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Army Materiel Development and Readiness Command (DARCOM) is responsible for the life cycle functions for all assigned materiel systems of the United States Army and Department of Defense agencies. DARCOM installations account for approximately 19 percent of the Army's total energy consumption (approximately 44 million barrels of oil equivalent) and have reduced energy consumption approximately 26 percent below FY 75 levels. Highlights of the program include a comprehensive energy audit program, process energy studies, several different energy capital investment programs, and an aggressive energy awareness program. This paper describes the program with particular emphasis on the ongoing effort to establish relationships between key production parameters and energy consumption throughout the command. This will enable DARCOM to forecast future energy requirements and to determine the effectiveness of the conservation program in a dynamic industrial environment.

Aveta, G. A.; Sliwinski, B. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

NSLS Industrial User Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Industrial Program Coordinator | Publications Courtesy of The New York Times, Noah Berger The overall goal of the plan to enhance the NSLS facility's Industrial Users'...

404

Uranium industry annual 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Construction Industry Institute  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in one of our country's most vital industries. ... An industry-led program to disseminate practical ... fire-proofing materials, connections, and steel trusses; ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

406

Reduce Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This DOE Industrial Program fact sheet describes ten effective ways to save energy and money in industrial process heating systems by making some changes in equipment, operations, and maintenance.

Not Available

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Supporting rural wood industry through timber utilization research. Research paper  

SciTech Connect

The report evaluates the potential impact of USDA Forest Service wood utilization and wood energy research on rural employment and income. Recent projections suggest employment will decrease in many forest products industries, such as softwood sawmilling, but will eventually increase in softwood plywood and reconstituated panel mills. Forest products industries expected to provide wages exceeding the average manufacturing production wage include logging, softwood sawmills, millwork, softwood plywood--veneer, structural wood members, particle-board, wood partitions, pulp mills, paper mills, and paperboard mills. Industries expected to pay 90 percent of the average manufacturing production wage include wood kitchen cabinets, mobile homes, prefabricated wood buildings, and wood preservatives.

Skog, K.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Renewable Energy and Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy and Climate Change Symposium in Honor of 2009 and 2010 ACS Fellows in the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division Helena Chum, NREL Research Fellow August...

409

Contact Information - Industrial : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BESC Industry Contact Information BESC Industry Contact Information To learn more about BESC's industry program please contact Renae Speck, Director of Technology Transfer and Partnerships for BESC, (865-576-4680), Renae Speck). Renae Speck Renae Speck, PhD spends fifty percent of her time as a Senior Commercialization Manager in the Office of Technology Transfer in the Partnership Directorate and fifty percent of her time as the Manager of Technology Transfer and Partnerships for the BioEnergy Science Center. As a Senior Commercialization Manager, Renae is responsible for portfolio management and commercialization of intellectual property created by researchers and staff in the Biological and Environmental Sciences Divisions as well as any intellectual property created by Oak Ridge National Laboratory staff that is funded by the BioEnergy Science Center

410

Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archive of Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources Cincinnati, Ohio, USA Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources ...

411

10 Percent Rule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and you can try to explain it. The natural law it illustrates is the second law of thermodynamics; entropy is created in any natural trnasfer of energy. Richard E. Barrans Jr. This...

412

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

413

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

414

Thin-Film Photovoltaic Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of the thin-film (TF) photovoltaic (PV) industry as of the third quarter of 2012, a time in the midst of very rapid changes.  The TFPV industry has seen significantly greater investment in the past 5 to 10 years than in any previous time and up until recently it seemed that this investment was on track to make TFPV a much larger player in the overall PV market.  However, market dynamics have conspired to dim TFPV’s near-term prospects and ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Industrial energy efficiency policy in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Indicators," Energy Policy 25(7'-9): 727-744. X u ,Best Practice Energy Policies in the Industrial Sector, Mayand Intensity Change," Energy Policy 22(3): Sinton, J.E.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Restructuring the Philippine electric power industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Philippine electricity industry has shown it can change, and change quickly. In contrast with the crises and changes imposed on it in the past, the industry now has as opportunity to forge a progressive, forward-looking strategy, This opportunity is enhanced by the force of law - the Department of Energy Act of 1992 mandates privatization of the National Power Corporation (NPC) - and by the easing of the power crisis which has significantly diminished political interference. In order to position the industry for growth and rising investment requirements and to support the growing role of the Philippine economy in international markets, that strategy must address the structural deficiencies that continue to plague the industry. By addressing structural changes that need to be made now, it can build on the impetus gained from its privatization mandate to improve accountability, increase efficiency and reduce government risk.

Bowden, S.; Ellis, M.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

An introduction to electric industry restructuring  

SciTech Connect

This paper briefly describes the electric industry, its residential markets, industry structure and current trends. Its purpose is to provide Weatherization grants managers with the background necessary to assess their leveraging opportunities in an industry that is experiencing sweeping changes, commonly known as electric industry restructuring. The study describes the terrain of a changing industry topography on a national and regional basis, with some state and local information also provided. Weatherization managers and subgrantees who read this paper should be better able to understand the leveraging opportunities that are emerging now in the electricity market place. The reader will be introduced to the basics of the electric industry as it presently operates, the nature of the changes that are in the process of occurring, and the driving forces that are behind those changes. The major industry players are described by type and their interests are explored in further depth. There will also be an overview of the regulatory process as it has operated historically, as well as the changes now underway at both the state and federal levels. Finally, the paper will conclude with a description of some of the assets and opportunities available to those who may be interested in participating in the restructuring process in order to expand or protect low-income programs in their own states.

Eisenberg, J.F.; Berry, L.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Econometric model of the U.S. sheep and mohair industries for policy analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. sheep industry has been declining in size for many years. Many factors have contributed to the decline of the sheep industry including declining consumption of lamb and mutton, the growth in manmade fiber use, scarcity of labor, and predator losses. In an effort to slow the rate of decline in the U.S. sheep industry, the U.S. Congress passed the Wool Act of 1954. In 1993, Congress passed a three-year phase out of the Wool Act incentive payments with the last payments occurring in 1996. The 2002 Farm Bill included a marketing loan program for wool. The loan rates are set to $0.40 per pound for un-graded wool, $1.00 per pound for graded wool. In recent years exchange rate changes have had a large impact on the industry affecting lamb and wool trade. The U.S. is the second largest producer of mohair and Texas accounts for over 85 percent of the U.S. mohair production. Mohair also received incentive payments through the Wool Act. Mohair payments were also phased out along with the wool incentive payments. Moreover, the 2002 Farm Bill reinstated support for the industry by implementing a loan program with loan rates of $4.20 per pound of mohair. This analysis uses capital stock inventory accounting methodology to model the supply side of the sheep industry. Demand is incorporated using traditional single equations and complete demand system estimation methods. OLS, 2SLS, and 3SLS models are developed and tested for the single equations estimation methods. The OLS model is used to model the impacts of three different levels of loan rates for wool. Also, an OLS mohair model is developed and used to examine the impacts of three different levels of loan rates for mohair. Results indicate that the sheep industry will continue to decline even with the marketing loan program for wool in the 2002 Farm Bill. However, a higher loan rate for wool would reduce the decline rate of the industry. The Angora goat industry will continue to decline in size, but with a higher loan rate for mohair, the number of goats clipped would increase.

Ribera Landivar, Luis Alejandro

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Climate VISION: Industry Associations  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations Industry Associations Aluminum Aluminum Association (Coordinating aluminum industry Climate VISION activities) The Aluminum Association, Inc. is the trade association for producers of primary aluminum, recyclers and semi-fabricated aluminum products, as well as suppliers to the industry. The Association provides leadership to the industry through its programs and services which aim to enhance aluminum's position in a world of proliferating materials, increase its use as the "material of choice," remove impediments to its fullest use, and assist in achieving the industry's environmental, societal, and economic objectives. Automobile Manufacturers Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers (Coordinating automobile industry Climate VISION activities) The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, Inc. is a trade association

420

DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse Gas-Free Hydrogen at Existing Nuclear Power Plants DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse Gas-Free Hydrogen at Existing Nuclear Power Plants April 13, 2006 - 10:19am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - In support of President Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI), Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will allocate up to $1.6 million this year to fund industry studies on the best ways to utilize energy from existing commercial nuclear reactors for production of hydrogen in a safe and environmentally-sound manner. DOE is seeking industry proposals for these Federal Financial Assistance Awards, worth up to 80 percent of the total

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Engineering salary trends in the petroleum industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To understand the changes that occur cyclically in engineering manpower supply/demand trends in the petroleum industry, it is desirable to have an awareness of some of the major activities and factors affecting such trends; of starting Petroleum Engineering salaries relating to that background; of the on-going engineering salary status which developed from these activities; and of the large effect that high starting and on-going salaries do have in attracting and retaining engineers within the petroleum industry. It is important to realize that changes in industry trends can be brought about both by economic and political decisions, in both domestic and international activities.

Brown, D.C.; Terrant, L.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.unido.org/fileadmin/user_media/Publications/Pub_free/UNEnergy2009P Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Screenshot References: Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change[1]

423

Transforming the Oil Industry into the Energy Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shortcomings. First, it targets only biofuels. Second, thebiofuels must achieve at least fifty percent reduction in lifecycle GHG emissions, and a subcategory must meet a sixty percent reduction target.

Sperling, Daniel; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Evaluation of 2 Percent CrMoWV HP/LP Rotor Gap Forging for Single Cylinder Steam Turbine Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been considerable industry interest in developing a single shaft rotor configuration that uses the same rotor in the high-pressure (HP) as well as the Low Pressure (LP) sections of a steam turbine. This report evaluates an HP/LP rotor forging for single cylinder steam turbines.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

425

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

426

Recovery Act: Re-utilization of Industrial Carbon Dioxide for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Re-utilization of Industrial Carbon Dioxide for Algae Production Using a Phase Change Material Background Worldwide carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from human activity have...

427

Strategic vision toward the next-generation telecom industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Telecommunication industry is experiencing volatile change in technology and business model. Every telecom company needs strategy that gives direction through rapidly shifting environment. NTT, Japanese telecom giant is ...

Yoshioka, Kenji, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Trends in Industrial Energy Efficiency: The Role of Standards...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Industrial Energy Efficiency: The Role of Standards, Certification, and Energy Management in Climate Change Mitigation Speaker(s): Aimee McKane Date: March 18, 2008 -...

429

CANCELED: Trends in Industrial Energy Efficiency - the Role of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CANCELED: Trends in Industrial Energy Efficiency - the Role of Standards, Certification, and Energy Management in Climate Change Mitigation Speaker(s): Aimee McKane Date: January...

430

Industrial Innovation in the United States: The Complementary ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... century, America learned that the power of government ... In the late 1960s, winds of change were ... in thousands of industrial settings all over America. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

431

An Evaluation of Thermal Storage at Two Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal storage offers substantial energy cost savings potential in situations with favorable electrical rates and significant cooling demand. Full storage is usually restricted to facilities occupied only part of the day, but two industrial plants were recently encountered which offered the potential for full storage. The first plant, a textile weaving operation, has over 5,000 tons of installed chiller capacity used for strict control of temperature and humidity. Measurements of peak load indicated the units were less than 50 percent loaded. Because of the excess chiller capacity, summer demand can be met by operating the units fully loaded during off-peak hours and storing unneeded chilled water in a storage tank for daytime usage. The second plant is a single shift poultry processing operation that uses large amounts of ice to preserve the product during shipping. In this case, ice making during off-peak times for use during production was analyzed. Despite the fact that both options offered significant savings, the paybacks were higher than acceptable due to the significant investment required. While the projects are not economically feasible at the present time, the analysis verifies the technical feasibility of thermal storage. Future changes in electricity cost could make the concept more attractive economically.

Brown, M. L.; Gurta, M. E.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Energy Efficiency Improvement in the Petroleum RefiningIndustry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information has proven to be an important barrier inindustrial energy efficiency improvement. Voluntary government programsaim to assist industry to improve energy efficiency by supplyinginformation on opportunities. ENERGY STAR(R) supports the development ofstrong strategic corporate energy management programs, by providingenergy management information tools and strategies. This paper summarizesENERGY STAR research conducted to develop an Energy Guide for thePetroleum Refining industry. Petroleum refining in the United States isthe largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually every economicsector, including the transport sector and the chemical industry.Refineries spend typically 50 percent of the cash operating costs (e.g.,excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy amajor cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction.The petroleum refining industry consumes about 3.1 Quads of primaryenergy, making it the single largest industrial energy user in the UnitedStates. Typically, refineries can economically improve energy efficiencyby 20 percent. The findings suggest that given available resources andtechnology, there are substantial opportunities to reduce energyconsumption cost-effectively in the petroleum refining industry whilemaintaining the quality of the products manufactured.

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

US Energy Industry Financial Developments, 1993 fourth quarter, April 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report traces key financial trends in the US energy industry for the fourth quarter of 1993. Financial data (only available for publicly-traded US companies) are included in two broad groups -- fossil fuel production and rate-regulated electric utilities. All financial data are taken from public sources such as energy industry corporate reports and press releases, energy trade publications, and The Wall Street Journal`s Earnings Digest; return on equity is calculated from data available from Standard and Poor`s Compustat data service. Since several major petroleum companies disclose their income by lines of business and geographic area, these data are also presented in this report. Although the disaggregated income concept varies by company and is not strictly comparable to corporate income, relative movements in income by lines of business and geographic area are summarized as useful indicators of short-term changes in the underlying profitability of these operations. Based on information provided in 1993 fourth quarter financial disclosures, the net income for 82 petroleum companies -- including 18 majors -- was unchanged between the fourth quarter of 1992 and the fourth quarter of 1993. An 18-percent decline in crude oil prices resulted in a deterioration of the performance of upstream (oil and gas production) petroleum companies during the final quarter of 1993. However, prices for refined products fell much less than the price of crude oil, resulting in higher refined product margins and downstream (refining, marketing and transport) petroleum earnings. An increase in refined product demand also contributed to the rise in downstream income.

Not Available

1994-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

434

The specification and estimation of technological change in electricity production  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on the rate of technological change in electricity production. The dominant role of fossil fuel-fired electricity production in the industry, coupled with the direct association with the emission of greenhouse gases, makes technology parameters particularly significant for several reasons. First, very long-run simulations of energy-economic paths at a global level require that technical progress occupy a place in the methodology for sound formulations that are vital in global emissions/energy policy analysis. Second, given the outlook for electricity generation being predominately coal-based, especially in developing economies around the world, the specification and measurement of technical change is essential for developing realistic long-run technology forecasts. Finally, industry or sector growth in productivity hinges partly on technical progress, and updated analysis will always be necessary to stay abreast of developments on this front, as well as for economic growth considerations in general. This study is based on empirical economic research on production functions in the electric utility industry. However, it advances a seldom used approach, called the {open_quotes}engineering-production function{close_quotes}, in contrast to the more common neoclassical approach used by economists. Combined with this approach is a major departure from the type of data used to conduct econometric estimations of production parameters. This research draws upon a consistent set of ex ante or {open_quotes}blueprint{close_quotes} data that better reflects planned, technical performance and cost data elements, in contrast to the more customary, expect type of data from actual firm/plant operations. The results from the examination of coal-fired technologies indicate the presence of technical change. Using data for the period from 1979 to 1989, we find technical change to be capital-augmenting at the rate of 1.8 percent per year.

Kavanaugh, D.C.; Ashton, W.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Users from Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users from Industry Users from Industry Users from Industry Print The Advanced Light Source (ALS) welcomes industrial users from large and small companies whose projects advance scientific knowledge, investigate the development of new products and manufacturing methods, or provide economic benefits and jobs to the economy. The nature of industrial research can be different from traditional university and government sponsored projects, so the ALS has created unique opportunities for new and existing industrial users to access our user facilities and engage in productive relationships with our scientific and engineering staff. Examples of past and current research conducted at the ALS can be viewed on the Industry @ ALS Web page. There are several modes of access; the ALS User and Scientific Support Groups are especially committed to helping new industrial users gain a foothold in our user community and welcome inquiries about how to make that happen.

436

Challenges of electric power industry restructuring for fuel suppliers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide an assessment of the changes in other energy industries that could occur as the result of restructuring in the electric power industry. This report is prepared for a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric power industry, and the general public. 28 figs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Product strategy in response to technological innovation in the semiconductor test industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After the market boom of 2000 in the semiconductor industry changed significantly. The changes included stricter limits on capital cost spending, and the increased propensity of the industry to outsource the manufacturing ...

Lin, Robert W. (Robert Wei-Pang), 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

The Copper Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...These products are sold to a wide variety of industrial users. Certain mill productsâ??chiefly wire, cable, and most

439

NIST Industry Day 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... at www.fedbizopps.gov. Search NIST-AMD-INDUSTRY-DAY-2012 in the Quick Search engine. Deadline for registration ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

Industrial Development Projects (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes municipalities and counties to issue bonds or interest coupons to finance industrial projects, including energy generation facilities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

America's Booming Wind Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sharing key findings from two new Energy Department reports that highlight the record growth of America's wind industry.

442

Advanced technology options for industrial heating equipment research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents a strategy for a comprehensive program plan that is applicable to the Combustion Equipment Program of the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies (the program). The program seeks to develop improved heating equipment and advanced control techniques which, by improvements in combustion and beat transfer, will increase energy-use efficiency and productivity in industrial processes and allow the preferred use of abundant, low grade and waste domestic fuels. While the plan development strategy endeavors to be consistent with the programmatic goals and policies of the office, it is primarily governed by the needs and concerns of the US heating equipment industry. The program, by nature, focuses on energy intensive industrial processes. According to the DOE Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), the industrial sector in the US consumed about 21 quads of energy in 1988 in the form of coal, petroleum, natural gas and electricity. This energy was used as fuels for industrial boilers and furnaces, for agricultural uses, for construction, as feedstocks for chemicals and plastics, and for steel, mining, motors, engines and other industrial use over 75 percent of this energy was consumed to provide heat and power for manufacturing industries. The largest consumers of fuel energy were the primary metals, chemical and allied products, paper and allied products, and stone, clay and glass industry groups which accounted for about 60% of the total fuel energy consumed by the US manufacturing sector.

Jain, R.C.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Transforming the Oil Industry into the Energy Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

innovation and lets industry pick winning technologies. TheTransforming the Oil Industry intothe Energy Industry BY DANIEL SPERLING AND SONIA YEH A C C E

Sperling, Daniel; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

From Industry Protection to Industry Promotion: IT Policy in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brazilian banking automation industry. Science, TechnologyBrazilian liberalisation of the IT industry on technologicalWorking paper. Computer Industry Almanac, Inc. (1999).

Botelho, Antonio Jose Junqueira; Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.; Tigre, Paulo Bastos

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Deregulation in Japanese gas industries : significance and problems of gas rate deregulation for large industrial customers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, the circumstances surrounding Japanese City gas industries have been changing drastically. On one hand, as energy suppliers, natural gas which has become major fuel resource for city gas, as public utilities, ...

Inoue, Masayuki

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Industry - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry banner Industry banner Neutron scattering research has applications in practically every field, and neutron research at ORNL is leading to productive partnerships with the industrial and business communities. We welcome proposals for all types of research, including those involving proprietary work. Recent studies have led to discoveries with potential applications in fields such as medicine, energy, and various metals technologies. For more information, please see our recent research highlights. Research Collaborations Industry-Driven Research Benefits Plastics Manufacturing Corning uses VULCAN to test limits of ceramic material for car emission controls, filtration devices Neutrons Probe Inner Workings of Batteries Industry and Neutron Science: Working To Make a Match

447

China: Changing Wood Products Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;China: Changing Wood Products Markets less is probably known about the forestry and wood products market in China than most other U.S. trading partners. In the 1980s China emerged as the world,11,12). However, U.S. wood products exports to China declined nearly 93 percent from 1988 to 1996, from $-I%3

Zhang, Daowei

448

Guidance for growth factors, projections, and control strategies for the 15 percent rate-of-progress plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 182(b)(1) of the Clean Air Act (Act) requires all ozone nonattainment areas classified as moderate and above to submit a State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision by November 15, 1993, which describes, in part, how the areas will achieve an actual volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions reduction of at least 15 percent during the first 6 years after enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). In addition, the SIP revision must describe how any growth in emissions from 1990 through 1996 will be fully offset. It is important to note that section 182(b)(1) also requires the SIP for moderate areas to provide for reductions in VOC and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as necessary to attain the national primary ambient air quality standard for ozone by November 15, 1996. The guidance document focuses on the procedures for developing 1996 projected emissions inventories and control measures which moderate and above ozone nonattainment areas must include in their rate-of-progress plans. The document provides technical guidance to support the policy presented in the 'General Preamble: Implementation of Title I of the CAAA of 1990' (57 FR 13498).

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Analysis of Percent On-Cell Reformation of Methane in SOFC Stacks: Thermal, Electrical and Stress Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a parametric analysis performed to determine the effect of varying the percent on-cell reformation (OCR) of methane on the thermal and electrical performance for a generic, planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack design. OCR of methane can be beneficial to an SOFC stack because the reaction (steam-methane reformation) is endothermic and can remove excess heat generated by the electrochemical reactions directly from the cell. The heat removed is proportional to the amount of methane reformed on the cell. Methane can be partially pre-reformed externally, then supplied to the stack, where rapid reaction kinetics on the anode ensures complete conversion. Thus, the thermal load varies with methane concentration entering the stack, as does the coupled scalar distributions, including the temperature and electrical current density. The endotherm due to the reformation reaction can cause a temperature depression on the anode near the fuel inlet, resulting in large thermal gradients. This effect depends on factors that include methane concentration, local temperature, and stack geometry.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Jarboe, Daniel T.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2006-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

450

US energy industry financial developments, 1993 third quarter  

SciTech Connect

Based on information provided in 1993 third quarter financial disclosures, the average net income for 112 petroleum companies -- including 18 majors -- rose 13 percent between the third quarter of 1992 and the third quarter of 1993. The gain in overall petroleum income was derived from increases in refined product consumption and margins, which improved the profitability of downstream petroleum (refining, marketing and transport) operations. A 17-percent decline in crude oil prices led to reduced income for upstream (oil and gas exploration, development and production) operations. A 16-percent rise in natural gas wellhead prices only partially offset the negative effects of low crude oil prices. Electric utilities also reported improved financial results for the third quarter of 1993 as hotter summer temperatures relative to the year-earlier quarter helped boost air conditioning demand and overall electricity usage. The following points highlight third-quarter energy industry financial developments: (1) Refined product demand and margins lift downstream earnings. Petroleum product consumption rose 2 percent between the third quarter of 1992 and the third quarter of 1993. Although petroleum product prices declined in the most recent reporting period, they did not decline as much as crude oil input prices. As a consequence, refined product margins widened. (2) Lower crude oil prices reduce upstream earnings. Crude oil prices fell 17 percent between the third quarter of 1992 and the third quarter of 1993 leading to a substantial reduction in income for the major petroleum companies` upstream operations. (3) Drilling income rises with increased North American exploratory activity.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Uranium industry annual 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

452

Uranium industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

453

Tobacco Industry Involvement in Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accessed May 25, 2004) Industry Summary. 1992 (est. ).11 May 2004) Tobacco Industry Involvement in Colorado Pageor (800) LUNG-USA. Tobacco Industry Involvement in Colorado

Landman, BA, Anne; Bialick, Peter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

For Industry | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D accelerates battery technology | More news Home | Connect with ORNL | For Industry For Industry | For Industry SHARE There are a few different way of "working" with...

455

Users from Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users from Industry Print Users from Industry Print The Advanced Light Source (ALS) welcomes industrial users from large and small companies whose projects advance scientific knowledge, investigate the development of new products and manufacturing methods, or provide economic benefits and jobs to the economy. The nature of industrial research can be different from traditional university and government sponsored projects, so the ALS has created unique opportunities for new and existing industrial users to access our user facilities and engage in productive relationships with our scientific and engineering staff. Examples of past and current research conducted at the ALS can be viewed on the Industry @ ALS Web page. There are several modes of access; the ALS User and Scientific Support Groups are especially committed to helping new industrial users gain a foothold in our user community and welcome inquiries about how to make that happen.

456

Global product development in semiconductor industry : Intel -- Tick-Tock product development cadence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates on changes in semiconductor industry's product development methodology by following Intel's product development from year 2000. Intel was challenged by customer's preference change, competitors new ...

Park, Cheolmin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive...

458

Orion Bus Industries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bus Industries Bus Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name Orion Bus Industries Place Ontario, Canada Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Other Relationship Partnering Center within NREL Transportation Technologies and Systems Partnership Year 2001 Link to project description http://www.nrel.gov/news/press/2002/3002_hybird_buses.html LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Orion Bus Industries is a company located in Ontario, Canada. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Orion_Bus_Industries&oldid=381704" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

459

Industrial Energy Auditing: An Opportunity for Improving Energy Efficiency and Industrial Competitiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the Department of Energy's industrial energy auditing program, its achievements to date, and future plans. The Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) Program provides no-cost energy audits to small and medium size manufacturers, and recommends ways to cut plant energy use. The program is conducted by universities for the DOE, and has performed over 3600 audits since 1976. Approximately 55 percent of the recommendations made through the EADC program are implemented by industry. Since program inception, audit recommendations have produced a cumulative national energy savings of about 67 trillion Btus, valued at $365 million. The National Energy Strategy (NES) has identified industrial energy audits as a cost-effective means to reduce energy consumption in industry. In support of the NES, the EADC program is expanding, and plans to have 40 operational EADCs by the year 2000. Through outreach activities, EADCs will also encourage similar private-sector programs, e.g. utility-conducted industrial audits performed for demand-side management programs.

Glaser, C.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Gasification world database 2007. Current industry status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information on trends and drivers affecting the growth of the gasification industry is provided based on information in the USDOE NETL world gasification database (available on the www.netl.doe.gov website). Sectors cover syngas production in 2007, growth planned through 2010, recent industry changes, and beyond 2010 - strong growth anticipated in the United States. A list of gasification-based power plant projects, coal-to-liquid projects and coal-to-SNG projects under consideration in the USA is given.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A Brief History of the Electricity Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

data and evaluating electricity data and evaluating electricity restructuring James Bushnell University of California Energy Inst. www.ucei.berkeley.edu Outline * Shameless flattery - Why EIA data are so important * Why are people so unhappy? - With electricity restructuring * What EIA data have helped us learn - Production efficiencies - Market efficiency - Market competition - Environmental compliance Why EIA is so important * Important industries undergoing historic changes - Restructuring/deregulation - Environmental regulation and markets * We know much more about these industries than others where data are not collected - And much more than the europeans know about their energy industries * Academics and economists flock to data - Much more "open source" knowledge about the functioning of these markets

462

Table 28. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 28. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 2,214 2,356 1,994 4,570 4,353 5.0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 48 37 53 85 90 -5.6 313 Textile Mills 31 29 22 59 63 -6.1 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w w w w 322 Paper Manufacturing

463

Industrial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Industrial Dataset Summary Description The Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Database is a collection of all the publicly available data from energy efficiency assessments conducted by IACs at small and medium-sized industrial facilities. Source Department of Energy Industrial Assessment Centers Date Released September 20th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated September 20th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords assessment energy efficiency Industrial manufacturing small and medium-sized Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon copy_of_iac_database.xls (xls, 28.7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Standards Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Daily Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset

464

Photovoltaic industry progress through 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growth of the US photovoltaics (PV) industry over the past decade has been impressive. First designed to provide power for satellites using high-cost production techniques, PV is now the economical choice in many remote terrestrial applications. The remarkable growth of PV in terms of quality of cells and modules, production techniques, and system design, was initiated by a cooperative effort of the US Government and the domestic PV manufacturers. European and Japanese firms entered the PV industry later, but are also growing rapidy. The Europeans continue to supply PV systems for village electrification and water pumping to many Third World countries. The Japanese have been developing the amorphous silicon (A-Si) technology by expanding its use in consumer goods. The world PV industry saw dramatic changes in industry ownership and in the emphasis on developing new and improved technology during 1984. The objective of this report is to present information on the developments of the world PV industry and focuses on developments occurring in 1984. Information is presented on a regional basis (US, Europe, Japan, other) to avoid disclosing company-confidential data. All information was gleaned from several sources, including a review of the technical literature and direct contacts with PV manufacturers. Prior to publishing the regional totals, all numbers were compared with those of other sources. The information contained in this report is prepared for use by the Department of Energy for their use in long-term R and D planning. However, this information should also be of interest by PV manufacturers and to those who may be contemplating entering the PV market. PV shipments for 1984, government supports for PV, and various PV market sectors are discussed.

Watts, R.L.; Smith, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Assessments Lynn Price Staff Scientist China Energy Group Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Definition and overview of key components - International experience - Chinese situation and recommendations - US-China collaboration Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Analysis of the use of energy and potential for energy efficiency in an industrial facility * Current situation * Recommendations for improving energy efficiency * Cost-benefit analysis of recommended options * An action plan for realizing potential savings Types of Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Preliminary or walk-through - Detailed or diagnostic Audit criteria

466

Industrial Partnerships Office  

Industrial Partnerships Office 6/13 Richard Rankin Director----Roger Werne Deputy Director-----Yvonne King Administrator Nina Potter Manager Intellectual Property

467

Industrial Waste Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9) Page 2 of 7 Industrial Waste Generation Work with Engineered Nanomaterials Power Consumption Historical Contamination (groundwater, soil) Hazardous Waste Generation Atmospheric...

468

Search - Industrial Partnerships Office  

Industrial Partnerships Office P.O. Box 808, L-795 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-6416 Fax: (925) 423-8988 Operated by Lawrence Livermore ...

469

Construction Industry Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Translates a CIS/2 (CIMsteel Integration Standards) file into a 3D interactive VRML model of a steel structure or an IFC (Industry Foundation Classes ...

2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

470

Technologies - Industrial Partnerships Office  

Energy, Utilities, & Power Systems. Industrial Partnerships Office P.O. Box 808, L-795 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-6416 Fax: (925) 423-8988

471

OpenEI - Industrial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion btu) for electricity generation in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial and electric power) and by...

472

Food Processing Industry: Business Characteristics, Energy Use Patterns and Decision Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Food Processing Industry, behind only paper and metals, is the third largest user of energy in the United States. Approximately 17 percent of the 1.2 trillion BTUs used in this industry comes from electricity. This study represents an effort to identify trends and businesses issues in food processing that represent opportunities for energy providers to offer value added services and enhance relationships. Conducting focus groups in five cities, researchers received input from 62 study participants, i...

1999-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

473

Food Processing Industry: Business Characteristics, Energy Use Patterns and Decision Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Food Processing Industry, behind only paper and metals, is the third largest user of energy in the United States. Approximately 17 percent of the 1.2 trillion BTUs used in this industry comes from electricity. This study represents an effort to identify trends and businesses issues in food processing that represent opportunities for energy providers to offer value added services and enhance relationships. Conducting focus groups in five cities, researchers received input from 62 study participants, i...

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

474

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

SciTech Connect

This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of the March 1992 `Recent Developments` section of Nuexco. Specific issues mentioned are: (1) closure of Yankee Rowe, (2) steam-generator tube plugging at Trojan, (3) laser enrichment in South Africa, (4) the US uranium industry, (5) planning for two nuclear units in Taiwan, and (6) the establishment of a Czech/French joint venture.

NONE

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Geothermal industry assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment of the geothermal industry is presented, focusing on industry structure, corporate activities and strategies, and detailed analysis of the technological, economic, financial, and institutional issues important to government policy formulation. The study is based principally on confidential interviews with executives of 75 companies active in the field. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

2. Changes in Firm Transportation Capacity Contracting  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Chapter 6). A direct consequence of industry restructuring and regulatory reform is that the mix of various natural gas services has changed.

477

Industry - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry and Neutron Science Industry and Neutron Science Industry and Neutron Science: Working To Make a Match "In fundamental research, we want to know everything. Industry wants to know enough to answer a question." Research Contact: Mike Crawford September 2011, Written by Deborah Counce Mike Crawford and Souleymane Diallo Mike Crawford of Dupont (right) and Souleymane Diallo, instrument scientist for the Backscattering Spectrometer at SNS, prepare a material sample for an experiment on the instrument. Industrial users are starting to eye the potential of neutron science for solving problems that can't be solved in any other way. At the same time, the SNS and HFIR neutron science facilities at ORNL are exploring ways to woo such users and to make a match of it, to the benefit of both.

478

Uranium industry annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Uranium industry annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Residential Building Industry Consulting Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Place New York, NY Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Residential Building Industry Consulting Services is a company located in New York, NY. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Residential_Building_Industry_Consulting_Services&oldid=381757" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industry percent change" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

NSLS Industrial User Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jun Wang Physicist, Industrial Program Coordinator Phone: 344-2661 Email: junwang@bnl.gov Jun Wang is an Industrial Program Coordinator in the Photon Science Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory. She is working closely with industrial researchers as well as beamline staff to identify and explore new opportunities in industrial applications using synchrotron radiation. She has been leading the industrial research program including consultation, collaboration and outreach to the industrial user groups. Before joining BNL in 2008, Jun Wang was a Lead Scientist for a high-resolution high throughput powder diffraction program at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). As a Physicist at BNL, her research focuses on materials structure determination and evolution. Her expertise covers wide range x-ray techniques such as thin film x-ray diffraction and reflectivity, powder diffraction, small angle x-ray scattering, protein solution scattering and protein crystallography, as well as x-ray imaging. Currently she is the project leader of a multi-million dollar project on transmission x-ray microscopy recently funded by the U.S. DOE and the spokesperson for this new imaging beamline at the NSLS. She has also been collaborating with universities and industries for several projects on energy research at the NSLS.

482

Solar energy industry survey  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of a survey of companies in the solar energy industry. The general objective of the survey was to provide information to help evaluate the effectiveness of technology transfer mechanisms for the development of the solar industry. The specific objectives of the survey included: (1) determination of the needs of the solar industry; (2) identification of special concerns of the solar industry; and (3) determination of the types of technology transfer mechanisms that would be most helpful to the solar industry in addressing these needs and concerns. The major focus was on technical problems and developments, but institutional and marketing considerations were also treated. The majority of the sample was devoted to the solar heating and cooling (SHAC) component of the industry. However, a small number of photovoltaic (PV), wind, and power generation system manufacturers were also surveyed. Part I discusses the methodology used in the selection, performance, and data reduction stages of the survey, comments on the nature of the responses, and describes the conclusions drawn from the survey. The latter include both general conclusions concerning the entire solar industry, and specific conclusions concerning component groups, such as manufacturers, architects, installers, or dealers. Part II consists of tabulated responses and non-attributed verbatim comments that summarize and illustrate the survey results.

1979-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

483

Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study. Phase 2: 100 percent oxygen enriched combustion in regenerative glass melters, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field test project described in this report was conducted to evaluate the energy and environmental performance of 100% oxygen enriched combustion (100% OEC) in regenerative glass melters. Additional objectives were to determine other impacts of 100% OEC on melter operation and glass quality, and to verify on a commercial scale that an on-site Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant can reliably supply oxygen for glass melting with low electrical power consumption. The tests constituted Phase 2 of a cooperative project between the United States Department of Energy, and Praxair, Inc. Phase 1 of the project involved market and technical feasibility assessments of oxygen enriched combustion for a range of high temperature industrial heating applications. An assessment of oxygen supply options for these applications was also performed during Phase 1, which included performance evaluation of a pilot scale 1 ton per day PSA oxygen plant. Two regenerative container glass melters were converted to 100% OEC operation and served as host sites for Phase 2. A 75 ton per day end-fired melter at Carr-Lowrey Glass Company in Baltimore, Maryland, was temporarily converted to 100% OEC in mid- 1990. A 350 tpd cross-fired melter at Gallo Glass Company in Modesto, California was rebuilt for permanent commercial operation with 100% OEC in mid-1991. Initially, both of these melters were supplied with oxygen from liquid storage. Subsequently, in late 1992, a Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant was installed at Gallo to supply oxygen for 100% OEC glass melting. The particular PSA plant design used at Gallo achieves maximum efficiency by cycling the adsorbent beds between pressurized and evacuated states, and is therefore referred to as a Vacuum/Pressure Swing Adsorption (VPSA) plant.

Tuson, G.B.; Kobayashi, H.; Campbell, M.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Industrial process surveillance system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W. (Glendale Heights, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL); Mott, Jack E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Industrial Process Surveillance System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W (Glendale Heights, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL); Mott, Jack E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

486

Industrial process surveillance system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy. 96 figs.

Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.; Singer, R.M.; Mott, J.E.

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

487

Working Through Outsourcing: Software Practice, Industry Organization and Industry Evolution in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outsourcing: Software Practice, Industry Organizationand Industry Evolution in India Kyle EischenSoftware Practice, Industry Organization and Industry

Eischen, Kyle

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Department of Energy Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology Department of Energy Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology Department of Energy Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology November 30, 2007 - 4:45pm Addthis DOE Celebrates One-Year Anniversary of Operation of the Energy Efficient "Super Boiler" WASHINGTON, DC - Representing important technology transfer from Department of Energy (DOE) labs to the marketplace, DOE today announced the successful one-year operation of the first generation "Super Boiler," which can deliver 94 percent thermal efficiency, while producing fewer emissions than conventional boiler technologies. By 2020, this technology could save more than 185 trillion British Thermal Units (Btus) of energy - equivalent to the natural gas consumed by more than two million households. The

489

Department of Energy Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology Department of Energy Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology November 30, 2007 - 4:45pm Addthis DOE Celebrates One-Year Anniversary of Operation of the Energy Efficient "Super Boiler" WASHINGTON, DC - Representing important technology transfer from Department of Energy (DOE) labs to the marketplace, DOE today announced the successful one-year operation of the first generation "Super Boiler," which can deliver 94 percent thermal efficiency, while producing fewer emissions than conventional boiler technologies. By 2020, this technology could save more than 185 trillion British Thermal Units (Btus) of energy - equivalent to the natural gas consumed by more than two million households. The

490

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

491

Industry | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industry Industry Dataset Summary Description The Energy Statistics Database contains comprehensive energy statistics on the production, trade, conversion and final consumption of primary and secondary; conventional and non-conventional; and new and renewable sources of energy. The Energy Statistics dataset, covering the period from 1990 on, is available at UNdata. This dataset relates to the consumption of alcohol by other industries and construction. Data is only available for Paraguay and the U.S., years 2000 to 2007. Source United Nations (UN) Date Released December 09th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Agriculture Alcohol consumption Industry UN Data application/zip icon XML (zip, 514 bytes) application/zip icon XLS (zip, 425 bytes) Quality Metrics

492

Industry - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Former User Group Chair Enthusiastic About Relevance of Neutron Scattering Former User Group Chair Enthusiastic About Relevance of Neutron Scattering to Industrial Research Former User Group Chair Mike Crawford Mike Crawford, DuPont Research and Development. The drive is intensifying to encourage research partnerships between Neutron Sciences and private industry. Such partnerships, a long-term strategic goal set by the DOE's Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, will deliver industry and its technological problems to SNS and HFIR, where joint laboratory-industry teams can use the unparalleled resources available here to resolve them. "SNS is a tremendous facility. It has the potential to have a couple of thousand user visits a year and, if they build another target station in the future, you're probably talking about 4000 user visits a year,"

493

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

494

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

495

Argonne CNM: Industrial Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Industrial Users For Industrial Users The Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) has specific interest in growing the industrial user program and encourages researchers in industry to consider the capabilities and expertise we have to offer. As a CNM user, you have easy access to sophisticated scientific instrumentation geared toward nanoscience and nanotechnology. Moreover, our widely recognized staff researchers offer support in designing your experiments, using the equipment, and analyzing your data. Access to the CNM is through peer review of user proposals. Before you submit your first user proposal, we encourage you to contact any of our staff researchers, group leaders, the User Office, or division management to discuss the feasibility of your intended research using the expertise and facilities at the CNM. We are here to serve you as part of our user community and will be happy to address any questions you might have.

496

Electric Utility Industry Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Industry Update Electric Utility Industry Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets Edison Electric Institute FUPWG Spring 2012 April 12, 2012 Edison Electric Institute ď‚› Investor-Owned Electric Companies ď‚› Membership includes ď‚› 200 US companies, ď‚› More than 65 international affiliates and ď‚› 170 associates ď‚› US members ď‚› Serve more than 95% of the ultimate customers in the investor-owned segment of the industry and ď‚› Nearly 70% of all electric utility ultimate customers, and ď‚› Our mission focuses on advocating public policy; expanding market opportunities; and providing strategic business information Agenda ď‚›Significant Industry Trends ď‚›Utility Infrastructure Investments ď‚›Generation and Fuel Landscape

497

Technologies - Industrial Partnerships Office  

Industrial Partnerships Office P.O. Box 808, L-795 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-6416 Fax: (925) 423-8988 Operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC ...

498

Industrial Oil Products Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A forum for professionals involved in research, development, engineering, marketing, and testing of industrial products and co-products from fats and oils, including fuels, lubricants, coatings, polymers, paints, inks, cosmetics, dielectric fluids, and ad

499

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

500

Optimization of Industrial Enzymes  

Enzymes are highly efficient naturally occurring catalysts that are used in a wide range of applications from industrial processes to new drug development. Conventional mechanism for understanding the mechanisms of enzyme functions are costly and time ...